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Sample records for absorption band detected

  1. Detection of metal stress in boreal forest species using the 0.67-micron chlorophyll absorption band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhroy, Vernon H.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that a shift of the red-edge inflection near 0.70 micron in vegetation reflectance spectra is an indicator of metal stress, partially attributable to changes in chlorophyll concentration. This 'red-edge shift', however, is difficult to detect and has been reported both toward longer (red) and shorter (blue) wavelengths. Our work demonstrates that direct measurement of the depth and width of the chlorophyll absorption band at 0.67 micron using digital feature extraction and absorption band characterization procedures developed for the analysis of mineral spectra is a more consistent indicator of metal stress. Additionally, the magnitude of these parameters is generally greater than that of the red edge shift and thus should be more amenable to detection and mapping using field and aircraft spectrometers.

  2. First detection of ionized helium absorption lines in infrared K band spectra of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Block, David L.; Geballe, T. R.; Hanson, Margaret M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained high SNR, moderate-resolution K band spectra of two early O-type main sequence stars, HD 46150 O5 V, and HD 46223 O4 V, in the Rosette Nebula. We report the detection, for the first time, of the 2.189 micron He II line in O-type stars. Also detected is the 2.1661 micron Br-gamma line in absorption. The 2.058 micron He I line appears to be present in absorption in both stars, although its appearance at our resolution is complicated by atmospheric features. These three lines can form the basis for a spectral classification system for hot stars in the K band that may be used at infrared wavelengths to elucidate the nature of those luminous stars in otherwise obscured H II and giant H II regions.

  3. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p < 0.05), 146.5% (p < 0.05), 282.4% (p < 0.05), 32.4% (p < 0.05), 56.00 (p < 0.05) and 83.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p < 0.05), 262.9% (p < 0.05), 660.1% (p < 0.05) and 34% (p < 0.05), 72. 2% (p < 0.05), 113.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were

  4. Multilayer Cloud Detection with the MODIS Near-Infrared Water Vapor Absorption Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Hubanks, Paul A,; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection 5 processing for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the NASA Earth Observing System EOS Terra and Aqua spacecraft includes an algorithm for detecting multilayered clouds in daytime. The main objective of this algorithm is to detect multilayered cloud scenes, specifically optically thin ice cloud overlying a lower-level water cloud, that presents difficulties for retrieving cloud effective radius using single layer plane-parallel cloud models. The algorithm uses the MODIS 0.94 micron water vapor band along with CO2 bands to obtain two above-cloud precipitable water retrievals, the difference of which, in conjunction with additional tests, provides a map of where multilayered clouds might potentially exist. The presence of a multilayered cloud results in a large difference in retrievals of above-cloud properties between the CO2 and the 0.94 micron methods. In this paper the MODIS multilayered cloud algorithm is described, results of using the algorithm over example scenes are shown, and global statistics for multilayered clouds as observed by MODIS are discussed. A theoretical study of the algorithm behavior for simulated multilayered clouds is also given. Results are compared to two other comparable passive imager methods. A set of standard cloudy atmospheric profiles developed during the course of this investigation is also presented. The results lead to the conclusion that the MODIS multilayer cloud detection algorithm has some skill in identifying multilayered clouds with different thermodynamic phases

  5. Investigation of the optical-absorption bands of Nb4+ and Ti3+ in lithium niobate using magnetic circular dichroism and optically detected magnetic-resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyher, H.-J.; Schulz, R.; Thiemann, O.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the absorption of Nb4+Li and Ti3+Li centers in LiNbO3 has been selectively measured by applying optically detected magnetic resonance. The attribution of a well-known broad and unstructured absorption band peaking at 1.6 eV to the Nb4+Li bound small polaron is now unambiguously confirmed. In the MCD spectrum of the isoelectronic Ti3+Li center, bands show up, which closely resemble the MCD bands at 1.6 eV of this bound small polaron. This striking similarity is explained by a cluster model, representing both defects. Either TiLi or NbLi is at the center of this cluster. In both cases, the small polaron is bound to the cluster, and its MCD bands correspond to intervalence transfer transitions within the constituents of the cluster. A study of the spin-orbit coupling of the molecular orbitals of the cluster allows one to analyze the structure of the MCD bands at 2.9 eV of Ti3+Li have no counterpart in the Nb4+Li spectrum. These bands are assigned to transitions to excited states, which are specific to the impurity and are related to the 10Dq transitions known for the crystal field states of a d1 ion.

  6. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  7. First laboratory detection of an absorption line of the first overtone electric quadrupolar band of N2 by CRDS near 2.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, P.; Vasilchenko, S.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The extremely weak 2-0 O(14) electric quadrupole transition of N2 has been detected by very high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy near 4518 cm-1. It is the first N2 absorption line in the first overtone band reported so far from laboratory experiments. By combining a feedback narrowed Distributed Feedback laser diode with a passive cell tracking technique, a limit of detection of αmin ∼ 1.2 × 10-11 cm-1 was achieved after one day of spectra averaging. The N2 2-0 O(14) line position and line intensity (about 1.5 × 10-30 cm/molecule) agree with calculated values provided in the HITRAN2012 database.

  8. Absorption band Q model for the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption band model are: low-Q in the seismic band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.

  9. Highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules in low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas detected by high sensitivity ultra-broad-band optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Carbone, Emile; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-08-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2 (at pressures of 5-80 mTorr and radiofrequency power up to 500 W) were studied by optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range 200-450 nm, showing the presence of highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules (up to vʺ = 18) by Schumann-Runge band absorption. Analysis of the relative band intensities indicates a vibrational temperature up to 10,000 K, but these hot molecules only represent a fraction of the total O2 density. By analysing the (11-0) band at higher spectral resolution the O2 rotational temperature was also determined, and was found to increase with both pressure and power, reaching 900 K at 80 mTorr 500 W. These measurements were achieved using a new high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup, based on a laser-plasma light source, achromatic optics and an aberration-corrected spectrograph. This setup allows the measurement of weak broadband absorbances due to a baseline variability lower than 2   ×   10-5 across a spectral range of 250 nm.

  10. Electronic structure of an [FeFe] hydrogenase model complex in solution revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using narrow-band emission detection.

    PubMed

    Leidel, Nils; Chernev, Petko; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Schwartz, Lennart; Ott, Sascha; Haumann, Michael

    2012-08-29

    High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy with narrow-band X-ray emission detection, supported by density functional theory calculations (XAES-DFT), was used to study a model complex, ([Fe(2)(μ-adt)(CO)(4)(PMe(3))(2)] (1, adt = S-CH(2)-(NCH(2)Ph)-CH(2)-S), of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. For 1 in powder material (1(powder)), in MeCN solution (1'), and in its three protonated states (1H, 1Hy, 1HHy; H denotes protonation at the adt-N and Hy protonation of the Fe-Fe bond to form a bridging metal hydride), relations between the molecular structures and the electronic configurations were determined. EXAFS analysis and DFT geometry optimization suggested prevailing rotational isomers in MeCN, which were similar to the crystal structure or exhibited rotation of the (CO) ligands at Fe1 (1(CO), 1Hy(CO)) and in addition of the phenyl ring (1H(CO,Ph), 1HHy(CO,Ph)), leading to an elongated solvent-exposed Fe-Fe bond. Isomer formation, adt-N protonation, and hydride binding caused spectral changes of core-to-valence (pre-edge of the Fe K-shell absorption) and of valence-to-core (Kß(2,5) emission) electronic transitions, and of Kα RIXS data, which were quantitatively reproduced by DFT. The study reveals (1) the composition of molecular orbitals, for example, with dominant Fe-d character, showing variations in symmetry and apparent oxidation state at the two Fe ions and a drop in MO energies by ~1 eV upon each protonation step, (2) the HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, of ~2.3 eV for 1(powder) and ~2.0 eV for 1', and (3) the splitting between iron d(z(2)) and d(x(2)-y(2)) levels of ~0.5 eV for the nonhydride and ~0.9 eV for the hydride states. Good correlations of reduction potentials to LUMO energies and oxidation potentials to HOMO energies were obtained. Two routes of facilitated bridging hydride binding thereby are suggested, involving ligand rotation at Fe1 for 1Hy(CO) or adt-N protonation for 1HHy(CO,Ph). XAES-DFT thus enables verification of the effects of ligand

  11. Triple-band metamaterial absorption utilizing single rectangular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Jik; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-01-01

    In the general metamaterial absorber, the single absorption band is made by the single meta-pattern. Here, we introduce the triple-band metamaterial absorber only utilizing single rectangular hole. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism of the triple absorption. The first absorption peak was caused by the fundamental magnetic resonance in the metallic part between rectangular holes. The second absorption was generated by induced tornado magnetic field. The process of realizing the second band is also presented. The third absorption was induced by the third-harmonic magnetic resonance in the metallic region between rectangular holes. In addition, the visible-range triple-band absorber was also realized by using similar but smaller single rectangular-hole structure. These results render the simple metamaterials for high frequency in large scale, which can be useful in the fabrication of metamaterials operating in the optical range.

  12. Absorption enhancement of a dual-band metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Han, Gui Ming; Liu, Shui Jie; Xu, Bang Li; Wang, Jie; Huang, Hua Qing

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose and fabricate a dual-band metamaterial absorber in 6-24 THz region. Electric field distribution reveal that the first absorption band is obtained from localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes which are excited both on inside and outside edges of each circular-patterned metal-dielectric stack, while the second absorption band is excited by LSP modes on outside edges of each stack. Measured results indicate that the absorption band width can be tuned by increasing the radius of circular-patterned layers or reducing the thickness of dielectric spacing layers. Moreover, the designed dual-band metamaterial absorber is independent on circular-patterned dielectric layer combinations.

  13. Interpretation of absorption bands in airborne hyperspectral radiance data.

    PubMed

    Szekielda, Karl H; Bowles, Jeffrey H; Gillis, David B; Miller, W David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments.

  14. Interpretation of Absorption Bands in Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance Data

    PubMed Central

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David B.; Miller, W. David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:22574053

  15. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  16. Spectrophotometer spectral bandwidth calibration with absorption bands crystal standard.

    PubMed

    Soares, O D; Costa, J L

    1999-04-01

    A procedure for calibration of a spectral bandwidth standard for high-resolution spectrophotometers is described. Symmetrical absorption bands for a crystal standard are adopted. The method relies on spectral band shape fitting followed by a convolution with the slit function of the spectrophotometer. A reference spectrophotometer is used to calibrate the spectral bandwidth standard. Bandwidth calibration curves for a minimum spectral transmission factor relative to the spectral bandwidth of the reference spectrophotometer are derived for the absorption bands at the wavelength of the band absorption maximum. The family of these calibration curves characterizes the spectral bandwidth standard. We calibrate the spectral bandwidth of a spectrophotometer with respect to the reference spectrophotometer by determining the spectral transmission factor minimum at every calibrated absorption band of the bandwidth standard for the nominal instrument values of the spectral bandwidth. With reference to the standard spectral bandwidth calibration curves, the relation of the spectral bandwidth to the reference spectrophotometer is determined. We determine the discrepancy in the spectrophotometers' spectral bandwidths by averaging the spectral bandwidth discrepancies relative to the standard calibrated values found at the absorption bands considered. A weighted average of the uncertainties is taken.

  17. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  18. Glucose Absorption by the Bacillary Band of Trichuris muris

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael; Nejsum, Peter; Mejer, Helena; Denwood, Matthew; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common characteristic of Trichuris spp. infections in humans and animals is the variable but low efficacy of single-dose benzimidazoles currently used in mass drug administration programmes against human trichuriasis. The bacillary band, a specialised morphological structure of Trichuris spp., as well as the unique partly intracellular habitat of adult Trichuris spp. may affect drug absorption and perhaps contribute to the low drug accumulation in the worm. However, the exact function of the bacillary band is still unknown. Methodology We studied the dependency of adult Trichuris muris on glucose and/or amino acids for survival in vitro and the absorptive function of the bacillary band. The viability of the worms was evaluated using a motility scale from 0 to 3, and the colorimetric assay Alamar Blue was utilised to measure the metabolic activity. The absorptive function of the bacillary band in living worms was explored using a fluorescent glucose analogue (6-NBDG) and confocal microscopy. To study the absorptive function of the bacillary band in relation to 6-NBDG, the oral uptake was minimised or excluded by sealing the oral cavity with glue and agarose. Principal Findings Glucose had a positive effect on both the motility (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) of T. muris in vitro, whereas this was not the case for amino acids. The 6-NBDG was observed in the pores of the bacillary band and within the stichocytes of the living worms, independent of oral sealing. Conclusions/Significance Trichuris muris is dependent on glucose for viability in vitro, and the bacillary band has an absorptive function in relation to 6-NBDG, which accumulates within the stichocytes. The absorptive function of the bacillary band calls for an exploration of its possible role in the uptake of anthelmintics, and as a potential anthelmintic target relevant for future drug development. PMID:27588682

  19. Electronic Band Structure and Sub-band-gap Absorption of Nitrogen Hyperdoped Silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Dong, Xiao; Li, Ning; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2015-05-27

    We investigated the atomic geometry, electronic band structure, and optical absorption of nitrogen hyperdoped silicon based on first-principles calculations. The results show that all the paired nitrogen defects we studied do not introduce intermediate band, while most of single nitrogen defects can introduce intermediate band in the gap. Considering the stability of the single defects and the rapid resolidification following the laser melting process in our sample preparation method, we conclude that the substitutional nitrogen defect, whose fraction was tiny and could be neglected before, should have considerable fraction in the hyperdoped silicon and results in the visible sub-band-gap absorption as observed in the experiment. Furthermore, our calculations show that the substitutional nitrogen defect has good stability, which could be one of the reasons why the sub-band-gap absorptance remains almost unchanged after annealing.

  20. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M., Fraser, H. J.; Terada, H.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass YSOs contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. In order to investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we have observed ice absorption bands towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Slit-less spectroscopic observations are performed using the grism mode of Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO_2 band and the blue wing of the H_2O band, which are not accessible from the ground. We developed procedures to reduce the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra are fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. Then we fit the molecular absorption bands with the laboratory spectra from the database, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the dispersion element. Towards the Class 0-I sources, absorption bands of H_2O, CO_2, CO and XCN (OCN^-) are clearly detected. Weak features of 13CO_2, HDO, the C-H band, and gaseous CO are detected as well. OCS ice absorption is tentatively detected towards IRC-L1041-2. The detected features would mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN^- could originate in the region close to the protostar. Towards class II stars, H_2O ice band is detected. We also detected H_2O ice, CO_2 ice and tentative CO gas features of the foreground component of class II stars.

  1. Atmospheric absorption of high frequency noise and application to fractional-octave bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Pure tone sound absorption coefficients were measured at 1/12 octave intervals from 4 to 100 KHz at 5.5K temperature intervals between 255.4 and 310.9 K and at 10 percent relative humidity increments between 0 percent and saturation in a large cylindrical tube (i.d., 25.4 cm; length, 4.8 m). Special solid-dielectric capacitance transducers, one to generate bursts of sound waves and one to terminate the sound path and detect the tone bursts, were constructed to fit inside the tube. The absorption was measured by varying the transmitter receiver separation from 1 to 4 m and observing the decay of multiple reflections or change in amplitude of the first received burst. The resulting absorption was compared with that from a proposed procedure for computing sound absorption in still air. Absorption of bands of noise was numerically computed by using the pure tone results. The results depended on spectrum shape, on filter type, and nonlinearly on propagation distance. For some of the cases considered, comparison with the extrapolation of ARP-866A showed a difference as large as a factor of 2. However, for many cases, the absorption for a finite band was nearly equal to the pure tone absorption at the center frequency of the band. A recommended prediction procedure is described for 1/3 octave band absorption coefficients.

  2. Possible spinel absorption bands in S-asteroid visible reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Vilas, F.; Sunshine, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Minor absorption bands in the 0.55 to 0.7 micron wavelength range of reflectance spectra of 10 S asteroids have been found and compared with those of spinel-group minerals using the modified Gaussian model. Most of these S asteroids are consistently shown to have two absorption bands around 0.6 and 0.67 micron. Of the spinel-group minerals examined in this study, the 0.6 and 0.67 micron bands are most consistent with those seen in chromite. Recently, the existence of spinels has also been detected from the absorption-band features around 1 and 2 micron of two S-asteroid reflectance spectra, and chromite has been found in a primitive achondrite as its major phase. These new findings suggest a possible common existence of spinel-group minerals in the solar system.

  3. Shape of impurity electronic absorption bands in nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-11-01

    The impurity-matrix anisotropic static intermolecular interactions, orientation-statistical properties, and electronic structure of uniaxial impurity molecules are shown to have a significant influence on spectral moments of the electronic absorption bands of impurities in the nematic liquid crystal. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Constraints on the absorption band model of Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Gary M.; Cormier, Vernon C.

    1980-10-01

    First order models for the combined depth and frequency dependence of Q are derived and tested using several independent constraints. (1) Using a microphysics approach, the adoption of an absorption band as a first-order model for the frequency dependence of Q is justified, and the expected depth behavior of relaxation times in the earth is derived. The significant new parameter in this model of Q is τ2, the period at the half-amplitude point of the high frequency end of the absorption band. (2) Using observed body-wave spectra, the existence of a frequency dependence in Q is proved, and the average location of that frequency dependence (i.e., τ2) is estimated to be in the range 1 to 2.5 Hz. (3) Under the constraints of Q model ratios, the depth dependence of τ2 is estimated by assuming that a free-oscillation and a body-wave Q model both measure Q from the same absorption band. The resulting τ2 is about 0.04 s in the upper 200 km and then increases exponentially with depth in the mantle to about 1.9 at the core mantle boundary. The Q model ratios are better satisfied if a second absorption band is hypothesized to operate in the depth range of the asthenosphere. In that case, τ2 for the mantle absorption band varies from about 0.09 s in the first 200 km to 4.0 s at 2886 km, and τ2 for the asthenosphere absorption band is about 0.005 s in the depth range 35-220 km. (4) Both classes of Q models are tested in the time domain using synthetic seismograms of Russian and American nuclear explosions. Although trade-offs between source and mantle transfer functions preclude further refinement of the models at this time, a compatibility is demonstrated between the double absorption band model and time domain constraints, including arrival time and pulse shape.

  5. Concerning the Optical Absorption Band of the Hydrated Electron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    methylene blue ) showed marked nonlinear absorption due to saturation of optical transitions, no such change was observed for hydrated electrons even though the light intensity was varied by > 10 to the 7th power up to 200 photons per hydrated electron per sq cm. Consequently the photoexcited state lifetime is estimated to be than 6 x 10 to the -12th power sec. This finding is discussed briefly in terms of three possible origins for the absorption band, namely that involving excitation to a bound excited state, as a photoionization efficiency profile or as a distribution

  6. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yongjun

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the μM level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  7. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  8. Home-use cancer detecting band aid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zalevsky, Zeev; Rudnitsky, Arkady; Sheinman, Victor; Tzoy, Andrey; Toktosunov, Aitmamat; Adashov, Arkady

    2016-03-01

    In this paper we present a novel concept in which special band aid is developed for early detection of cancer. The band aid contains an array of micro needles with small detection array connected to each needle which inspects the color of the surface of the skin versus time after being pinched with the needles. We were able to show in pre-clinical trials that the color varies differently if the skin is close to tumor tissue.

  9. Assignment and rotational analysis of new absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues in Venus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, S.; Borkov, Yu. G.; Vander Auwera, J.; Drummond, R.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Vandaele, A. C.; Perevalov, V. I.; Tashkun, S. A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues, detected by the Solar Occultation for the Infrared Range (SOIR) instrument on board the Venus Express Satellite. The SOIR instrument combines an echelle spectrometer and an Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter (AOTF) for order selection. It performs solar occultation measurements in the Venus atmosphere in the IR region (2.2-4.3 μm), at a resolution of 0.12-0.18 cm-1. The wavelength range probed by SOIR allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere above the cloud layer (65-150 km) to be made with emphasis on the vertical distributions of gases. Thanks to the SOIR spectral resolution, a new CO2 absorption band was identified: the 21101-01101 band of 16O12C18O with R branch up to J=31. Two other previously reported bands were observed dispelling any doubts about their identifications: the 20001-00001 band of 16O13C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894] and the 01111-00001 band of 16O12C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894 and Wilquet V, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:895-905]. These bands were analyzed, and spectroscopic constants characterizing them were obtained. The rotational assignment of the 20001-00001 band was corrected. The present measurements are compared with data available in the HITRAN database.

  10. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  11. Near-infrared broad-band cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a superluminescent light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Denzer, W; Hamilton, M L; Hancock, G; Islam, M; Langley, C E; Peverall, R; Ritchie, G A D

    2009-11-01

    A fibre coupled near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode that emits approximately 10 mW of radiation between 1.62 and 1.7 microm is employed in combination with a broad-band cavity enhanced spectrometer consisting of a linear optical cavity with mirrors of reflectivity approximately 99.98% and either a dispersive near-infrared spectrometer or a Fourier transform interferometer. Results are presented on the absorption of 1,3-butadiene, and sensitivities are achieved of 6.1 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the dispersive spectrometer in combination with phase-sensitive detection, and 1.5 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the Fourier transform interferometer (expressed as a minimum detectable absorption coefficient) over several minutes of acquisition time.

  12. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  13. Search for CO absorption bands in IUE far-ultraviolet spectra of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessner, Susan E.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the red supergiant (M2 Iab) alpha Ori with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided an unambiguous detection of a far-ultraviolet (far-UV) chromospheric continuum on which are superposed strong molecular absorption bands. The absorption bands have been identified by Carpenter et al. (1994) with the fourth-positive A-X system of CO and are likely formed in the circumstellar shell. Comparison of these GHRS data with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha Ori indicates that both the continuum and the CO absorption features can be seen with IUE, especially if multiple IUE spectra, reduced with the post-1981 IUESIPS extraction procedure (i.e., with an oversampling slit), are carefully coadded to increase the signal to noise over that obtainable with a single spectrum. We therefore initiated a program, utilizing both new and archival IUE Short Wavelength Prime (SWP) spectra, to survey 15 cool, low-gravity stars, including alpha Ori, for the presence of these two new chromospheric and circumstellar shell diagnostics. We establish positive detections of far-UV stellar continua, well above estimated IUE in-order scattered light levels, in spectra of all of the program stars. However, well-defined CO absorption features are seen only in the alpha Ori spectra, even though spectra of most of the program stars have sufficient signal to noise to allow the dectection of features of comparable magnitude to the absorptions seen in alpha Ori. Clearly if CO is present in the circumstellar environments of any of these stars, it is at much lower column densities.

  14. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Individual induced absorption bands in MgF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. P.; Sergeev, P. B.

    2008-03-01

    The absorption spectra of MgF2 samples exposed to an electron beam and laser radiation at 248, 308, and 372 nm are investigated. Fourteen individual absorption bands are separated in the spectra. The parameters of the eight spectra of them are obtained for the first time. The separated bands are assigned to the intrinsic defects of the MgF2 crystal.

  15. e-beam irradiation effects on IR absorption bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Nagao, Katsunori; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Umezu, Ikurou; Ando, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the absorption and Raman spectral change induced by the irradiation of e-beam. By the irradiation of e-beam on SWNTs thin films, the intensity of defect related Raman band increase, and the peak energy of IR absorption bands shift to the higher energy side. These results indicate that the origin of infrared band is due to the plasmon resonance of finite-length SWNT. We have estimated the effective tube length and defect density from IR absorption peak energy.

  16. Below-band-gap absorption in undoped GaAs at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Michał; Walczak, Jarosław; Motyka, Marcin; Janiak, Filip; Trajnerowicz, Artur; Jasik, Agata

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results of measurements of optical absorption in undoped epitaxial GaAs for photon energies below the band gap. Absorption spectra were determined from transmission spectra of a thin GaAs layer at several temperatures between 25 °C and 205 °C. We optimized our experiment to investigate the long-wavelength part of the spectrum, where the absorption is relatively low, but significant from the point of view of applications of GaAs in semiconductor lasers. Absorption of 100 cm-1 was observed over 30 nm below the band gap at high temperatures.

  17. Multitemporal spectroscopy for crop stress detection using band selection methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mewes, Thorsten; Franke, Jonas; Menz, Gunter

    2008-08-01

    A fast and precise sensor-based identification of pathogen infestations in wheat stands is essential for the implementation of site-specific fungicide applications. Several works have shown possibilities and limitations for the detection of plant stress using spectral sensor data. Hyperspectral data provide the opportunity to collect spectral reflectance in contiguous bands over a broad range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Individual phenomena like the light absorption of leaf pigments can be examined in detail. The precise knowledge of stress-dependent shifting in certain spectral wavelengths provides great advantages in detecting fungal infections. This study focuses on band selection techniques for hyperspectral data to identify relevant and redundant information in spectra regarding a detection of plant stress caused by pathogens. In a laboratory experiment, five 1 sqm boxes with wheat were multitemporarily measured by a ASD Fieldspec® 3 FR spectroradiometer. Two stands were inoculated with Blumeria graminis - the pathogen causing powdery mildew - and one stand was used to simulate the effect of water deficiency. Two stands were kept healthy as control stands. Daily measurements of the spectral reflectance were taken over a 14-day period. Three ASD Pro Lamps were used to illuminate the plots with constant light. By applying band selection techniques, the three types of different wheat vitality could be accurately differentiated at certain stages. Hyperspectral data can provide precise information about pathogen infestations. The reduction of the spectral dimension of sensor data by means of band selection procedures is an appropriate method to speed up the data supply for precision agriculture.

  18. Permeation absorption sampler with multiple detection

    DOEpatents

    Zaromb, Solomon

    1990-01-01

    A system for detecting analytes in air or aqueous systems includes a permeation absorption preconcentrator sampler for the analytes and analyte detectors. The preconcentrator has an inner fluid-permeable container into which a charge of analyte-sorbing liquid is intermittently injected, and a fluid-impermeable outer container. The sample is passed through the outer container and around the inner container for trapping and preconcentrating the analyte in the sorbing liquid. The analyte can be detected photometrically by injecting with the sorbing material a reagent which reacts with the analyte to produce a characteristic color or fluorescence which is detected by illuminating the contents of the inner container with a light source and measuring the absorbed or emitted light, or by producing a characteristic chemiluminescence which can be detected by a suitable light sensor. The analyte can also be detected amperometrically. Multiple inner containers may be provided into which a plurality of sorbing liquids are respectively introduced for simultaneously detecting different analytes. Baffles may be provided in the outer container. A calibration technique is disclosed.

  19. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  20. Conformational statistics of molecules with inner rotation and shapes of their electronic absorption bands

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of conformational statistics of molecules with inner rotation of {pi}-conjugated fragments on the position, intensity, and electronic absorption band shapes is studied in isotropic molecular media. It is shown that the conformational disorder of molecules with one inner rotation degree of freedom exerts an appreciable effect on the shift, inhomogeneous broadening, and asymmetry of the electronic absorption bands. An interpretation of the available experimental data is give. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  1. Ozone absorption cross section measurements in the Wulf bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Hupalo, Peter; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    A tandem dual-beam spectrometer has been developed to determine ozone absorption cross sections for 13 selected wavelengths between 750 and 975 nm at room temperature. The increasingly pronounced structure in this region may interfere with atmospheric trace gas transitions that are useful for remote sensing and complicate the measurement of aerosols. Ozone concentrations were determined by absorption at the common HeNe laser transition near 632.8 nm using the absolute cross section reported previously. The overall accuracy of these room temperature measurements is generally better than 2 percent. A synoptic near-IR spectrum scaled to these measurements is employed for comparison with results of previous studies.

  2. HAC: Band Gap, Photoluminescence, and Optical/Near-Infrared Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Ryutov, Dimitri; Furton, Douglas G.

    1996-01-01

    We report results of laboratory measurements which illustrate the wide range of physical properties found among hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) solids. Within this range, HAC can match quantitatively the astronomical phenomena ascribed to carbonaceous coatings on interstellar grains. We find the optical band gap of HAC to be well correlated with other physical properties of HAC of astronomical interest, and conclude that interstellar HAC must be fairly hydrogen-rich with a band gap of E(sub g) is approx. greater than 2.0 eV.

  3. Temperature behavior of optical absorption bands in colored LiF crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastampa, Renato; Missori, Mauro; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Conti, Claudio; Vincenti, Maria Aurora; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    We measured the optical absorption spectra of thermally treated, gamma irradiated LiF crystals, as a function of temperature in the range 16-300 K. The temperature dependence of intensity, peak position and bandwidth of F and M absorption bands were obtained.

  4. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  5. Nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of intersubband absorption for nonparabolic single-band effective mass Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Kolek, Andrzej

    2015-05-04

    The formulas are derived that enable calculations of intersubband absorption coefficient within nonequilibrium Green's function method applied to a single-band effective-mass Hamiltonian with the energy dependent effective mass. The derivation provides also the formulas for the virtual valence band components of the two-band Green's functions which can be used for more exact estimation of the density of states and electrons and more reliable treatment of electronic transport in unipolar n-type heterostructure semiconductor devices.

  6. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  7. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of isotopic oxygen, (O-18)2, at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Friedman, R. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    Cross-sections of (O-18)2 at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 177.8-197.8 nm with a 6.65 m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400 lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross-sections of the Schumann-Runge bands (14,0) through (2,0) are, with the exception of the (12,0) band, independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically here and are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm as numerical compilations stored on magnetic tape. Band oscillator strengths of those bands have been determined by direct numerical integration of the measured absolute cross-sections and are in excellent agreement with these theoretically calculated values.

  8. Hot Bands in Overtone Absorption Transitions: High Temperature Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-17

    the overtone transition. ൖ WWIŝST3" 3 24 002 15.NUMBER ,OF ,,A Overtone Spectroscopy, Hot Bands 16. PRKI CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18...Rev 2-89) aWVPOO AfeD $10 139-18’q wAPI .’ N o, lgi OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH GRANT or CONTRACT N00014-88-K-4130 R&T Code 4131063 Technical Report No...Unannounced fJ Justification ................ Prepared for Publication By ................ Di•.t. ibution I in Availability Codes Avail and /or Dist Special

  9. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  10. Fe-substituted indium thiospinels: New intermediate band semiconductors with better absorption of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Chen, Haijie; Qin, Mingsheng; Yang, Chongyin; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Yufeng; Zhang, Wenqing; Huang, Fuqiang

    2013-06-01

    The indium thiospinels In2S3 and MgIn2S4 are promising host for the intermediated band (IB) photovoltaic materials due to their ideal band gap value. Here, the optical properties and electronic structure of Fe-doped In2S3 and MgIn2S4 have been investigated. All the Fe-substituted semiconductors exhibit two additional absorption bands at about 0.7 and 1.25 eV, respectively. The results of first-principles calculations revealed that the Fe substituted at the octahedral In site would introduce a partially filled IB into the band gap. Thanks to the formation of IB, the Fe-substituted semiconductors have the ability to absorb the photons with energies below the band gap. With the wide-spectrum absorption of solar energy, these materials possess potential applications in photovoltaic domain.

  11. Highly sensitive detection using Herriott cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chongyi; Song, Guangming; Du, Yang; Zhao, Xiaojun; Wang, Wenju; Zhong, Liujun; Hu, Mai

    2016-11-01

    The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the long absorption path technique is a significant method to detect harmful gas. The long optical path could come true by Herriott cell reducing the size of the spectrometers. A 15 cm long Herriott cell with 28.8 m optical absorption path after 96 times reflection was designed that enhanced detection sensitivity of absorption spectroscopy. According to the theory data of calculation, Herriott cell is analyzed and simulated by softwares Matlab and Lighttools.

  12. Trial for the direct detection of exoplanets in the N-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Mitsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    We propose to make N-band deep imaging observations for detecting the HR8799 exoplanets. Since the exoplanets have been detected from optical wavelengths to M-band so far, this will be the case detected in the longest wavelengths, which will be the milestone for the groundbased mid-infrared (N-band) astronomy. We also try to make multi-wavelegnths observations to confirm the presence/absence of NH3 absorption features. NH3 absorption feature is expected based on the brown dwarf atmospheric models, thus it will illustrates the similarity or difference between the atmosphere of exoplanets and that of brown dwarfs. Even when we could only get the flux upper limit of the exoplanets, our observations will be helpful to constrain the exoplanets' atmospheric models. Therefore, our observations are promising for the promotion of our understanding of exoplanets' atmosphere.

  13. New detections of Galactic molecular absorption systems toward ALMA calibrator sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryo; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Umehata, Hideki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We report on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) detections of molecular absorption lines in Bands 3, 6, and 7 toward four radio-loud quasars, which were observed as the bandpass and complex gain calibrators. The absorption systems, three of which are newly detected, are found to be Galactic origin. Moreover, HCO absorption lines toward two objects are detected, which almost doubles the number of HCO absorption samples in the Galactic diffuse medium. In addition, high HCO-to-H13CO+ column density ratios are found, suggesting that the interstellar media (ISM) observed toward the two calibrators are in photodissociation regions, which observationally illustrates the chemistry of diffuse ISM driven by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These results demonstrate that calibrators in the ALMA Archive are potential sources for the quest for new absorption systems and for detailed investigation of the nature of the ISM.

  14. The effective air absorption coefficient for predicting reverberation time in full octave bands.

    PubMed

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2014-12-01

    A substantial amount of research has been devoted to producing a calculation model for air absorption for pure tones. However, most statistical and geometrical room acoustic prediction models calculate the reverberation time in full octave bands in accordance with ISO 3382-1 (International Organization for Standardization, 2009). So far, the available methods that allow calculation of air absorption in octave bands have not been investigated for room acoustic applications. In this paper, the effect of air absorption on octave band reverberation time calculations is investigated based on calculations. It is found that the approximation method, as described in the standard ANSI S1.26 (American National Standards Institute, 1995), fails to estimate accurate decay curves for full octave bands. In this paper, a method is used to calculate the energy decay curve in rooms based on a summation of pure tones within the band. From this decay curve, which is found to be slightly concave upwards, T20 and T30 can be determined. For different conditions, an effective intensity attenuation coefficient mB ;eff for the full octave bands has been calculated. This mB ;eff can be used for reverberation time calculations, if results are to be compared with T20 or T30 measurements. Also, guidelines are given for the air absorption correction of decay curves, measured in a scale model.

  15. VARIABILITY OF WATER AND OXYGEN ABSORPTION BANDS IN THE DISK-INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5%-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H{sub 2}O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared with atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.

  16. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  17. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  18. Full band structure calculation of two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J. L.; Rioux, J.; Sipe, J. E.

    2011-03-28

    Degenerate two-photon indirect absorption in silicon is an important limiting effect on the use of silicon structures for all-optical information processing at telecommunication wavelengths. We perform a full band structure calculation to investigate two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon, using a pseudopotential description of the energy bands and an adiabatic bond charge model to describe phonon dispersion and polarization. Our results agree well with some recent experimental results. The transverse acoustic/optical phonon-assisted processes dominate.

  19. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  20. Emergence of Very Broad Infrared Absorption Band By Hyperdoping of Silicon with Chalcogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-03

    measured by Hall effect in Ref. 9 (crosses) as functions of implanted sulfur dose. (c) Calculated reflectivity by Kramers- Kronig transformation of the...MIR band is small enough, this assumption is reasonable according to the Kramers- Kronig relationship between optical absorption and reflectivity...calculated by a Kramers- Kronig transformation of the absorption spectrum shown in Fig. 1(a) and the results are shown in Fig. 1(c). However, the a value

  1. A band model for melanin deducted from optical absorption and photoconductivity experiments.

    PubMed

    Crippa, P R; Cristofoletti, V; Romeo, N

    1978-01-03

    Natural and synthetic melanins have been studied by optical absorption and photoconductivity measurements in the range 200--700 nm. Both optical absorption and photoconductivity increase in the ultraviolet region, and a negative photoconductivity was observed with a maximum near 500 nm. This behaviour has been interpreted by the band model of amorphous materials and an "optical gap" of 3.4 eV has been determined.

  2. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250-450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl- negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  3. Diversity in the Visible-NIR Absorption Band Characteristics of Lunar and Asteroidal Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Kaiden, H.; Misawa, K.; Kojima, H.; Uemoto, K.; Ohtake, M.; Arai, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral properties of plagioclase has been challenging because of the difficulty in obtaining good plagioclase separates from pristine planetary materials such as meteorites and returned lunar samples. After an early study indicated that the 1.25 m band position of plagioclase spectrum might be correlated with the molar percentage of anorthite (An#) [1], there have been few studies which dealt with the band center behavior. In this study, the VNIR absorption band parameters of plagioclase samples have been derived using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) [2] following a pioneering study by [3].

  4. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  5. Accurate band-to-band registration of AOTF imaging spectrometer using motion detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Pengwei; Zhao, Huijie; Jin, Shangzhong; Li, Ningchuan

    2016-05-01

    This paper concerns the problem of platform vibration induced band-to-band misregistration with acousto-optic imaging spectrometer in spaceborne application. Registrating images of different bands formed at different time or different position is difficult, especially for hyperspectral images form acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF) imaging spectrometer. In this study, a motion detection method is presented using the polychromatic undiffracted beam of AOTF. The factors affecting motion detect accuracy are analyzed theoretically, and calculations show that optical distortion is an easily overlooked factor to achieve accurate band-to-band registration. Hence, a reflective dual-path optical system has been proposed for the first time, with reduction of distortion and chromatic aberration, indicating the potential of higher registration accuracy. Consequently, a spectra restoration experiment using additional motion detect channel is presented for the first time, which shows the accurate spectral image registration capability of this technique.

  6. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  7. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  8. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of isotopic oxygen, (0-16)(0-18), at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Friedman, R. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-sections of (0-16)(0-18) at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements on mixtures of (0-16)2, (0-18)2, and (0-16)(0-18) at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 180.5-195.3 nm with a 6.65 m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400 lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross-sections of the (0-16)(0-18) Schumann-Runge bands (11.0)-(3.0) are independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically.

  9. Effect of Sn on the optical band gap determined using absorption spectrum fitting method

    SciTech Connect

    Heera, Pawan; Kumar, Anup; Sharma, Raman

    2015-05-15

    We report the preparation and the optical studies on tellurium rich glasses thin films. The thin films of Se{sub 30}Te{sub 70-x} Sn{sub x} system for x= 0, 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 glassy alloys prepared by melt quenching technique are deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The analysis of absorption spectra in the spectral range 400nm–4000 nm at room temperature obtained from UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer [Perkin Elmer Lamda-750] helps us in the optical characterization of the thin films under study. The absorption spectrum fitting method is applied by using the Tauc’s model for estimating the optical band gap and the width of the band tail of the thin films. The optical band gap is calculated and is found to decrease with the Sn content.

  10. Dual-Band Perfect Absorption by Breaking the Symmetry of Metamaterial Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Le Dinh; Qui, Vu Dinh; Dinh, Tiep Hong; Hai, Pham; Giang, Trinh Thị; Cuong, Tran Manh; Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh

    2017-02-01

    Since the first proposal of Landy et al. (Phys Rev Lett 100:207402, 2008), the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) has rapidly become one of the most crucial research trends. Recently, dual-band, multi-band and broadband MPA have been highly desirable in electronic applications. In this paper, we demonstrate and evaluate a MPA structure which can generate dual-band absorption operating at the microwave frequency by breaking the symmetry of structure. There is an agreement between simulation and experimental results. The results can be explained by using the equivalent LC circuit and the electric field distribution of this structure. In addition, various structures with different symmetry configurations were studied to gain greater insight into the absorption.

  11. Jet-cooled infrared absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of HCOOH and HCOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yulan; Li, Wenguang; Duan, Chuanxi

    2017-04-01

    The jet-cooled absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of normal formic acid (HCOOH) and deuterated formic acid (HCOOD) was recorded in the frequency range of 1370-1392 cm-1 with distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs) as the tunable infrared radiations. A segmented rapid-scan data acquisition scheme was developed for pulsed supersonic jet infrared laser absorption spectroscopy based on DFB-QCLs with a moderate vacuum pumping capacity. The unperturbed band-origin and rotational constants in the excited vibrational state were determined for both HCOOH and HCOOD. The unperturbed band-origin locates at 1379.05447(11) cm-1 for HCOOH, and 1366.48430(39) cm-1 for HCOOD, respectively.

  12. Real-time monitoring of reactive species in downstream etch reactor by VUV broad-band absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, R.; Vallier, L.; Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma etching of nanometric size, high aspect-ratio structures is more challenging at each new technological node. Remote plasmas are beginning to find use when damages on nanostructures by ion bombardment become critical or when etching with high selectivity on different materials present on the wafer is necessary (i . e . tungsten oxide etching with fluorine and hydrogen containing plasmas in remote reactor from AMAT). Furthermore, it is expected that downstream plasma will replace many wet chemical etching processes to alleviate the issue of pattern collapses caused by capillary forces when nanometer size high aspect ratio structures are immersed in liquids. In these downstream plasmas, radicals are the main active species and a control of their density is of prime importance. Most of gases used and radicals produced in etching plasmas (HBr, BrCl, Br2, NF3, CH2F2,...) have strong absorption bands in the vacuum UV spectral region and we have shown that very low concentration of these species can be detected by VUV absorption. We have recently improved the technique by using a VUV CCD camera, instead of the PMT, which render possible the Broad-Band absorption spectroscopy in the 120-200 nm range, with a deuterium lamp, or a laser produced xenon arc lamp as light source. The multi-spectral detection ability of the CCD reduces the acquisition time to less than 1 second and can permit the real time control of the process control.

  13. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-06-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2- (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2- species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2-, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples.

  14. Thermal Infrared Spectral Band Detection Limits for Unidentified Surface Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkland, Laurel E.; Herr, Kenneth C.; Salisbury, John W.

    2001-01-01

    Infrared emission spectra recorded by airborne or satellite spectrometers can be searched for spectral features to determine the composition of rocks on planetary surfaces. Surface materials are identified by detections of characteristic spectral bands. We show how to define whether to accept an observed spectral feature as a detection when the target material is unknown. We also use remotely sensed spectra measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) and the Spatially Enhanced Broadband Array Spectrograph System to illustrate the importance of instrument parameters and surface properties on band detection limits and how the variation in signal-to-noise ratio with wavelength affects the bands that are most detectable for a given instrument. The spectrometer's sampling interval, spectral resolution, signal-to-noise ratio as a function of wavelength, and the sample's surface properties influence whether the instrument can detect a spectral feature exhibited by a material. As an example, in the 6-13 micrometer wavelength region, massive carbonates exhibit two bands: a very strong, broad feature at approximately 6.5 micrometers and a less intense, sharper band at approximately 11.25 micrometers. Although the 6.5-micrometer band is stronger and broader in laboratory-measured spectra, the 11.25-micrometer band will cause a more detectable feature in TES spectra.

  15. Improved target detection by IR dual-band image fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adomeit, U.; Ebert, R.

    2009-09-01

    Dual-band thermal imagers acquire information simultaneously in both the 8-12 μm (long-wave infrared, LWIR) and the 3-5 μm (mid-wave infrared, MWIR) spectral range. Compared to single-band thermal imagers they are expected to have several advantages in military applications. These advantages include the opportunity to use the best band for given atmospheric conditions (e. g. cold climate: LWIR, hot and humid climate: MWIR), the potential to better detect camouflaged targets and an improved discrimination between targets and decoys. Most of these advantages have not yet been verified and/or quantified. It is expected that image fusion allows better exploitation of the information content available with dual-band imagers especially with respect to detection of targets. We have developed a method for dual-band image fusion based on the apparent temperature differences in the two bands. This method showed promising results in laboratory tests. In order to evaluate its performance under operational conditions we conducted a field trial in an area with high thermal clutter. In such areas, targets are hardly to detect in single-band images because they vanish in the clutter structure. The image data collected in this field trial was used for a perception experiment. This perception experiment showed an enhanced target detection range and reduced false alarm rate for the fused images compared to the single-band images.

  16. Analysis of wavelength-dependent photoisomerization quantum yields in bilirubins by fitting two exciton absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, M.; Agati, G.; Troup, G. J.; Pratesi, R.

    2003-09-01

    The absorption spectra of bilirubins were deconvoluted by two Gaussian curves of equal width representing the exciton bands of the non-degenerate molecular system. The two bands were used to study the wavelength dependence of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) configurational photoisomerization quantum yield of the bichromophoric bilirubin-IXalpha (BR-IX), the intrinsically asymmetric bile pigment associated with jaundice and the symmetrically substituted bilirubins (bilirubin-IIIalpha and mesobilirubin-XIIIalpha), when they are irradiated in aqueous solution bound to human serum albumin (HSA). The same study was performed for BR-IX in ammoniacal methanol solution (NH4OH/MeOH). The quantum yields of the configurational photoprocesses were fitted with a combination function of the two Gaussian bands normalized to the total absorption, using the proportionality coefficients and a scaling factor as parameters. The decrease of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) quantum yield with increasing wavelength, which occurs for wavelengths longer than the most probable Franck-Condon transition of the molecule, did not result in a unique function of the exciton absorptions. In particular we found two ranges corresponding to different exciton interactions with different proportionality coefficients and scaling factors. The wavelength-dependent photoisomerization of bilirubins was described as an abrupt change in quantum yield as soon as the resulting excitation was strongly localized in each chromophore. The change was correlated to a variation of the interaction between the two chromophores when the short-wavelength exciton absorption became vanishingly small. With the help of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of BR-IX in HSA, a small band was resolved in the bilirubin absorption spectrum, delivering part of the energy required for the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) photoisomerization of the molecule.

  17. Non-uniform temperature and species concentration measurements in a laminar flame using multi-band infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liu Hao; Lau, Lok Yin; Ren, Wei

    2017-03-01

    We report in situ measurements of non-uniform temperature, H2O and CO2 concentration distributions in a premixed methane-air laminar flame using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). A mid-infrared, continuous-wave, room-temperature interband cascade laser (ICL) at 4183 nm was used for the sensitive detection of CO2 at high temperature.The H2O absorption lines were exploited by one distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser at 1343 nm and one ICL at 2482 nm to achieve multi-band absorption measurements with high species concentration sensitivity, high temperature sensitivity, and immunity to variations in ambient conditions. A novel profile-fitting function was proposed to characterize the non-uniform temperature and species concentrations along the line-of-sight in the flame by detecting six absorption lines of CO2 and H2O simultaneously. The flame temperature distribution was measured at different heights above the burner (5-20 mm), and compared with the thermocouple measurement with heat-transfer correction. Our TDLAS measured temperature of the central flame was in excellent agreement (<1.5% difference) with the thermocouple data.The TDLAS results were also compared with the CFD simulations using a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism (GRI 3.0) and considering the heat loss to the surroundings.The current CFD simulation overpredicted the flame temperature in the gradient region, but was in excellent agreement with the measured temperature and species concentration in the core of the flame.

  18. Study of band inversion in the PbxSn1-xTe class of topological crystalline insulators using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, K. V.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Krbal, M.; Tominaga, J.; Uruga, T.

    2014-11-01

    PbxSn1-xTe and PbxSn1-xSe crystals belong to the class of topological crystalline insulators where topological protection is achieved due to crystal symmetry rather than time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we make use of selection rules in the x-ray absorption process to experimentally detect band inversion along the PbTe(Se)-SnTe(Se) tie-lines. The observed significant change in the ratio of intensities of L1 and L3 transitions along the tie-line demonstrates that x-ray absorption can be a useful tool to study band inversion in topological insulators.

  19. Detection of the transient PNO molecule by infrared laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, I. S.; Hamilton, P. A.; Davies, P. B.

    The PNO molecule has been observed in the gas phase for the first time. Some 200 vibrationrotation transitions were detected in the 1760cm-1 region using infrared diode laser absorption spectroscopy in a long path cell. Most of the lines can be assigned to the (001)←(000) stretching fundamental and (011)←(010) hot band transitions. The fundamental band exhibits a perturbation at high rotational levels which leads to a unique assignment of the rotational numbering. The effective rotational constants determined are in good agreement with ab initio predictions and the band origin, 1756.64586(24)cm-1, is very close to the matrix value. A tentative rotational assignment of the hot band transitions has been made which gives a band origin of 1748.388cm-1.

  20. The Soret absorption band of isolated chlorophyll a and b tagged with quaternary ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Stockett, Mark H; Musbat, Lihi; Kjær, Christina; Houmøller, Jørgen; Toker, Yoni; Rubio, Angel; Milne, Bruce F; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2015-10-21

    We have performed gas-phase absorption spectroscopy in the Soret-band region of chlorophyll (Chl) a and b tagged by quaternary ammonium ions together with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. This band is the strongest in the visible region of metalloporphyrins and an important reporter on the microenvironment. The cationic charge tags were tetramethylammonium, tetrabutylammonium, and acetylcholine, and the dominant dissociation channel in all cases was breakage of the complex to give neutral Chl and the charge tag as determined by photoinduced dissociation mass spectroscopy. Two photons were required to induce fragmentation on the time scale of the experiment (microseconds). Action spectra were recorded where the yield of the tag as a function of excitation wavelength was sampled. These spectra are taken to represent the corresponding absorption spectra. In the case of Chl a we find that the tag hardly influences the band maximum which for all three tags is at 403 ± 5 nm. A smaller band with maximum at 365 ± 10 nm was also measured for all three complexes. The spectral quality is worse in the case of Chl b due to lower ion beam currents; however, there is clear evidence for the absorption being to the red of that of Chl a (most intense peak at 409 ± 5 nm) and also a more split band. Our results demonstrate that the change in the Soret-band spectrum when one peripheral substituent (CH3) is replaced by another (CHO) is an intrinsic effect. First principles TD-DFT calculations agree with our experiments, supporting the intrinsic nature of the difference between Chl a and b and also displaying minimal spectral changes when different charge tags are employed. The deviations between theory and experiment have allowed us to estimate that the Soret-band absorption maxima in vacuo for the neutral Chl a and Chl b should occur at 405 nm and 413 nm, respectively. Importantly, the Soret bands of the isolated species are significantly blueshifted

  1. PRINCIPAL INFRARED ABSORPTION BANDS OF SOME DERIVATIVES OF 1,3-DINITROBENZENE AND 1,3,5TRINITROBENZENE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The frequencies of the strong infrared absorption bands of 46 derivatives of di- and tri-nitrobenzene were measured and tabulated. The vibrational ... modes producing these absorptions were assigned in most cases. The effect of structure on the frequency of the absorption due to each of the modes is discussed, with emphasis on identifying unknowns. (Author)

  2. Solvatochromic Shifts on Absorption and Fluorescence Bands of N,N-Dimethylaniline.

    PubMed

    Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Elena Martín, M; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2009-02-10

    A theoretical study of the absorption and fluorescence UV/vis spectra of N,N-dimethylaniline in different solvents has been performed, using a method combining quantum mechanics, molecular mechanics, and the mean field approximation. The transitions between the three lowest-lying states have been calculated in vacuum as well as in cyclohexane, tetrahydrofuran, and water. The apparent anomalies experimentally found in water (a blue shift in the absorption bands with respect to the trend in other solvents, and an abnormally high red shift for the fluorescence band) are well reproduced and explained in view of the electronic structure of the solute and the solvent distribution around it. Additional calculations were done with a mixture of cyclohexane and tetrahydrofuran as solvent, which displays a nonlinear solvatochromic shift. Results, although not conclusive, are consistent with experiment and provide a possible explanation for the nonlinear behavior in the solvent mixture.

  3. An alternative model for photodynamic therapy of cancers: Hot-band absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Jiyao

    2013-12-01

    The sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS), a photosensitizer for photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT), has an absorption tail in the near-infrared region (700-900 nm) which is so-called hot band absorption (HBA). With the HBA of 800 nm, the up-conversion excitation of AlPcS was achieved followed by the anti-Stocks emission (688 nm band) and singlet oxygen production. The HBA PDT of AlPcS seriously damaged the KB and HeLa cancer cells, with a typical light dose dependent mode. Particularly, the in vitro experiments with the AlPcS shielding solutions further showed that the HBA PDT can overcome a self-shielding effect benefiting the PDT applications.

  4. PHASE ANGLE EFFECTS ON 3 μm ABSORPTION BAND ON CERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DAWN MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Corre, L. Le; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25–5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9–4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ∼20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ∼25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  5. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  6. Wide-band gas leak imaging detection system using UFPA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Wei-qi; Li, Jia-kun; Dun, Xiong; Jin, Minglei; Wang, Xia

    2014-11-01

    The leakage of toxic or hazardous gases not only pollutes the environment, but also threatens people's lives and property safety. Many countries attach great importance to the rapid and effective gas leak detection technology and instrument development. However, the gas leak imaging detection systems currently existing are generally limited to a narrow-band in Medium Wavelength Infrared (MWIR) or Long Wavelength Infrared (LWIR) cooled focal plane imaging, which is difficult to detect the common kinds of the leaking gases. Besides the costly cooled focal plane array is utilized, the application promotion is severely limited. To address this issue, a wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using Uncooled Focal Plane Array (UFPA) detector is proposed, which is composed of wide-band IR optical lens, sub-band filters and switching device, wide-band UFPA detector, video processing and system control circuit. A wide-band (3µm~12µm) UFPA detector is obtained by replacing the protection window and optimizing the structural parameters of the detector. A large relative aperture (F#=0.75) wide-band (3μm~12μm) multispectral IR lens is developed by using the focus compensation method, which combining the thickness of the narrow-band filters. The gas leak IR image quality and the detection sensitivity are improved by using the IR image Non-Uniformity Correction (NUC) technology and Digital Detail Enhancement (DDE) technology. The wide-band gas leak IR imaging detection system using UFPA detector takes full advantage of the wide-band (MWIR&LWIR) response characteristic of the UFPA detector and the digital image processing technology to provide the resulting gas leak video easy to be observed for the human eyes. Many kinds of gases, which are not visible to the naked eyes, can be sensitively detected and visualized. The designed system has many commendable advantages, such as scanning a wide range simultaneously, locating the leaking source quickly, visualizing the gas

  7. Decomposing the First Absorption Band of OCS Using Photofragment Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toulson, Benjamin W; Murray, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Photofragment excitation spectra of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been recorded from 212-260 nm by state-selectively probing either electronically excited S((1)D) or ground state S((3)P) photolysis products via 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Probing the major S((1)D) product results in a broad, unstructured action spectrum that reproduces the overall shape of the first absorption band. In contrast, spectra obtained probing S((3)P) products display prominent resonances superimposed on a broad continuum; the resonances correspond to the diffuse vibrational structure observed in the conventional absorption spectrum. The vibrational structure is assigned to four progressions, each dominated by the C-S stretch, ν1, following direct excitation to quasi-bound singlet and triplet states. The S((3)PJ) products are formed with a near-statistical population distribution over the J = 2, 1, and 0 spin-orbit levels across the wavelength range investigated. Although a minor contributor to the S atom yield near the peak of the absorption cross section, the relative yield of S((3)P) increases significantly at longer wavelengths. The experimental measurements validate recent theoretical work characterizing the electronic states responsible for the first absorption band by Schmidt and co-workers.

  8. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2− (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2− species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2−, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples. PMID:26098075

  9. Infrared absorption band in deformed qtz crystals analyzed by combining different microstructural methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, Holger; Thust, Anja; Behrens, Harald; Heilbronner, Renee; Kilian, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FÍs decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FÍs form, increasing the number of FÍs drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FÍs is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FÍs. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FÍs, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FÍs during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  10. Laser-based ultraviolet absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1994-04-01

    Laser-based UV absorption in capillary electrophoresis is demonstrated. The use of vacuum photodiodes and an all-electronic noise canceller provides adequate baseline stability despite the large inherent intensity noise in UV lasers. A 4-fold improvement in the detection limit is achieved in comparison to that of commercial instruments. The main advantage here is the better optical coupling with small capillary tubes, maximizing the available optical pathlength for absorption.

  11. Reassignment of the Iron (3) Absorption Bands in the Spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Absorption features in the near-infrared and visible region reflectance spectra of Mars have been assigned to specific Fe (3+) crystal-field and o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge transfer transitions. Recently, near-ultraviolet absorption spectra of iron oxides were obtained and the energies of o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions were determined from accurate SCF-X # alpha-SW molecular orbital calculations on (FeO6)(9-) and (FeO4)(5-) clusters. Both the theoretical and experimental results, together with existing data in the literature, show that some of the previous Fe(3+) band assignments in the spectra of Mars need to be revised. The theory of Fe(3+) spectra in minerals is discussed and applied to the spectrum of Mars.

  12. Doping-Induced Absorption Bands in P3HT: Polarons and Bipolarons.

    PubMed

    Enengl, Christina; Enengl, Sandra; Pluczyk, Sandra; Havlicek, Marek; Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw; Neugebauer, Helmut; Ehrenfreund, Eitan

    2016-12-05

    In this work, we focus on the formation of different kinds of charge carriers such as polarons and bipolarons upon p-type doping (oxidation) of the organic semiconductor poly(3- hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). We elucidate the cyclic voltammogram during oxidation of this polymer and present spectroscopic changes upon doping in the UV/Vis/near-IR range as well as in the mid-IR range. In the low-oxidation regime, two absorption bands related to sub-gap transitions appear, one in the UV/Vis range and another one in the mid-IR range. The UV/Vis absorption gradually decreases upon further doping while the mid-IR absorption shifts to lower energy. Additionally, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements are performed, showing an increase of the EPR signal up to a certain doping level, which significantly decreases upon further doping. Furthermore, the absorption spectra in the UV/Vis range are analyzed in relation to the morphology (crystalline vs. amorphous) by using theoretical models. Finally, the calculated charge carriers from cyclic voltammogram are linked together with optical transitions as well as with the EPR signals upon p-type doping. We stress that our results indicate the formation of polarons at low doping levels and the existence of bipolarons at high doping levels. The presented spectroscopic data are an experimental evidence of the formation of bipolarons in P3HT.

  13. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured in the IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the results on the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured employing two different experimental setup. Each of them allows us to reproduce typical planetary conditions, at a pressure and temperature from 1 up to 50 bar and from 298 up to 500 K respectively. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of the CO2 CIA absorption bands will be presented.

  14. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  15. Femtosecond supercontinuum generation in water in the vicinity of absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Dharmadhikari, J A; Steinmeyer, G; Gopakumar, G; Mathur, D; Dharmadhikari, A K

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to overcome the perceived limitations caused by absorption bands in water so as to generate supercontinuum (SC) spectra in the anomalous dispersion regime that extend well beyond 2000 nm wavelength. By choosing a pump wavelength within a few hundred nanometers above the zero-dispersion wavelength of 1048 nm, initial spectral broadening extends into the normal dispersion regime and, in turn, the SC process in the visible strongly benefits from phase-matching and matching group velocities between dispersive radiation and light in the anomalous dispersion regime. Some of the SC spectra are shown to encompass two and a half octaves.

  16. Theoretical Modeling of Low Energy Electronic Absorption Bands in Reduced Cobaloximes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task. PMID:25113847

  17. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L; Gray, Harry B; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J

    2014-10-06

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we analyze the low-energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and use a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  18. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  19. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  20. Optimal Reflectance, Transmittance, and Absorptance Wavebands and Band Ratios for the Estimation of Leaf Chlorophyll Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Spiering, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study utilized regression analysis to identify: wavebands and band ratios within the 400-850 nm range that could be used to estimate total chlorophyll concentration with minimal error; and simple regression models that were most effective in estimating chlorophyll concentrations were measured for two broadleaved species, a broadleaved vine, a needle-leaved conifer, and a representative of the grass family.Overall, reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance corresponded most precisely with chlorophyll concentration at wavelengths near 700 nm, although regressions were strong as well in the 550-625 nm range.

  1. The nature of splitting of fullerene C{sub 70} polarized absorption bands in liquid-crystal matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-06-01

    The recently discovered splitting of polarized electronic absorption bands of fullerene C{sub 70} in uniaxial liquid-crystal matrices is shown to result from the spectral dependence of the polarization of these bands relative to the molecular coordinate system. 9 refs.

  2. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  3. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  4. Band tail absorption saturation in CdWO4 with 100 fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Laasner, R; Fedorov, N; Grigonis, R; Guizard, S; Kirm, M; Makhov, V; Markov, S; Nagirnyi, V; Sirutkaitis, V; Vasil'ev, A; Vielhauer, S; Tupitsyna, I A

    2013-06-19

    The decay kinetics of the excitonic emission of CdWO4 scintillators was studied under excitation by powerful 100 fs laser pulses in the band tail (Urbach) absorption region. A special imaging technique possessing both spatial and temporal resolution provided a unique insight into the Förster dipole-dipole interaction of self-trapped excitons, which is the main cause of the nonlinear quenching of luminescence in this material. In addition, the saturation of phonon-assisted excitonic absorption due to extremely short excitation pulses was discovered. A model describing the evolution of electronic excitations in the conditions of absorption saturation was developed and an earlier model of decay kinetics based on the Förster interaction was extended to include the saturation effect. Compared to the previous studies, a more accurate calculation yields 3.7 nm as the Förster interaction radius. It was shown that exciton-exciton interaction is the main source of scintillation nonproportionality in CdWO4. A quantitative description using a new model of nonproportionality was presented, making use of the corrected value of the Förster radius.

  5. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  6. Thermally induced effect on sub-band gap absorption in Ag doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Sharma, Kriti; Bharti, Shivani; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of Ag doped CdSe have been prepared by thermal evaporation using inert gas condensation (IGC) method taking Argon as inert gas. The prepared thin films are annealed at 363 K for one hour. The sub-band gap absorption spectra in the as deposited and annealed thin films have been studied using constant photocurrent method (CPM). The absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region is described by an Urbach tail in both as deposited and annealed thin films. The value of Urbach energy and number density of trap states have been calculated from the absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region which have been found to increase after annealing treatment indicating increase in disorderness in the lattice. The energy distribution of the occupied density of states below Fermi level has also been studied using derivative procedure of absorption coefficient.

  7. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies.

  8. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Flittner, D.E.; Herman, B.M.; Thome, K.J.; Simpson, J.M.; Reagan, J.A. )

    1993-04-15

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns (i.e., total columnar ozone and aerosol optical depth) may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The current method requires radiometric measurements of total optical depth through the Chappuis ozone band. It assumes no a priori shape for the aerosol optical depth versus wavelength profile and makes no assumptions about the ozone amount. Thus, the method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15%. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimates total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. A Multiple-Channel Sub-Band Transient Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    David A. Smith

    1998-11-01

    We have developed a unique multiple-channel sub-band transient detection system to record transient electromagnetic signals in carrier-dominated radio environments; the system has been used to make unique observations of weak, transient HF signals. The detection system has made these observations possible through improved sensitivity compared to conventional broadband transient detection systems; the sensitivity improvement is estimated to be at least 20 dB. The increase in sensitivity has been achieved through subdivision of the band of interest (an 18 MHz tunable bandwidth) into eight sub-band independent detection channels, each with a 400 kHz bandwidth and its own criteria. The system generates a system trigger signal when a predetermined number of channels (typically five) trigger within a predetermined window of time (typically 100 ~s). Events are recorded with a broadband data acquisition system sampling at 50 or 100 Msample/s, so despite the fact that the detection system operates on portions of the signal confined to narrow bands, data acquisition is broadband. Between May and September of 1994, the system was used to detect and record over six thousand transient events in the frequency band from 3 to 30 MHz. Approximately 500 of the events have been characterized as paired bursts of radio noise with individual durations of 2 to 10 ps and separations between the bursts of 5 to 160 ps. The paired transients are typically 5 to 40 dB brighter than the background electromagnetic spectrum between carrier signals. We have termed these events SubIonospheric Pulse Pairs (SIPPS) and presently have no explanation as to their source. Our observations of SIPPS resemble observations of TransIonospheric Pulse Pairs (TIPPs) recorded by the Blackboard instrument on the ALEXIS satellite; the source of TIPP events is also unknown. Most of the recorded SIPP events do not exhibit frequency dispersion, implying propagation along a line-of-sight (groundwave) path; but seven of

  10. Measurement of Oxygen A Band Line Parameters by Using Modulation Spectroscopy with Higher Harmonic Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharamsi, Amin

    1999-01-01

    Wavelength modulation spectroscopy is used to demonstrate that extremely weak absorption lines can be measured even when these lines suffer from interference from the wings of adjacent stronger lines. It is shown that the use of detection at several harmonics allows such interference to be examined clearly and conveniently. The results of experimental measurements on a weak magnetic dipole driven, spin-forbidden line in the oxygen A band, which experiences interference from the wings of a pair of adjacent lines towards the blue and red regions of line center, are presented. A comparison of the experimental results to theory is given.

  11. Contrast based band selection for optimized weathered oil detection in hyperspectral images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levaux, Florian; Bostater, Charles R., Jr.; Neyt, Xavier

    2012-09-01

    Hyperspectral imagery offers unique benefits for detection of land and water features due to the information contained in reflectance signatures such as the bi-directional reflectance distribution function or BRDF. The reflectance signature directly shows the relative absorption and backscattering features of targets. These features can be very useful in shoreline monitoring or surveillance applications, for example to detect weathered oil. In real-time detection applications, processing of hyperspectral data can be an important tool and Optimal band selection is thus important in real time applications in order to select the essential bands using the absorption and backscatter information. In the present paper, band selection is based upon the optimization of target detection using contrast algorithms. The common definition of the contrast (using only one band out of all possible combinations available within a hyperspectral image) is generalized in order to consider all the possible combinations of wavelength dependent contrasts using hyperspectral images. The inflection (defined here as an approximation of the second derivative) is also used in order to enhance the variations in the reflectance spectra as well as in the contrast spectrua in order to assist in optimal band selection. The results of the selection in term of target detection (false alarms and missed detection) are also compared with a previous method to perform feature detection, namely the matched filter. In this paper, imagery is acquired using a pushbroom hyperspectral sensor mounted at the bow of a small vessel. The sensor is mechanically rotated using an optical rotation stage. This opto-mechanical scanning system produces hyperspectral images with pixel sizes on the order of mm to cm scales, depending upon the distance between the sensor and the shoreline being monitored. The motion of the platform during the acquisition induces distortions in the collected HSI imagery. It is therefore

  12. Label free detection of phospholipids by infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Tahsin; Foster, Erick; Vigil, Genevieve; Khan, Aamir A.; Bohn, Paul; Howard, Scott S.

    2014-08-01

    We present our study on compact, label-free dissolved lipid sensing by combining capillary electrophoresis separation in a PDMS microfluidic chip online with mid-infrared (MIR) absorption spectroscopy for biomarker detection. On-chip capillary electrophoresis is used to separate the biomarkers without introducing any extrinsic contrast agent, which reduces both cost and complexity. The label free biomarker detection could be done by interrogating separated biomarkers in the channel by MIR absorption spectroscopy. Phospholipids biomarkers of degenerative neurological, kidney, and bone diseases are detectable using this label free technique. These phospholipids exhibit strong absorption resonances in the MIR and are present in biofluids including urine, blood plasma, and cerebrospinal fluid. MIR spectroscopy of a 12-carbon chain phosphatidic acid (PA) (1,2-dilauroyl-snglycero- 3-phosphate (sodium salt)) dissolved in N-methylformamide, exhibits a strong amide peak near wavenumber 1660 cm-1 (wavelength 6 μm), arising from the phosphate headgroup vibrations within a low-loss window of the solvent. PA has a similar structure to many important phospholipids molecules like phosphatidylcholine (PC), phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylethanolamine (PE), phosphatidylglycerol (PG), and phosphatidylserine (PS), making it an ideal molecule for initial proof-of-concept studies. This newly proposed detection technique can lead us to minimal sample preparation and is capable of identifying several biomarkers from the same sample simultaneously.

  13. Incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy of the marine boundary layer species I2, IO and OIO.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Stewart; Gherman, Titus; Ruth, Albert A; Orphal, Johannes

    2008-08-14

    The novel combination of incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and a discharge-flow tube for the study of three key atmospheric trace species, I(2), IO and OIO, is reported. Absorption measurements of I(2) and OIO at lambda=525-555 nm and IO at lambda=420-460 nm were made using a compact cavity-enhanced spectrometer employing a 150 W short-arc Xenon lamp. The use of a flow system allowed the monitoring of the chemically short-lived radical species IO and OIO to be conducted over timescales of several seconds. We report detection limits of approximately 26 pmol mol(-1) for I(2) (L=81 cm, acquisition time 60 s), approximately 45 pmol mol(-1) for OIO (L=42.5 cm, acquisition time 5 s) and approximately 210 pmol mol(-1) for IO (L=70 cm, acquisition time 60 s), demonstrating the usefulness of this approach for monitoring these important species in both laboratory studies and field campaigns.

  14. Geometrical attenuation, frequency dependence of Q, and the absorption band problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Igor B.

    2008-10-01

    A geometrical attenuation model is proposed as an alternative to the conventional frequency-dependent attenuation law Q(f) = Q0(f/f0)η. The new model provides a straightforward differentiation between the geometrical and effective attenuation (Qe) which incorporates the intrinsic attenuation and small-scale scattering. Unlike the (Q0, η) description, the inversion procedure uses only the spectral amplitude data and does not rely on elaborate theoretical models or restrictive assumptions. Data from over 40 reported studies were transformed to the new parametrization. The levels of geometrical attenuation strongly correlate with crustal tectonic types and decrease with tectonic age. The corrected values of Qe are frequency-independent and generally significantly higher than Q0 and show no significant correlation with tectonic age. Several case studies were revisited in detail, with significant changes in the interpretations. The absorption-band and the `10-Hz transition' are not found in the corrected Qe data, and therefore, these phenomena are interpreted as related to geometrical attenuation. The absorption band could correspond to changes in the dominant mode content of the wavefield as the frequency changes from about 0.1 to 100 Hz. Alternatively, it could also be a pure artefact related to the power-law Q(f) paradigm above. The explicit separation of the geometrical and intrinsic attenuation achieves three goals: (1) it provides an unambiguous, assumption- and model-free description of attenuation, (2) it allows relating the observations to the basic physics and geology and (3) it simplifies the interpretation because of reduced emphasis on the apparent Q(f) dependence. The model also agrees remarkably well with the initial attempts for finite-difference short-period coda waveform modelling. Because of its consistency and direct link to the observations, the approach should also help in building robust and transportable coda magnitudes and in seismic

  15. Investigation of band gap narrowing in nitrogen-doped La2Ti2O7 with transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yost, Brandon T; Cushing, Scott K; Meng, Fanke; Bright, Joeseph; Bas, Derek A; Wu, Nianqiang; Bristow, Alan D

    2015-12-14

    Doping a semiconductor can extend the light absorption range, however, it usually introduces mid-gap states, reducing the charge carrier lifetime. This report shows that doping lanthanum dititinate (La2Ti2O7) with nitrogen extends the valence band edge by creating a continuum of dopant states, increasing the light absorption edge from 380 nm to 550 nm without adding mid-gap states. The dopant states are experimentally resolved in the excited state by correlating transient absorption spectroscopy with a supercontinuum probe and DFT prediction. The lack of mid-gap states is further confirmed by measuring the excited state lifetimes, which reveal the shifted band edge only increased carrier thermalization rates to the band edge and not interband charge recombination under both ultraviolet and visible excitation. Terahertz (time-domain) spectroscopy also reveals that the conduction mechanism remains unchanged after doping, suggesting the states are delocalized.

  16. Impact of informative band selection on target detection performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gholizadeh, Hamed; Valadan Zoej, Mohammad Javad; Mojaradi, Barat

    2011-11-01

    In this paper, the effect of dimensionality reduction of hyperspectral data on 10 subpixel target detectors is investigated. The genetic algorithm (GA) and wavelet feature extraction methods are used for dimensionality reduction as they maintain physically meaningful bands and physical structure of the spectra, respectively. In the former case, the wrapper method is used to improve subpixel target detectors' results in terms of the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. Meanwhile, in the latter case, the AUC is used as a criterion to choose the optimum level of wavelet decomposition. Experimental results obtained from a real-world hyperspectral data and a challenging synthetic dataset approved that band selection with the wrapper method is more efficient than using target detection methods without dimensionality reduction, especially in the presence of difficult targets at subpixel level.

  17. Band gap reduction in InNxSb1-x alloys: Optical absorption, k . P modeling, and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, W. M.; Rajpalke, M. K.; Buckeridge, J.; Murgatroyd, P. A. E.; Bomphrey, J. J.; Alaria, J.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Scanlon, D. O.; Ashwin, M. J.; Veal, T. D.

    2016-09-01

    Using infrared absorption, the room temperature band gap of InSb is found to reduce from 174 (7.1 μm) to 85 meV (14.6 μm) upon incorporation of up to 1.13% N, a reduction of ˜79 meV/%N. The experimentally observed band gap reduction in molecular-beam epitaxial InNSb thin films is reproduced by a five band k . P band anticrossing model incorporating a nitrogen level, EN, 0.75 eV above the valence band maximum of the host InSb and an interaction coupling matrix element between the host conduction band and the N level of β = 1.80 eV. This observation is consistent with the presented results from hybrid density functional theory.

  18. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  19. Absorption band oscillator strengths of N2 transitions between 95.8 and 99.4 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, G.; Smith, Peter L.; Huber, K. P.; Yoshino, K.; Stevens, M. H.; Ito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen plays a central role in the energetics of the earth's upper atmosphere and is the major constituent of the atmospheres of the planetary satellites Titan and Triton. This paper reports a new set of absorption oscillator strengths measured at higher resolution for seven bands in the 95.8-99.4 nm region. The results are compared with earlier, lower resolution absorption measurements, electron scattering measurements, and calculations based on a deperturbation analysis of the excited states.

  20. Detection and measurement of the Wing-Ford band in the near-infrared spectra of elliptical galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Edouardo; Couture, Jean

    1988-02-01

    An absorption feature was detected at the location of the Wing-Ford band near 9916 A in high-quality CCD spectra of five elliptical galaxies taken with the Cerro Tololo 4-m RC spectrograph. Measurements reveal that the mean strength is 0.013 mag (1 sigma of the mean) and individual galaxy strengths have 1 sigma errors of the order 0.002 mag. The (3-4) band of the delta system of TiO with band head at 9986 A was also detected, suggesting that the observed Wing-Ford feature is affected by the (2-3) band of the delta system of TiO at 9899 A which is present in late giants. Therefore, this feature is not due exclusively to the FeH molecule strong in late M dwarfs.

  1. Absorption band III kinetics probe the picosecond heme iron motion triggered by nitric oxide binding to hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kruglik, Sergei G; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Negrerie, Michel

    2012-04-05

    To study the ultrafast movement of the heme iron induced by nitric oxide (NO) binding to hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb), we probed the picosecond spectral evolution of absorption band III (∼760 nm) and vibrational modes (iron-histidine stretching, ν(4) and ν(7) in-plane modes) in time-resolved resonance Raman spectra. The time constants of band III intensity kinetics induced by NO rebinding (25 ps for hemoglobin and 40 ps for myoglobin) are larger than in Soret bands and Q-bands. Band III intensity kinetics is retarded with respect to NO rebinding to Hb and to Mb. Similarly, the ν((Fe-His)) stretching intensity kinetics are retarded with respect to the ν(4) and ν(7) heme modes and to Soret absorption. In contrast, band III spectral shift kinetics do not coincide with band III intensity kinetics but follows Soret kinetics. We concluded that, namely, the band III intensity depends on the heme iron out-of-plane position, as theoretically predicted ( Stavrov , S. S. Biopolymers 2004 , 74 , 37 - 40 ).

  2. CH3 and CFx Detection in Low Pressure RF Discharges by Broadband Ultraviolet Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappelli, M. A.; Kim, J. S.; Sharma, S. P.

    1998-10-01

    The detection of reactive radicals in low-pressure radio-frequency (RF) discharges is of importance to the understanding of the chemical processes involved in discharge applications such as reactive ion etching (RIE) and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Furthermore, the quantitative measurement of radical concentrations and their spatial distributions provide a test of theoretical models that describe the kinetics of such discharges and their ability to predict the overall reactor-scale performance. In this presentation, we describe preliminary studies of the quantitative detection of CH3 and CF2, which are the products of electron collisional dissociation of methane (CH4) and tetrafluoromethane (CF4), respectively, in low-pressure RF plasma discharges. The discharge studied is an inductively (transformer) coupled plasma (ICP) source, operating on either pure methane or pure tetrafluoromethane, in some cases, with argon dilution. Such discharges are commonly employed in RIE and PECVD applications, and these data contribute to the growing database on properties of such discharges, for which sophisticated models of their operation are presently under development at many laboratories. The detection method employed in these experiments relies on the relatively well studied, X -> B uv-absorption band of CH3 near 216 nm, and the A(0,2,0) -> X(0,0,0) uv-absorption band of CF2 at 234.3 nm.

  3. Effects of surface texture and measurement geometry on the near infrared water-of-hydration absorption bands. Implications for the Martian regolith water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.

    Near-IR reflectance spectroscopy is widely used to detect mineral hydration on Solar System surfaces by the observation of absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. Recent studies established empirical relationships between the strength of the 3 µm band and the water content of the studied minerals (Milliken et al., 2005). These results have especially been applied to the OMEGA dataset to derive global maps of the Martian regolith water content (Jouglet et al., 2006 and Milliken et al., 2006). However, parameters such as surface texture and measurement geometry are known to have a strong effect on reflectance spectra but their influence on the hydration bands is poorly documented. The aim of this work is the determination of the quantitative effects of particle size, mixing between materials with different albedo and measurement geometry on the absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. We used both an experimental and a modeling approach to study these effects. Bidirectional reflectance spectra were measured for series of well characterized samples (smectite, volcanic tuff and coals, pure and mixed) and modeled with optical constants of a smectite (Roush, 2005). Criteria commonly used to estimate the strength of the bands were then calculated on these spectra. We show that particle size has a strong effect on the 1.9 and 3 µm bands strength, especially for the finest particles (less than 200 µm). Mixing between a fine smectite powder and anthracite powders with various particle sizes (modeled by a synthetic neutral material) highlights the strong effect of the materials albedo on the hydration band estimation criteria. Measurement geometry has a significant effect on the bands strength for high phase angles. Furthermore, the relative variations of band strength with measurement geometry appear very dependent on the surface texture. We will present in details the relationships between these physical parameters and various criteria chosen to estimate the hydration bands

  4. [Application of atomic absorption spectrometry in the engine knock detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Dan

    2013-02-01

    Because existing human experience diagnosis method and apparatus for auxiliary diagnosis method are difficult to diagnose quickly engine knock. Atomic absorption spectrometry was used to detect the automobile engine knock in in innovative way. After having determined Fe, Al, Cu, Cr and Pb content in the 35 groups of Audi A6 engine oil whose travel course is 2 000 -70 000 kilometers and whose sampling interval is 2 000 kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the database of primary metal content in the same automobile engine at different mileage was established. The research shows that the main metal content fluctuates within a certain range. In practical engineering applications, after the determination of engine oil main metal content and comparison with its database value, it can not only help to diagnose the type and location of engine knock without the disintegration and reduce vehicle maintenance costs and improve the accuracy of engine knock fault diagnosis.

  5. Dual-band microwave absorption properties of metamaterial absorber composed of split ring resonator on carbonyl iron powder composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Hee; Ryu, Yo-Han; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the dual-band absorption properties of metamaterial absorbers composed of a split ring resonator (SRR) on a grounded magnetic substrate. Polymer composites of carbonyl iron powders (CIP) of high permeability and magnetic loss were used as the substrate material. Computational tools were used to model the interaction between electromagnetic waves and materials with the SRR structure. For perpendicular polarization with an electric field (E) perpendicular to the SRR gap, dualband absorption peaks are predicted in the simulation result of reflection loss. Magnetic resonance resulting from antiparallel currents between the SRR and the ground plane is observed at the frequencies of two absorption peaks. The first strong absorption peak at the lower frequency (3.3 GHz) is due to magnetic resonance at the wire part of the SRR. The second absorption peak at the higher frequency (7.2 GHz) is due to magnetic resonance at the SRR split gap. The decreased capacitance with increased gap spacing moves the second absorption frequency to higher frequencies, while the first absorption peak is invariant with gap spacing. In the case of dual gaps at the opposite sides of the SRR, a single absorption peak is predicted due to the elimination of low-frequency resonance. For parallel polarization with the E-field parallel to the SRR gap, a single absorption peak is predicted, corresponding to magnetic resonance at the SRR wire.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  6. Band gap shift and the optical nonlinear absorption of sputtered ZnO-TiO2 films.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Bo; Han, Jun-Bo; Hao, Zhong-Hua

    2011-06-01

    ZnO-TiO2 composite films with different Zn/Ti atomic ratios were prepared with radio frequency reactive sputtering method. The Zn percentage composition (f(Zn)) dependent optical band gap and optical nonlinear absorption were investigated using the transmittance spectrum and the Z-scan technique, respectively. The results showed that composite films with f(Zn) in the range of 23.5%-88.3% are poor crystallized and their optical properties are anomalous which exhibit adjustable optical band gap and large optical nonlinear absorption. The optical absorption edge shifted to the blue wavelength direction with the increasing of f(Zn) and reached the minimum value of 285 nm for the sample with f(Zn) = 70.5%, which has the largest direct band gap of 4.30 eV. Further increasing of f(Zn) resulted in the red-shift of the optical absorption edge. The maximum optical nonlinear absorption coefficient of 1.5 x 10(3) cm/GW was also obtained for the same sample with f(Zn) = 70.5%, which is more than 40 times larger than those of pure TiO2 and ZnO films.

  7. Stratospheric observations of the attenuated solar irradiance in the Schumann-Runge band absorption region of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Hudson, R. D.; Mentall, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A spectrometer flown on the first Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-1) observed the attenuated solar irradiance between 184 and 202 nm from an altitude near 40 km. These measurements provide a check on the absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen in the spectral region of the Schumann-Runge bands. Comparison of the measurements with calculations based on cross sections derived from laboratory data shows a general agreement although the irradiance measurements have large error bars near the centers of the absorption bands. The results imply that the 184-200 nm solar irradiance that penetrates to the stratosphere can be computed to an accuracy of + or - 30% or better by using presently available cross sections.

  8. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of perovskite niobium oxynitrides with wide visible-light absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Siritanaratkul, Bhavin; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Hisatomi, Takashi; Domen, Kazunari

    2011-01-17

    Photocatalytic activities of perovskite-type niobium oxynitrides (CaNbO₂N, SrNbO₂N, BaNbO₂N, and LaNbON₂) were examined for hydrogen and oxygen evolution from water under visible-light irradiation. These niobium oxynitrides were prepared by heating the corresponding oxide precursors, which were synthesized using the polymerized complex method, for 15 h under a flow of ammonia. They possess visible-light absorption bands between 600-750 nm, depending on the A-site cations in the structures. The oxynitride CaNbO₂N, was found to be active for hydrogen and oxygen evolution from methanol and aqueous AgNO₃, respectively, even under irradiation by light at long wavelengths (λ<560 nm). The nitridation temperature dependence of CaNbO₂N was investigated and 1023 K was found to be the optimal temperature. At lower temperatures, the oxynitride phase is not adequately produced, whereas higher temperatures produce more reduced niobium species (e. g., Nb³(+) and Nb⁴(+)), which can act as electron-hole recombination centers, resulting in a decrease in activity.

  9. Microwave absorption behavior of a polyaniline magnetic composite in the X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aphesteguy, J. C.; Damiani, A.; DiGiovanni, D.; Jacobo, S. E.

    2012-08-01

    The development of nanosized materials is a subject of considerable interest both for understanding of the fundamental properties of magnetic materials for new technological applications. Polyaniline, composites Fe3O4/(PANI) with conducting, magnetic and electromagnetic properties with different amounts of Fe3O4 were successfully prepared. The samples were structurally characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetically, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. In order to explore microwave-absorbing properties in X-band, the composite nanoparticles were mixed with an epoxy resin to be converted into a microwave-absorbing composite. Microwave behavior with different Fe3O4/(PANI)-epoxy resin ratio was studied using a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in the range 7.5 to 13 GHz. For a constant thickness of 1.5 mm, absorption increases with the magnetite contents in the composites and in the oriented samples by the application of a magnetic field.

  10. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Cross sections of O2 at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 179.3-198.0 nm with a 6.65-m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400-lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands (12,0) through (2,0) are independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically here and are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm as numerical compilations stored on magnetic tape from the National Space Science Data Center, NASA/Goddard. Band oscillator strengths of these bands have been determined by direct numerical integration of the measured cross sections.

  11. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  12. Energy conversion within infrared plasmonic absorption metamaterials for multi-band resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqian; Su, Lei; Xu, Xiaolun; Zhang, Chenglin; Wang, Binbin

    2015-05-01

    The energy conversion within the cross-shaped plasmonic absorber metamaterials (PAM) was investigated theoretically and numerically in the infrared range based on the Poynting's theorem of electromagnetic energy. From the microscopic details, the heat generation owing to the electric current accounts for the majority of the energy conversion, while the magnetic resonance plays a negligible role. The PAMs possess three distinct resonant peaks standing independently, which are attributed to the polarization sensitive excitation of plasmonic resonance. Field redistribution and enhancement associated with multiplex resonant electromagnetic wave passing through the PAM medium provided insight into the energy conversion processes inside the nanostructure. The research results will assist the design of novel plasmon enhanced infrared detectors with multiple-band detection.

  13. Improved space borne detection of volcanic ash for real-time monitoring using 3-Band method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guéhenneux, Y.; Gouhier, M.; Labazuy, P.

    2015-02-01

    For over 25 years, thermal infrared data supplied by satellite-based sensors are used to detect and characterize volcanic ash clouds using a commonly accepted method: the 2-Band reverse absorption technique. This method is based on a two-channel difference model using the opposite extinction features of water-ice and ash particles at 11 and 12 μm wavelengths. Although quite efficient with the supervision of a user, this method shows however some limitations for reliable automated detection of volcanic ash in a real-time fashion. Here we explore a method dedicated to the operational monitoring of volcanic ash that combines the 11-12 μm brightness temperature difference (BTD11-12) with a second brightness temperature difference between channels 8.7 μm and 11 μm, (BTD8.7-11). We first achieve a detailed microphysics analysis of different atmospheric aerosols (volcanic ash, water/ice, sulfuric acid, mineral dust) using optical properties (e.g., extinction efficiency, single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter) calculated by Mie theory, and showing that BTD8.7-11 can be particularly efficient to remove most of artifacts. Then, we tested this method for eight different eruptions between 2005 and 2011 from six different volcanoes (Mount Etna, Piton de la Fournaise, Karthala, Soufriere Hills, Eyjafjallajökull, and Grimsvötn) using data from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) geostationary satellite. We show that between 95.6% and 99.9% of ash-contaminated pixels erroneously identified by the BTD11-12 method (i.e., artifacts) were detected and removed by the 3-Band method. For all eruptions, the 3-Band method shows a high and constant reliability having a false alarm rate in the range 0.002-0.08%, hence allowing operational implementation for automated detection in case of a volcanic crisis.

  14. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  15. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  16. The absorption coefficient of the liquid N2 2.15-micron band and application to Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The present measurements of the temperature dependence exhibited by the liquid N2 2.15-micron 2-0 collision-induced band's absorption coefficient and integrated absorption show the latter to be smaller than that of the N2 gas, and to decrease with decreasing temperature. Extrapolating this behavior to Triton's nominal surface temperature yields a new estimate of the N2-ice grain size on the Triton south polar cap; a mean N2 grain size of 0.7-3.0 cm is consistent with grain growth rate calculation results.

  17. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  18. A broadband absorption spectrometer using light emitting diodes for ultrasensitive, in situ trace gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langridge, Justin M.; Ball, Stephen M.; Shillings, Alexander J. L.; Jones, Roderic L.

    2008-12-01

    A broadband absorption spectrometer has been developed for highly sensitive and target-selective in situ trace gas measurements. The instrument employs two distinct modes of operation: (i) broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) is used to quantify the concentration of gases in sample mixtures from their characteristic absorption features, and (ii) periodic measurements of the cavity mirrors' reflectivity are made using step-scan phase shift cavity ringdown spectroscopy (PSCRDS). The latter PSCRDS method provides a stand-alone alternative to the more usual method of determining mirror reflectivities by measuring BBCEAS absorption spectra for calibration samples of known composition. Moreover, the instrument's two modes of operation use light from the same light emitting diode transmitted through the cavity in the same optical alignment, hence minimizing the potential for systematic errors between mirror reflectivity determinations and concentration measurements. The ability of the instrument to quantify absorber concentrations is tested in instrument intercomparison exercises for NO2 (versus a laser broadband cavity ringdown spectrometer) and for H2O (versus a commercial hygrometer). A method is also proposed for calculating effective absorption cross sections for fitting the differential structure in BBCEAS spectra due to strong, narrow absorption lines that are under-resolved and hence exhibit non-Beer-Lambert law behavior at the resolution of the BBCEAS measurements. This approach is tested on BBCEAS spectra of water vapor's 4v+δ absorption bands around 650 nm. The most immediate analytical application of the present instrument is in quantifying the concentration of reactive trace gases in the ambient atmosphere. The instrument's detection limits for NO3 as a function of integration time are considered in detail using an Allan variance analysis. Experiments under laboratory conditions produce a 1σ detection limit of 0.25 pptv for a 10 s

  19. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-07-01

    Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H2Cdbnd Cdbnd C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  20. Imaging Catalytic Surfaces by Multiplexed Capillary Electrophoresis With Absorption Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Christodoulou, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A new technique for in situ imaging and screening heterogeneous catalysts by using multiplexed capillary electrophoresis with absorption detection was developed. By bundling the inlets of a large number of capillaries, an imaging probe can be created that can be used to sample products formed directly from a catalytic surface with high spatial resolution. In this work, they used surfaces made of platinum, iron or gold wires as model catalytic surfaces for imaging. Various shapes were recorded including squares and triangles. Model catalytic surfaces consisting of both iron and platinum wires in the shape of a cross were also imaged successfully. Each of the two wires produced a different electrochemical product that was separated by capillary electrophoresis. Based on the collected data they were able to distinguish the products from each wire in the reconstructed image.

  1. Detection of electron paramagnetic resonance absorption using frequency modulation.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroshi; Kuyama, Toshifumi; Ono, Mitsuhiro; Shimoyama, Yuhei

    2003-10-01

    A frequency modulation (FM) method was developed to measure electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) absorption. The first-derivative spectrum of 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) powder was measured with this FM method. Frequency modulation of up to 1.6 MHz (peak-to-peak) was achieved at a microwave carrier frequency of 1.1 GHz. This corresponds to a magnetic field modulation of 57microT (peak-to-peak) at 40.3 mT. By using a tunable microwave resonator and automatic control systems, we achieved a practical continuous-wave (CW) EPR spectrometer that incorporates the FM method. In the present experiments, the EPR signal intensity was proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. The background signal at the modulation frequency (1 kHz) for EPR detection was also proportional to the magnitude of frequency modulation. An automatic matching control (AMC) system reduced the amplitude of noise in microwave detection and improved the baseline stability. Distortion of the spectral lineshape was seen when the spectrometer settings were not appropriate, e.g., with a lack of the open-loop gain in automatic tuning control (ATC). FM is an alternative to field modulation when the side-effect of field modulation is detrimental for EPR detection. The present spectroscopic technique based on the FM scheme is useful for measuring the first derivative with respect to the microwave frequency in investigations of electron-spin-related phenomena.

  2. Spectroscopy of JVI Himalia for detection and characterization of the 3 um water band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Karsten

    2013-10-01

    We aim at securely detecting and characterizing the presence of the 3um band for the first time in the reflectance spectrum of a Jovian irregular satellite. Features in the 3um band can unambiguously reveal water ice or past aqueous alteration of the surface material that lead to bound water molecules and hydroxyl groups in minerals. Water ice and hydrated minerals are ubiquitous in the Jovian system and have been found on Europa, Ganymede, Callisto and the inner regular satellite JV Amalthea. In contrast to these neighboring satellites and to two irregular satellites that have been studied at Saturn and Neptune, a detection of water (previously or currently present) on a Jovian irregular satellite has not yet been succeeded due to constraints of ground-based observatories. No dedicated spacecraft mission to the Jovian system has allowed to study them close-up. Their very low albedos and small diameters only allow ground-based spectroscopy up to 2.5um for very few objects. The strong telluric absorption band of the atmosphere between 2.55-2.85um and the increasing IR-background beyond 2.85um makes ground-based spectroscopy for these very faint objects impossible. SOFIA has the unique capability to overcome these limits. Flitecam provides enough sensitivity to conduct spectroscopic investigations between 2.6-3.5um of the largest object of the Jovian irregular satellite population, JVI Himalia. Supplementary high quality spectral data from 0.65-2.55um has already been acquired by Schindler and Reddy using SpeX on NASA IRTF. Three indicators strongly suggest the presence of the 3um band: A shallow absorption feature around 1.1um attributed to magnetite, a weak feature around 0.7 um attributed to phyllosillicates and an average heliocentric distance of 5.2AU where water ice is thought to be stable throughout the history of the Solar System. The results of this study will greatly contribute to understand the origin and history of these objects.

  3. a Theoretical Model for Wide-Band Infrared-Absorption Molecular Spectra at any Pressure: Fiction or Reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyreva, Jeanna; Vander Auwera, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Various atmospheric applications require modeling of infrared absorption by the main atmospheric species in wide ranges of frequencies, pressures and temperatures. For different pressure regimes, different mechanisms are responsible for the observed intensities of vibration-rotation line manifolds, and the structure of the bands changes drastically when going from low to high densities. Therefore, no universal theoretical model exists presently to interpret simultaneously collapsed band-shapes observed at very high pressures and isolated-line shapes recorded in sub-atmospheric regimes. Using CO_2 absorption spectra as an example, we introduce some improvements in the non-Markovian Energy-Corrected Sudden model, developed for high-density spectra of arbitrary tensorial rank and generalized recently to parallel and perpendicular infrared absorption bands, and test the applicability of this approach for the case of nearly Doppler pressure regime via comparisons with recently recorded experimental intensities. J.V. Buldyreva and L. Bonamy, Phys. Rev. A 60(1), 370-376 (1999). J. Buldyreva and L. Daneshvar, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164107 (2013). L. Daneshvar, T. Földes, J. Buldyreva, J. Vander Auwera, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 2014 (to be submitted).

  4. Wideband enhancement of infrared absorption in a direct band-gap semiconductor by using nonabsorptive pyramids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weitao; Yap, Daniel; Chen, Gang

    2012-07-02

    Efficient trapping of the light in a photon absorber or a photodetector can improve its performance and reduce its cost. In this paper we investigate two designs for light-trapping in application to infrared absorption. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that nonabsorptive pyramids either located on top of an absorbing film or having embedded absorbing rods can efficiently enhance the absorption in the absorbing material. A spectrally averaged absorptance of 83% is achieved compared to an average absorptance of 28% for the optimized multilayer structure that has the same amount of absorbing material. This enhancement is explained by the coupled-mode theory. Similar designs can also be applied to solar cells.

  5. Why is the librational water-ice band at 11.5μm so difficult to detect?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, G.; Maldoni, M. M.

    2010-11-01

    Radiative transfer models have been produced for stars surrounded by circumstellar dust shells in order to investigate the detectability of the 11.5-μm librational band due to water-ice (H2O-ice). The dust grains were assumed to be composed of a core material of either amorphous silicate of olivine composition (MgFeSiO4) or alumina (Al2O3), both grain species being coated with a water-ice mantle. The models may be divided into three classes: those with small, intermediate and large optical depths. It is found that in all three cases, even with only olivine present, the water-ice librational band feature is masked by radiative transfer effects and is therefore difficult to detect. For the librational band to display its characteristic shape requires far larger amounts of water-ice than are present in any known circumstellar dust shell, as indicated by the depth of the much stronger 3.1-μm water-ice band. The best prospect for finding some evidence of the librational band is likely to be via using a small beam centred on the cooler outer regions of the dust shell; in this case the line of sight may encounter only water-ice coated grains, thereby reducing the contaminating effect of bare grains. If a grain species such as alumina is present, with a broad absorption band in the vicinity of 11.5μm, the identification of the librational band may be possible, perhaps surprisingly, as result of the sharpening of the 11.5-μm feature. We have fitted the spectrum of IRAS 22036+5306 and find that, although water-ice is clearly present in this object, as evidenced by the presence of the strong 3.1-μm band, the librational band has no obvious effect on its 10-μm spectrum.

  6. Wide angle and narrow-band asymmetric absorption in visible and near-infrared regime through lossy Bragg stacks

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shiwei; Zhan, Yawen; Lee, Chris; Lu, Jian; Li, Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Absorber is an important component in various optical devices. Here we report a novel type of asymmetric absorber in the visible and near-infrared spectrum which is based on lossy Bragg stacks. The lossy Bragg stacks can achieve near-perfect absorption at one side and high reflection at the other within the narrow bands (several nm) of resonance wavelengths, whereas display almost identical absorption/reflection responses for the rest of the spectrum. Meanwhile, this interesting wavelength-selective asymmetric absorption behavior persists for wide angles, does not depend on polarization, and can be ascribed to the lossy characteristics of the Bragg stacks. Moreover, interesting Fano resonance with easily tailorable peak profiles can be realized using the lossy Bragg stacks. PMID:27251768

  7. Annealing-induced optical and sub-band-gap absorption parameters of Sn-doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of Sn-doped CdSe were prepared by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates in an argon gas atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures. Structural evaluation of the films was carried out using X-ray diffraction and their stoichiometry studied by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The films exhibit a preferred orientation along the hexagonal direction of CdSe. The optical transmittance of the films shows a red shift of the absorption edge with annealing. The fundamental absorption edge corresponds to a direct energy gap with a temperature coefficient of 3.34 × 10-3 eV K-1. The refractive index, optical conductivity and real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to increase after annealing. The sub-band gap absorption coefficient was evaluated using the constant photocurrent method. It varies exponentially with photon energy. The Urbach energy, the density of defect states, and the steepness of the density of localized states were evaluated from the sub-band-gap absorption.

  8. Detection of KS -band Thermal Emission from WASP-3b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ming; Milburn, Jennifer; Barman, Travis; Hinkley, Sasha; Swain, Mark R.; Wright, Jason; Monnier, John D.

    2012-03-01

    We report the detection of thermal emission from the hot Jupiter WASP-3b in the KS band, using a newly developed guiding scheme for the WIRC instrument at the Palomar Hale 200 inch telescope. Our new guiding scheme has improved the telescope guiding precision by a factor of ~5-7, significantly reducing the correlated systematics in the measured light curves. This results in the detection of a secondary eclipse with depth of 0.181% ± 0.020% (9σ)—a significant improvement in WIRC's photometric precision and a demonstration of the capability of Palomar/WIRC to produce high-quality measurements of exoplanetary atmospheres. Our measured eclipse depth cannot be explained by model atmospheres with heat redistribution but favors a pure radiative equilibrium case with no redistribution across the surface of the planet. Our measurement also gives an eclipse phase center of 0.5045 ± 0.0020, corresponding to an ecos ω of 0.0070 ± 0.0032. This result is consistent with a circular orbit, although it also suggests that the planet's orbit might be slightly eccentric. The possible non-zero eccentricity provides insight into the tidal circularization process of the star-planet system, but might also have been caused by a second low-mass planet in the system, as suggested by a previous transit timing variation study. More secondary eclipse observations, especially at multiple wavelengths, are necessary to determine the temperature-pressure profile of the planet's atmosphere and shed light on its orbital eccentricity.

  9. The C2H, C2, and CN electronic absorption bands in the carbon star HD 19557

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Bregman, J. D.; Cooper, D. M.; Goorvitch, D.; Langhoff, S. R.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometry of the R-type carbon star HD 19557 is presented. Two unusual spectroscopic features are seen: a 3.1 micron band is lacking and a 2.8 micron band is present. Identifications are proposed for three previously unreported stellar absorption bands with electronic sequences of C2, CN, and C2H. The latter is proposed to be responsible for the 2.8 micron feature. The atmospheric structure of the star is studied with synthetic spectra, and an effective temperature between 2600 K and 3000 K is suggested. No SiC emission is seen at 11.3 microns, indicating that grain formation is not a viable process around the star. The lack of dust in R stars may suggest a salient difference between R and N types.

  10. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  11. HAB detection based on absorption and backscattering properties of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Hui; Pan, Delu; Bai, Yan; Chen, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Yan; Zhu, Qiankun

    2011-11-01

    The coastal area of East China Sea (ECS) suffers from the harmful algal blooms (HAB) frequently every year in the warm season. The most common causative phytoplankton algal species of HAB in the ECS in recent years are Prorocentrum donghaiense (dinoflagellates), Karenia mikimotoi (dinoflagellates which could produce hemolytic and ichthyotoxins) and Skeletonema costatum (diatom). The discrimination between the dinoflagellates and diatom HAB through ocean color remote sensing approach can add the knowledge of HAB events in ECS and help to the precaution. A series of in-situ measurement consisted of absorption coefficient, total scattering and particulate backscattering coefficient was conducted in the southern coast of Zhejiang Province in May 2009, and the estuary of Changjiang River in August 2009 and December 2010, which encountered two HAB events and a moderate bloom. The Inherent Optical Properties (IOPs) of the bloom waters have significant difference between phytoplankton species in absorption and backscattering properties. The chlorophyll a specific absorption coefficient (a*phy(λ)) for the bloom patches (chlorophyll a concentration >6mg m-3) differ greatly from the adjacent normal seawater, with the a*phy(λ) of bloom water lower than 0.03 m2 mg-1 while the a*phy(λ) of the adjacent normal seawater is much higher (even up to 0.06 m2 mg-1). Meanwhile, the backscattering coefficients at 6 wavebands (420, 442, 470, 510, 590 and 700nm) are also remarkably lower for bloom waters (<0.01 m-1) than the normal seawater (> 0.02 m-1). The backscattering coefficient ratio (Rbp(λ)) is much lower for diatom bloom waters than for dinoflagellates types (0.01079 vs. 0.01227). A discrimination model based on IOPs is established, and several typical dinoflagellates and diatom bloom events including Prorocentrum donghaiense, Karenia mikimotoi and Skeletonema costatum in the ECS are picked out for testing with the MODIS-L2 and L3 ocean color remote sensing products from NASA

  12. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  13. Sub-nanometer linewidth perfect absorption in visible band induced by Bloch surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jiawei; Liu, Wenxing; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Ren, Naifei; Ding, Guilin; Chen, Mingyang; Yao, Hongbing

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the unity absorption of visible light with an ultra-narrow 0.1 nm linewidth. It arises from the Bloch surface wave resonance in alternating TiO2/SiO2 multilayers. The total absorption and narrow linewidth are explained from the radiative and absorptive damping, which are quantitatively determined by the temporal coupled mode theory. When a silver film with proper thickness is added to the absorber, the perfect absorption is achieved with only 3 structural bilayers, in contrast with 8 bilayers required without Ag. Furthermore, significant field enhancement and an ultrahigh 2600/RIU sensing figure-of-merit are simultaneously obtained at resonance, which might facilitate applications in nonlinear optical devices and high resolution refractive index sensing.

  14. Toward broad-band x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance in longitudinal geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Ollefs, K.; Meckenstock, R.; Spoddig, D.; Römer, F. M.; Hassel, Ch.; Schöppner, Ch.; Farle, M.; Ney, V.; Ney, A.

    2015-06-14

    An ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible setup for broad-band X-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) in longitudinal geometry is introduced which relies on a low-power, continuous-wave excitation of the ferromagnetic sample. A simultaneous detection of the conventional ferromagnetic resonance via measuring the reflected microwave power and the XFMR signal of the X-ray absorption is possible. First experiments on the Fe and Co L{sub 3}-edges of a permalloy film covered with Co nanostripes as well as the Fe and Ni K-edges of a permalloy film are presented and discussed. Two different XFMR signals are found, one of which is independent of the photon energy and therefore does not provide element-selective information. The other much weaker signal is element-selective, and the dynamic magnetic properties could be detected for Fe and Co separately. The dependence of the latter XFMR signal on the photon helicity of the synchrotron light is found to be distinct from the usual x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect.

  15. Cirrus cloud detection from airborne imaging spectrometer data using the 1.38 micron water vapor band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Bo-Cai; Goetz, Alexander F. H.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1993-01-01

    Using special images acquired by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) at 20 km altitude, we show that wavelengths close to the center of the strong 1.38 micron water vapor band are useful for detecting thin cirrus clouds. The detection makes use of the fact that cirrus clouds are located above almost all the atmospheric water vapor. Because of the strong water vapor absorption in the lower atmosphere, AVIRIS channels near 1.38 micron receive little scattered solar radiance from the surface of low level clouds. When cirrus clouds are present, however, these channels receive large amounts of scattered solar radiance from the cirrus clouds. Our ability to determine cirrus cloud cover using space-based remote sensing will be improved if channels near the center of the 1.38 micron water vapor band are added to future satellites.

  16. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  17. Semi-Empirical Validation of the Cross-Band Relative Absorption Technique for the Measurement of Molecular Mixing Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S

    2013-01-01

    Studies were performed to carry out semi-empirical validation of a new measurement approach we propose for molecular mixing ratios determination. The approach is based on relative measurements in bands of O2 and other molecules and as such may be best described as cross band relative absorption (CoBRA). . The current validation studies rely upon well verified and established theoretical and experimental databases, satellite data assimilations and modeling codes such as HITRAN, line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM), and the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA). The approach holds promise for atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2 and a variety of other molecules currently under investigation for several future satellite lidar missions. One of the advantages of the method is a significant reduction of the temperature sensitivity uncertainties which is illustrated with application to the ASCENDS mission for the measurement of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). Additional advantages of the method include the possibility to closely match cross-band weighting function combinations which is harder to achieve using conventional differential absorption techniques and the potential for additional corrections for water vapor and other interferences without using the data from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  18. Asymptomatic Gastric Band Erosion Detected during Routine Gastroduodenoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Gee Young; Kim, Woo Sub; Kim, Hye Jin; Kang, Sun Hyung; Moon, Hee Seok; Sung, Jae Kyu; Jeong, Hyun Yong

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of gastric band erosion has decreased to 1%. Gastric band erosion can manifest with various clinical symptoms, although some patients remain asymptomatic. We present a case of a mostly asymptomatic patient who was diagnosed with gastric band erosion during a routine health check-up. A 32-year-old man without any underlying diseases except for non-alcoholic fatty liver underwent laparoscopic adjustable gastric band surgery in 2010. He had no significant complications postoperatively. He underwent routine health check-ups with near-normal gastroduodenoscopic findings through 2014. However, in 2015, routine gastroduodenoscopy showed that the gastric band had eroded into the stomach. His gastric band was removed laparoscopically, and the remaining gastric ulcer perforation was repaired using an omental patch. Due to the early diagnosis, the infection was not serious. The patient was discharged on postoperative day 3 with oral antibiotics. This patient was fortunately diagnosed early by virtue of a routine health check-up; thus, eliminating the possibility of serious complications. PMID:26867553

  19. Method for improving terahertz band absorption spectrum measurement accuracy using noncontact sample thickness measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Su, Haixia; Yan, Fang; Zhang, Han

    2012-07-10

    The terahertz absorption spectrum has a complex nonlinear relationship with sample thickness, which is normally measured mechanically with limited accuracy. As a result, the terahertz absorption spectrum is usually determined incorrectly. In this paper, an iterative algorithm is proposed to accurately determine sample thickness. This algorithm is independent of the initial value used and results in convergent calculations. Precision in sample thickness can be improved up to 0.1 μm. A more precise absorption spectrum can then be extracted. By comparing the proposed method with the traditional method based on mechanical thickness measurements, quantitative analysis experiments on a three-component amino acid mixture shows that the global error decreased from 0.0338 to 0.0301.

  20. Absorption and emission line shapes in the O2 atmospheric bands - Theoretical model and limb viewing simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Bucholtz, A.; Hays, P. B.; Ortland, D.; Skinner, W. R.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple scattering radiative transfer model has been developed to carry out a line-by-line calculation of the absorption and emission limb measurements that will be made by the High Resolution Doppler Imager to be flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The multiple scattering model uses the doubling and adding methods to solve the radiative transfer equation, modified to take into account a spherical inhomogeneous atmosphere. Representative absorption and emission line shapes in the O2 1Sigma(+)g - 3Sigma(-)g atmospheric bands (A,B, and gamma) and their variation with altitude are presented. The effects of solar zenith angle, aerosol loading, surface albedo, and cloud height on the line shapes are also discussed.

  1. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of ERTS-1 images of Nevada has followed two courses: comparative lineament mapping and spectral reflectance evaluation. The comparative lineament mapping was conducted by mapping lineaments on 9 x 9 inch prints of MSS bands 5 and 7, transferring the data to a base map, and comparing the results with existing geologic maps. The most significant results are that lineaments are more numerous on the band 7 images, and approximately 100 percent more were mapped than appear on existing maps. Geologic significance of these newly mapped lineaments will not be known until they are checked in the field: many are probably faults. Spectral analysis has been limited to visual comparison among the four MSS bands. In general, higher scene contrast is shown in the near infrared bands (6 and 7) than in the visible wavelength bands (4 and 5). The economic implications of these results derive chiefly from the greater efficiency that can be obtained by using near infrared as well as visible wavelength images.

  2. Signatures of a conical intersection in photofragment distributions and absorption spectra: Photodissociation in the Hartley band of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2014-08-21

    Photodissociation of ozone in the near UV is studied quantum mechanically in two excited electronic states coupled at a conical intersection located outside the Franck-Condon zone. The calculations, performed using recent ab initio PESs, provide an accurate description of the photodissociation dynamics across the Hartley/Huggins absorption bands. The observed photofragment distributions are reproduced in the two electronic dissociation channels. The room temperature absorption spectrum, constructed as a Boltzmann average of many absorption spectra of rotationally excited parent ozone, agrees with experiment in terms of widths and intensities of diffuse structures. The exit channel conical intersection contributes to the coherent broadening of the absorption spectrum and directly affects the product vibrational and translational distributions. The photon energy dependences of these distributions are strikingly different for fragments created along the adiabatic and the diabatic paths through the intersection. They can be used to reverse engineer the most probable geometry of the non-adiabatic transition. The angular distributions, quantified in terms of the anisotropy parameter β, are substantially different in the two channels due to a strong anticorrelation between β and the rotational angular momentum of the fragment O{sub 2}.

  3. Experimental demonstration of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with a broad and flat high absorption band.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy; Ramani, Suchitra; Reiten, Matthew T; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Taylor, Antoinette J; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2012-01-15

    We present the design, numerical simulations and experimental measurements of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with a broad and flat absorption top over a wide incidence angle range for either transverse electric or transverse magnetic polarization depending on the incident direction. The metamaterial absorber unit cell consists of two sets of structures resonating at different but close frequencies. The overall absorption spectrum is the superposition of individual components and becomes flat at the top over a significant bandwidth. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  4. Theoretical study on the photofragment branching ratios and anisotropy parameters of ICl in the second absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Yabushita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and non-adiabatic coupling terms of the excited states of ICl molecule have been obtained by the spin-orbit configuration interaction method to examine the branching ratios and the anisotropy parameters of the photodissociation process in the second absorption band. The calculation of the branching ratios with the time-dependent coupled Schrödinger equations, including the quantum interference effect between the 0+(III) and 0+(IV) states, shows good agreement with recent experiments, thus resolves the long standing disagreement. The contribution of the quantum interference effect to the photodissociation process is discussed based on a time-dependent perturbation treatment.

  5. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  6. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  7. Iron absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A lineament study of the Nevada test site is near completion. Two base maps (1:500,000) have been prepared, one of band 7 lineaments and the other of band 5 lineaments. In general, more lineaments and more faults are seen on band 5. About 45% of the lineaments appear to be faults and contacts, the others being predominantly streams, roads, railway tracks, and mountain crests. About 25% of the lineaments are unidentified so far. Special attention is being given to unmapped extensions of faults, groups of unmapped lineaments, and known mineralized areas and alteration zones. Earthquake epicenters recorded from 1869 to 1963 have been plotted on the two base maps. Preliminary examination as yet indicates no basic correlation with the lineaments. Attempts are being made to subtract bands optically, using an I2S viewer, an enlarger, and a data color viewer. Success has been limited so far due to technical difficulties, mainly vignetting and poor light sources, within the machines. Some vegetation and rock type differences, however, have been discerned.

  8. Shape of impurity electronic absorption bands in a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1995-02-01

    It is shown that the anisotropic intermolecular impurity-matrix interactions, statistical orientation properties, and the electronic structure of the uniaxial impurity molecules considerably affect the spectral moments of the impurity electronic adsorption bands in a nematic liquid crystal. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  10. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  11. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  12. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  13. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  14. Presence of terrestrial atmospheric gas absorption bands in standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance curves in the near-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Green, R O

    1995-09-20

    The solar irradiance curves compiled by Wehrli [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Publ. 615 (World Radiation Center, Davosdorf, Switzerland, 1985)] and by Neckel and Labs [Sol. Phys. 90, 205 (1984)] are widely used. These curves were obtained based on measurements of solar radiation from the ground and from aircraft platforms. Contaminations in these curves by atmospheric gaseous absorptions were inevitable. A technique for deriving the transmittance spectrum of the Sun's atmosphere from high-resolution (0.01 cm(-1)) solar occultation spectra measured above the Earth's atmosphere by the use of atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) aboard the space shuttle is described. The comparisons of the derived ATMOS solar transmittance spectrum with the two solar irradiance curves show that he curve derived by Wehrli contains many absorption features in the 2.0-2.5-µm region that are not of solar origin, whereas the curve obtained by Neckel and Labs is completely devoid of weak solar absorption features that should be there. An Earth atmospheric oxygen band at 1.268 µm and a water-vapor band near 0.94 µm are likely present in the curve obtained by Wehrli. It is shown that the solar irradiance measurement errors in some narrow spectral intervals can be as large as 20%. An improved solar irradiance spectrum is formed by the incorporation of the solar transmittance spectrum derived from the ATMOS data into the solar irradiance spectrum from Neckel and Labs. The availability of a new solar spectrum from 50 to 50 000 cm(-1) from the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is also discussed.

  15. Infrared, visible and ultraviolet absorptions of transition metal doped ZnS crystals with spin-polarized bands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.H.; Ding, J.W.; Cao, J.X.; Zhang, Y.L.

    2011-03-15

    The formation energies, electronic structures and optical properties of TM:ZnS systems (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) are investigated by using the first principles method. It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures have about the same stability, and thus can coexist in the TM:ZnS system. From the wurtzite TM:ZnS, especially, a partially filled intermediate band (IB) is obtained at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, while it is absent at TM=Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. The additional absorptions are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions, due to the completely spin-polarized IB at Fermi level. The results are very helpful for both the designs and applications of TM:ZnS opto-electronics devices, such as solar-cell prototype. -- Graphical abstract: Absorption coefficients of w-TM{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S crystals (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) at x=0.028. The results may be helpful for the design and applications of TM:ZnS devices, especially for the new high efficiency solar-cell prototype, UV detector and UV LEDs. Display Omitted Research highlights: > It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures can coexist in TM:ZnS. > An intermediate band is obtained in TM:ZnS at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}. > The absorption coefficients are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet regions.

  16. On the sub-band gap optical absorption in heat treated cadmium sulphide thin film deposited on glass by chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Karim, B.; Guha Roy, S.

    2013-12-28

    The sub-band gap optical absorption in chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films annealed at different temperatures has been critically analyzed with special reference to Urbach relation. It has been found that the absorption co-efficient of the material in the sub-band gap region is nearly constant up to a certain critical value of the photon energy. However, as the photon energy exceeds the critical value, the absorption coefficient increases exponentially indicating the dominance of Urbach rule. The absorption coefficients in the constant absorption region and the Urbach region have been found to be sensitive to annealing temperature. A critical examination of the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient indicates two different kinds of optical transitions to be operative in the sub-band gap region. After a careful analyses of SEM images, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, and the dc current-voltage characteristics, we conclude that the absorption spectra in the sub-band gap domain is possibly associated with optical transition processes involving deep levels and the grain boundary states of the material.

  17. Broad Band Light Absorption and High Photocurrent of (In,Ga)N Nanowire Photoanodes Resulting from a Radial Stark Effect.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Bogdanoff, Peter; Corfdir, Pierre; Brandt, Oliver; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-12-21

    The photoelectrochemical properties of (In,Ga)N nanowire photoanodes are investigated using H2O2 as a hole scavenger to prevent photocorrosion. Under simulated solar illumination, In0.16Ga0.84N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy show a high photocurrent of 2.7 mA/cm(2) at 1.2 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode. This value is almost the theoretical maximum expected from the corresponding band gap (2.8 eV) for homogeneous bulk material without taking into account surface effects. These nanowires exhibit a higher incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency over a broader wavelength range and a higher photocurrent than a compact layer with higher In content of 28%. These results are explained by the combination of built-in electric fields at the nanowire sidewall surfaces and compositional fluctuations in (In,Ga)N, which gives rise to a radial Stark effect. This effect enables spatially indirect transitions at energies much lower than the band gap. The resulting broad band light absorption leads to high photocurrents. This benefit of the radial Stark effect in (In,Ga)N nanowires for solar harvesting applications opens up the perspective to break the theoretical limit for photocurrents.

  18. Detection of ocean glint and ozone absorption using LCROSS Earth observations

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Ennico, Kimberly; Meadows, Victoria S.; Sparks, William; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Bussey, D. Ben J.; Breiner, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) observed the distant Earth on three occasions in 2009. These data span a range of phase angles, including a rare crescent phase view. For each epoch, the satellite acquired near-infrared and mid-infrared full-disk images, and partial-disk spectra at 0.26-0.65 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 500) and 1.17-2.48 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 50). Spectra show strong absorption features due to water vapor and ozone, which is a biosignature gas. We perform a significant recalibration of the UV-visible spectra and provide the first comparison of high-resolution visible Earth spectra to the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional spectral Earth model. We find good agreement with the observations, reproducing the absolute brightness and dynamic range at all wavelengths for all observation epochs, thus validating the model to within the ∼10% data calibration uncertainty. Data-model comparisons reveal a strong ocean glint signature in the crescent phase data set, which is well matched by our model predictions throughout the observed wavelength range. This provides the first observational test of a technique that could be used to determine exoplanet habitability from disk-integrated observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, where the glint signal is strongest. We examine the detection of the ozone 255 nm Hartley and 400-700 nm Chappuis bands. While the Hartley band is the strongest ozone feature in Earth's spectrum, false positives for its detection could exist. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for future exoplanet characterization missions.

  19. Detection of dual-band infrared small target based on joint dynamic sparse representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jinwei; Li, Jicheng; Shi, Zhiguang; Lu, Xiaowei; Ren, Dongwei

    2015-10-01

    Infrared small target detection is a crucial and yet still is a difficult issue in aeronautic and astronautic applications. Sparse representation is an important mathematic tool and has been used extensively in image processing in recent years. Joint sparse representation is applied in dual-band infrared dim target detection in this paper. Firstly, according to the characters of dim targets in dual-band infrared images, 2-dimension Gaussian intensity model was used to construct target dictionary, then the dictionary was classified into different sub-classes according to different positions of Gaussian function's center point in image block; The fact that dual-band small targets detection can use the same dictionary and the sparsity doesn't lie in atom-level but in sub-class level was utilized, hence the detection of targets in dual-band infrared images was converted to be a joint dynamic sparse representation problem. And the dynamic active sets were used to describe the sparse constraint of coefficients. Two modified sparsity concentration index (SCI) criteria was proposed to evaluate whether targets exist in the images. In experiments, it shows that the proposed algorithm can achieve better detecting performance and dual-band detection is much more robust to noise compared with single-band detection. Moreover, the proposed method can be expanded to multi-spectrum small target detection.

  20. Fluorinated graphene oxide for enhanced S and X-band microwave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sudeep, P. M.; Vinayasree, S.; Mohanan, P.; Ajayan, P. M.; Narayanan, T. N.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Here we report the microwave absorbing properties of three graphene derivatives, namely, graphene oxide (GO), fluorinated GO (FGO, containing 5.6 at. % Fluorine (F)), and highly FGO (HFGO, containing 23 at. % F). FGO is known to be exhibiting improved electrochemical and electronic properties when compared to GO. Fluorination modifies the dielectric properties of GO and hence thought of as a good microwave absorber. The dielectric permittivities of GO, FGO, and HFGO were estimated in the S (2 GHz to 4 GHz) and X (8 GHz to 12 GHz) bands by employing cavity perturbation technique. For this, suspensions containing GO/FGO/HFGO were made in N-Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP) and were subjected to cavity perturbation. The reflection loss was then estimated and it was found that −37 dB (at 3.2 GHz with 6.5 mm thickness) and −31 dB (at 2.8 GHz with 6 mm thickness) in the S band and a reflection loss of −18 dB (at 8.4 GHz with 2.5 mm thickness) and −10 dB (at 11 GHz with 2 mm thickness) in the X band were achieved for 0.01 wt. % of FGO and HFGO in NMP, respectively, suggesting that these materials can serve as efficient microwave absorbers even at low concentrations.

  1. VUV Fourier-transform absorption study of the Lyman and Werner bands in D2.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Arno; Dickenson, Gareth D; Salumbides, Edcel J; Ubachs, Wim; de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Nahon, Laurent

    2012-06-21

    An extensive survey of the D(2) absorption spectrum has been performed with the high-resolution VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer employing synchrotron radiation. The frequency range of 90,000-119,000 cm(-1) covers the full depth of the potential wells of the B (1)Σ(u)(+), B' (1)Σ(u)(+), and C (1)Π(u) electronic states up to the D(1s) + D(2l) dissociation limit. Improved level energies of rovibrational levels have been determined up to respectively v = 51, v = 13, and v = 20. Highest resolution is achieved by probing absorption in a molecular gas jet with slit geometry, as well as in a liquid helium cooled static gas cell, resulting in line widths of ≈0.35 cm(-1). Extended calibration methods are employed to extract line positions of D(2) lines at absolute accuracies of 0.03 cm(-1). The D (1)Π(u) and B'' (1)Σ(u)(+) electronic states correlate with the D(1s) + D(3l]) dissociation limit, but support a few vibrational levels below the second dissociation limit, respectively, v = 0-3 and v = 0-1, and are also included in the presented study. The complete set of resulting level energies is the most comprehensive and accurate data set for D(2). The observations are compared with previous studies, both experimental and theoretical.

  2. Chromosomal rearrangements detected by FISH and G-banding.

    PubMed

    Hou, J W; Wang, T R

    1996-09-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using chromosome-specific DNA libraries as painting probes, locus-specific unique sequence (cosmid) probes, and Y-specific repetitive sequences was applied in the analysis of eighteen cases of chromosomal rearrangements of undetermined nature. FISH clarified the origin of the extra or translocated chromosome segments in seventeen patients, one with 2q+, two with 4q+, one each with 6p+, 7p+, 9q+, 10p+, 11q+ and 12p+, two with 13q+, and one each with 15q+, 17p+, 18p+, 20p+, 21p+ and Yq+, as well as the nature of a de novo supernumerary chromosome marker in a previously reported case. By G-banding and molecular cytogenetic studies of the family members, six cases were determined to have unbalanced translocations inherited from the carrier parent. The extra translocated genetic material may cause specific trisomic syndromes, including partial 6p21.3-p23, 9q32-q34.3, 13q32-q34, 15q24-q26, and 17p11.2-p13 trisomies in those patients. A translocated 21q segment on 12p was shown by a painting probe in a patient with Down features. A patient with cat cry syndrome resulting from a loss of the terminal segment of the short arm of chromosome 5 was confirmed by a cosmid probe showing de novo reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 5 and 18:t(5;18) (p13.3;p11.31). With FISH, the extra material on the rearranged chromosome could also be identified as duplicated or translocated. The FISH technique thus provides a method for the analysis of extra structurally abnormal chromosomes (especially in de novo cases), recognizable syndromes (contiguous gene syndromes) caused by translocated deletion from parental balanced chromosome rearrangements, and supernumerary marker chromosomes. FISH subsequent to G-banding is also of great help in the confirmation of preliminary abnormal G-banded karyotypes after a modified destaining procedure. In conclusion, the combination of G-banding and FISH is very useful in the accurate diagnosis of chromosomal

  3. Ultrasensitive molecular absorption detection using metal slot antenna arrays.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Kwang Jun; Bahk, Young-Mi; Kim, Dai-Sik; Kyoung, Jisoo; Rotermund, Fabian

    2015-07-27

    We theoretically study the transmission reduction of light passing through absorptive molecules embedded in a periodic metal slot array in a near infrared wavelength regime. From the analytically solved transmitted light, we present a simple relation given by the attenuation length of light at the resonance wavelength of the slot antennas with respect to the spectral width of the resonant transmission peak. This relation clearly explains that the control of the transmission reduction even with very low absorptive materials is possible. We investigate also the transmission reduction by absorptive molecules in a real metallic slot antenna array on a dielectric substrate and compare the results with finite difference time domain calculations. In numerical calculations, we demonstrate that the same amount of transmission reduction by a bulk absorptive material can be achieved only with one-hundredth thickness of the same material when it is embedded in an optimized Fano-resonant slot antenna array. Our relation presented in this study can contribute to label-free chemical and biological sensing as an efficient design and performance criterion for periodic slot antenna arrays.

  4. Would the solvent effect be the main cause of band shift in the theoretical absorption spectrum of large lanthanide complexes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rodrigues, Nailton M.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Gimenez, Iara F.; da Costa Junior, Nivan B.

    2011-06-01

    As most reactions take place in solution, the study of solvent effects on relevant molecular properties - either by experimental or theoretical methods - is crucial for the design of new processes and prediction of technological properties. In spite of this, only few works focusing the influence of the solvent nature specifically on the spectroscopic properties of lanthanide complexes can be found in the literature. The present work describes a theoretical study of the solvent effect on the prediction of the absorption spectra for lanthanide complexes, but other possible relevant factors have been also considered such as the molecular geometry and the excitation window used for interaction configuration (CI) calculations. The [Eu(ETA) 2· nH 2O] +1 complex has been chosen as an ideal candidate for this type of study due to its small number of atoms (only 49) and also because the absorption spectrum exhibits a single band. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed, the first one considering the [Eu(ETA) 2] +1 complex in 400 water molecules, evidencing that the complex presents four coordinated water molecules. The second simulation considered the [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex in 400 ethanol molecules, in order to evaluate the solvent effect on the shift of the maximum absorption in calculated spectra, compared to the experimental one. Quantum chemical studies were also performed in order to evaluate the effect of the accuracy of calculated ground state geometry on the prediction of absorption spectra. The influence of the excitation window used for CI calculations on the spectral shift was also evaluated. No significant solvent effect was found on the prediction of the absorption spectrum for [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex. A small but significant effect of the ground state geometry on the transition energy and oscillator strength was also observed. Finally it must be emphasized that the absorption spectra of lanthanide complexes can be predicted with great accuracy

  5. On the Use of Difference Bands for Modeling SF_6 Absorption in the 10μm Atmospheric Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Mbaye; Manceron, Laurent; Roy, P.; Boudon, Vincent; Loete, Michel

    2016-06-01

    To model correctly the SF_6 atmospheric absorption requires the knowledge of the spectroscopic parameters of all states involved in the numerous hot bands in the 10,5μm atmospheric transparency window. However, due to their overlapping, a direct analysis of the hot bands near the 10,5μm absorption of SF_6 in the atmospheric window is not possible. It is necessary to use another strategy, gathering information in the far and mid infrared regions on initial and final states to compute the relevant total absorption. In this talk, we present new results from the analysis of spectra recorded at the AILES beamline at the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility. For these measurements, we used a IFS125HR interferometer combined with the synchrotron radiation in the 100-3200 wn range, coupled to a cryogenic multiple pass cell. The optical path length was varied from 45 to 141m with measuring temperatures between 223 and 153+/-5 K. The new information obtained on νb{2}+νb{4}-νb{5}, 2νb{5}-νb{6} and νb{3}+νb{6}-νb{4} allowed to derive improved parameters for νb{5}, 2νb{5} and νb{3}+νb{6}. In turn, they are used to model the more important νb{3}+νb{5}-νb{5} and νb{3}+νb{6}-νb{6} hot band contributions. By including these new parameters in the XTDS model, we substantially improved the SF_6 parameters used to model the atmosphere. F. Kwabia Tchana, F. Willaert, X. Landsheere, J. M. Flaud, L. Lago, M. Chapuis, P. Roy, L. Manceron. A new, low temperature long-pass cell for mid-IR to THz Spectroscopy and Synchrotron Radiation Use. Rev. Sci. Inst. 84, 093101, (2013) C. Wenger, V. Boudon, M. Rotger, M. Sanzharov, and J.-P. Champion,"XTDS and SPVIEW: Graphical tools for Analysis and Simulation of High Resolution Molecular Spectra", J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 102 (2008)

  6. A thermal broadening analysis of absorption spectra of the D1/D2/cytochrome b-559 complex in terms of Gaussian decomposition sub-bands.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, R; Zucchelli, G; Garlaschi, F M; Finzi, L; Jennings, R C

    1995-11-21

    Absorption spectra of the isolated D1/D2/cytochrome b-559 complex have been measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. All spectra were analyzed in terms of a linear combination of Gaussian bands and the thermal broadening data interpreted in terms of a model in which the spectrum of each pigment site is broadened by (a) a homogeneous component due to linear electron-phonon coupling to a low-frequency protein vibration and (b) an inhomogeneous component associated with stochastic fluctuations at each pigment site. In order to obtain a numerically adequate description of the absorption spectra, a minimum number of five sub-bands is required. Further refinement of this sub-band description was achieved by taking into account published data from hole burning and absorption difference spectroscopy. In this way, both a six sub-band description and a seven sub-band description were generated. In arriving at the seven sub-band description, the original five sub-band wavelength positions were essentially unchanged. Thermal broadening analysis of the seven sub-band description yielded data which displayed the closest correspondence with the literature observations. The wavelength positions of the sub-bands were near 661, 667, 670, and 675 nm, with two bands near 680 and 684 nm. The two almost isoenergetic sub-bands near 680 nm, identified as P680 and pheophytin, have optical reorganization energies around 40 and 16 cm-1, respectively. All other sub-bands, identified as accessory pigments, have optical reorganization energies close to 16 cm-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Europa's ultraviolet absorption band (260 to 320 nm) - Temporal and spatial evidence from IUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert, Maureen E.; Nelson, Robert M.; Lane, Arthur L.; Matson, Dennis L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of 33 IUE UV spectra of Europa, obtained from 1978 to 1982 for orbital phase angles of 21 to 343 deg, confirms that the Lane et al. (1981) absorption feature, centered at 280 nm, is most clearly revealed when 223-333 deg orbital phase angle spectra are ratioed to those nearest 90 deg. The feature's strength is noted to have persisted over the 5-year period studied, suggesting that no large endogenically or exogenically generated changes in surface sulfur dioxide concentration have occurred. These results further substantiate the Lane et al. hypothesis that the feature is due to the implantation of Io plasma torus-derived sulfur ions on the Europa trailing side's water-ice surface.

  8. Optimizing organic photovoltaics using tailored heterojunctions: A photoinduced absorption study of oligothiophenes with low band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueppel, R.; Schmidt, K.; Uhrich, C.; Schulze, K.; Wynands, D.; Brédas, J. L.; Brier, E.; Reinold, E.; Bu, H.-B.; Baeuerle, P.; Maennig, B.; Pfeiffer, M.; Leo, K.

    2008-02-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 3.4% with an open-circuit voltage of 1V was recently demonstrated in a thin film solar cell utilizing fullerene C60 as acceptor and a new acceptor-substituted oligothiophene with an optical gap of 1.77eV as donor [K. Schulze , Adv. Mater. (Weinheim, Ger.) 18, 2872 (2006)]. This prompted us to systematically study the energy- and electron transfer processes at the oligothiophene:fullerene heterojunction for a homologous series of these oligothiophenes. Cyclic voltammetry and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data show that the heterojunction is modified due to tuning of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy for different oligothiophene chain lengths, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy remains essentially fixed due to the presence of electron-withdrawing end groups (dicyanovinyl) attached to the oligothiophene. Use of photoinduced absorption (PA) allows the study of the electron transfer process at the heterojunction to C60 . Quantum-chemical calculations performed at the density functional theory and/or time-dependent density functional theory level and cation absorption spectra of diluted DCVnT provide an unambiguous identification of the transitions observed in the PA spectra. Upon increasing the effective energy gap of the donor-acceptor pair by increasing the ionization energy of the donor, photoinduced electron transfer is eventually replaced with energy transfer, which alters the photovoltaic operation conditions. The optimum open-circuit voltage of a solar cell is thus a trade-off between efficient charge separation at the interface and maximized effective gap. It appears that the open-circuit voltages of 1.0-1.1V in our solar cell devices have reached an optimum since higher voltages result in a loss in charge separation efficiency.

  9. Preliminary Analysis of X-Band and Ka-Band Radar for Use in the Detection of Icing Conditions Aloft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reehorst, Andrew L.; Koenig, George G.

    2004-01-01

    NASA and the U.S. Army Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory (CRREL) have an on-going activity to develop remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of icing conditions aloft. Radar has been identified as a strong tool for this work. However, since the remote detection of icing conditions with the intent to identify areas of icing hazard is a new and evolving capability, there are no set requirements for radar sensitivity. This work is an initial attempt to quantify, through analysis, the sensitivity requirements for an icing remote sensing radar. The primary radar of interest for cloud measurements is Ka-band, however, since NASA is currently using an X-band unit, this frequency is also examined. Several aspects of radar signal analysis were examined. Cloud reflectivity was calculated for several forms of cloud using two different techniques. The Air Force Geophysical Laboratory (AFGL) cloud models, with different drop spectra represented by a modified gamma distribution, were utilized to examine several categories of cloud formation. Also a fundamental methods approach was used to allow manipulation of the cloud droplet size spectra. And an analytical icing radar simulator was developed to examine the complete radar system response to a configurable multi-layer cloud environment. Also discussed is the NASA vertical pointing X-band radar. The radar and its data system are described, and several summer weather events are reviewed.

  10. Thermodynamic consequence of the new attribution of bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of electron donor-iodine-solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Sergey P.

    1999-06-01

    The subject review pays attention to the peculiarities in behaviour of bands in the electronic absorption spectra of electron donor-iodine-solvent systems, the appearance of which is associated with the intermolecular interaction of molecular iodine with electron donor organic molecules. The new concept of the bands’ attribution to the isomeric equilibrium molecular charge-transfer complexes (CTCs) of CTC-I and CTC-II types is considered. The features of possible phase transitions in the solid state are discussed on the basis of the thermodynamic properties and electronic structures of the CTC-I and CTC-II in electron donor-iodine-solvent systems. The stabilisation of the CTC-II structure with the temperature lowering coincided in many cases with the electrons’ localisation in the solid state structures having charge-transfer bonds.

  11. Depolarisation of light scattered by disperse systems of low-dimensional potassium polytitanate nanoparticles in the fundamental absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnyakov, D A; Yuvchenko, S A; Pravdin, A B; Kochubey, V I; Gorokhovsky, A V; Tretyachenko, E V; Kunitsky, A I

    2014-07-31

    The results of experimental studies of depolarising properties of disperse systems on the basis of potassium polytitanate nanoplatelets and nanoribbons in the visible and near-UV spectral regions are presented. It is shown that in the fundamental absorption band of the nanoparticle material the increase in the depolarisation factor takes place for the radiation scattered perpendicularly to the direction of the probing beam. For nanoribbons a pronounced peak of depolarisation is observed, which is caused by the essential anisotropy of the particles shape and the peculiarities of the behaviour of the material dielectric function. The empirical data are compared with the theoretical results for 'nanodiscs' and 'nanoneedles' with the model dielectric function, corresponding to that obtained from optical constants of the titanium dioxide dielectric function. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-A diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorption features of astronomical spectra are suggested by recent results to be separable from the grains that cause visual extinction. Attention is presently given to laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10(+), which is one of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular candidates proposed as carriers for DIBs. This ion exhibits an intense but strangely broad continuum similar to that of the naphthalene cation, so that this may be a common feature of all PAH cations and the basis of an explanation for PAHs' converting of an interstellar radiation fraction as large as that from the UV and visible range down to the IR.

  13. Calibration of VIIRS F1 Sensor Fire Detection Band Using lunar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Jeff; Efremova, Boryana; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Fight 1 (Fl) sensor includes a fire detection band at roughly 4 microns. This spectral band has two gain states; fire detection occurs in the low gain state above approximately 345 K. The thermal bands normally utilize an on-board blackbody to provide on-orbit calibration. However, as the maximum temperature of this blackbody is 315 K, the low gain state of the 4 micron band cannot be calibrated in the same manner as the rest of the thermal bands. Regular observations of the moon provide an alternative calibration source. The lunar surface temperature has been recently mapped by the DIVINER sensor on the LRO platform. The periodic on-board high gain calibration along with the DIVINER surface temperatures was used to determine the emissivity and solar reflectance of the lunar surface at 4 microns; these factors and the lunar data are then used to fit the low gain calibration coefficients of the 4 micron band. Furthermore, the emissivity of the lunar surface is well known near 8.5 microns due to the Christiansen feature (an emissivity maximum associated with Si-O stretching vibrations) and the solar reflectance is negligible. Thus, the 8.5 micron band is used for relative calibration with the 4 micron band to de-trend any temporal variations. In addition, the remaining thermal bands are analyzed in a similar fashion, with both calculated emissivities and solar reflectances produced.

  14. Comparison of line-by-line and band models of near-IR methane absorption applied to outer planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M.; Boudon, V.; Campargue, A.; Nikitin, A.

    2012-03-01

    Recent improvements in high spectral resolution measurements of methane absorption at wavenumbers between 4800 cm-1 and 7919 cm-1 have greatly increased the number of lines with known lower state energies, the number of weak lines, and the number of lines observed at low temperatures (Campargue, A., Wang, L., Kassi, S., Mašát, M., Votava, O. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1141-1151; Campargue, A., Wang, L., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Kassi, S. [2010]. Chem. Phys. 373, 203-210; Mondelain, D., Kassi, S., Wang, L.C. [2011]. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 7985-7996; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2011a]. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 268, 93-106; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 2211-2224; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Campargue, A. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1130-1140; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Campargue, A. [2011]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 112, 937-951), making it possible to fit near-IR spectra of Titan using line-by-line calculations instead of band models (Bailey, J., Ahlsved, L., Meadows, V.S. [2011]. Icarus 213, 218-232; de Bergh, C. et al. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2011.05.003). Using these new results, we compiled an improved line list relative that used by Bailey et al. by updating several spectral regions with either calculated or more recently measured line parameters, revising lower state energy estimates for lines lacking them, and adding room temperature lines to make the list applicable over a wider range of temperatures. We compared current band models with line-by-line calculations using this new line list, both to assess the behavior of band models, and to identify remaining issues with line-by-line calculations when applied to outer planet atmospheres and over a wider range of wavelengths. Comparisons were made for a selection of uniform paths representing outer planet conditions and for representative non-uniform paths within the atmospheres of Uranus, Saturn

  15. Anomalous band gap behavior in mixed Sn and Pb perovskites enables broadening of absorption spectrum in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Chang, Robert P H; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2014-06-04

    Perovskite-based solar cells have recently been catapulted to the cutting edge of thin-film photovoltaic research and development because of their promise for high-power conversion efficiencies and ease of fabrication. Two types of generic perovskites compounds have been used in cell fabrication: either Pb- or Sn-based. Here, we describe the performance of perovskite solar cells based on alloyed perovskite solid solutions of methylammonium tin iodide and its lead analogue (CH3NH3Sn(1-x)Pb(x)I3). We exploit the fact that, the energy band gaps of the mixed Pb/Sn compounds do not follow a linear trend (the Vegard's law) in between these two extremes of 1.55 and 1.35 eV, respectively, but have narrower bandgap (<1.3 eV), thus extending the light absorption into the near-infrared (~1,050 nm). A series of solution-processed solid-state photovoltaic devices using a mixture of organic spiro-OMeTAD/lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide/pyridinium additives as hole transport layer were fabricated and studied as a function of Sn to Pb ratio. Our results show that CH3NH3Sn(0.5)Pb(0.5)I3 has the broadest light absorption and highest short-circuit photocurrent density ~20 mA cm(-2) (obtained under simulated full sunlight of 100 mW cm(-2)).

  16. The first UV absorption band for indole is not due to two simultaneous orthogonal electronic transitions differing in dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Javier

    2015-05-21

    The currently accepted model for the photophysics of indole assumes that the first UV absorption band encompasses two orthogonal electronic transitions ((1)Lb and (1)La), leading to two electronic states with a markedly different dipole moment. However, there is a body of evidence not explained by this model, which led us to develop a new photophysical model for indole. Based on the new model, the polarity of the electronic ground state (S0) in indoles is very similar to that of the first electronic excited state (S1) producing this structured emission; however, this excited state can lead to a highly dipolar excited state (S1') with largely structureless emission under the influence of the polarity of the medium, and also, very likely, of its viscosity. The molecular structure of the new excited state can be reversibly converted into the normal structure of the compound. Previous observations were confirmed by the absorption, emission, and excitation spectra for indole, as well as by its polarized emission and excitation spectra in various media. Thus, the polarized emission spectra for indole in glycerol at 283 K and 223 K showed the transition dipole moments for the emission from the first two excited states in a polar medium, S1 and S1', to differ by less than 20°.

  17. Prototype explosives detection system based on nuclear resonance absorption in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Morgado, R.E.; Arnone, G.; Cappiello, C.C.; Gardner, S.D.; Hollas, C.L.; Ussery, L.E.; White, J.M.; Zahrt, J.D.; Krauss, R.A.

    1993-12-01

    A-prototype explosives detection system that was developed for experimental evaluation of a nuclear resonance absorption techniques is described. The major subsystems are a proton accelerator and beam transport, high-temperature proton target, an airline-luggage tomographic inspection station, and an image-processing/detection- alarm subsystem. The detection system performance, based on a limited experimental test, is reported.

  18. The Fundamental Quadrupole Band of (14)N2: Line Positions from High-Resolution Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Grunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to report accurate measurements of the positions of O- and S-branch lines of the (1-0) vibration-rotation quadrupole band of molecular nitrogen ((14)N2) and improved Dunham coefficients derived from a simultaneous least-squares analysis of these measurements and selected infrared and far infrared data taken from the literature. The new measurements have been derived from stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded with Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) instruments operated at unapodized spectral resolutions of 0.002 and 0.01 /cm. The motivation for the present investigation is the need for improved N2 line parameters for use in IR atmospheric remote sensing investigations. The S branch of the N2 (1-0) quadrupole band is ideal for calibrating the line-of-sight airmasses of atmospheric spectra since the strongest lines are well placed in an atmospheric window, their absorption is relatively insensitive to temperature and is moderately strong (typical line center depths of 10 to 50% in high-resolution ground-based solar spectra and in lower stratospheric solar occultation spectra), and the volume mixing ratio of nitrogen is constant in the atmosphere and well known. However, a recent investigation has'shown the need to improve the accuracies of the N2 fine positions, intensities, air-broadened half-widths, and their temperature dependences to fully exploit this calibration capability (1). The present investigation addresses the problem of improving the accuracy of the N2 line positions.

  19. Visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum during the New Horizons encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert J.; Marchant, Jonathan M.

    2015-11-01

    Whilst Earth-based observations obviously cannot compete with New Horizons’ on-board instrumentation in most regards, the New Horizons data set is essentially a snapshot of Pluto in July 2015. The New Horizons project team therefore coordinated a broad international observing campaign to provide temporal context and to take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to directly link our Earth-based view of Pluto with “ground truth” provided by in situ measurements. This both adds value to existing archival data sets and forms the basis of long term, monitoring as we watch Pluto recede from the Sun over the coming years. We present visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum over the period July - October 2015 from the Liverpool Telescope (LT). In particular we wished to understand the well-known 6-day fluctuation in the methane ice absorption spectrum which is observable from Earth in relation to the never-before-available high resolution maps of the Pluto surface. The LT is a fully robotic 2.0m optical telescope that automatically and dynamically schedules observations across 30+ observing programmes with a broad instrument suite. It is ideal for both reactive response to dynamic events (such as the fly-by) and long term, stable monitoring with timing constraints individually optimised to the science requirements of each programme. For example past studies of the observed CH4 absorption variability have yielded ambiguity of whether they were caused by real physical changes or geometric observation constraints, in large part because of the uneven time sampling imposed by traditional telescope scheduling.

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  1. Detection of marine methane emissions with AVIRIS band ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Eliza S.; Leifer, Ira; Roberts, Dar A.; Dennison, Philip E.; Washburn, Libe

    2011-05-01

    The relative source contributions of methane (CH4) have high uncertainty, creating a need for local-scale characterization in concert with global satellite measurements. However, efforts towards methane plume imaging have yet to provide convincing results for concentrated sources. Although atmospheric CH4 mapping did not motivate the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) design, recent studies suggest its potential for studying concentrated CH4 sources such as the Coal Oil Point (COP) seep field (˜0.015 Tg CH4 yr-1) offshore Santa Barbara, California. In this study, we developed a band ratio approach on high glint COP AVIRIS data and demonstrate the first successful local-scale remote sensing mapping of natural atmospheric CH4 plumes. Plume origins closely matched surface and sonar-derived seepage distributions, with plume characteristics consistent with wind advection. Imaging spectrometer data may also be useful for high spatial-resolution characterization of concentrated, globally-significant CH4 emissions from offshore platforms and cattle feedlots.

  2. Detectability of cold streams into high-redshift galaxies by absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Dekel, Avishai; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Ceverino, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Cold gas streaming along the dark matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major source of fuel for disc buildup, violent disc instability and star formation in massive galaxies at high redshift. We investigate to what extent such cold gas is detectable in the extended circumgalactic environment of galaxies via Lyα absorption and selected low-ionization metal absorption lines. We model the expected absorption signatures using high-resolution zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations. In the post-processing, we distinguish between self-shielded gas and unshielded gas. In the self-shielded gas, which is optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation, we assume pure collisional ionization for species with an ionization potential greater than 13.6 eV. In the optically-thin, unshielded gas, these species are also photoionized by the metagalactic radiation. In addition to absorption of radiation from background quasars, we compute the absorption line profiles of radiation emitted by the galaxy at the centre of the same halo. We predict the strength of the absorption signal for individual galaxies without stacking. We find that the Lyα absorption profiles produced by the streams are consistent with observations of absorption and emission Lyα profiles in high-redshift galaxies. Due to the low metallicities in the streams, and their low covering factors, the metal absorption features are weak and difficult to detect.

  3. Characterizing Protein Complexes with UV absorption, Light Scattering, and Refractive Index Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainoff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Many modern pharmaceuticals and naturally occurring biomolecules consist of complexes of proteins and polyethylene glycol or carbohydrates. In the case of vaccine development, these complexes are often used to induce or amplify immune responses. For protein therapeutics they are used to modify solubility and function, or to control the rate of degradation and elimination of a drug from the body. Characterizing the stoichiometry of these complexes is an important industrial problem that presents a formidable challenge to analytical instrument designers. Traditional analytical methods, such as using florescent tagging, chemical assays, and mass spectrometry perturb the system so dramatically that the complexes are often destroyed or uncontrollably modified by the measurement. A solution to this problem consists of fractionating the samples and then measuring the fractions using sequential non-invasive detectors that are sensitive to different components of the complex. We present results using UV absorption, which is primarily sensitive to the protein fraction, Light Scattering, which measures the total weight average molar mass, and Refractive Index detection, which measures the net concentration. We also present a solution of the problem inter-detector band-broadening problem that has heretofore made this approach impractical. Presented will be instrumentation and an analysis method that overcome these obstacles and make this technique a reliable and robust way of non-invasively characterizing these industrially important compounds.

  4. [Colon adenoma detection using Kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein bands].

    PubMed

    Wei, Hua-Jiang; Guo, Zhou-Yi; Xie, Shu-Sen; He, Bo-Hua; Li, Li-Bo; Chen, Xue-Mei; Wu, Guo-Yong; Lu, Jian-Jun

    2009-06-01

    Differential diagnosis of human colon adenoma was studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 590 to 1 064 nm pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 218% (p < 0.05) and 68.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. Pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 208% (p < 0.05) and 59.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. Pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant differences in the averaged values of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log [f(r infinity)] of the beta-carotene absorption bands at 480 nm between normal and adenomatous colon epithelial tissues, and the differences were 41.7% (p < 0.05) and 32.9% (p < 0.05) respectively. Obviously, pathological changes of colon epithelial tissues were induced so that there were significant changes in the contents of the DNA, protein and beta-carotene of colon epithelial tissues. The conclusion can be applied to rapid, low-cost and noninvasive optical biopsy of colon adenoma, and provides a useful reference.

  5. Three-pulse femtosecond spectroscopy of PbSe nanocrystals: 1S bleach nonlinearity and sub-band-edge excited-state absorption assignment.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Itay; Shapiro, Arthur; Yang, Chunfan; Yanover, Diana; Lifshitz, Efrat; Ruhman, Sanford

    2015-02-24

    Above band-edge photoexcitation of PbSe nanocrystals induces strong below band gap absorption as well as a multiphased buildup of bleaching in the 1Se1Sh transition. The amplitudes and kinetics of these features deviate from expectations based on biexciton shifts and state filling, which are the mechanisms usually evoked to explain them. To clarify these discrepancies, the same transitions are investigated here by double-pump-probe spectroscopy. Re-exciting in the below band gap induced absorption characteristic of hot excitons is shown to produce additional excitons with high probability. In addition, pump-probe experiments on a sample saturated with single relaxed excitons prove that the resulting 1Se1Sh bleach is not linear with the number of excitons per nanocrystal. This finding holds for two samples differing significantly in size, demonstrating its generality. Analysis of the results suggests that below band edge induced absorption in hot exciton states is due to excited-state absorption and not to shifted absorption of cold carriers and that 1Se1Sh bleach signals are not an accurate counter of sample excitons when their distribution includes multiexciton states.

  6. Oil detection in the coastal marshes of Louisiana using MESMA applied to band subsets of AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Seth H.; Roberts, Dar A.; Beland, Michael; Kokaly, Raymond F.; Ustin, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    We mapped oil presence in the marshes of Barataria Bay, Louisiana following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill using Airborne Visible InfraRed Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) data. Oil and non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) have very similar spectra, differing only in two narrow hydrocarbon absorption regions around 1700 and 2300 nm. Confusion between NPV and oil is expressed as an increase in oil fraction error with increasing NPV, as shown by Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) applied to synthetic spectra generated with known endmember fractions. Significantly, the magnitude of error varied depending upon the type of NPV in the mixture. To reduce error, we used stable zone unmixing to identify a nine band subset that emphasized the hydrocarbon absorption regions, allowing for more accurate detection of oil presence using MESMA. When this band subset was applied to post-spill AVIRIS data acquired over Barataria Bay on several dates following the 2010 oil spill, accuracies ranged from 87.5% to 93.3%. Oil presence extended 10.5 m into the marsh for oiled shorelines, showing a reduced oil fraction with increasing distance from the shoreline.

  7. Evaluation of ammonia absorption coefficients by photoacoustic spectroscopy for detection of ammonia levels in human breath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dumitras, D. C.; Dutu, D. C.; Matei, C.; Cernat, R.; Banita, S.; Patachia, M.; Bratu, A. M.; Petrus, M.; Popa, C.

    2011-04-01

    Photoacoustic spectroscopy represents a powerful technique for measuring extremely low absorptions independent of the path length and offers a degree of parameter control that cannot be attained by other methods. We report precise measurements of the ammonia absorption coefficients at the CO2 laser wavelengths by using a photoacoustic (PA) cell in an extracavity configuration and we compare our results with other values reported in the literature. Ammonia presents a clear fingerprint spectrum and high absorption strengths in the CO2 wavelengths region. Because more than 250 molecular gases of environmental concern for atmospheric, industrial, medical, military, and scientific spheres exhibit strong absorption bands in the region 9.2-10.8 μm, we have chosen a frequency tunable CO2 laser. In the present work, ammonia absorption coefficients were measured at both branches of the CO2 laser lines by using a calibrated mixture of 10 ppm NH3 in N2. We found the maximum absorption in the 9 μm region, at 9R(30) line of the CO2 laser. One of the applications based on the ammonia absorption coefficients is used to measure the ammonia levels in exhaled human breath. This can be used to determine the exact time necessary at every session for an optimal degree of dialysis at patients with end-stage renal disease.

  8. Label-free assay for the detection of glucose mediated by the effects of narrowband absorption on quantum dot photoluminescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Saara A.; Smith, Gennifer T.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2014-03-01

    We present a novel strategy for label-free detection of glucose based on CdSe/ZnS core/shell quantum dots (QDs). We exploit the concentration-dependent, narrowband absorption of the hexokinase-glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase enzymatic assay to selectively filter a 365-nm excitation source, leading to a proportional decrease in the photoluminescence intensity of the QDs. The visible wavelength emission of the QDs enables quantitative readout using standard visible detectors (e.g., CCD). Experimental results show highly linear QD photoluminescence over the clinically relevant glucose concentration range of 1-25mM, in excellent agreement with detection methods demonstrated by others. The method has a demonstrated limit of detection of 3.5μM, also on par with the best proposed methods. A significant advantage of our strategy is the complete elimination of QDs as a consumable. In contrast with other methods of QD-based measurement of glucose, our system does not require the glucose solution to be mixed with the QDs, thereby decreasing its overall cost and making it an ideal strategy for point-of-care detection of glucose in low-resource areas. Furthermore, readout can be accomplished with low-cost, portable detectors such as cellular phones, eliminating the need for expensive and bulky spectrophotometers to output quantitative information. The general strategy we present is useful for other biosensing applications involving chemistries with unique absorption peaks falling within the excitation band of available QDs.

  9. Ion-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [Nevada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator); Wetlaufer, P. H.

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A technique which combines digital computer processing and color composition was devised for detecting hydrothermally altered areas and for discriminating among many rock types in an area in south-central Nevada. Subtle spectral reflectance differences among the rock types are enhanced by ratioing and contrast-stretching MSS radiance values for form ratio images which subsequently are displayed in color-ratio composites. Landform analysis of Nevada shows that linear features compiled without respect to length results in approximately 25 percent coincidence with mapped faults. About 80 percent of the major lineaments coincides with mapped faults, and substantial extension of locally mapped faults is commonly indicated. Seven major lineament systems appear to be old zones of crustal weakness which have provided preferred conduits for rising magma through periodic reactivation.

  10. Electrically detected magnetic resonance in a W-band microwave cavity

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, V.; Lo, C. C.; George, R. E.; Lyon, S. A.; Bokor, J.; Schenkel, T.; Ardavan, A.; Morton, J. J. L.

    2011-01-14

    We describe a low-temperature sample probe for the electrical detection of magnetic resonance in a resonant W-band (94 GHz) microwave cavity. The advantages of this approach are demonstrated by experiments on silicon field-effect transistors. A comparison with conventional low-frequency measurements at X-band (9.7 GHz) on the same devices reveals an up to 100-fold enhancement of the signal intensity. In addition, resonance lines that are unresolved at X-band are clearly separated in the W-band measurements. Electrically detected magnetic resonance at high magnetic fields and high microwave frequencies is therefore a very sensitive technique for studying electron spins with an enhanced spectral resolution and sensitivity.

  11. Detection of cm to sub-mm band radio and gamma-ray correlated variability in Fermi bright blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuhrmann, Lars; Larsson, S.; Chiang, J.; Angelakis, E.; Zensus, A.; F-GAMMA Team; Fermi Collaboration

    2014-01-01

    The exact location of the gamma-ray emitting region in blazars is still controversial. In order to attack this problem we performed a detailed statistical cross-correlation analysis between radio (cm/mm/sub-mm wavelengths, F-GAMMA program) and gamma-ray 3.5 year light curves of 54 Fermi bright blazars. In this talk, the main results of this analysis are highlighted including the first significant detection of multi-band radio/gamma-ray correlations using a stacking analysis. The radio bands are usually lagging the gamma rays with average time delays (source frame) ranging between 76+/-23 and 7+/-9 days, systematically decreasing from cm to mm/sub-mm bands following a power-law frequency dependence. The latter is in good agreement with synchrotron self-absorption dominated opacity effects, whereas a (positive) time lag of 12+/-8 days at 3 mm strongly suggests that the bulk gamma-ray production region is usually located within or even upstream of the innermost mm core region of these sources. Based on our findings we finally demonstrate that the gamma-ray emitting region of quasar 3C 454.3 is located at a distance of > 0.8-1.6 pc from the central supermassive black hole, i.e. at the outer edge of the Broad Line Region or beyond.

  12. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  13. CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 {mu}m ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-10-10

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker for exolife. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 {mu}m oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 {mu}m with the IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by midnight. By compiling nearby star catalogs combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if it exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant source of photon noise for the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m band detection comes from the night airglow if the contribution of the stellar point-spread function (PSF) halo is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors, for which the detection contrast is limited by photon noise, can detect the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m absorption band of Earth twins for {approx}50 candidates of the late-type star. This paper demonstrates the importance of deploying a small inner working angle as an efficient coronagraph and extreme adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, and clearly shows that doing so will enable the study of potentially habitable planets.

  14. Radar Detection Performance in Medium Grazing Angle X-band Sea-clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Radar Detection Performance in Medium Grazing Angle X-band Sea-clutter Luke Rosenberg 1 and Stephen Bocquet 2 1 National Security and...detection performance of an airborne surface surveillance radar in the presence of medium grazing angle sea-clutter. In the absence of frequency...interference ratio for a given probability of detection, Pd, will be incorrect by several dB, resulting in over-estimated performance . This report describes a

  15. Influence of temperature and turbidity on water COD detection by UV absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Kun-peng; Bi, Wei-hong; Zhang, Qi-hang; Fu, Xing-hu; Wu, Guo-qing

    2016-11-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy is used to detect the concentration of water chemical oxygen demand (COD). The UV absorption spectra of COD solutions are analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. The partial least square (PLS) algorithm is used to model COD solution and the modeling results are compared. The influence of environmental temperature and turbidity is analyzed. These results show that the influence of temperature on the predicted value can be ignored. However, the change of turbidity can affect the detection results of UV spectra, and the COD detection error can be effectively compensated by establishing the single-element regression model.

  16. Gas trace detection with cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy: a review of its process in the field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Siqi; Luo, Zhifu; Tan, Zhongqi; Long, Xingwu

    2016-11-01

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) is a technology in which the intracavity absorption is deduced from the intensity of light transmitted by the high finesse optical cavity. Then the samples' parameters, such as their species, concentration and absorption cross section, would be detection. It was first proposed and demonstrated by Engeln R. [1] and O'Keefe[2] in 1998. This technology has extraordinary detection sensitivity, high resolution and good practicability, so it is used in many fields , such as clinical medicine, gas detection and basic physics research. In this paper, we focus on the use of gas trace detection, including the advance of CEAS over the past twenty years, the newest research progresses, and the prediction of this technology's development direction in the future.

  17. Improved Experimental Line Positions for the (1,1) Band of the b 1Σ+ - X 3Σ- Transition of O2 by Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Leah C.; O'Brien, Emily C.; O'Brien, James J.

    2012-06-01

    We report improved experimental line positions for the (1,1) band of the b 1Σ+ - X 3Σ- transition of O2. Results are comparised with previous experimental measurements and predicted values. Additionally, a new method of producing vibrationally hot molecules for use in absorption spectroscopy of stable gas phase molecules is described.

  18. [A line-by-line trace gas absorption model and its application in NDIR gas detection technology].

    PubMed

    Fang, Jing; Liu, Wen-qing; Zhang, Tian-shu

    2008-06-01

    An accurate line-by-line integral trace gas absorption model is presented in the present article. It is for mid-infrared band and can be used in the study on and application to detecting trace gas (or pollution gas). First of all, two algorithms of trace gas radioactive properties, line-by-line integral method and band model method, were introduced. The merits and demerits of each were compared. Several recent developed line-by-line integral calculation models were also introduced. Secondly, the basic principle of line-by-line integral trace gas absorption calculation model was described in detail. The absorption coefficient is a function of temperature, frequency (wave number), pressure, gas volume mixing ratio and constants associated with all contributing line transitions. The average monochromatic absorption coefficient at a given frequency of a given gas species can be written as the product of the number density of the molecular species to which the spectral line belongs, the line intensity and a line shape factor. Efficient calculation of the line shape factor may be required for different atmospheric conditions. In the lower atmosphere, the shape of spectral lines is dominated by pressure broadening and can be represented most simply by the Lorentz line shape factor. At high altitudes, the shape of spectral lines is governed by Doppler broadening At intermediate altitudes, they can be modeled using the Voigt line shape factor, a convolution of the Lorentz and Doppler line shape factors. Finally, in the section of experiment, the results calculated by model were compared with that measured by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. As an instance, the model was applied to the detectors design of NDIR (non-dispersive infrared) technology and the relationship between signal intensity of detectors and concentration of CO2/CO was simulated by model. Available concentration range of detector was given by calculating the results of the model. It is based on

  19. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  20. Microwave-assisted synthesis of graphene-Ni composites with enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zetao; Sun, Xin; Li, Guoxian; Xue, Hairong; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Pan, Xuchen; He, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Recently, graphene has been applied as a new microwave absorber because of its high dielectric loss and low density. Nevertheless, the high dielectric constant of pristine graphene has caused unbalanced electromagnetic parameters and results in a bad impedance matching characteristic. In this study, we report a facile microwave-assisted heating approach to produce reduced graphene oxide-nickel (RGO-Ni) composites. The phase and morphology of as-synthesized RGO-Ni composites are characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM and TEM. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with a diameter around 20 nm are grown densely and uniformly on the RGO sheets. In addition, enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band of RGO-Ni composites is mainly due to the synergistic effect of dielectric loss and magnetic loss and the dramatically electron polarizations caused by the formation of large conductive network. The minimum reflection loss of RGO-Ni-2 composite with the thickness of 2 mm can reaches -42 dB at 17.6 GHz. The RGO-Ni composite is an attractive candidate for the new type of high performance microwave absorbing material.

  1. Simple and efficient way to detect small polymorphic bands in plants

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manu; Kim, Seong Ryong; Sharma, Prabodh Chander; Pareek, Ashwani

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to detect polymorphism. In this study we use the microsatellite markers to detect the polymorphism for the salt tolerance. This method has been successfully conducted in Oryza sativa and Brassica juncea. The results are reproducible. In contrast to previous methods, our method is simple and quite accurate for detecting the polymorphic bands. In this study instead of using agarose gel and ethidium bromide staining, we used non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel and a low-cost improved method for silver staining when we compare it to 11 other methods for their ability to detect simple sequence repeat polymorphisms as small as 50 bp in denaturing polyacrylamide gels. All methods detected the same alleles and banding pattern. However, important differences in sensitivity, contrast, time consumption and background were observed. PMID:26484259

  2. Detection of buried mines and explosive objects using dual-band thermal imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lepley, Jason J.; Averill, Michael T.

    2011-06-01

    We demonstrate the development and use of novel image processing methods to combine dual-band (MWIR and LWIR) images from SELEX GALILEO's Condor II camera to extract characteristics of observed scenes comprising buried mines and explosive objects. We discuss the development of a statistical processing technique to extract the different characteristics of the two bands. We further present a statistical classifier used to detect targets on independently trained images with a high detection probability and low false negative rates and discuss methods to mitigate the impact of false positives through the selective processing of image regions and the contextual interpretation of the scene content.

  3. High resolution absorption cross sections in the transmission window region of the Schumann-Runge bands and Herzberg continuum of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements, conducted in the wavelength region 180-195 nm, and at different pressures of oxygen (between 2.5-760 torr) in order to separate the pressure-dependent absorption from the main cross sections, of the absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands in the window region between the rotational lines of S-R bands of O2. The present cross sections supersede the earlier published cross sections (Yoshino et al., 1983). The combined cross sections are presented graphically; they are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm from the National Space Science Data Center. The Herzberg continuum cross sections are derived after subtracting calculated contributions from the Schumann-Runge bands. These are significantly smaller than any previous measurements.

  4. Effect of thickness on microwave absorptive behavior of La-Na doped Co-Zr barium hexaferrites in 18.0-26.5 GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Amit; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal

    2017-02-01

    In this research, the microwave properties of Lanthanum-Sodium doped Cobalt-Zirconium barium hexaferrites, intended as microwave absorbers, are analyzed on Vector Network Analyzer in K-band. The results indicate that the doping has resulted in lowering of real permittivity and enhancement of dielectric losses. Real permeability has shown increase while magnetic losses have shown decrease in value with doping. All these four properties have shown very small variation with frequency in the scanned frequency range which indicates the relaxation type of behavior. Microwave absorption characteristics of these compositions are analyzed with change in sample thickness. The results demonstrate that the matching frequency of the microwave absorber shifts towards lower side of frequency band with increase in thickness. The complete analysis of the prepared microwave absorbers shows a striking achievement with very low reflection loss and wide absorption bandwidth for all the six compositions in 18-26.5 GHz frequency band.

  5. Testing and Adapting a Daytime Four Band Satellite Ash Detection Algorithm for Eruptions in Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrup-Henriksen, G.; Skoog, R. A.

    2007-12-01

    Volcanic ash is detectable from satellite remote sensing due to the differences in spectral signatures compared to meteorological clouds. Recently a new global daytime ash detection algorithm was developed at University of Madison, Wisconsin. The algorithm is based on four spectral bands with the central wavelengths 0.65, 3.75, 11 and 12 micrometers that are common on weather satellite sensors including MODIS, AVHRR, GOES and MTSAT. The initial development of the algorithm was primarily based on MODIS data with global coverage. We have tested it using three years of AVHRR data in Alaska and the Kamchatka Peninsula, Russia. All the AVHRR data have been manually analyzed and recorded into an observational database during the daily monitoring performed by the remote sensing group at the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO). By taking the manual observations as accurate we were able to examine the accuracy of the four-channel algorithm for daytime data. The results were also compared to the current automated ash alarm used by AVO, based on the reverse absorption technique, also known as the split window method, with a threshold of -1.7K. This comparison indicates that the four- banded technique has a higher sensitivity to volcanic ash, but a greater number of false alarms. The algorithm was modified to achieve a false alarm rate comparable to current ash alarm while still maintaining increased sensitivity.

  6. Detection of cancerous biological tissue areas by means of infrared absorption and SERS spectroscopy of intercellular fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velicka, M.; Urboniene, V.; Ceponkus, J.; Pucetaite, M.; Jankevicius, F.; Sablinskas, V.

    2015-08-01

    We present a novel approach to the detection of cancerous kidney tissue areas by measuring vibrational spectra (IR absorption or SERS) of intercellular fluid taken from the tissue. The method is based on spectral analysis of cancerous and normal tissue areas in order to find specific spectral markers. The samples were prepared by sliding the kidney tissue over a substrate - surface of diamond ATR crystal in case of IR absorption or calcium fluoride optical window in case of SERS. For producing the SERS signal the dried fluid film was covered by silver nanoparticle colloidal solution. In order to suppress fluorescence background the measurements were performed in the NIR spectral region with the excitation wavelength of 1064 nm. The most significant spectral differences - spectral markers - were found in the region between 400 and 1800 cm-1, where spectral bands related to various vibrations of fatty acids, glycolipids and carbohydrates are located. Spectral markers in the IR and SERS spectra are different and the methods can complement each other. Both of them have potential to be used directly during surgery. Additionally, IR absorption spectroscopy in ATR mode can be combined with waveguide probe what makes this method usable in vivo.

  7. Influence of the nature of the absorption band on the potential performance of high molar extinction coefficient ruthenium(II) polypyridinic complexes as dyes for sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gajardo, Francisco; Barrera, Mauricio; Vargas, Ricardo; Crivelli, Irma; Loeb, Barbara

    2011-07-04

    When tested in solar cells, ruthenium polypyridinic dyes with extended π systems show an enhanced light-harvesting capacity that is not necessarily reflected by a high (collected electrons)/(absorbed photons) ratio. Provided that metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands, MLCT, are more effective, due to their directionality, than intraligand (IL) π-π* bands for the electron injection process in the solar cell, it seems important to explore and clarify the nature of the absorption bands present in these types of dyes. This article aims to elucidate if all the absorbed photons of these dyes are potentially useful in the generation of electric current. In other words, their potentiality as dyes must also be analyzed from the point of view of their contribution to the generation of excited states potentially useful for direct injection. Focusing on the assignment of the absorption bands and the nature of the emitting state, a systematic study for a series of ruthenium complexes with 4,4'-distyryl-2,2'-dipyridine (LH) and 4,4'-bis[p-(dimethylamino)-α-styryl]-2,2'-bipyridine (LNMe(2)) "chromophoric" ligands was undertaken. The observed experimental results were complemented with TDDFT calculations to elucidate the nature of the absorption bands, and a theoretical model was proposed to predict the available energy that could be injected from a singlet or a triplet excited state. For the series studied, the results indicate that the percentage of MLCT character to the anchored ligand for the lower energy absorption band follows the order [Ru(deebpy)(2)(LNMe(2))](PF(6))(2) > [Ru(deebpy)(2)(LH)](PF(6))(2) > [Ru(deebpy)(LH)(2)](PF(6))(2), where deebpy is 4,4'-bis(ethoxycarbonyl)-2,2'-bipyridine, predicting that, at least from this point of view, their efficiency as dyes should follow the same trend.

  8. Development of narrow-band fluorescence index for the detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Ononye, Ambrose; Brown, Robert L.; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2011-06-01

    Aflatoxin is produced by the fungus Aspergillus flavus when the fungus invades developing corn kernels. Because of its potent toxicity, the levels of aflatoxin are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in the US, allowing 20 ppb (parts per billion) limits in food, and feed intended for interstate commerce. Currently, aflatoxin detection and quantification methods are based on analytical tests. These tests require the destruction of samples, can be costly and time consuming, and often rely on less than desirable sampling techniques. Thus, the ability to detect aflatoxin in a rapid, non-invasive way is crucial to the corn industry in particular. This paper described how narrow-band fluorescence indices were developed for aflatoxin contamination detection based on single corn kernel samples. The indices were based on two bands extracted from full wavelength fluorescence hyperspectral imagery. The two band results were later applied to two large sample experiments with 25 g and 1 kg of corn per sample. The detection accuracies were 85% and 95% when 100 ppb threshold was used. Since the data acquisition period is significantly lower for several image bands than for full wavelength hyperspectral data, this study would be helpful in the development of real-time detection instrumentation for the corn industry.

  9. Replication Banding Patterns in Human Chromosomes Detected Using 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Osamu; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2011-10-26

    A novel technique using the incorporation of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) into replicating DNA is described for the analysis of replicating banding patterns of human metaphase chromosomes. Human lymphocytes were synchronized with excess thymidine and treated with EdU during the late S phase of the cell cycle. The incorporated EdU was then detected in metaphase chromosomes using Alexa Fluor® 488 azides, through the 1,3-dipolar cycloaddition reaction of organic azides with the terminal acetylene group of EdU. Chromosomes with incorporated EdU showed a banding pattern similar to G-banding of normal human chromosomes. Imaging by atomic force microscopy (AFM) in liquid conditions showed that the structure of the chromosomes was well preserved even after EdU treatment. Comparison between fluorescence microscopy and AFM images of the same chromosome 1 indicated the presence of ridges and grooves in the chromatid arm, features that have been previously reported in relation to G-banding. These results suggest an intimate relationship between EdU-induced replication bands and G- or R-bands in human chromosomes. This technique is thus useful for analyzing the structure of chromosomes in relation to their banding patterns following DNA replication in the S phase.

  10. Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy for Improving the Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koral, Can; De Giacomo, Alessandro; Mao, Xianglei; Zorba, Vassilia; Russo, Richard E.

    2016-11-01

    Enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas is important for improving sensitivity and limits of detection in molecular sensing and molecular isotope analysis. In this work we introduce the use of Nanoparticle Enhanced Laser Induced Breakdown (NELIBS) for the enhancement of molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas, and study the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed enhancement. The use of Ag nanoparticles leads to an order of magnitude enhancement for AlO (B2Σ+ → Χ+ Σ+) system emission from an Al-based alloy. We demonstrate that the mechanism responsible for the enhancement of molecular bands differs from that of atomic emission, and can be traced down to the increased number of atomic species in NELIBS which lead to AlO molecular formation. These findings showcase the potential of NELIBS as a simple and viable technology for enhancing molecular band emission in laser-induced plasmas.

  11. Supercontinuum high-speed cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for sensitive multispecies detection.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Lämmlein, Bastian; Huber, Franz J T; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-05-15

    Cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy is promising for many applications requiring a very high concentration sensitivity but often accompanied by low temporal resolution. In this Letter, we demonstrate a broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectrometer capable of detection rates of up to 50 kHz, based on a spatially coherent supercontinuum (SC) light source and an in-house-built, high-speed near-infrared spectrograph. The SC spectrometer allows for the simultaneous quantitative detection of CO2, C2H2, and H2O within a spectral range from 1420 to 1570 nm. Using cavity mirrors with a specified reflectivity of R=98.0±0.3% a minimal spectrally averaged absorption coefficient of αmin=1·10-5  cm-1 can be detected at a repetition rate of 50 kHz.

  12. Spectrum sensing of trace C(2)H(2) detection in differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Dong, Xiaopeng

    2014-09-10

    An improved algorithm for trace C(2)H(2) detection is presented in this paper. The trace concentration is accurately calculated by focusing on the absorption spectrum from the frequency domain perspective. The advantage of the absorption spectroscopy frequency domain algorithm is its anti-interference capability. First, the influence of the background noise on the minimum detectable concentration is greatly reduced. Second, the time-consuming preprocess of spectra calibration in the differential optical absorption spectroscopy technique is skipped. Experimental results showed the detection limit of 50 ppm is achieved at a lightpath length of 0.2 m. This algorithm can be used in real-time spectrum analysis with high accuracy.

  13. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eparvier, F.G.; Barth, C.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.

  14. Signal to Noise Ratio in Digital Lock-in Detection for Multiple Intensity-Modulated Signals in CO2 Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CHEN, S.; Lin, B.; Harrison, F. W.; Nehrir, A. R.; Campbell, J. F.; Refaat, T.; Abedin, N. M.; Obland, M. D.; Ismail, S.; Meadows, B. L.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Langley Research Center is investigating Intensity-Modulated, Continuous-Wave Laser Absorption Spectrometers (LASs) for the measurement of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) column mixing ratio from both air- and space-borne platforms. The LAS system uses high-power fiber lasers/amplifiers in the 1.57-um CO2 absorption band and the 1.26-um O2 absorption band in the transmitters and simultaneous digital lock-in detection for the multiple intensity-modulated signals with different modulation waveforms , such as simple sinusoidal waves at different frequencies, associated with different wavelengths in the receivers. The Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR) of the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in the system is of interest for the system designs and the performance prediction of airborne and space-borne implementations in the future. This paper will discuss the properties of the signals and various noises in the LAS system, especially for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection with a single detector for the multiple intensity-modulated signals at different frequencies. The numerical simulation of the SNR for the simultaneous digital lock-in detection in terms of relative intensity of the multiple modulated signals and the integration time, and an initial experimental verification will be presented.

  15. On-column double-beam laser absorption detection for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1993-08-01

    Double-beam laser absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been developed. This is based on the direct subtraction of reference and signal photocurrents by an electronic circuit, under feedback control, to reduce background noise. A simple equation for calculating concentrations has been proposed and was confirmed by experimental results. A practical noise-to-signal ratio of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] in intensity is achieved. This is 5 times lower than that of commercial CE systems. For absorbance detection, as low as 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] M malachite green can be detected. This corresponds to a 25-fold improvement of detection limit over commercial systems. This gain in detectability results from both a reduction in intensity fluctuations (noise) and an increase in the effective absorption path length (signal). 22 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Analysis of Mars surface hydration through the MEx/OMEGA observation of the 3 μm absorption band.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouglet, D.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Gondet, B.; Milliken, R. E.; Mustard, J. F.

    The near infrared Mars surface global mapping done by OMEGA gives the first opportunity to study the global and detailed characteristics of the 3µm hydration absorption band on Mars surface. This feature is indistinctly due to bending and stretching vibrations of water bound in minerals or adsorbed at their surface, and of hydroxyl groups (for a review, see e.g. [1] or [2]). Its study may give new elements to determine the geologic and climatic past of Mars, and may put new constrain about the current water cycle of Mars. OMEGA data are processed in a pipeline that converts raw data to radiance, removes atmospheric effects and gets I/F. Specific data reduction scheme has been developed to assess temperature of OMEGA spectra at 5 µm and to remove their thermal part so as to get the albedo from 1.µm to 5.1µm ([2]). Two methods, the Integrated Band Depth and the water content based on comparison with laboratory measures of Yen et al. ([3]), have been used to assess the 3µm band depth. These two methods where applied to OMEGA spectra acquired at a nominal calibration level and not exhibiting water ice features. This corresponds to approximately 35 million spectra ([2]). The data processed show the presence of this absorption feature overall the Martian surface, which could be explained by the presence of adsorbed water up to 1% water mass percentage ([4]) and by rinds or coating resulting from weathering (see e.g. [5] or [6]). A possible increase of hydration with albedo is discussed so as to discriminate between the albedo-dependence of the method and hydration variations. Terrains enriched in phyllosilicates ([7]), sulfates ([8]) or hydroxides exhibit an increased hydration at 3 µm. This terrains show that the 3 µm band can bring additional information about composition, for example by observing a variation in the shape of the band. A decrease of hydration with elevation is observed on the processed data independently of the value of albedo. This correlation

  17. Multispectral band selection and spatial characterization: Application to mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    PubMed

    Irshad, H; Gouaillard, A; Roux, L; Racoceanu, D

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the second most frequent cancer. The reference process for breast cancer prognosis is Nottingham grading system. According to this system, mitosis detection is one of the three important criteria required for grading process and quantifying the locality and prognosis of a tumor. Multispectral imaging, as relatively new to the field of histopathology, has the advantage, over traditional RGB imaging, to capture spectrally resolved information at specific frequencies, across the electromagnetic spectrum. This study aims at evaluating the accuracy of mitosis detection on histopathological multispectral images. The proposed framework includes: selection of spectral bands and focal planes, detection of candidate mitotic regions and computation of morphological and multispectral statistical features. A state-of-the-art of the methods for mitosis classification is also provided. This framework has been evaluated on MITOS multispectral dataset and achieved higher detection rate (67.35%) and F-Measure (63.74%) than the best MITOS contest results (Roux et al., 2013). Our results indicate that the selected multispectral bands have more discriminant information than a single spectral band or all spectral bands for mitotic figures, validating the interest of using multispectral images to improve the quality of the diagnostic in histopathology.

  18. Dual-band, infrared buried mine detection using a statistical pattern recognition approach

    SciTech Connect

    Buhl, M.R.; Hernandez, J.E.; Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.

    1993-08-01

    The main objective of this work was to detect surrogate land mines, which were buried in clay and sand, using dual-band, infrared images. A statistical pattern recognition approach was used to achieve this objective. This approach is discussed and results of applying it to real images are given.

  19. Extremely sensitive detection of NO₂ employing off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy coupled with multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-05-01

    We report on the development of a new sensor for NO₂ with ultrahigh sensitivity of detection. This has been accomplished by combining off-axis integrated cavity output spectroscopy (OA-ICOS) (which can provide large path lengths of the order of several kilometers in a small volume cell) with multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy (MLIAS) (where we integrate the absorption spectra over a large number of rotational-vibrational transitions of the molecular species to further improve the sensitivity). Employing an external cavity quantum cascade laser operating in the 1601-1670 cm⁻¹ range and a high-finesse optical cavity, the absorption spectra of NO₂ over 100 transitions in the R band have been recorded. From the observed linear relationship between the integrated absorption versus concentration of NO₂ and the standard deviation of the integrated absorption signal, we report an effective sensitivity of detection of approximately 28 ppt (parts in 10¹²) for NO₂ To the best of our knowledge, this is among the most sensitive levels of detection of NO₂ to date.

  20. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  1. [Research on VOC concentration detection by photoelastic modulation infrared spectrum absorption method].

    PubMed

    Hu, Miao; Wang, Tai-yong; Qiao, Zhi-feng; Geng, Bo; Xiao, Xin-hua

    2011-12-01

    In order to ensure high stability and strong anti-interference ability in static interference system for qualitative and quantitative analysis of gas, a static scans interference detection system was designed based on photoelastic modulation infrared spectrum absorption system. The system consists of infrared laser, polarizer, photoelastic modulator, polarization analyzer and CCD components. By photoelastic modulator the principal refractive index of optical crystal will change cyclically by the modulation signal, producing cyclical changes in the optical path difference. With the calculation of modulation phase variation, the authors can get the function of the crystal length, the modulation cycle, and the range of optical path difference. Based on phase delay value and the energy distribution of interference pattern, the authors got the formula for the corresponding interference light intensity. The experiment used ZnSe crystal as the photoelastic modulation crystal, the polarizer uses the DOP3212 polarizer, and the detector uses the TCD5390AP array CCD. The five groups have different concentrations with three common VOC gases (formaldehyde, benzene and xylene) for detecting the concentrations of gases. The experimental results with the traditional infrared absorption were compared with the test results of photoelastic modulation infrared spectrum absorption method. The method of photoelastic modulation infrared spectrum absorption had high stability and real-time features, while the detection accuracy is better than the traditional infrared absorption method.

  2. Radiative analysis of global mean temperature trends in the middle atmosphere: Effects of non-locality and secondary absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. I.; Jonsson, A. I.; Ward, W. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we provide a refined and extended assignment of past and future temperature changes relative to previous analyses and describe and evaluate the relevance of vertical coupling and non-linear and secondary radiative mechanisms for the interpretation of climatic temperature variations in the middle atmosphere. Because of their nature, the latter mechanisms are not adequately accounted for in most regression analyses of temperature trends as a function of local constituent variations. These mechanisms are examined using (1) globally averaged profiles from transient simulations with the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) forced by changes in greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances and (2) a one-dimensional radiative-equilibrium model forced using the diagnosed global mean changes in radiatively active constituents as derived from the CMAM model runs. The conditions during the periods 1975 to 1995 and 2010 to 2040 (during which the rates of change in ozone and CO2 differ) provide a suitable contrast for the role of the non-linear and non-local mechanisms being evaluated in this paper to be clearly differentiated and evaluated. Vertical coupling of radiative transfer effects and the influence of secondary absorption bands are important enough to render the results of multiple linear regression analyses between the temperature response and constituent changes misleading. These effects are evaluated in detail using the 1D radiative-equilibrium model using profiles from the CMAM runs as inputs. In order to explain the differences in the CMAM temperature trends prior to and after 2000 these other radiative effects must be considered in addition to local changes in the radiatively active species. The middle atmosphere temperature cools in response to CO2 and water vapor increases, but past and future trends are modulated by ozone changes.

  3. A simultaneous dual-band infrared hyperspectral imager for standoff detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Neelam; Smith, Dale

    2005-11-01

    A novel dual-band hyperspectral imager has been developed to collect 128-band hyperspectral image cubes simultaneously in both 4-5.25 μm (mid wave IR, MWIR) and 8-10.5 μm (long wave IR, LWIR) bands for both target detection and standoff detection of chemical and biological agents. The imager uses a specially designed diffractive optics Ge lens with a dual-band 320×240 HgCdTe infrared (IR) focal plane array (FPA) cooled with a closed cycle Sterling-cooler. The diffractive optics lens acts both as a focusing as well as a dispersive device. The imager simultaneously collects a single-color full scene image with a narrow band in the LWIR region (e.g., at 8 μm) using the first order diffraction and corresponding single-color image in the MWIR region (e.g., at 4 μm) using the second order diffraction. Images at different wavelengths are obtained by moving the lens along its optical axis to focus the corresponding wavelengths. Contributions of out of focus wavelengths are removed in post processing. In this paper we will briefly discuss the imager and present data and results from a recent field test.

  4. Cloud top height retrieval using the imaging polarimeter (3MI) top-of-atmosphere reflectance measurements in the oxygen absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Munro, Rose

    2016-04-01

    The determination of cloud top height from a satellite has a number of applications both for climate studies and aviation safety. A great variety of methods are applied using both active and passive observation systems in the optical and microwave spectral regions. One of the most popular methods with good spatial coverage is based on the measurement of outgoing radiation in the spectral range where oxygen strongly absorbs incoming solar light. Clouds shield tropospheric oxygen reducing the depth of the corresponding absorption line as detected by a satellite instrument. Radiative transfer models are used to connect the solar light reflectance, e.g., in the oxygen A-band located around 761nm, and the cloud top height. The inverse problem is then solved e.g. using look-up tables, to determine the cloud top height. In this paper we propose a new fast and robust oxygen A-band method for the retrieval of cloud altitude using the Multi-viewing Multi-channel Multi-polarization Imaging instrument (3MI) on board the EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation (EPS-SG). The 3MI measures the intensity at the wavelengths of 410, 443, 490, 555, 670, 763, 765, 865, 910, 1370, 1650, and 2130nm, and (for selected channels) the second and third Stokes vector components which allows the degree of linear polarization and the polarization orientation angle of reflected solar light to be derived at up to 14 observation angles. The instrument response function (to a first approximation) can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) equal to 20nm for all channels except 765nm, 865nm, 1370nm, 1650nm, and 2130nm, where it is equal to 40nm. The FWHM at 763nm (the oxygen A-band location) is equal to 10nm. The following 3MI channels are used in the retrieval procedure: 670, 763, and 865nm. The channels at 670 and 865 nm are not affected by the oxygen absorption. The channel at 763nm is affected by the oxygen concentration vertical profile. The higher

  5. Absorption of human skin and its detecting platform in the process of laser cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Lin; Ouyang, Li; Wang, Yang

    2000-10-01

    Because of the melanin, hemoglobin and water molecules, etc. contained, light absorption of human skin tissue changes with wavelength of light. This is the principle used in laser cosmetology for treating pigment diseases and vascular lesion diseases as well as skin decoration such as body tattooing, eyebrow tattooing, etc. The parameters of treatment used in laser cosmetology principally come from the research of the skin tissue optical characteristics of whites, and it is not suitable for the Oriental. The absorption spectrum of yellow race alive skin has been researched. The detecting platform for use in the measuring of vivi-tissue absorption spectrum has been developed which using opto-electronic nondestructive testing and virtual instrument techniques. The degree of pathological changes of skin can be detected by this platform also, thus the shortcoming of dosage selection in laser clinical treatments which have been decided only by naked eye observation and past experience of doctors can be solved.

  6. Origin of absorption peaks in reflection loss spectrum in Ku- frequency band of Co-Zr substituted strontium hexaferrites prepared using sucrose precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Chawla, S. K.; Kaur, Prabhjyot

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the detailed explanation of the factors, contributing towards the absorption peaks in reflection loss spectrum of hexaferrites. Cobalt-Zirconium substituted strontium hexaferrites, synthesized using sucrose precursor sol-gel technique, were analyzed in 12.4-18 GHz frequency range. The concepts of impedance matching through quarter wavelength condition, complex thickness, dielectric phase angle and attenuation constant have been used to determine the location as well as intensity of absorption peaks. This study also demonstrates the potential application of three compositions of this series with doping content (x)==0.0, 0.6 and 0.8 as an effective microwave absorbers in Ku-frequency band.

  7. Highly increased detection of silver stained protein bands in polyacrylamide gels with thermo-optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Giulia; Posnicek, Thomas; Brandl, Martin

    2016-11-01

    Sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis is a well-known technique to separate proteins by their molecular weight. After electrophoresis, the gels are commonly stained for protein band analysis with silver stain; this allows the detection of protein loads to about 1 ng. To increase the detection sensitivity of the protein bands down in the subnanogram level, a sensor has been developed based on the thermal lens effect to scan and quantify protein loads which would remain undetected using the standard imaging systems. The thermal lens sensor is equipped with a 450 nm diode pump laser modulated at 1 Hz and a HeNe probe laser mounted in collinear geometry. The sensor could detect protein bands of 0.05 ng when the gel was soaked in methanol/water and 0.1 ng in water. The limit of detection ranged from 8 to 20 pg, depending on the soaking medium and the staining efficiency. Thus, the detection of silver stain by thermal lens effect results 10 to 20 times more sensitive than the standard colorimetric method.

  8. Determination of target detection limits in hyperspectral data using band selection and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, W.; Boehler, J.; Twizer, K.; Kedem, B.; Lenz, A.; Kneubuehler, M.; Wellig, P.; Oechslin, R.; Schilling, H.; Rotman, S.; Middelmann, W.

    2016-10-01

    Hyperspectral remote sensing data can be used for civil and military applications to robustly detect and classify target objects. High spectral resolution of hyperspectral data can compensate for the comparatively low spatial resolution, which allows for detection and classification of small targets, even below image resolution. Hyperspectral data sets are prone to considerable spectral redundancy, affecting and limiting data processing and algorithm performance. As a consequence, data reduction strategies become increasingly important, especially in view of near-real-time data analysis. The goal of this paper is to analyze different strategies for hyperspectral band selection algorithms and their effect on subpixel classification for different target and background materials. Airborne hyperspectral data is used in combination with linear target simulation procedures to create a representative amount of target-to-background ratios for evaluation of detection limits. Data from two different airborne hyperspectral sensors, AISA Eagle and Hawk, are used to evaluate transferability of band selection when using different sensors. The same target objects were recorded to compare the calculated detection limits. To determine subpixel classification results, pure pixels from the target materials are extracted and used to simulate mixed pixels with selected background materials. Target signatures are linearly combined with different background materials in varying ratios. The commonly used classification algorithms Adaptive Coherence Estimator (ACE) is used to compare the detection limit for the original data with several band selection and data reduction strategies. The evaluation of the classification results is done by assuming a fixed false alarm ratio and calculating the mean target-to-background ratio of correctly detected pixels. The results allow drawing conclusions about specific band combinations for certain target and background combinations. Additionally

  9. Probability of detecting band-tailed pigeons during call-broadcast versus auditory surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kirkpatrick, C.; Conway, C.J.; Hughes, K.M.; Devos, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    Estimates of population trend for the interior subspecies of band-tailed pigeon (Patagioenas fasciata fasciata) are not available because no standardized survey method exists for monitoring the interior subspecies. We evaluated 2 potential band-tailed pigeon survey methods (auditory and call-broadcast surveys) from 2002 to 2004 in 5 mountain ranges in southern Arizona, USA, and in mixed-conifer forest throughout the state. Both auditory and call-broadcast surveys produced low numbers of cooing pigeons detected per survey route (x?? ??? 0.67) and had relatively high temporal variance in average number of cooing pigeons detected during replicate surveys (CV ??? 161%). However, compared to auditory surveys, use of call-broadcast increased 1) the percentage of replicate surveys on which ???1 cooing pigeon was detected by an average of 16%, and 2) the number of cooing pigeons detected per survey route by an average of 29%, with this difference being greatest during the first 45 minutes of the morning survey period. Moreover, probability of detecting a cooing pigeon was 27% greater during call-broadcast (0.80) versus auditory (0.63) surveys. We found that cooing pigeons were most common in mixed-conifer forest in southern Arizona and density of male pigeons in mixed-conifer forest throughout the state averaged 0.004 (SE = 0.001) pigeons/ha. Our results are the first to show that call-broadcast increases the probability of detecting band-tailed pigeons (or any species of Columbidae) during surveys. Call-broadcast surveys may provide a useful method for monitoring populations of the interior subspecies of band-tailed pigeon in areas where other survey methods are inappropriate.

  10. Polarization and field dependent two-photon absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well waveguides in the half-band gap spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, H. K.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.; Grant, R. S.; Sibbett, W.; Soole, J. B. D.; LeBlanc, H. P.; Andreadakis, N. C.; Colas, E.; Kim, M. S.

    1991-12-01

    We report the observation of two photon absorption which is strongly dependent on the applied electric field and the optical polarization. At 1.55 μm wavelength, the two-photon absorption coefficient of the GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well (MQW) waveguides for transverse-magnetic light is about seven times lower than for transverse-electric polarized light and changes by a factor of approximately 4 for a change in applied direct-current electric field of ˜140 kV/cm. Ultrafast nonlinear refraction causing phase changes of over π radians without appreciable excess loss is observed. These measurements demonstrate that GaAs/AlGaAs MQW waveguides could be successfully used for subpicosecond all-optical switching near half-band gap, at wavelengths corresponding to the 1.55 μm optical communications band.

  11. Portable 4.6 Micrometers Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The air quality aboard manned spacecraft must be continuously monitored to ensure crew safety and identify equipment malfunctions. In particular, accurate real-time monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) levels helps to prevent chronic exposure and can also provide early detection of combustion-related hazards. For long-duration missions, environmental monitoring grows in importance, but the mass and volume of monitoring instruments must be minimized. Furthermore, environmental analysis beyond low-Earth orbit must be performed in-situ, as sample return becomes impractical. Due to their small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor-laser-based absorption spectrometers are viable candidates for this purpose. To reduce instrument form factor and complexity, the emission wavelength of the laser source should coincide with strong fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which occur in the 3 to 5 micrometers wavelength range for most combustion products of interest, thereby reducing the absorption path length required for low-level concentration measurements. To address the needs of current and future NASA missions, we have developed a prototype absorption spectrometer using a semiconductor quantum cascade laser source operating near 4.6 micrometers that can be used to detect low concentrations of CO with a compact single-pass absorption cell. In this study, we present the design of the prototype instrument and report on measurements of CO emissions from the combustion of a variety of aerospace plastics.

  12. A NEW MULTI-BAND RADIAL VELOCITY TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTING EXOPLANETS AROUND ACTIVE STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Ma Bo; Ge Jian E-mail: jge@astrto.ufl.edu

    2012-05-10

    The radial velocity (RV) technique is one of the most efficient ways of detecting exoplanets. However, large RV jitters induced by starspots on an active star can inhibit detection of any exoplanet present or even lead to a false positive detection. This paper presents a new multi-band RV technique capable of substantially reducing starspot-induced RV jitters from stellar RV measurements to allow efficient and accurate extraction of RV signals caused by exoplanets. It takes full advantage of the correlation of RV jitters at different spectral bands and the independence of exoplanet signals at the corresponding bands. Simulations with a single-spot model and a multi-spot model have been conducted to investigate the RV jitter reduction capability of this method. The results show that this method can reduce the RV jitter amplitude by at least an order of magnitude, allowing detection of weaker exoplanet signals without significantly increasing RV observation time and cadence. This method can greatly reduce the observation time required to detect Earth-like planets around solar type stars with {approx}0.1 m s{sup -1} long term Doppler precision if spot-induced jitter is the dominant astrophysical noise source for RV measurements. This method can work efficiently for RV jitter removal if: (1) all the spots on a target star have approximately the same temperature during RV observations; (2) the RV jitter amplitude changes with wavelength, i.e., the RV jitter amplitude ratio, {alpha}, between two different spectral bands is not close to one; (3) the spot-induced RV jitter dominates the RV measurement error.

  13. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties by Tuning Cation Deficiency of Perovskite Oxides of Two-Dimensional LaFeO3/C Composite in X-Band.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Wang, Lai-Sen; Ma, Yating; Zheng, Hongfei; Lin, Liang; Zhang, Qinfu; Chen, Yuanzhi; Qiu, Yulong; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2017-03-01

    Development of microwave absorption materials with tunable thickness and bandwidth is particularly urgent for practical applications but remains a great challenge. Here, two-dimensional nanocomposites consisting of perovskite oxides (LaFeO3) and amorphous carbon were successfully obtained through a one pot with heating treatment using sodium chloride as a hard template. The tunable absorption properties were realized by introducing A-site cation deficiency in LaFeO3 perovskite. Among the A-site cation-deficient perovskites, La0.62FeO3/C (L0.62FOC) has the best microwave absorption properties in which the maximum absorption is -26.6 dB at 9.8 GHz with a thickness of 2.94 mm and the bandwidth range almost covers all X-band. The main reason affecting the microwave absorption performance was derived from the A-site cation deficiency which induced more dipoles polarization loss. This work proposes a promising method to tune the microwave absorption performance via introducing deficiency in a crystal lattice.

  14. Gamma-band synchronization in visual cortex predicts speed of change detection.

    PubMed

    Womelsdorf, Thilo; Fries, Pascal; Mitra, Partha P; Desimone, Robert

    2006-02-09

    Our capacity to process and respond behaviourally to multiple incoming stimuli is very limited. To optimize the use of this limited capacity, attentional mechanisms give priority to behaviourally relevant stimuli at the expense of irrelevant distractors. In visual areas, attended stimuli induce enhanced responses and an improved synchronization of rhythmic neuronal activity in the gamma frequency band (40-70 Hz). Both effects probably improve the neuronal signalling of attended stimuli within and among brain areas. Attention also results in improved behavioural performance and shortened reaction times. However, it is not known how reaction times are related to either response strength or gamma-band synchronization in visual areas. Here we show that behavioural response times to a stimulus change can be predicted specifically by the degree of gamma-band synchronization among those neurons in monkey visual area V4 that are activated by the behaviourally relevant stimulus. When there are two visual stimuli and monkeys have to detect a change in one stimulus while ignoring the other, their reactions are fastest when the relevant stimulus induces strong gamma-band synchronization before and after the change in stimulus. This enhanced gamma-band synchronization is also followed by shorter neuronal response latencies on the fast trials. Conversely, the monkeys' reactions are slowest when gamma-band synchronization is high in response to the irrelevant distractor. Thus, enhanced neuronal gamma-band synchronization and shortened neuronal response latencies to an attended stimulus seem to have direct effects on visually triggered behaviour, reflecting an early neuronal correlate of efficient visuo-motor integration.

  15. Quantitative photoluminescence of broad band absorbing melanins: a procedure to correct for inner filter and re-absorption effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesz, Jennifer; Gilmore, Joel; Meredith, Paul

    2005-07-01

    We report methods for correcting the photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra of highly absorbing samples for re-absorption and inner filter effects. We derive the general form of the correction, and investigate various methods for determining the parameters. Additionally, the correction methods are tested with highly absorbing fluorescein and melanin (broadband absorption) solutions; the expected linear relationships between absorption and emission are recovered upon application of the correction, indicating that the methods are valid. These procedures allow accurate quantitative analysis of the emission of low quantum yield samples (such as melanin) at concentrations where absorption is significant.

  16. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-15

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ∼ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  17. Detection of Ne VIII in an Intervening Multiphase Absorption System Toward 3C 263

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayanan, Anand; Wakker, Bart P.; Savage, Blair D.

    2009-09-01

    We report the detection of Ne VIII in an intervening multiphase absorption line system at z = 0.32566 in the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer spectrum of the quasar 3C 263 (zem = 0.646). The Ne VIII λ770 Å detection has a 3.9σ significance. At the same velocity, we also find absorption lines from C IV, O III, O IV, and N IV. The line parameter measurements yield log [N(Ne VIII) cm-2] = 13.98+0.10 -0.13 and b = 49.8 ± 5.5 km s-1. We find that the ionization mechanism in the gas phase giving rise to the Ne VIII absorption is inconsistent with photoionization. The absorber has a multiphase structure, with the intermediate ions produced in cool photoionized gas and the Ne VIII most likely in a warm collisionally ionized medium in the temperature range (0.5-1.0) × 106 K. This is the second ever detection of an intervening Ne VIII absorption system. Its properties resemble the previous Ne VIII absorber reported by Savage and colleagues. Direct observations of H I and O VI are needed to better constrain the physical conditions in the collisionally ionized gas phase of this absorber. Based on observations with the NASA-CNES-CSA Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer operated by Johns Hopkins University, supported by NASA contract NAS5-32985.

  18. Use of X-band radars to support the detection of in-flight icing hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serke, David J.; Politovich, Marcia K.; Reehorst, Andrew L.; Gaydos, Andy

    2009-05-01

    The NASA Icing Remote Sensing System was operated for the Alliance Icing Research Study II field program during the winter of 2003 around Montreal, Canada and around Cleveland, Ohio during the winter of 2005. Icing research aircraft flights from these field programs provided verification data on liquid water content, air temperature and also cloud particle imagery and distributions. The purpose of this work is to show that the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System X-band radar reflectivity profiles could be used beyond merely defining vertical cloud boundaries, by operationally deriving a qualitative small drop icing hazard warning flag. Several case studies are presented which depict a variety of synoptic weather scenarios. These cases demonstrate that X-band reflectivities below -10 dBZ and above the minimum detectable are uniquely indicative of a particle population dominated by small, liquid droplets. A discussion is included for each case on how an in-flight icing hazard flag from the radar reflectivity profile would improve the operational hazard detection system. Comparison of the NASA Icing Remote Sensing System's X-band radar data to a nearby similar X-band from McGill University is done to ensure data quality and consistency.

  19. Standard addition/absorption detection microfluidic system for salt error-free nitrite determination.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jae-Hoon; Jo, Kyoung Ho; Hahn, Jong Hoon

    2015-07-30

    A continuous-flow microfluidic chip-based standard addition/absorption detection system has been developed for accurate determination of nitrite in water of varying salinity. The absorption detection of nitrite is made via color development using the Griess reaction. We have found the yield of the reaction is significantly affected by salinity (e.g., -12% error for 30‰ NaCl, 50.0 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-) solution). The microchip has been designed to perform standard addition, color development, and absorbance detection in sequence. To effectively block stray light, the microchip made from black poly(dimethylsiloxane) is placed on the top of a compact housing that accommodates a light-emitting diode, a photomultiplier tube, and an interference filter, where the light source and the detector are optically isolated. An 80-mm liquid-core waveguide mounted on the chip externally has been employed as the absorption detection flow cell. These designs for optics secure a wide linear response range (up to 500 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-)) and a low detection limit (0.12 μg L(-1)N-NO2(-) = 8.6 nM N-NO2(-), S/N = 3). From determination of nitrite in standard samples and real samples collected from an estuary, it has been demonstrated that our microfluidic system is highly accurate (<1% RSD, n = 3) and precise (<1% RSD, n = 3).

  20. Strong interlayer coupling mediated giant two-photon absorption in MoS e2 /graphene oxide heterostructure: Quenching of exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rituraj; Aneesh, J.; Yadav, Rajesh Kumar; Sanda, Suresh; Barik, A. R.; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Maji, Tuhin Kumar; Karmakar, Debjani; Adarsh, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complex few-layer MoS e2 /graphene oxide (GO) heterostructure with strong interlayer coupling was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. In this strongly coupled heterostructure, we demonstrate a giant enhancement of two-photon absorption that is in stark contrast to the reverse saturable absorption of a weakly coupled MoS e2 /GO heterostructure and saturable absorption of isolated MoS e2 . Spectroscopic evidence of our study indicates that the optical signatures of isolated MoS e2 and GO domains are significantly modified in the heterostructure, displaying a direct coupling of both domains. Furthermore, our first-principles calculations indicate that strong interlayer coupling between the layers dramatically suppresses the MoS e2 excitonic bands. We envision that our findings provide a powerful tool to explore different optical functionalities as a function of interlayer coupling, which may be essential for the development of device technologies.

  1. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [infrared spectral reflectance of Nevada iron deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Most major rock units and unaltered and altered areas in the study area can be discriminated on the basis of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity differences recorded from satellite altitude. These subtle spectral differences are detectable by digital ratioing of the MSS bands and subsequent stretching to increase the contrast to enhance spectral differences. Hydrothermally altered areas appear as anomalous color patches within the volcanic-rock areas. A map has been prepared which can be regarded as an excellent reconnaissance exploration map, for use in targeting areas for more detailed geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies. Mafic and felsic rock types are easily discriminated on the color stretched-ratio composite. The ratioing process minimizes albedo effects, leaving only the recorded characteristic spectral response. The spectra of unaltered rocks appear different from those of altered rocks, which are typically dominated by limonite and clay minerals. It seems clear that differences in spectral shape can provide a basis for discrimination of geologic material, although the relations between visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity and mineralogical composition are not yet entirely understood.

  2. Thickness and Composition Tailoring of K- and Ka-Band Microwave Absorption of BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Singh, Charanjeet

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of M-type barium hexaferrites with chemical formula BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 ( x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) in K and Ka band. Characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm ferrite formation. The frequency dependence of the complex permittivity and complex permeability was studied for prepared ferrite samples in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 40 GHz. Factors such as the quarter-wavelength condition, impedance matching, high dielectric-magnetic losses, as well as ferromagnetic resonance were investigated to determine their contribution to the absorption characteristics. It was found that the quarter-wavelength ( λ/4) model could be successfully applied to predict and understand the position as well as number of reflection peaks in the microwave absorption spectrum. The origin of the reflection loss peaks is explained and verified based on calculations of input impedance, loss tangent, and ferromagnetic resonance. Reflection loss analysis revealed that all six compositions exhibited reflection loss peaks (absorption >90%) at their matching thicknesses and frequencies. Therefore, these ferrites are potential candidates for use in electromagnetic shielding applications requiring low reflectivity in K and Ka band.

  3. Interstellar scattering effects on the detection of narrow-band signals

    SciTech Connect

    Cordes, J.M.; Lazio, T.J. )

    1991-07-01

    The detection and decoding of narrow-band radio signals are investigated after propagation through the turbulent, ionized interstellar medium. For most lines of sight through the Galaxy, spectral broadening due to scattering below about 0.1 Hz at 1 GHz occurs. Spectral broadening is therefore unimportant for the detection of hypothesized signals from extraterrestrial intelligence. Intensity scintillations, however, are of considerable importance. They both help and hinder detection: signals too weak to be detected without the scattering medium may be modulated above the detection threshold while, conversely, signals above threshold can be modulated below. In strong scattering (distances above about 100 pc at 1 GHz), multiple observations of a given target comprise a strategy that is superior to single observations even when the total time per target is held fixed. Decoding information carrying signals may encounter difficulties due to intensity scintillations. 49 refs.

  4. Detection of gastrointestinal cancer by elastic scattering and absorption spectroscopies with the Los Alamos Optical Biopsy System

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Boyer, J.; Johnson, T.M.; Lacey, J.; Bigio, I.J.; Bohorfoush, A.; Mellow, M.

    1995-03-01

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory has continued the development of the Optical Biopsy System (OBS) for noninvasive, real-time in situ diagnosis of tissue pathologies. In proceedings of earlier SPIE conferences we reported on clinical measurements in the bladder, and we report here on recent results of clinical tests in the gastrointestinal tract. With the OBS, tissue pathologies are detected/diagnosed using spectral measurements of the elastic optical transport properties (scattering and absorption) of the tissue over a wide range of wavelengths. The use of elastic scattering as the key to optical tissue diagnostics in the OBS is based on the fact that many tissue pathologies, including a majority of cancer forms, exhibit significant architectural changes at the cellular and sub-cellular level. Since the cellular components that cause elastic scattering have dimensions typically on the order of visible to near-IR wavelengths, the elastic (Mie) scattering properties will be wavelength dependent. Thus, morphology and size changes can be expected to cause significant changes m an optical signature that is derived from the wavelength-dependence of elastic scattering. Additionally, the optical geometry of the OBS beneficially enhances its sensitivity for measuring absorption bands. The OBS employs a small fiber-optic probe that is amenable to use with any endoscope or catheter, or to direct surface examination, as well as interstitial needle insertion. Data acquistion/display time is <1 second.

  5. A light-emitting diode- (LED-) based absorption sensor for simultaneous detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, Jr., William P.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Here, a sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3–5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of themore » LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.« less

  6. A study of the structure of the ν1(HF) absorption band of the СH3СN…HF complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, E. I.; Glazachev, E. V.; Bulychev, V. P.; Koshevarnikov, A. M.; Tokhadze, K. G.

    2015-09-01

    The ν1(HF) absorption band shape of the CH3CN…HF complex is studied in the gas phase at a temperature of 293 K. The spectra of gas mixtures CH3CN/HF are recorded in the region of 4000-3400 cm-1 at a resolution from 0.1 to 0.005 cm-1 with a Bruker IFS-120 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer in a cell 10 cm in length with wedge-shaped sapphire windows. The procedure used to separate the residual water absorption allows more than ten fine-structure bands to be recorded on the low-frequency wing of the ν1(HF) band. It is shown that the fine structure of the band is formed primarily due to hot transitions from excited states of the low-frequency ν7 librational vibration. Geometrical parameters of the equilibrium nuclear configuration, the binding energy, and the dipole moment of the complex are determined from a sufficiently accurate quantum-chemical calculation. The frequencies and intensities for a number of spectral transitions of this complex are obtained in the harmonic approximation and from variational solutions of anharmonic vibrational problems.

  7. Detection of buried objects by fusing dual-band infrared images

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, G.A.; Sengupta, S.K.; Sherwood, R.J.; Buhl, M.R.; Schaich, P.C.; Kane, R.J.; Barth, M.J.; Fields, D.J.; Carter, M.R.

    1993-11-01

    We have conducted experiments to demonstrate the enhanced detectability of buried land mines using sensor fusion techniques. Multiple sensors, including visible imagery, infrared imagery, and ground penetrating radar (GPR), have been used to acquire data on a number of buried mines and mine surrogates. Because the visible wavelength and GPR data are currently incomplete. This paper focuses on the fusion of two-band infrared images. We use feature-level fusion and supervised learning with the probabilistic neural network (PNN) to evaluate detection performance. The novelty of the work lies in the application of advanced target recognition algorithms, the fusion of dual-band infrared images and evaluation of the techniques using two real data sets.

  8. Complexities in pyroxene compositions derived from absorption band centers: Examples from Apollo samples, HED meteorites, synthetic pure pyroxenes, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We reexamine the relationship between pyroxene composition and near-infrared absorption bands, integrating measurements of diverse natural and synthetic samples. We test an algorithm (PLC) involving a two-part linear continuum removal and parabolic fits to the 1 and 2 μm bands—a computationally simple approach which can easily be automated and applied to remote sensing data. Employing a suite of synthetic pure pyroxenes, the PLC technique is shown to derive similar band centers to the modified Gaussian model. PLC analyses are extended to natural pyroxene-bearing materials, including (1) bulk lunar basalts and pyroxene separates, (2) diverse lunar soils, and (3) HED meteorites. For natural pyroxenes, the relationship between composition and absorption band center differs from that of synthetic pyroxenes. These differences arise from complexities inherent in natural materials such as exsolution, zoning, mixing, and space weathering. For these reasons, band center measurements of natural pyroxene-bearing materials are compositionally nonunique and could represent three distinct scenarios (1) pyroxene with a narrow compositional range, (2) complexly zoned pyroxene grains, or (3) a mixture of multiple pyroxene (or nonpyroxene) components. Therefore, a universal quantitative relationship between band centers and pyroxene composition cannot be uniquely derived for natural pyroxene-bearing materials without additional geologic context. Nevertheless, useful relative relationships between composition and band center persist in most cases. These relationships are used to interpret M3 data from the Humboldtianum Basin. Four distinct compositional units are identified (1) Mare Humboldtianum basalts, (2) distinct outer basalts, (3) low-Ca pyroxene-bearing materials, and (4) feldspathic materials.

  9. The Detection and Mitigation of RFI with the Aquarius L-Band Scatterometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, A. P.; Piepmeier, J. R.; Fischman, M. A.; McWatters, D. A.; Spencer, M. W.

    2008-01-01

    The Aquarius sea-surface salinity mission includes an L-band scatterometer to sense sea-surface roughness. This radar is subject to radio-frequency interference (RFI) in its passband from 1258 to 1262 MHz, a region also allocated for terrestrial radio location. Due to its received power sensitivity requirements, the expected RFI environment poses significant challenges. We present the results of a study evaluating the severity of terrestrial RFI sources on the operation of the Aquarius scatterometer, and propose a scheme to both detect and remove problematic RFI signals in the ocean backscatter measurements. The detection scheme utilizes the digital sampling of the ambient input power to detect outliers from the receiver noise floor which are statistically significant, and flags nearby radar echoes as potentially contaminated by RFI. This detection strategy, developed to meet tight budget and data downlink requirements, has been implemented and tested in hardware, and shows great promise for the detection and global mapping of L-band RFI sources.

  10. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Ruan, John J.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Scott, Caroline; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. T.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-02-01

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band (g, r, i, z) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN, we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g ‑ r to g ‑ i and then to g ‑ z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  11. Detection of Lyman continuum absorption in the BL Lacertae object PKS 0735+178

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. N.; Glassgold, A. E.; Huggins, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    The detection of the Lyman edge in the BL Lac object PKS 0735+178 at the absorption red shift determined by optical measurements leads to a lower limit for the column density of atomic hydrogen, N(H I) not less than 4(17)/sq cm. The Lyman-alpha absorption line appears to have been detected, but only an approximate upper limit can be obtained from the data, of the order of 2(19)/sq cm. This amount of atomic hydrogen is less than that for a line of sight through the disk of a normal spiral galaxy. It is suggested that the absorbing material exists either in the halo of a galaxy or in the tenuous, extended, gaseous disk of a galaxy.

  12. Molecular detection with terahertz waves based on absorption-induced transparency metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G. Rodrigo, Sergio; Martín-Moreno, L.

    2016-10-01

    A system for the detection of spectral signatures of chemical compounds at the Terahertz regime is presented. The system consists on a holey metal film whereby the presence of a given substance provokes the appearance of spectral features in transmission and reflection induced by the molecular specimen. These induced effects can be regarded as an extraordinary optical transmission phenomenon called absorption-induced transparency (AIT). The phenomenon consist precisely in the appearance of peaks in transmission and dips in reflection after sputtering of a chemical compound onto an initially opaque holey metal film. The spectral signatures due to AIT occur unexpectedly close to the absorption energies of the molecules. The presence of a target, a chemical compound, would be thus revealed as a strong drop in reflectivity measurements. We theoretically predict the AIT based system would serve to detect amounts of hydrocyanic acid (HCN) at low rate concentrations.

  13. Detection of Variable Gaseous Absorption Features in the Debris Disks Around Young A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon L.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2012-10-01

    We present medium resolution (R = 60,000) absorption measurements of the interstellar Ca II K line observed towards five nearby A-type stars (49 Ceti, 5 Vul, ι Cyg, 2 And, and HD 223884) suspected of possessing circumstellar gas debris disks. The stars were observed on a nightly basis during a six night observing run on the 2.1-meter Otto Struve telescope at the McDonald Observatory, Texas. We have detected nightly changes in the absorption strength of the Ca II K line observed near the stellar radial velocity in three of the stars (49 Ceti, i Cyg and HD 223884). Such changes in absorption suggest the presence of a circumstellar (atomic) gas disk around these stars. In addition to the absorption changes in the main Ca II K line profile, we have also observed weak transient absorption features that randomly appear at redshifted velocities in the spectra of 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And. These absorption features are most probably associated with the presence of falling evaporated bodies (exo-comets) that liberate evaporating gas on their approach to the central star. This now brings the total number of systems in which exocomet activity has been observed at Ca II or Na I wavelengths on a nightly basis to seven (β Pic, HR 10, HD 85905, β Car, 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And), with 2 And exhibiting weaker and less frequent changes. All of the disk systems presently known to exhibit either type of short-term variability in Ca II K line absorption are rapidly rotating A-type stars (V sin i > 120 km s-1). Most exhibit mid-IR excesses, and many of them are very young (< 20 Myr), thus supporting the argument that many of them are transitional objects between Herbig Ae and “Vega-like” A-type stars with more tenuous circumstellar disks. No mid-IR excess (due to the presence of a dust disk) has yet been detected around either 2 And or HD 223884, both of which have been classified as λ Boötis-type stars. This may indicate that the observed changes in gas absorption for these

  14. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  15. Detection and Monitoring of Inundation with Polarimetric L-Band SAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, B. D.; Celi, J. E.; Hamilton, S. K.; McDonald, K. C.

    2014-12-01

    It has been known for decades that at wavelengths L-band or longer, SAR is a sensitive indicator of inundation underneath forest canopies. The high resolution detection of below-canopy inundation is difficult to accomplish at regional to continental scales using other types of remote sensing sensors, making it a compelling SAR measurement especially useful for studying wetland inundation dynamics, particularly in difficult-to-reach access, canopy-covered tropical forest environments. Most results have utilized spaceborne SAR observations with less than fully polarimetric data. Since one of the objectives of the NISAR mission is to characterize and understand the fundamental process that drives changes to ecosystems such as wetland inundated areas, we will discuss the sensitivity of L-band SAR to inundation. We will illustrate the detection of inundation using fully polarimetric L-band SAR data from UAVSAR, NASA's airborne SAR, over a tropical forest region in Ecuador and Peru. At the same time as the data collection, measurements were made on the ground to characterize vegetation and inundation characteristics. The field data were used to validate the results of classifying the vanZyl decomposition of the polarimetric data. We compare this classification with that possible with a reduced subset of the polarimetric observations.

  16. Self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy for acetylene detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Qin-Bin; Xu, Xue-Mei; Li, Chen-Jing; Ding, Yi-Peng; Cao, Can; Yin, Lin-Zi; Ding, Jia-Feng

    2016-11-01

    The expressions of the second harmonic (2f) signal are derived on the basis of absorption spectral and lock-in theories. A parametric study indicates that the phase shift between the intensity and wavelength modulation makes a great contribution to the 2f signal. A self-calibration wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) is applied, combining the advantages of ambient pressure, temperature suppression, and phase-shift influences elimination. Species concentration is retrieved simultaneously from selected 2f signal pairs of measured and reference WMS-2f spectra. The absorption line of acetylene (C2H2) at 1530.36 nm near-infrared is selected to detect C2H2 concentrations in the range of 0-400 ppmv. System sensitivity, detection precision and limit are markedly improved, demonstrating that the self-calibration method has better detecting performance than the conventional WMS. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61172047, 61502538, and 61501525).

  17. Contribution of the transition moments, form of the absorption band, exciton, and the correlation effects in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Ponce, Javier Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    This work compares the linear and nonlinear optical properties of polyenes and polyenynes. The simulation was made for finite and infinite conjugation of conjugated polymers, such as polyacetylene, β-carotene, bis (p-toluene sulfonate) (PTS) polyenyne, and a short conjugated polyenyne poly-2,6-decadyin-1,6-ylene azelate (PHDAz). The resonance energy and degree of conjugation are determined by fitting the linear absorption spectra. These parameters are then used for calculating the two photon and third-order nonlinear optical properties. The contribution of the transition moment, the form of the absorption band, the exciton, and phonons in the optical properties are determined. The difference of the experimental values is assigned to correlation effects. We found that the exciton, the correlation effects, and the conduction band are more important in the optical properties of polyenynes than of polyenes. In this way, the dependence of the optical properties of polyenynes on the conduction band makes it possible to increase their nonlinear optical properties by interaction with photons (θ ≈ 0). The dependence of the optical properties on the conduction band also produces that the finiteness of the conjugation strongly decreases the optical properties of polyenynes in relation to polyenes with similar conjugation. On the other hand, the phonons are more important in the optical properties of polyenes than of polyenynes. Consequently, the band is indirect for the studied polyenes and direct for the polyenynes. Therefore, the nonlinear optical properties in the resonance frequency of polyenyne PTS are higher than those for polyacetylene. We also found that asymmetric oscillations of χ(3) in the Brillouin zone increases the χ(3) final value in polyenynes. In addition, we found a change of sign of the wave function coefficients by the Peierls distortion of polyenes to become polyenynes, but this change of sign does not affect the optical properties. As a corollary

  18. Detection of water vapour absorption around 363nm in measured atmospheric absorption spectra and its effect on DOAS evaluations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lampel, Johannes; Polyansky, Oleg. L.; Kyuberis, Alexandra A.; Zobov, Nikolai F.; Tennyson, Jonathan; Lodi, Lorenzo; Pöhler, Denis; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Water vapour is known to absorb light from the microwave region to the blue part of the visible spectrum at a decreasing magnitude. Ab-initio approaches to model individual absorption lines of the gaseous water molecule predict absorption lines until its dissociation limit at 243 nm. We present first evidence of water vapour absorption at 363 nm from field measurements based on the POKAZATEL absorption line list by Polyansky et al. (2016) using data from Multi-Axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) and Longpath (LP)-DOAS measurements. The predicted absorptions contribute significantly to the observed optical depths with up to 2 × 10-3. Their magnitude correlates well (R2 = 0.89) to simultaneously measured well-established water vapour absorptions in the blue spectral range from 452-499 nm, but is underestimated by a factor of 2.6 ± 0.6 in the ab-initio model. At a spectral resolution of 0.5nm this leads to a maximum absorption cross-section value of 5.4 × 10-27 cm2/molec at 362.3nm. The results are independent of the employed cross-section data to compensate for the overlayed absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. The newly found absorption can have a significant impact on the spectral retrieval of absorbing trace-gas species in the spectral range around 363 nm. Its effect on the spectral analysis of O4, HONO and OClO are discussed.

  19. The Rovibrational Intensities of Five Absorption Bands of (12)C(16)O2 Between 5218 and 5349/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Brown, Linda R.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Freedman, Richard S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Absolute line intensities, band intensities, and Herman-Wallis parameters were measured for the (01(sup 1)2)(sub I) from (00(sup 0)0)(sub I) perpendicular band of (12)C(16)O2 centered at 5315/cm, along with the three nearby associated hot bands: (10(sup 0)2)(sub II) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5248/cm, (02(sup 2))(sub I) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5291/cm, and (10(sup 0)2)(sub I) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5349/cm. The nearby parallel hot band (30(sup 0))(sub I) from (10(sup 0)0)(sub II) at 5218/cm was also included in this study.

  20. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy--digital detection of gas absorption harmonics based on Fourier analysis.

    PubMed

    Mei, Liang; Svanberg, Sune

    2015-03-20

    This work presents a detailed study of the theoretical aspects of the Fourier analysis method, which has been utilized for gas absorption harmonic detection in wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). The lock-in detection of the harmonic signal is accomplished by studying the phase term of the inverse Fourier transform of the Fourier spectrum that corresponds to the harmonic signal. The mathematics and the corresponding simulation results are given for each procedure when applying the Fourier analysis method. The present work provides a detailed view of the WMS technique when applying the Fourier analysis method.

  1. Absorption Bands at 4300 and 6000-8000Å as Signs of Silicate and Organic Matter Separation and Formation of Hydrated Silicates in KBOs and Similar Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Dorofeeva, V. A.; Makalkin, A. B.

    2004-12-01

    Recent spectral observations of some Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) (Boehnhardt et al.: 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 47-50; Fornasier S. et al., 2004, Astron. Astrophys. 421, 353-363) discovered characteristic absorption bands at 4300 and 6000-8000Å in reflectance spectra of the bodies. Spectral positions and other parameters of the features are similar to those found in reflectance spectra of terrestrial phyllosilicates (e. g., Clark et al., 1990, J. Geophys. Res. 95, 12653-12680; Busarev et al., 2004, The new ROSETTA targets (L. Colangeli et al., eds.), 79-83), CI- and CM-carbonaceous chondrites (e. g., Busarev and Taran, 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 933-936), primitive C-, P-, D-, F- and G-class asteroids (Vilas and Gaffey, 1989, Science 246, 790-792) and hydrated M-, S- and E-class asteroids (Busarev and Taran, 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 933-936). Hence, these absorption bands may be considered as universal indicators of hydrated silicates on celestial solid bodies including KBOs. However, before phyllosilicates were formed, an aqueous media should spring up and exist a considerable time in the bodies. One more important factor for the spectral features of hydrated silicates to be observed, it is probably an aqueous separation of silicate and darkening CHON (PAH plus more light organic compounds) components in the bodies. To check the assumptions we have performed some calculations (Busarev et al., 2003, Earth, Moon, and Planets 92, 345-357) applicable to KBOs and analogous silicate-icy bodies existed for the first time in the formation zones of neighbouring giant planets. According to the calculations, the decay of the short-lived 26Al at the early stage of the bodies' evolution and their mutual collisions (at velocities >1.5 km s-1) at the subsequent stage were probably the main sources of heating sufficient for melting water ice in their interiors. Because of these processes, an internal ocean of liquid water covered with ˜10-km crust of dirty ice could originate in

  2. z'-BAND GROUND-BASED DETECTION OF THE SECONDARY ECLIPSE OF WASP-19b

    SciTech Connect

    Burton, J. R.; Watson, C. A.; Pollacco, D.; Littlefair, S. P.; Dhillon, V. S.; Gibson, N. P.; Marsh, T. R.

    2012-08-01

    We present the ground-based detection of the secondary eclipse of the transiting exoplanet WASP-19b. The observations were made in the Sloan z' band using the ULTRACAM triple-beam CCD camera mounted on the New Technology Telescope. The measurement shows a 0.088% {+-} 0.019% eclipse depth, matching previous predictions based on H- and K-band measurements. We discuss in detail our approach to the removal of errors arising due to systematics in the data set, in addition to fitting a model transit to our data. This fit returns an eclipse center, T{sub 0}, of 2455578.7676 HJD, consistent with a circular orbit. Our measurement of the secondary eclipse depth is also compared to model atmospheres of WASP-19b and is found to be consistent with previous measurements at longer wavelengths for the model atmospheres we investigated.

  3. Fresnel zone antenna for dual-band detection at millimeter and infrared wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Alda, Javier; González, Francisco Javier

    2009-03-15

    In this work the concept of a Fresnel zone antenna for dual-band detection in the IR and millimeter wave region is presented. The design is based on a Fresnel zone plate lens in the IR that is transformed to serve as a millimeter-wave antenna. Two different designs are presented, a circular-zone design that gives a high diffractive efficiency in the IR and a square-zone design that gives a higher response in the millimeter band but a lower focusing efficiency in the IR. Both designs have an operation bandwidth with the same low frequency limit of 400 GHz (750 microm), which can be tailored by changing the number of Fresnel zones, and a high frequency limit of 4.5 THz (65 microm) for the circular-zone design and 5 THz (59 microm) for the square-zone design.

  4. Low-cost detection of RC-IED activation signals in VHF band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camargo Suarez, Victor Hugo; Marulanda B., Jose Ignacio

    2014-05-01

    The proliferation of Radio Controlled Improvised Explosive Devices (RC-IED) is a growing threat around the world. The ease of construction and low cost of these devices are transforming common things in lethal tramps. The fight against this threats normally involves the use of sophisticated and expensive equipment of Electronic Warfare based on high speed DSP systems, just to detect the presence of detonation signals. In this work is showed how to find activation signals based on the characteristic of the power in a specific band and the previous knowledge about the detonation signals. As proof of concept we have taken the information about the RC-IEDs used in the Colombian conflict and develop an algorithm to find detonation signals based on the measured power in frequencies between 136 MHz and 174 MHz (2 meter civil band)

  5. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR crevasse detection radar : final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2007-09-01

    This document is the final report for the Antarctica Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Project. The project involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system to operate at X-band in order to assess the feasibility of an airborne radar to detect crevasses in Antarctica. This radar successfully detected known crevasses at various geometries. The best results were obtained for synthetic aperture radar resolutions of at most one foot and finer. In addition to the main goal of detecting crevasses, the radar was used to assess conops for a future operational radar. The radar scanned large areas to identify potential safe landing zones. In addition, the radar was used to investigate looking at objects on the surface and below the surface of the ice. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica.

  6. High-field optically detected EPR and ENDOR of semiconductor defects using W-band microwave Fabry-Pérot resonators.

    PubMed

    Spaeth, J-M; Tkach, I; Greulich-Weber, S; Overhof, H

    2005-11-01

    The designs of W-band (approximately 95 GHz) Fabry-Pérot microwave resonators for optically detected EPR and ENDOR using the magnetic circular dichroism of the optical absorption (MCDA) as well as for photo-luminescence-detected EPR are briefly described. We report on the first MCDA-detected high-field EPR/ENDOR investigation of the paramagnetic EL2+ defect in semi-insulating GaAs. The higher-order effects, which prevented the unambiguous analysis of previous MCDA-detected K-band EPR/ENDOR experiments could be suppressed in W-band. The analysis of the ENDOR spectra showed that an extremely precise alignment of the samples is necessary. The paramagnetic El2+ defect turned out to be an As antisite defect, which has four almost equivalent nearest 75As neighbours differing less than 1.5% in the superhyperfine interactions suggestive of an isolated As antisite, while the third 75As shell (fifth neighbour shell) is clearly of lower symmetry than expected for an isolated As antisite. We discuss as a possible solution to this paradoxical situation that EL2+ is an isolated antisite at room temperature, which at low temperature, where all magnetic resonance experiments are performed, associates itself with shallow acceptors such as Zn(Ga)- more than two nearest neighbour distances away. According to recent theoretical calculations, such 'loose' complexes with binding energies between 0.01 eV and 0.05 eV and disturb the equivalence of the nearest neighbour superhyperfine (shf) interactions less than 1.5%. Also, W-band EPR was measured using the photo-luminescence for detection to investigate P dopants in 6H-SiC.

  7. SIMULTANEOUS MULTI-BAND DETECTION OF LOW SURFACE BRIGHTNESS GALAXIES WITH MARKOVIAN MODELING

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmer, B.; Bonnarel, F.; Louys, M.; Perret, B.; Petremand, M.; Lavigne, F.; Collet, Ch.; Van Driel, W.; Sabatini, S.

    2013-02-01

    We present to the astronomical community an algorithm for the detection of low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies in images, called MARSIAA (MARkovian Software for Image Analysis in Astronomy), which is based on multi-scale Markovian modeling. MARSIAA can be applied simultaneously to different bands. It segments an image into a user-defined number of classes, according to their surface brightness and surroundings-typically, one or two classes contain the LSB structures. We have developed an algorithm, called DetectLSB, which allows the efficient identification of LSB galaxies from among the candidate sources selected by MARSIAA. The application of the method to two and three bands simultaneously was tested on simulated images. Based on our tests, we are confident that we can detect LSB galaxies down to a central surface brightness level of only 1.5 times the standard deviation from the mean pixel value in the image background. To assess the robustness of our method, the method was applied to a set of 18 B- and I-band images (covering 1.3 deg{sup 2} in total) of the Virgo Cluster to which Sabatini et al. previously applied a matched-filter dwarf LSB galaxy search algorithm. We have detected all 20 objects from the Sabatini et al. catalog which we could classify by eye as bona fide LSB galaxies. Our method has also detected four additional Virgo Cluster LSB galaxy candidates undetected by Sabatini et al. To further assess the completeness of the results of our method, both MARSIAA, SExtractor, and DetectLSB were applied to search for (1) mock Virgo LSB galaxies inserted into a set of deep Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS) gri-band subimages and (2) Virgo LSB galaxies identified by eye in a full set of NGVS square degree gri images. MARSIAA/DetectLSB recovered {approx}20% more mock LSB galaxies and {approx}40% more LSB galaxies identified by eye than SExtractor/DetectLSB. With a 90% fraction of false positives from an entirely unsupervised pipeline, a completeness of

  8. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-05

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor.

  9. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  10. Broad band nonlinear optical absorption measurements of the laser dye IR26 using white light continuum Z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumyodeep; Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem Ballabh

    2017-03-01

    We study the nonlinear optical response of a standard dye IR26 using the Z-scan technique, but with the white light continuum. The continuum source of wavelength from 450 nm to 1650 nm has been generated from the photonic crystal fiber on pumping with 772 nm of Ti:Sapphire oscillator. The use of broadband incident pulse enables us to probe saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA) over the large spectral range with a single Z-scan measurement. The system shows SA in the resonant region while it turns to RSA in the non-resonant regions. The low saturation intensity of the dye can be explained based on the simultaneous excitation from ground states to various higher energy levels with the help of composite energy level diagram. The cumulative effects of excited state absorption and thermal induced nonlinear optical effects are responsible for the observed RSA.

  11. Symmetry-Breaking in Cationic Polymethine Dyes: Part 2. Shape of Electronic Absorption Bands Explained by the Thermal Fluctuations of the Solvent Reaction Field.

    PubMed

    Masunov, Artëm E; Anderson, Dane; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-02

    The electronic absorption spectra of the symmetric cyanines exhibit dramatic dependence on the conjugated chain length: whereas short-chain homologues are characterized by the narrow and sharp absorption bands of high intensity, the long-chain homologues demonstrate very broad, structureless bands of low intensity. Spectra of the intermediate homologues combine both features. These broad bands are often explained using spontaneous symmetry-breaking and charge localization at one of the termini, and the combination of broad and sharp features was interpreted as coexistence of symmetric and asymmetric species in solution. These explanations were not supported by the first principle simulations until now. Here, we employ a combination of time-dependent density functional theory, a polarizable continuum model, and Franck-Condon (FC) approximation to predict the absorption line shapes for the series of 2-azaazulene and 1-methylpyridine-4-substituted polymethine dyes. To simulate inhomogeneous broadening by the solvent, the molecular structures are optimized in the presence of a finite electric field of various strengths. The calculated FC line shapes, averaged with the Boltzmann weights of different field strengths, reproduce the experimentally observed spectra closely. Although the polarizable continuum model accounts for the equilibrium solvent reaction field at absolute zero, the finite field accounts for the thermal fluctuations in the solvent, which break the symmetry of the solute molecule. This model of inhomogeneous broadening opens the possibility for computational studies of thermochromism. The choice of the global hybrid exchange-correlation functional SOGGA11-X, including 40% of the exact exchange, plays the critical role in the success of our model.

  12. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-08

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  13. Role of charge separation on two-step two photon absorption in InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creti, A.; Tasco, V.; Cola, A.; Montagna, G.; Tarantini, I.; Salhi, A.; Al-Muhanna, A.; Passaseo, A.; Lomascolo, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report on the competition between two-step two photon absorption, carrier recombination, and escape in the photocurrent generation mechanisms of high quality InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells. In particular, the different role of holes and electrons is highlighted. Experiments of external quantum efficiency dependent on temperature and electrical or optical bias (two-step two photon absorption) highlight a relative increase as high as 38% at 10 K under infrared excitation. We interpret these results on the base of charge separation by phonon assisted tunneling of holes from quantum dots. We propose the charge separation as an effective mechanism which, reducing the recombination rate and competing with the other escape processes, enhances the infrared absorption contribution. Meanwhile, this model explains why thermal escape is found to predominate over two-step two photon absorption starting from 200 K, whereas it was expected to prevail at lower temperatures (≥70 K), solely on the basis of the relatively low electron barrier height in such a system.

  14. Breaking of symmetrical charge distribution in xanthylocyanine chromophores detecting by their absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyluk, S. V.; Viniychuk, O. O.; Poronik, Ye. M.; Kovtun, Yu. P.; Shandura, M. P.; Yashchuk, V. M.; Kachkovsky, O. D.

    2011-03-01

    A detailed experimental investigation and quantum-chemical analysis of symmetrical cyanines with xanthylium and its substituted derivatives and with different polymethine chain (containing 1 and 2 vinylene groups) have been performed with the goal of understanding the nature of the electronic transitions in molecules. It is established electronic transitions in carbocyanines are similar to that in the typical Brooker's cyanines. In contrast, the absorption spectra of dicarbocyanines demonstrate a strong solvent dependence and substantial band broadening represented by the growth of the short wavelength shoulder. Basing on the results of the quantum-chemical calculation and conception of the mobile solitonic-like charge waves, we have concluded that the dicarbocyanines exist in two charged forms in the ground state with symmetrical and unsymmetrical distributions of the charge density. These are the examples of the cationic cyanines with the shortest chain when the symmetry breaking occurs.

  15. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  16. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    DOE PAGES

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; ...

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  17. Calculating Effect of Point Defects on Optical Absorption Spectra of III-V Semiconductor Superlattices Based on (8x8) k-dot-p Band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, David; Krishna, Sanjay

    For a superlattice which is composed of layered zinc-blende structure III-V semiconductor materials, its realistic anisotropic band structures around the Gamma-point are calculated by using the (8x8)k-dot-p method with the inclusion of the self-consistent Hartree potential and the spin-orbit coupling. By including the many-body screening effect, the obtained band structures are further employed to calculate the optical absorption coefficient which is associated with the interband electron transitions. As a result of a reduced quasiparticle lifetime due to scattering with point defects in the system, the self-consistent vertex correction to the optical response function is also calculated with the help of the second-order Born approximation.

  18. Evolution of dielectric function of Al-doped ZnO thin films with thermal annealing: effect of band gap expansion and free-electron absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Chen, T P; Liu, Y; Leong, K C

    2014-09-22

    Evolution of dielectric function of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films with annealing temperature is observed. It is shown that the evolution is due to the changes in both the band gap and the free-electron absorption as a result of the change of free-electron concentration of the AZO thin films. The change of the electron concentration could be attributed to the activation of Al dopant and the creation/annihilation of the donor-like defects like oxygen vacancy in the thin films caused by annealing.

  19. Predissociation linewidths of the (1,0)-(12,0) Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O2 in the wavelength region 179-202 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, A. S.-C.; Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Chiu, S. S.-L.; Freeman, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares method of retrieving predissociation linewidths from the experimental absolute absorption cross sections of Yoshino et al. (1983) has been applied to the (1,0)-(12,0) Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen. The predissociation linewidths deduced are larger than the theoretical predictions of Julienne (1976) and the latest measurements of Lewis et al. (1986). The larger linewidths found will have an impact on calculations of solar flux penetration into the earth atmosphere and of the photodissociation rates of trace species in the upper atmosphere.

  20. Change Detection in a Short Time Sequence of Polarimetric C-Band SAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Skriver, Henning

    2016-08-01

    Based on an omnibus likelihood ratio test statistic for the equality of several variance-covariance matrices following the complex Wishart distribution and a factorization of this test statistic with associated p-values, change analysis in a time series of multilook, polarimetric SAR data in the covariance matrix representation is carried out. The omnibus test statistic and its factorization detect if and when change(s) occur. The technique is demonstrated on airborne EMISAR C-band data but may be applied to ALOS, COSMO-SkyMed, RadarSat-2 Sentinel-1, TerraSAR-X, and Yaogan data also.

  1. Bipyridine hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Qingqing; Wu, Ziye; Hai, Zijuan; Tao, Changlu; Yuan, Qingpan; Gong, Yadi; Guan, Yafeng; Jiang, Jun; Liang, Gaolin

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we report for the first time the use of bipyridine-based hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. At low concentrations, hydrogelator 1 was applied for selective detection of Cd2+in vitro and in living cells with high sensitivity. In the absence of metal ions, 1 is nonfluorescent at 470 nm. Upon addition of metal ions, 1 selectively coordinates to Cd2+, causing an 86-fold increase of fluorescence intensity at 470 nm via the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as revealed by first-principles simulations. At 1.5 wt% and pH 5.5, 1 self-assembles into nanofibers to form hydrogel Gel I. Since Cd2+ could actively participate in the hydrogelation and promote the self-assembly, we also successfully applied Gel I for visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. With these excellent properties, Gel I is expected to be explored as one type of versatile biomaterial for not only environmental monitoring but also for pollution treatment in the near future.Herein, we report for the first time the use of bipyridine-based hydrogel for selective and visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. At low concentrations, hydrogelator 1 was applied for selective detection of Cd2+in vitro and in living cells with high sensitivity. In the absence of metal ions, 1 is nonfluorescent at 470 nm. Upon addition of metal ions, 1 selectively coordinates to Cd2+, causing an 86-fold increase of fluorescence intensity at 470 nm via the chelation enhanced fluorescence (CHEF) effect, as revealed by first-principles simulations. At 1.5 wt% and pH 5.5, 1 self-assembles into nanofibers to form hydrogel Gel I. Since Cd2+ could actively participate in the hydrogelation and promote the self-assembly, we also successfully applied Gel I for visible detection and absorption of Cd2+. With these excellent properties, Gel I is expected to be explored as one type of versatile biomaterial for not only environmental monitoring but also for pollution treatment in the near future

  2. Spatially resolved micro-absorption spectroscopy with a broadband source and confocal detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Silki; Mauser, Jennifer; Chakrabarti, Debopam; Schulte, Alfons

    2015-11-01

    We present a novel approach to measure optical absorption spectra with spatial resolution at the micron scale. The setup combines a continuous white light excitation beam in transmission geometry with a confocal microscope. The spatial resolution is found to be better than 1.4 μm in the lateral and 3.6 μm in the axial direction. Employing multichannel detection the absorption spectrum of hemoglobin in a single red blood cell is measured on the timescale of seconds. Through measurements of the transmitted intensity in solutions in nanoliter quantities we establish that the absorbance varies linearly with concentration. Our setup enables the investigation of spatial variations in the optical density of small samples on the micron scale and can be applied to the study of biological assemblies at the single cell level, in optical diagnostics, and in micro-fluidics.

  3. Hydration-dependent far-infrared absorption in lysozyme detected using synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Moeller, K D; Williams, G P; Steinhauser, S; Hirschmugl, C; Smith, J C

    1992-01-01

    Using the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven far-infrared absorption in the frequency range 15-45 cm-1 was detected in samples of lysozyme at different hydrations and in water. The absorption is due to the presence of low-frequency (picosecond timescale) motion in the samples, such as are calculated in molecular dynamics simulations. The form of the transmission profile is temperature independent but varies significantly with the degree of hydration of the protein. At higher hydrations the profile resembles closely that of pure water in the region 20-45 cm-1. At a low hydration marked differences are seen with, in particular, the appearance of a transmission minimum at 19 cm-1. The possible origins of the hydration dependence are discussed. The results demonstrate the usefulness of long-wavelength synchrotron radiation for the characterisation of biologically-important low-frequency motions in protein samples. PMID:1540696

  4. Heterodyne detection of the 752.033-GHz H2O rotational absorption line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T. S.; Litvak, M. M.; Fetterman, H. R.

    1980-08-01

    A tunable high resolution two stage heterodyne radiometer was developed for the purpose of investigating the intensity and lineshape of the 752.033 GHz rotational transition of water vapor. Single-sideband system noise temperatures of approximately 45,000 K were obtained using a sensitive GaAs Schottky diode as the first stage mixer. First local oscillator power was supplied by a CO2 laser pumped formic acid laser (761.61 GHz), generating an X-band IF signal with theoretical line center at 9.5744 GHz. Second local oscillator power was provided by means of a 3 GHz waveguide cavity filter with only 9 dB insertion loss. In absorption measurements of the H2O taken from a laboratory simulation of a high altitude rocket plume, the center frequency of the 752 GHz line was determined to within 1 MHz of the reported value. A rotational temperature 75 K, a linewidth 5 MHz and a Doppler shift 3 MHz were measured with the line-of-sight intersecting the simulated-plume axis at a distance downstream of 30 nozzle diameters. These absorption data were obtained against continuum background radiation sources at temperatures of 1175 and 300 K.

  5. Heterodyne detection of the 752.033-GHz H2O rotational absorption line

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dionne, G. F.; Fitzgerald, J. F.; Chang, T. S.; Litvak, M. M.; Fetterman, H. R.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable high resolution two stage heterodyne radiometer was developed for the purpose of investigating the intensity and lineshape of the 752.033 GHz rotational transition of water vapor. Single-sideband system noise temperatures of approximately 45,000 K were obtained using a sensitive GaAs Schottky diode as the first stage mixer. First local oscillator power was supplied by a CO2 laser pumped formic acid laser (761.61 GHz), generating an X-band IF signal with theoretical line center at 9.5744 GHz. Second local oscillator power was provided by means of a 3 GHz waveguide cavity filter with only 9 dB insertion loss. In absorption measurements of the H2O taken from a laboratory simulation of a high altitude rocket plume, the center frequency of the 752 GHz line was determined to within 1 MHz of the reported value. A rotational temperature 75 K, a linewidth 5 MHz and a Doppler shift 3 MHz were measured with the line-of-sight intersecting the simulated-plume axis at a distance downstream of 30 nozzle diameters. These absorption data were obtained against continuum background radiation sources at temperatures of 1175 and 300 K.

  6. Radar absorption due to a corotating interaction region encounter with Mars detected by MARSIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, David D.; Gurnett, Donald A.; Kirchner, Donald L.; David Winningham, J.; Frahm, Rudy A.; Brain, David A.; Mitchell, David L.; Luhmann, Janet G.; Nielsen, Erling; Espley, Jared R.; Acuña, Mario H.; Plaut, Jeffrey J.

    2010-03-01

    Mars Advanced Radar for Subsurface and Ionospheric Sounding (MARSIS) is a subsurface and topside ionosphere radar sounder aboard the European Space Agency spacecraft Mars Express, in orbit at Mars since 25 December 2003, and in operation since 17 June 2005. The ionospheric sounding mode of MARSIS is capable of detecting the reflection of the sounding wave from the martian surface. This ability has been used in previous work to show that the surface reflection is absorbed and disappears during periods when high fluxes of energetic particles are incident on the ionosphere of Mars. These absorption events are believed to be the result of increased collisional damping of the sounding wave, caused by increased electron density below the spacecraft, in turn caused by impact ionization from the impinging particles. In this work we identify two absorption events that were isolated during periods when the surface reflection is consistently visible and when Mars is nearly at opposition. The visibility of the surface reflection is viewed in conjunction with particle and photon measurements taken at both Mars and Earth. Both absorption events are found to coincide with Earth passing through solar wind speed and ion flux signatures indicative of a corotating interaction region (CIR). The two events are separated by an interval of approximately 27 days, corresponding to one solar rotation. The first of the two events coincides with abruptly enhanced particle fluxes seen in situ at Mars. Simultaneous with the particle enhancement there are an abrupt decrease in the intensity of electron oscillations, typically seen by the Mars Express particle instrument ASPERA-3 between the magnetic pileup boundary and the martian bow shock, and a sharp drop in the solar wind pressure, seen in the proxy quantity based on MGS magnetometer observations. The decrease in oscillation intensity is therefore the probable effect of a relaxation of the martian bow shock. The second absorption event does

  7. Reflectance-based skin detection in the short wave infrared band and its application to video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langston, Tye

    2016-10-01

    Robust reflectance-based skin detection is a potentially powerful tool for security and search and rescue applications, especially when applied to video. However, to be useful it must be able to account for the variations of human skin, as well as other items in the environment that could cause false detections. This effort focused on identifying a robust skin detection scheme that is appropriate for video application. Skin reflectance was modeled to identify unique skin features and compare them to potential false positive materials. Based on these comparisons, specific wavelength bands were selected and different combinations of two and three optical filters were used for actively identifying skin, as well as identifying and removing potential false positive materials. One wavelength combination (1072/1250 nm) was applied to video using both single- and dual-camera configurations based on its still image performance, as well as its appropriateness for video application. There are several important factors regarding the extension of still image skin detection to video, including light available for detection (solar irradiance and reflectance intensity), overall intensity differences between different optical filters, optical component light loss, frame rate, time lag when switching between filters, image coregistration, and camera auto gain behavior.

  8. Quantum cascade laser-based multipass absorption system for hydrogen peroxide detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yingchun; Sanchez, Nancy P.; Jiang, Wenzhe; Ren, Wei; Lewicki, Rafal; Jiang, Dongfang; Griffin, Robert J.; Tittel, Frank K.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relevant molecular trace gas species, that is related to the oxidative capacity of the atmosphere, the production of radical species such as OH, the generation of sulfate aerosol via oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI), and the formation of acid rain. The detection of atmospheric H2O2 involves specific challenges due to its high reactivity and low concentration (ppbv to sub-ppbv level). Traditional methods for measuring atmospheric H2O2 concentration are often based on wet-chemistry methods that require a transfer from the gas- to liquid-phase for a subsequent determination by techniques such as fluorescence spectroscopy, which can lead to problems such as sampling artifacts and interference by other atmospheric constituents. A quartz-enhanced photoacoustic spectroscopy-based system for the measurement of atmospheric H2O2 with a detection limit of 75 ppb for 1-s integration time was previously reported. In this paper, an updated H2O2 detection system based on long-optical-path-length absorption spectroscopy by using a distributed feedback quantum cascade laser (DFB-QCL) will be described. A 7.73-μm CW-DFB-QCL and a thermoelectrically cooled infrared detector, optimized for a wavelength of 8 μm, are employed for theH2O2 sensor system. A commercial astigmatic Herriott multi-pass cell with an effective optical path-length of 76 m is utilized for the reported QCL multipass absorption system. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection is used for enhancing the signal-to-noise-ratio. A minimum detection limit of 13.4 ppb is achieved with a 2 s sampling time. Based on an Allan-Werle deviation analysis the minimum detection limit can be improved to 1.5 ppb when using an averaging time of 300 s.

  9. Oil spill detection method using X-band marine radar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xueyuan; Li, Ying; Feng, Haiyang; Liu, Bingxin; Xu, Jin

    2015-01-01

    A viable method to implement oil spill detection and monitoring based on marine radar is proposed. The primary data of this study are obtained from the X-band marine radar of the teaching-training ship, YUKUN, of the Dalian Maritime University on July 21, 2010, when a pipeline burst and an oil spill accident occurred at the Xingang Port in Dalian. Aiming at the working characteristics of marine radar, the adaptive median filter algorithm is improved to eliminate the radar shared-frequency interference by adding the identification of noise points and resetting the neighborhood window. A power attenuation correction method is proposed to solve the uneven distribution in resolution and echo intensity by acquiring the average power distribution of radar images simultaneously. Oil spill will be easily detected from different sea backgrounds after morphological processing, gray segmentation, and image smoothing. Comparison with the images extracted from a thermal infrared sensor on the same monitoring point demonstrates the validity of the extraction method for oil spill based on X-band marine radar.

  10. Detection limit of fishing boats by the day night band (DNB) on VIIRS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asanuma, Ichio; Yamaguchi, Takashi; Park, John-geol; Mackin, Kenneth J.; Mittleman, John

    2016-09-01

    The detection limit of DNB was proposed as a function of the brightness temperature (BT) at 3.7 μm, where the transmittance of cloud could be observed as a change of surface temperature. The shortwave infrared band exhibited a wide distribution in BT more than the thermal infrared band for the same level of DNB radiance. The lights from surface were identified even under the full Moon condition with the proposed method, where clouds were reflecting the lunar lights. A different distribution of clouds for day to day and a change of the Moon phase with its elevation make this problem more complicated. But the approach of contrast based evaluation of surface lights and lunar reflected lights could be one solution to distinguish the lights from the surface. Currently, a validation is necessary in the future to confirm this algorithm and to validate the detected pixels to be fishing boats with the stable light sources. The time series data of fishing boats could be studied to analyze the region of fishing area relative to the distribution of sea surface temperature and/or chlorophyll-a.

  11. A Light-Emitting Diode- (LED-) Based Absorption Sensor for Simultaneous Detection of Carbon Monoxide and Carbon Dioxide.

    PubMed

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, William; Vasu, Subith S

    2016-06-01

    A sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3-5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.

  12. A light-emitting diode- (LED-) based absorption sensor for simultaneous detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, Jr., William P.; Vasu, Subith S.

    2016-04-18

    Here, a sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3–5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of the LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.

  13. Peroxy radical detection for airborne atmospheric measurements using absorption spectroscopy of NO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horstjann, M.; Andrés Hernández, M. D.; Nenakhov, V.; Chrobry, A.; Burrows, J. P.

    2014-05-01

    Development of an airborne instrument for the determination of peroxy radicals (PeRCEAS - peroxy radical chemical enhancement and absorption spectroscopy) is reported. Ambient peroxy radicals (HO2 and RO2, R being an organic chain) are converted to NO2 in a reactor using a chain reaction involving NO and CO. Provided that the amplification factor, called effective chain length (eCL), is known, the concentration of NO2 can be used as a proxy for the peroxy radical concentration in the sampled air. The eCL depends on radical surface losses and must thus be determined experimentally for each individual setup. NO2 is detected by continuous-wave cavity ring-down spectroscopy (cw-CRDS) using an extended cavity diode laser (ECDL) at 408.9 nm. Optical feedback from a V-shaped resonator maximizes transmission and allows for a simple detector setup. CRDS directly yields absorption coefficients, thus providing NO2 concentrations without additional calibration. The optimum 1σ detection limit is 0.3 ppbv at an averaging time of 40 s and an inlet pressure of 300 hPa. Effective chain lengths were determined for HO2 and CH3O2 at different inlet pressures. The 1σ detection limit at an inlet pressure of 300 hPa for HO2 is 3 pptv for an averaging time of 120 s.

  14. Multiplexed selective detection and identification of TCE and xylene in water by on-chip absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T.

    2013-03-01

    We demonstrate a device which can do multiplexed detection of two different chemicals on one chip by using infrared absorption spectroscopy. The signature of Trichloroethylene(TCE) and xylene in water enable multiplexed detection on one chip. We use the slow light effect in the photonic crystal design which enhances the absorption of the analytes by a factor of 30 as demonstrated by our previous works. In order to match the absorption peaks of these two analytes, photonic crystal slow light regions are designed at 1644nm and 1674nm with a SU8 cladding on top. Multiplexed detection is enabled by using a multimode interference (MMI) optical power splitter at the input, which divides optical power into two arms, and Y combiner at the output. Consequently, the absorption of these two chemicals can be enhanced by the slow light effect. The MMI structure and Y combiner also enable the multiplexed detection of two analytes on one chip.

  15. The Azimuthal Dependence of Outflows and Accretion Detected Using O VI Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Muzahid, Sowgat; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2015-12-01

    We report a bimodality in the azimuthal angle (Φ) distribution of gas around galaxies traced by O vi absorption. We present the mean Φ probability distribution function of 29 Hubble Space Telescope-imaged O vi absorbing (EW > 0.1 Å) and 24 non-absorbing (EW < 0.1 Å) isolated galaxies (0.08 \\lt z \\lt 0.67) within ˜200 kpc of background quasars. We show that equivalent width (EW) is anti-correlated with impact parameter and O vi covering fraction decreases from 80% within 50 kpc to 33% at 200 kpc. The presence of O vi absorption is azimuthally dependent and occurs between ±10°-20° of the galaxy projected major axis and within ±30° of the projected minor axis. We find higher EWs along the projected minor axis with weaker EWs along the project major axis. Highly inclined galaxies have the lowest covering fractions due to minimized outflow/inflow cross-section geometry. Absorbing galaxies also have bluer colors while non-absorbers have redder colors, suggesting that star formation is a key driver in the O vi detection rate. O vi surrounding blue galaxies exists primarily along the projected minor axis with wide opening angles while O vi surrounding red galaxies exists primarily along the projected major axis with smaller opening angles, which may explain why absorption around red galaxies is less frequently detected. Our results are consistent with a circumgalactic medium (CGM) originating from major axis-fed inflows/recycled gas and from minor axis-driven outflows. Non-detected O vi occurs between Φ = 20°-60°, suggesting that O vi is not mixed throughout the CGM and remains confined within the outflows and the disk-plane. We find low O vi covering fractions within +/- 10^\\circ of the projected major axis, suggesting that cool dense gas resides in a narrow planer geometry surrounded by diffuse O vi gas.

  16. Sub-Band Gap Absorption in As-Deposited and Annealed nc-CdSe Thin Films Using Constant Photocurrent Method (CPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kriti; Al-Kabbi, A. S.; Singh, Baljinder; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    Nanocrystalline CdSe thin films have been prepared by thermal vaccum evaporation technique using Inert Gas Condensation method using Argon as inert gas. XRD confirms the crystalline cubic nature of nc-CdSe thin films. The optical band gap is calculated for as deposited nc-CdSe and it comes out to be 2.1 eV. CPM has been used to measure sub-band gap absorption in nanocrystalline CdSe thin films. The thin films of nc-CdSe have been annealed at 80 °C for one hour and sub-bandgap absorption in annealed samples has also been calculated. Slope of Urbach tail which is a measure of disorder in both as deposited and annealed samples has been calculated. In the case of as deposited nc-CdSe thin films, Urbach slope is 354 meV. It decreases to the value 198 meV after annealing which shows structural disorder decreases after annealing.

  17. Fiber-optic thermometer using temperature dependent absorption, broadband detection, and time domain referencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Piltch, Nancy D.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic thermometer based on temperature dependent absorption in Nd(3+) doped glass is demonstrated over the 298-573 K range. A broadband detection technique allows the use of the complete spectrum of a pulse modulated light emitting diode. A fiber-optic recirculating loop is employed to construct a reference channel in the time domain by generating a train of pulses from one initial pulse. A theoretical model is developed, and experimental data are shown to compare well with the theory. Possible sources of error and instability are identified, and ways to enhance the performance of the system are proposed.

  18. Multiplexed detection of xylene and trichloroethylene in water by photonic crystal absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wei-Cheng; Chakravarty, Swapnajit; Zou, Yi; Chen, Ray T

    2013-10-01

    We experimentally demonstrate simultaneous selective detection of xylene and trichloroethylene (TCE) using multiplexed photonic crystal waveguides (PCWs) by near-infrared optical absorption spectroscopy on a chip. Based on the slow light effect of photonic crystal structure, the sensitivity of our device is enhanced to 1 ppb (v/v) for xylene and 10 ppb (v/v) for TCE in water. Multiplexing is enabled by multimode interference power splitters and Y-combiners that integrate multiple PCWs on a silicon chip in a silicon-on-insulator platform.

  19. High energy electron irradiation of interstellar carbonaceous dust analogs: Cosmic ray effects on the carriers of the 3.4 µm absorption band.

    PubMed

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J

    2016-11-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity vs electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 10(8) yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 10(7) yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds.

  20. High energy electron irradiation of interstellar carbonaceous dust analogs: Cosmic ray effects on the carriers of the 3.4 µm absorption band

    PubMed Central

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity vs electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 108 yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 107 yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds. PMID:28133388

  1. High-energy Electron Irradiation of Interstellar Carbonaceous Dust Analogs: Cosmic-ray Effects on the Carriers of the 3.4 μm Absorption Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity versus electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher-energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic-ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 108 yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 107 yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds.

  2. Mid-infrared carbon monoxide detection system using differential absorption spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming; Sui, Yue; Li, Guo-lin; Zheng, Chuan-tao; Chen, Mei-mei; Wang, Yi-ding

    2015-11-01

    A differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g. light-collector) and a multi-pass gas-chamber is presented in this paper. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path and environmental changes. Detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performance on CO concentration. The results indicate that at 1.013×105 Pa and 298 K, the limit of detection (LoD) is about 11.5 mg/m3 with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 115 mg/m3 (1.013×105 Pa, 298 K), the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7%—+1.9%. Based on 12 h long-term measurement on the 115 mg/m3 and 1 150 mg/m3 CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Due to the low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection in the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  3. Microwave absorption properties of LiNb3O8 in X-band prepared by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, J. Pundareekam; Sindam, Bashaiah; Tumuluri, Anil; Raju, K. C. James

    2015-08-01

    Single phase LiNb3O8 powders were prepared using combustion synthesis technique. The powders were prepared by heat treating Li2CO3+Nb2O5/urea mixture in 1:3 ratio. Structural and morphological details have been done to confirm the presence of LiNb3O8. The S-parameters were measured using rectangular waveguide method in the X-band frequency (8.2GHz to 12.4GHz) by Vector Network Analyzer. The dielectric characteristics like dielectric constant (ɛ') and dielectric loss (ɛ″) were calculated using Nicolson-Ross-Weir algorithm. Complex permittivity of 28-0.2j and 26-1.0j at 8.2GHz and 12.4GHz respectively are observed. Reflection loss was derived with permittivity and permeability as input parameters. Microwave absorber thickness is optimized and the RL< -20dB is obtained in the X-band frequency.

  4. Uniform Supersonic Expansion for FTIR Absorption Spectroscopy: The nu(5) Band of (NO)(2) at 26 K.

    PubMed

    Benidar; Georges; Le Doucen R; Boissoles; Hamon; Canosa; Rowe

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier transform interferometer (Bruker IFS 120 HR) was combined with a uniform supersonic expansion produced by means of axisymmetric Laval nozzles. The geometry profile of the nozzle enabled us to work under precise thermodynamic and kinetic conditions. The effect of the cooling rate of different nozzles on cluster nucleation is illustrated. The experimental sensitivity was tested by recording the nu(5) band of (NO)(2) at 26 K. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  5. Shock tube study on the thermal decomposition of fluoroethane using infrared laser absorption detection of hydrogen fluoride.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi

    2014-08-28

    Motivated by recent shock tube studies on the thermal unimolecular decomposition of fluoroethanes, in which unusual trends have been reported for collisional energy-transfer parameters, the rate constants for the thermal decomposition of fluoroethane were investigated using a shock tube/laser absorption spectroscopy technique. The rate constants were measured behind reflected shock waves by monitoring the formation of HF by IR absorption at the R(1) transition in the fundamental vibrational band near 2476 nm using a distributed-feedback diode laser. The peak absorption cross sections of this absorption line have also been determined and parametrized using the Rautian-Sobel'man line shape function. The rate constant measurements covered a wide temperature range of 1018-1710 K at pressures from 100 to 290 kPa, and the derived rate constants were successfully reproduced by the master equation calculation with an average downward energy transfer, ⟨ΔEdown⟩, of 400 cm(-1).

  6. High Speed All Optical Nyquist Signal Generation and Full-band Coherent Detection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Junwen; Yu, Jianjun; Fang, Yuan; Chi, Nan

    2014-01-01

    Spectrum efficient data transmission is of key interest for high capacity optical communication systems considering the limited available bandwidth. Transmission of the high speed signal with higher-order modulation formats within the Nyquist bandwidth using coherent detection brings attractive performance advantages. However, high speed Nyquist signal generation with high order modulation formats is challenging. Electrical Nyquist pulse generation is restricted by the limited sampling rate and processor capacities of digital-to-analog convertor devices, while the optical Nyquist signals can provide a much higher symbol rate using time domain multiplexing method. However, most optical Nyquist signals are based on direct detection with simple modulation formats. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of high speed all optical Nyquist signal generation based on Sinc-shaped pulse generation and time-division multiplexing with high level modulation format and full-band coherent detection. Our experiments demonstrate a highly flexible and compatible all optical high speed Nyquist signal generation and detection scheme for future fiber communication systems. PMID:25142269

  7. Improving Nocturnal Fire Detection with the VIIRS Day-Night Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Polivka, T. N.; Ellison, L.; Ichoku, C. M.; Hyer, E. J.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS), this study investigates the adjustment of fire pixel selection criteria to include visible light signatures at night, creating the Firelight Detection Algorithm (FILDA). This allows for greatly improved detection of smaller and cooler fires from satellite observations. VIIRS scenes with coincident Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) overpasses are examined after applying the operational VIIRS fire product algorithm and including a modified "candidate fire pixel selection" approach, which lowers the 4 micron brightness temperature threshold from 305 K but includes a minimum day-night band (DNB) radiance. FILDA is tested by applying it to scenes in different environments, including large forest fires like the Rim Fire in California and High Park fire in Colorado, in addition to gas flares. A large increase in the number of detected fire pixels is observed with small non-agricultural wildfires, as verified with the finer-resolution ASTER data (90 m). Quantitative use of the DNB to improve detection of these smaller fires could lead to reduced warning and response times as well as provide more accurate quantification of biomass burning emissions at night.

  8. The electronic band structures of gadolinium chalcogenides: a first-principles prediction for neutron detecting.

    PubMed

    Li, Kexue; Liu, Lei; Yu, Peter Y; Chen, Xiaobo; Shen, D Z

    2016-05-11

    By converting the energy of nuclear radiation to excited electrons and holes, semiconductor detectors have provided a highly efficient way for detecting them, such as photons or charged particles. However, for detecting the radiated neutrons, those conventional semiconductors hardly behave well, as few of them possess enough capability for capturing these neutral particles. While the element Gd has the highest nuclear cross section, here for searching proper neutron-detecting semiconductors, we investigate theoretically the Gd chalcogenides whose electronic band structures have never been characterized clearly. Among them, we identify that γ-phase Gd2Se3 should be the best candidate for neutron detecting since it possesses not only the right bandgap of 1.76 eV for devices working under room temperature but also the desired indirect gap nature for charge carriers surviving longer. We propose further that semiconductor neutron detectors with single-neutron sensitivity can be realized with such a Gd-chalcogenide on the condition that their crystals can be grown with good quality.

  9. Using the VIIRS Day/Night Band to Improve Nocturnal Fire Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polivka, T. N.; Wang, J.; Hyer, E. J.

    2014-12-01

    Wildfires are a serious threat to life and property that has exacted greater costs in recent years, despite improving warning systems. In addition to local impacts, the smoke produced by wildfires and biomass burning can travel thousands of kilometers downwind, impacting visibility and health far from the source. Using the recently launched Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) aboard the Suomi-NPP satellite, this study investigates the adjustment of fire pixel selection criteria to include visible light signatures at night, allowing for greatly improved detection of smaller and cooler fires from satellite observations. VIIRS scenes with coincident Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) overpasses are examined by applying the operational VIIRS fire product algorithm, and including a modified "candidate fire pixel selection" approach, which lowers the 4 µm brightness temperature thresholds but includes a minimum DNB radiance. This approach is applied while leaving the contextual tests unchanged; to be flagged as fires, fire pixels must pass the existing operational tests that compare them to background temperatures. While the detection of small agricultural fires in the Central United States remain problematic because of the coarse spatial resolutions of the 750 meter (M)oderate resolution bands, a large increase in the number of detected fire pixels is observed with small non-agricultural wildfires. Quantitative use of the DNB to improve detection of these smaller fires could lead to reduced warning and response times as well as provide more accurate quantification of biomass burning emissions at night.

  10. A Multi-Band Analytical Algorithm for Deriving Absorption and Backscattering Coefficients from Remote-Sensing Reflectance of Optically Deep Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-band analytical (MBA) algorithm is developed to retrieve absorption and backscattering coefficients for optically deep waters, which can be applied to data from past and current satellite sensors, as well as data from hyperspectral sensors. This MBA algorithm applies a remote-sensing reflectance model derived from the Radiative Transfer Equation, and values of absorption and backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated from values of remote-sensing reflectance. There are only limited empirical relationships involved in the algorithm, which implies that this MBA algorithm could be applied to a wide dynamic range of waters. Applying the algorithm to a simulated non-"Case 1" data set, which has no relation to the development of the algorithm, the percentage error for the total absorption coefficient at 440 nm a (sub 440) is approximately 12% for a range of 0.012 - 2.1 per meter (approximately 6% for a (sub 440) less than approximately 0.3 per meter), while a traditional band-ratio approach returns a percentage error of approximately 30%. Applying it to a field data set ranging from 0.025 to 2.0 per meter, the result for a (sub 440) is very close to that using a full spectrum optimization technique (9.6% difference). Compared to the optimization approach, the MBA algorithm cuts the computation time dramatically with only a small sacrifice in accuracy, making it suitable for processing large data sets such as satellite images. Significant improvements over empirical algorithms have also been achieved in retrieving the optical properties of optically deep waters.

  11. H I emission and absorption in nearby, gas-rich galaxies - II. Sample completion and detection of intervening absorption in NGC 5156

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, S. N.; Sadler, E. M.; Allison, J. R.; Koribalski, B. S.; Curran, S. J.; Pracy, M. B.; Phillips, C. J.; Bignall, H. E.; Reynolds, C.

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a survey for intervening 21 cm H I absorption in a sample of 10 nearby, gas-rich galaxies selected from the H I Parkes All-Sky Survey (HIPASS). This follows the six HIPASS galaxies searched in previous work and completes our full sample. In this paper, we searched for absorption along 17 sightlines with impact parameters between 6 and 46 kpc, making one new detection. We also obtained simultaneous H I emission-line data, allowing us to directly relate the absorption-line detection rate to the H I distribution. From this, we find the majority of the non-detections in the current sample are because sightline does not intersect the H I disc of the galaxy at sufficiently high column density, but that source structure is also an important factor. The detected absorption-line arises in the galaxy NGC 5156 (z = 0.01) at an impact parameter of 19 kpc. The line is deep and narrow with an integrated optical depth of 0.82 km s-1. High-resolution Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) images at 5 and 8 GHz reveal that the background source is resolved into two components with a separation of 2.6 arcsec (500 pc at the redshift of the galaxy), with the absorption likely occurring against a single component. We estimate that the ratio of the spin temperature and covering factor, TS/f, is approximately 950 K in the outer disc of NGC 5156, but further observations using very long baseline interferometry would allow us to accurately measure the covering factor and spin temperature of the gas.

  12. GBT Detection of Polarization-Dependent HI Absorption and HI Outflows in Local ULIRGs and Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teng, Stacy H.; Veilleux, Sylvain; Baker, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of a 21-cm HI survey of 27 local massive gas-rich late-stage mergers and merger remnants with the Green Bank Telescope (GBT). These remnants were selected from the Quasar/ULIRG Evolution Study (QUEST) sample of ultraluminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs; L(sub 8 - 1000 micron) > 10(exp 12) solar L) and quasars; our targets are all bolometrically dominated by active galactic nuclei (AGN) and sample the later phases of the proposed ULIRG-to-quasar evolutionary sequence. We find the prevalence of HI absorption (emission) to be 100% (29%) in ULIRGs with HI detections, 100% (88%) in FIR-strong quasars, and 63% (100%) in FIR-weak quasars. The absorption features are associated with powerful neutral outflows that change from being mainly driven by star formation in ULIRGs to being driven by the AGN in the quasars. These outflows have velocities that exceed 1500 km/s in some cases. Unexpectedly, we find polarization-dependent HI absorption in 57% of our spectra (88% and 63% of the FIR-strong and FIR-weak quasars, respectively). We attribute this result to absorption of polarized continuum emission from these sources by foreground HI clouds. About 60% of the quasars displaying polarized spectra are radio-loud, far higher than the approx 10% observed in the general AGN population. This discrepancy suggests that radio jets play an important role in shaping the environments in these galaxies. These systems may represent a transition phase in the evolution of gas-rich mergers into "mature" radio galaxies.

  13. Carbon dioxide sequestration monitoring and verification via laser based detection system in the 2 mum band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, Seth David

    Carbon Dioxide (CO2) is a known contributor to the green house gas effect. Emissions of CO2 are rising as the global demand for inexpensive energy is placated through the consumption and combustion of fossil fuels. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) may provide a method to prevent CO2 from being exhausted to the atmosphere. The carbon may be captured after fossil fuel combustion in a power plant and then stored in a long term facility such as a deep geologic feature. The ability to verify the integrity of carbon storage at a location is key to the success of all CCS projects. A laser-based instrument has been built and tested at Montana State University (MSU) to measure CO2 concentrations above a carbon storage location. The CO2 Detection by Differential Absorption (CODDA) Instrument uses a temperature-tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser diode that is capable of accessing a spectral region, 2.0027 to 2.0042 mum, that contains three CO2 absorption lines and a water vapor absorption line. This instrument laser is aimed over an open-air, two-way path of about 100 m, allowing measurements of CO2 concentrations to be made directly above a carbon dioxide release test site. The performance of the instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is studied using a newly developed CO2 controlled release facility. The field and CO2 releases are managed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at MSU. Two test injections were carried out through vertical wells simulating seepage up well paths. Three test injections were done as CO2 escaped up through a slotted horizontal pipe simulating seepage up through geologic fault zones. The results from these 5 separate controlled release experiments over the course of three summers show that the CODDA Instrument is clearly capable of verifying the integrity of full-scale CO2 storage operations.

  14. Application of modified difference absorption method to stand-off detection of alcohol in simulated car cabins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubicki, Jan; Młyńczak, Jaroslaw; Kopczyński, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Some aspects of stand-off detection of alcohol in simulated car cabins are described. The proposed method is the well-known "difference absorption" method applied to the differential absorption lidar system, modified by taking advantage of a third laser beam. The modification was motivated by the familiar physical phenomena such as dispersion and different absorption coefficients in window panes for applied laser wavelengths. The mathematical expressions for the method were derived and confirmed by experiments. The presented investigations indicate that the method can be successfully applied to stand-off detection of ethyl alcohol in moving cars.

  15. Hyperspectral reflectance imaging for detecting citrus canker based on dual-band ratio image classification method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiangbo; Rao, Xiuqin; Guo, Junxian; Ying, Yibin

    2010-10-01

    Citrus are one of the major fruit produced in China. Most of this production is exported to Europe for fresh consumption, where consumers increasingly demand best quality. Citrus canker is one of the most devastating diseases that threaten peel of most commercial citrus varieties. The aim of this research was to investigate the potential of using hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting canker lesions on citrus fruit. Navel oranges with cankerous, normal and various common diseased skin conditions including wind scar, thrips scarring, scale insect, dehiscent fruit, phytotoxicity, heterochromatic stripe, and insect damage were studied. The imaging system (400-1000 nm) was established to acquire reflectance images from samples. Region of interest (ROI) spectral feature of various diseased peel areas was analyzed and characteristic wavebands (630, 685, and 720 nm) were extracted. The dual-band reflectance ratio (such as Q720/685) algorithm was performed on the hyperspectral images of navel oranges for differentiating canker from normal fruit skin and other surface diseases. The overall classification success rate was 96.84% regardless of the presence of other confounding diseases. The presented processing approach overcame the presence of stem/navel on navel oranges that typically has been a problematic source for false positives in the detection of defects. Because of the limited sample size, delineation of an optimal detection scheme is beyond the scope of the current study. However, the results showed that two-band ratio (Q685/630) along with the use of a simple threshold value segmentation method for discriminating canker on navel oranges from other peel diseases may be feasible.

  16. Improving Nocturnal Fire Detection with the VIIRS Day-Night Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polivka, Thomas N.; Wang, Jun; Ellison, Luke T.; Hyer, Edward J.; Ichoku, Charles M.

    2016-01-01

    Building on existing techniques for satellite remote sensing of fires, this paper takes advantage of the day-night band (DNB) aboard the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) to develop the Firelight Detection Algorithm (FILDA), which characterizes fire pixels based on both visible-light and infrared (IR) signatures at night. By adjusting fire pixel selection criteria to include visible-light signatures, FILDA allows for significantly improved detection of pixels with smaller and/or cooler subpixel hotspots than the operational Interface Data Processing System (IDPS) algorithm. VIIRS scenes with near-coincident Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection (ASTER) overpasses are examined after applying the operational VIIRS fire product algorithm and including a modified "candidate fire pixel selection" approach from FILDA that lowers the 4-µm brightness temperature (BT) threshold but includes a minimum DNB radiance. FILDA is shown to be effective in detecting gas flares and characterizing fire lines during large forest fires (such as the Rim Fire in California and High Park fire in Colorado). Compared with the operational VIIRS fire algorithm for the study period, FILDA shows a large increase (up to 90%) in the number of detected fire pixels that can be verified with the finer resolution ASTER data (90 m). Part (30%) of this increase is likely due to a combined use of DNB and lower 4-µm BT thresholds for fire detection in FILDA. Although further studies are needed, quantitative use of the DNB to improve fire detection could lead to reduced response times to wildfires and better estimate of fire characteristics (smoldering and flaming) at night.

  17. Differences in Error Detection Skills by Band and Choral Preservice Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stambaugh, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Band and choral preservice teachers (N = 44) studied band and choral scores, listened to recordings of school ensembles, and identified errors in the recordings. Results indicated that preservice teachers identified significantly more errors when listening to recordings of their primary area (band majors listening to band, p = 0.045; choral majors…

  18. Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy for detection of multimetal traces in low-voltage electrical marks.

    PubMed

    Jakubeniene, Marija; Zakaras, Algirdas; Minkuviene, Zita Nijole; Benoshys, Alvydas

    2006-08-10

    Application of atomic absorption spectroscopy to detect multimetal traces in injured skin is a promising tool for investigation of fatalities caused by electrocution. The present paper is aimed at testing the reliability of this method for metal traces detection in electric current marks and is focused on study of peculiarities of metal penetration into the skin exposed to a current impact. Bare aluminum wire, tin-lead coated copper multistrand wire, and zinc-plated steel rope were used to make electrical marks on pig skin. It is demonstrated that amount of copper, zinc, lead, and iron may serve as statistically reliable indicators for the type of wire, which caused the electrical mark, in spite of the background content of these metals in the skin without injury. Different penetration rates for different metals contained in the wire inflicting an electrical mark were observed.

  19. Comparison of two absorption imaging methods to detect cold atoms in magnetic trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan; Hu, Zhao-Hui; Qi, Lu

    2015-02-01

    Two methods of absorption imaging to detect cold atoms in a magnetic trap are implemented for a high-precision cold atom interferometer. In the first method, a probe laser which is in resonance with a cycle transition frequency is used to evaluate the quantity and distribution of the atom sample. In the second method, the probe laser is tuned to an open transition frequency, which stimulates a few and constant number of photons per atom. This method has a shorter interaction time and results in absorption images which are not affected by the magnetic field and the light field. We make a comparison of performance between these two imaging methods in the sense of parameters such as pulse duration, light intensity, and magnetic field strength. The experimental results show that the second method is more reliable when detecting the quantity and density profiles of the atoms. These results fit well to the theoretical analysis. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61227902 and 61121003) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2120132005).

  20. [The application of atomic absorption spectrometry in automatic transmission fault detection].

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-dan; Chen, Kai-kao

    2012-01-01

    The authors studied the innovative applications of atomic absorption spectrometry in the automatic transmission fault detection. After the authors have determined Fe, Cu and Cr contents in the five groups of Audi A6 main metal in automatic transmission fluid whose travel course is respectively 10-15 thousand kilometers, 20-26 thousand kilometers, 32-38 thousand kilometers, 43-49 thousand kilometers, and 52-58 thousand kilometers by atomic absorption spectrometry, the authors founded the database of primary metal content in the Audi A6 different mileage automatic transmission fluid (ATF). The research discovered that the main metal content in the automatic transmission fluid increased with the vehicles mileage and its normal metal content level in the automatic transmission fluid is between the two trend lines. The authors determined the main metal content of automatic transmission fluid which had faulty symptoms and compared it with its database value. Those can not only judge the wear condition of the automatic transmission which had faulty symptoms but also help the automobile detection and maintenance personnel to diagnose automatic transmission failure reasons without disintegration. This reduced automobile maintenance costs, and improved the quality of automobile maintenance.

  1. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules.

    PubMed

    Bui, Tung S; Dao, Thang D; Dang, Luu H; Vu, Lam D; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V

    2016-08-24

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3'-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  2. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    PubMed Central

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, YoungPak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-01-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3′-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes. PMID:27555217

  3. Metamaterial-enhanced vibrational absorption spectroscopy for the detection of protein molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bui, Tung S.; Dao, Thang D.; Dang, Luu H.; Vu, Lam D.; Ohi, Akihiko; Nabatame, Toshihide; Lee, Youngpak; Nagao, Tadaaki; Hoang, Chung V.

    2016-08-01

    From visible to mid-infrared frequencies, molecular sensing has been a major successful application of plasmonics because of the enormous enhancement of the surface electromagnetic nearfield associated with the induced collective motion of surface free carriers excited by the probe light. However, in the lower-energy terahertz (THz) region, sensing by detecting molecular vibrations is still challenging because of low sensitivity, complicated spectral features, and relatively little accumulated knowledge of molecules. Here, we report the use of a micron-scale thin-slab metamaterial (MM) architecture, which functions as an amplifier for enhancing the absorption signal of the THz vibration of an ultrathin adsorbed layer of large organic molecules. We examined bovine serum albumin (BSA) as a prototype large protein molecule and Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G) and 3,3‧-diethylthiatricarbocyanine iodide (DTTCI) as examples of small molecules. Among them, our MM significantly magnified only the signal strength of bulky BSA. On the other hand, DTTCI and Rh6G are inactive, as they lack low-frequency vibrational modes in this frequency region. The results obtained here clearly demonstrate the promise of MM-enhanced absorption spectroscopy in the THz region for detection and structural monitoring of large biomolecules such as proteins or pathogenic enzymes.

  4. Infrared absorption spectra of the CO(2)/H(2)O complex in a cryogenic nitrogen matrix--detection of a new bending frequency.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xu; Sander, Stanley P

    2011-09-08

    Infrared absorption spectra have been measured for the mixture of CO(2) and H(2)O in a cryogenic nitrogen matrix. The 1:1 CO(2)/H(2)O complex has been observed. Each structure of this complex should have two bending frequencies corresponding to the CO(2) fundamental bending mode (ν(2)). In this work, three bending frequencies corresponding to the CO(2) fundamental bending mode (ν(2)) have been detected; one of them at 660.3 cm(-1) is reported here for the first time. This finding helps confirm the existence of two structures for this complex. A new feature attributed to a CO(2) and H(2)O complex is observed at 3604.4 cm(-1) and is tentatively assigned to the CO(2)/H(2)O complex band corresponding to the CO(2) combination mode (ν(3) + 2ν(2)). In addition, a band that belongs to a CO(2) and H(2)O complex is detected at 3623.8 cm(-1) for the first time and is tentatively assigned to the (CO(2))(2)/H(2)O complex band corresponding to the symmetric stretching mode (ν(1)) of H(2)O.

  5. Detection of Digital Elevation Model Errors Using X-band Weather Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Steven D.; deHaag, Maatren Uijt

    2007-01-01

    Flight in Instrument Meteorological Conditions requires pilots to manipulate flight controls while referring to a Primary Flight Display. The Primary Flight Display indicates aircraft attitude along with, in some cases, many other state variables such as altitude, speed, and guidance cues. Synthetic Vision Systems have been proposed that overlay the traditional information provided on Primary Flight Displays onto a scene depicting the location of terrain and other geo-spatial features.Terrain models used by these displays must have sufficient quality to avoid providing misleading information. This paper describes how X-band radar measurements can be used as part of a monitor, and/or maintenance system, to quantify the integrity of terrain models that are used by systems such as Synthetic Vision. Terrain shadowing effects, as seen by the radar, are compared in a statistical manner against estimated shadow feature elements extracted from the stored terrain model from the perspective of the airborne observer. A test statistic is defined that enables detection of errors as small as the range resolution of the radar. Experimental results obtained from two aircraft platforms hosting certified commercial-off-the-shelf X-band radars test the premise and illustrate its potential.

  6. Efficient tissue ablation using a laser tunable in the water absorption band at 3 microns with little collateral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nierlich, Alexandra; Chuchumishev, Danail; Nagel, Elizabeth; Marinova, Kristiana; Philipov, Stanislav; Fiebig, Torsten; Buchvarov, Ivan; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2014-03-01

    Lasers can significantly advance medical diagnostics and treatment. At high power, they are typically used as cutting tools during surgery. For lasers that are used as knifes, radiation wavelengths in the far ultraviolet and in the near infrared spectral regions are favored because tissue has high contents of collagen and water. Collagen has an absorption peak around 190 nm, while water is in the near infrared around 3,000 nm. Changing the wavelength across the absorption peak will result in significant differences in laser tissue interactions. Tunable lasers in the infrared that could optimize the laser tissue interaction for ablation and/or coagulation are not available until now besides the Free Electron Laser (FEL). Here we demonstrate efficient tissue ablation using a table-top mid-IR laser tunable between 3,000 to 3,500 nm. A detailed study of the ablation has been conducted in different tissues. Little collateral thermal damage has been found at a distance above 10-20 microns from the ablated surface. Furthermore, little mechanical damage could be seen in conventional histology and by examination of birefringent activity of the samples using a pair of cross polarizing filters.

  7. Case of pharyngeal cancer not detected during preoperative transoral endoscopy with narrow band imaging.

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Kunihiro; Doyama, Hisashi; Nakanishi, Hiroyoshi; Takemura, Kenichi; Moriyama, Hideki; Sakumoto, Makoto; Tsuyama, Sho; Kurumaya, Hiroshi

    2015-04-01

    We herein report a case of pharyngeal cancer that was not detected during preoperative transoral endoscopy with narrow band imaging (NBI). A 61-year-old female was referred to our hospital for further evaluation of a pharyngeal lesion. Endoscopy revealed a small, elevated lesion, approximately 7 mm in size, at the right pyriform sinus. We performed endoscopic resection to remove this lesion under general anesthesia based on the biopsy results. Intraoperatively, we detected another tumor in the left oropharyngeal wall with Lugol staining after insertion of a curved laryngoscope. Although this lesion was ≥20 mm in diameter, we were unable to detect it during preoperative transoral endoscopy with NBI and white light imaging. We performed endoscopic treatment for this lesion 2 months later. The pathological diagnosis was pharyngeal cancer; the lesion had low vascularity. This case report provides an example of false-negative endoscopy with NBI. Although transoral endoscopy with NBI has improved the early diagnosis of superficial squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck, pharyngeal cancers that are less vascular may be missed with NBI.

  8. Phase effects in masking by harmonic complexes: detection of bands of speech-shaped noise.

    PubMed

    Deroche, Mickael L D; Culling, John F; Chatterjee, Monita

    2014-11-01

    When phase relationships between partials of a complex masker produce highly modulated temporal envelopes on the basilar membrane, listeners may detect speech information from temporal dips in the within-channel masker envelopes. This source of masking release (MR) is however located in regions of unresolved masker partials and it is unclear how much of the speech information in these regions is really needed for intelligibility. Also, other sources of MR such as glimpsing in between resolved masker partials may provide sufficient information from regions that disregard phase relationships. This study simplified the problem of speech recognition to a masked detection task. Target bands of speech-shaped noise were restricted to frequency regions containing either only resolved or only unresolved masker partials, as a function of masker phase relationships (sine or random), masker fundamental frequency (F0) (50, 100, or 200 Hz), and masker spectral profile (flat-spectrum or speech-shaped). Although masker phase effects could be observed in unresolved regions at F0s of 50 and 100 Hz, it was only at 50-Hz F0 that detection thresholds were ever lower in unresolved than in resolved regions, suggesting little role of envelope modulations for harmonic complexes with F0s in the human voice range and at moderate level.

  9. Automatic detection of aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels using dual-band imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ononye, Ambrose E.; Yao, Haibo; Hruska, Zuzana; Kincaid, Russell; Brown, Robert L.; Cleveland, Thomas E.

    2009-05-01

    Aflatoxin is a mycotoxin predominantly produced by Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasitiucus fungi that grow naturally in corn, peanuts and in a wide variety of other grain products. Corn, like other grains is used as food for human and feed for animal consumption. It is known that aflatoxin is carcinogenic; therefore, ingestion of corn infected with the toxin can lead to very serious health problems such as liver damage if the level of the contamination is high. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has strict guidelines for permissible levels in the grain products for both humans and animals. The conventional approach used to determine these contamination levels is one of the destructive and invasive methods that require corn kernels to be ground and then chemically analyzed. Unfortunately, each of the analytical methods can take several hours depending on the quantity, to yield a result. The development of high spectral and spatial resolution imaging sensors has created an opportunity for hyperspectral image analysis to be employed for aflatoxin detection. However, this brings about a high dimensionality problem as a setback. In this paper, we propose a technique that automatically detects aflatoxin contaminated corn kernels by using dual-band imagery. The method exploits the fluorescence emission spectra from corn kernels captured under 365 nm ultra-violet light excitation. Our approach could lead to a non-destructive and non-invasive way of quantifying the levels of aflatoxin contamination. The preliminary results shown here, demonstrate the potential of our technique for aflatoxin detection.

  10. Absolute Absorption Intensities in the Fundamental nu2 and nu5 Bands of 12CH3F.

    PubMed

    Lepère; Blanquet; Walrand; Tarrago

    1998-06-01

    The absolute strengths of 93 lines belonging to the nu2 and nu5 bands of methyl fluoride were measured in the range of 1416-1503 cm-1 using a tunable diode-laser (TDL) spectrometer. These experimental line intensities were obtained from the equivalent width method. The intensities were analyzed within a dyad system, required to account properly for the strong Coriolis coupling between nu2 and nu5. The fit to the experimental data led to the determination of the dipole moment derivatives partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq2 and partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq5, as well as the first-order Herman-Wallis correction in K to partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq5. The intensities were reproduced with an overall standard deviation of 1.44%, to be compared with a mean experimental uncertainty equal to 1.58%. The values derived for the vibrational band strengths of nu2 and nu5 are 2.124 (18) cm-2.atm-1 and 36.96 cm-2.atm-1 at 296 K, respectively. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  11. Isoelectric focusing in agarose gel for detection of oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal and other biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Csako, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) coupled with immunodetection (immunofixation or immunoblotting) has become the leading technique for the detection and study of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and also is increasingly used in other body fluids such as the tear and serum. Limited commercial availability of precast agarose IEF gels for research and a need for customization prompted reporting a detailed general protocol for the preparation and casting of agarose IEF gel along with sample, control, and isoelectric point marker preparation and carrying out the focusing itself for CSF OCBs. However, the method is readily adaptable to the use of other body fluid specimens and, possibly, research specimens such as culture fluids as well.

  12. Polyp detection rates using magnification with narrow band imaging and white light

    PubMed Central

    Gilani, Nooman; Stipho, Sally; Panetta, James D; Petre, Sorin; Young, Michele A; Ramirez, Francisco C

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To compare the yield of adenomas between narrow band imaging and white light when using high definition/magnification. METHODS: This prospective, non-randomized comparative study was performed at the endoscopy unit of veteran affairs medical center in Phoenix, Arizona. Consecutive patients undergoing first average risk colorectal cancer screening colonoscopy were selected. Two experienced gastroenterologists performed all the procedures that were blinded to each other’s findings. Demographic details were recorded. Data are presented as mean ± SEM. Proportional data were compared using the χ2 test and means were compared using the Student’s t test. Tandem colonoscopy was performed in a sequential and segmental fashion using one of 3 strategies: white light followed by narrow band imaging [Group A: white light (WL) → narrow band imaging (NBI)]; narrow band imaging followed by white light (Group B: NBI → WL) and, white light followed by white light (Group C: WL → WL). Detection rate of missed polyps and adenomas were evaluated in all three groups. RESULTS: Three hundred patients were studied (100 in each Group). Although the total time for the colonoscopy was similar in the 3 groups (23.8 ± 0.7, 22.2 ± 0.5 and 24.1 ± 0.7 min for Groups A, B and C, respectively), it reached statistical significance between Groups B and C (P < 0.05). The cecal intubation time in Groups B and C was longer than for Group A (6.5 ± 0.4 min and 6.5 ± 0.4 min vs 4.9 ± 0.3 min; P < 0.05). The withdrawal time for Groups A and C was longer than Group B (18.9 ± 0.7 min and 17.6 ± 0.6 min vs 15.7 ± 0.4 min; P < 0.05). Overall miss rate for polyps and adenomas detected in three groups during the second look was 18% and 17%, respectively (P = NS). Detection rate for polyps and adenomas after first look with white light was similar irrespective of the light used during the second look (WL → WL: 13.7% for polyps, 12.6% for adenomas; WL → NBI: 14.2% for polyps, 11.3% for

  13. XMM-Newton Spectroscopy of the X-ray Detected Broad Absorption Line QSO CSO 755

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandt, Niel

    2005-01-01

    We present the results from XMM-Newton observations of the highly optically polarized broad absorption line quasar (BALQSO) CSO 755. By analyzing its X-ray spectrum with a total of approximately 3000 photons we find that this source has an X-ray continuum of "typical" radio-quiet quasars, with a photon index of Gamma=1.83, and a rather flat (X-ray bright) intrinsic optical-to-X-ray spectral slope of alpha_ox=- 1.51. The source shows evidence for intrinsic absorption, and fitting the spectrum with a neutral-absorption model gives a column density of N_H approximately 1.2x10^22 cm^{-2}; this is among the lowest X-ray columns measured for BALQSOs. We do not detect, with high significance, any other absorption features in the X-ray spectrum. Upper limits we place on the rest-frame equivalent width of a neutral (ionized) Fe K-alpha line, less than =180 eV (less than =120 eV), and on the Compton-reflection component parameter, R less than =0.2, suggest that most of the X-rays from the source are directly observed rather than being scattered or reflected; this is also supported by the relatively flat intrinsic alpha ox we measure. The possibility that most of the X-ray flux is scattered due to the high level of UV-optical polarization is ruled out. Considering data for 46 BALQSOs from the literature, including CSO 755, we have found that the UV-optical continuum polarization level of BALQSOs is not correlated with any of their X-ray properties. A lack of significant short-term and long-term X-ray flux variations in the source may be attributed to a large black-hole mass in CSO 755. We note that another luminous BALQSO, PG 2112+059, has both similar shallow C IV BALs and moderate X-ray absorption.

  14. Ion irradiation of carbonaceous interstellar analogues. Effects of cosmic rays on the 3.4 μm interstellar absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Féraud, G.; Chabot, M.; Carpentier, Y.; Pino, T.; Brunetto, R.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Bréchignac, P.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Dartois, E.

    2011-05-01

    Context. A 3.4 μm absorption band (around 2900 cm-1), assigned to aliphatic C-H stretching modes of hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H), is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears or is modified in dense clouds. This spectral difference between different phases of the interstellar medium reflects the processing of dust in different environments. Cosmic ray bombardment is one of the interstellar processes that make carbonaceous dust evolve. Aims: We investigate the effects of cosmic rays on the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band carriers. Methods: Samples of carbonaceous interstellar analogues (a-C:H and soot) were irradiated at room temperature by swift ions with energy in the MeV range (from 0.2 to 160 MeV). The dehydrogenation and chemical bonding modifications that occurred during irradiation were studied with IR spectroscopy. Results: For all samples and all ions/energies used, we observed a decrease of the aliphatic C-H absorption bands intensity with the ion fluence. This evolution agrees with a model that describes the hydrogen loss as caused by the molecular recombination of two free H atoms created by the breaking of C-H bonds by the impinging ions. The corresponding destruction cross section and asymptotic hydrogen content are obtained for each experiment and their behaviour over a large range of ion stopping powers are inferred. Using elemental abundances and energy distributions of galactic cosmic rays, we investigated the implications of these results in different astrophysical environments. The results are compared to the processing by UV photons and H atoms in different regions of the interstellar medium. Conclusions: The destruction of aliphatic C-H bonds by cosmic rays occurs in characteristic times of a few 108 years, and it appears that even at longer time scales, cosmic rays alone cannot explain the observed disappearance of this spectral signature in dense regions. In diffuse interstellar medium, the formation

  15. Specific absorption spectra of hemoglobin at different PO2 levels: potential noninvasive method to detect PO2 in tissues.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Zhirong; Zeng, Changchun; Nie, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb), as one of main components of blood, has a unique quaternary structure. Its release of oxygen is controlled by oxygen partial pressure (PO2). We investigate the specific spectroscopic changes in Hb under different PO2 levels to optimize clinical methods of measuring tissue PO2. The transmissivity of Hb under different PO2 levels is measured with a UV/Vis fiber optic spectrometer. Its plotted absorption spectral curve shows two high absorption peaks at 540 and 576 nm and an absorption valley at 560 nm when PO2 is higher than 100 mm Hg. The two high absorption peaks decrease gradually with a decrease in PO2, whereas the absorption valley at 560 nm increases. When PO2 decreases to approximately 0 mm Hg, the two high absorption peaks disappear completely, while the absorption valley has a hypochromic shift (8 to 10 nm) and forms a specific high absorption peak at approximately 550 nm. The same phenomena can be observed in visible reflectance spectra of finger-tip microcirculation. Specific changes in extinction coefficient and absorption spectra of Hb occur along with variations in PO2, which could be used to explain pathological changes caused by tissue hypoxia and for early detection of oxygen deficiency diseases in clinical monitoring.

  16. Specific absorption spectra of hemoglobin at different PO2 levels: potential noninvasive method to detect PO2 in tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Peipei; Zhu, Zhirong; Zeng, Changchun; Nie, Guang

    2012-12-01

    Hemoglobin (Hb), as one of main components of blood, has a unique quaternary structure. Its release of oxygen is controlled by oxygen partial pressure (PO2). We investigate the specific spectroscopic changes in Hb under different PO2 levels to optimize clinical methods of measuring tissue PO2. The transmissivity of Hb under different PO2 levels is measured with a UV/Vis fiber optic spectrometer. Its plotted absorption spectral curve shows two high absorption peaks at 540 and 576 nm and an absorption valley at 560 nm when PO2 is higher than 100 mm Hg. The two high absorption peaks decrease gradually with a decrease in PO2, whereas the absorption valley at 560 nm increases. When PO2 decreases to approximately 0 mm Hg, the two high absorption peaks disappear completely, while the absorption valley has a hypochromic shift (8 to 10 nm) and forms a specific high absorption peak at approximately 550 nm. The same phenomena can be observed in visible reflectance spectra of finger-tip microcirculation. Specific changes in extinction coefficient and absorption spectra of Hb occur along with variations in PO2, which could be used to explain pathological changes caused by tissue hypoxia and for early detection of oxygen deficiency diseases in clinical monitoring.

  17. Study on synchronous detection method of methane and ethane with laser absorption spectroscopy technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ying; Zhang, Yu-jun; You, Kun; Gao, Yan-wei; Chen, Chen; Liu, Jian-guo; Liu, Wen-qing

    2016-10-01

    The main ingredient of mash gas is alkenes, and methane is the most parts of mash gas and ethane is a small portion of it. Fast, accurate, real-time measurement of methane and ethane concentration is an important task for preventing coal mining disaster. In this research, a monitoring system with tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology has been set up for simultaneous measurement of methane and ethane, and a DFB laser at wavelength of 1.653μm was used as the laser source. The absorption spectroscopy information of methane and ethane, especially the characteristic of the spectrum peak positions and relative intensity were determined by available spectral structures from previous study and available database. Then, the concentration inversion algorithm method based on the spectral resolution and feature extraction was designed for methane and ethane synchronous detection. At last, the continuously experimental results obtained by different concentration of methane and ethane sample gases with the multiple reflection cell and the standard distribution system. In this experiment, the standard distribution system made with the standard gas and two high precision mass flow meters of D07 Sevenstar series whose flow velocity is 1l/min and 5l/min respectively. When the multiple reflection cell work stably, the biggest detection error of methane concentration inversion was 3.7%, and the biggest detection error of ethane was 4.8%. So it is verified that this concentration inversion algorithm works stably and reliably. Thus, this technology could realize the real-time, fast and continuous measurement requirement of mash gas and it will provide the effective technical support to coal mining production in safety for our country.

  18. Hydrazine detection limits in the cigarette smoke matrix using infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Plunkett, Susan; Parrish, Milton E; Shafer, Kenneth H; Shorter, Joanne H; Nelson, David D; Zahniser, Mark S

    2002-09-01

    Infrared absorption lines of hydrazine are broad and typically not baseline resolved, with line strengths approximately 100 times weaker than the more widely studied compound ammonia. Hardware and software improvements have been made to a two-color infrared tunable diode laser (IR-TDL) spectrometer in order to improve the limit of detection (LOD) of hydrazine (N2H4) in the cigarette smoke matrix. The detection limit in the smoke matrix was improved from 25 parts-per-million-by-volume (ppmv) to 4.2 ppmv using a 100 m pathlength cell with acquisition of background spectra immediately prior to each sample and 100 ms temporal resolution. This study did not detect hydrazine in cigarette smoke in the 964.4-964.9 cm(-1) spectral region, after mathematically subtracting the spectral contributions of ethylene, ammonia, carbon dioxide, methanol, acrolein, and acetaldehyde. These compounds are found in cigarette smoke and absorb in this spectral region. The LOD is limited by remaining spectral structure from unidentified smoke species. The pseudo random noise (root mean square) in the improved instrument was 2 x 10(-4) absorbance units (base e) which is equivalent to a 0.09 ppmv hydrazine gas sample in the multipass cell. This would correspond to a detection limit of 0.44 ppmv of hydrazine, given the dilution of the smoke by a factor of 5 by the sampling system. This is a factor of 10 less than the 4.2 ppmv detection limit for hydrazine in the smoke matrix, and indicates that the detection limit is primarily a result of the complexity of the matrix rather than the random noise of the TDL instrument.

  19. Confinement effect of laser ablation plume in liquids probed by self-absorption of C{sub 2} Swan band emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2005-01-01

    The (0,0) Swan band of the C{sub 2} molecules in a laser ablation plume produced on the surface of graphite target submerged in water was used as a probe to estimate the density of C{sub 2} molecules in the plume. Observed emission spectra were reproduced excellently by introducing a self-absorption parameter to the theoretical spectral profile expected by a rotational population distribution at a certain temperature. The optical density of the ablation plume as a function of time was determined as a best-fit parameter by the quantitative fitting of the whole spectral profile. The results show high optical densities for the laser ablation plume in water compared with that in air. It is related to the plume confinement or the expansion, which are the important phenomena influencing the characteristics of laser ablation plumes in liquids.

  20. Tentative identification of the 780/cm nu-4 band Q branch of chlorine nitrate in high-resolution solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Malathy Devi, V.

    1985-01-01

    According to models of the photochemistry of the stratosphere, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is an important temporary reservoir of stratospheric chlorine. At night, ClO is believed to combine in a three-body reaction with NO2 to form chlorine nitrate. During daylight, chlorine nitrate is destroyed by photolysis to form free chlorine and NO3. Infrared spectroscopy has the potential to provide a technique for conducting important quantitative measurements of stratospheric chlorine nitrate. The present paper reports a detailed study of spectra in the 780/cm region. This study has led to the tentative identification of the nu-4 band Q branch of ClONO2 as a significant contributor to the observed stratospheric absorption near 780.21 per cm.

  1. Invisible ink mark detection in the visible spectrum using absorption difference.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong; Kong, Seong G; Kang, Tae-Yi; Kim, Byounghyun; Jeon, Oc-Yeub

    2014-03-01

    One of popular techniques in gambling fraud involves the use of invisible ink marks printed on the back surface of playing cards. Such covert patterns are transparent in the visible spectrum and therefore invisible to unaided human eyes. Invisible patterns can be made visible with ultraviolet (UV) illumination or a CCD camera installed with an infrared (IR) filter depending on the type of ink materials used. Cheating gamers often wear contact lenses or eyeglasses made of IR or UV filters to recognize the secret marks on the playing cards. This paper presents an image processing technique to reveal invisible ink patterns in the visible spectrum without the aid of special equipment such as UV lighting or IR filters. A printed invisible ink pattern leaves a thin coating on the surface with different refractive index for different wavelengths of light, which results in color dispersion or absorption difference. The proposed method finds the differences of color components caused by absorption difference to detect invisible ink patterns on the surface. Experiment results show that the proposed scheme is effective for both UV-active and IR-active invisible ink materials.

  2. meso-meso linked porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-porphyrin hybrid arrays and their triply linked tapes exhibiting strong absorption bands in the NIR region.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Takayuki; Lee, Sangsu; Lim, Jong Min; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-02-11

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of directly meso-meso linked porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-porphyrin hybrid oligomers and their triply linked (completely fused) hybrid tapes. meso-meso Linked Ni(II) porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-Ni(II) porphyrin trimers were prepared by methanesulfonic acid-catalyzed cross-condensation of meso-formyl Ni(II) porphyrins with a 5,10-diaryltripyrrane followed by oxidation with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ). The Ni(II) porphyrin moieties were converted to Zn(II) porphyrins via an indirect route involving reduction of the [26]hexaphyrin to its 28π congener, acid-induced denickelation, oxidation of the [28]hexaphyrin, and finally Zn(II) ion insertion. Over the course of these transformations, porphyrin-[28]hexaphyrin-porphyrin trimers have been revealed to take on a Möbius aromatic twisted structure for the [28]hexaphyrin segment. Oxidation of meso-meso linked hybrid trimer bearing 5,15-diaryl Zn(II) porphyrins with DDQ/Sc(OTf)3 under mild conditions resulted in meso-meso coupling oligomerization, affording the corresponding dimeric (hexamer), trimeric (nonamer), and tetrameric (dodecamer) oligomers. On the other hand, oxidation of a meso-meso linked hybrid trimer bearing 5,10,15-triaryl Zn(II) porphyrin terminals with DDQ/Sc(OTf)3 under harsher conditions afforded a meso-meso, β-β, β-β triply linked hybrid porphyrin tape, which displays a sharp and intense absorption band at 1912 nm. Comparison of this extremely red-shifted absorption band with those of Zn(II) porphyrin tapes suggests that the bathochromic-shifting capability of a [26]hexaphyrin unit is large, almost equivalent to that of four individual Zn(II) porphyrin units. As demonstrated, the fusion of porphyrins to [26]hexaphyrin offers an efficient means to expand their conjugation networks, significantly expanding the capabilities attainable for these chromophores.

  3. Microwave absorption in X and Ku band frequency of cotton fabric coated with Ni-Zn ferrite and carbon formulation in polyurethane matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Abbas, S. M.; Goswami, T. H.; Abhyankar, A. C.

    2014-08-01

    The present study highlights various microwave properties, i.e. reflection, transmission, absorption and reflection loss, of the coated cotton fabric [formulation: Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni 0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) and carbon black (acetylene black) at concentrations of 30, 40, 50, 60 and70 g of ferrite and 5 g carbon in each 100 ml polyurethane] evaluated at 8-18 GHz frequency. The uniform density of filling materials in coated fabrics (dotted marks in SEM micrograph) indicates homogeneous dispersion of conducting fillers in polyurethane and the density of filling material cluster increases with increase in ferrite concentration. SEM images also show uniform coating of conducting fillers/resin system over individual fibers and interweave spaces. The important parameters governing the microwave properties of coated fabrics i.e. permittivity and permeability, S-parameters, reflection loss, etc. were studied in a HVS free space microwave measurement system. The lossy character of coated fabric is found to increase with increase of ferrite content; the ferrite content decreases the impedance and increases the permittivity and permeability values. The 1.6-1.8 mm thick coated fabric sample (40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU) has shown about 40% absorption, 20% transmission and 40% reflectance in X (8.2-12.4 GHz) and Ku (12-18 GHz) frequency bands. The reflection loss at 13.5 GHz has shown the highest peak value (22.5 dB) due to coated sample optical thickness equal to λ/4 and more than 7.5 dB in entire Ku band. Owing to its thin and flexible nature, the coated fabric can be used as apparel in protecting human being from hazardous microwaves and also as radar camouflage covering screen in defense.

  4. Early stage breast cancer detection by means of time-domain ultra-wide band sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoon, T. F.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2011-11-01

    The interest in the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) impulses for medical imaging, particularly early stage breast cancer detection, is driven by safety advantage, super resolution capability, significant dielectric contrast between tumours and their surrounding tissues, patient convenience and low operating costs. However, inversion algorithms leading to recovery of the dielectric profile are complex in their nature, and vulnerable to noisy experimental conditions and environment. In this paper, we present a simplified yet robust gradient-based iterative image reconstruction technique to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem. The calculation is based on the Polak-Ribière's approach while the Broyden's formula is used to update the gradient in an iterative scheme. To validate this approach, both numerical and experimental results are presented. Animal derived biological targets in the form of chicken skin, beef and salted butter are used to construct an experimental breast phantom, while vegetable oil is used as a background media. UWB transceivers in the form of biconical antennas contour the breast forming a full view scanning geometry at a frequency range of 0-5 GHz. Results indicate the feasibility of experimental detection of millimetre scaled targets.

  5. Airborne cable detection with a W-band FMCW imaging sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goshi, D. S.; Liu, Y.; Mai, K.; Bui, L.; Shih, Y.

    2010-04-01

    Numerous accidents occur each year due to wire strikes for both military and commercial helicopters leading to a significant number of fatalities. The millimeter-wave sensor presents itself as an ideal candidate for a solution because it can see the very small attributes of the typical power line/cable wire as well as operate when visual conditions worsen due to environmental issues such as fog, smoke or dust. This paper presents recent results on the development of a W-band FMCW imaging sensor with potential application to cable detection and imaging. The sensor front end is integrated with a radar signal generator, processor, and data acquisition unit for the purpose of closing the loop between prototype demonstration and system development. Real-time imaging is achieved at a 10 Hz frame rate with a field of view of 30°. A complete flight demonstration of this system was performed on a Honeywell-operated AStar helicopter to validate the flight-worthiness of the sensor under close to actual operational conditions. The development of such technology that can detect and avoid obstacles such as cables and wires especially for rotorcraft platforms will save lives, assets, and enable the execution of more complex and dangerous tactical missions.

  6. Optimization of absorption bands of dye-sensitized and perovskite tandem solar cells based on loss-in-potential values.

    PubMed

    Sobuś, Jan; Ziółek, Marcin

    2014-07-21

    A numerical study of optimal bandgaps of light absorbers in tandem solar cell configurations is presented with the main focus on dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The limits in efficiency and the expected improvements of tandem structures are investigated as a function of total loss-in-potential (V(L)), incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) and fill factor (FF) of individual components. It is shown that the optimal absorption onsets are significantly smaller than those derived for multi-junction devices. For example, for double-cell devices the onsets are at around 660 nm and 930 nm for DSSCs with iodide based electrolytes and at around 720 nm and 1100 nm for both DSSCs with cobalt based electrolytes and PSCs. Such configurations can increase the total sunlight conversion efficiency by about 35% in comparison to single-cell devices of the same VL, IPCE and FF. The relevance of such studies for tandem n-p DSSCs and for a proposed new configuration for PSCs is discussed. In particular, it is shown that maximum total losses of 1.7 V for DSSCs and 1.4 V for tandem PSCs are necessary to give any efficiency improvement with respect to the single bandgap device. This means, for example, a tandem n-p DSSC with TiO2 and NiO porous electrodes will hardly work better than the champion single DSSC. A source code of the program used for calculations is also provided.

  7. Method of analyzing multiple sample simultaneously by detecting absorption and systems for use in such a method

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Gong, Xiaoyi

    2004-09-07

    The present invention provides a method of analyzing multiple samples simultaneously by absorption detection. The method comprises: (i) providing a planar array of multiple containers, each of which contains a sample comprising at least one absorbing species, (ii) irradiating the planar array of multiple containers with a light source and (iii) detecting absorption of light with a detetion means that is in line with the light source at a distance of at leaat about 10 times a cross-sectional distance of a container in the planar array of multiple containers. The absorption of light by a sample indicates the presence of an absorbing species in it. The method can further comprise: (iv) measuring the amount of absorption of light detected in (iii) indicating the amount of the absorbing species in the sample. Also provided by the present invention is a system for use in the abov metho.The system comprises; (i) a light source comrnpising or consisting essentially of at leaat one wavelength of light, the absorption of which is to be detected, (ii) a planar array of multiple containers, and (iii) a detection means that is in line with the light source and is positioned in line with and parallel to the planar array of multiple contiainers at a distance of at least about 10 times a cross-sectional distance of a container.

  8. Detection, identification and mapping of iron anomalies in brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhaylova, A.; Davidson, M.; Toastmann, H.; Channell, J.E.T.; Guyodo, Y.; Batich, C.; Dobson, J.

    2008-06-16

    This work describes a novel method for the detection, identification and mapping of anomalous iron compounds in mammalian brain tissue using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. We have located and identified individual iron anomalies in an avian tissue model associated with ferritin, biogenic magnetite and haemoglobin with a pixel resolution of less than 5 {micro}m. This technique represents a breakthrough in the study of both intra- and extra-cellular iron compounds in brain tissue. The potential for high-resolution iron mapping using microfocused X-ray beams has direct application to investigations of the location and structural form of iron compounds associated with human neurodegenerative disorders - a problem which has vexed researchers for 50 years.

  9. Detection of a Deep 3-μm Absorption Feature in the Spectrum of Amalthea (JV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J.; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  10. Detection of a deep 3-microm absorption feature in the spectrum of Amalthea (JV).

    PubMed

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-24

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  11. Broadband magnetometry by infrared-absorption detection of nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, V. M.; Bauch, E.; Jarmola, A.; Zipp, L. J.; Ledbetter, M. P.; Budker, D.

    2010-10-25

    We demonstrate magnetometry by detection of the spin state of high-density nitrogen-vacancy ensembles in diamond using optical absorption at 1042 nm. With this technique, measurement contrast, and collection efficiency can approach unity, leading to an increase in magnetic sensitivity compared to the more common method of collecting red fluorescence. Working at 75 K with a sensor with effective volume 50x50x300 {mu}m{sup 3}, we project photon shot-noise limited sensitivity of 5 pT in one second of acquisition and bandwidth from dc to a few megahertz. Operation in a gradiometer configuration yields a noise floor of 7 nT{sub rms} at {approx}110 Hz in one second of acquisition.

  12. Optimal design and loss mechanism analysis of microwave absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composites with broad absorption band and good polarization stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangchao; Jiang, Jianjun; He, Yun; Bie, Shaowei

    2016-04-01

    A microwave-absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composite with wide absorption and good polarization stability was designed by genetic algorithm. The anisotropic nature of unidirectional fiber composites was considered in the design by characterizing tensor permittivity. This special composite is composed of two kinds of SiC fibers that separately exhibit relatively high conductivity and low conductivity. The electromagnetic loss mechanism of this composite was examined for polarizations that differ in the electric field of the incident wave, applied either in the direction of the fiber or in the transverse direction, perpendicular to the fibers. For both polarizations, the absorption band of our composite can reach 6 GHz and the lowest microwave reflectivity was about -20 dB over a range of 8-18 GHz. When the electric field is polarized parallel to fibers, strong coupling among the high-conductivity fibers can induce a strong current and thus efficiently dissipate the electromagnetic energy. When the electric field is polarized perpendicular to fibers, the electromagnetic loss mechanism in the composite resembles the electric energy loss in capacitors and currents in the transverse direction are obstructed by the fibers resulting in attenuation of the electromagnetic energy in the matrix.

  13. Highly ordered monolayer/bilayer TiO2 hollow sphere films with widely tunable visible-light reflection and absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qin, Yao; Jin, Chao; Li, Ying; Shi, Donglu; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Gan, Lihua; Yang, Jinhu

    2013-06-07

    Monolayer and bilayer TiO2 hollow hemisphere/sphere (THH/THS) films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal-patterned THHs/THSs with thin shells of ~10 nm and different diameters of ~170 and ~470 nm have been prepared by templating of two-dimensional polystyrene sphere (PS) assembly films coupled with TiO2 sputtering/wet coating approaches. Owing to their precisely adjustable structural parameters, such as THH/THS shape and diameter as well as film layer thickness, the prepared THH/THS films exhibit widely tunable visible-light reflection and absorption bands, i.e. from 380 to 850 nm for reflection and 390 to 520 nm for absorption, respectively. The mechanism of the novel optical behaviors of the THH/THS films has been discussed in depth, combined with some calculations according to Bragg's law. In addition, photocatalytic experiments of RhB degradation employing the THH/THS films as recyclable catalysts have been conducted. The THH/THS films with controlled structures and precisely tunable optical properties are attractive for a wide range of applications, such as recyclable catalysts for photocatalysis, efficient oxide electrodes or scattering layers for solar cells, gas-permeable electrode materials for high-performance sensors and so on.

  14. Electromagnetic properties and microwave absorption properties of BaTiO 3-carbonyl iron composite in S and C bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui-gang, Yang

    2011-07-01

    BaTiO3 powders are prepared by sol-gel method. The carbonyl iron powder is prepared via thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. Then BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite with different mixture ratios was prepared using the as-prepared material. The structure, morphology, and properties of the composites are characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a network analyzer. The complex permittivity and reflection loss of the composites have been measured at different microwave frequencies in S- and C-bands employing vector network analyzer model PNA 3629D vector. The effect of the mass ratio of BaTiO3/carbonyl iron on the microwave loss properties of the composites is investigated. A possible microwave absorbing mechanism of BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite has been proposed. The BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite can find applications in suppression of electromagnetic interference, and reduction of radar signature.

  15. Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectrum of the T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 Transition of Acrolein: Analysis of the 0^0_0 Band Rotational Contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Acrolein (propenal, CH_2=CH---CH=O) is the simplest conjugated enal molecule and serves as a prototype for investigating the photochemical properties of larger enals and enones. Acrolein has a coplanar arrangement of heavy atoms in its ground electronic state. Much of the photochemistry is mediated by the T_1(π,π*) state, which has a CH_2--twisted equilibrium structure. In solution, the T_1(π,π*) state is typically accessed via intersystem crossing from an intially prepared planar S_1(n,π*) state. An intermediate in this photophysical transformation is the lowest ^3 (n,π*) state, a planar species with adiabatic excitation energy below S_1 and above T_1(π,π*). The present work focuses on this ^3 (n,π*) intermediate state; it is designated T_1(n,π*) as the lowest-energy triplet state of acrolein having a planar equilibrium structure. The T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 band system, with origin near 412 nm, was first recorded in the 1970s at medium (0.5 cm-1) resolution using a long-path absorption cell. Here we report the cavity ringdown spectrum of the 0^0_0 band, recorded using a pulsed dye laser with 0.1 cm-1 spectral bandwidth. The spectrum was measured under both bulk-gas (room-temperature) and jet-cooled conditions. The band contour in each spectrum was analyzed by using a computer program developed for simulating and fitting the rotational structure of singlet-triplet transitions. The assignment of several resolved sub-band heads in the room-temperature spectrum permitted approximate fitting of the inertial constants for the T_1(n,π*) state. The determined values (cm-1) are A=1.662, B=0.1485, C=0.1363. For the parameters A and (B+C)/2, estimated uncertainties of ± 0.003 cm-1 and ± 0.0004 cm-1, respectively, correspond to a range of values that produce qualitatively satisfactory global agreement with the observed room-temperature contour. The fitted inertial constants were used to simulate the rotational contour of the 0^0_0 band under jet-cooled conditions

  16. Strain and temperature dependent absorption spectra studies for identifying the phase structure and band gap of EuTiO3 perovskite films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Zhao, Run; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Qinglin; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Hu, Zhigao; Yang, Hao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-21

    Post-annealing has been approved to effectively relax the out-of-plane strain in thin films. Epitaxial EuTiO3 (ETO) thin films, with and without strain, have been fabricated on (001) LaAlO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The absorption and electronic transitions of the ETO thin films are investigated by means of temperature dependent transmittance spectra. The antiferrodistortive phase transition can be found at about 260-280 K. The first-principles calculations indicate there are two interband electronic transitions in ETO films. Remarkably, the direct optical band gap and higher interband transition for ETO films show variation in trends with different strains and temperatures. The strain leads to a band gap shrinkage of about 240 meV while the higher interband transition an expansion of about 140 meV. The hardening of the interband transition energies in ETO films with increasing temperature can be attributed to the Fröhlich electron-phonon interaction. The behavior can be linked to the strain and low temperature modified valence electronic structure, which is associated with rotations of the TiO6 octahedra.

  17. Detection and quantification of precipitations signatures on synthetic aperture radar imagery at X band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Saverio; Montopoli, Mario; Pulvirenti, Luca; Marzano, Frank S.; Pierdicca, Nazzareno

    2016-10-01

    Nowadays a well-established tool for Earth remote sensing is represented by Spaceborne synthetic aperture radars (SARs) operating at L-band and above that offers a microwave perspective at very high spatial resolution in almost all-weather conditions. Nevertheless, atmospheric precipitating clouds can significantly affect the signal backscattered from the ground surface on both amplitude and phase, as assessed by numerous recent works analyzing data collected by COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) and TerraSAR-X (TSX) missions. On the other hand, such sensitivity could allow detecting and quantifying precipitations through SARs. In this work, we propose an innovative processing framework aiming at producing X-SARs precipitation maps and cloud masks. While clouds masks allow the user to detect areas interested by precipitations, precipitation maps offer the unique opportunity to ingest within flood forecasting model precipitation data at the catchment scale. Indeed, several issues still need to be fully addressed. The proposed approach allows distinguishing flooded areas, precipitating clouds together with permanent water bodies. The detection procedure uses image segmentation techniques, fuzzy logic and ancillary data such as local incident angle map and land cover; an improved regression empirical algorithm gives the precipitation estimation. We have applied the proposed methodology to 16 study cases, acquired within TSX and CSK missions over Italy and United States. This choice allows analysing different typologies of events, and verifying the proposed methodology through the available local weather radar networks. In this work, we will discuss the results obtained until now in terms of improved rain cell localization and precipitation quantification.

  18. ANOMALOUS DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN THE SPECTRUM OF HERSCHEL 36. I. OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED CH AND CH{sup +} ABSORPTION AND STRONG, EXTENDED REDWARD WINGS ON SEVERAL DIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom, Julie; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Jiang Zihao; Sherman, Reid; Hobbs, L. M.; Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2013-08-10

    Anomalously broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 5780.5, 5797.1, 6196.0, and 6613.6 A are found in absorption along the line of sight to Herschel 36, the star illuminating the bright Hourglass region of the H II region Messier 8. Interstellar absorption from excited CH{sup +} in the J = 1 level and from excited CH in the J = 3/2 level is also seen. To our knowledge, neither those excited molecular lines nor such strongly extended DIBs have previously been seen in absorption from interstellar gas. These unusual features appear to arise in a small region near Herschel 36 which contains most of the neutral interstellar material in the sight line. The CH{sup +} and CH in that region are radiatively excited by strong far-IR radiation from the adjacent infrared source Her 36 SE. Similarly, the broadening of the DIBs toward Herschel 36 may be due to radiative pumping of closely spaced high-J rotational levels of relatively small, polar carrier molecules. If this picture of excited rotational states for the DIB carriers is correct and applicable to most DIBs, the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background may set the minimum widths (about 0.35 A) of known DIBs, with molecular processes and/or local radiation fields producing the larger widths found for the broader DIBs. Despite the intense local UV radiation field within the cluster NGC 6530, no previously undetected DIBs stronger than 10 mA in equivalent width are found in the optical spectrum of Herschel 36, suggesting that neither dissociation nor ionization of the carriers of the known DIBs by this intense field creates new carriers with easily detectable DIB-like features. Possibly related profile anomalies for several other DIBs are noted.

  19. LINE ABSORPTION OSCILLATOR STRENGTHS FOR THE c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0-5) BANDS IN N{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Lavin, C.; Velasco, A. M.

    2011-09-20

    Theoretical absorption oscillator strengths and emission branching ratios for rotational lines of the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0-5) bands of molecular nitrogen are reported. The calculations have been performed with the molecular quantum defect orbital method, which has proved to be reliable in previous studies of rovibronic transitions in diatomic molecules. The strong interaction between c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3) and b' {sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(10) states has been analyzed through an interaction matrix that includes rotational terms. Owing to the perturbation, the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(0), c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(1), and c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3)-X{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub g}(5) bands are not weak, in contrast to what would be expected on the basis of the Franck-Condon principle. Moreover, the intensity distribution of the rotational lines within each of the vibronic bands deviates from considerations based on Hoenl-London factors. In this work, we provide data that may be useful to interpret spectra from atmospheres of the Earth, Titan, and Triton, in which transitions from the c'{sub 4}{sup 1}{Sigma}{sup +}{sub u}(3) level have been detected.

  20. SERS active Ag encapsulated Fe@SiO2 nanorods in electromagnetic wave absorption and crystal violet detection.

    PubMed

    Senapati, Samarpita; Srivastava, Suneel Kumar; Singh, Shiv Brat; Kulkarni, Ajit R

    2014-11-01

    The present work is focused on the preparation of Fe nanorods by the chemical reduction of FeCl3 (aq) using NaBH4 in the presence of glycerol as template followed by annealing of the product at 500°C in the presence of H2 gas flow. Subsequently, its surface has been modified by silica followed by silver nanoparticles to form silica coated Fe (Fe@SiO2) and Ag encapsulated Fe@SiO2 nanostructure employing the Stöber method and silver mirror reaction respectively. XRD pattern of the products confirmed the formation of bcc phase of iron and fcc phase of silver, though silica remained amorphous. FESEM images established the growth of iron nanorods from the annealed product and also formation of silica and silver coating on its surface. The appearance of the characteristics bands in FTIR confirmed the presence of SiO2 on the Fe surface. Magnetic measurements at room temperature indicated the ferromagnetic behavior of as prepared iron nanorods, Fe@SiO2 and silver encapsulated Fe@SiO2 nanostructures. All the samples exhibited strong microwave absorption property in the high frequency range (10GHz), though it is superior for Ag encapsulated Fe@SiO2 (-14.7dB) compared with Fe@SiO2 (-9.7dB) nanostructures of the same thickness. The synthesized Ag encapsulated Fe@SiO2 nanostructure also exhibited the SERS phenomena, which is useful in the detection of the carcinogenic dye crystal violet (CV) upto the concentration of 10(-10)M. All these findings clearly demonstrate that the Ag encapsulated Fe@SiO2 nanostructure could efficiently be used in the environmental remediation.

  1. An approach to detect afterslips in giant earthquakes in the normal-mode frequency band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanimoto, Toshiro; Ji, Chen; Igarashi, Mitsutsugu

    2012-08-01

    An approach to detect afterslips in the source process of giant earthquakes is presented in the normal-mode frequency band (0.3-2.0 mHz). The method is designed to avoid a potential systematic bias problem in the determination of earthquake moment by a typical normal-mode approach. The source of bias is the uncertainties in Q (modal attenuation parameter) which varies by up to about ±10 per cent among published studies. A choice of Q values within this range affects amplitudes in synthetic seismograms significantly if a long time-series of about 5-7 d is used for analysis. We present an alternative time-domain approach that can reduce this problem by focusing on a shorter time span with a length of about 1 d. Application of this technique to four recent giant earthquakes is presented: (1) the Tohoku, Japan, earthquake of 2011 March 11, (2) the 2010 Maule, Chile earthquake, (3) the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake and (4) the Solomon earthquake of 2007 April 1. The Global Centroid Moment Tensor (GCMT) solution for the Tohoku earthquake explains the normal-mode frequency band quite well. The analysis for the 2010 Chile earthquake indicates that the moment is about 7-10 per cent higher than the moment determined by its GCMT solution but further analysis shows that there is little evidence of afterslip; the deviation in moment can be explained by an increase of the dip angle from 18° in the GCMT solution to 19°. This may be a simple trade-off problem between the moment and dip angle but it may also be due to a deeper centroid in the normal-mode frequency band data, as a deeper source could have steeper dip angle due to changes in geometry of the Benioff zone. For the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman earthquake, the five point-source solution by Tsai et al. explains most of the signals but a sixth point-source with long duration improves the fit to the normal-mode frequency band data. The 2007 Solomon earthquake shows that the high-frequency part of our analysis (above 1 mHz) is

  2. Modelling of Collision Induced Absorption Spectra Of H2-H2 Pairs for the Planetary Atmospheres Structure: The Second Overtone Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Borysow, Jacek I.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the proposal was to model the collision induced, second overtone band of gaseous hydrogen at low temperatures. The aim of this work is to assist planetary scientists in their investigation of planetary atmospheres, mainly those of Uranus and Neptune. The recently completed extended database of collision induced dipole moments of hydrogen pairs allowed us, for the first time, to obtain dipole moment matrix elements responsible for the roto-vibrational collision induced absorption spectra of H2-H2 in the second overtone band. Despite our numerous attempts to publish those data, the enormous volume of the database did not allow us to do this. Instead, we deposited the data on a www site. The final part of this work has been partially supported by NASA, Division for Planetary Atmospheres. In order to use our new data for modelling purpose, we first needed to test how well we can reproduce the existing experimental data from theory, when using our new input data. Two papers resulted from this work. The obtained agreement between theoretical results and the measurements appeared to be within 10-30%. The obviously poorer agreement than observed for the first H2 overtone, the fundamental, and the rototranslational bands can be attributed to the fact that dipole moments responsible for the second overtone are much weaker, therefore susceptible to larger numerical uncertainties. At the same time, the intensity of the second overtone band is much weaker and therefore it is much harder to be measured accurately in the laboratory. We need to point out that until now, no dependable model of the 2nd overtone band was available for modelling of the planetary atmospheres. The only one, often referred to in previous works on Uranian and Neptune's atmospheres, uses only one lineshape, with one (or two) parameter(s) deduced at the effective temperature of Uranus (by fitting the planetary observation). After that, the parameter(s) was(were) made temperature

  3. Detection of Glucose with Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy by Using Oligonucleotide Functionalized Gold Nanoparticle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Yan, Honglian; Ling, Liansheng

    2016-06-01

    A novel method for the detection of glucose was established with atomic absorption spectroscopy by using the label of gold nanoparticle (AuNP). Silver-coated glass assembled with oligonucleotide 5'-SH-T12-AGA CAA GAG AGG-3' (Oligo 1) was acted as separation probe, oligonucleotide 5'-CAA CAG AGA ACG-T12-SH-3' modified gold nanoparticle (AuNP-Oligo 2) was acted as signal-reporting probe. Oligonucleotide 5'-CGT TCT CTG TTG CCT CTC TTG TCT-3' (Oligo 3) could hybridize with Oligo 1 on the surface of silver-coated glass and AuNP-Oligo 2, and free AuNP-Oligo 2 could be removed by rinsing with buffer. Hence the concentration of Oligo 3 was transformed into the concentration of gold element. In addition, Oligo 3 could be cleaved into DNA fragments by glucose, glucose oxidase and Fe(2+)-EDTA through Fenton reaction. Thereby the concentration of glucose could be transformed to the absorbance of gold element. Under the optimum conditions, the integrated absorbance decreased proportionally to the concentration of glucose over the range from 50.0 μM to 1.0 mM with a detection limit of 40.0 μM. Moreover, satisfactory result was obtained when the assay was used to determinate glucose in human serum.

  4. DETECTION OF K{sub S} -BAND THERMAL EMISSION FROM WASP-3b

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Ming; Wright, Jason; Milburn, Jennifer; Hinkley, Sasha; Barman, Travis; Swain, Mark R.; Monnier, John D.

    2012-03-20

    We report the detection of thermal emission from the hot Jupiter WASP-3b in the K{sub S} band, using a newly developed guiding scheme for the WIRC instrument at the Palomar Hale 200 inch telescope. Our new guiding scheme has improved the telescope guiding precision by a factor of {approx}5-7, significantly reducing the correlated systematics in the measured light curves. This results in the detection of a secondary eclipse with depth of 0.181% {+-} 0.020% (9{sigma})-a significant improvement in WIRC's photometric precision and a demonstration of the capability of Palomar/WIRC to produce high-quality measurements of exoplanetary atmospheres. Our measured eclipse depth cannot be explained by model atmospheres with heat redistribution but favors a pure radiative equilibrium case with no redistribution across the surface of the planet. Our measurement also gives an eclipse phase center of 0.5045 {+-} 0.0020, corresponding to an ecos {omega} of 0.0070 {+-} 0.0032. This result is consistent with a circular orbit, although it also suggests that the planet's orbit might be slightly eccentric. The possible non-zero eccentricity provides insight into the tidal circularization process of the star-planet system, but might also have been caused by a second low-mass planet in the system, as suggested by a previous transit timing variation study. More secondary eclipse observations, especially at multiple wavelengths, are necessary to determine the temperature-pressure profile of the planet's atmosphere and shed light on its orbital eccentricity.

  5. Sleep Apnea Detection Based on Thoracic and Abdominal Movement Signals of Wearable Piezo-Electric Bands.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yin-Yan; Wu, Hau-Tieng; Hsu, Chi-An; Huang, Po-Chiun; Huang, Yuan-Hao; Lo, Yu-Lun

    2016-12-07

    Physiologically, the thoracic (THO) and abdominal (ABD) movement signals, captured using wearable piezo-electric bands, provide information about various types of apnea, including central sleep apnea (CSA) and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, the use of piezo-electric wearables in detecting sleep apnea events has been seldom explored in the literature. This study explored the possibility of identifying sleep apnea events, including OSA and CSA, by solely analyzing one or both the THO and ABD signals. An adaptive non-harmonic model was introduced to model the THO and ABD signals, which allows us to design features for sleep apnea events. To confirm the suitability of the extracted features, a support vector machine was applied to classify three categories - normal and hypopnea, OSA, and CSA. According to a database of 34 subjects, the overall classification accuracies were on average 75.9%±11.7% and 73.8%±4.4%, respectively, based on the cross validation. When the features determined from the THO and ABD signals were combined, the overall classification accuracy became 81.8%±9.4%. These features were applied for designing a state machine for online apnea event detection. Two event-byevent accuracy indices, S and I, were proposed for evaluating the performance of the state machine. For the same database, the S index was 84.01%±9.06%, and the I index was 77.21%±19.01%. The results indicate the considerable potential of applying the proposed algorithm to clinical examinations for both screening and homecare purposes.

  6. A W-Band MMIC Radar System for Remote Detection of Vital Signs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, Sebastian; Ayhan, Serdal; Scherr, Steffen; Massler, Hermann; Tessmann, Axel; Leuther, Arnulf; Ambacher, Oliver; Zwick, Thomas; Kallfass, Ingmar

    2012-12-01

    In medical and personal health systems for vital sign monitoring, contact-free remote detection is favourable compared to wired solutions. For example, they help to avoid severe pain, which is involved when a patient with burned skin has to be examined. Continuous wave (CW) radar systems have proven to be good candidates for this purpose. In this paper a monolithic millimetre-wave integrated circuit (MMIC) based CW radar system operating in the W-band (75-110 GHz) at 96 GHz is presented. The MMIC components are custom-built and make use of 100 nm metamorphic high electron mobility transistors (mHEMTs). The radar system is employing a frequency multiplier-by-twelve MMIC and a receiver MMIC both packaged in split-block modules. They allow for the determination of respiration and heartbeat frequency of a human target sitting in 1 m distance. The analysis of the measured data is carried out in time and frequency domain and each approach is shown to have its advantages and drawbacks.

  7. Leaf water stress detection utilizing thematic mapper bands 3, 4 and 5 in soybean plants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holben, B. N.; Schutt, J. B.; Mcmurtrey, J., III

    1983-01-01

    The total and diffuse radiance responses of Thematic Mapper bands 3 (0.63-0.69 microns), 4 (0.76-0.90 microns), and 5 (1.55-1.75 microns) to water stress in a soybean canopy are compared. Polarization measurements were used to separate the total from the diffuse reflectance; the reflectances were compared statistically at a variety of look angles at 15 min intervals from about 09.00 until 14.00 hrs EST. The results suggest that remotely sensed data collected in the photographic infrared region (TM4) are sensitive to leaf water stress in a 100 percent canopy cover of soybeans, and that TM3 is less sensitive than TM4 for detection of reversible foliar water stress. The mean values of TM5 reflectance data show similar trends to TM4. The primary implication of this study is that remote sensing of water stress in green plant canopies is possible in TM4 from ground-based observations primarily through the indirect link of leaf geometry.

  8. Dual-band infrared imaging to detect corrosion damage within airframes and concrete structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrande, Nancy; Durbin, Philip F.

    1994-03-01

    We are developing dual-band IR (DBIR) imaging and detection techniques to inspect airframes and concrete bridge decks for hidden corrosion damage. Using selective DBIR image ratios, we enhanced surface temperature contrast and removed surface emissivity noise associated with clutter. Our surface temperature maps depicted defect sites, which heat and cool at different rates than their surroundings. Our emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed the masking effects of surface clutter. For airframe inspections, we used time-resolved DBIR temperature, emissivity-ratio and composite thermal inertia maps to locate corrosion-thinning effects within a flash-heated Boeing 737 airframe. Emissivity-ratio maps tagged and removed clutter sites from uneven paint, dirt and surface markers. Temperature and thermal inertia maps characterized defect sites, types, sizes, thicknesses, thermal properties and material-loss effects from airframe corrosion. For concrete inspections, we mapped DBIR temperature and emissivity-ratio patterns to better interpret surrogate delamination sites within naturally- heated, concrete slabs and removed the clutter mask from sand pile-up, grease stains, rocks and other surface objects.

  9. Experimental demonstration of a multi-target detection technique using an X-band optically steered phased array radar.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nuannuan; Li, Ming; Deng, Ye; Zhang, Lihong; Sun, Shuqian; Tang, Jian; Li, Wei; Zhu, Ninghua

    2016-06-27

    An X-band optically-steered phased array radar is developed to demonstrate high resolution multi-target detection. The beam forming is implemented based on wavelength-swept true time delay (TTD) technique. The beam forming system has a wide direction tuning range of ± 54 degree, low magnitude ripple of ± 0.5 dB and small delay error of 0.13 ps/nm. To further verify performance of the proposed optically-steered phased array radar, three experiments are then carried out to implement the single and multiple target detection. A linearly chirped X-band microwave signal is used as radar signal which is finally compressed at the receiver to improve the detection accuracy. The ranging resolution for multi-target detection is up to 2 cm within the measuring distance over 4 m and the azimuth angle error is less than 4 degree.

  10. Two-wave-band color-mixing binoculars for the detection of wholesome and unwholesome chicken carcasses: a simulation.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fujian; Chen, Yud-Ren; Chao, Kuanglin

    2005-09-10

    Visual inspection of wholesome and unwholesome chicken carcasses with a novel two-narrowband color-mixing technique for optically enhanced binoculars is simulated. From mean spectra of wholesome, airsacculitis (air-sac), cadaver, inflammatory process (IP), septicemia-toxemia (septox), and tumor chicken samples, 10 nm wave-band pairs are selected using color difference and chromaticness difference indices for simulation of multitarget and single-target detection. The color appearance simulation uses the CIECAM97s color appearance model. Results show that for multitarget detection, the wave-band pair of (454 nm, 578 nm) is able to differentiate all six chicken conditions. For single-target detection of wholesome, air-sac, cadaver, and tumor, the wave-band pairs of (449 nm, 571 nm), (441 nm, 576 nm), (458 nm, 576 nm), and (431 nm, 501 nm), respectively, easily distinguish the target condition from the other five conditions. For single-target detection of IP and septox, the wave-band pairs of (454 nm, 591 nm) and (454 nm, 590 nm), respectively, are able to differentiate the target conditions from wholesome and tumor conditions but have difficulty with the other chicken conditions. The two-color-mixing technique shows promise for use in small-scale processing plant environments to improve the visual inspection process.

  11. A search for formic acid in the upper troposphere - A tentative identification of the 1105-per cm nu-6 band Q branch in high-resolution balloon-borne solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.02-per cm resolution during a balloon flight from Alamogordo, NM (33 deg N), on March 23, 1981, have been analyzed for the possible presence of absorption by formic acid (HCOOH). An absorption feature at 1105 per cm has been tentatively identified in upper tropospheric spectra as due to the nu-6 band Q branch. A preliminary analysis indicates a concentration of about 0.6 ppbv and 0.4 ppbv near 8 and 10 km, respectively.

  12. Laser Based Instruments Using Differential Absorption Detection for Above and Below Ground Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S. D.; Barr, J. L.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration in geologic formations provides a method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from entering the Earth's atmosphere. An important issue for the successful storage of CO2 is the ability to monitor geologic sequestration sites for leakage to verify site integrity. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. A field experiment was conducted at the ZERT field site beginning July 9th, 2008 and ending August 7th, 2008 to test the performance of several CO2 detection instruments. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. A flow rate of 0.3 tons CO2/day was used for the entirety of this experiment. This paper describes the results from two laser based instruments that use differential absorption techniques to determine CO2 concentrations in real time both above and below the ground surface. Both instruments use a continuous wave (cw) temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser capable of tuning across several CO2 and water vapor absorption features between at 2003 nm and 2006 nm. The first instrument uses the DFB laser to measure path integrated atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The second instrument uses the temperature tunable DFB laser to monitor underground CO2 concentrations using a buried photonic bandgap optical fiber. The above ground instrument operated nearly continuously during the CO2 release experiment and an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration above the release pipe of approximately 2.5 times higher than the background was observed. The underground instrument also operated continuously during the experiment and saw an increase in underground CO2 concentration of approximately 15 times higher than the background. These results from the 2008 ZERT field experiment demonstrate

  13. Resonance Raman intensity analysis of the excited state proton transfer dynamics of 2-nitrophenol in the charge-transfer band absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yaqiong; Wang Huigang; Zhang Shuqiang; Pei Kemei; Zheng Xuming; Lee Phillips, David

    2006-12-07

    Resonance Raman spectra were obtained for 2-nitrophenol in cyclohexane solution with excitation wavelengths in resonance with the charge-transfer (CT) proton transfer band absorption. These spectra indicate that the Franck-Condon region photodissociation dynamics have multidimensional character with motion along more than 15 normal modes: the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 12} (1326 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend {nu}{sub 23} (564 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CO stretch+NO stretch+CC stretch {nu}{sub 14} (1250 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch+COH bend {nu}{sub 15} (1190 cm{sup -1}); the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 17} (1134 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 22} (669 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCN bend {nu}{sub 27} (290 cm{sup -1}), the nominal NO{sub 2} bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 21} (820 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCO bend+CNO bend {nu}{sub 25} (428 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CC stretch {nu}{sub 7} (1590 cm{sup -1}), the nominal NO stretch {nu}{sub 8} (1538 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend+NO{sub 2} bend {nu}{sub 20} (870 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CC stretch {nu}{sub 6} (1617 cm{sup -1}), the nominal COH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 11} (1382 cm{sup -1}), nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 9} (1472 cm{sup -1}). A preliminary resonance Raman intensity analysis was done and the results for 2-nitrophenol were compared to previously reported results for nitrobenzene, p-nitroaniline, and 2-hydroxyacetophenone. The authors briefly discuss the differences and similarities in the CT-band absorption excitation of 2-nitrophenol relative to those of nitrobenzene, p-nitroaniline, and 2-hydroxyacetophenone.

  14. Application of surface pressure measurements of O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part II - A quasi-observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part on assessing the impacts of assimilating various distributions of sea-level pressure (SLP) on hurricane simulations, using the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR). One key purpose of this series of study is to explore the potential of using remotely sensed sea surface barometric data from O2-band differential absorption radar system currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. In this part II we further validate the conclusions of observational system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in the part I using observed SLP for three hurricanes that passed over the Florida peninsula. Three SLP patterns are tested again, including all available data near the Florida peninsula, and a band of observations either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position. Before the assimilation, a vortex SLP reconstruction technique is employed for the use of observed SLP as discussed in the part I. In agreement with the results from OSSEs, the performance of assimilating SLP is enhanced for the two hurricanes with stronger initial minimum SLP, leading to a significant improvement in the track and position relative to the control where no data are assimilated. On the other hand, however, the improvement in the hurricane intensity is generally limited to the first 24-48 h of integration, while a high resolution nested domain simulation, along with assimilation of SLP in the coarse domain, shows more profound improvement in the intensity. A diagnostic analysis of the potential vorticity suggests that the improved track forecasts are attributed to the combined effects of adjusting the steering wind fields in a consistent manner with having a deeper vortex, and the associated changes in the convective activity.

  15. Study of Evanescence Wave Absorption in Lindane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, A.; Prasetyo, E.; Gitrin, M. P.; Suryanti, V.

    2017-02-01

    Evanescent wave field has been studied for the purpose of tailoring fiber sensor capable of detecting lindane concentration in a solution. The mounted fiber was optically polished such that part of the fiber clad is stripped off. To study the evanescent wave field absorption in lindane solution, the unclad fiber was immersed in the solution. Light coming out of the fiber was studied at different wavelength each for different lindane concentration. It was shown that evanescent wave field absorption is stronger at wavelength corresponding to lindane absorption band as has been shown from absorption studies lindane in UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer.

  16. Detection of the secondary eclipse of WASP-10b in the Ks-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Patricia; Barrado, David; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Diaz, Marcos; Birkby, Jayne; López-Morales, Mercedes; Hodgkin, Simon; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2015-02-01

    Context. WASP-10b, a non-inflated hot Jupiter, was discovered around a K-dwarf in a near circular orbit (~0.06). Since its discovery in 2009, different published parameters for this system have led to a discussion about the size, density, and eccentricity of this exoplanet. Aims: In order to test the hypothesis of a circular orbit for WASP-10b, we observed its secondary eclipse in the Ks-band, where the contribution of planetary light is high enough to be detected from the ground. Methods: Observations were performed with the OMEGA2000 instrument at the 3.5 m telescope at Calar Alto (Almería, Spain), in staring mode during 5.4 continuous hours, with the telescope defocused, monitoring the target during the expected secondary eclipse. A relative light curve was generated and corrected from systematic effects, using the principal component analysis (PCA) technique. The final light curve was fitted using a transit model to find the eclipse depth and a possible phase shift. Results: The best model obtained from the Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis resulted in an eclipse depth of ΔF of 0.137%+0.013%-0.019% and a phase offset of Δφ of -0.0028 +0.0005-0.0004. The eclipse phase offset derived from our modeling has systematic errors that were not taken into account and should not be considered as evidence of an eccentric orbit. The offset in phase obtained leads to a value for | ecosω | of 0.0044. The derived eccentricity is too small to be of any significance. Based on observations collected at the Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain.

  17. Space-based detection of wetlands' surface water level changes from L-band SAR interferometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wdowinski, S.; Kim, S.-W.; Amelung, F.; Dixon, T.H.; Miralles-Wilhelm, F.; Sonenshein, R.

    2008-01-01

    Interferometric processing of JERS-1 L-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data acquired over south Florida during 1993-1996 reveals detectable surface changes in the Everglades wetlands. Although our study is limited to south Florida it has implication for other large-scale wetlands, because south Florida wetlands have diverse vegetation types and both managed and natural flow environments. Our analysis reveals that interferometric coherence level is sensitive to wetland vegetation type and to the interferogram time span. Interferograms with time spans less than six months maintain phase observations for all wetland types, allowing characterization of water level changes in different wetland environments. The most noticeable changes occur between the managed and the natural flow wetlands. In the managed wetlands, fringes are organized, follow patterns related to some of the managed water control structures and have high fringe-rate. In the natural flow areas, fringes are irregular and have a low fringe-rate. The high fringe rate in managed areas reflects dynamic water topography caused by high flow rate due to gate operation. Although this organized fringe pattern is not characteristic of most large-scale wetlands, the high level of water level change enables accurate estimation of the wetland InSAR technique, which lies in the range of 5-10??cm. The irregular and low rate fringe pattern in the natural flow area reflects uninterrupted flow that diffuses water efficiently and evenly. Most of the interferograms in the natural flow area show an elongated fringe located along the transitional zone between salt- and fresh-water wetlands, reflecting water level changes due to ocean tides. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Onogi, S.

    2013-04-01

    A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from an optical disdrometer on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometer, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  19. Detection of potentially hazardous convective clouds with a dual-polarized C-band radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamauchi, H.; Onogi, S.

    2013-10-01

    A method for forecasting very short-term rainfall to detect potentially hazardous convective cloud that produces heavy local rainfall was developed using actual volumetric C-band polarimetric radar data. Because the rainfall estimation algorithm used in this method removed the effect of ice particles based on polarimetric measurements, it was immune to the high reflectivity associated with hail. The reliability of the algorithm was confirmed by comparing the rainfall rate estimated from the polarimetric radar measurements at the lowest elevation angle with that obtained from optical disdrometers on the ground. The rainfall rate estimated from polarimetric data agreed well with the results obtained from the disdrometers, and was much more reliable than results derived from reflectivity alone. Two small cumulus cells were analyzed, one of which developed and later produced heavy rainfall, whereas the other did not. Observations made by polarimetric radar with a volumetric scan revealed that a high vertical maximum intensity of rainfall rate and a vertical area of enhanced differential reflectivity extending above the freezing level, often termed a high ZDR column, were clearly formed about 10 min prior to the onset of heavy rainfall on the ground. The onset time of the heavy rainfall could be estimated in advance from the polarimetric data, which agreed fairly well with observations. These polarimetric characteristics were not observed for the cumulus cell that did not produce heavy rainfall. The results suggest that both the vertical maximum intensity of the rainfall rate and a high ZDR column, estimated from polarimetric measurements, can be used to identify potentially hazardous clouds. Furthermore, this study shows that polarimetric radar measurements with high spatial and temporal resolutions are invaluable for disaster reduction.

  20. Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) imaging: From cancer detection to sub-cellular function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le

    Light scattering spectroscopy (LSS), an optical technique that relates the spectroscopic properties of light elastically scattered by small particles to their size, refractive index and shape, has been recently successfully employed for sensing morphological and biochemical properties of epithelial tissues and cells in vivo. LSS does not require exogenous markers, is non-invasive, and, due to its multispectral nature, can sense biological structures well beyond the diffraction limit. All that makes LSS be a very good candidate to be used both in clinical medicine for in vivo detection of disease and in cell biology to monitor cell function on the organelle scale. Recently we developed two LSS-based imaging modalities: clinical Polarized LSS (PLSS) Endoscopic Technique for locating early pre-cancerous changes in GI tract and Confocal Light Absorption and Scattering Spectroscopic (CLASS) Microscopy for studying cells in vivo without exogenous markers. One important application of the clinical PLSS endoscopic instrument, a noncontact scanning imaging device compatible with the standard clinical endoscopes and capable of detecting dysplastic changes, is to serve as a guide for biopsy in Barrett's esophagus (BE). The instrument detects parallel and perpendicular components of the polarized light, backscattered from epithelial tissues, and determines characteristics of epithelial nuclei from the residual spectra. It also can find tissue oxygenation, hemoglobin content and other properties from the diffuse light component. By rapidly scanning esophagus the PLSS endoscopic instrument makes sure the entire BE portion is scanned and examined for the presence of dysplasia. CLASS microscopy, on the other hand, combines principles of light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) with confocal microscopy. Its main purpose is to image cells on organelle scale in vivo without the use of exogenous labels which may affect the cell function. The confocal geometry selects specific region and

  1. Application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy in the detection of oxygen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xin; Jin, Xing

    2015-10-01

    Most aircrafts is driven by chemic energy which is released in the combustion process. For improving the capability of engine and controlling the running on-time, the processes of fuel physics and chemistry need to be analysis by kinds of high quality sensor. In the research of designing and improving the processes of fuel physics and chemistry, the concentration, temperature and velocity of kinds of gas in the combustor need to be detected and measured. In addition, these engines and research equipments are always in the harsh environment of high temperature, high pressure and high speed. The harsh environment needs the sensor to be high reliability, well repetition, no cross- sensitivity between gases, and the traditional measurement system can't satisfy the metrical requirement well. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) analytic measurement technology can well satisfy the measurement in the harsh environment, which can support the whole measurement plan and high quality measurement system. Because the TDLAS sensor has the excellence of small bulk, light weight, high reliability and well specifically measurement, the TDLAS measurement technology has wide prospects. Different from most measurements, only a beam of laser can be pass through the measured environment by TDLAS, and the measurement equipment needn't be set in the harsh environment. So, the TDLAS equipment can't be interrupted by the measured equipment. The ability of subsistence in the harsh environment is very valuable, especially in the measurement on the subject of aerospace with environment of high speed, combustion and plasma. This paper focuses on the collecting the articles on the subject of oxygen detection of TDLAS. By analyzing the research and results of the articles, we conclude the central issues, difficulties and results. And we can get some instructive conclusions.

  2. Two-Dimensional UV Absorption Correlation Spectroscopy as a Method for the Detection of Thiamethoxam Residue in Tea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J.; Zhao, Zh.; Wang, L.; Zhu, X.; Shen, L.; Yu, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy (2D-COS) combined with UV absorption spectroscopy was evaluated as a technique for the identification of spectral regions associated with the residues of thiamethoxam in tea. There is only one absorption peak at 275 nm in the absorption spectrum of a mixture of thiamethoxam and tea, which is the absorption peak of tea. Based on 2D-COS, the absorption peak of thiamethoxam at 250 nm is extracted from the UV spectra of the mixture. To determine the residue of thiamethoxam in tea, 250 nm is selected as the measured wavelength, at which the fitting result is as follows: the residual sum of squares is 0.01375, standard deviation R2 is 0.99068, and F value is 426. Statistical analysis shows that there is a significant linear relationship between the concentration of thiamethoxam in tea and the absorbance at 250 nm in the UV spectra of the mixture. Moreover, the average prediction error is 0.0033 and the prediction variance is 0.1654, indicating good predictive result. Thus, the UV absorption spectrum can be used as a measurement method for rapid detection of thiamethoxam residues in tea.

  3. Intracavity Dye-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IDLAS) for application to planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Todd M.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved, quasi-continuous wave, intracavity dye-laser absorption spectroscopy is applied to the investigation of absolute absorption coefficients for vibrational-rotational overtone bands of water at visible wavelengths. Emphasis is placed on critical factors affecting detection sensitivity and data analysis. Typical generation-time dependent absorption spectra are given.

  4. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band at temperatures from 20 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Chunguang; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1995-01-01

    A simple formalism is presented that permits quick computations of the low-resolution, rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band of hydrogen, at temperatures from 20 to 500 K. These spectra account for the free-free transitions. The sharp dimer features, originating from the bound-free, free-bound, and bound-bound transitions are ignored, though their integrated intensities are properly accounted for. The method employs spectral model line- shapes with parameters computed from the three lowest spectral moments. The moments are obtained from first principles expressed as analytical functions of temperature. Except for the sharp dimer features, which are absent in this model, the computed spectra reproduce closely the results of exact quantum mechanical lineshape computations. Comparisons of the computed spectra with existing experimental data also show good agreement. The work interest for the modeling of the atmospheres of the outer planets in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. The user-friendly Fortran program developed here is available on request from the authors.

  5. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-01

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) exposed to 60Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a-SiO2, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a-SiO2. The full width at half maximum for a-SiO2 is larger by ˜40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a-SiO2 network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a-SiO2.

  6. Ti3C2 MXenes with Modified Surface for High-Performance Electromagnetic Absorption and Shielding in the X-Band.

    PubMed

    Han, Meikang; Yin, Xiaowei; Wu, Heng; Hou, Zexin; Song, Changqing; Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-08-17

    Electromagnetic (EM) absorbing and shielding composites with tunable absorbing behaviors based on Ti3C2 MXenes are fabricated via HF etching and annealing treatment. Localized sandwich structure without sacrificing the original layered morphology is realized, which is responsible for the enhancement of EM absorbing capability in the X-band. The composite with 50 wt % annealed MXenes exhibits a minimum reflection loss of -48.4 dB at 11.6 GHz, because of the formation of TiO2 nanocrystals and amorphous carbon. Moreover, superior shielding effectiveness with high absorption effectiveness is achieved. The total and absorbing shielding effectiveness of Ti3C2 MXenes in a wax matrix with a thickness of only 1 mm reach values of 76.1 and 67.3 dB, while those of annealed Ti3C2 MXenes/wax composites are 32 and 24.2 dB, respectively. Considering the promising performance of Ti3C2 MXenes with the modified surface, this work is expected to open the door for the expanded applications of MXenes family in EM absorbing and shielding fields.

  7. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  8. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band ν2 of H2O trapped in an argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitsevich, G.; Doroshenko, I.; Malevich, A..; Shalamberidze, E.; Sapeshko, V.; Pogorelov, V.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J″ = 0 - 2; and J‧ = 0 - 3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrödinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  9. Chemical Effects on Vegetation Detectable in Optical Bands 350-2500 nm

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-03-31

    analysis of the data using vegetation indices, which focus on key spectral bands associated with chlorophyll, pigments and water content, showed that the...For this analysis we chose a number of commonly used vegetation indices that focus on bands related to pigments and water content of leaves. Table...chlorophyll (A, B), pigments (ß-carotene, pycoerythrin and phycocyanin), cellulose and lignin, and water common to vegetation . Table 7. Spectral

  10. Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediate–band

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H. Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C.

    2014-07-07

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using wide–gap matrix material, InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs, for realizing intermediate–band solar cells (IBSCs) with two–step photon–absorption. The plane–wave expanded Burt–Foreman operator ordered 8–band k·p theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of two–step photon–absorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, which is lattice–matched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of two–step photon–absorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

  11. Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediate-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using wide-gap matrix material, InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSLs, for realizing intermediate-band solar cells (IBSCs) with two-step photon-absorption. The plane-wave expanded Burt-Foreman operator ordered 8-band k . p theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of two-step photon-absorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In0.48Ga0.52P, which is lattice-matched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of two-step photon-absorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

  12. IUE's View of Callisto: Detection of an SO2 Absorption Correlated to Possible Torus Neutral Wind Alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Arthur L.; Domingue, Deborah L.

    1997-01-01

    Observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) detected a 0.28 micron absorption feature on Callisto's leading and Jupiter-facing hemispheres. This feature is similar to Europa's 0.28 micron feature, however it shows no correlation with magnetospheric ion bombardment. The strongest 0.28 micron signature is seen in the region containing the Valhalla impact. This absorption feature also shows some spatial correlation to possible neutral wind interactions, suggestive of S implantation (rather than S(sub x)) into Callisto's water ice surface, Indications of possible temporal variations (on the 10% level) are seen at other wavelengths between the 1984-1986 and the 1996 observations.

  13. Development of a Near-Ir Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectrometer for the Detection of Atmospheric Oxidation Products and Organoamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan C.; Jewell, Breanna; Thurnherr, Emily

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 10,000 to 100,000 different compounds have been measured in the atmosphere, each one undergoes many oxidation reactions that may or may not degrade air quality. To date, the fate of even some of the most abundant hydrocarbons in the atmosphere is poorly understood. One difficulty is the detection of atmospheric oxidation products that are very labile and decompose during analysis. To study labile species under atmospheric conditions, a highly sensitive, non-destructive technique is needed. Here we describe a near-IR incoherent broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) setup that we are developing to meet this end. We have chosen to utilize the near-IR, where vibrational overtone absorptions are observed, due to the clean spectral windows and better spectral separation of absorption features. In one spectral window we can simultaneously and continuously monitor the composition of alcohols, hydroperoxides, and carboxylic acids in an air mass. In addition, we have used our CEAS setup to detect organoamines. The long effective path length of CEAS allows for low detection limits, even of the overtone absorption features, at ppb and ppt levels.

  14. Above-Cloud Precipitable Water Retrievals using the MODIS 0.94 micron Band with Applications for Multi-Layer Cloud Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platnick, S.; Wind, G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to perform satellite retrievals of cloud properties, it is important to account for the effect of the above-cloud atmosphere on the observations. The solar bands used in the operational MODIS Terra and Aqua cloud optical and microphysical algorithms (visible, NIR, and SWIR spectral windows) are primarily affected by water vapor, and to a lesser extent by well-mixed gases. For water vapor, the above-cloud column amount, or precipitable water, provides adequate information for an atmospheric correction; details of the vertical vapor distribution are not typically necessary for the level of correction required. Cloud-top pressure has a secondary effect due to pressure broadening influences. For well- mixed gases, cloud-top pressure is also required for estimates of above-cloud abundances. We present a method for obtaining above-cloud precipitable water over dark Ocean surfaces using the MODIS 0.94 pm vapor absorption band. The retrieval includes an iterative procedure for establishing cloud-top temperature and pressure, and is useful for both single layer water and ice clouds. Knowledge of cloud thermodynamic phase is fundamental in retrieving cloud optical and microphysical properties. However, in cases of optically thin cirrus overlapping lower water clouds, the concept of a single unique phase is ill- defined and depends, at least, on the spectral region of interest. We will present a method for multi-layer and multi-phase cloud detection which uses above-cloud precipitable water retrievals along with several existing MODIS operational cloud products (cloud-top pressure derived from a C02 slicing algorithm, IR and SWIR phase retrievals). Results are catagorized by whether the radiative signature in the MODIS solar bands is primarily that of a water cloud with ice cloud contamination, or visa-versa. Examples in polar and mid-latitude regions will be shown.

  15. Is it worth to report the presence of a single and additional band in the cerebrospinal fluid detected by isoelectrofocusing?

    PubMed

    Lefèvre, Camille; Derache, Nathalie; Grandhomme, Frédérique; Fradin, Sabine; Allouche, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Despite the revisions of the Mac Donald criteria of multiple sclerosis (MS) in 2010, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis by isoelectrofocusing (IEF) remains useful for atypical presentations of MS. The IEF is considered as positive when at least two or more additional bands are detected in the CSF by comparison with the patient's serum but sometimes, the IEF interpretation is more difficult. The goal of our study was to determine the significance when a single band in the CSF is detected by IEF. We conducted a retrospective study on 990 patients who underwent a lumbar puncture followed by a CSF analysis by IEF. Only 2% display such IEF profile (i.e. single and additional band in the CSF). A diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome or MS was evidenced in 4 among those 21 patients. In conclusion, our data suggest that even if the presence of a single and additional band in the CSF is a rare situation, it should be mentioned to clinicians to not exclude the hypothesis of an inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.

  16. Excitation/Detection Strategies for OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Presence of Interfering Fuel Signal and Absorption Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) excitation/detection methods have been applied to obtain spatial distributions of the hydroxyl [OH] reacting intermediary and hydrocarbon [HC] primary species in laminar and turbulent combustion reactions. In this report, broadband and narrowband excitation/filtering techniques are explored to identify an optimal experimental configuration yielding significant fluorescent signal with low absorption losses. The combustion environments analyzed include 1) a laminar non-premixed methane/air flame and 2) a turbulent, non-premixed Jet-A/air fueled flame within a lean flame tube combustor. Hydrocarbon-based fuel and OH were excited via the R1 (1), R1(10) and R2(7) transitions of the A(sup 2)Epsilon(+) X(sup 2)pi(1,0) band using a broadband Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and narrowband Nd:YAG/dye laser with ultraviolet frequency extension (UVX) package. Variables tested for influence on fluorescent signal and absorption characteristics were excitation line, laser energy, exciting linewidth, combustion reactants, and test flow conditions. Results are intended to guide the transition from a dye/UVX laser to an OPO system for performing advanced diagnostics of low-emission combustion concepts.

  17. Polarisation transform analysis for detection of shallow buried non-metallic landmines in microwave X-band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, K. C.; Singh, D.; Arora, M.

    2011-06-01

    Alternative approaches and models continue to be investigated and evolved to correctly locate and identify a buried mine with minimum risk. Though microwave remote sensing based detection of shallow buried landmines provides such a risk free alternative, it is a highly complex and computationally intensive task involving several parameters. The present paper deals with the use of data obtained in multiple polarizations and their transforms approximating rough surface conditions in sand for landmine detection. Data in both HH and VV polarizations in microwave X-band frequency (10 GHz, 3cm) was generated using a live landmine (with explosives less fuze) for the present study under field conditions. Various transforms such as image differencing, image ratioing and polarization discriminant ratio (PDR) were studied for its effect on landmine detection. However, it was found that most of the clutter and noise gets suppressed on using a transform obtained by subtracting the difference of data in two polarizations from its sum. The surface roughness conditions have been approximated as available in western parts of India and which are suitable for application of microwave radar remote sensing for detection of minefields. With the advent of satellites providing data in various polarizations, it has now become relevant to investigate methods which can be used for landmine detection using polarization techniques. The proposed analysis is expected to be useful in future in detection of landmines using multi-polarization satellite data in microwave X-band in deserts such as those existing in the western borders of India.

  18. DETECTION OF MOLECULAR ABSORPTION IN THE DAYSIDE OF EXOPLANET 51 PEGASI b?

    SciTech Connect

    Brogi, M.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Birkby, J. L.; De Kok, R. J.; Albrecht, S.; De Mooij, E. J. W.

    2013-04-10

    In this paper, we present ground-based high-resolution spectroscopy of 51 Pegasi using CRIRES at the Very Large Telescope. The system was observed for 3 Multiplication-Sign 5 hr at 2.3 {mu}m at a spectral resolution of R = 100,000, targeting potential signatures from carbon monoxide, water vapor, and methane in the planet's dayside spectrum. In the first 2 Multiplication-Sign 5 hr of data, we find a combined signal from carbon monoxide and water in absorption at a formal 5.9{sigma} confidence level, indicating a non-inverted atmosphere. We derive a planet mass of M{sub P} = (0.46 {+-} 0.02)M{sub Jup} and an orbital inclination i between 79. Degree-Sign 6 and 82. Degree-Sign 2, with the upper limit set by the non-detection of the planet transit in previous photometric monitoring. However, there is no trace of the signal in the final five hours of data. A statistical analysis indicates that the signal from the first two nights is robust, but we find no compelling explanation for its absence in the final night. The latter suffers from stronger noise residuals and greater instrumental instability than the first two nights, but these cannot fully account for the missing signal. It is possible that the integrated dayside emission from 51 Peg b is instead strongly affected by weather. However, more data are required before we can claim any time variability in the planet's atmosphere.

  19. Electron and hole photoemission detection for band offset determination of tunnel field-effect transistor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Qin; Kirillov, Oleg A.; Levin, Igor; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J.; Nguyen, N. V. E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Bijesh, R.; Datta, S.; Liang, Yiran; Peng, Lian-Mao; Liang, Xuelei E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn

    2014-11-24

    We report experimental methods to ascertain a complete energy band alignment of a broken-gap tunnel field-effect transistor based on an InAs/GaSb hetero-junction. By using graphene as an optically transparent electrode, both the electron and hole barrier heights at the InAs/GaSb interface can be quantified. For a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InAs/GaSb layer structure, the barrier height from the top of the InAs and GaSb valence bands to the bottom of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} conduction band is inferred from electron emission whereas hole emissions reveal the barrier height from the top of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} valence band to the bottom of the InAs and GaSb conduction bands. Subsequently, the offset parameter at the broken gap InAs/GaSb interface is extracted and thus can be used to facilitate the development of predicted models of electron quantum tunneling efficiency and transistor performance.

  20. Absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts of fundamental and first overtone bands for OH stretching vibration of methanol upon methanol-pyridine complex formation in CCl4: analysis by NIR/IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Futami, Yoshisuke; Ozaki, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-21

    Infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) spectra were measured for methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in carbon tetrachloride. Upon the formation of the methanol-pyridine complex, the frequencies of both the fundamental and first overtone bands of the OH stretching vibration shifted to lower frequencies, and the absorption intensity of the fundamental increased significantly, while that of the first overtone decreased markedly. By using quantum chemical calculations, we estimated the absorption intensities and frequencies of the fundamental and first overtone bands for the OH stretching vibration based on the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The calculated results well reproduced the experimental results. The molecular vibration potentials and dipole moment functions of the OH stretching vibration modes were compared between methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in terms of absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts. The large change in the dipole moment function was found to be the main cause for the variations in absorption intensity for the fundamental and first overtone bands.

  1. A novel multi-band SAR data technique for fully automatic oil spill detection in the ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Frate, Fabio; Latini, Daniele; Taravat, Alireza; Jones, Cathleen E.

    2013-10-01

    With the launch of the Italian constellation of small satellites for the Mediterranean basin observation COSMO-SkyMed and the German TerraSAR-X missions, the delivery of very high-resolution SAR data to observe the Earth day or night has remarkably increased. In particular, also taking into account other ongoing missions such as Radarsat or those no longer working such as ALOS PALSAR, ERS-SAR and ENVISAT the amount of information, at different bands, available for users interested in oil spill analysis has become highly massive. Moreover, future SAR missions such as Sentinel-1 are scheduled for launch in the very next years while additional support can be provided by Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle (UAV) SAR systems. Considering the opportunity represented by all these missions, the challenge is to find suitable and adequate image processing multi-band procedures able to fully exploit the huge amount of data available. In this paper we present a new fast, robust and effective automated approach for oil-spill monitoring starting from data collected at different bands, polarizations and spatial resolutions. A combination of Weibull Multiplicative Model (WMM), Pulse Coupled Neural Network (PCNN) and Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) techniques is proposed for achieving the aforementioned goals. One of the most innovative ideas is to separate the dark spot detection process into two main steps, WMM enhancement and PCNN segmentation. The complete processing chain has been applied to a data set containing C-band (ERS-SAR, ENVISAT ASAR), X-band images (Cosmo-SkyMed and TerraSAR-X) and L-band images (UAVSAR) for an overall number of more than 200 images considered.

  2. Atmospheric CO2 measurements with a 2 μm airborne laser absorption spectrometer employing coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Spiers, Gary D; Menzies, Robert T; Jacob, Joseph; Christensen, Lance E; Phillips, Mark W; Choi, Yonghoon; Browell, Edward V

    2011-05-10

    We report airborne measurements of CO(2) column abundance conducted during two 2009 campaigns using a 2.05 μm laser absorption spectrometer. The two flight campaigns took place in the California Mojave desert and in Oklahoma. The integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) method is used for the CO(2) column mixing ratio retrievals. This instrument and the data analysis methodology provide insight into the capabilities of the IPDA method for both airborne measurements and future global-scale CO(2) measurements from low Earth orbit pertinent to the NASA Active Sensing of CO(2) Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons mission. The use of a favorable absorption line in the CO(2) 2 μm band allows the on-line frequency to be displaced two (surface pressure) half-widths from line center, providing high sensitivity to the lower tropospheric CO(2). The measurement repeatability and measurement precision are in good agreement with predicted estimates. We also report comparisons with airborne in situ measurements conducted during the Oklahoma campaign.

  3. Performing target specific band reduction using artificial neural networks and assessment of its efficacy using various target detection algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yadav, Deepti; Arora, M. K.; Tiwari, K. C.; Ghosh, J. K.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging is a powerful tool in the field of remote sensing and has been used for many applications like mineral detection, detection of landmines, target detection etc. Major issues in target detection using HSI are spectral variability, noise, small size of the target, huge data dimensions, high computation cost, complex backgrounds etc. Many of the popular detection algorithms do not work for difficult targets like small, camouflaged etc. and may result in high false alarms. Thus, target/background discrimination is a key issue and therefore analyzing target's behaviour in realistic environments is crucial for the accurate interpretation of hyperspectral imagery. Use of standard libraries for studying target's spectral behaviour has limitation that targets are measured in different environmental conditions than application. This study uses the spectral data of the same target which is used during collection of the HSI image. This paper analyze spectrums of targets in a way that each target can be spectrally distinguished from a mixture of spectral data. Artificial neural network (ANN) has been used to identify the spectral range for reducing data and further its efficacy for improving target detection is verified. The results of ANN proposes discriminating band range for targets; these ranges were further used to perform target detection using four popular spectral matching target detection algorithm. Further, the results of algorithms were analyzed using ROC curves to evaluate the effectiveness of the ranges suggested by ANN over full spectrum for detection of desired targets. In addition, comparative assessment of algorithms is also performed using ROC.

  4. AlGaN Ultraviolet Detectors for Dual-Band UV Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miko, Laddawan; Franz, David; Stahle, Carl M.; Yan, Feng; Guan, Bing

    2010-01-01

    This innovation comprises technology that has the ability to measure at least two ultraviolet (UV) bands using one detector without relying on any external optical filters. This allows users to build a miniature UVA and UVB monitor, as well as to develop compact, multicolor imaging technologies for flame temperature sensing, air-quality control, and terrestrial/counter-camouflage/biosensing applications.

  5. Band gap widening at random CIGS grain boundary detected by valence electron energy loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Debora; Buecheler, Stephan; Reinhard, Patrick; Pianezzi, Fabian; Bissig, Benjamin; Carron, Romain; Hage, Fredrik; Ramasse, Quentin; Erni, Rolf; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2016-10-01

    Cu(In,Ga) Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cells have demonstrated very high efficiencies, but still the role of nanoscale inhomogeneities in CIGS and their impact on the solar cell performance are not yet clearly understood. Due to the polycrystalline structure of CIGS, grain boundaries are very common structural defects that are also accompanied by compositional variations. In this work, we apply valence electron energy loss spectroscopy in scanning transmission electron microscopy to study the local band gap energy at a grain boundary in the CIGS absorber layer. Based on this example, we demonstrate the capabilities of a 2nd generation monochromator that provides a very high energy resolution and allows for directly relating the chemical composition and the band gap energy across the grain boundary. A band gap widening of about 20 meV is observed at the grain boundary. Furthermore, the compositional analysis by core-loss EELS reveals an enrichment of In together with a Cu, Ga and Se depletion at the same area. The experimentally obtained results can therefore be well explained by the presence of a valence band barrier at the grain boundary.

  6. Chromatism compensation in wide-band nulling interferometry for exoplanet detection.

    PubMed

    Spronck, Julien; Pereira, Silvania F; Braat, Joseph J M

    2006-02-01

    We introduce the concept of chromatism compensation in nulling interferometry that enables a high rejection ratio in a wide spectral band. Therefore the achromaticity condition considered in most nulling interferometers can be relaxed. We show that this chromatism compensation cannot be applied to a two-beam nulling interferometer, and we make an analysis of the particular case of a three-telescope configuration.

  7. Detection of HO2 in an atmospheric pressure plasma jet using optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianella, Michele; Reuter, Stephan; Lawry Aguila, Ana; Ritchie, Grant A. D.; van Helden, Jean-Pierre H.

    2016-11-01

    Cold non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma jets are increasingly applied in material processing and plasma medicine. However, their small dimensions make diagnosing the fluxes of generated species a challenge. Here we report on the detection of the hydroperoxyl radical, HO2, in the effluent of a plasma jet by the use of optical feedback cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy. The spectrometer has a minimum detectable absorption coefficient {α }\\min of 2.25× {10}-10 cm-1 with a 100 second acquisition, equivalent to 5.5× {10}12 {{cm}}-3 of HO2 (under ideal conditions). Concentrations in the range of (3.1-7.8) × 1013 cm-3 were inferred in the 4 mm wide effluent of the plasma jet.

  8. Screened coulomb hybrid DFT investigation of band gap and optical absorption predictions of CuVO3, CuNbO3 and Cu5Ta11O30 materials.

    PubMed

    Harb, Moussab; Masih, Dilshad; Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-09-14

    We present a joint theoretical and experimental investigation of the optoelectronic properties of CuVO3, CuNbO3 and Cu5Ta11O30 materials for potential photocatalytic and solar cell applications. In addition to the experimental results obtained by powder X-ray diffraction and UV-Vis spectroscopy of the materials synthesized under flowing N2 gas at atmospheric pressure via solid-state reactions, the electronic structure and the UV-Vis optical absorption coefficient of these compounds are predicted with high accuracy using advanced first-principles quantum methods based on DFT (including the perturbation theory approach DFPT) within the screened coulomb hybrid HSE06 exchange-correlation formalism. The calculated density of states are found to be in agreement with the UV-Vis diffuse reflectance spectra, predicting a small indirect band gap of 1.4 eV for CuVO3, a direct band gap of 2.6 eV for CuNbO3, and an indirect (direct) band gap of 2.1 (2.6) eV for Cu5Ta11O30. It is confirmed that the Cu(I)-based multi-metal oxides possess a strong contribution of filled Cu(I) states in the valence band and of empty d(0) metal states in the conduction band. Interestingly, CuVO3 with its predicted small indirect band gap of 1.4 eV shows the highest absorption coefficient in the visible range with a broad absorption edge extending to 886 nm. This novel result offers a great opportunity for this material to be an excellent candidate for solar cell applications.

  9. Analysis and interpretation of short tandem repeat microvariants and three-banded allele patterns using multiple allele detection systems.

    PubMed

    Crouse, C A; Rogers, S; Amiott, E; Gibson, S; Masibay, A

    1999-01-01

    The Palm Beach County Sheriffs Office (PBSO) Crime Laboratory and the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences (ADFS) have validated and implemented analysis of short tandem repeat (STR) sequences on casework using silver staining kit and SYBR Green I detection systems and are presently validating fluorescently tagged STR alleles using the Hitachi FMBIO 100 instrument. Concurrently, the Broward County Sheriff's Office (BSO) Crime Laboratory is validating the ABI Prism310 Genetic Analyzer capillary electrophoresis STR detection system (ABI CE310) from Perkin Elmer Applied BioSystems. During the course of analyzing over 10,000 individuals for the STR loci CSF1PO, TPOX and THO1 (CTT) using silver staining for allele detection, 42 samples demonstrated alleles that were "off ladder," contained three-banded patterns at a single locus, or exhibited an apparent THO1 "9.3,10" allele pattern. PBSO, ADFS and BSO Crime Laboratories have collaborated on the verification of the allele patterns observed in these 42 samples using the following allele detection systems: (1) manual silver staining, (2) SYBR Green I staining, and/or (3) fluorescently tagged amplified products separated by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis or capillary electrophoresis followed by laser detection. Regardless of the CTT allele detection system utilized, concordant results were obtained for 41 of the 42 samples. The only exception was a sample in which a wide band within the THO1 locus was identified as a THO1 "9.3, 10" genotype by silver staining kit and SYBR Green I staining but was verified to be a THO1 "9.3" homozygote by all other allele detection systems. Manual allele detection could readily identify microvariants, as a visual assessment of stained gels clearly shows that alleles do not migrate coincident with well-characterized allele size standards. As would be predicted, however, the manual detection systems did not provide adequate resolution to approximate the basepair size for off

  10. Multi-heterodyne molecular absorption spectrum detection of H13C14N based on dual frequency combs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Honglei; Wei, Haoyun; Li, Yan

    2014-11-01

    In order to acquire high-resolution molecular absorption spectrum, a measurement system consisting of two Erbium-doped fiber optical frequency combs based on multi-heterodyne detection method is established. Preliminary result shows that the specific line in the RF spectrum corresponding to 6452.59 cm-1 in the optical region, where there is an error of 0.14 cm-1 compared with the simulation result. And the further improvement of this system will be discussed in the end.

  11. Detection of absorption by H2 in molecular clouds: A direct measurement of the H2:CO ratio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacy, J. H.; Knacke, R.; Geballe, T. R.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1994-01-01

    Vibrational absorption by H2 and CO has been searched for toward infrared sources embedded in molecular clouds. H2 was detected toward NGC 2024 IRS 2 and possibly toward NGC 2264 (GL 989). CO was detected toward both sources. The results are consistent with the H2 ortho:para ratio being equilibrated at the cloud temperature. Toward NGC 2024, H2:CO = (3700(sub -2600)(sup +3100)) (2 sigma limits), and toward NGC 2264, H2:CO less than 6000. Approximately one-third of all carbon is in gas-phase CO.

  12. Near-infrared diode laser based spectroscopic detection of ammonia: a comparative study of photoacoustic and direct optical absorption methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozoki, Zoltan; Mohacsi, Arpad; Szabo, Gabor; Bor, Zsolt; Erdelyi, Miklos; Chen, Weidong; Tittel, Frank K.

    2002-01-01

    A photoacoustic spectroscopic (PAS) and a direct optical absorption spectroscopic (OAS) gas sensor, both using continuous-wave room-temperature diode lasers operating at 1531.8 nm, were compared on the basis of ammonia detection. Excellent linear correlation between the detector signals of the two systems was found. Although the physical properties and the mode of operation of both sensors were significantly different, their performances were found to be remarkably similar, with a sub-ppm level minimum detectable concentration of ammonia and a fast response time in the range of a few minutes.

  13. EXAMINING THE BROADBAND EMISSION SPECTRUM OF WASP-19b: A NEW z-BAND ECLIPSE DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, George; Bayliss, Daniel D. R.; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna; Bailey, Jeremy

    2013-09-10

    WASP-19b is one of the most irradiated hot-Jupiters known. Its secondary eclipse is the deepest of all transiting planets and has been measured in multiple optical and infrared bands. We obtained a z-band eclipse observation with a measured depth of 0.080% {+-} 0.029%, using the 2 m Faulkes Telescope South, which is consistent with the results of previous observations. We combined our measurement of the z-band eclipse with previous observations to explore atmosphere models of WASP-19b that are consistent with its broadband spectrum. We use the VSTAR radiative transfer code to examine the effect of varying pressure-temperature profiles and C/O abundance ratios on the emission spectrum of the planet. We find that models with super-solar carbon enrichment best match the observations, which is consistent with previous model retrieval studies. We also include upper atmosphere haze as another dimension in the interpretation of exoplanet emission spectra and find that particles <0.5 {mu}m in size are unlikely to be present in WASP-19b.

  14. Study of Laser Produced Plasma of Limiter of the Aditya Tokomak for Detection of Molecular Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rai, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The tokamak wall protection is one of the prime concerns, and for this purpose, limiters are used. Graphite is commonly used as a limiter material and first wall material for complete coverage of the internal vacuum vessel surfaces of the tokamak. From the past few years, we are working to identify and quantify the impurities deposited on the different part of Aditya Tokamak in collaboration with the Scientists at Institute of Plasma Research, Ahmedabad, India using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) [1-3]. Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) spectra of limiter of Aditya Tokamak have been recorded in the spectral range of 200-900 nm in open atmosphere. Along with atomic and ionic spectral lines of the constituent elements of the limiter (1-3), LIBS spectra also give the molecular bands. When a high power laser beam is focused on the sample, laser induced plasma is produced on its surface. In early stage of the plasma Back ground continuum is dominated due to free-free or free-bound emission. Just after few nanoseconds the light from the plasma is dominated by ionic emission. Atomic emission spectra is dominated from the laser induced plasma during the first few microsecond after an ablation pulse where as molecular spectra is generated later when the plasma further cools down. For this purpose the LIBS spectra has been recorded with varying gate delay and gate width. The spectra of the limiter show the presence of molecular bands of CN and C2. To get better signal to background ratios of the molecular bands, different experimental parameters like gate delay, gate width, collection angle and collection point (spatial analysis off the plasama) of the plasma have been optimized. Thus the present paper deals with the variation of spectral intensity of the molecular bands with different experimental parameters. Keywords: Limiter, Molecular bands, C2, CN. References: 1. Proof-of-concept experiment for On-line LIBS Analysis of Impurity Layer Deposited on

  15. EL2 deep level defects and above-band gap two-photon absorption in high gain lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Wei; Niu, Hongjian; Zhang, Xianbin; Ji, Weili

    2005-01-01

    Experiments of a lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch, both linear and nonlinear mode of the switch were observed when the switch was triggered by 1064 nm laser pulses, with energy of 1.9 mJ and the pulse width of 60 ns, and operated at biased electric field of 4.37 kV/cm. It"s wavelength is longer than 876nm, but the experiments indicate that the semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switches can absorb 1064 nm laser obviously, which is out of the absorption range of the GaAs material. It is not possible to explain this behavior by using intrinsic absorption mechanism. We think that there are two mostly kinds of absorption mechanisms play a key part in absorption process, they are the two-steps-single-photon absorption that based on the EL2 energy level and two-photon absorption.

  16. Detection of significant differences between absorption spectra of neutral helium and low temperature photoionized helium plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Fok, T.; Jarocki, R.; Szczurek, M.

    2013-11-15

    In this work, spectral investigations of photoionized He plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of helium stream, with intense pulses from laser-plasma extreme ultraviolet (EUV) source. The EUV source was based on a double-stream Xe/Ne gas-puff target irradiated with 10 ns/10 J Nd:YAG laser pulses. The most intense emission from the source spanned a relatively narrow spectral region below 20 nm, however, spectrally integrated intensity at longer wavelengths was also significant. The EUV radiation was focused onto a gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulse. The long-wavelength part of the EUV radiation was used for backlighting of the photoionized plasmas to obtain absorption spectra. Both emission and absorption spectra in the EUV range were investigated. Significant differences between absorption spectra acquired for neutral helium and low temperature photoionized plasmas were demonstrated for the first time. Strong increase of intensities and spectral widths of absorption lines, together with a red shift of the K-edge, was shown.

  17. Sensitivity of S- and Ka-band matched dual-wavelength radar system for detecting nonprecipitating cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivekanandan, J.; Politovich, Marcia; Rilling, Robert; Ellis, Scott; Pratte, Frank

    2004-12-01

    Remote detection of cloud phase in either liquid, ice or mixed form a key microphysical observation. Evolution of a cloud system and associated radiative properties depend on microphysical characteristics. Polarization radars rely on the shape of the particle to delineate the regions of liquid and ice. For specified transmitter and receiver characteristics, it is easier to detect a high concentrations of larger atmospheric particles than a low concentration of small particles. However, the radar cross-section of a given hydrometeor increases as the transmit frequency of the radar increases. Thus, in spite of a low transmit power, the sensitivity of a millimeter-wave radar might be better than high powered centimeter-wave radars. Also, ground clutter echoes and receiver system noise powers are sensitive functions of radar transmit frequency. For example, ground clutter in centimeter-wave radar sample volumes might mask non-precipitating or lightly precipitating clouds. An optimal clutter filter or signal processing technique can be used to suppress clutter masking its effects and/or enhanced weak cloud echoes that have significantly different Doppler characteristics than stationary ground targets. In practice, it is imperative to investigate the actual performance of S and Ka-band radar systems to detect small-scale, weak cloud reflectivity. This paper describes radar characteristics and the sensitivity of the new system in non-precipitating conditions. Recently, a dual-wavelength S and Ka-band radar system with matched resolution volume and sensitivity was built to remotely detect supercooled liquid droplets. The detection of liquid water content was based on the fact that the shorter of the two wavelengths is more strongly attenuated by liquid water. The radar system was deployed during the Winter Icing Storms Project 2004 (WISP04) near Boulder, Colorado to detect and estimate liquid water content. Observations by dual-wavelength radar were collected in both non

  18. Detection of hydrogen peroxide based on long-path absorption spectroscopy using a CW EC-QCL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, N. P.; Yu, Y.; Dong, L.; Griffin, R.; Tittel, F. K.

    2016-02-01

    A sensor system based on a CW EC-QCL (mode-hop-free range 1225-1285 cm-1) coupled with long-path absorption spectroscopy was developed for the monitoring of gas-phase hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) using an interference-free absorption line located at 1234.055 cm-1. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) with second harmonic detection was implemented for data processing. Optimum levels of pressure and modulation amplitude of the sensor system led to a minimum detection limit (MDL) of 25 ppb using an integration time of 280 sec. The selected absorption line for H2O2, which exhibits no interference from H2O, makes this sensor system suitable for sensitive and selective monitoring of H2O2 levels in decontamination and sterilization processes based on Vapor Phase Hydrogen Peroxide (VPHP) units, in which a mixture of H2O and H2O2 is generated. Furthermore, continuous realtime monitoring of H2O2 concentrations in industrial facilities employing this species can be achieved with this sensing system in order to evaluate average permissible exposure levels (PELs) and potential exceedances of guidelines established by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration for H2O2.

  19. Detection of an Octave Band of Noise as a Function of Stimulus Presentation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-11-04

    band of noise presented in noise. In one method, denoted the fixed presentation method, the signal was presented at a fixed SNR , following a specified...with the noise at the start of the trial at a low SNR . During the trial, the SNR increased at a constant rate of one-half dB per two seconds. Upon...attaining a specified SNR , the stimulus was gated. Six levels of ending SNR were examined with each method. Four subjects responded on a six-point

  20. Sea-Spike Detection in High Grazing Angle X-band Sea-Clutter

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    and verification, Journal of Geophysical Research 96(C11), 20,547– 20,559. Keller, M . R., Gotwols, B. L . & Chapman, R. D. (2002) Multiple sea spike...Hindman, C. L ., Lake, B. M ., Rungaldier, H., Shelton, J. C., Williams, A. B., Yee, R. & Yuen, H. C. (1995a) X-band microwave backscattering from...ocean waves, Journal of Geophysical Research 100(C2), 2591–2611. Lee, P. H. Y., Barter, J. D., Caponi, E., Hidman, C. L ., Lake, B. M ., Rungaldier, H

  1. Hydrophilic Indolium Cycloruthenated Complex System for Visual Detection of Bisulfite with a Large Red Shift in Absorption.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianlong; Hu, Rongrong; Li, Xianghong; Zhu, Jun; Luo, Facheng; Niu, Xuehu; Li, Mei; Zhao, Qiang

    2016-01-19

    Bisulfite, as an important additive in foodstuffs, is one of the most widely distributed environmental pollutants. The excessive intake of bisulfite may cause asthmatic attacks and allergic reactions. Therefore, the determination and visual detection of bisulfite are very important. Herein, a newly designed hydrophilic indolium cycloruthenated complex, [Ru(mepbi)(bpy)2](+) [1; bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine and Hmepbi = 3,3-dimethyl-1-ethyl-2-[4-(pyridin-2-yl)styryl]benzo[e]indolium iodide (3)], was successfully synthesized and used as a bisulfite probe. The bisulfite underwent a 1,4-addition reaction with complex 1 in PBS buffer (10 mM, pH 7.40), resulting in a dramatic change in absorption spectra with a red shift of over 100 nm and a remarkable change in solution color from yellow to pink. It is worth noting that this obvious bathochromic shift is rarely observed in the detection of bisulfite through an addition reaction. The detection limit was calculated to be as low as 0.12 μM by UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. Moreover, complex 1 was also used to detect bisulfite in sugar samples (granulated and crystal sugar) with good recovery.

  2. Detection Method of Skin Region by Near-IR Spectrum Multi-Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Yamamoto, Kazuhiko; Kato, Kunihito; Andoh, Michinori; Kojima, Shinichi

    Many active safety technologies for the driver support system are developing. Most of the traffic accidents are caused by driver's inattentive or drowsy. We are developing a driver support system that protects from traffic accidents by these causes. Our purpose is to detect the driver's face region by using a camera. A lot of face detection methods are proposed, but there is not a technique addressing every environment inside the car. For example, skin color segmentation can not detect the skin region in the night, because it has to light up the driver by bright light. In this paper, we propose a skin detection method by the unique reflection characteristics of the materials. Our method is very simple algorithm. We developed a skin detection system, and confirmed effectiveness by the evaluation experiment in indoor environment, and showed the effectiveness by a driving experiment in the night.

  3. Anomalous Signal Detection in ELF Band Electromagnetic Wave using Multi-layer Neural Network with Wavelet Decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itai, Akitoshi; Yasukawa, Hiroshi; Takumi, Ichi; Hata, Masayasu

    It is well known that electromagnetic waves radiated from the earth's crust are useful for predicting earthquakes. We analyze the electromagnetic waves received at the extremely low frequency band of 223Hz. These observed signals contain the seismic radiation from the earth's crust, but also include several undesired signals. Our research focuses on the signal detection technique to identify an anomalous signal corresponding to the seismic radiation in the observed signal. Conventional anomalous signal detections lack a wide applicability due to their assumptions, e.g. the digital data have to be observed at the same time or the same sensor. In order to overcome the limitation related to the observed signal, we proposed the anomalous signals detection based on a multi-layer neural network which is trained by digital data observed during a span of a day. In the neural network approach, training data do not need to be recorded at the same place or the same time. However, some noises, which have a large amplitude, are detected as the anomalous signal. This paper develops a multi-layer neural network to decrease the false detection of the anomalous signal from the electromagnetic wave. The training data for the proposed network is the decomposed signal of the observed signal during several days, since the seismic radiations are often recorded from several days to a couple of weeks. Results show that the proposed neural network is useful to achieve the accurate detection of the anomalous signal that indicates seismic activity.

  4. Detection of intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis by capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay in oligoclonal band negative multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Huss, André; Buttmann, Mathias; Steinacker, Petra; Oeckl, Patrick; Brecht, Isabel; Weishaupt, Andreas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCBs) restricted to the cerebrospinal fluid indicate intrathecal inflammation. Using isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting, they are detected in about 95 % of patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). To elucidate whether in the remaining 5 % OCBs are truly absent or alternatively missed due to insufficient sensitivity of the routine measurement, we employed a new, highly sensitive nanoscale method for OCB detection. Capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection served to analyze OCBs in 33 well-characterized OCB-negative and 10 OCB-positive MS patients as well as in 100 OCB-negative control patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases and 30 OCB-positive control patients with inflammatory neurological diseases. We detected intrathecal immunoglobulin G production in 10 out of 33 MS patients (30 %), initially diagnosed as being OCB-negative, and in all 10 OCB-positive MS patients, but in only 3 out of 100 non-inflammatory neurological controls (3 %) and in 29 of 30 inflammatory neurological controls (97 %). At least about one-third of MS patients without intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis according to standard methods are OCB-positive. Advanced methods for OCB detection may increase the analytical sensitivity for detecting OCB in patients with MS who are OCB-negative according to current routine methods.

  5. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  6. Orthogonal-band-multiplexed offset-QAM optical superchannel generation and coherent detection

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhennan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Xiaoqi; Lv, Xin; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhu, Yixiao; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2015-01-01

    Nowadays the Internet not only has fast growing data traffic, but also has a fast growing number of on-line devices. This leads to high demand of capacity and flexibility of the future networks. The conventional Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) and Nyquist pulse shaping signals have the advantage of high spectral efficiency when consisting of superchannels in the Wavelength-Division-Multiplexing (WDM) way. However, they face a cost issue when the spectral granularity of the superchannel is decreased to support more users. This paper proposes for the first time the scheme of Orthogonal-band-multiplexed offset-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (OBM-OQAM) superchannel. OBM-OQAM superchannel provides large capacity and high spectral efficiency. Furthermore, it has the advantage of offering subbands of variable symbol rate without changing the system configuration. We provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of OBM-OQAM superchannel transmission. In our experiment, 400 Gbps 16 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) OBM-OQAM superchannel transmission over 400 km Standard Single Mode Fiber (SSMF) is conducted. The experimental results show that the OBM-OQAM signal has low penalty in multi-band aggregation. PMID:26644162

  7. Orthogonal-band-multiplexed offset-QAM optical superchannel generation and coherent detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhennan; Wang, Dan; Zhu, Xiaoqi; Lv, Xin; Zou, Kaiheng; Zhu, Yixiao; Zhang, Fan; Chen, Zhangyuan

    2015-12-08

    Nowadays the Internet not only has fast growing data traffic, but also has a fast growing number of on-line devices. This leads to high demand of capacity and flexibility of the future networks. The conventional Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) and Nyquist pulse shaping signals have the advantage of high spectral efficiency when consisting of superchannels in the Wavelength-Division-Multiplexing (WDM) way. However, they face a cost issue when the spectral granularity of the superchannel is decreased to support more users. This paper proposes for the first time the scheme of Orthogonal-band-multiplexed offset-Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (OBM-OQAM) superchannel. OBM-OQAM superchannel provides large capacity and high spectral efficiency. Furthermore, it has the advantage of offering subbands of variable symbol rate without changing the system configuration. We provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of OBM-OQAM superchannel transmission. In our experiment, 400 Gbps 16 Quadrature Amplitude Modulation (QAM) OBM-OQAM superchannel transmission over 400 km Standard Single Mode Fiber (SSMF) is conducted. The experimental results show that the OBM-OQAM signal has low penalty in multi-band aggregation.

  8. Production of photocurrent due to intermediate-to-conduction-band transitions: a demonstration of a key operating principle of the intermediate-band solar cell.

    PubMed

    Martí, A; Antolín, E; Stanley, C R; Farmer, C D; López, N; Díaz, P; Cánovas, E; Linares, P G; Luque, A

    2006-12-15

    We present intermediate-band solar cells manufactured using quantum dot technology that show for the first time the production of photocurrent when two sub-band-gap energy photons are absorbed simultaneously. One photon produces an optical transition from the intermediate-band to the conduction band while the second pumps an electron from the valence band to the intermediate-band. The detection of this two-photon absorption process is essential to verify the principles of operation of the intermediate-band solar cell. The phenomenon is the cornerstone physical principle that ultimately allows the production of photocurrent in a solar cell by below band gap photon absorption, without degradation of its output voltage.

  9. OTHELLO: a novel SWIR dual-band detection system and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tidhar, Gil A.; Aphek, Ori B.; Cohen, Eliyahu

    2013-06-01

    A fourth generation of SWIR based optical detection and warning means is presented as the EL/O-5220 OTHELLO passive Optical Threat Locator, which detects and precisely finds directions towards a source of battle tank gun fire and missile (e.g. Anti-Tank Guided Missiles (ATGMs) Rocket Propelled Grenades (RPGs)) launch events in the battlefield. OTHELLO hardware is described followed by an explanation of some inherent advantages of SWIR imagers as building blocks for optical detection systems mounted on ground military vehicles at harsh and demanding operating conditions. Finally we describe possible application of OTHELLO with radar systems.

  10. Improving the automated detection of refugee/IDP dwellings using the multispectral bands of the WorldView-2 satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemper, Thomas; Gueguen, Lionel; Soille, Pierre

    2012-06-01

    The enumeration of the population remains a critical task in the management of refugee/IDP camps. Analysis of very high spatial resolution satellite data proofed to be an efficient and secure approach for the estimation of dwellings and the monitoring of the camp over time. In this paper we propose a new methodology for the automated extraction of features based on differential morphological decomposition segmentation for feature extraction and interactive training sample selection from the max-tree and min-tree structures. This feature extraction methodology is tested on a WorldView-2 scene of an IDP camp in Darfur Sudan. Special emphasis is given to the additional available bands of the WorldView-2 sensor. The results obtained show that the interactive image information tool is performing very well by tuning the feature extraction to the local conditions. The analysis of different spectral subsets shows that it is possible to obtain good results already with an RGB combination, but by increasing the number of spectral bands the detection of dwellings becomes more accurate. Best results were obtained using all eight bands of WorldView-2 satellite.

  11. Detection of convective cells with a potential to produce local heavy rainfalls by a C-band polarimetric radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Ahoro; Kobayashi, Takahisa; Yamauchi, Hiroshi; Onogi, Shigeru

    2011-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that polarimetric radars are capable of providing distributions of rain intensity with high accuracy. Variables obtained by the polarimetric radars include radar reflectivity factor (Zhh), differential propagation phase (Φdp) and differential reflectivity (Zdr). A number of methods to estimate rain intensity from these variables have been proposed. In this study, the rain intensity estimated from the differential reflectivity and radar reflectivity factor measured with a C-band polarimetric radar is used to analyze a local heavy rainfall event as a case study because the differential reflectivity measured with C-band radar is more sensitive to large raindrops associated with heavy rainfalls than is radars operating at other frequencies. Results show that the estimated rainfall intensity agrees well with surface observations made during the event. Moreover, the so-called high Zdr column, a large differential reflectivity region was clearly analyzed aloft about 10 minutes prior to the local heavy rainfall on the ground, suggesting that the differential reflectivity observed with C-band polarimetric radar can be a good index to detect heavy precipitation events in advance.

  12. Modeling absorption spectra for detection of the combustion products of jet engines by laser remote sensing.

    PubMed

    Voitsekhovskaya, Olga K; Kashirskii, Danila E; Egorov, Oleg V; Shefer, Olga V

    2016-05-10

    The absorption spectra of exhaust gases (H2O, CO, CO2, NO, NO2, and SO2) and aerosol (soot and Al2O3) particles were modeled at different temperatures for the first time and suitable spectral ranges were determined for conducting laser remote sensing of the combustion products of jet engines. The calculations were conducted on the basis of experimental concentrations of the substances and the sizes of the aerosol particles. The temperature and geometric parameters of jet engine exhausts were also taken from the literature. The absorption spectra were obtained via the line-by-line method, making use of the spectral line parameters from the authors' own high-temperature databases (for NO2 and SO2 gases) and the HITEMP 2010 database, and taking into account atmospheric transmission. Finally, the theoretical absorption spectra of the exhaust gases were plotted at temperatures of 400, 700, and 1000 K, and the impact of aerosol particles on the total exhaust spectra was estimated in spectral ranges suitable for remote sensing applications.

  13. Detection of the secondary eclipse of Qatar-1b in the Ks band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz, Patricia; Barrado, David; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Diaz, Marcos; Birkby, Jayne; López-Morales, Mercedes; Fortney, Jonathan J.

    2016-10-01

    Aims: Qatar-1b is a close-orbiting hot Jupiter (Rp ≃ 1.18 RJ, Mp ≃ 1.33 MJ) around a metal-rich K-dwarf, with orbital separation and period of 0.023 AU and 1.42 days. We have observed the secondary eclipse of this exoplanet in the Ks band with the objective of deriving a brightness temperature for the planet and providing further constraints to the orbital configuration of the system. Methods: We obtained near-infrared photometric data from the ground by using the OMEGA2000 instrument at the 3.5 m telescope at Calar Alto (Spain) in staring mode, with the telescope defocused. We have used principal component analysis (PCA) to identify correlated systematic trends in the data. A Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis was performed to model the correlated systematics and fit for the secondary eclipse of Qatar-1b using a previously developed occultation model. We adopted the prayer bead method to assess the effect of red noise on the derived parameters. Results: We measured a secondary eclipse depth of 0.196%+ 0.071%-0.051%, which indicates a brightness temperature in the Ks band for the planet of 1885+ 212-168 K. We also measured a small deviation in the central phase of the secondary eclipse of -0.0079+ 0.0162-0.0043, which leads to a value for ecosω of -0.0123+ 0.0252-0.0067. However, this last result needs to be confirmed with more data. Based on observations collected at the Calar Alto Observatory, Almería, Spain.Lightcurve data are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/595/A61

  14. Ultra-wide-band 3D microwave imaging scanner for the detection of concealed weapons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezgui, Nacer-Ddine; Andrews, David A.; Bowring, Nicholas J.

    2015-10-01

    The threat of concealed weapons, explosives and contraband in footwear, bags and suitcases has led to the development of new devices, which can be deployed for security screening. To address known deficiencies of metal detectors and x-rays, an UWB 3D microwave imaging scanning apparatus using FMCW stepped frequency working in the K and Q bands and with a planar scanning geometry based on an x y stage, has been developed to screen suspicious luggage and footwear. To obtain microwave images of the concealed weapons, the targets are placed above the platform and the single transceiver horn antenna attached to the x y stage is moved mechanically to perform a raster scan to create a 2D synthetic aperture array. The S11 reflection signal of the transmitted sweep frequency from the target is acquired by a VNA in synchronism with each position step. To enhance and filter from clutter and noise the raw data and to obtain the 2D and 3D microwave images of the concealed weapons or explosives, data processing techniques are applied to the acquired signals. These techniques include background subtraction, Inverse Fast Fourier Transform (IFFT), thresholding, filtering by gating and windowing and deconvolving with the transfer function of the system using a reference target. To focus the 3D reconstructed microwave image of the target in range and across the x y aperture without using focusing elements, 3D Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) techniques are applied to the post-processed data. The K and Q bands, between 15 to 40 GHz, show good transmission through clothing and dielectric materials found in luggage and footwear. A description of the system, algorithms and some results with replica guns and a comparison of microwave images obtained by IFFT, 2D and 3D SAR techniques are presented.

  15. Systematic variations in microvilli banding patterns along fiddler crab rhabdoms.

    PubMed

    Alkaladi, Ali; How, Martin J; Zeil, Jochen

    2013-02-01

    Polarisation sensitivity is based on the regular alignment of dichroic photopigment molecules within photoreceptor cells. In crustaceans, this is achieved by regularly stacking photopigment-rich microvilli in alternating orthogonal bands within fused rhabdoms. Despite being critical for the efficient detection of polarised light, very little research has focused on the detailed arrangement of these microvilli bands. We report here a number of hitherto undescribed, but functionally relevant changes in the organisation of microvilli banding patterns, both within receptors, and across the compound eye of fiddler crabs. In all ommatidia, microvilli bands increase in length from the distal to the proximal ends of the rhabdom. In equatorial rhabdoms, horizontal bands increase gradually from 3 rows of microvilli distally to 20 rows proximally. In contrast, vertical equatorial microvilli bands contain 15-20 rows of microvilli in the distal 30 µm of the rhabdom, shortening to 10 rows over the next 30 µm and then increase in length to 20 rows in parallel with horizontal bands. In the dorsal eye, horizontal microvilli occupy only half the cross-sectional area as vertical microvilli bands. Modelling absorption along the length of fiddler crab rhabdoms suggests that (1) increasing band length assures that photon absorption probability per band remains constant along the length of photoreceptors, indicating that individual bands may act as units of transduction or adaptation; (2) the different organisation of microvilli bands in equatorial and dorsal rhabdoms tune receptors to the degree and the information content of polarised light in the environment.

  16. Experimental and theoretical study of absorption spectrum of the (CH3)2CO···HF complex. Influence of anharmonic interactions on the frequency and intensity of the C=O and H-F stretching bands.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, V P; Svishcheva, E A; Tokhadze, K G

    2014-01-03

    IR absorption spectra of mixtures (CH3)2CO/HF and free (CH3)2CO molecules are recorded in the region of 4000-900 cm(-1) with a Bruker IFS-125 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer at room temperature with a resolution up to 0.02 cm(-1). Spectral characteristics of the 2ν(C=O) overtone band of free acetone are reliably measured. The ν1(HF) and ν(C=O) absorption bands of the (CH3)2CO···HF complex are obtained by subtracting the absorption bands of free HF and acetone and absorption lines of atmospheric water from the experimental spectrum of mixtures. The experimental data are compared with theoretical results obtained from variational solutions of 1D-4D vibrational Schrödinger equations. The anharmonic potential energy and dipole moment surfaces used in the calculations were computed in the MP2/6-311++G(2d,2p) approximation with corrections for the basis set superposition error. Comparison of the data derived from solutions for different combinations of vibrational degrees of freedom shows that taking the inter-mode anharmonic interactions into account has different effects on the transition frequencies and intensities. Particular attention has been given to elucidation of the influence of anharmonic coupling of the H-F and C=O stretches with the low-frequency intermolecular modes on their frequencies and intensities and the strength of resonance between the fundamental H-F and the first overtone C=O transitions.

  17. Combining CrIS double CO2 bands for detecting clouds located in different layers of the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Lin; Zou, Xiaolei; Weng, Fuzhong

    2017-02-01

    Detection of clouds within certain vertical layers of the atmosphere from satellite infrared instruments is challenging, especially of those optically thin clouds due to their small thermal contrasts to the background. This study develops a new method for cloud detection by using the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) hyperspectral radiances at shortwave ( 4.3 µm) and longwave ( 15 µm) CO2 bands. Specifically, CrIS longwave channels are first paired with shortwave channels based on weighting function altitudes and sensitivity to clouds. A linear relationship of brightness temperatures between each paired channel is then derived for predicting the shortwave channel from the longwave channel in clear-sky conditions. A cloud emission and scattering index (CESI) can finally be defined as the difference of the paired shortwave channel between the clear-sky, regression model predicted and the observed brightness temperatures. Spatial distributions of such derived CESI for several paired channels in the troposphere are examined for a winter storm that occurred in the eastern part of the United States during 22-24 January 2016. It is shown that the CESI values over the storm regions with optically thin cirrus, fog, and supercooled water clouds are positively larger than those over optically thick opaque ice and overshooting clouds or in clear-sky conditions. Of particular interest is that an area of fog and water clouds over Gulf of Mexico, which are indicated by the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite day and night band observations, is identified by the CESI. The global distribution of CESIs derived from CrIS double CO2 bands with weighting functions peak around 321 hPa agrees well with the distribution of ice cloud optical thickness from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder version 6 cloud product data set in both daytime and nighttime.

  18. Detection of submicroscopic deletions in band 17p13 in patients with the Miller-Dieker syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Charles E.; Johnson, John P.; Holycross, Bridget; Mandeville, Tracy M.; Sears, Tena S.; Graul, Elizabeth A.; Carey, John C.; Schroer, Richard J.; Phelan, Mary C.; Szollar, Judith; Flannery, David B.; Stevenson, Roger E.

    1988-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), a syndrome with lissencephaly, distinctive craniofacial features, growth impairment, and profound developmental failure, has been associated with a deletion of the distal part of chromosome band 17p13. A minority of patients with the syndrome do not have a deletion detectable with current cytogenetic techniques. Using three highly polymorphic DNA probes (pYNZ22, pYNH37.3, and p144D6) we have detected microdeletions in three MDS patients, two of whom had no visible abnormalities of chromosome 17. Loci defined by two of the DNA probes, pYNZ22 and pYNH37.3, were deleted in all three patients. The most distal locus, defined by p144D6, was present in one MDS patient, possibly defining the distal limits of the MDS region in band 17pl3.3. None of these loci were absent in one case of lissencephaly without MDS. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:2903661

  19. Detection of Near-Threshold Sounds is Independent of EEG Phase in Common Frequency Bands.

    PubMed

    Zoefel, Benedikt; Heil, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Low-frequency oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) are thought to reflect periodic excitability changes of large neural networks. Consistent with this notion, detection probability of near-threshold somatosensory, visual, and auditory targets has been reported to co-vary with the phase of oscillations in the EEG. In audition, entrainment of δ-oscillations to the periodic occurrence of sounds has been suggested to function as a mechanism of attentional selection. Here, we examine in humans whether the detection of brief near-threshold sounds in quiet depends on the phase of EEG oscillations. When stimuli were presented at irregular intervals, we did not find a systematic relationship between detection probability and phase. When stimuli were presented at regular intervals (2-s), reaction times were significantly shorter and we observed phase entrainment of EEG oscillations corresponding to the frequency of stimulus presentation (0.5 Hz), revealing an adjustment of the system to the regular stimulation. The amplitude of the entrained oscillation was higher for hits than for misses, suggesting a link between entrainment and stimulus detection. However, detection was independent of phase at frequencies ≥1 Hz. Furthermore, we show that when the data are analyzed using acausal, though common, algorithms, an apparent "entrainment" of the δ-phase to presented stimuli emerges and detection probability appears to depend on δ-phase, similar to reports in the literature. We show that these effects are artifacts from phase distortion at stimulus onset by contamination with the event-related potential, which differs markedly for hits and misses. This highlights the need to carefully deal with this common problem, since otherwise it might bias and mislead this exciting field of research.

  20. A carbon monoxide detection device based on mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy at 4.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guo-Lin; Sui, Yue; Dong, Ming; Ye, Wei-Lin; Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2015-05-01

    We present a differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g., light collector) and a multi-pass gas chamber. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path, and environmental changes. The detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are designed and developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performances on CO concentration. The results indicate that the limit of detection is about 10 ppm with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 100 ppm, the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7 to +1.9 %. Based on 12-h long-term measurements on the 100 and 1000 ppm CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9 and 5.5 %, respectively. Benefit from low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection under the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  1. Demonstration of a portable near-infrared CH4 detection sensor based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chuan-Tao; Huang, Jian-Qiang; Ye, Wei-Lin; Lv, Mo; Dang, Jing-Min; Cao, Tian-Shu; Chen, Chen; Wang, Yi-Ding

    2013-11-01

    A portable near-infrared (NIR) CH4 detection sensor based on a distributed feedback (DFB) laser modulated at 1.654 μm is experimentally demonstrated. Intelligent temperature controller with an accuracy of -0.07 to +0.09 °C as well as a scan and modulation module generating saw-wave and cosine-wave signals are developed to drive the DFB laser, and a cost effective lock-in amplifier used to extract the second harmonic signal is integrated. Thorough experiments are carried out to obtain detection performances, including detection range, accuracy, stability and the minimum detection limit (MDL). Measurement results show that the absolute detection error relative to the standard value is less than 7% within the range of 0-100%, and the MDL is estimated to be about 11 ppm under an absorption length of 0.2 m and a noise level of 2 mVpp. Twenty-four hours monitoring on two gas samples (0.1% and 20%) indicates that the absolute errors are less than 7% and 2.5%, respectively, suggesting good long term stability. The sensor reveals competitive characteristics compared with other reported portable or handheld sensors. The developed sensor can also be used for the detection of other gases by adopting other DFB lasers with different center-wavelength using the same hardware and slightly modified software.

  2. Robust Detection of Fading Narrow-Band Signals in Non-Gaussian Noise

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    1978. 9. H.V. Poor, M. Mami and J.B. Thomas, "On robust detection of discrete-time sto- chastic signals," /. Franklin Inst., vol. 309, pp. 29-53...NSEA 05H) Crystal Mall #4, Rm. 129 Washington, DC 20036 1 B. E. Clark RR #2, Box 647-B Graham, NC 27253 1 Naval Underwater Systems Center Attn

  3. Detection of small surface vessels in near, medium, and far infrared spectral bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dulski, R.; Milewski, S.; Kastek, M.; Trzaskawka, P.; Szustakowski, M.; Ciurapinski, W.; Zyczkowski, M.

    2011-11-01

    Protection of naval bases and harbors requires close co-operation between security and access control systems covering land areas and those monitoring sea approach routes. The typical location of naval bases and harbors - usually next to a large city - makes it difficult to detect and identify a threat in the dense regular traffic of various sea vessels (i.e. merchant ships, fishing boats, tourist ships). Due to the properties of vessel control systems, such as AIS (Automatic Identification System), and the effectiveness of radar and optoelectronic systems against different targets it seems that fast motor boats called RIB (Rigid Inflatable Boat) could be the most serious threat to ships and harbor infrastructure. In the paper the process and conditions for the detection and identification of high-speed boats in the areas of ports and naval bases in the near, medium and far infrared is presented. Based on the results of measurements and recorded thermal images the actual temperature contrast delta T (RIB / sea) will be determined, which will further allow to specify the theoretical ranges of detection and identification of the RIB-type targets for an operating security system. The data will also help to determine the possible advantages of image fusion where the component images are taken in different spectral ranges. This will increase the probability of identifying the object by the multi-sensor security system equipped additionally with the appropriate algorithms for detecting, tracking and performing the fusion of images from the visible and infrared cameras.

  4. Analysis of X-band radar images for the detection of the reflected and diffracted waves in coastal zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludeno, Giovanni; Natale, Antonio; Soldovieri, Francesco; Vicinanza, Diego; Serafino, Francesco

    2014-05-01

    The observation of nearshore waves and the knowledge of the sea state parameters can play a crucial role for the safety of harbors and ocean engineering. In the last two decades, different algorithms for the estimation of sea state parameters, surface currents and bathymetry from X-band radar data have been developed and validated [1, 2]. The retrieval of ocean wave parameters such as significant height, period, direction and wavelength of the dominant wave is based on the spectral analysis of data sequences collected by nautical X-band radars [3]. In particular, the reconstruction of the wave motion is carried out through the inversion procedure explained in [1-3], which exploits the dispersion relationship to define a band pass filter used to separate the energy associated with the ocean waves from the background noise. It is worth to note that the shape of such a band pass filter depends upon the value of both the surface currents and bathymetry; in our reconstruction algorithm these parameters are estimated through the (Normalized Scalar Product) procedure [1], which outperforms other existing methods (e.g., the Least Squares) [4]. From the reconstructed wave elevation sequences we can get the directional spectrum that provides useful information (i.e., wavelength, period, direction and amplitude) relevant to the main waves contributing to the wave motion. Of course, in coastal zones a number of diffraction and reflection phenomena can be observed, due to sea-waves impinging obstacles as jetties, breakwaters and boats. In the present paper we want to show the capability to detect reflected and diffracted sea-waves offered by the processing of X-band radar data. Further details relevant to the obtained results will be provided in the full paper and at the conference time. References [1] F. Serafino, C. Lugni, F. Soldovieri, "A novel strategy for the surface current determination from marine X-Band radar data", IEEE Geosci. and Remote Sensing Letters, vol. 7, no

  5. Development of gas fire detection system using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y. L.; Li, G.; Yang, T.; Wang, J. J.

    2017-01-01

    The conventional fire detection methods mainly produce an alarm through detecting the changes in smoke concentration, flame radiation, heat and other physical parameters in the environment, but are unable to provide an early warning of a fire emergency. We have designed a gas fire detection system with a high detection sensitivity and high selectivity using the tunable semiconductor diode laser as a light source and combining wavelength modulation and harmonic detection technology. This system can invert the second harmonic signal obtained to obtain the concentration of carbon monoxide gas (a fire characteristic gas) so as to provide an early warning of fire. We reduce the system offset noise and the background noise generated due to the laser interference by deducting the system background spectrum lines from the second harmonic signal. This can also eliminate the interference of other gas spectral lines to a large extent. We detected the concentration of the carbon monoxide gas generated in smoldering sandalwood fire and open beech wood fire with the homemade fire simulator, and tested the lowest detectable limit of system. The test results show that the lowest detectable limit can reach 5×10-6 the system can maintain stable operation for a long period of time and can automatically trigger a water mist fire extinguishing system, which can fully meet the needs of early fire warning.

  6. ULTRACAM z'-band detection of the secondary eclipse of WASP-12b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhring, D.; Dhillon, V. S.; Madhusudhan, Nikku; Marsh, T. R.; Copperwheat, C. M.; Littlefair, S. P.; Wilson, Richard W.

    2013-11-01

    We present z'-band secondary eclipse photometry of the highly irradiated hot Jupiter WASP-12b using ULTRACAM on the 4.2 m William Herschel Telescope. We measure a decrease in flux of δ = 0.130 ± 0.013 per cent during the passage of the planet behind the star, which is significantly deeper than the previous measurement at this wavelength (0.082 ± 0.015 per cent). Our secondary eclipse is best fitted with a mid-eclipse phase, φ, that is compatible with a circular orbit φ = 0.501 ± 0.002, in agreement with previous results. In combination with existing data, our eclipse depth measurement allows us to constrain the characteristics of the planet's atmosphere, which is consistent with a carbon-rich model, with no evidence for a strong thermal inversion. If the difference in eclipse depth reported here compared to that of López-Morales et al. is of physical origin, as opposed to due to systematics, it may be caused by temporal variability in the flux, due to atmospheric dynamics.

  7. Detecting forest structure and biomass with C-band multipolarization radar - Physical model and field tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Paris, Jack F.

    1987-01-01

    The ability of C-band radar (4.75 GHz) to discriminate features of forest structure, including biomass, is tested using a truck-mounted scatterometer for field tests on a 1.5-3.0 m pygmy forest of cypress (Cupressus pygmaea) and pine (Pinus contorta ssp, Bolanderi) near Mendocino, CA. In all, 31 structural variables of the forest are quantified at seven sites. Also measured was the backscatter from a life-sized physical model of the pygmy forest, composed of nine wooden trees with 'leafy branches' of sponge-wrapped dowels. This model enabled independent testing of the effects of stem, branch, and leafy branch biomass, branch angle, and moisture content on radar backscatter. Field results suggested that surface area of leaves played a greater role in leaf scattering properties than leaf biomass per se. Tree leaf area index was strongly correlated with vertically polarized power backscatter (r = 0.94; P less than 0.01). Field results suggested that the scattering role of leaf water is enhanced as leaf surface area per unit leaf mass increases; i.e., as the moist scattering surfaces become more dispersed. Fog condensate caused a measurable rise in forest backscatter, both from surface and internal rises in water content. Tree branch mass per unit area was highly correlated with cross-polarized backscatter in the field (r = 0.93; P less than 0.01), a result also seen in the physical model.

  8. Detection of the 2175 Å Dust Feature in Mg II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    1997-10-01

    The broad absorption bump at 2175 Å due to dust, which is ubiquitous in the Galaxy and is seen in the Magellanic clouds, is also seen in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts, we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra as well as small features in the flat-fielding of the spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 Å (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 μm-1, and the central wavelength is 2240 Å. These are somewhat different from the central wavelength of 2176 Å and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 μm-1 found in the Galaxy. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 Å feature in Mg II absorbers and the Galactic interstellar medium can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them.

  9. The Role of Narrow Band Imaging in the Detection of Recurrent Laryngeal and Hypopharyngeal Cancer after Curative Radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zabrodsky, Michal; Plzak, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Narrow band imaging is considered a significant improvement in the possibility of detecting early mucosal lesion of the upper aerodigestive tract. Early detection of mucosal neoplastic lesions is of utmost importance for patients survival. There is evidence that, especially in patients previously treated by means of curative radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, the early detection rate of recurrent disease is quite low. The aim of this study was to prove whether the videoendoscopy coupled with NBI might help detect recurrent or secondary tumors of the upper aerodigestive tract. 66 patients previously treated by means of RT or CRT with curative intent were enrolled in the study. All patients underwent transnasal flexible videoendoscopy with NBI mode under local anesthesia. When a suspicious lesion was identified in an ambulatory setting, its nature was proved histologically. Many of these changes were not identifiable by means of conventional white light (WL) endoscopy. The accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive value of the method are very high (88%, 92%, 76%, 96%, and 91%, resp.). Results demonstrate that outpatient transnasal endoscopy with NBI is an excellent method for the follow-up of patients with carcinomas of the larynx and the hypopharynx primarily treated with radiotherapy. PMID:25101264

  10. Endoscopic Detection of Early Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma in Patients with Achalasia: Narrow-Band Imaging versus Lugol's Staining.

    PubMed

    Ide, Edson; Carneiro, Fred Olavo Aragão Andrade; Frazão, Mariana Souza Varella; Chaves, Dalton Marques; Sallum, Rubens Antônio Aissar; de Moura, Eduardo Guimarães Hourneaux; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2013-01-01

    Chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining remains the gold standard technique for detecting superficial SCC. An alternative technique, such as narrow-band imaging (NBI), for "optical staining" would be desirable, since NBI is a simpler technique and has no known complications. In this study, we compare NBI without magnification and chromoendoscopy with Lugol's staining for detecting high-grade dysplasia and intramucosal esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in patients with achalasia. This was a prospective observational study of 43 patients with achalasia referred to the Gastrointestinal Endoscopy Unit of the Hospital of Clinics, São Paulo, University Medical School, Brazil, from October 2006 to February 2007. Conventional examinations with white light, NBI, and Lugol staining were consecutively performed, and the suspected lesions were mapped, recorded, and sent for biopsy. The results of the three methods were compared regarding sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, positive likelihood value, and negative likelihood value. Of the 43 patients, one was diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and it was detected by all of the methods. NBI technology without magnification has high sensitivity and negative predictive value for detecting superficial esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, and it has comparable results with those obtained with Lugol's staining.

  11. Viral immunoblotting: a sensitive method for detecting viral-specific oliogoclonal bands in unconcentrated cerebrospinal fluid.

    PubMed

    Moyle, S; Keir, G; Thompson, E J

    1984-06-01

    A new method for detecting viral antibodies in cerebrospinal fluid is described. The technique has many advantages over previously published methods in that it is highly sensitive eliminating the need to concentrate the CSF, takes 5 h to complete, avoids the use of radionucleides, and most importantly circumvents problems associated with prozone effects which occur in immunoprecipitation reaction since the viral antigen is immobilized on nitrocellulose membranes.

  12. The detection of carbon dioxide leaks using quasi-tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy measurements in variable wind

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Dobler, Jeremy T.; Blume, Nathan; Braun, Michael; Scott Zaccheo, T.; Pernini, Timothy G.

    2016-01-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used over the last several decades for the measurement of trace gasses in the atmosphere. For over a decade, LAS measurements from multiple sources and tens of retroreflectors have been combined with sparse-sample tomography methods to estimate the 2-D distribution of trace gas concentrations and underlying fluxes from point-like sources. In this work, we consider the ability of such a system to detect and estimate the position and rate of a single point leak which may arise as a failure mode for carbon dioxide storage. The leak is assumed to be at a constant rate giving rise to a plume with a concentration and distribution that depend on the wind velocity. We demonstrate the ability of our approach to detect a leak using numerical simulation and also present a preliminary measurement. PMID:27453761

  13. The detection of carbon dioxide leaks using quasi-tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy measurements in variable wind

    DOE PAGES

    Levine, Zachary H.; Pintar, Adam L.; Dobler, Jeremy T.; ...

    2016-04-13

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used over the last several decades for the measurement of trace gasses in the atmosphere. For over a decade, LAS measurements from multiple sources and tens of retroreflectors have been combined with sparse-sample tomography methods to estimate the 2-D distribution of trace gas concentrations and underlying fluxes from point-like sources. In this work, we consider the ability of such a system to detect and estimate the position and rate of a single point leak which may arise as a failure mode for carbon dioxide storage. The leak is assumed to be at a constant ratemore » giving rise to a plume with a concentration and distribution that depend on the wind velocity. We demonstrate the ability of our approach to detect a leak using numerical simulation and also present a preliminary measurement.« less

  14. Detection of interstellar sodium hydroxide in self-absorption toward the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Rhodes, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    A weak self-absorbed emission line, which is identified as the J = 4-3 transition of sodium hydroxide, has been detected in the direction of Sgr B2(OH). The correspondingly weak Sgr B2(QH) emission line U75406, previously reported as an unidentified spectral feature by other investigators, is consistent with the J = 3-2 transition of sodium hydroxide. This detection may represent the first evidence of a grain reaction formation mechanism for simple metal hydroxides. The detection of H62 Delta toward Orion A is also reported.

  15. Detection of Mucosal Recurrent Nasopharyngeal Carcinomas After Radiotherapy With Narrow-Band Imaging Endoscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wen-Hung; Lin, Yen-Chun; Chen, Wen-Cheng; Chen, Miao-Fen; Chen, Chih-Cheng; Lee, Kam-Fai

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: This study evaluated the feasibility of screening mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma with narrow-band imaging (NBI) endoscopy. Methods and Materials: One hundred and six patients were enrolled. All patients underwent conventional white-light (WL) endoscopic examination of the nasopharynx followed by NBI endoscopy. Biopsies were performed if recurrence was suspected. Results: We identified 32 suspected lesions by endoscopy in WL and/or NBI mode. Scattered brown spots (BS) were identified in 22 patients, and 4 of the 22 who had negative MRI findings were histopathologically confirmed to be neoplasias that were successfully removed via endoscopy. A comparison of the visualization in NBI closer view corresponded to histopathological findings in 22 BS, and the prevalence rates of neoplasias in tail signs, round signs, and irregularities signs were 0% (0/6), 0% (0/7), and 44.4% (4/9), respectively (p = 0.048). The sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic capability were 37.5%, 92.9% and 0.652 for WL, 87.5%, 74.5% and 0.810 for NBI, and 87.5%, 87.8%, and 0.876 for NBI closer view, respectively. NBI closer view was effective in increasing specificity compared with NBI alone (87.8% vs. 74.5%, p < 0.05), and in increasing sensitivity and diagnostic capability compared to WL alone (87.5% vs. 37.5%, p < 0.05; 0.876 vs. 0.652, p = 0.0001). Conclusions: Although NBI in endoscopy can improve sensitivity of mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal neoplasias, false-positive (nonneoplasia BS) results may be obtained in areas with nonspecific inflammatory changes due to postradiation effects. NBI closer view not only can offer a timely, convenient, and highly reliable assessment of mucosal recurrent nasopharyngeal carcinoma, it can also make endoscopic removal possible.

  16. High Explosives Mixtures Detection Using Fiber Optics Coupled: Grazing Angle Probe/Fourier Transform Reflection Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.; Soto-Feliciano, Yadira M.; Pacheco-Londoño, Leonardo C.; Hernández-Rivera, Samuel P.

    2008-12-01

    Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy operating in Reflection-Absorption mode has been demonstrated as a potential spectroscopic technique to develop new methodologies for detection of chemicals deposited on metallic surfaces. Mid-IR transmitting optical fiber bundle coupled to an external Grazing Angle Probe and an MCT detector together with a bench Michelson interferometer have been used to develop a highly sensitive and selective methodology for detecting traces of organic compounds on metal surfaces. The methodology is remote sensed, in situ and can detect surface loading concentrations of nanograms/cm2 of most target compounds. It is an environmentally friendly, solvent free technique that does not require sample preparation. In this work, the ever-important task of high explosives detection, present as traces of neat crystalline forms and in lab-made mixtures, equivalent to the important explosive formulation Pentolite, has been addressed. The sample set consisted of TNT, PETN (both pure samples) and the formulation based on them: Pentolite, present in various loading concentrations. The spectral data collected was subjected to a number of statistical pre-treatments, including first derivative and normalization transformations to make the data more suitable for the analysis. Principal Components Analysis combined with Linear Discriminant Analysis allowed the classification and discrimination of the target analytes contained in the sample set. Loading concentrations as 220 ng/cm2 were detected for each explosive in neat form and the in the simulated mixture of Pentolite.

  17. Karyotype analysis of four jewel-beetle species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae) detected by standard staining, C-banding, AgNOR-banding and CMA3/DAPI staining

    PubMed Central

    Karagyan, Gayane; Lachowska, Dorota; Kalashian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The male karyotypes of Acmaeodera pilosellae persica Mannerheim, 1837 with 2n=20 (18+neoXY), Sphenoptera scovitzii Faldermann, 1835 (2n=38–46), Dicerca aenea validiuscula Semenov, 1895 – 2n=20 (18+Xyp) and Sphaerobothris aghababiani Volkovitsh et Kalashian, 1998 – 2n=16 (14+Xyp) were studied using conventional staining and different chromosome banding techniques: C-banding, AgNOR-banding, as well as fluorochrome Chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and DAPI. It is shown that C-positive segments are weakly visible in all four species which indicates a small amount of constitutive heterochromatin (CH). There were no signals after DAPI staining and some positive signals were discovered using CMA3 staining demonstrating absence of AT-rich DNA and presence of GC-rich clusters of CH. Nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) were revealed using Ag-NOR technique; argentophilic material mostly coincides with positive signals obtained using CMA3 staining. PMID:24260661

  18. Karyotype analysis of four jewel-beetle species (Coleoptera, Buprestidae) detected by standard staining, C-banding, AgNOR-banding and CMA3/DAPI staining.

    PubMed

    Karagyan, Gayane; Lachowska, Dorota; Kalashian, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The male karyotypes of Acmaeodera pilosellae persica Mannerheim, 1837 with 2n=20 (18+neoXY), Sphenoptera scovitzii Faldermann, 1835 (2n=38-46), Dicerca aenea validiuscula Semenov, 1895 - 2n=20 (18+Xyp) and Sphaerobothris aghababiani Volkovitsh et Kalashian, 1998 - 2n=16 (14+Xyp) were studied using conventional staining and different chromosome banding techniques: C-banding, AgNOR-banding, as well as fluorochrome Chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and DAPI. It is shown that C-positive segments are weakly visible in all four species which indicates a small amount of constitutive heterochromatin (CH). There were no signals after DAPI staining and some positive signals were discovered using CMA3 staining demonstrating absence of AT-rich DNA and presence of GC-rich clusters of CH. Nucleolus organizing regions (NORs) were revealed using Ag-NOR technique; argentophilic material mostly coincides with positive signals obtained using CMA3 staining.

  19. Novel quad-band terahertz metamaterial absorber based on single pattern U-shaped resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ben-Xin; Wang, Gui-Zhen

    2017-03-01

    A novel quad-band terahertz metamaterial absorber using four different modes of single pattern resonator is demonstrated. Four obvious frequencies with near-perfect absorption are realized. Near-field distributions of the four modes are provided to reveal the physical picture of the multiple-band absorption. Unlike most previous quad-band absorbers that typically require four or more patterns, the designed absorber has only one resonant structure, which is simpler than previous works. The presented quad-band absorber has potential applications in biological sensing, medical imaging, and material detection.

  20. Detecting Lamb waves with broad-band acousto-ultrasonic signals in composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.

    1992-01-01

    Lamb waves can be produced and detected in ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and metal matrix composites (MMC) plates using the acousto-ultrasonic configuration employing broadband transducers. Experimental dispersion curves of lowest symmetric and antisymmetric modes behave in a manner analogous to the graphite/polymer theoretical curves. In this study a basis has been established for analyzing Lamb wave velocities for characterizing composite plates. Lamb wave dispersion curves and group velocities were correlated with variations in axial stiffness and shear stiffness in MMC and CMC. For CMC, interfacial shear strength was also correlated with the first antisymmetric Lamb mode.

  1. Automatic microseismic event detection by band-limited phase-only correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shaojiang; Wang, Yibo; Zhan, Yi; Chang, Xu

    2016-12-01

    Identification and detection of microseismic events is a significant issue in source locations and source mechanism analysis. The number of the records is notably large, especially in the case of some real-time monitoring, and while the majority of microseismic events are highly weak and sparse, automatic algorithms are indispensable. In this study, we introduce an effective method for the identification and detection of microseismic events by judging whether the P-wave phase exists in a local segment from a single three-component microseismic records. The new judging algorithm consists primarily of the following key steps: 1) transform the waveform time series into time-varying spectral representations using the S-transform; 2) calculate the similarity of the frequency content in the time-frequency domain using the phase-only correlation function; and 3) identify the P-phase by the combination analysis between any two components. The proposed algorithm is compared to a similar approach using the cross-correlation in the time domain between any two components and later tested with synthetic microseismic datasets and real field-recorded datasets. The results indicate that the proposed algorithm is able to distinguish similar and dissimilar waveforms, even for low signal noise ratio and emergent events, which is important for accurate and rapid selection of microseismic events from a large number of records. This method can be applied to other geophysical analyses based on the waveform data.

  2. Detection of concealed explosives at stand-off distances using wide band swept millimetre waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, David A.; Rezgui, Nacer D.; Smith, Sarah E.; Bowring, Nicholas; Southgate, Matthew; Baker, John G.

    2008-10-01

    Millimetre waves in the range 20 to 110 GHz have been used to detect the presence and thickness of dielectric materials, such as explosives, by measuring the frequency response of the return signal. Interference between the reflected signals from the front and back surfaces of the dielectric provides a characteristic frequency variation in the return signal, which may be processed to yield its optical depth [Bowring et al, Meas. Sci. Technol. 19, 024004 (2008)]. The depth resolution depends on the sweep bandwidth, which is typically 10 to 30 GHz. By using super-heterodyne detection the range of the object can also be determined, which enables a signal from a target, such as a suicide bomber to be extracted from background clutter. Using millimetre wave optics only a small area of the target is illuminated at a time, thus reducing interference from different parts of a human target. Results are presented for simulated explosive materials with water or human backing at stand-off distances. A method of data analysis that involves pattern recognition enables effective differentiation of target types.

  3. Detecting the radiometric changes of FY-3A/MERSI reflective solar bands by use of stable desert sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xiuqing

    2014-11-01

    To monitor changes in sensor performance and sensor calibration is a critical step to ensure data quality and to meet the needs of quantitative remote sensing in a broad range of scientific applications. One of the least expensive and increasingly popular methods of on-orbit calibration has been the use of large-area stable terrestrial sites. In this study, three stable desert sites of Libya-1, Sonora, and Arabia-2 are used to assessment the radiometric changes of reflective solar bands of FY-3A/MERSI from May 2008 to Dec. 2013. For each site, two BRDF models are established using the TOA reflectance measurements in the winter half-year and summer half-year late in the mission. Then, the degradation rates of RSBs of MERSI are predicted using an exponential fit of the BRDF-corrected time series. Results show that the use of two BRDF models is effective to removal of seasonal oscillation caused by angular effects. Degradation rates from three desert sites are in good agreement, with the standard deviation less than 1.5% for most of the bands. When compared with the DCC method, consistent detecting results are found, and the absolute deviation is less than 3% for most of the channels.

  4. Determination of the 14N quadrupole coupling constant of nitroxide spin probes by W-band ELDOR-detected NMR.

    PubMed

    Florent, Marc; Kaminker, Ilia; Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2011-06-01

    Nitroxide spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has proven to be a very successful method to probe local polarity and solvent hydrogen bonding properties at the molecular level. The g(xx) and the (14)N hyperfine A(zz) principal values are the EPR parameters of the nitroxide spin probe that are sensitive to these properties and are therefore monitored experimentally. Recently, the (14)N quadrupole interaction of nitroxides has been shown to be also highly sensitive to polarity and H-bonding (A. Savitsky et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 9079). High-field electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) was used successfully to determine the P(xx) and P(yy) principal components of the (14)N quadrupole tensor. The P(zz) value was calculated from the traceless character of the quadrupole tensor. We introduce here high-field (W-band, 95 GHz, 3.5 T) electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR as a method to obtain the (14)N P(zz) value directly, together with A(zz). This is complemented by W-band hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) measurements carried out along the g(xx) direction to determine the principal P(xx) and P(yy) components. Through measurements of TEMPOL dissolved in solvents of different polarities, we show that A(zz) increases, while |P(zz)| decreases with polarity, as predicted by Savitsky et al.

  5. Determination of the 14N quadrupole coupling constant of nitroxide spin probes by W-band ELDOR-detected NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Florent, Marc; Kaminker, Ilia; Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2011-06-01

    Nitroxide spin probe electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) has proven to be a very successful method to probe local polarity and solvent hydrogen bonding properties at the molecular level. The g xx and the 14N hyperfine A zz principal values are the EPR parameters of the nitroxide spin probe that are sensitive to these properties and are therefore monitored experimentally. Recently, the 14N quadrupole interaction of nitroxides has been shown to be also highly sensitive to polarity and H-bonding (A. Savitsky et al., J. Phys. Chem. B 112 (2008) 9079). High-field electron spin echo envelope modulation (ESEEM) was used successfully to determine the P xx and P yy principal components of the 14N quadrupole tensor. The P zz value was calculated from the traceless character of the quadrupole tensor. We introduce here high-field (W-band, 95 GHz, 3.5 T) electron-electron double resonance (ELDOR)-detected NMR as a method to obtain the 14N P zz value directly, together with A zz. This is complemented by W-band hyperfine sublevel correlation (HYSCORE) measurements carried out along the g xx direction to determine the principal P xx and P yy components. Through measurements of TEMPOL dissolved in solvents of different polarities, we show that A zz increases, while | P zz| decreases with polarity, as predicted by Savitsky et al.

  6. The two-photon absorptivity of rotational transitions in the A2 Sigma hyperon + (v prime = O) - X-2 pion (v prime prime = O) gamma band of nitric oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, K. P.; Mckenzie, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    A predominantly single-mode pulsed dye laser system giving a well characterized spatial and temporal output suitable for absolute two-photon absorptivity measurements was used to study the NO gamma(0,0) S11 + R21 (J double prime = 7-1/2) transition. Using a calibrated induced-fluorescence technique, an absorptivity parameter of 2.8 + or - 1.4 x 10 to the minus 51st power cm to the 6th power was obtained. Relative strengths of other rotational transitions in the gamma(0,0) band were also measured and shown to compare well with predicted values in all cases except the O12 (J double prime = 10-1/2) transition.

  7. Multi-epoch Detections of Water Ice Absorption in Edge-on Disks around Herbig Ae Stars: PDS 144N and PDS 453

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terada, Hiroshi; Tokunaga, Alan T.

    2017-01-01

    We report the multi-epoch detections of water ice in 2.8–4.2 μ {{m}} spectra of two Herbig Ae stars, PDS 144N (A2 IVe) and PDS 453 (F2 Ve), which have an edge-on circumstellar disk. The detected water ice absorption is found to originate from their protoplanetary disks. The spectra show a relatively shallow absorption of water ice of around 3.1 μ {{m}} for both objects. The optical depths of the water ice absorption are ∼0.1 and ∼0.2 for PDS 144N and PDS 453, respectively. Compared to the water ice previously detected in low-mass young stellar objects with an edge-on disk with a similar inclination angle, these optical depths are significantly lower. It suggests that stronger UV radiation from the central stars effectively decreases the water ice abundance around the Herbig Ae stars through photodesorption. The water ice absorption in PDS 453 shows a possible variation of the feature among the six observing epochs. This variation could be due to a change of absorption materials passing through our line of sight to the central star. The overall profile of the water ice absorption in PDS 453 is quite similar to the absorption previously reported in the edge-on disk object d216-0939, and this unique profile may be seen only at a high inclination angle in the range of 76°–80°.

  8. Antarctica X-band MiniSAR Crevasse Detection Radar : draft final report.

    SciTech Connect

    Sander, Grant J.; Bickel, Douglas Lloyd

    2010-08-01

    This document is the final report for the 2009 Antarctica Crevasse Detection Radar (CDR) Project. This portion of the project is referred to internally as Phase 2. This is a follow on to the work done in Phase 1 reported on in [1]. Phase 2 involved the modification of a Sandia National Laboratories MiniSAR system used in Phase 1 to work with an LC-130 aircraft that operated in Antarctica in October through November of 2009. Experiments from the 2006 flights were repeated, as well as a couple new flight tests to examine the effect of colder snow and ice on the radar signatures of 'deep field' sites. This document includes discussion of the hardware development, system capabilities, and results from data collections in Antarctica during the fall of 2009.

  9. GeSn p-i-n photodetector for all telecommunication bands detection.

    PubMed

    Su, Shaojian; Cheng, Buwen; Xue, Chunlai; Wang, Wei; Cao, Quan; Xue, Haiyun; Hu, Weixuan; Zhang, Guangze; Zuo, Yuhua; Wang, Qiming

    2011-03-28

    Using a 820 nm-thick high-quality Ge0.97Sn0.03 alloy film grown on Si(001) by molecular beam epitaxy, GeSn p-i-n photodectectors have been fabricated. The detectors have relatively high responsivities, such as 0.52 A/W, 0.23 A/W, and 0.12 A/W at 1310 nm, 1540 nm, and 1640 nm, respectively, under a 1 V reverse bias. With a broad detection spectrum (800-1800 nm) covering the whole telecommunication windows and compatibility with conventional complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS) technology, the GeSn devices are attractive for applications in both optical communications and optical interconnects.

  10. Detecting air pollution stress in southern California vegetation using Landsat Thematic Mapper band data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westman, Walter E.; Price, Curtis V.

    1988-01-01

    Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) and aircraft-borne Thematic Mapper simulator (TMS) data were collected over two areas of natural vegetation in southern California exposed to gradients of pollutant dose, particularly in photochemical oxidants: the coastal sage scrub of the Santa Monica Mountains in the Los Angeles basin, and the yellow pine forests in the southern Sierra Nevada. In both situations, natural variations in canopy closure, with subsequent exposure of understory elements (e.g.,rock or soil, chaparral, grasses, and herbs), were sufficient to cause changes in spectral variation that could obscure differences due to visible foliar injury symptoms observed in the field. TM or TMS data are therefore more likely to be successful in distinguishing pollution injury from background variation when homogeneous communities with closed canopies are subjected to more severe pollution-induced structural and/or compositional change. The present study helps to define the threshold level of vegetative injury detectable by TM data.

  11. Detecting and Quantifying Forest Change: The Potential of Existing C- and X-Band Radar Datasets.

    PubMed

    Tanase, Mihai A; Ismail, Ismail; Lowell, Kim; Karyanto, Oka; Santoro, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluates the opportunity provided by global interferometric radar datasets for monitoring deforestation, degradation and forest regrowth in tropical and semi-arid environments. The paper describes an easy to implement method for detecting forest spatial changes and estimating their magnitude. The datasets were acquired within space-borne high spatial resolutions radar missions at near-global scales thus being significant for monitoring systems developed under the United Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The approach presented in this paper was tested in two areas located in Indonesia and Australia. Forest change estimation was based on differences between a reference dataset acquired in February 2000 by the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM) and TanDEM-X mission (TDM) datasets acquired in 2011 and 2013. The synergy between SRTM and TDM datasets allowed not only identifying changes in forest extent but also estimating their magnitude with respect to the reference through variations in forest height.

  12. Detection of copper in water using on-line plasma-excited atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS).

    PubMed

    Porento, Mika; Sutinen, Veijo; Julku, Timo; Oikari, Risto

    2011-06-01

    A measurement method and apparatus was developed to measure continuously toxic metal compounds in industrial water samples. The method was demonstrated by using copper as a sample metal. Water was injected into the sample line and subsequently into a nitrogen plasma jet, in which the samples comprising the metal compound dissolved in water were decomposed. The transmitted monoch