Science.gov

Sample records for absorption band observed

  1. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on YSOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M., Fraser, H. J.; Terada, H.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2011-05-01

    Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass YSOs contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. In order to investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass YSOs, we have observed ice absorption bands towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Slit-less spectroscopic observations are performed using the grism mode of Infrared Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO_2 band and the blue wing of the H_2O band, which are not accessible from the ground. We developed procedures to reduce the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra are fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. Then we fit the molecular absorption bands with the laboratory spectra from the database, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the dispersion element. Towards the Class 0-I sources, absorption bands of H_2O, CO_2, CO and XCN (OCN^-) are clearly detected. Weak features of 13CO_2, HDO, the C-H band, and gaseous CO are detected as well. OCS ice absorption is tentatively detected towards IRC-L1041-2. The detected features would mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN^- could originate in the region close to the protostar. Towards class II stars, H_2O ice band is detected. We also detected H_2O ice, CO_2 ice and tentative CO gas features of the foreground component of class II stars.

  2. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  3. Stratospheric observations of the attenuated solar irradiance in the Schumann-Runge band absorption region of molecular oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederick, J. E.; Hudson, R. D.; Mentall, J. E.

    1981-01-01

    A spectrometer flown on the first Solar Absorption Balloon Experiment (SABE-1) observed the attenuated solar irradiance between 184 and 202 nm from an altitude near 40 km. These measurements provide a check on the absorption cross sections of molecular oxygen in the spectral region of the Schumann-Runge bands. Comparison of the measurements with calculations based on cross sections derived from laboratory data shows a general agreement although the irradiance measurements have large error bars near the centers of the absorption bands. The results imply that the 184-200 nm solar irradiance that penetrates to the stratosphere can be computed to an accuracy of + or - 30% or better by using presently available cross sections.

  4. Theoretical study of electronic absorption spectroscopy of propadienylidene molecule vis-â-vis the observed diffuse interstellar bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Samala Nagaprasad; Mahapatra, S.

    2012-07-01

    Observation of broad and diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 4881 Å and 5440 Å assigned to the optical absorption spectrum of Y-shaped propadienylidene (H2Cdbnd Cdbnd C:) molecule is theoretically examined in this paper. This molecule apparently absorbs in the same wavelength region as the observed DIBs and was suggested to be a potential carrier of these DIBs. This assignment mostly relied on the experimental data from radioastronomy and laboratory measurements. Motivated by these available experimental data we attempt here a theoretical study and investigate the detailed electronic structure and nuclear dynamics underlying the electronic absorption bands of propadienylidene molecule. Our results show that this molecule indeed absorbs in the wavelength region of the recorded DIBs. Strong nonadiabatic coupling between its energetically low-lying electronic states plays major role, initiates ultrafast internal conversion and contributes to the spectral broadening. Theoretical findings are finally compared with the available experimental and theoretical data and discussed in connection with the recorded DIBs.

  5. Analysis of Mars surface hydration through the MEx/OMEGA observation of the 3 μm absorption band.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jouglet, D.; Poulet, F.; Bibring, J. P.; Langevin, Y.; Gondet, B.; Milliken, R. E.; Mustard, J. F.

    The near infrared Mars surface global mapping done by OMEGA gives the first opportunity to study the global and detailed characteristics of the 3µm hydration absorption band on Mars surface. This feature is indistinctly due to bending and stretching vibrations of water bound in minerals or adsorbed at their surface, and of hydroxyl groups (for a review, see e.g. [1] or [2]). Its study may give new elements to determine the geologic and climatic past of Mars, and may put new constrain about the current water cycle of Mars. OMEGA data are processed in a pipeline that converts raw data to radiance, removes atmospheric effects and gets I/F. Specific data reduction scheme has been developed to assess temperature of OMEGA spectra at 5 µm and to remove their thermal part so as to get the albedo from 1.µm to 5.1µm ([2]). Two methods, the Integrated Band Depth and the water content based on comparison with laboratory measures of Yen et al. ([3]), have been used to assess the 3µm band depth. These two methods where applied to OMEGA spectra acquired at a nominal calibration level and not exhibiting water ice features. This corresponds to approximately 35 million spectra ([2]). The data processed show the presence of this absorption feature overall the Martian surface, which could be explained by the presence of adsorbed water up to 1% water mass percentage ([4]) and by rinds or coating resulting from weathering (see e.g. [5] or [6]). A possible increase of hydration with albedo is discussed so as to discriminate between the albedo-dependence of the method and hydration variations. Terrains enriched in phyllosilicates ([7]), sulfates ([8]) or hydroxides exhibit an increased hydration at 3 µm. This terrains show that the 3 µm band can bring additional information about composition, for example by observing a variation in the shape of the band. A decrease of hydration with elevation is observed on the processed data independently of the value of albedo. This correlation

  6. Direct Observation of Two-Step Photon Absorption in an InAs/GaAs Single Quantum Dot for the Operation of Intermediate-Band Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Katsuyuki; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2015-07-08

    We present the first direct observation of two-step photon absorption in an InAs/GaAs single quantum dot (QD) using photocurrent spectroscopy with two lasers. The sharp peaks of the photocurrent are shifted due to the quantum confined Stark effect, indicating that the photocurrent from a single QD is obtained. In addition, the intensity of the peaks depends on the power of the secondary laser. These results reveal the direct demonstration of the two-step photon absorption in a single QD. This is an essential result for both the fundamental operation and the realization of ultrahigh solar-electricity energy conversion in quantum dot intermediate-band solar cells.

  7. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  8. Application of surface pressure measurements of O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part II - A quasi-observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part on assessing the impacts of assimilating various distributions of sea-level pressure (SLP) on hurricane simulations, using the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR). One key purpose of this series of study is to explore the potential of using remotely sensed sea surface barometric data from O2-band differential absorption radar system currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. In this part II we further validate the conclusions of observational system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in the part I using observed SLP for three hurricanes that passed over the Florida peninsula. Three SLP patterns are tested again, including all available data near the Florida peninsula, and a band of observations either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position. Before the assimilation, a vortex SLP reconstruction technique is employed for the use of observed SLP as discussed in the part I. In agreement with the results from OSSEs, the performance of assimilating SLP is enhanced for the two hurricanes with stronger initial minimum SLP, leading to a significant improvement in the track and position relative to the control where no data are assimilated. On the other hand, however, the improvement in the hurricane intensity is generally limited to the first 24-48 h of integration, while a high resolution nested domain simulation, along with assimilation of SLP in the coarse domain, shows more profound improvement in the intensity. A diagnostic analysis of the potential vorticity suggests that the improved track forecasts are attributed to the combined effects of adjusting the steering wind fields in a consistent manner with having a deeper vortex, and the associated changes in the convective activity.

  9. Interpretation of absorption bands in airborne hyperspectral radiance data.

    PubMed

    Szekielda, Karl H; Bowles, Jeffrey H; Gillis, David B; Miller, W David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments.

  10. Interpretation of Absorption Bands in Airborne Hyperspectral Radiance Data

    PubMed Central

    Szekielda, Karl H.; Bowles, Jeffrey H.; Gillis, David B.; Miller, W. David

    2009-01-01

    It is demonstrated that hyperspectral imagery can be used, without atmospheric correction, to determine the presence of accessory phytoplankton pigments in coastal waters using derivative techniques. However, care must be taken not to confuse other absorptions for those caused by the presence of pigments. Atmospheric correction, usually the first step to making products from hyperspectral data, may not completely remove Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption bands and these absorptions may interfere with identification of phytoplankton accessory pigments. Furthermore, the ability to resolve absorption bands depends on the spectral resolution of the spectrometer, which for a fixed spectral range also determines the number of observed bands. Based on this information, a study was undertaken to determine under what circumstances a hyperspectral sensor may determine the presence of pigments. As part of the study a hyperspectral imager was used to take high spectral resolution data over two different water masses. In order to avoid the problems associated with atmospheric correction this data was analyzed as radiance data without atmospheric correction. Here, the purpose was to identify spectral regions that might be diagnostic for photosynthetic pigments. Two well proven techniques were used to aid in absorption band recognition, the continuum removal of the spectra and the fourth derivative. The findings in this study suggest that interpretation of absorption bands in remote sensing data, whether atmospherically corrected or not, have to be carefully reviewed when they are interpreted in terms of photosynthetic pigments. PMID:22574053

  11. Electronic Band Structure and Sub-band-gap Absorption of Nitrogen Hyperdoped Silicon.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen; Shao, Hezhu; Dong, Xiao; Li, Ning; Ning, Bo-Yuan; Ning, Xi-Jing; Zhao, Li; Zhuang, Jun

    2015-05-27

    We investigated the atomic geometry, electronic band structure, and optical absorption of nitrogen hyperdoped silicon based on first-principles calculations. The results show that all the paired nitrogen defects we studied do not introduce intermediate band, while most of single nitrogen defects can introduce intermediate band in the gap. Considering the stability of the single defects and the rapid resolidification following the laser melting process in our sample preparation method, we conclude that the substitutional nitrogen defect, whose fraction was tiny and could be neglected before, should have considerable fraction in the hyperdoped silicon and results in the visible sub-band-gap absorption as observed in the experiment. Furthermore, our calculations show that the substitutional nitrogen defect has good stability, which could be one of the reasons why the sub-band-gap absorptance remains almost unchanged after annealing.

  12. Glucose Absorption by the Bacillary Band of Trichuris muris

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael; Nejsum, Peter; Mejer, Helena; Denwood, Matthew; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common characteristic of Trichuris spp. infections in humans and animals is the variable but low efficacy of single-dose benzimidazoles currently used in mass drug administration programmes against human trichuriasis. The bacillary band, a specialised morphological structure of Trichuris spp., as well as the unique partly intracellular habitat of adult Trichuris spp. may affect drug absorption and perhaps contribute to the low drug accumulation in the worm. However, the exact function of the bacillary band is still unknown. Methodology We studied the dependency of adult Trichuris muris on glucose and/or amino acids for survival in vitro and the absorptive function of the bacillary band. The viability of the worms was evaluated using a motility scale from 0 to 3, and the colorimetric assay Alamar Blue was utilised to measure the metabolic activity. The absorptive function of the bacillary band in living worms was explored using a fluorescent glucose analogue (6-NBDG) and confocal microscopy. To study the absorptive function of the bacillary band in relation to 6-NBDG, the oral uptake was minimised or excluded by sealing the oral cavity with glue and agarose. Principal Findings Glucose had a positive effect on both the motility (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) of T. muris in vitro, whereas this was not the case for amino acids. The 6-NBDG was observed in the pores of the bacillary band and within the stichocytes of the living worms, independent of oral sealing. Conclusions/Significance Trichuris muris is dependent on glucose for viability in vitro, and the bacillary band has an absorptive function in relation to 6-NBDG, which accumulates within the stichocytes. The absorptive function of the bacillary band calls for an exploration of its possible role in the uptake of anthelmintics, and as a potential anthelmintic target relevant for future drug development. PMID:27588682

  13. Absorption band Q model for the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption band model are: low-Q in the seismic band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.

  14. Constraints on the absorption band model of Q

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lundquist, Gary M.; Cormier, Vernon C.

    1980-10-01

    First order models for the combined depth and frequency dependence of Q are derived and tested using several independent constraints. (1) Using a microphysics approach, the adoption of an absorption band as a first-order model for the frequency dependence of Q is justified, and the expected depth behavior of relaxation times in the earth is derived. The significant new parameter in this model of Q is τ2, the period at the half-amplitude point of the high frequency end of the absorption band. (2) Using observed body-wave spectra, the existence of a frequency dependence in Q is proved, and the average location of that frequency dependence (i.e., τ2) is estimated to be in the range 1 to 2.5 Hz. (3) Under the constraints of Q model ratios, the depth dependence of τ2 is estimated by assuming that a free-oscillation and a body-wave Q model both measure Q from the same absorption band. The resulting τ2 is about 0.04 s in the upper 200 km and then increases exponentially with depth in the mantle to about 1.9 at the core mantle boundary. The Q model ratios are better satisfied if a second absorption band is hypothesized to operate in the depth range of the asthenosphere. In that case, τ2 for the mantle absorption band varies from about 0.09 s in the first 200 km to 4.0 s at 2886 km, and τ2 for the asthenosphere absorption band is about 0.005 s in the depth range 35-220 km. (4) Both classes of Q models are tested in the time domain using synthetic seismograms of Russian and American nuclear explosions. Although trade-offs between source and mantle transfer functions preclude further refinement of the models at this time, a compatibility is demonstrated between the double absorption band model and time domain constraints, including arrival time and pulse shape.

  15. Concerning the Optical Absorption Band of the Hydrated Electron,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    methylene blue ) showed marked nonlinear absorption due to saturation of optical transitions, no such change was observed for hydrated electrons even though the light intensity was varied by > 10 to the 7th power up to 200 photons per hydrated electron per sq cm. Consequently the photoexcited state lifetime is estimated to be than 6 x 10 to the -12th power sec. This finding is discussed briefly in terms of three possible origins for the absorption band, namely that involving excitation to a bound excited state, as a photoionization efficiency profile or as a distribution

  16. Triple-band metamaterial absorption utilizing single rectangular hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seung Jik; Yoo, Young Joon; Kim, Young Ju; Lee, YoungPak

    2017-01-01

    In the general metamaterial absorber, the single absorption band is made by the single meta-pattern. Here, we introduce the triple-band metamaterial absorber only utilizing single rectangular hole. We also demonstrate the absorption mechanism of the triple absorption. The first absorption peak was caused by the fundamental magnetic resonance in the metallic part between rectangular holes. The second absorption was generated by induced tornado magnetic field. The process of realizing the second band is also presented. The third absorption was induced by the third-harmonic magnetic resonance in the metallic region between rectangular holes. In addition, the visible-range triple-band absorber was also realized by using similar but smaller single rectangular-hole structure. These results render the simple metamaterials for high frequency in large scale, which can be useful in the fabrication of metamaterials operating in the optical range.

  17. Absorption enhancement of a dual-band metamaterial absorber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Min; Han, Gui Ming; Liu, Shui Jie; Xu, Bang Li; Wang, Jie; Huang, Hua Qing

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose and fabricate a dual-band metamaterial absorber in 6-24 THz region. Electric field distribution reveal that the first absorption band is obtained from localized surface plasmon (LSP) modes which are excited both on inside and outside edges of each circular-patterned metal-dielectric stack, while the second absorption band is excited by LSP modes on outside edges of each stack. Measured results indicate that the absorption band width can be tuned by increasing the radius of circular-patterned layers or reducing the thickness of dielectric spacing layers. Moreover, the designed dual-band metamaterial absorber is independent on circular-patterned dielectric layer combinations.

  18. 13C(16)O(2): Global Treatment of Vibrational-Rotational Spectra and First Observation of the 2nu(1) + 5nu(3) and nu(1) + 2nu(2) + 5nu(3) Absorption Bands.

    PubMed

    Tashkun; Perevalov; Teffo; Lecoutre; Huet; Campargue; Bailly; Esplin

    2000-04-01

    The effective operator approach is applied to the calculation of both line positions and line intensities of the (13)C(16)O(2) molecule. About 11 000 observed line positions of (13)C(16)O(2) selected from the literature have been used to derive 84 parameters of a reduced effective Hamiltonian globally describing all known vibrational-rotational energy levels in the ground electronic state. The standard deviation of the fit is 0.0015 cm(-1). The eigenfunctions of this effective Hamiltonian have then been used in fittings of parameters of an effective dipole-moment operator to more than 600 observed line intensities of the cold and hot bands covering the nu(2) and 3nu(2) regions. The standard deviations of the fits are 3.2 and 12.0% for these regions, respectively. The quality of the fittings and the extrapolation properties of the fitted parameters are discussed. A comparison of calculated line parameters with those provided by the HITRAN database is given. Finally, the first observations of the 2nu(1) + 5nu(3) and nu(1) + 2nu(2) + 5nu(3) absorption bands by means of photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) is presented. The deviations of predicted line positions from observed ones is found to be less than 0.1 cm(-1), and most of them lie within the experimental accuracy (0.007 cm(-1)) once the observed line positions are included in the global fit. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Application of surface pressure measurements from O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part I - An observing system simulation experiments study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    Sea level pressure (SLP) is an important variable in regulating hurricane motion. However, SLP generally cannot be measured in open oceans due to limited buoys. Because of the potential availability of an O2-band differential absorption radar for sea surface barometry, we investigate the value of assimilating various patterns of SLP from such a system on hurricane prediction using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) three-dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR) based on Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs). An important objective of this series of study is to explore the potential to use space and airborne sea surface air pressure measurements from an O2-band differential absorption radar currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. The surface pressure patterns include an area of SLP, and a band of SLP either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position; the latter two distributions are similar to what could be obtained from the differential absorption radar system, which could be installed on spaceborne satellites and/or mounted on reconnaissance aircraft. In the banded pressure cases, we propose a vortex reconstruction technique based on surface pressure field. Assimilating observations from the reconstructed surface pressure leads to a better representation of initial SLP and vertical cross-section of wind, relative to the control where no data is assimilated and to the assimilation without vortex reconstruction. In eight of the nine OSSEs simulations on three hurricanes with three leading times of integration, which cover a wide range of initial minimum SLP from 951 to 1011 hPa, substantial improvements are found not only in the hurricane track and position, but also in the hurricane intensity, in terms of the SLP and maximum surface wind. The only case without significant improvement is resulted from the very weak initial condition (SLP 1011 hPa), which had no clear indication of

  20. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  1. Spectrophotometer spectral bandwidth calibration with absorption bands crystal standard.

    PubMed

    Soares, O D; Costa, J L

    1999-04-01

    A procedure for calibration of a spectral bandwidth standard for high-resolution spectrophotometers is described. Symmetrical absorption bands for a crystal standard are adopted. The method relies on spectral band shape fitting followed by a convolution with the slit function of the spectrophotometer. A reference spectrophotometer is used to calibrate the spectral bandwidth standard. Bandwidth calibration curves for a minimum spectral transmission factor relative to the spectral bandwidth of the reference spectrophotometer are derived for the absorption bands at the wavelength of the band absorption maximum. The family of these calibration curves characterizes the spectral bandwidth standard. We calibrate the spectral bandwidth of a spectrophotometer with respect to the reference spectrophotometer by determining the spectral transmission factor minimum at every calibrated absorption band of the bandwidth standard for the nominal instrument values of the spectral bandwidth. With reference to the standard spectral bandwidth calibration curves, the relation of the spectral bandwidth to the reference spectrophotometer is determined. We determine the discrepancy in the spectrophotometers' spectral bandwidths by averaging the spectral bandwidth discrepancies relative to the standard calibrated values found at the absorption bands considered. A weighted average of the uncertainties is taken.

  2. Below-band-gap absorption in undoped GaAs at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasiak, Michał; Walczak, Jarosław; Motyka, Marcin; Janiak, Filip; Trajnerowicz, Artur; Jasik, Agata

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results of measurements of optical absorption in undoped epitaxial GaAs for photon energies below the band gap. Absorption spectra were determined from transmission spectra of a thin GaAs layer at several temperatures between 25 °C and 205 °C. We optimized our experiment to investigate the long-wavelength part of the spectrum, where the absorption is relatively low, but significant from the point of view of applications of GaAs in semiconductor lasers. Absorption of 100 cm-1 was observed over 30 nm below the band gap at high temperatures.

  3. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  4. Shape of impurity electronic absorption bands in nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-11-01

    The impurity-matrix anisotropic static intermolecular interactions, orientation-statistical properties, and electronic structure of uniaxial impurity molecules are shown to have a significant influence on spectral moments of the electronic absorption bands of impurities in the nematic liquid crystal. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Atmospheric absorption of high frequency noise and application to fractional-octave bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Pure tone sound absorption coefficients were measured at 1/12 octave intervals from 4 to 100 KHz at 5.5K temperature intervals between 255.4 and 310.9 K and at 10 percent relative humidity increments between 0 percent and saturation in a large cylindrical tube (i.d., 25.4 cm; length, 4.8 m). Special solid-dielectric capacitance transducers, one to generate bursts of sound waves and one to terminate the sound path and detect the tone bursts, were constructed to fit inside the tube. The absorption was measured by varying the transmitter receiver separation from 1 to 4 m and observing the decay of multiple reflections or change in amplitude of the first received burst. The resulting absorption was compared with that from a proposed procedure for computing sound absorption in still air. Absorption of bands of noise was numerically computed by using the pure tone results. The results depended on spectrum shape, on filter type, and nonlinearly on propagation distance. For some of the cases considered, comparison with the extrapolation of ARP-866A showed a difference as large as a factor of 2. However, for many cases, the absorption for a finite band was nearly equal to the pure tone absorption at the center frequency of the band. A recommended prediction procedure is described for 1/3 octave band absorption coefficients.

  6. Stratospheric infrared continuum absorptions observed by the ATMOS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Namkung, J. S.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of infrared continuum absorption features observed in ATMOS/Spacelab 3 (1985) spectra of the lower stratosphere is reported. Continuous absorption produced primarily by the collision-induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of O2 and to a lesser extent by the superposition of H2O far line wings has been observed in the 1400 to 1800/cm interval below tangent heights of about 25 km. Continuum optical depths measured in microwindows nearly free of atmospheric line absorption are 0.78 + or - 0.06 times those calculated with the O2 absorption coefficients of Timofeyev and Tonkov (1978). Transmittance measurements in microwindows between 2395 and 2535/cm have been used to study continuous absorption from the collision induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of N2 and the far wings of strong CO2 lines. The measured transmittances have been analyzed to derive best fit absorption coefficients for the N2 pressure-induced band at lower stratospheric temperatures (about 210 K).

  7. A band model for melanin deducted from optical absorption and photoconductivity experiments.

    PubMed

    Crippa, P R; Cristofoletti, V; Romeo, N

    1978-01-03

    Natural and synthetic melanins have been studied by optical absorption and photoconductivity measurements in the range 200--700 nm. Both optical absorption and photoconductivity increase in the ultraviolet region, and a negative photoconductivity was observed with a maximum near 500 nm. This behaviour has been interpreted by the band model of amorphous materials and an "optical gap" of 3.4 eV has been determined.

  8. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy of inductively coupled chlorine plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinov, Daniil; Foucher, Mickaël; Campbell, Ewen; Brouard, Mark; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2016-06-01

    We propose a method to measure the densities of vibrationally excited Cl2(v) molecules in levels up to v  =  3 in pure chlorine inductively coupled plasmas (ICPs). The absorption continuum of Cl2 in the 250-450 nm spectral range is deconvoluted into the individual components originating from the different vibrational levels of the ground state, using a set of ab initio absorption cross sections. It is shown that gas heating at constant pressure is the major depletion mechanism of the Cl2 feedstock in the plasma. In these line-integrated absorption measurements, the absorption by the hot (and therefore rarefied) Cl2 gas in the reactor centre is masked by the cooler (and therefore denser) Cl2 near the walls. These radial gradients in temperature and density make it difficult to assess the degree of vibrational excitation in the centre of the reactor. The observed line-averaged vibrational distributions, when analyzed taking into account the radial temperature gradient, suggest that vibrational and translational degrees of freedom in the plasma are close to local equilibrium. This can be explained by efficient vibrational-translational (VT) relaxation between Cl2 and Cl atoms. Besides the Cl2(v) absorption band, a weak continuum absorption is observed at shorter wavelengths, and is attributed to photodetachment of Cl- negative ions. Thus, line-integrated densities of negative ions in chlorine plasmas can be directly measured using broad-band absorption spectroscopy.

  9. Isothermal annealing of a 620 nm optical absorption band in Brazilian topaz crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isotani, Sadao; Matsuoka, Masao; Albuquerque, Antonio Roberto Pereira Leite

    2013-04-01

    Isothermal decay behaviors, observed at 515, 523, 562, and 693 K, for an optical absorption band at 620 nm in gamma-irradiated Brazilian blue topaz were analyzed using a kinetic model consisting of O- bound small polarons adjacent to recombination centers (electron traps). The kinetic equations obtained on the basis of this model were solved using the method of Runge-Kutta and the fit parameters describing these defects were determined with a grid optimization method. Two activation energies of 0.52±0.08 and 0.88±0.13 eV, corresponding to two different structural configurations of the O- polarons, explained well the isothermal decay curves using first-order kinetics expected from the kinetic model. On the other hand, thermoluminescence (TL) emission spectra measured at various temperatures showed a single band at 400 nm in the temperature range of 373-553 K in which the 620 nm optical absorption band decreased in intensity. Monochromatic TL glow curve data at 400 nm extracted from the TL emission spectra observed were found to be explained reasonably by using the knowledge obtained from the isothermal decay analysis. This suggests that two different structural configurations of O- polarons are responsible for the 620 nm optical absorption band and that the thermal annealing of the polarons causes the 400 nm TL emission band.

  10. Infrared band strengths: Laboratory techniques and applications to astronomical observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerakines, P. A.

    2002-09-01

    Whenever an abundance measurement is derived by way of infrared spectroscopy, it will typically make use of a laboratory-obtained conversion factor between the size of an IR absorption feature and the (column) density of the molecule under study. This factor is usually called the "absolute absorption intensity" by a chemist or the "band strength" by a typical IR astronomer. Band strengths have been studied in chemistry since the 1950s, and the commonly quoted "accuracy to with a factor of ten" historically required of astronomical calculations has not required much new input into this area. Today, however, astronomical measurements require much higher precision, and it is time for IR astronomers to ask more of laboratory measurements and to understand when and why to use IR band strengths in a more appropriate manner. The history, interpretation, measurement, and common astrophysical applications of infrared band strengths will be discussed. The "secrets" of the laboratory techniques involved in their measurement are described, and a compilation of results from the literature is given along with some new results. Typical astrophysical applications and appropriate uses will also be discussed. Common misconceptions are confronted and two challenges are presented: (i) to the laboratory astrophysics community to produce and advertise accurate values with caveats when necessary, and (ii) to the observational community to use the most appropriate results for the environment under study.

  11. ANOMALOUS DIFFUSE INTERSTELLAR BANDS IN THE SPECTRUM OF HERSCHEL 36. I. OBSERVATIONS OF ROTATIONALLY EXCITED CH AND CH{sup +} ABSORPTION AND STRONG, EXTENDED REDWARD WINGS ON SEVERAL DIBs

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlstrom, Julie; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Oka, Takeshi; Johnson, Sean; Jiang Zihao; Sherman, Reid; Hobbs, L. M.; Friedman, Scott D.; Sonnentrucker, Paule; Rachford, Brian L.; Snow, Theodore P.

    2013-08-10

    Anomalously broad diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) at 5780.5, 5797.1, 6196.0, and 6613.6 A are found in absorption along the line of sight to Herschel 36, the star illuminating the bright Hourglass region of the H II region Messier 8. Interstellar absorption from excited CH{sup +} in the J = 1 level and from excited CH in the J = 3/2 level is also seen. To our knowledge, neither those excited molecular lines nor such strongly extended DIBs have previously been seen in absorption from interstellar gas. These unusual features appear to arise in a small region near Herschel 36 which contains most of the neutral interstellar material in the sight line. The CH{sup +} and CH in that region are radiatively excited by strong far-IR radiation from the adjacent infrared source Her 36 SE. Similarly, the broadening of the DIBs toward Herschel 36 may be due to radiative pumping of closely spaced high-J rotational levels of relatively small, polar carrier molecules. If this picture of excited rotational states for the DIB carriers is correct and applicable to most DIBs, the 2.7 K cosmic microwave background may set the minimum widths (about 0.35 A) of known DIBs, with molecular processes and/or local radiation fields producing the larger widths found for the broader DIBs. Despite the intense local UV radiation field within the cluster NGC 6530, no previously undetected DIBs stronger than 10 mA in equivalent width are found in the optical spectrum of Herschel 36, suggesting that neither dissociation nor ionization of the carriers of the known DIBs by this intense field creates new carriers with easily detectable DIB-like features. Possibly related profile anomalies for several other DIBs are noted.

  12. Assignment and rotational analysis of new absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues in Venus spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robert, S.; Borkov, Yu. G.; Vander Auwera, J.; Drummond, R.; Mahieux, A.; Wilquet, V.; Vandaele, A. C.; Perevalov, V. I.; Tashkun, S. A.; Bertaux, J. L.

    2013-01-01

    We present absorption bands of carbon dioxide isotopologues, detected by the Solar Occultation for the Infrared Range (SOIR) instrument on board the Venus Express Satellite. The SOIR instrument combines an echelle spectrometer and an Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter (AOTF) for order selection. It performs solar occultation measurements in the Venus atmosphere in the IR region (2.2-4.3 μm), at a resolution of 0.12-0.18 cm-1. The wavelength range probed by SOIR allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere above the cloud layer (65-150 km) to be made with emphasis on the vertical distributions of gases. Thanks to the SOIR spectral resolution, a new CO2 absorption band was identified: the 21101-01101 band of 16O12C18O with R branch up to J=31. Two other previously reported bands were observed dispelling any doubts about their identifications: the 20001-00001 band of 16O13C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894] and the 01111-00001 band of 16O12C18O [Villanueva G, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:883-894 and Wilquet V, et al. J Quant Spectrosc Radiat Transfer 2008;109:895-905]. These bands were analyzed, and spectroscopic constants characterizing them were obtained. The rotational assignment of the 20001-00001 band was corrected. The present measurements are compared with data available in the HITRAN database.

  13. Observational Evidence Linking Interstellar UV Absorption to PAH Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasberger, Avi; Behar, Ehud; Perets, Hagai B.; Brosch, Noah; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    The 2175 Å UV extinction feature was discovered in the mid-1960s, yet its physical origin remains poorly understood. One suggestion is absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, which is supported by theoretical molecular structure computations and by laboratory experiments. PAHs are positively detected by their 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μm IR emission bands, which are specified by their modes of vibration. A definitive empirical link between the 2175 Å UV extinction and the IR PAH emission bands, however, is still missing. We present a new sample of hot stars that have both 2175 Å absorption and IR PAH emission. We find significant shifts of the central wavelength of the UV absorption feature, up to 2350 Å, but predominantly in stars that also have IR PAH emission. These UV shifts depend on stellar temperature in a fashion that is similar to the shifts of the 6.2 and 7.7 μm IR PAH bands, that is, the features are increasingly more redshifted as the stellar temperature decreases, but only below ∼15 kK. Above 15 kK both UV and IR features retain their nominal values. Moreover, we find a suggestive correlation between the UV and IR shifts. We hypothesize that these similar dependences of both the UV and IR features on stellar temperature hint at a common origin of the two in PAH molecules and may establish the missing link between the UV and IR observations. We further suggest that the shifts depend on molecular size, and that the critical temperature of ∼15 kK above which no shifts are observed is related to the onset of UV-driven hot-star winds and their associated shocks.

  14. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands measured in the IR spectral range .

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    In this work we present two experimental setup able to characterize the optical properties of gases, in particular CO_2 and H_2, at typically planetary conditions. The apparatus consists of a Fourier Transform InfraRed (FT-IT) interferometer able to work in a wide spectral range, from 350 to 25000 cm-1 (0.4 to 29 mu m ) with a relatively high spectral resolution, from 10 to 0.07 cm-1. Two dedicated gas cells have been integrated with the FT-IR. The first, called High Pressure High Temperature (HP-HT), can support pressures up to 300 bar, temperatures up to 300oC and is characterized by an optical path of 2 cm. The second one, a Multi Pass (MP) absorption gas cell, is designed to have a variable optical path, from 2.5 to 30 m, can be heated up to 200o and operate at pressures up to 10 bar. In this paper, measurements of Collision-Induced Absorption (CIA) bands in carbon dioxide and hydrogen recorded in the InfraRed spectral range will be presented. In principle, linear symmetric molecules such as CO_2 and H_2 possess no dipole moment, but, even when the pressure is only a few bar, we have observed the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands. This absorption results from a short-time collisional interaction between molecules. The band integrated intensity shows a quadratic dependence versus density opposed to the absorption by isolated molecules, which follows Beer's law \\citep{Beer's}. This behaviour suggests an absorption by pairs rather than by individual molecules. The bands integrated intensities show a linear dependence vs square density according to \\citep {CIA Shape} and \\citep{CIA posi}. For what concerns the H_2 CIA bands, a preliminary comparison between simulated data obtained with the model described in \\citep{CIA H2}and measured, shows a good agreement. These processes are very relevant in the dense atmospheres of planets, such as those of Venus and Jupiter and also in extrasolar planets. A detailed knowledge of these contributions is very

  15. Decomposing the First Absorption Band of OCS Using Photofragment Excitation Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Toulson, Benjamin W; Murray, Craig

    2016-09-01

    Photofragment excitation spectra of carbonyl sulfide (OCS) have been recorded from 212-260 nm by state-selectively probing either electronically excited S((1)D) or ground state S((3)P) photolysis products via 2 + 1 resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization. Probing the major S((1)D) product results in a broad, unstructured action spectrum that reproduces the overall shape of the first absorption band. In contrast, spectra obtained probing S((3)P) products display prominent resonances superimposed on a broad continuum; the resonances correspond to the diffuse vibrational structure observed in the conventional absorption spectrum. The vibrational structure is assigned to four progressions, each dominated by the C-S stretch, ν1, following direct excitation to quasi-bound singlet and triplet states. The S((3)PJ) products are formed with a near-statistical population distribution over the J = 2, 1, and 0 spin-orbit levels across the wavelength range investigated. Although a minor contributor to the S atom yield near the peak of the absorption cross section, the relative yield of S((3)P) increases significantly at longer wavelengths. The experimental measurements validate recent theoretical work characterizing the electronic states responsible for the first absorption band by Schmidt and co-workers.

  16. NARROW-K-BAND OBSERVATIONS OF THE GJ 1214 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, Knicole D.; Gaidos, Eric

    2013-10-10

    GJ 1214 is a nearby M dwarf star that hosts a transiting super-Earth-size planet, making this system an excellent target for atmospheric studies. Most studies find that the transmission spectrum of GJ 1214b is flat, which favors either a high mean molecular weight or cloudy/hazy hydrogen (H) rich atmosphere model. Photometry at short wavelengths (<0.7 μm) and in the K band can discriminate the most between these different atmosphere models for GJ 1214b, but current observations do not have sufficiently high precision. We present photometry of seven transits of GJ 1214b through a narrow K-band (2.141 μm) filter with the Wide Field Camera on the 3.8 m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. Our photometric precision is typically 1.7 × 10{sup –3} (for a single transit), comparable with other ground-based observations of GJ 1214b. We measure a planet-star radius ratio of 0.1158 ± 0.0013, which, along with other studies, also supports a flat transmission spectrum for GJ 1214b. Since this does not exclude a scenario where GJ 1214b has an H-rich envelope with heavy elements that are sequestered below a cloud/haze layer, we compare K-band observations with models of H{sub 2} collision-induced absorption in an atmosphere for a range of temperatures. While we find no evidence for deviation from a flat spectrum (slope s = 0.0016 ± 0.0038), an H{sub 2}-dominated upper atmosphere (<60 mbar) cannot be excluded. More precise observations at <0.7 μm and in the K band, as well as a uniform analysis of all published data, would be useful for establishing more robust limits on atmosphere models for GJ 1214b.

  17. INTERACTION OF LASER RADIATION WITH MATTER: Individual induced absorption bands in MgF2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, A. P.; Sergeev, P. B.

    2008-03-01

    The absorption spectra of MgF2 samples exposed to an electron beam and laser radiation at 248, 308, and 372 nm are investigated. Fourteen individual absorption bands are separated in the spectra. The parameters of the eight spectra of them are obtained for the first time. The separated bands are assigned to the intrinsic defects of the MgF2 crystal.

  18. Band gap reduction in InNxSb1-x alloys: Optical absorption, k . P modeling, and density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linhart, W. M.; Rajpalke, M. K.; Buckeridge, J.; Murgatroyd, P. A. E.; Bomphrey, J. J.; Alaria, J.; Catlow, C. R. A.; Scanlon, D. O.; Ashwin, M. J.; Veal, T. D.

    2016-09-01

    Using infrared absorption, the room temperature band gap of InSb is found to reduce from 174 (7.1 μm) to 85 meV (14.6 μm) upon incorporation of up to 1.13% N, a reduction of ˜79 meV/%N. The experimentally observed band gap reduction in molecular-beam epitaxial InNSb thin films is reproduced by a five band k . P band anticrossing model incorporating a nitrogen level, EN, 0.75 eV above the valence band maximum of the host InSb and an interaction coupling matrix element between the host conduction band and the N level of β = 1.80 eV. This observation is consistent with the presented results from hybrid density functional theory.

  19. Search for CO absorption bands in IUE far-ultraviolet spectra of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessner, Susan E.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the red supergiant (M2 Iab) alpha Ori with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided an unambiguous detection of a far-ultraviolet (far-UV) chromospheric continuum on which are superposed strong molecular absorption bands. The absorption bands have been identified by Carpenter et al. (1994) with the fourth-positive A-X system of CO and are likely formed in the circumstellar shell. Comparison of these GHRS data with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha Ori indicates that both the continuum and the CO absorption features can be seen with IUE, especially if multiple IUE spectra, reduced with the post-1981 IUESIPS extraction procedure (i.e., with an oversampling slit), are carefully coadded to increase the signal to noise over that obtainable with a single spectrum. We therefore initiated a program, utilizing both new and archival IUE Short Wavelength Prime (SWP) spectra, to survey 15 cool, low-gravity stars, including alpha Ori, for the presence of these two new chromospheric and circumstellar shell diagnostics. We establish positive detections of far-UV stellar continua, well above estimated IUE in-order scattered light levels, in spectra of all of the program stars. However, well-defined CO absorption features are seen only in the alpha Ori spectra, even though spectra of most of the program stars have sufficient signal to noise to allow the dectection of features of comparable magnitude to the absorptions seen in alpha Ori. Clearly if CO is present in the circumstellar environments of any of these stars, it is at much lower column densities.

  20. e-beam irradiation effects on IR absorption bands in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichida, Masao; Nagao, Katsunori; Ikemoto, Yuka; Okazaki, Toshiya; Miyata, Yasumitsu; Kawakami, Akira; Kataura, Hiromichi; Umezu, Ikurou; Ando, Hiroaki

    2017-01-01

    We have measured the absorption and Raman spectral change induced by the irradiation of e-beam. By the irradiation of e-beam on SWNTs thin films, the intensity of defect related Raman band increase, and the peak energy of IR absorption bands shift to the higher energy side. These results indicate that the origin of infrared band is due to the plasmon resonance of finite-length SWNT. We have estimated the effective tube length and defect density from IR absorption peak energy.

  1. Study of sub band gap absorption of Sn doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Rani, Mamta; Tripathi, S. K.

    2014-04-01

    The nanocrystalline thin films of Sn doped CdSe at different dopants concentration are prepared by thermal evaporation technique on glass substrate at room temperature. The effect of Sn doping on the optical properties of CdSe has been studied. A decrease in band gap value is observed with increase in Sn concentration. Constant photocurrent method (CPM) is used to study the absorption coefficient in the sub band gap region. Urbach energy has been obtained from CPM spectra which are found to increase with amount of Sn dopants. The refractive index data calculated from transmittance is used for the identification of oscillator strength and oscillator energy using single oscillator model which is found to be 7.7 and 2.12 eV, 6.7 and 2.5 eV for CdSe:Sn 1% and CdSe:Sn 5% respectively.

  2. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  3. Enhancement of broadband optical absorption in photovoltaic devices by band-edge effect of photonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshinori; Kawamoto, Yosuke; Fujita, Masayuki; Noda, Susumu

    2013-08-26

    We numerically investigate broadband optical absorption enhancement in thin, 400-nm thick microcrystalline silicon (µc-Si) photovoltaic devices by photonic crystals (PCs). We realize absorption enhancement by coupling the light from the free space to the large area resonant modes at the photonic band-edge induced by the photonic crystals. We show that multiple photonic band-edge modes can be produced by higher order modes in the vertical direction of the Si photovoltaic layer, which can enhance the absorption on multiple wavelengths. Moreover, we reveal that the photonic superlattice structure can produce more photonic band-edge modes that lead to further optical absorption. The absorption average in wavelengths of 500-1000 nm weighted to the solar spectrum (AM 1.5) increases almost twice: from 33% without photonic crystal to 58% with a 4 × 4 period superlattice photonic crystal; our result outperforms the Lambertian textured structure.

  4. Conformational statistics of molecules with inner rotation and shapes of their electronic absorption bands

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-10-01

    The effect of conformational statistics of molecules with inner rotation of {pi}-conjugated fragments on the position, intensity, and electronic absorption band shapes is studied in isotropic molecular media. It is shown that the conformational disorder of molecules with one inner rotation degree of freedom exerts an appreciable effect on the shift, inhomogeneous broadening, and asymmetry of the electronic absorption bands. An interpretation of the available experimental data is give. 19 refs., 1 fig.

  5. Ozone absorption cross section measurements in the Wulf bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Stuart M.; Hupalo, Peter; Mauersberger, Konrad

    1993-01-01

    A tandem dual-beam spectrometer has been developed to determine ozone absorption cross sections for 13 selected wavelengths between 750 and 975 nm at room temperature. The increasingly pronounced structure in this region may interfere with atmospheric trace gas transitions that are useful for remote sensing and complicate the measurement of aerosols. Ozone concentrations were determined by absorption at the common HeNe laser transition near 632.8 nm using the absolute cross section reported previously. The overall accuracy of these room temperature measurements is generally better than 2 percent. A synoptic near-IR spectrum scaled to these measurements is employed for comparison with results of previous studies.

  6. HAC: Band Gap, Photoluminescence, and Optical/Near-Infrared Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Ryutov, Dimitri; Furton, Douglas G.

    1996-01-01

    We report results of laboratory measurements which illustrate the wide range of physical properties found among hydrogenated amorphous carbon (HAC) solids. Within this range, HAC can match quantitatively the astronomical phenomena ascribed to carbonaceous coatings on interstellar grains. We find the optical band gap of HAC to be well correlated with other physical properties of HAC of astronomical interest, and conclude that interstellar HAC must be fairly hydrogen-rich with a band gap of E(sub g) is approx. greater than 2.0 eV.

  7. Temperature behavior of optical absorption bands in colored LiF crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastampa, Renato; Missori, Mauro; Braidotti, Maria Chiara; Conti, Claudio; Vincenti, Maria Aurora; Montereali, Rosa Maria

    We measured the optical absorption spectra of thermally treated, gamma irradiated LiF crystals, as a function of temperature in the range 16-300 K. The temperature dependence of intensity, peak position and bandwidth of F and M absorption bands were obtained.

  8. Observations of 40-70 micron bands of ice in IRAS 09371 + 1212 and other stars

    SciTech Connect

    Omont, A.; Forveille, T.; Moseley, S.H.; Glaccum, W.J.; Harvey, P.M.; Likkel, L.; Loewenstein, R.F.; Lisse, C.M. NASA, Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD Texas Univ., Austin California Univ., Los Angeles Yerkes Observatory, Williams Bay, WI STX, Inc., Greenbelt, MD )

    1990-05-01

    IRAS 09371 + 1212 is still an absolutely unique object. This M giant star, with circumstellar CO and a spectacular bipolar nebula, displays unique IRAS FIR colors which had been attributed to strong emission in the 40-70-micron bands of ice, as subsequently supported by the observation of a strong 3.1-micron absorption band. The results of the KAO observations have confirmed its unusual nature: the far-infrared bands of ice are by far the strongest known. Its dust temperature, 50 K or less, is by far the lowest known for a late-type circumstellar envelope. 31 refs.

  9. Absorption of Solar Radiation by Clouds: Observations Versus Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cess, R. D.; Zhang, M. H.; Minnis, P.; Corsetti, L.; Dutton, E. G.; Forgan, B. W.; Garber, D. P.; Gates, W. L.; Hack, J. J.; Harrison, E. F.; Jing, X.; Kiehl, J. T.; Long, C. N.; Morcrette, J.-J.; Potter, G. L.; Ramanathan, V.; Subasilar, B.; Whitlock, C. H.; Young, D. F.; Zhou, Y.

    1995-01-01

    There has been a long history of unexplained anomalous absorption of solar radiation by clouds. Collocated satellite and surface measurements of solar radiation at five geographically diverse locations showed significant solar absorption by clouds, resulting in about 25 watts per square meter more global-mean absorption by the cloudy atmosphere than predicted by theoretical models. It has often been suggested that tropospheric aerosols could increase cloud absorption. But these aerosols are temporally and spatially heterogeneous, whereas the observed cloud absorption is remarkably invariant with respect to season and location. Although its physical cause is unknown, enhanced cloud absorption substantially alters our understanding of the atmosphere's energy budget.

  10. Nonequilibrium Green's function formulation of intersubband absorption for nonparabolic single-band effective mass Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Kolek, Andrzej

    2015-05-04

    The formulas are derived that enable calculations of intersubband absorption coefficient within nonequilibrium Green's function method applied to a single-band effective-mass Hamiltonian with the energy dependent effective mass. The derivation provides also the formulas for the virtual valence band components of the two-band Green's functions which can be used for more exact estimation of the density of states and electrons and more reliable treatment of electronic transport in unipolar n-type heterostructure semiconductor devices.

  11. Investigation of locally resonant absorption and factors affecting the absorption band of a phononic glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Meng; Jiang, Heng; Feng, Yafei; Wang, Yuren

    2014-12-01

    We experimentally and theoretically investigated the mechanisms of acoustic absorption in phononic glass to optimize its properties. First, we experimentally studied its locally resonant absorption mechanism. From these results, we attributed its strong sound attenuation to its locally resonant units and its broadband absorption to its networked structure. These experiments also indicated that the porosity and thickness of the phononic glass must be tuned to achieve the best sound absorption at given frequencies. Then, using lumped-mass methods, we studied how the absorption bandgaps of the phononic glass were affected by various factors, including the porosity and the properties of the coating materials. These calculations gave optimal ranges for selecting the porosity, modulus of the coating material, and ratio of the compliant coating to the stiff matrix to achieve absorption bandgaps in the range of 6-30 kHz. This paper provides guidelines for designing phononic glasses with proper structures and component materials to work in specific frequency ranges.

  12. Dual-band microwave absorption properties of metamaterial absorber composed of split ring resonator on carbonyl iron powder composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jun-Hee; Ryu, Yo-Han; Kim, Sung-Soo

    2015-05-01

    This study investigated the dual-band absorption properties of metamaterial absorbers composed of a split ring resonator (SRR) on a grounded magnetic substrate. Polymer composites of carbonyl iron powders (CIP) of high permeability and magnetic loss were used as the substrate material. Computational tools were used to model the interaction between electromagnetic waves and materials with the SRR structure. For perpendicular polarization with an electric field (E) perpendicular to the SRR gap, dualband absorption peaks are predicted in the simulation result of reflection loss. Magnetic resonance resulting from antiparallel currents between the SRR and the ground plane is observed at the frequencies of two absorption peaks. The first strong absorption peak at the lower frequency (3.3 GHz) is due to magnetic resonance at the wire part of the SRR. The second absorption peak at the higher frequency (7.2 GHz) is due to magnetic resonance at the SRR split gap. The decreased capacitance with increased gap spacing moves the second absorption frequency to higher frequencies, while the first absorption peak is invariant with gap spacing. In the case of dual gaps at the opposite sides of the SRR, a single absorption peak is predicted due to the elimination of low-frequency resonance. For parallel polarization with the E-field parallel to the SRR gap, a single absorption peak is predicted, corresponding to magnetic resonance at the SRR wire.[Figure not available: see fulltext.

  13. VARIABILITY OF WATER AND OXYGEN ABSORPTION BANDS IN THE DISK-INTEGRATED SPECTRA OF EARTH

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Yuka; Suto, Yasushi; Turner, Edwin L.

    2013-03-10

    We study the variability of major atmospheric absorption features in the disk-integrated spectra of Earth with future application to Earth-analogs in mind, concentrating on the diurnal timescale. We first analyze observations of Earth provided by the EPOXI mission, and find 5%-20% fractional variation of the absorption depths of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands, two molecules that have major signatures in the observed range. From a correlation analysis with the cloud map data from the Earth Observing Satellite (EOS), we find that their variation pattern is primarily due to the uneven cloud cover distribution. In order to account for the observed variation quantitatively, we consider a simple opaque cloud model, which assumes that the clouds totally block the spectral influence of the atmosphere below the cloud layer, equivalent to assuming that the incident light is completely scattered at the cloud top level. The model is reasonably successful, and reproduces the EPOXI data from the pixel-level EOS cloud/water vapor data. A difference in the diurnal variability patterns of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} bands is ascribed to the differing vertical and horizontal distribution of those molecular species in the atmosphere. On Earth, the inhomogeneous distribution of atmospheric water vapor is due to the existence of its exchange with liquid and solid phases of H{sub 2}O on the planet's surface on a timescale short compared with atmospheric mixing times. If such differences in variability patterns were detected in spectra of Earth-analogs, it would provide the information on the inhomogeneous composition of their atmospheres.

  14. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of isotopic oxygen, (O-18)2, at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Friedman, R. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1988-01-01

    Cross-sections of (O-18)2 at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 177.8-197.8 nm with a 6.65 m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400 lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross-sections of the Schumann-Runge bands (14,0) through (2,0) are, with the exception of the (12,0) band, independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically here and are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm as numerical compilations stored on magnetic tape. Band oscillator strengths of those bands have been determined by direct numerical integration of the measured absolute cross-sections and are in excellent agreement with these theoretically calculated values.

  15. Possible spinel absorption bands in S-asteroid visible reflectance spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Vilas, F.; Sunshine, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    Minor absorption bands in the 0.55 to 0.7 micron wavelength range of reflectance spectra of 10 S asteroids have been found and compared with those of spinel-group minerals using the modified Gaussian model. Most of these S asteroids are consistently shown to have two absorption bands around 0.6 and 0.67 micron. Of the spinel-group minerals examined in this study, the 0.6 and 0.67 micron bands are most consistent with those seen in chromite. Recently, the existence of spinels has also been detected from the absorption-band features around 1 and 2 micron of two S-asteroid reflectance spectra, and chromite has been found in a primitive achondrite as its major phase. These new findings suggest a possible common existence of spinel-group minerals in the solar system.

  16. Hot Bands in Overtone Absorption Transitions: High Temperature Spectra

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-03-17

    the overtone transition. ൖ WWIŝST3" 3 24 002 15.NUMBER ,OF ,,A Overtone Spectroscopy, Hot Bands 16. PRKI CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18...Rev 2-89) aWVPOO AfeD $10 139-18’q wAPI .’ N o, lgi OFFICE OF NAVAL RESEARCH GRANT or CONTRACT N00014-88-K-4130 R&T Code 4131063 Technical Report No...Unannounced fJ Justification ................ Prepared for Publication By ................ Di•.t. ibution I in Availability Codes Avail and /or Dist Special

  17. Varied absorption peaks of dual-band metamaterial absorber analysis by using reflection theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Han; Yu, Yan-Tao; Tang, Ming-Chun; Chen, Shi-Yong; Liu, Dan-Ping; Ou, Xiang; Zeng, Hao

    2016-03-01

    Cross-resonator metamaterial absorbers (MMA) have been widely investigated from microwave to optical frequencies. However, only part of the factors influencing the absorption properties were analyzed in previous works at the same time. In order to completely understand how the spacer thickness, dielectric parameter and incidence angle affect the absorption properties of the dual-band MMA, two sets of simulation were performed. It was found that with increasing incident angles, the low-frequency absorption peak showed a blue shift, while the high-frequency absorption peaks showed a red shift. However, with the increase in spacer thickness, both of the absorption peaks showed a red shift. By using the reflection theory expressions, the physical mechanism of the cross-resonator MMA was well explained. This method provides an effective way to analyze multi-band absorber in technology.

  18. On the NH3 absorption depression observable at Northern low latitudes of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tejfel, Victor G.; Vdovichenko, Vladimir D.; Lysenko, Peter G.; Karimov, Alibek M.; Kirienko, Galina A.; Bondarenko, Natalya N.; Kharitonova, Galina

    2016-10-01

    From February to April of 2016, we carried out a special series of spectrophotometric observations of Jupiter to study the current behavior of the ammonia absorption at the low latitudes of the Northern hemisphere, where in 2004 we have found a well-defined depression of the 787 nm NH3 absorption band intensity (V.Tejfel et al., Bull.AAS, 2005, Vol. 37, p.682). In subsequent years, an existence of this depression was annually confirmed by spectral observations, although we were noticing its variable character. During observations of 2016 we obtained more than 2,500 CCD-spectrograms, including the spectra of the central meridian, the GRS, and 12 scans of Jovian disk on different dates (70 zonal spectra in each scan). The 787 nm NH3 absorption band was extracted with using of ratios of the Jovian spectra to the Saturn's disk spectrum that was taken as a reference. The depression of absorption in this band begins almost from the equator, and its maximum occurs at the planetographic latitude of 100N then the absorption increases again approaching to the latitude of 200N. The equivalent bandwidths corresponding to these latitudes are equal to 18.7 ± 1.4 A, 14.4 ± 1.0 A and 17.8 ± 0.8A. The 645 nm NH3 absorption band also shows depletion at the low latitudes of the Northern hemisphere, but it is less pronounced. At the temperate latitudes of the Northern hemisphere this band's absorption is systematically lower than the Southern Hemisphere's ones. We will continue research in this direction, especially because recently a significant depletion of gaseous NH3 has also been found with using of the VLA with high resolution (I. de Pater et al., Science, 2016, Vol. 352, Issue 6290, p.1290-1294) at the low latitudes of the Northern hemisphere in the region of the NEB.

  19. Fe-substituted indium thiospinels: New intermediate band semiconductors with better absorption of solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ping; Chen, Haijie; Qin, Mingsheng; Yang, Chongyin; Zhao, Wei; Liu, Yufeng; Zhang, Wenqing; Huang, Fuqiang

    2013-06-01

    The indium thiospinels In2S3 and MgIn2S4 are promising host for the intermediated band (IB) photovoltaic materials due to their ideal band gap value. Here, the optical properties and electronic structure of Fe-doped In2S3 and MgIn2S4 have been investigated. All the Fe-substituted semiconductors exhibit two additional absorption bands at about 0.7 and 1.25 eV, respectively. The results of first-principles calculations revealed that the Fe substituted at the octahedral In site would introduce a partially filled IB into the band gap. Thanks to the formation of IB, the Fe-substituted semiconductors have the ability to absorb the photons with energies below the band gap. With the wide-spectrum absorption of solar energy, these materials possess potential applications in photovoltaic domain.

  20. Structural diversity of the 3-micron absorption band in Enceladus’ plume from Cassini VIMS: Insights into subsurface environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhingra, Deepak; Hedman, Matthew M.; Clark, Roger N.

    2015-11-01

    Water ice particles in Enceladus’ plume display their diagnostic 3-micron absorption band in Cassini VIMS data. These near infrared measurements of the plume also exhibit noticeable variations in the character of this band. Mie theory calculations reveal that the shape and location of the 3-micron band are controlled by a number of environmental and structural parameters. Hence, this band provides important insights into the properties of the water ice grains and about the subsurface environmental conditions under which they formed. For example, the position of the 3-micron absorption band minimum can be used to distinguish between crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice and to constrain the formation temperature of the ice grains. VIMS data indicates that the water ice grains in the plume are dominantly crystalline which could indicate formation temperatures above 113 K [e.g. 1, 2]. However, there are slight (but observable) variations in the band minimum position and band shape that may hint at the possibility of varying abundance of amorphous ice particles within the plume. The modeling results further indicate that there are systematic shifts in band minimum position with temperature for any given form of ice but the crystalline and amorphous forms of water ice are still distinguishable at VIMS spectral resolution. Analysis of the eruptions from individual source fissures (tiger stripes) using selected VIMS observations reveal differences in the 3-micron band shape that may reflect differences in the size distributions of the water ice particles along individual fissures. Mie theory models suggest that big ice particles (>3 micron) may be an important component of the plume.[1] Kouchi, A., T. Yamamoto, T. Kozasa, T. Kuroda, and J. M. Greenberg (1994) A&A, 290, 1009-1018 [2] Mastrapa, R. M. E., W. M. Grundy, and M. S. Gudipati (2013) in M. S. Gudipati and J. Castillo-Rogez (Eds.), The Science of Solar System Ices, pp. 371.

  1. Observation of the visible absorption spectrum of H2O(+)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, Biman; Farley, John W.

    1991-01-01

    The water cation, H2O(+), has been studied, using laser absorption spectroscopy in a velocity-modulated discharge. It is shown that it is possible to observe the absorption spectrum of an ion that is not a terminal ion, despite the weak absorption oscillator strength, and despite the use of a relatively noisy dye laser. The relative intensities of the absorption lines have been measured to an accuracy of 13 percent. It is concluded that if the absorption cross section of a single transition can be measured absolutely, then the entire manifold will be known absolutely.

  2. The effective air absorption coefficient for predicting reverberation time in full octave bands.

    PubMed

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2014-12-01

    A substantial amount of research has been devoted to producing a calculation model for air absorption for pure tones. However, most statistical and geometrical room acoustic prediction models calculate the reverberation time in full octave bands in accordance with ISO 3382-1 (International Organization for Standardization, 2009). So far, the available methods that allow calculation of air absorption in octave bands have not been investigated for room acoustic applications. In this paper, the effect of air absorption on octave band reverberation time calculations is investigated based on calculations. It is found that the approximation method, as described in the standard ANSI S1.26 (American National Standards Institute, 1995), fails to estimate accurate decay curves for full octave bands. In this paper, a method is used to calculate the energy decay curve in rooms based on a summation of pure tones within the band. From this decay curve, which is found to be slightly concave upwards, T20 and T30 can be determined. For different conditions, an effective intensity attenuation coefficient mB ;eff for the full octave bands has been calculated. This mB ;eff can be used for reverberation time calculations, if results are to be compared with T20 or T30 measurements. Also, guidelines are given for the air absorption correction of decay curves, measured in a scale model.

  3. Geometrical attenuation, frequency dependence of Q, and the absorption band problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, Igor B.

    2008-10-01

    A geometrical attenuation model is proposed as an alternative to the conventional frequency-dependent attenuation law Q(f) = Q0(f/f0)η. The new model provides a straightforward differentiation between the geometrical and effective attenuation (Qe) which incorporates the intrinsic attenuation and small-scale scattering. Unlike the (Q0, η) description, the inversion procedure uses only the spectral amplitude data and does not rely on elaborate theoretical models or restrictive assumptions. Data from over 40 reported studies were transformed to the new parametrization. The levels of geometrical attenuation strongly correlate with crustal tectonic types and decrease with tectonic age. The corrected values of Qe are frequency-independent and generally significantly higher than Q0 and show no significant correlation with tectonic age. Several case studies were revisited in detail, with significant changes in the interpretations. The absorption-band and the `10-Hz transition' are not found in the corrected Qe data, and therefore, these phenomena are interpreted as related to geometrical attenuation. The absorption band could correspond to changes in the dominant mode content of the wavefield as the frequency changes from about 0.1 to 100 Hz. Alternatively, it could also be a pure artefact related to the power-law Q(f) paradigm above. The explicit separation of the geometrical and intrinsic attenuation achieves three goals: (1) it provides an unambiguous, assumption- and model-free description of attenuation, (2) it allows relating the observations to the basic physics and geology and (3) it simplifies the interpretation because of reduced emphasis on the apparent Q(f) dependence. The model also agrees remarkably well with the initial attempts for finite-difference short-period coda waveform modelling. Because of its consistency and direct link to the observations, the approach should also help in building robust and transportable coda magnitudes and in seismic

  4. Measurement of the depolarization ratio of Rayleigh scattering at absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglister, J.; Steinberg, I. Z.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of the depolarization ratio ρv of light scattered by the pigments lycopene and β-carotene at the red part of their absorption bands yielded values which are very close to the theoretical value 1/3 of a fully anisotropic molecular polarizability, i.e., that due to an electric dipole moment. Measurements of ρv at the blue edge of the visible absorption band of pinacyanol chloride yielded a value of 0.75 at 472.2 nm, which is the maximum value that a depolarization ratio can assume, and is attained if the average molecular polarizability is zero. This is possible only if the diagonalized polarizability tensor has at least one negative element to counterbalance the positive ones. A negative refractive index at the blue edge of the absorption band is thus experimentally demonstrated.

  5. Electronic structure of polyenes related to the visual chromophore. A simple model for the observed band shapes.

    PubMed Central

    Hemley, R; Kohler, B E

    1977-01-01

    A model is presented which attributes the widths of absorption bands in carotenoids to conformational disorder induced by the beta-ionylidene moiety. With reasonable parameter choices, the model gives a good quantitative fit to the spectra observed for four carotenoids and at the same time accounts for the lack of structure in the long-wavelength absorption of retinal. PMID:922126

  6. Full band structure calculation of two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, J. L.; Rioux, J.; Sipe, J. E.

    2011-03-28

    Degenerate two-photon indirect absorption in silicon is an important limiting effect on the use of silicon structures for all-optical information processing at telecommunication wavelengths. We perform a full band structure calculation to investigate two-photon indirect absorption in bulk silicon, using a pseudopotential description of the energy bands and an adiabatic bond charge model to describe phonon dispersion and polarization. Our results agree well with some recent experimental results. The transverse acoustic/optical phonon-assisted processes dominate.

  7. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  8. Emergence of Very Broad Infrared Absorption Band By Hyperdoping of Silicon with Chalcogens

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-03

    measured by Hall effect in Ref. 9 (crosses) as functions of implanted sulfur dose. (c) Calculated reflectivity by Kramers- Kronig transformation of the...MIR band is small enough, this assumption is reasonable according to the Kramers- Kronig relationship between optical absorption and reflectivity...calculated by a Kramers- Kronig transformation of the absorption spectrum shown in Fig. 1(a) and the results are shown in Fig. 1(c). However, the a value

  9. Airborne imaging spectrometer data of the Ruby Mountains, Montana: Mineral discrimination using relative absorption band-depth images

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crowley, J.K.; Brickey, D.W.; Rowan, L.C.

    1989-01-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometer data collected in the near-infrared (1.2-2.4 ??m) wavelength range were used to study the spectral expression of metamorphic minerals and rocks in the Ruby Mountains of southwestern Montana. The data were analyzed by using a new data enhancement procedure-the construction of relative absorption band-depth (RBD) images. RBD images, like bandratio images, are designed to detect diagnostic mineral absorption features, while minimizing reflectance variations related to topographic slope and albedo differences. To produce an RBD image, several data channels near an absorption band shoulder are summed and then divided by the sum of several channels located near the band minimum. RBD images are both highly specific and sensitive to the presence of particular mineral absorption features. Further, the technique does not distort or subdue spectral features as sometimes occurs when using other data normalization methods. By using RBD images, a number of rock and soil units were distinguished in the Ruby Mountains including weathered quartz - feldspar pegmatites, marbles of several compositions, and soils developed over poorly exposed mica schists. The RBD technique is especially well suited for detecting weak near-infrared spectral features produced by soils, which may permit improved mapping of subtle lithologic and structural details in semiarid terrains. The observation of soils rich in talc, an important industrial commodity in the study area, also indicates that RBD images may be useful for mineral exploration. ?? 1989.

  10. Diversity in the Visible-NIR Absorption Band Characteristics of Lunar and Asteroidal Plagioclase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hiroi, T.; Kaiden, H.; Misawa, K.; Kojima, H.; Uemoto, K.; Ohtake, M.; Arai, T.; Sasaki, S.; Takeda, H.; Nyquist, L. E.; Shih, C.-Y.

    2012-01-01

    Studying the visible and near-infrared (VNIR) spectral properties of plagioclase has been challenging because of the difficulty in obtaining good plagioclase separates from pristine planetary materials such as meteorites and returned lunar samples. After an early study indicated that the 1.25 m band position of plagioclase spectrum might be correlated with the molar percentage of anorthite (An#) [1], there have been few studies which dealt with the band center behavior. In this study, the VNIR absorption band parameters of plagioclase samples have been derived using the modified Gaussian model (MGM) [2] following a pioneering study by [3].

  11. a Theoretical Model for Wide-Band Infrared-Absorption Molecular Spectra at any Pressure: Fiction or Reality?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buldyreva, Jeanna; Vander Auwera, Jean

    2014-06-01

    Various atmospheric applications require modeling of infrared absorption by the main atmospheric species in wide ranges of frequencies, pressures and temperatures. For different pressure regimes, different mechanisms are responsible for the observed intensities of vibration-rotation line manifolds, and the structure of the bands changes drastically when going from low to high densities. Therefore, no universal theoretical model exists presently to interpret simultaneously collapsed band-shapes observed at very high pressures and isolated-line shapes recorded in sub-atmospheric regimes. Using CO_2 absorption spectra as an example, we introduce some improvements in the non-Markovian Energy-Corrected Sudden model, developed for high-density spectra of arbitrary tensorial rank and generalized recently to parallel and perpendicular infrared absorption bands, and test the applicability of this approach for the case of nearly Doppler pressure regime via comparisons with recently recorded experimental intensities. J.V. Buldyreva and L. Bonamy, Phys. Rev. A 60(1), 370-376 (1999). J. Buldyreva and L. Daneshvar, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 164107 (2013). L. Daneshvar, T. Földes, J. Buldyreva, J. Vander Auwera, J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Transfer 2014 (to be submitted).

  12. Models for the water-ice librational band in cool dust: possible observational test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, G.

    2014-01-01

    Of all the water-ice (H2O-ice) bands the librational band, occurring at a wavelength of about 12 μm, has proved to be the most difficult to detect observationally and also to reproduce in radiative transfer models. In fact, the case for the positive identification of the feature is strong in only a few astronomical objects. A previously suggested explanation for this is that so-called radiative transfer effects may mask the feature. In this paper, radiative transfer models are produced which unambiguously reveal the presence of the librational band as a separate resolved feature provided that there is no dust present which radiates significantly in the 10-μm region, specifically silicate-type dust. This means that the maximum dust temperature must be ≲50 K. In this case, the models indicate that the librational band may clearly be observed as an absorption feature against the stellar continuum. This suggests that the feature may be best observed by obtaining the 10-μm spectrum of stars either with very cool circumstellar dust shells, with Tmax ≲ 50 K, or those without circumstellar dust shells at all but with interstellar extinction. The first option might, however, require unrealistically large amounts of dust in the circumstellar shell in order to produce measurable absorption. Thus, the best place to look for the water-ice librational band may not be protostars with the remnants of their dust cloud still present, or evolved objects with ejected dust shells, as one might first think, because of the warm dust (Tmax ≫ 50 K) usually present in the shells of these objects. If objects associated with very cool dust exclusively do show the 3.1-μm water-ice band in deep absorption, but the librational band still does not appear, this may imply that it is not radiative transfer effects which suppress the librational band, and that some other mechanism for its suppression is in play. One possibility is that a low water-ice to silicate abundance may mask the

  13. Infrared band absorptance correlations and applications to nongray radiation. [mathematical models of absorption spectra for nongray atmospheres in order to study air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiwari, S. N.; Manian, S. V. S.

    1976-01-01

    Various mathematical models for infrared radiation absorption spectra for atmospheric gases are reviewed, and continuous correlations for the total absorptance of a wide band are presented. Different band absorptance correlations were employed in two physically realistic problems (radiative transfer in gases with internal heat source, and heat transfer in laminar flow of absorbing-emitting gases between parallel plates) to study their influence on final radiative transfer results. This information will be applied to the study of atmospheric pollutants by infrared radiation measurement.

  14. Laboratory Measurements of the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm Water Vapor Absorption Band Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Gore, Warren J.; Pilewskie, P.; Freedman, R. S.; Chackerian, C., Jr.; Varanasi, P.

    2001-01-01

    We have used the solar spectral flux radiometer (SSFR) flight instrument with the Ames 25 meter base-path White cell to obtain about 20 moderate resolution (8 nm) pure water vapor spectra from 650 to 1650 nm, with absorbing paths from 806 to 1506 meters and pressures up to 14 torr. We also obtained a set at 806 meters with several different air-broadening pressures. Model simulations were made for the 940, 1130, and 1370 nm absorption bands for some of these laboratory conditions using the Rothman, et al HITRAN-2000 linelist. This new compilation of HITRAN includes new intensity measurements for the 940 nm region. We compared simulations for our spectra of this band using HITRAN-2000 with simulations using the prior HITRAN-1996. The simulations of the 1130 nm band show about 10% less absorption than we measured. There is some evidence that the total intensity of this band is about 38% stronger than the sum of the HITRAN line intensities in this region. In our laboratory conditions the absorption depends approximately on the square root of the intensity. Thus, our measurements agree that the band is stronger than tabulated in HITRAN, but by about 20%, substantially less than the published value. Significant differences have been shown between Doppler-limited resolution spectra of the 1370 nm band obtained at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and HITRAN simulations. Additional new intensity measurements in this region are continuing to be made. We expect the simulations of our SSFR lab data of this band will show the relative importance of improving the HITRAN line intensities of this band for atmospheric measurements.

  15. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge absorption bands of isotopic oxygen, (0-16)(0-18), at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Friedman, R. S.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1989-01-01

    Cross-sections of (0-16)(0-18) at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements on mixtures of (0-16)2, (0-18)2, and (0-16)(0-18) at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 180.5-195.3 nm with a 6.65 m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400 lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross-sections of the (0-16)(0-18) Schumann-Runge bands (11.0)-(3.0) are independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically.

  16. Effect of Sn on the optical band gap determined using absorption spectrum fitting method

    SciTech Connect

    Heera, Pawan; Kumar, Anup; Sharma, Raman

    2015-05-15

    We report the preparation and the optical studies on tellurium rich glasses thin films. The thin films of Se{sub 30}Te{sub 70-x} Sn{sub x} system for x= 0, 1.5, 2.5 and 4.5 glassy alloys prepared by melt quenching technique are deposited on the glass substrate using vacuum thermal evaporation technique. The analysis of absorption spectra in the spectral range 400nm–4000 nm at room temperature obtained from UV-VIS-NIR spectrophotometer [Perkin Elmer Lamda-750] helps us in the optical characterization of the thin films under study. The absorption spectrum fitting method is applied by using the Tauc’s model for estimating the optical band gap and the width of the band tail of the thin films. The optical band gap is calculated and is found to decrease with the Sn content.

  17. Dual-Band Perfect Absorption by Breaking the Symmetry of Metamaterial Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Le Dinh; Qui, Vu Dinh; Dinh, Tiep Hong; Hai, Pham; Giang, Trinh Thị; Cuong, Tran Manh; Tung, Bui Son; Lam, Vu Dinh

    2017-02-01

    Since the first proposal of Landy et al. (Phys Rev Lett 100:207402, 2008), the metamaterial perfect absorber (MPA) has rapidly become one of the most crucial research trends. Recently, dual-band, multi-band and broadband MPA have been highly desirable in electronic applications. In this paper, we demonstrate and evaluate a MPA structure which can generate dual-band absorption operating at the microwave frequency by breaking the symmetry of structure. There is an agreement between simulation and experimental results. The results can be explained by using the equivalent LC circuit and the electric field distribution of this structure. In addition, various structures with different symmetry configurations were studied to gain greater insight into the absorption.

  18. Jet-cooled infrared absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of HCOOH and HCOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yulan; Li, Wenguang; Duan, Chuanxi

    2017-04-01

    The jet-cooled absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of normal formic acid (HCOOH) and deuterated formic acid (HCOOD) was recorded in the frequency range of 1370-1392 cm-1 with distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs) as the tunable infrared radiations. A segmented rapid-scan data acquisition scheme was developed for pulsed supersonic jet infrared laser absorption spectroscopy based on DFB-QCLs with a moderate vacuum pumping capacity. The unperturbed band-origin and rotational constants in the excited vibrational state were determined for both HCOOH and HCOOD. The unperturbed band-origin locates at 1379.05447(11) cm-1 for HCOOH, and 1366.48430(39) cm-1 for HCOOD, respectively.

  19. Broad-band transmission spectrum and K-band thermal emission of WASP-43b as observed from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, G.; van Boekel, R.; Wang, H.; Nikolov, N.; Fortney, J. J.; Seemann, U.; Wang, W.; Mancini, L.; Henning, Th.

    2014-03-01

    Aims: WASP-43b is the closest-orbiting hot Jupiter, and it has high bulk density. It causes deep eclipse depths in the system's light curve in both transit and occultation that is attributed to the cool temperature and small radius of its host star. We aim to secure a broad-band transmission spectrum and to detect its near-infrared thermal emission in order to characterize its atmosphere. Methods: We observed one transit and one occultation event simultaneously in the g', r', i', z', J, H, K bands using the GROND instrument on the MPG/ESO 2.2-m telescope, where the telescope was heavily defocused in staring mode. After modeling the light curves, we derived wavelength-dependent transit depths and flux ratios and compared them to atmospheric models. Results: From the transit event, we have independently derived WASP-43's system parameters with high precision and improved the period to be 0.81347437(13) days based on all the available timings. No significant variation in transit depths is detected, with the largest deviations coming from the i'-, H-, and K-bands. Given the observational uncertainties, the broad-band transmission spectrum can be explained by either (i) a flat featureless straight line that indicates thick clouds; (ii) synthetic spectra with absorption signatures of atomic Na/K, or molecular TiO/VO that in turn indicate cloud-free atmosphere; or (iii) a Rayleigh scattering profile that indicates high-altitude hazes. From the occultation event, we detected planetary dayside thermal emission in the K-band with a flux ratio of 0.197 ± 0.042%, which confirms previous detections obtained in the 2.09 μm narrow band and KS-band. The K-band brightness temperature 1878+108-116 K favors an atmosphere with poor day- to nightside heat redistribution. We also have a marginal detection in the i'-band (0.037+0.023-0.021%), corresponding to TB = 2225+139-225 K, which is either a false positive, a signature of non-blackbody radiation at this wavelength, or an

  20. The meaning of DAPI bands observed after C-banding and FISH procedures.

    PubMed

    Barros e Silva, A E; Guerra, M

    2010-04-01

    Under specific technical conditions chromosome staining with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) permits characterization of heterochromatic regions as AT-rich (DAPI(+)) or AT-poor (DAPI(-)), especially when the chromosomes are counterstained with chromomycin A(3) (CMA), which preferentially binds to GC-rich DNA. DAPI(+) bands also often have been observed after C-banding or FISH. In these cases, however, it is not clear whether only AT-rich regions stain positively with DAPI or other heterochromatins with different base compositions also are stained. We evaluated the meaning of DAPI bands observed after C-banding and FISH using three plant species bearing different types of heterochromatin: DAPI(+)/CMA(-), DAP(-)/CMA(+) and DAPI(0)/CMA(0) (neutral bands). Additional tests were performed using propidium iodide, a fluorochrome without preferential affinity for AT or GC. Our results indicate that AT-rich heterochromatin stains as DAPI(+) bands after C-banding or FISH, but other kinds of heterochromatin also may be stained by DAPI.

  1. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-06-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2- (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2- species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2-, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples.

  2. The Mars Observer Ka-band link experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rebold, T. A.; Kwok, A.; Wood, G. E.; Butman, S.

    1994-01-01

    The Ka-Band Link Experiment was the first demonstration of a deep-space communications link in the 32- to 35-GHz band (Ka-band). It was carried out using the Mars Observer spacecraft while the spacecraft was in the cruise phase of its mission and using a 34-meter beam-waveguide research and development antenna at the Goldstone complex of the DSN. The DSN has been investigating the performance benefits of a shift from X-band (8.4 GHz) to Ka-band (32 GHz) for deep-space communications. The fourfold increase in frequency is expected to offer a factor of 3 to 10 improvement (5 to 10 dB) in signal strength for a given spacecraft transmitter power and antenna size. Until recently, the expected benefits were based on performance studies, with an eye to implementing such a link, but theory was transformed to reality when a 33.7-GHz Ka-band signal was received from the spacecraft by DSS 13. This article describes the design and implementation of the Ka-Band Link Experiment from the spacecraft to the DSS-13 system, as well as results from the Ka-band telemetry demonstration, ranging demonstration, and long-term tracking experiment. Finally, a preliminary analysis of comparative X- and Ka-band tracking results is included. These results show a 4- to 7-dB advantage for Ka-band using the system at DSS 13, assuming such obstacles as antenna pointing loss and power conversion loss are overcome.

  3. Analysis of wavelength-dependent photoisomerization quantum yields in bilirubins by fitting two exciton absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzoni, M.; Agati, G.; Troup, G. J.; Pratesi, R.

    2003-09-01

    The absorption spectra of bilirubins were deconvoluted by two Gaussian curves of equal width representing the exciton bands of the non-degenerate molecular system. The two bands were used to study the wavelength dependence of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) configurational photoisomerization quantum yield of the bichromophoric bilirubin-IXalpha (BR-IX), the intrinsically asymmetric bile pigment associated with jaundice and the symmetrically substituted bilirubins (bilirubin-IIIalpha and mesobilirubin-XIIIalpha), when they are irradiated in aqueous solution bound to human serum albumin (HSA). The same study was performed for BR-IX in ammoniacal methanol solution (NH4OH/MeOH). The quantum yields of the configurational photoprocesses were fitted with a combination function of the two Gaussian bands normalized to the total absorption, using the proportionality coefficients and a scaling factor as parameters. The decrease of the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) quantum yield with increasing wavelength, which occurs for wavelengths longer than the most probable Franck-Condon transition of the molecule, did not result in a unique function of the exciton absorptions. In particular we found two ranges corresponding to different exciton interactions with different proportionality coefficients and scaling factors. The wavelength-dependent photoisomerization of bilirubins was described as an abrupt change in quantum yield as soon as the resulting excitation was strongly localized in each chromophore. The change was correlated to a variation of the interaction between the two chromophores when the short-wavelength exciton absorption became vanishingly small. With the help of the circular dichroism (CD) spectrum of BR-IX in HSA, a small band was resolved in the bilirubin absorption spectrum, delivering part of the energy required for the (4Z, 15Z) rightarrow (4Z, 15E) photoisomerization of the molecule.

  4. The Soret absorption band of isolated chlorophyll a and b tagged with quaternary ammonium ions.

    PubMed

    Stockett, Mark H; Musbat, Lihi; Kjær, Christina; Houmøller, Jørgen; Toker, Yoni; Rubio, Angel; Milne, Bruce F; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2015-10-21

    We have performed gas-phase absorption spectroscopy in the Soret-band region of chlorophyll (Chl) a and b tagged by quaternary ammonium ions together with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) calculations. This band is the strongest in the visible region of metalloporphyrins and an important reporter on the microenvironment. The cationic charge tags were tetramethylammonium, tetrabutylammonium, and acetylcholine, and the dominant dissociation channel in all cases was breakage of the complex to give neutral Chl and the charge tag as determined by photoinduced dissociation mass spectroscopy. Two photons were required to induce fragmentation on the time scale of the experiment (microseconds). Action spectra were recorded where the yield of the tag as a function of excitation wavelength was sampled. These spectra are taken to represent the corresponding absorption spectra. In the case of Chl a we find that the tag hardly influences the band maximum which for all three tags is at 403 ± 5 nm. A smaller band with maximum at 365 ± 10 nm was also measured for all three complexes. The spectral quality is worse in the case of Chl b due to lower ion beam currents; however, there is clear evidence for the absorption being to the red of that of Chl a (most intense peak at 409 ± 5 nm) and also a more split band. Our results demonstrate that the change in the Soret-band spectrum when one peripheral substituent (CH3) is replaced by another (CHO) is an intrinsic effect. First principles TD-DFT calculations agree with our experiments, supporting the intrinsic nature of the difference between Chl a and b and also displaying minimal spectral changes when different charge tags are employed. The deviations between theory and experiment have allowed us to estimate that the Soret-band absorption maxima in vacuo for the neutral Chl a and Chl b should occur at 405 nm and 413 nm, respectively. Importantly, the Soret bands of the isolated species are significantly blueshifted

  5. Observation of suppressed terahertz absorption in photoexcited graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frenzel, A. J.; Lui, C. H.; Fang, W.; Nair, N. L.; Herring, P. K.; Jarillo-Herrero, P.; Kong, J.; Gedik, N.

    2013-03-01

    When light is absorbed by a semiconductor, photoexcited charge carriers enhance the absorption of far-infrared radiation due to intraband transitions. We observe the opposite behavior in monolayer graphene, a zero-gap semiconductor with linear dispersion. By using time domain terahertz (THz) spectroscopy in conjunction with optical pump excitation, we observe a reduced absorption of THz radiation in photoexcited graphene. The measured spectral shape of the differential optical conductivity exhibits non-Drude behavior. We discuss several possible mechanisms that contribute to the observed low-frequency non-equilibrium optical response of graphene.

  6. PRINCIPAL INFRARED ABSORPTION BANDS OF SOME DERIVATIVES OF 1,3-DINITROBENZENE AND 1,3,5TRINITROBENZENE,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The frequencies of the strong infrared absorption bands of 46 derivatives of di- and tri-nitrobenzene were measured and tabulated. The vibrational ... modes producing these absorptions were assigned in most cases. The effect of structure on the frequency of the absorption due to each of the modes is discussed, with emphasis on identifying unknowns. (Author)

  7. Solvatochromic Shifts on Absorption and Fluorescence Bands of N,N-Dimethylaniline.

    PubMed

    Fdez Galván, Ignacio; Elena Martín, M; Muñoz-Losa, Aurora; Aguilar, Manuel A

    2009-02-10

    A theoretical study of the absorption and fluorescence UV/vis spectra of N,N-dimethylaniline in different solvents has been performed, using a method combining quantum mechanics, molecular mechanics, and the mean field approximation. The transitions between the three lowest-lying states have been calculated in vacuum as well as in cyclohexane, tetrahydrofuran, and water. The apparent anomalies experimentally found in water (a blue shift in the absorption bands with respect to the trend in other solvents, and an abnormally high red shift for the fluorescence band) are well reproduced and explained in view of the electronic structure of the solute and the solvent distribution around it. Additional calculations were done with a mixture of cyclohexane and tetrahydrofuran as solvent, which displays a nonlinear solvatochromic shift. Results, although not conclusive, are consistent with experiment and provide a possible explanation for the nonlinear behavior in the solvent mixture.

  8. An alternative model for photodynamic therapy of cancers: Hot-band absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Chen, Jiyao

    2013-12-01

    The sulfonated aluminum phthalocyanine (AlPcS), a photosensitizer for photodynamic cancer therapy (PDT), has an absorption tail in the near-infrared region (700-900 nm) which is so-called hot band absorption (HBA). With the HBA of 800 nm, the up-conversion excitation of AlPcS was achieved followed by the anti-Stocks emission (688 nm band) and singlet oxygen production. The HBA PDT of AlPcS seriously damaged the KB and HeLa cancer cells, with a typical light dose dependent mode. Particularly, the in vitro experiments with the AlPcS shielding solutions further showed that the HBA PDT can overcome a self-shielding effect benefiting the PDT applications.

  9. PHASE ANGLE EFFECTS ON 3 μm ABSORPTION BAND ON CERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DAWN MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Corre, L. Le; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25–5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9–4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ∼20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ∼25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  10. Challenges for continuity of L-Band observations over land

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over land, L-band observations are primarily used for the detection of soil freeze/thaw events and the quantification of surface soil moisture content. Both products have important science, climate and decision support applications and would benefit from longer historical data records derived from s...

  11. A thermal broadening analysis of absorption spectra of the D1/D2/cytochrome b-559 complex in terms of Gaussian decomposition sub-bands.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, R; Zucchelli, G; Garlaschi, F M; Finzi, L; Jennings, R C

    1995-11-21

    Absorption spectra of the isolated D1/D2/cytochrome b-559 complex have been measured in the temperature range 80-300 K. All spectra were analyzed in terms of a linear combination of Gaussian bands and the thermal broadening data interpreted in terms of a model in which the spectrum of each pigment site is broadened by (a) a homogeneous component due to linear electron-phonon coupling to a low-frequency protein vibration and (b) an inhomogeneous component associated with stochastic fluctuations at each pigment site. In order to obtain a numerically adequate description of the absorption spectra, a minimum number of five sub-bands is required. Further refinement of this sub-band description was achieved by taking into account published data from hole burning and absorption difference spectroscopy. In this way, both a six sub-band description and a seven sub-band description were generated. In arriving at the seven sub-band description, the original five sub-band wavelength positions were essentially unchanged. Thermal broadening analysis of the seven sub-band description yielded data which displayed the closest correspondence with the literature observations. The wavelength positions of the sub-bands were near 661, 667, 670, and 675 nm, with two bands near 680 and 684 nm. The two almost isoenergetic sub-bands near 680 nm, identified as P680 and pheophytin, have optical reorganization energies around 40 and 16 cm-1, respectively. All other sub-bands, identified as accessory pigments, have optical reorganization energies close to 16 cm-1.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Dust observations with the new ALMA Band 1 receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morata, O.; Di Francesco, J.; Kemper, C.; ALMA Band 1 Science Team

    The ALMA Band 1 project will expand the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) access to frequencies between 35 and 52 GHz for high angular resolution and sensitivity observations from the southern hemisphere. The main dust related science case for ALMA Band 1 is also an ALMA Level One Science Case: the study of the evolution of grains in protoplanetary disks. ALMA Band 1 will be able to resolve protoplanetary disks at the distance of the nearest star-forming regions and will allow us to follow the dust grain growth from mm-sized to cm-sized pebbles in protoplanetary disks and hopefully show where and when dust coagulation occurs. Observations of debris disks will also be possible, although more challenging than those for protoplanetary disks. The high sensitivity and angular resolution of Band 1 will also allow us to study the spinning dust emission that it is related to the very small grain (VSG) population in the interstellar medium under conditions not possible to observe using mid-IR emission.

  13. Study of band inversion in the PbxSn1-xTe class of topological crystalline insulators using x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, K. V.; Kolobov, A. V.; Fons, P.; Krbal, M.; Tominaga, J.; Uruga, T.

    2014-11-01

    PbxSn1-xTe and PbxSn1-xSe crystals belong to the class of topological crystalline insulators where topological protection is achieved due to crystal symmetry rather than time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we make use of selection rules in the x-ray absorption process to experimentally detect band inversion along the PbTe(Se)-SnTe(Se) tie-lines. The observed significant change in the ratio of intensities of L1 and L3 transitions along the tie-line demonstrates that x-ray absorption can be a useful tool to study band inversion in topological insulators.

  14. Cluster Observations of Whistler Mode Ducts and Banded Chorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, N.; Inan, U. S.; Bell, T. F.

    2011-12-01

    Bell et al., [2009] proposed that the source region for banded chorus consists of whistler mode ducts of depleted electron density (Ne) for upper band (UB) chorus for all wave normal angles (θ) and ducts of either enhanced or depleted Ne for lower band (LB) chorus, for small θ and θ near or greater than the Gendrin angle (θG), respectively. We provide support for this model using new high resolution (17 km) Ne observations from the Cluster WHISPER and EFW instruments. Data is examined from January 20, 2004, when strong banded chorus was observed over 3000 km of the Cluster 2 orbit, ending at the magnetic equator. Previous analysis of LB chorus on this day showed θ>θG [Santolík et al., 2009; Chum et al., 2009]. Using the Ne data, we show that the LB chorus is generated within depletion ducts in the source region and that the half-width of these ducts (˜70 km) is comparable to the transverse scale (˜100 km) of the chorus source region. Making use of the fact that the group velocity of the LB chorus waves has a significant cross-L component, we show the source region extends over 500 km near the magnetic equator.

  15. Results of MODIS band-to-band registration characterization using on-orbit lunar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Angal, Amit; Xie, Yong; Choi, Taeyoung; Wang, Zhipeng

    2011-10-01

    Since launch, lunar observations have been made on a regular basis for both Terra and Aqua MODIS and used in a number of applications for their on-orbit calibration and characterization, including radiometric stability monitoring, band-to-band registration (BBR) characterization, optical leak and electronic cross-talk characterization, and calibration inter-comparisons with others sensors. MODIS has 36 spectral bands, consisting of a total of 490 individual detectors, which are located on four different focal plane assemblies (FPAs). This paper focuses on the use of MODIS lunar observations for its on-orbit BBR characterization in both along-scan and along-track directions. In addition to BBR, study of detector-to-detector registration (DDR) through the use of lunar observations is also discussed. The yearly averaged BBR results developed from MODIS lunar observations are presented in this paper and compared with that derived from its on-board calibrator (OBC). In general, results from different approaches agree well. Results show that on-orbit changes in BBR have been very small for both Terra and Aqua MODIS over their entire missions. It is clearly demonstrated in this paper that the lunar approaches developed and applied to MODIS can be effectively used by other sensors for their on-orbit BBR and DDR characterization.

  16. Surface Material Characterization from Multi-band Optical Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, D.

    2010-09-01

    Ground-based optical and radar sites routinely acquire resolved images of satellites. These resolved images provide the means to construct accurate wire-frame models of the observed body, as well as an understanding of its orientation as a function of time. Unfortunately, because such images are typically acquired in a single spectral band, they provide little information on the types of materials covering the satellite's various surfaces. Detailed surface material characterization generally requires spectrometric and/or multi-band photometric measurements. Fortunately, many instruments provide such multi-band information (e.g., spectrographs and multi-channel photometers). However, these sensors often measure the brightness of the entire satellite, with no spatial resolution at all. Because such whole-body measurements represent a summation of contributions from many reflecting surfaces, an ―un-mixing‖ or inversion process must be employed to determine the materials covering each of the satellite's individual sub-components. The first section of this paper describes the inversion theory required to retrieve satellite surface material properties from temporal sequences of whole-body multi-band brightness measurements. The inversion requires the following as input: 1) a set of multi-band measurements of a satellite's reflected-sunlight brightness, 2) the satellite's wire-frame model, including each major component capable of reflecting sunlight, 3) the satellite's attitude, specifying the body’s orientation at the time of each multi-band measurement, and 4) a database of bi-directional reflection distribution functions for a set of candidate surface materials. As output, the inversion process yields estimates of the fraction of each major satellite component covered by each candidate material. The second section of the paper describes several tests of the method by applying it to simulated multi-band observations of a cubical satellite with different materials

  17. Estimating Coastal Turbidity using MODIS 250 m Band Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, James E.; Moeller, Christopher C.; Gunshor, Mathew M.; Menzel, W. Paul; Walker, Nan D.

    2004-01-01

    Terra MODIS 250 m observations are being applied to a Suspended Sediment Concentration (SSC) algorithm that is under development for coastal case 2 waters where reflectance is dominated by sediment entrained in major fluvial outflows. An atmospheric correction based on MODIS observations in the 500 m resolution 1.6 and 2.1 micron bands is used to isolate the remote sensing reflectance in the MODIS 25Om resolution 650 and 865 nanometer bands. SSC estimates from remote sensing reflectance are based on accepted inherent optical properties of sediment types known to be prevalent in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico coastal zone. We present our findings for the Atchafalaya Bay region of the Louisiana Coast, in the form of processed imagery over the annual cycle. We also apply our algorithm to selected sites worldwide with a goal of extending the utility of our approach to the global direct broadcast community.

  18. Signatures of a conical intersection in photofragment distributions and absorption spectra: Photodissociation in the Hartley band of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2014-08-21

    Photodissociation of ozone in the near UV is studied quantum mechanically in two excited electronic states coupled at a conical intersection located outside the Franck-Condon zone. The calculations, performed using recent ab initio PESs, provide an accurate description of the photodissociation dynamics across the Hartley/Huggins absorption bands. The observed photofragment distributions are reproduced in the two electronic dissociation channels. The room temperature absorption spectrum, constructed as a Boltzmann average of many absorption spectra of rotationally excited parent ozone, agrees with experiment in terms of widths and intensities of diffuse structures. The exit channel conical intersection contributes to the coherent broadening of the absorption spectrum and directly affects the product vibrational and translational distributions. The photon energy dependences of these distributions are strikingly different for fragments created along the adiabatic and the diabatic paths through the intersection. They can be used to reverse engineer the most probable geometry of the non-adiabatic transition. The angular distributions, quantified in terms of the anisotropy parameter β, are substantially different in the two channels due to a strong anticorrelation between β and the rotational angular momentum of the fragment O{sub 2}.

  19. Understanding of sub-band gap absorption of femtosecond-laser sulfur hyperdoped silicon using synchrotron-based techniques

    PubMed Central

    Limaye, Mukta V.; Chen, S. C.; Lee, C. Y.; Chen, L. Y.; Singh, Shashi B.; Shao, Y. C.; Wang, Y. F.; Hsieh, S. H.; Hsueh, H. C.; Chiou, J. W.; Chen, C. H.; Jang, L. Y.; Cheng, C. L.; Pong, W. F.; Hu, Y. F.

    2015-01-01

    The correlation between sub-band gap absorption and the chemical states and electronic and atomic structures of S-hyperdoped Si have been extensively studied, using synchrotron-based x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES), extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VB-PES) and first-principles calculation. S 2p XPS spectra reveal that the S-hyperdoped Si with the greatest (~87%) sub-band gap absorption contains the highest concentration of S2− (monosulfide) species. Annealing S-hyperdoped Si reduces the sub-band gap absorptance and the concentration of S2− species, but significantly increases the concentration of larger S clusters [polysulfides (Sn2−, n > 2)]. The Si K-edge XANES spectra show that S hyperdoping in Si increases (decreased) the occupied (unoccupied) electronic density of states at/above the conduction-band-minimum. VB-PES spectra evidently reveal that the S-dopants not only form an impurity band deep within the band gap, giving rise to the sub-band gap absorption, but also cause the insulator-to-metal transition in S-hyperdoped Si samples. Based on the experimental results and the calculations by density functional theory, the chemical state of the S species and the formation of the S-dopant states in the band gap of Si are critical in determining the sub-band gap absorptance of hyperdoped Si samples. PMID:26098075

  20. Infrared absorption band in deformed qtz crystals analyzed by combining different microstructural methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stunitz, Holger; Thust, Anja; Behrens, Harald; Heilbronner, Renee; Kilian, Ruediger

    2016-04-01

    Natural single crystals of quartz have been experimentally deformed in two orientations: (1) normal to one prism-plane, (2) In O+ orientation at temperatures of 900 and 1000°C, pressures of 1.0 and 1.5 GPa, and strain rates of ~1 x 10-6s-1. The starting material is milky quartz, consisting of dry quartz (H2O contents of <150 H/106Si) with fluid inclusions (FI). During pressurization many FÍs decrepitate. Cracks heal and small neonate FÍs form, increasing the number of FÍs drastically. During subsequent deformation, the size of FÍs is further reduced (down to ~10 nm). Sample deformation occurs by dominant dislocation glide on selected slip systems, accompanied by some dynamic recovery. Strongly deformed regions show FTIR spectra with a pointed broad absorption band in the ~3400 cm-1 region as a superposition of molecular H2O bands and three discrete absorption bands (at 3367, 3400, and 3434 cm-1). In addition, there is a discrete absorption band at 3585 cm-1, which only occurs in deformed regions. The 3585 cm-1 band is reduced or even disappears after annealing. This band is polarized and represents structurally bound H, its H-content is estimated to be 1-3% of the total H2O-content and appears to be associated with dislocations. The H2O weakening effect in our FI-bearing natural quartz crystals is assigned to the processes of dislocation generation and multiplication at small FÍs. The deformation processes in these crystals represent a recycling of H2O between FÍs, dislocation generation at very small fluid inclusions, incorporation of structurally bound H into dislocation cores, and release of H2O from dislocations back into FÍs during recovery. Cracking and crack healing play an important role in the recycling process and imply a close interrelationship between brittle and crystal plastic deformation. The H2O weakening by this process is of a disequilibrium nature and thus depends on the amount of H2O available.

  1. Unknown Bands Observed in the 266 NM Photolysis of Iodomethanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jia-Jen; Chen, Chia-Hsin; Chang, Bor-Chen

    2012-06-01

    Unknown bands that were not seen in the nascent emission spectra following the near-UV photolysis of bromomathanes (CHBr3-nCl_n, n= 0, 1, 2 and CH_2Br_2) were observed in the 520-820 nm region of the nascent emission spectra following the 266 nm photolysis of iodomethanes (CHI_3, CH_2I_2, and CH_3I) in a slow flow system at ambient temperature. We have dramatically improved the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratios of these unknown bands for further data analyses. Pressure dependence and temporal waveforms of the unknown bands were also recorded. The analyses show that these bands have the vibrational intervals of roughly 400 cm-1 and possibly originate from the same upper level with emission to different lower levels. Moreover, the nascent emission spectra of photolyzing the deuterated or 13C-substituted isotopomers (CD_2I_2, CD_3I, and 13CH_2I_2) were also acquired, and the results indicate that the carrier molecule probably does not contain any hydrogen or carbon atoms. Our current progress will be presented. S.-X. Yang, G.-Y. Hou, J.-H. Dai, C-.H. Chang, and B.-C. Chang, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4785 (2010) C.-N. Liu, H.-F. Liao, G.-Y. Hou, S-.X. Yang, and B.-C. Chang, 65 OSU International Symposium on Molecular Spectroscopy, MI10 (2010).

  2. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  3. An infrared metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption for low observability (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jagyeong; Han, Kiwook; Hahn, Jae W.

    2016-09-01

    Advancement in stealth technology is very crucial for the protection from enemy. Detection of IR electromagnetic wave is performed by detecting the IR radiation from aircraft fuselage or reflected laser by using laser guided missile. In this research, we designed the metamaterial selective absorber with emitter considering atmospheric absorption to minimize observability from these detecting system. The model is designed as T-asymmetric structure for dual-band absorption or emission, and these two parts can be independently tuned. One part is designed as emitter which emit the radiation in the wavelength region where atmospheric absorption is strong. In order to select the target wavelength region, we used the MODTRAN database to calculate the molecular absorption in the atmosphere and strong absorptions occurs at 2μm, 4μm and 5-8μm wavelength regions. The other part is designed as an absorber which absorbs the IR signal from laser guided missile at 1.064μm. Selective emission or absorption at these wavelength region can be achieved by tuning the geometry of the structure. These mechanisms suppose the thermal equilibrium state so that the Kirchhoff law is satisfied. FDTD simulations of the designed structure was conducted to confirm the electromagnetic resonance. Also, we calculated the detected energy from the designed structure and compared with that from conventional aircraft surface. According to the calculation results, the measured signal from the suggested structure decreases to 1/10 of the signal from conventional surface.

  4. Observation of blue satellite bands and photoassociation at ultracold temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Pichler, Marin; Qi Jianbing; Stwalley, William C.; Beuc, Robert; Pichler, Goran

    2006-02-15

    We have observed atomic line self-broadening of Cs near 7P{sub 3/2} and 7P{sub 1/2} atomic lines at ultracold temperatures using a magneto-optical trap and resonant ionization detection. We have observed blue satellite band features at detunings of 560 and 800 MHz, respectively, as well as sharp hyperfine-split photoassociative spectra on the red wings of each line and also on the blue wings. Possible explanations of these features are discussed.

  5. Reassignment of the Iron (3) Absorption Bands in the Spectra of Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Absorption features in the near-infrared and visible region reflectance spectra of Mars have been assigned to specific Fe (3+) crystal-field and o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge transfer transitions. Recently, near-ultraviolet absorption spectra of iron oxides were obtained and the energies of o(2-) yields Fe(3+) charge-transfer (LMCT) transitions were determined from accurate SCF-X # alpha-SW molecular orbital calculations on (FeO6)(9-) and (FeO4)(5-) clusters. Both the theoretical and experimental results, together with existing data in the literature, show that some of the previous Fe(3+) band assignments in the spectra of Mars need to be revised. The theory of Fe(3+) spectra in minerals is discussed and applied to the spectrum of Mars.

  6. Near-infrared broad-band cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy using a superluminescent light emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Denzer, W; Hamilton, M L; Hancock, G; Islam, M; Langley, C E; Peverall, R; Ritchie, G A D

    2009-11-01

    A fibre coupled near-infrared superluminescent light emitting diode that emits approximately 10 mW of radiation between 1.62 and 1.7 microm is employed in combination with a broad-band cavity enhanced spectrometer consisting of a linear optical cavity with mirrors of reflectivity approximately 99.98% and either a dispersive near-infrared spectrometer or a Fourier transform interferometer. Results are presented on the absorption of 1,3-butadiene, and sensitivities are achieved of 6.1 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the dispersive spectrometer in combination with phase-sensitive detection, and 1.5 x 10(-8) cm(-1) using the Fourier transform interferometer (expressed as a minimum detectable absorption coefficient) over several minutes of acquisition time.

  7. Doping-Induced Absorption Bands in P3HT: Polarons and Bipolarons.

    PubMed

    Enengl, Christina; Enengl, Sandra; Pluczyk, Sandra; Havlicek, Marek; Lapkowski, Mieczyslaw; Neugebauer, Helmut; Ehrenfreund, Eitan

    2016-12-05

    In this work, we focus on the formation of different kinds of charge carriers such as polarons and bipolarons upon p-type doping (oxidation) of the organic semiconductor poly(3- hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT). We elucidate the cyclic voltammogram during oxidation of this polymer and present spectroscopic changes upon doping in the UV/Vis/near-IR range as well as in the mid-IR range. In the low-oxidation regime, two absorption bands related to sub-gap transitions appear, one in the UV/Vis range and another one in the mid-IR range. The UV/Vis absorption gradually decreases upon further doping while the mid-IR absorption shifts to lower energy. Additionally, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) measurements are performed, showing an increase of the EPR signal up to a certain doping level, which significantly decreases upon further doping. Furthermore, the absorption spectra in the UV/Vis range are analyzed in relation to the morphology (crystalline vs. amorphous) by using theoretical models. Finally, the calculated charge carriers from cyclic voltammogram are linked together with optical transitions as well as with the EPR signals upon p-type doping. We stress that our results indicate the formation of polarons at low doping levels and the existence of bipolarons at high doping levels. The presented spectroscopic data are an experimental evidence of the formation of bipolarons in P3HT.

  8. Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured in the IR spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefani, S.; Piccioni, G.; Snels, M.; Adriani, A.; Grassi, D.

    2015-10-01

    In this paper we present the results on the Collisional Induced Absorption (CIA) bands of CO2 and H2 measured employing two different experimental setup. Each of them allows us to reproduce typical planetary conditions, at a pressure and temperature from 1 up to 50 bar and from 298 up to 500 K respectively. A detailed study on the temperature dependence of the CO2 CIA absorption bands will be presented.

  9. Results of MODIS Band-to-Band Registration Characterization Using On-Orbit Lunar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Sun, Junqiang; Angal,Amit

    2011-01-01

    Since launch, lunar observations have been made regularly by both Terra and Aqua MODIS and used for a number of sensor calibration and characterization related applications, including radiometric stability monitoring, spatial characterization, optical leak and electronic cross-talk characterization, and calibration inter-comparison. MODIS has 36 spectral bands with a total of 490 individual detectors. They are located on four focal plane assemblies (FPA). This paper focuses on the use of MODIS lunar observations to characterize its band-to-band registration (BBR). In addition to BBR, the approach developed by the MODIS Characterization Support Team (MCST) can be used to characterize MODIS detector-to-detector registration (DDR). Long-term BBR results developed from this approach are presented and compared with that derived from a unique on-board calibrator (OBC). Results show that on-orbit changes of BBR have been very small for both Terra and Aqua MODIS and this approach can be applied to other remote sensing instruments.

  10. Femtosecond supercontinuum generation in water in the vicinity of absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Dharmadhikari, J A; Steinmeyer, G; Gopakumar, G; Mathur, D; Dharmadhikari, A K

    2016-08-01

    We show that it is possible to overcome the perceived limitations caused by absorption bands in water so as to generate supercontinuum (SC) spectra in the anomalous dispersion regime that extend well beyond 2000 nm wavelength. By choosing a pump wavelength within a few hundred nanometers above the zero-dispersion wavelength of 1048 nm, initial spectral broadening extends into the normal dispersion regime and, in turn, the SC process in the visible strongly benefits from phase-matching and matching group velocities between dispersive radiation and light in the anomalous dispersion regime. Some of the SC spectra are shown to encompass two and a half octaves.

  11. Theoretical Modeling of Low Energy Electronic Absorption Bands in Reduced Cobaloximes

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task. PMID:25113847

  12. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L; Gray, Harry B; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M; Field, Martin J

    2014-10-06

    The reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we analyze the low-energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and use a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  13. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    SciTech Connect

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; Gray, Harry B.; Fujita, Etsuko; Muckerman, James T.; Fontecave, Marc; Artero, Vincent; Arantes, Guilherme M.; Field, Martin J.

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  14. Theoretical modeling of low-energy electronic absorption bands in reduced cobaloximes

    DOE PAGES

    Bhattacharjee, Anirban; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Dempsey, Jillian L.; ...

    2014-08-11

    Here, we report that the reduced Co(I) states of cobaloximes are powerful nucleophiles that play an important role in the hydrogen-evolving catalytic activity of these species. In this work we have analyzed the low energy electronic absorption bands of two cobaloxime systems experimentally and using a variety of density functional theory and molecular orbital ab initio quantum chemical approaches. Overall we find a reasonable qualitative understanding of the electronic excitation spectra of these compounds but show that obtaining quantitative results remains a challenging task.

  15. Optimal Reflectance, Transmittance, and Absorptance Wavebands and Band Ratios for the Estimation of Leaf Chlorophyll Concentration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Gregory A.; Spiering, Bruce A.

    2000-01-01

    The present study utilized regression analysis to identify: wavebands and band ratios within the 400-850 nm range that could be used to estimate total chlorophyll concentration with minimal error; and simple regression models that were most effective in estimating chlorophyll concentrations were measured for two broadleaved species, a broadleaved vine, a needle-leaved conifer, and a representative of the grass family.Overall, reflectance, transmittance, and absorptance corresponded most precisely with chlorophyll concentration at wavelengths near 700 nm, although regressions were strong as well in the 550-625 nm range.

  16. Visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum during the New Horizons encounter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Robert J.; Marchant, Jonathan M.

    2015-11-01

    Whilst Earth-based observations obviously cannot compete with New Horizons’ on-board instrumentation in most regards, the New Horizons data set is essentially a snapshot of Pluto in July 2015. The New Horizons project team therefore coordinated a broad international observing campaign to provide temporal context and to take advantage of the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to directly link our Earth-based view of Pluto with “ground truth” provided by in situ measurements. This both adds value to existing archival data sets and forms the basis of long term, monitoring as we watch Pluto recede from the Sun over the coming years. We present visible-band (390-940nm) monitoring of the Pluto absorption spectrum over the period July - October 2015 from the Liverpool Telescope (LT). In particular we wished to understand the well-known 6-day fluctuation in the methane ice absorption spectrum which is observable from Earth in relation to the never-before-available high resolution maps of the Pluto surface. The LT is a fully robotic 2.0m optical telescope that automatically and dynamically schedules observations across 30+ observing programmes with a broad instrument suite. It is ideal for both reactive response to dynamic events (such as the fly-by) and long term, stable monitoring with timing constraints individually optimised to the science requirements of each programme. For example past studies of the observed CH4 absorption variability have yielded ambiguity of whether they were caused by real physical changes or geometric observation constraints, in large part because of the uneven time sampling imposed by traditional telescope scheduling.

  17. The nature of splitting of fullerene C{sub 70} polarized absorption bands in liquid-crystal matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1994-06-01

    The recently discovered splitting of polarized electronic absorption bands of fullerene C{sub 70} in uniaxial liquid-crystal matrices is shown to result from the spectral dependence of the polarization of these bands relative to the molecular coordinate system. 9 refs.

  18. Deep z-band observations of the coolest Y dwarf

    SciTech Connect

    Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Deacon, Niall R.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Bayo, Amelia; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Manjavacas, Elena; Kopon, Derek; Biller, Beth A.

    2014-12-10

    WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter, WISE 0855-07) is the coolest Y dwarf known to date and is located at a distance of 2.31 ± 0.08 pc, giving it the fourth largest parallax of any known star or brown dwarf system. We report deep z-band observations of WISE 0855-07 using FORS2 on UT1/Very Large Telescope. We do not detect any counterpart to WISE 0855-07 in our z-band images and estimate a brightness upper limit of AB mag > 24.8 (F {sub ν} < 0.45 μJy) at 910 ± 65 nm with 3σ confidence. We combine our z-band upper limit with previous near- and mid-infrared photometry to place constraints on the atmospheric properties of WISE 0855-07 via comparison to models which implement water clouds in the atmospheres of T {sub eff} < 300 K substellar objects. We find that none of the available models that implement water clouds can completely reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution of WISE 0855-07. Every model significantly disagrees with the (3.6 μm/4.5 μm) flux ratio and at least one other bandpass. Since methane is predicted to be the dominant absorber at 3-4 μm, these mismatches might point to an incorrect or incomplete treatment of methane in current models. We conclude that (a) WISE0855-07 has T {sub eff} ∼ 200-250 K, (b) <80% of its surface is covered by clouds, and (c) deeper observations, and improved models of substellar evolution, atmospheres, clouds, and opacities will be necessary to better characterize this object.

  19. Aquarius L-Band Radiometers Calibration Using Cold Sky Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dinnat, Emmanuel P.; Le Vine, David M.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Brown, Shannon T.; Hong, Liang

    2015-01-01

    An important element in the calibration plan for the Aquarius radiometers is to look at the cold sky. This involves rotating the satellite 180 degrees from its nominal Earth viewing configuration to point the main beams at the celestial sky. At L-band, the cold sky provides a stable, well-characterized scene to be used as a calibration reference. This paper describes the cold sky calibration for Aquarius and how it is used as part of the absolute calibration. Cold sky observations helped establish the radiometer bias, by correcting for an error in the spillover lobe of the antenna pattern, and monitor the long-term radiometer drift.

  20. New transient absorption observed in the spectrum of colloidal CdSe nanoparticles pumped with high-power femtosecond pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Burda, C.; Link, S.; Green, T.C.; El-Sayed, M.A.

    1999-12-09

    The power dependence of the transient absorption spectrum of CdSe nanoparticle colloids with size distribution of 4.0 {+-} 0.4 nm diameter is studied with femtosecond pump-probe techniques. At the lowest pump laser power, the absorption bleaching (negative spectrum) characteristic of the exciton spectrum is observed with maxima at 560 and 480 nm. As the pump laser power increases, two new transient absorptions at 510 and 590 nm with unresolved fast rise (<100 fs) and long decay times ({much{underscore}gt}150 ps) are observed. The energy of each of the positive absorption is red shifted from that of the bleach bands by {approximately}120 MeV. The origin of this shift is discussed in terms of the effect of the internal electric field of the many electron-hole pairs formed within the quantum dot at the high pump intensity, absorption from a metastable excited state or the formation of biexcitons.

  1. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wm. Hayden; Conner, Charles P.; Baines, Kevin H.

    1990-01-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH4 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum.

  2. Absorption coefficients for the 6190-A CH sub 4 band between 290 and 100 K with application to Uranus' atmosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, WM.H.; Conner, C.P.; Baines, K.H. JPL, Pasadena, CA )

    1990-05-01

    A novel laser intracavity photoacoustic spectroscopy method allowing high sample control accuracy due to the small sample volume required has been used to obtain absorption coefficients for the CH{sub 4} 6190 A band as a function of temperature, from 290 to 100 K. The peak absorption coefficient is found to increase from 0.6 to 1.0/cm, and to be accompanied by significant band shape changes. When used to further constrain the Baines and Bergstrahl (1986) standard model of the Uranus atmosphere, the low-temperature data yield an excellent fit to the bandshape near the 6190 A band's minimum. 18 refs.

  3. Band tail absorption saturation in CdWO4 with 100 fs laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Laasner, R; Fedorov, N; Grigonis, R; Guizard, S; Kirm, M; Makhov, V; Markov, S; Nagirnyi, V; Sirutkaitis, V; Vasil'ev, A; Vielhauer, S; Tupitsyna, I A

    2013-06-19

    The decay kinetics of the excitonic emission of CdWO4 scintillators was studied under excitation by powerful 100 fs laser pulses in the band tail (Urbach) absorption region. A special imaging technique possessing both spatial and temporal resolution provided a unique insight into the Förster dipole-dipole interaction of self-trapped excitons, which is the main cause of the nonlinear quenching of luminescence in this material. In addition, the saturation of phonon-assisted excitonic absorption due to extremely short excitation pulses was discovered. A model describing the evolution of electronic excitations in the conditions of absorption saturation was developed and an earlier model of decay kinetics based on the Förster interaction was extended to include the saturation effect. Compared to the previous studies, a more accurate calculation yields 3.7 nm as the Förster interaction radius. It was shown that exciton-exciton interaction is the main source of scintillation nonproportionality in CdWO4. A quantitative description using a new model of nonproportionality was presented, making use of the corrected value of the Förster radius.

  4. Observation of confinement effects through liner and nonlinear absorption spectroscopy in cuprous oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhar, H.; Rakesh Kumar, Y.; Narayana Rao, D.

    2015-02-01

    Cuprous oxide nano clusters, micro cubes and micro particles were successfully synthesized by reducing copper (II) salt with ascorbic acid in the presence of sodium hydroxide via a co-precipitation method. The X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of pure single phase cubic. Raman spectrum shows the inevitable presence of CuO on the surface of the Cu2O powders which may have an impact on the stability of the phase. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) data revealed that the morphology evolves from nanoclusters to micro cubes and micro particles by increasing the concentration of NaOH. Linear optical measurements show that the absorption peak maximum shifts towards red with changing morphology from nano clusters to micro cubes and micro particles. The nonlinear optical properties were studied using open aperture Z-scan technique with 532 nm, 6 ns laser pulses. Samples exhibited saturable as well as reverse saturable absorption. The results show that the transition from SA to RSA is ascribed to excited-state absorption (ESA) induced by two-photon absorption (TPA) process. Due to confinement effects (enhanced band gap) we observed enhanced nonlinear absorption coefficient (βeff) in the case of nano-clusters compared to their micro-cubes and micro-particles.

  5. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies. PMID:26477740

  6. Thermally induced effect on sub-band gap absorption in Ag doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Sharma, Kriti; Bharti, Shivani; Tripathi, S. K.

    2015-05-01

    Thin films of Ag doped CdSe have been prepared by thermal evaporation using inert gas condensation (IGC) method taking Argon as inert gas. The prepared thin films are annealed at 363 K for one hour. The sub-band gap absorption spectra in the as deposited and annealed thin films have been studied using constant photocurrent method (CPM). The absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region is described by an Urbach tail in both as deposited and annealed thin films. The value of Urbach energy and number density of trap states have been calculated from the absorption coefficient in the sub-band gap region which have been found to increase after annealing treatment indicating increase in disorderness in the lattice. The energy distribution of the occupied density of states below Fermi level has also been studied using derivative procedure of absorption coefficient.

  7. Ultra-wideband microwave absorber by connecting multiple absorption bands of two different-sized hyperbolic metamaterial waveguide arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Xiang; Long, Chang; Li, Junhao; Zhu, Hua; Chen, Lin; Guan, Jianguo; Li, Xun

    2015-10-01

    Microwave absorbers have important applications in various areas including stealth, camouflage, and antenna. Here, we have designed an ultra-broadband light absorber by integrating two different-sized tapered hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) waveguides, each of which has wide but different absorption bands due to broadband slow-light response, into a unit cell. Both the numerical and experimental results demonstrate that in such a design strategy, the low absorption bands between high absorption bands with a single-sized tapered HMM waveguide array can be effectively eliminated, resulting in a largely expanded absorption bandwidth ranging from 2.3 to 40 GHz. The presented ultra-broadband light absorber is also insensitive to polarization and robust against incident angle. Our results offer a further step in developing practical artificial electromagnetic absorbers, which will impact a broad range of applications at microwave frequencies.

  8. Total ozone and aerosol optical depths inferred from radiometric measurements in the Chappuis absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Flittner, D.E.; Herman, B.M.; Thome, K.J.; Simpson, J.M.; Reagan, J.A. )

    1993-04-15

    A second-derivative smoothing technique, commonly used in inversion work, is applied to the problem of inferring total columnar ozone amounts and aerosol optical depths. The application is unique in that the unknowns (i.e., total columnar ozone and aerosol optical depth) may be solved for directly without employing standard inversion methods. It is shown, however, that by employing inversion constraints, better solutions are normally obtained. The current method requires radiometric measurements of total optical depth through the Chappuis ozone band. It assumes no a priori shape for the aerosol optical depth versus wavelength profile and makes no assumptions about the ozone amount. Thus, the method is quite versatile and able to deal with varying total ozone and various aerosol size distributions. The technique is applied first in simulation, then to 119 days of measurements taken in Tucson, Arizona, that are compared to TOMS values for the same dates. The technique is also applied to two measurements taken at Mauna Loa, Hawaii, for which Dobson ozone values are available in addition to the TOMS values, and the results agree to within 15%. It is also shown through simulations that additional information can be obtained from measurements outside the Chappuis band. This approach reduces the bias and spread of the estimates total ozone and is unique in that it uses measurements from both the Chappuis and Huggins absorption bands. 12 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Ku/Ka band observations over polar ice sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibaut, Pierre; Lasne, Yannick; Guillot, Amandine; Picot, Nicolas; Rémy, Frédérique

    2015-04-01

    For the first time, comparisons between Ku and Ka altimeter measurements are possible thanks to the new AltiKa instrument embarked onboard the Saral mission launched on February 25, 2013. This comparison is of particular interest when dealing with ice sheet observations because both frequencies have different penetration characteristics. We propose in this paper to revisit the estimation of the ice sheet topography (and other related parameters) with altimeter systems and to present illustrations of the differences observed in Ku and Ka bands using AltiKa, Envisat/RA-2 but also Cryosat-2 measurements. Working on AltiKa waveforms in the frame of the PEACHI project has allowed us to better understand the impact of the penetration depth on the echo shape, to improve the estimation algorithm and to compare its output with historical results obtained on Envisat and ERS missions. In particular, analyses at cross-overs of the Cryosat-2 and Saral data will be presented. Sentinel-3 mission should be launch during 2015. Operating in Ku band and in delay/doppler mode, it will be crucial to account for penetration effects in order to accurately derive the ice sheet heights and trends. The results of the work presented here, will benefit to the Sentinel-3 mission.

  10. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1,0)[gamma] band in the daytime thermosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Eparvier, F.G.; Barth, C.A. )

    1992-09-01

    Sounding rocket observations of the ultraviolet fluorescent emissions of the nitric oxide molecule in the lower thermospheric dayglow are described and analyzed. The rocket experiment was an ultraviolet spectrometer which took limb-viewing spectra of the dayglow between 90- and 185- km altitude in the spectral region from 2120 to 2505 [angstrom] with a resolution of 2.0 [angstrom]. The flight occurred at local noon on March 7, 1989, from Poker Flat, Alaska. Several NO[gamma] bands were visible at all altitudes of the flight, along with emission features of N[sub 2], O[sup +], and N[sup +]. The data for the NO (1,0) and (0,1)[gamma] bands were modeled with optically thin synthetic spectra and used as diagnostics of nitric oxide concentrations. The resonant NO (1,0)[gamma] band emissions were shown to be attenuated at low altitudes relative to the expected emission rates predicted from comparison with the nonresonant (0,1)[gamma] band. Inversion of the optically thin data resulted in a peak nitric oxide concentration of 3.1x10[sup 8] cm[sup [minus]3] at an altitude of 100km. A self-absorption model using Holstein transmission functions was developed and applied to the (1,0) [gamma] band observation. The model results agree with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO. The success of the model also confirms the value adopted for the absorption oscillator strength of the (1,0)[gamma] band transition and the instrument calibration.

  11. Depolarisation of light scattered by disperse systems of low-dimensional potassium polytitanate nanoparticles in the fundamental absorption band

    SciTech Connect

    Zimnyakov, D A; Yuvchenko, S A; Pravdin, A B; Kochubey, V I; Gorokhovsky, A V; Tretyachenko, E V; Kunitsky, A I

    2014-07-31

    The results of experimental studies of depolarising properties of disperse systems on the basis of potassium polytitanate nanoplatelets and nanoribbons in the visible and near-UV spectral regions are presented. It is shown that in the fundamental absorption band of the nanoparticle material the increase in the depolarisation factor takes place for the radiation scattered perpendicularly to the direction of the probing beam. For nanoribbons a pronounced peak of depolarisation is observed, which is caused by the essential anisotropy of the particles shape and the peculiarities of the behaviour of the material dielectric function. The empirical data are compared with the theoretical results for 'nanodiscs' and 'nanoneedles' with the model dielectric function, corresponding to that obtained from optical constants of the titanium dioxide dielectric function. (laser biophotonics)

  12. [Gastric cancer detection using kubelka-Munk spectral function of DNA and protein absorption bands].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan-quan; Wei, Hua-jiang; Guo, Zhou-yi; Yang, Hong-qin; Xie, Shu-sen; Chen, Xue-mei; Li, Li-bo; He, Bol-hua; Wu, Guo-yong; Lu, Jian-jun

    2009-09-01

    Differential diagnosis for epithelial tissues of normal human gastric, undifferentiation gastric adenocarcinoma, gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and poorly differentiated gastric adenocarcinoma were studied using the Kubelka-Munk spectral function of the DNA and protein absorption bands at 260 and 280 nm in vitro. Diffuse reflectance spectra of tissue were measured using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The results of measurement showed that for the spectral range from 250 to 650 nm, pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the DNA absorption bands at 260 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 68.5% (p < 0.05), 146.5% (p < 0.05), 282.4% (p < 0.05), 32.4% (p < 0.05), 56.00 (p < 0.05) and 83.0% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were significant differences in the averaged value of the Kubelka-Munk function f(r infinity) and logarithmic Kubelka-Munk function log[f(r infinity)] of the protein absorption bands at 280 nm between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human undifferentiation gastric cancer, between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human gastric squamous cell carcinomas, and between epithelial tissues of normal human stomach and human poorly differentiated cancer. Their differences were 86.8% (p < 0.05), 262.9% (p < 0.05), 660.1% (p < 0.05) and 34% (p < 0.05), 72. 2% (p < 0.05), 113.5% (p < 0.05) respectively. And pathological changes of gastric epithelial tissues induced that there were

  13. W-band spaceborne radar observations of atmospheric river events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matrosov, S. Y.

    2010-12-01

    While the main objective of the world first W-band radar aboard the CloudSat satellite is to provide vertically resolved information on clouds, it proved to be a valuable tool for observing precipitation. The CloudSat radar is generally able to resolve precipitating cloud systems in their vertical entirety. Although measurements from the liquid hydrometer layer containing rainfall are strongly attenuated, special retrieval approaches can be used to estimate rainfall parameters. These approaches are based on vertical gradients of observed radar reflectivity factor rather than on absolute estimates of reflectivity. Concurrent independent estimations of ice cloud parameters in the same vertical column allow characterization of precipitating systems and provide information on coupling between clouds and rainfall they produce. The potential of CloudSat for observations atmospheric river events affecting the West Coast of North America is evaluated. It is shown that spaceborne radar measurements can provide high resolution information on the height of the freezing level thus separating areas of rainfall and snowfall. CloudSat precipitation rate estimates complement information from the surface-based radars. Observations of atmospheric rivers at different locations above the ocean and during landfall help to understand evolutions of atmospheric rivers and their structures.

  14. Observation of 'Band' Structures in Spacecraft Observations of Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Electrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Narasimhan, Kirthika; Fazakerley, Andrew; Milhaljcic, Branislav; Grimald, Sandrine; Dandouras, Iannis; Owen, Chris

    2013-04-01

    In previous studies, several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range of 1-25 keV. These structures have been known as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are known as "bands" if they are observed for extended periods of time. These proton structures have been studied quite extensively with multiple mechanisms proposed for their formation, not all of which apply for electrons. We examine Double-Star TC1 PEACE electron data recorded in the inner magnetosphere (L<15) near the equatorial plane to see if these features are also observed in the electron energy spectra. These "bands" also appear in electron spectrograms, spanning an energy range of 0.2-30 keV, and are shown to occur predominantly towards the dayside and dusk sectors. We also see multiple bands in some instances. We investigate the properties of these multi-banded structures and carry out a statistical survey analysing them as a function of geomagnetic activity, looking at both the Kp and Auroral Indices, in an attempt to explain their presence.

  15. BeppoSAX broad-band observations of Gamma Cassiopeiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owens, A.; Oosterbroek, T.; Parmar, A. N.; Schulz, R.; Stüwe, J. A.; Haberl, F.

    1999-08-01

    We report broad-band X-ray measurements of the Be star gamma Cassiopeiae by the BeppoSAX X-ray astronomy satellite. The observations took place on 1998 July, 18-23. The 0.1-200 keV X-ray spectrum is reasonably well fit by an optically thin thermal plasma model of temperature 12.5+/-0.6 keV with significant residuals around 0.3 keV and 1 keV. The former is interpreted as the variable soft component reported by ROSAT, although there is no evidence for variability at the 5% level. For a blackbody interpretation, the fitted temperature is 100+/- (320) 13 eV, in agreement with the ROSAT value of 200+/- 10 eV. However, a MEKAL interpretation gives a significantly lower temperature of (48+/-11 eV). The fitted abundances are about half solar values, in agreement with previous measurements. At higher energies, the spectrum does not require non-thermal components and the observation of a line at 6.8 keV supports the ASCA interpretation of the source as an accreting white dwarf. Assuming a source distance of 188 pc, the bolometric luminosity in the 2-10 keV band is 6x10(32) ergs s(-1) . Simultaneous optical measurements by the Wendelstein Observatory near Munich, indicate that the source continues to be in a late but rather normal Be phase, with no obvious signs of a transition to the Be-shell phase. The measured magnitudes at B, V and R wavelengths of 2.18+/-0.06, 2.23+/-0.02 and 2.36+/-0.03, respectively, confirm this.

  16. Influence of the nature of the absorption band on the potential performance of high molar extinction coefficient ruthenium(II) polypyridinic complexes as dyes for sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Gajardo, Francisco; Barrera, Mauricio; Vargas, Ricardo; Crivelli, Irma; Loeb, Barbara

    2011-07-04

    When tested in solar cells, ruthenium polypyridinic dyes with extended π systems show an enhanced light-harvesting capacity that is not necessarily reflected by a high (collected electrons)/(absorbed photons) ratio. Provided that metal-to-ligand charge transfer bands, MLCT, are more effective, due to their directionality, than intraligand (IL) π-π* bands for the electron injection process in the solar cell, it seems important to explore and clarify the nature of the absorption bands present in these types of dyes. This article aims to elucidate if all the absorbed photons of these dyes are potentially useful in the generation of electric current. In other words, their potentiality as dyes must also be analyzed from the point of view of their contribution to the generation of excited states potentially useful for direct injection. Focusing on the assignment of the absorption bands and the nature of the emitting state, a systematic study for a series of ruthenium complexes with 4,4'-distyryl-2,2'-dipyridine (LH) and 4,4'-bis[p-(dimethylamino)-α-styryl]-2,2'-bipyridine (LNMe(2)) "chromophoric" ligands was undertaken. The observed experimental results were complemented with TDDFT calculations to elucidate the nature of the absorption bands, and a theoretical model was proposed to predict the available energy that could be injected from a singlet or a triplet excited state. For the series studied, the results indicate that the percentage of MLCT character to the anchored ligand for the lower energy absorption band follows the order [Ru(deebpy)(2)(LNMe(2))](PF(6))(2) > [Ru(deebpy)(2)(LH)](PF(6))(2) > [Ru(deebpy)(LH)(2)](PF(6))(2), where deebpy is 4,4'-bis(ethoxycarbonyl)-2,2'-bipyridine, predicting that, at least from this point of view, their efficiency as dyes should follow the same trend.

  17. Polarization and field dependent two-photon absorption in GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well waveguides in the half-band gap spectral region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, H. K.; Penty, R. V.; White, I. H.; Grant, R. S.; Sibbett, W.; Soole, J. B. D.; LeBlanc, H. P.; Andreadakis, N. C.; Colas, E.; Kim, M. S.

    1991-12-01

    We report the observation of two photon absorption which is strongly dependent on the applied electric field and the optical polarization. At 1.55 μm wavelength, the two-photon absorption coefficient of the GaAs/AlGaAs multiquantum well (MQW) waveguides for transverse-magnetic light is about seven times lower than for transverse-electric polarized light and changes by a factor of approximately 4 for a change in applied direct-current electric field of ˜140 kV/cm. Ultrafast nonlinear refraction causing phase changes of over π radians without appreciable excess loss is observed. These measurements demonstrate that GaAs/AlGaAs MQW waveguides could be successfully used for subpicosecond all-optical switching near half-band gap, at wavelengths corresponding to the 1.55 μm optical communications band.

  18. New radio observations of the Moon at L band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xi-Zhen; Gray, Andrew; Su, Yan; Li, Jun-Duo; Landecker, Tom; Zhang, Hong-Bo; Li, Chun-Lai

    2012-09-01

    We present results of new radio observations of the Moon at L band with the synthesis telescope of the Dominion Radio Astrophysical Observatory Synthesis Telescope. The resolution and temperature sensitivity of the observations are 159″ × 87″ and 1.7K, respectively. The main results are: (1) the lunar brightness temperature averaged over the whole disk is about 233 K while the average brightness temperature for the four quadrants are 228.1K (NE), 239.7K (NW), 233.9K (SW) and 228.8K (SE). The observations reveal large temperature and spatial variations on the Moon for the first time. The highest brightness temperature is about 257 K and it is located along the lunar equator, to the west. The total uncertainty is about 5% due to the absolute accuracy of the fluxes of the primary calibrators; (2) the total degree of polarization is about 6%. Both polarization intensity and degree of polarization increase from the disk's center to the limb, and the distribution of the degree of polarization along the limb is not uniform; (3) the new data are used to study the properties of regolith, such as dielectric constant and thickness distribution. The results show that the lunar regolith's thickness increases from the NW (mare area) to the SE (highland area) regions on the lunar surface.

  19. Investigation of band gap narrowing in nitrogen-doped La2Ti2O7 with transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yost, Brandon T; Cushing, Scott K; Meng, Fanke; Bright, Joeseph; Bas, Derek A; Wu, Nianqiang; Bristow, Alan D

    2015-12-14

    Doping a semiconductor can extend the light absorption range, however, it usually introduces mid-gap states, reducing the charge carrier lifetime. This report shows that doping lanthanum dititinate (La2Ti2O7) with nitrogen extends the valence band edge by creating a continuum of dopant states, increasing the light absorption edge from 380 nm to 550 nm without adding mid-gap states. The dopant states are experimentally resolved in the excited state by correlating transient absorption spectroscopy with a supercontinuum probe and DFT prediction. The lack of mid-gap states is further confirmed by measuring the excited state lifetimes, which reveal the shifted band edge only increased carrier thermalization rates to the band edge and not interband charge recombination under both ultraviolet and visible excitation. Terahertz (time-domain) spectroscopy also reveals that the conduction mechanism remains unchanged after doping, suggesting the states are delocalized.

  20. Would the solvent effect be the main cause of band shift in the theoretical absorption spectrum of large lanthanide complexes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freire, Ricardo O.; Rodrigues, Nailton M.; Rocha, Gerd B.; Gimenez, Iara F.; da Costa Junior, Nivan B.

    2011-06-01

    As most reactions take place in solution, the study of solvent effects on relevant molecular properties - either by experimental or theoretical methods - is crucial for the design of new processes and prediction of technological properties. In spite of this, only few works focusing the influence of the solvent nature specifically on the spectroscopic properties of lanthanide complexes can be found in the literature. The present work describes a theoretical study of the solvent effect on the prediction of the absorption spectra for lanthanide complexes, but other possible relevant factors have been also considered such as the molecular geometry and the excitation window used for interaction configuration (CI) calculations. The [Eu(ETA) 2· nH 2O] +1 complex has been chosen as an ideal candidate for this type of study due to its small number of atoms (only 49) and also because the absorption spectrum exhibits a single band. Two Monte Carlo simulations were performed, the first one considering the [Eu(ETA) 2] +1 complex in 400 water molecules, evidencing that the complex presents four coordinated water molecules. The second simulation considered the [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex in 400 ethanol molecules, in order to evaluate the solvent effect on the shift of the maximum absorption in calculated spectra, compared to the experimental one. Quantum chemical studies were also performed in order to evaluate the effect of the accuracy of calculated ground state geometry on the prediction of absorption spectra. The influence of the excitation window used for CI calculations on the spectral shift was also evaluated. No significant solvent effect was found on the prediction of the absorption spectrum for [Eu(ETA) 2·4H 2O] +1 complex. A small but significant effect of the ground state geometry on the transition energy and oscillator strength was also observed. Finally it must be emphasized that the absorption spectra of lanthanide complexes can be predicted with great accuracy

  1. Retrieval of Aerosol Absorption Properties from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Jethva, H.; Ahn, Chang-Woo

    2012-01-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measurement can be explained, using an approximations of Beer's Law (BL), as the upwelling reflectance at the cloud top attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, corrections for molecular scattering effects are applied to both the observed ad the calculated cloud reflectance terms, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by an inversion of the BL approximation. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  2. Absorption band oscillator strengths of N2 transitions between 95.8 and 99.4 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stark, G.; Smith, Peter L.; Huber, K. P.; Yoshino, K.; Stevens, M. H.; Ito, K.

    1992-01-01

    Molecular nitrogen plays a central role in the energetics of the earth's upper atmosphere and is the major constituent of the atmospheres of the planetary satellites Titan and Triton. This paper reports a new set of absorption oscillator strengths measured at higher resolution for seven bands in the 95.8-99.4 nm region. The results are compared with earlier, lower resolution absorption measurements, electron scattering measurements, and calculations based on a deperturbation analysis of the excited states.

  3. H-band observations of the Chandra Deep Field South

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, E.; Barmby, P.; Rigopoulou, D.; Huang, J.-S.; Willner, S. P.; Fazio, G. G.

    2003-05-01

    We report results of our H-band survey of the Chandra Deep Field South (CDFS). The observations, made with SofI on the NTT, cover 0.027 square degrees to H< 20.5 and 0.17 square degrees to H< 19.8 (50% completeness limits). In total, 4819 objects were detected, of which 80% are galaxies based on the SExtractor parameter ``stellarity index'' having a value less than 0.5. Our astrometric solutions are in good agreement with those of the Las Campanas Infrared Survey (LCIRS), the COMBO-17, and the ESO-EIS surveys. Our photometry compares satisfactorily with the LCIRS results as well as with GOODS data. Galaxy number counts are ~ 50 000 galaxies per square degree at H< 20.75, in good agreement with those of LCIRS. The object catalog is published electronically at the CDS. The whole catalog is only available in electronic form at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/cgi-bin/qcat?J/A+A/403/493}. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile under programs 66.A-0451 and 68.A-0375.

  4. Absorption band III kinetics probe the picosecond heme iron motion triggered by nitric oxide binding to hemoglobin and myoglobin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Byung-Kuk; Kruglik, Sergei G; Lamarre, Isabelle; Martin, Jean-Louis; Negrerie, Michel

    2012-04-05

    To study the ultrafast movement of the heme iron induced by nitric oxide (NO) binding to hemoglobin (Hb) and myoglobin (Mb), we probed the picosecond spectral evolution of absorption band III (∼760 nm) and vibrational modes (iron-histidine stretching, ν(4) and ν(7) in-plane modes) in time-resolved resonance Raman spectra. The time constants of band III intensity kinetics induced by NO rebinding (25 ps for hemoglobin and 40 ps for myoglobin) are larger than in Soret bands and Q-bands. Band III intensity kinetics is retarded with respect to NO rebinding to Hb and to Mb. Similarly, the ν((Fe-His)) stretching intensity kinetics are retarded with respect to the ν(4) and ν(7) heme modes and to Soret absorption. In contrast, band III spectral shift kinetics do not coincide with band III intensity kinetics but follows Soret kinetics. We concluded that, namely, the band III intensity depends on the heme iron out-of-plane position, as theoretically predicted ( Stavrov , S. S. Biopolymers 2004 , 74 , 37 - 40 ).

  5. Observation of 'Band' Structures in Spacecraft Observations of Inner Magnetosphere Plasma Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan, Kirthika; Fazakerley, Andrew; Grimald, Sandrine; Dandouras, Iannis; Owen, Chris

    2014-05-01

    In previous studies, several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range of 1-25 keV (Smith and Hoffman (1974), etc). These structures have been described as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are also known as "bands" if they occur for extended periods of time. Statistical surveys (Buzulukova et al. (2003); Vallat et al. (2007)) of these features in Interball and Cluster data highlight the presence of single nose in nightside sectors and multi-nose strutures in the dayside sectors. We examine Double-Star TC1 HIA data mainly recorded in the equatorial plane of the inner magnetosphere (L<15) to see how observations of "multi-banded structures" compare to the observations from more inclined orbits of Cluster and Interball. We investigate the properties of these multi-banded structures and carry out a statistical survey analysing them as a function of geomagnetic activity. This is a comparison study to a similar study conducted using DoubleStar TC-1 PEACE electron data.

  6. The first UV absorption band for indole is not due to two simultaneous orthogonal electronic transitions differing in dipole moment.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Javier

    2015-05-21

    The currently accepted model for the photophysics of indole assumes that the first UV absorption band encompasses two orthogonal electronic transitions ((1)Lb and (1)La), leading to two electronic states with a markedly different dipole moment. However, there is a body of evidence not explained by this model, which led us to develop a new photophysical model for indole. Based on the new model, the polarity of the electronic ground state (S0) in indoles is very similar to that of the first electronic excited state (S1) producing this structured emission; however, this excited state can lead to a highly dipolar excited state (S1') with largely structureless emission under the influence of the polarity of the medium, and also, very likely, of its viscosity. The molecular structure of the new excited state can be reversibly converted into the normal structure of the compound. Previous observations were confirmed by the absorption, emission, and excitation spectra for indole, as well as by its polarized emission and excitation spectra in various media. Thus, the polarized emission spectra for indole in glycerol at 283 K and 223 K showed the transition dipole moments for the emission from the first two excited states in a polar medium, S1 and S1', to differ by less than 20°.

  7. Observation of band gaps in the gigahertz range and deaf bands in a hypersonic aluminum nitride phononic crystal slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorisse, M.; Benchabane, S.; Teissier, G.; Billard, C.; Reinhardt, A.; Laude, V.; Defaÿ, E.; Aïd, M.

    2011-06-01

    We report on the observation of elastic waves propagating in a two-dimensional phononic crystal composed of air holes drilled in an aluminum nitride membrane. The theoretical band structure indicates the existence of an acoustic band gap centered around 800 MHz with a relative bandwidth of 6.5% that is confirmed by gigahertz optical images of the surface displacement. Further electrical measurements and computation of the transmission reveal a much wider attenuation band that is explained by the deaf character of certain bands resulting from the orthogonality of their polarization with that of the source.

  8. Pioneer 11 observations of trapped particle absorption by Amalthea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckibben, R. B.; Pyle, K. R.; Simpson, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    The discovery of a microsignatury of trapped radiation in the Amalthea orbit as detected by Pioneer 11 in a flyby of Juptier in 1974 is reported and its implications for the radial diffusion coefficient in Jupiter's inner magnetosphere are discussed. A low energy telescope registered the absorption of low-energy protons as a function of the magnetic L shell durig inbound and outbound trajectories. Drift velocities of the 1 MeV particles were calculated. No correspondingly heightened effects were observed from high-energy electrons or heavier nuclei. Further analysis of the 0.5-8.7 MeV protons showed data to be consistent erosion of the particle drift shadows by a diffusion process. A limit was calculated for the highest diffusion coefficient value for the 1 MeV protons at the Amalthea orbit. The results indicate that the diffusion is driven by fluctuating electric or magnetic fields.

  9. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  10. The near-infrared bands of NO2 observed by high-resolution Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orphal, J.; Dreher, S.; Voigt, S.; Burrows, J. P.; Jost, R.; Delon, A.

    1998-12-01

    Fourier-transform absorption spectra of NO2 at 298 K were recorded between 9000-15 000 cm-1 at Doppler-limited resolution (0.012 cm-1), in the region near the à 2B2-X˜ 2A1 conical intersection. The strong rovibronic bands are rather isolated and organized into polyads which can be assigned by the number of bending quanta of the à 2B2 state, corresponding to the transitions with the largest Franck-Condon factors. Around 9735 cm-1, where the origin of the à 2B2-X˜ 2A1 vibronic band system is located and up to about 11 200 cm-1, hot bands dominate the spectrum. The complexity of the spectrum increases with energy due to an increasing density of à 2B2 and X˜ 2A1 vibrational levels. The rotational structure is dense and irregular as already observed for higher bands.

  11. Surface Material Characterization from Multi-band Optical Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    telescope provides visible-band and long- wavelength thermal infrared images with adaptive optics compensation to remove atmospheric blurring. In...addition, the AMOS Gemini 1.6m telescope system provides daytime visible-band and near- infrared speckle images. These systems reveal a great deal of

  12. Comparison of line-by-line and band models of near-IR methane absorption applied to outer planet atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M.; Boudon, V.; Campargue, A.; Nikitin, A.

    2012-03-01

    Recent improvements in high spectral resolution measurements of methane absorption at wavenumbers between 4800 cm-1 and 7919 cm-1 have greatly increased the number of lines with known lower state energies, the number of weak lines, and the number of lines observed at low temperatures (Campargue, A., Wang, L., Kassi, S., Mašát, M., Votava, O. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1141-1151; Campargue, A., Wang, L., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Kassi, S. [2010]. Chem. Phys. 373, 203-210; Mondelain, D., Kassi, S., Wang, L.C. [2011]. Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 7985-7996; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2011a]. J. Mol. Spectrosc. 268, 93-106; Nikitin, A.V. et al. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 2211-2224; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Campargue, A. [2010]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 111, 1130-1140; Wang, L., Kassi, S., Liu, A.W., Hu, S.M., Campargue, A. [2011]. J. Quant. Spectrosc. Radiat. Trans. 112, 937-951), making it possible to fit near-IR spectra of Titan using line-by-line calculations instead of band models (Bailey, J., Ahlsved, L., Meadows, V.S. [2011]. Icarus 213, 218-232; de Bergh, C. et al. [2011]. Planet. Space Sci. doi:10.1016/j.pss.2011.05.003). Using these new results, we compiled an improved line list relative that used by Bailey et al. by updating several spectral regions with either calculated or more recently measured line parameters, revising lower state energy estimates for lines lacking them, and adding room temperature lines to make the list applicable over a wider range of temperatures. We compared current band models with line-by-line calculations using this new line list, both to assess the behavior of band models, and to identify remaining issues with line-by-line calculations when applied to outer planet atmospheres and over a wider range of wavelengths. Comparisons were made for a selection of uniform paths representing outer planet conditions and for representative non-uniform paths within the atmospheres of Uranus, Saturn

  13. Band gap shift and the optical nonlinear absorption of sputtered ZnO-TiO2 films.

    PubMed

    Han, Yi-Bo; Han, Jun-Bo; Hao, Zhong-Hua

    2011-06-01

    ZnO-TiO2 composite films with different Zn/Ti atomic ratios were prepared with radio frequency reactive sputtering method. The Zn percentage composition (f(Zn)) dependent optical band gap and optical nonlinear absorption were investigated using the transmittance spectrum and the Z-scan technique, respectively. The results showed that composite films with f(Zn) in the range of 23.5%-88.3% are poor crystallized and their optical properties are anomalous which exhibit adjustable optical band gap and large optical nonlinear absorption. The optical absorption edge shifted to the blue wavelength direction with the increasing of f(Zn) and reached the minimum value of 285 nm for the sample with f(Zn) = 70.5%, which has the largest direct band gap of 4.30 eV. Further increasing of f(Zn) resulted in the red-shift of the optical absorption edge. The maximum optical nonlinear absorption coefficient of 1.5 x 10(3) cm/GW was also obtained for the same sample with f(Zn) = 70.5%, which is more than 40 times larger than those of pure TiO2 and ZnO films.

  14. Observation of a novel stapler band in 75As

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. G.; Chen, Q. B.; Zhang, S. Q.; Xu, C.; Hua, H.; Li, X. Q.; Wu, X. G.; Hu, S. P.; Meng, J.; Xu, F. R.; Liang, W. Y.; Li, Z. H.; Ye, Y. L.; Jiang, D. X.; Sun, J. J.; Han, R.; Niu, C. Y.; Chen, X. C.; Li, P. J.; Wang, C. G.; Wu, H. Y.; Li, G. S.; He, C. Y.; Zheng, Y.; Li, C. B.; Chen, Q. M.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, W. K.

    2017-03-01

    The heavy ion fusion-evaporation reaction study for the high-spin spectroscopy of 75As has been performed via the reaction channel 70Zn(9Be, 1p3n)75As at a beam energy of 42 MeV. The collective structure especially a dipole band in 75As is established for the first time. The properties of this dipole band are investigated in terms of the self-consistent tilted axis cranking covariant density functional theory. Based on the theoretical description and the examination of the angular momentum components, this dipole band can be interpreted as a novel stapler band, where the valence neutrons in (1g9/2) orbital rather than the collective core are responsible for the closing of the stapler of angular momentum.

  15. Observation of an Intermediate Band in Sn-doped Chalcopyrites with Wide-spectrum Solar Response

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chongyin; Qin, Mingsheng; Wang, Yaoming; Wan, Dongyun; Huang, Fuqiang; Lin, Jianhua

    2013-01-01

    Nanostrcutured particles and polycrystalline thin films of Sn-doped chalcopyrite are synthesized by newly-developed methods. Surprisingly, Sn doping introduces a narrow partially filled intermediate band (IB) located ~1.7 eV (CuGaS2) and ~0.8 eV (CuInS2) above the valance band maximum in the forbidden band gap. Diffuse reflection spectra and photoluminescence spectra reveal extra absorption and emission spectra induced by the IBs, which are further supported by first-principle calculations. Wide spectrum solar response greatly enhances photocatalysis, photovoltaics, and photo-induced hydrogen production due to the intermediate band. PMID:23412565

  16. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of perovskite niobium oxynitrides with wide visible-light absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Siritanaratkul, Bhavin; Maeda, Kazuhiko; Hisatomi, Takashi; Domen, Kazunari

    2011-01-17

    Photocatalytic activities of perovskite-type niobium oxynitrides (CaNbO₂N, SrNbO₂N, BaNbO₂N, and LaNbON₂) were examined for hydrogen and oxygen evolution from water under visible-light irradiation. These niobium oxynitrides were prepared by heating the corresponding oxide precursors, which were synthesized using the polymerized complex method, for 15 h under a flow of ammonia. They possess visible-light absorption bands between 600-750 nm, depending on the A-site cations in the structures. The oxynitride CaNbO₂N, was found to be active for hydrogen and oxygen evolution from methanol and aqueous AgNO₃, respectively, even under irradiation by light at long wavelengths (λ<560 nm). The nitridation temperature dependence of CaNbO₂N was investigated and 1023 K was found to be the optimal temperature. At lower temperatures, the oxynitride phase is not adequately produced, whereas higher temperatures produce more reduced niobium species (e. g., Nb³(+) and Nb⁴(+)), which can act as electron-hole recombination centers, resulting in a decrease in activity.

  17. Microwave absorption behavior of a polyaniline magnetic composite in the X-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aphesteguy, J. C.; Damiani, A.; DiGiovanni, D.; Jacobo, S. E.

    2012-08-01

    The development of nanosized materials is a subject of considerable interest both for understanding of the fundamental properties of magnetic materials for new technological applications. Polyaniline, composites Fe3O4/(PANI) with conducting, magnetic and electromagnetic properties with different amounts of Fe3O4 were successfully prepared. The samples were structurally characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and magnetically, with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer. In order to explore microwave-absorbing properties in X-band, the composite nanoparticles were mixed with an epoxy resin to be converted into a microwave-absorbing composite. Microwave behavior with different Fe3O4/(PANI)-epoxy resin ratio was studied using a microwave vector network analyzer (VNA) in the range 7.5 to 13 GHz. For a constant thickness of 1.5 mm, absorption increases with the magnetite contents in the composites and in the oriented samples by the application of a magnetic field.

  18. High resolution absorption cross-sections and band oscillator strengths of the Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen at 79 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Freeman, D. E.; Esmond, J. R.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1987-01-01

    Cross sections of O2 at 79 K have been obtained from photoabsorption measurements at various pressures throughout the wavelength region 179.3-198.0 nm with a 6.65-m photoelectric scanning spectrometer equipped with a 2400-lines/mm grating and having an instrumental width (FWHM) of 0.0013 nm. The measured absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands (12,0) through (2,0) are independent of the instrumental width. The measured cross-sections are presented graphically here and are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm as numerical compilations stored on magnetic tape from the National Space Science Data Center, NASA/Goddard. Band oscillator strengths of these bands have been determined by direct numerical integration of the measured cross sections.

  19. Multilayer Cloud Detection with the MODIS Near-Infrared Water Vapor Absorption Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wind, Galina; Platnick, Steven; King, Michael D.; Hubanks, Paul A,; Pavolonis, Michael J.; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Yang, Ping; Baum, Bryan A.

    2009-01-01

    Data Collection 5 processing for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) onboard the NASA Earth Observing System EOS Terra and Aqua spacecraft includes an algorithm for detecting multilayered clouds in daytime. The main objective of this algorithm is to detect multilayered cloud scenes, specifically optically thin ice cloud overlying a lower-level water cloud, that presents difficulties for retrieving cloud effective radius using single layer plane-parallel cloud models. The algorithm uses the MODIS 0.94 micron water vapor band along with CO2 bands to obtain two above-cloud precipitable water retrievals, the difference of which, in conjunction with additional tests, provides a map of where multilayered clouds might potentially exist. The presence of a multilayered cloud results in a large difference in retrievals of above-cloud properties between the CO2 and the 0.94 micron methods. In this paper the MODIS multilayered cloud algorithm is described, results of using the algorithm over example scenes are shown, and global statistics for multilayered clouds as observed by MODIS are discussed. A theoretical study of the algorithm behavior for simulated multilayered clouds is also given. Results are compared to two other comparable passive imager methods. A set of standard cloudy atmospheric profiles developed during the course of this investigation is also presented. The results lead to the conclusion that the MODIS multilayer cloud detection algorithm has some skill in identifying multilayered clouds with different thermodynamic phases

  20. Effects of surface texture and measurement geometry on the near infrared water-of-hydration absorption bands. Implications for the Martian regolith water content.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pommerol, A.; Schmitt, B.

    Near-IR reflectance spectroscopy is widely used to detect mineral hydration on Solar System surfaces by the observation of absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. Recent studies established empirical relationships between the strength of the 3 µm band and the water content of the studied minerals (Milliken et al., 2005). These results have especially been applied to the OMEGA dataset to derive global maps of the Martian regolith water content (Jouglet et al., 2006 and Milliken et al., 2006). However, parameters such as surface texture and measurement geometry are known to have a strong effect on reflectance spectra but their influence on the hydration bands is poorly documented. The aim of this work is the determination of the quantitative effects of particle size, mixing between materials with different albedo and measurement geometry on the absorption bands at 1.9 and 3 µm. We used both an experimental and a modeling approach to study these effects. Bidirectional reflectance spectra were measured for series of well characterized samples (smectite, volcanic tuff and coals, pure and mixed) and modeled with optical constants of a smectite (Roush, 2005). Criteria commonly used to estimate the strength of the bands were then calculated on these spectra. We show that particle size has a strong effect on the 1.9 and 3 µm bands strength, especially for the finest particles (less than 200 µm). Mixing between a fine smectite powder and anthracite powders with various particle sizes (modeled by a synthetic neutral material) highlights the strong effect of the materials albedo on the hydration band estimation criteria. Measurement geometry has a significant effect on the bands strength for high phase angles. Furthermore, the relative variations of band strength with measurement geometry appear very dependent on the surface texture. We will present in details the relationships between these physical parameters and various criteria chosen to estimate the hydration bands

  1. VUV Fourier-transform absorption study of the Lyman and Werner bands in D2.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Arno; Dickenson, Gareth D; Salumbides, Edcel J; Ubachs, Wim; de Oliveira, Nelson; Joyeux, Denis; Nahon, Laurent

    2012-06-21

    An extensive survey of the D(2) absorption spectrum has been performed with the high-resolution VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer employing synchrotron radiation. The frequency range of 90,000-119,000 cm(-1) covers the full depth of the potential wells of the B (1)Σ(u)(+), B' (1)Σ(u)(+), and C (1)Π(u) electronic states up to the D(1s) + D(2l) dissociation limit. Improved level energies of rovibrational levels have been determined up to respectively v = 51, v = 13, and v = 20. Highest resolution is achieved by probing absorption in a molecular gas jet with slit geometry, as well as in a liquid helium cooled static gas cell, resulting in line widths of ≈0.35 cm(-1). Extended calibration methods are employed to extract line positions of D(2) lines at absolute accuracies of 0.03 cm(-1). The D (1)Π(u) and B'' (1)Σ(u)(+) electronic states correlate with the D(1s) + D(3l]) dissociation limit, but support a few vibrational levels below the second dissociation limit, respectively, v = 0-3 and v = 0-1, and are also included in the presented study. The complete set of resulting level energies is the most comprehensive and accurate data set for D(2). The observations are compared with previous studies, both experimental and theoretical.

  2. Absolute infrared vibrational band intensities of molecular ions determined by direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams

    SciTech Connect

    Keim, E.R.; Polak, M.L.; Owrutsky, J.C.; Coe, J.V.; Saykally, R.J. )

    1990-09-01

    The technique of direct laser absorption spectroscopy in fast ion beams has been employed for the determination of absolute integrated band intensities ({ital S}{sup 0}{sub {ital v}}) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamental bands of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}. In addition, the absolute band intensities for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamental bands of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +} have been remeasured. The values obtained in units of cm{sup {minus}2} atm{sup {minus}1} at STP are 1880(290) and 580(90) for the {nu}{sub 1} fundamentals of HN{sup +}{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}, respectively; and 4000(800) and 1220(190) for the {nu}{sub 3} fundamentals of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and NH{sup +}{sub 4}, respectively. Comparisons with {ital ab} {ital initio} results are presented.

  3. Mapping atomic and diffuse interstellar band absorption across the Magellanic Clouds and the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mandy; van Loon, Jacco Th.; Sarre, Peter J.; Beckman, John E.

    2015-12-01

    Diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs) trace warm neutral and weakly ionized diffuse interstellar medium (ISM). Here we present a dedicated, high signal-to-noise spectroscopic survey of two of the strongest DIBs, at 5780 and 5797 Å, in optical spectra of 666 early-type stars in the Small and Large Magellanic Clouds, along with measurements of the atomic Na I D and Ca II K lines. The resulting maps show for the first time the distribution of DIB carriers across large swathes of galaxies, as well as the foreground Milky Way ISM. We confirm the association of the 5797 Å DIB with neutral gas, and the 5780 Å DIB with more translucent gas, generally tracing the star-forming regions within the Magellanic Clouds. Likewise, the Na I D line traces the denser ISM whereas the Ca II K line traces the more diffuse, warmer gas. The Ca II K line has an additional component at ˜200-220 km s-1 seen towards both Magellanic Clouds; this may be associated with a pan-Magellanic halo. Both the atomic lines and DIBs show sub-pc-scale structure in the Galactic foreground absorption; the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs show very little correlation on these small scales, as do the Ca II K and Na I D lines. This suggests that good correlations between the 5780 and 5797 Å DIBs, or between Ca II K and Na I D, arise from the superposition of multiple interstellar structures. Similarity in behaviour between DIBs and Na I in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC), Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Milky Way suggests the abundance of DIB carriers scales in proportion to metallicity.

  4. Detection of ocean glint and ozone absorption using LCROSS Earth observations

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Tyler D.; Ennico, Kimberly; Meadows, Victoria S.; Sparks, William; Schwieterman, Edward W.; Bussey, D. Ben J.; Breiner, Jonathan

    2014-06-01

    The Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) observed the distant Earth on three occasions in 2009. These data span a range of phase angles, including a rare crescent phase view. For each epoch, the satellite acquired near-infrared and mid-infrared full-disk images, and partial-disk spectra at 0.26-0.65 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 500) and 1.17-2.48 μm (λ/Δλ ∼ 50). Spectra show strong absorption features due to water vapor and ozone, which is a biosignature gas. We perform a significant recalibration of the UV-visible spectra and provide the first comparison of high-resolution visible Earth spectra to the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory three-dimensional spectral Earth model. We find good agreement with the observations, reproducing the absolute brightness and dynamic range at all wavelengths for all observation epochs, thus validating the model to within the ∼10% data calibration uncertainty. Data-model comparisons reveal a strong ocean glint signature in the crescent phase data set, which is well matched by our model predictions throughout the observed wavelength range. This provides the first observational test of a technique that could be used to determine exoplanet habitability from disk-integrated observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths, where the glint signal is strongest. We examine the detection of the ozone 255 nm Hartley and 400-700 nm Chappuis bands. While the Hartley band is the strongest ozone feature in Earth's spectrum, false positives for its detection could exist. Finally, we discuss the implications of these findings for future exoplanet characterization missions.

  5. The absorption coefficient of the liquid N2 2.15-micron band and application to Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grundy, William M.; Fink, Uwe

    1991-01-01

    The present measurements of the temperature dependence exhibited by the liquid N2 2.15-micron 2-0 collision-induced band's absorption coefficient and integrated absorption show the latter to be smaller than that of the N2 gas, and to decrease with decreasing temperature. Extrapolating this behavior to Triton's nominal surface temperature yields a new estimate of the N2-ice grain size on the Triton south polar cap; a mean N2 grain size of 0.7-3.0 cm is consistent with grain growth rate calculation results.

  6. Using Lunar Observations to Assess Terra MODIS Thermal Emissive Bands Calibration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chen, Hongda

    2010-01-01

    MODIS collects data in both the reflected solar and thermal emissive regions using 36 spectral bands. The center wavelengths of these bands cover the3.7 to 14.24 micron region. In addition to using its on-board calibrators (OBC), which include a full aperture solar diffuser (SD) and a blackbody (BB), lunar observations have been scheduled on a regular basis to support both Terra and Aqua MODIS on-orbit calibration and characterization. This paper provides an overview of MODIS lunar observations and their applications for the reflective solar bands (RSB) and thermal emissive bands (TEB) with an emphasis on potential calibration improvements of MODIS band 21 at 3.96 microns. This spectral band has detectors set with low gains to enable fire detection. Methodologies are proposed and examined on the use of lunar observations for the band 21 calibration. Also presented in this paper are preliminary results derived from Terra MODIS lunar observations and remaining challenging issues.

  7. X-ray absorption and reflection as probes of the GaN conduction bands: Theory and experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Lambrecht, W.R.L.; Rashkeev, S.N.; Segall, B.

    1997-04-01

    X-ray absorption measurements are a well-known probe of the unoccupied states in a material. The same information can be obtained by using glancing angle X-ray reflectivity. In spite of several existing band structure calculations of the group III nitrides and previous optical studies in UV range, a direct probe of their conduction band densities of states is of interest. The authors performed a joint experimental and theoretical investigation using both of these experimental techniques for wurtzite GaN.

  8. Observation of high-spin oblate band structures in {sup 141}Pm

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, L.; Zhu, S. J.; Wang, J. G.; Yeoh, E. Y.; Xiao, Z. G.; Zhang, M.; Liu, Y.; Ding, H. B.; Xu, Q.; Zhang, S. Q.; Meng, J.; Zhu, L. H.; Wu, X. G.; He, C. Y.; Li, G. S.; Wang, L. L.; Zheng, Y.; Zhang, B.

    2011-06-15

    The high-spin states of {sup 141}Pm have been investigated through the reaction {sup 126}Te({sup 19}F,4n) at a beam energy of 90 MeV. A previous level scheme has been updated with spins up to 49/2({h_bar}/2{pi}). Six collective bands at high spins are newly observed. Based on the systematic comparison, one band is proposed as a decoupled band; two bands with strong {Delta}I=1 M1 transitions inside the bands are suggested as the oblate bands with {gamma} {approx}-60 deg.; three other bands with large signature splitting have been proposed with the oblate-triaxial deformation with {gamma}{approx} -90 deg. The triaxial n-particle-n-hole particle rotor model calculations for one of the oblate bands in {sup 141}Pm are in good agreement with the experimental data. The other characteristics for these bands have been discussed.

  9. AKARI OBSERVATIONS OF BROWN DWARFS. I. CO AND CO{sub 2} BANDS IN THE NEAR-INFRARED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamura, Issei; Tsuji, Takashi; Tanabe, Toshihiko E-mail: ttsuji@ioa.s.u-tokyo.ac.j

    2010-10-10

    Near-infrared medium-resolution spectra of seven bright brown dwarfs are presented. The spectra were obtained with the Infrared Camera on board the infrared astronomical satellite AKARI, covering 2.5-5.0 {mu}m with a spectral resolution of approximately 120. The spectral types of the objects range from L5 to T8 and enable us to study the spectral evolution of brown dwarfs. The observed spectra are in general consistent with predictions from previous observations and photospheric models; spectra of L-type dwarfs are characterized by continuum opacity from dust clouds in the photosphere, while very strong molecular absorption bands dominate the spectra in T-type dwarfs. We find that the CO fundamental band around 4.6 {mu}m is clearly seen even in the T8 dwarf 2MASS J041519 - 0935, confirming the presence of a non-equilibrium chemical state in the atmosphere. We also identify the CO{sub 2} fundamental stretching-mode band at 4.2 {mu}m for the first time in the spectra of late-L- and T-type brown dwarfs. As a preliminary step towards interpretation of the data obtained by AKARI, we analyze the observed spectra by comparing with those predicted by the unified cloudy model (UCM). Although overall spectral energy distributions can be reasonably fitted with the UCM, observed CO and CO{sub 2} bands in late-L and T dwarfs are unexpectedly stronger than the model predictions assuming local thermodynamical equilibrium. We examine the vertical mixing model and find that this model explains the CO band at least partly in the T dwarfs 2MASS J041519 - 0935 and 2MASS J055919 - 1404. The CO fundamental band also shows excess absorption against the predicted one in the L9 dwarf SDSS J083008+4828. Since CO is already highly abundant in the upper photospheres of late-L dwarfs, the extra CO due to vertical mixing has little effect on the CO band strengths, and the vertical mixing model cannot be applied to this L dwarf. A more serious problem is that the significant enhancement of the

  10. Detection of metal stress in boreal forest species using the 0.67-micron chlorophyll absorption band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singhroy, Vernon H.; Kruse, Fred A.

    1991-01-01

    Several recent studies have shown that a shift of the red-edge inflection near 0.70 micron in vegetation reflectance spectra is an indicator of metal stress, partially attributable to changes in chlorophyll concentration. This 'red-edge shift', however, is difficult to detect and has been reported both toward longer (red) and shorter (blue) wavelengths. Our work demonstrates that direct measurement of the depth and width of the chlorophyll absorption band at 0.67 micron using digital feature extraction and absorption band characterization procedures developed for the analysis of mineral spectra is a more consistent indicator of metal stress. Additionally, the magnitude of these parameters is generally greater than that of the red edge shift and thus should be more amenable to detection and mapping using field and aircraft spectrometers.

  11. First detection of ionized helium absorption lines in infrared K band spectra of O-type stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conti, Peter S.; Block, David L.; Geballe, T. R.; Hanson, Margaret M.

    1993-01-01

    We have obtained high SNR, moderate-resolution K band spectra of two early O-type main sequence stars, HD 46150 O5 V, and HD 46223 O4 V, in the Rosette Nebula. We report the detection, for the first time, of the 2.189 micron He II line in O-type stars. Also detected is the 2.1661 micron Br-gamma line in absorption. The 2.058 micron He I line appears to be present in absorption in both stars, although its appearance at our resolution is complicated by atmospheric features. These three lines can form the basis for a spectral classification system for hot stars in the K band that may be used at infrared wavelengths to elucidate the nature of those luminous stars in otherwise obscured H II and giant H II regions.

  12. [Generation of reactive oxygen species in water under exposure of visible or infrared irradiation at absorption band of molecular oxygen].

    PubMed

    Gudkov, S V; Karp, O E; Garmash, S A; Ivanov, V E; Chernikov, A V; Manokhin, A A; Astashev, M E; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S; Bruskov, V I

    2012-01-01

    It is found that in bidistilled water saturated with oxygen hydrogen peroxide and hydroxyl radicals are formed under the influence of visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen. Formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) occurs under the influence of both solar and artificial light sourses, including the coherent laser irradiation. The oxygen effect, i.e. the impact of dissolved oxygen concentration on production of hydrogen peroxide induced by light, is detected. It is shown that the visible and infrared radiation in the absorption bands of molecular oxygen leads to the formation of 8-oxoguanine in DNA in vitro. Physicochemical mechanisms of ROS formation in water when exposed to visible and infrared light are studied, and the involvement of singlet oxygen and superoxide anion radicals in this process is shown.

  13. Optimizing organic photovoltaics using tailored heterojunctions: A photoinduced absorption study of oligothiophenes with low band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schueppel, R.; Schmidt, K.; Uhrich, C.; Schulze, K.; Wynands, D.; Brédas, J. L.; Brier, E.; Reinold, E.; Bu, H.-B.; Baeuerle, P.; Maennig, B.; Pfeiffer, M.; Leo, K.

    2008-02-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 3.4% with an open-circuit voltage of 1V was recently demonstrated in a thin film solar cell utilizing fullerene C60 as acceptor and a new acceptor-substituted oligothiophene with an optical gap of 1.77eV as donor [K. Schulze , Adv. Mater. (Weinheim, Ger.) 18, 2872 (2006)]. This prompted us to systematically study the energy- and electron transfer processes at the oligothiophene:fullerene heterojunction for a homologous series of these oligothiophenes. Cyclic voltammetry and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy data show that the heterojunction is modified due to tuning of the highest occupied molecular orbital energy for different oligothiophene chain lengths, while the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital energy remains essentially fixed due to the presence of electron-withdrawing end groups (dicyanovinyl) attached to the oligothiophene. Use of photoinduced absorption (PA) allows the study of the electron transfer process at the heterojunction to C60 . Quantum-chemical calculations performed at the density functional theory and/or time-dependent density functional theory level and cation absorption spectra of diluted DCVnT provide an unambiguous identification of the transitions observed in the PA spectra. Upon increasing the effective energy gap of the donor-acceptor pair by increasing the ionization energy of the donor, photoinduced electron transfer is eventually replaced with energy transfer, which alters the photovoltaic operation conditions. The optimum open-circuit voltage of a solar cell is thus a trade-off between efficient charge separation at the interface and maximized effective gap. It appears that the open-circuit voltages of 1.0-1.1V in our solar cell devices have reached an optimum since higher voltages result in a loss in charge separation efficiency.

  14. Wideband enhancement of infrared absorption in a direct band-gap semiconductor by using nonabsorptive pyramids.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weitao; Yap, Daniel; Chen, Gang

    2012-07-02

    Efficient trapping of the light in a photon absorber or a photodetector can improve its performance and reduce its cost. In this paper we investigate two designs for light-trapping in application to infrared absorption. Our numerical simulations demonstrate that nonabsorptive pyramids either located on top of an absorbing film or having embedded absorbing rods can efficiently enhance the absorption in the absorbing material. A spectrally averaged absorptance of 83% is achieved compared to an average absorptance of 28% for the optimized multilayer structure that has the same amount of absorbing material. This enhancement is explained by the coupled-mode theory. Similar designs can also be applied to solar cells.

  15. First direct observation of a nearly ideal graphene band structure

    SciTech Connect

    Sprinkle, M.; Siegel, D.; Hu, Y.; Hicks, J.; Tejeda, A.; Taleb-Ibrahimi, A.; Le Fèvre, P.; Bertran, F.; Vizzini, S.; Enriquez, H.; Chiang, S.; Soukiassian, P.; Berger, C.; de Heer, W.A.; Lanzara, A.; Conrad, E.H.

    2009-12-10

    Angle-resolved photoemission and x-ray diffraction experiments show that multilayer epitaxial graphene grown on the SiC(000{bar 1}) surface is a new form of carbon that is composed of effectively isolated graphene sheets. The unique rotational stacking of these films causes adjacent graphene layers to electronically decouple leading to a set of nearly independent linearly dispersing bands (Dirac cones) at the graphene K point. Each cone corresponds to an individual macroscale graphene sheet in a multilayer stack where AB-stacked sheets can be considered as low density faults.

  16. Wide angle and narrow-band asymmetric absorption in visible and near-infrared regime through lossy Bragg stacks

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Shiwei; Zhan, Yawen; Lee, Chris; Lu, Jian; Li, Yang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Absorber is an important component in various optical devices. Here we report a novel type of asymmetric absorber in the visible and near-infrared spectrum which is based on lossy Bragg stacks. The lossy Bragg stacks can achieve near-perfect absorption at one side and high reflection at the other within the narrow bands (several nm) of resonance wavelengths, whereas display almost identical absorption/reflection responses for the rest of the spectrum. Meanwhile, this interesting wavelength-selective asymmetric absorption behavior persists for wide angles, does not depend on polarization, and can be ascribed to the lossy characteristics of the Bragg stacks. Moreover, interesting Fano resonance with easily tailorable peak profiles can be realized using the lossy Bragg stacks. PMID:27251768

  17. Annealing-induced optical and sub-band-gap absorption parameters of Sn-doped CdSe thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Jagdish; Tripathi, S. K.

    2016-01-01

    Thin films of Sn-doped CdSe were prepared by thermal evaporation onto glass substrates in an argon gas atmosphere and annealed at different temperatures. Structural evaluation of the films was carried out using X-ray diffraction and their stoichiometry studied by energy-dispersive X-ray analysis. The films exhibit a preferred orientation along the hexagonal direction of CdSe. The optical transmittance of the films shows a red shift of the absorption edge with annealing. The fundamental absorption edge corresponds to a direct energy gap with a temperature coefficient of 3.34 × 10-3 eV K-1. The refractive index, optical conductivity and real and imaginary parts of the dielectric constants were found to increase after annealing. The sub-band gap absorption coefficient was evaluated using the constant photocurrent method. It varies exponentially with photon energy. The Urbach energy, the density of defect states, and the steepness of the density of localized states were evaluated from the sub-band-gap absorption.

  18. The Suzaku Observation of NGC 3516: Complex Absorption and the Broad and Narrow Fe K Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, Alex; Reeves, James N.; Miniutti, Giovanni; Serlemitsos, Peter; Kunieda, Hideyo; Taqoob, Tahir; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Mushotzky, Richard; Okajima, Takashi; Gallo, Luigi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Griffiths, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    We present results from a 150 ksec Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 1 NGC 3516 in October 2005. The source was in a relatively highly absorbed state. Our best-fit model is consistent with partial covering by a lowly-ionized absorber with a column density near 5x10(exp 22) cm(exp -2) and with a covering fraction 96-100 percent. Narrow K-shell absorption features due to He- and H-like Fe confirm the presence of a high-ionization absorbing component as well. A broad Fe K(alpha) diskline is required in all fits, even after the complex absorption is taken into account; an additional partial-covering component is an inadequate substitute for the continuum curvature associated with the broad line. The narrow Fe Ka line at 6.4 keV is resolved, yielding a velocity width commensurate with the optical Broad Line Region. The strength of the Compton reflection hump suggests a contribution mainly from the broad Fe line origin. We include in our model soft band emission lines from He- and H-like ions and radiative recombination lines, consistent with photo-ionization, though a small contribution from collisional ionization is possible.

  19. The C2H, C2, and CN electronic absorption bands in the carbon star HD 19557

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goebel, J. H.; Bregman, J. D.; Cooper, D. M.; Goorvitch, D.; Langhoff, S. R.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1983-01-01

    Infrared spectrophotometry of the R-type carbon star HD 19557 is presented. Two unusual spectroscopic features are seen: a 3.1 micron band is lacking and a 2.8 micron band is present. Identifications are proposed for three previously unreported stellar absorption bands with electronic sequences of C2, CN, and C2H. The latter is proposed to be responsible for the 2.8 micron feature. The atmospheric structure of the star is studied with synthetic spectra, and an effective temperature between 2600 K and 3000 K is suggested. No SiC emission is seen at 11.3 microns, indicating that grain formation is not a viable process around the star. The lack of dust in R stars may suggest a salient difference between R and N types.

  20. Analysis of airborne imaging spectrometer data for the Ruby Mountains, Montana, by use of absorption-band-depth images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brickey, David W.; Crowley, James K.; Rowan, Lawrence C.

    1987-01-01

    Airborne Imaging Spectrometer-1 (AIS-1) data were obtained for an area of amphibolite grade metamorphic rocks that have moderate rangeland vegetation cover. Although rock exposures are sparse and patchy at this site, soils are visible through the vegetation and typically comprise 20 to 30 percent of the surface area. Channel averaged low band depth images for diagnostic soil rock absorption bands. Sets of three such images were combined to produce color composite band depth images. This relative simple approach did not require extensive calibration efforts and was effective for discerning a number of spectrally distinctive rocks and soils, including soils having high talc concentrations. The results show that the high spectral and spatial resolution of AIS-1 and future sensors hold considerable promise for mapping mineral variations in soil, even in moderately vegetated areas.

  1. Evolution of dielectric function of Al-doped ZnO thin films with thermal annealing: effect of band gap expansion and free-electron absorption.

    PubMed

    Li, X D; Chen, T P; Liu, Y; Leong, K C

    2014-09-22

    Evolution of dielectric function of Al-doped ZnO (AZO) thin films with annealing temperature is observed. It is shown that the evolution is due to the changes in both the band gap and the free-electron absorption as a result of the change of free-electron concentration of the AZO thin films. The change of the electron concentration could be attributed to the activation of Al dopant and the creation/annihilation of the donor-like defects like oxygen vacancy in the thin films caused by annealing.

  2. Inferring Aerosol Angstrom Absorption Exponent using satellite observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Jethva, H. T.; Ahn, C.

    2013-12-01

    The Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE) is a parameter commonly used to characterize the wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD). It is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellite-based method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses multi-spectral measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols are present above clouds. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud top is attenuated by the absorption effects of the overlying aerosol layer. This attenuation effect can be described using an approximations of Beer's Law. The upwelling reflectance at the cloud-top in an aerosol-free atmospheric column is mainly a function of cloud optical depth (COD). In the proposed method of AAE derivation, the first step is determining COD which is retrieved using a previously developed color-ratio based approach. In the second step, the spectral AAOD is derived by an inversion of the measured spectral reflectance. The proposed technique will be discussed and application results making use of OMI multi-spectral measurements in the UV-Vis. will be presented.

  3. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-02-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  4. A Ka-band (32 GHz) beacon link experiment (KABLE) with Mars Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, A. L.; Hansen, D. M.; Mileant, A.; Hartop, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    A proposal for a Ka-Band (32 GHz) Link Experiment (KABLE) with the Mars Observer mission was submitted to NASA. The experiment will rely on the fourth harmonic of the spacecraft X-band transmitter to generate a 33.6 GHz signal. The experiment will rely also on the Deep Space Network (DSN) receiving station equipped to simultaneously receive X- and Ka-band signals. The experiment will accurately measure the spacecraft-to-Earth telecommunication link performance at Ka-band and X-band (8.4 GHz).

  5. Observation of localized flat-band states in Kagome photonic lattices.

    PubMed

    Zong, Yuanyuan; Xia, Shiqiang; Tang, Liqin; Song, Daohong; Hu, Yi; Pei, Yumiao; Su, Jing; Li, Yigang; Chen, Zhigang

    2016-04-18

    We report the first experimental demonstration of localized flat-band states in optically induced Kagome photonic lattices. Such lattices exhibit a unique band structure with the lowest band being completely flat (diffractionless) in the tight-binding approximation. By taking the advantage of linear superposition of the flat-band eigenmodes of the Kagome lattices, we demonstrate a high-fidelity transmission of complex patterns in such two-dimensional pyrochlore-like photonic structures. Our numerical simulations find good agreement with experimental observations, upholding the belief that flat-band lattices can support distortion-free image transmission.

  6. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  7. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona acquired during the Cassini 2001 superior conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    Simultaneous dual-frequency Ka-band (32 GHz) and X-band (8.4 GHz) carrier signal data have been acquired during the superior conjunction of the Cassini spacecraft June 2001, using the NASA Deep Space Network's facilities located in Goldstone, California. The solar elongation angle of the observations varied from -4.1 degrees (-16 solar radii) to -0.6 degrees (-2.3 solar radii). The observed coronal and solar effects on the signals include spectral broadening, amplitude scintillation, phase scintillation, and increased noise. The measurements were generally consistent with existing solar models, except during solar transient events when the signatures of the measurements were observed to increase significantly above the quiet background levels. This is the second solar conjunction of Cassini for which simultaneous X/Ka data were acquired. Both solar conjunctions, conducted in May 2000 and June 2001, occurred near the peak of the current 11 year solar cycle.

  8. Observations of the marginal band system of nucleated erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    The marginal band (MB) of nucleated erythrocytes (thos of nonmammalian vertebrates) is a continuous peripheral bundle of microtubules normally obscured by hemoglobin. Treatment of these elliptical cells with modified microtubule polymerization media containing Triton X-100 yields a semilysed system in which MB, nucleus, and trans-MB material (TBM) are visible under phase contrast. The TBM apparently interconnects structural components, passing around opposite sides of the nucleus and suspending it in native position. In uranyl acetatestained whole whole mounts (goldfish) examined by transmission electron microscopy, the TBM appears as a network. MBs of semilysed cells are relatively planar initially, but twist subsequently into a range of "figure-8" shapes with one of the two possible mirror-image configurations predominant. Nuclei and MBs can be released using proteolytic enzymes, to which the TBM seems most rapidly vulnerable. MBs thus freed are birefringent, generally untwisted, and much more circular than they are in situ. As a working hypothesis, it is prosposed that the flattened, elliptical shape of nucleated erythrocytes is a result of TBM tension applied asymmetrically across an otherwise more circular MB, and that the firure-8 configuration occurs when there is extreme TBM shrinkage or contraction. PMID:307555

  9. Sub-nanometer linewidth perfect absorption in visible band induced by Bloch surface wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Jiawei; Liu, Wenxing; Zhou, Zhiqiang; Ren, Naifei; Ding, Guilin; Chen, Mingyang; Yao, Hongbing

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate the unity absorption of visible light with an ultra-narrow 0.1 nm linewidth. It arises from the Bloch surface wave resonance in alternating TiO2/SiO2 multilayers. The total absorption and narrow linewidth are explained from the radiative and absorptive damping, which are quantitatively determined by the temporal coupled mode theory. When a silver film with proper thickness is added to the absorber, the perfect absorption is achieved with only 3 structural bilayers, in contrast with 8 bilayers required without Ag. Furthermore, significant field enhancement and an ultrahigh 2600/RIU sensing figure-of-merit are simultaneously obtained at resonance, which might facilitate applications in nonlinear optical devices and high resolution refractive index sensing.

  10. Characterization of Spectral Absorption Properties of Aerosols Using Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Jethva, H.; Bhartia, P. K.; Ahn, C.

    2012-01-01

    The wavelength-dependence of aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) is generally represented in terms of the Angstrom Absorption Exponent (AAE), a parameter that describes the dependence of AAOD with wavelength. The AAE parameter is closely related to aerosol composition. Black carbon (BC) containing aerosols yield AAE values near unity whereas Organic carbon (OC) aerosol particles are associated with values larger than 2. Even larger AAE values have been reported for desert dust aerosol particles. Knowledge of spectral AAOD is necessary for the calculation of direct radiative forcing effect of aerosols and for inferring aerosol composition. We have developed a satellitebased method of determining the spectral AAOD of absorbing aerosols. The technique uses high spectral resolution measurements of upwelling radiation from scenes where absorbing aerosols lie above clouds as indicated by the UV Aerosol Index. For those conditions, the satellite measured reflectance (rho lambda) is approximately given by Beer's law rho lambda = rho (sub 0 lambda) e (exp -mtau (sub abs lambda)) where rho(sub 0 lambda) is the cloud reflectance, m is the geometric slant path and tau (sub abs lambda) is the spectral AAOD. The rho (sub 0 lambda) term is determined by means of radiative transfer calculations using as input the cloud optical depth derived as described in Torres et al. [JAS, 2012] that accounts for the effects of aerosol absorption. In the second step, corrections for molecular and aerosol scattering effects are applied to the cloud reflectance term, and the spectral AAOD is then derived by inverting the equation above. The proposed technique will be discussed in detail and application results will be presented. The technique can be easily applied to hyper-spectral satellite measurements that include UV such as OMI, GOME and SCIAMACHY, or to multi-spectral visible measurements by other sensors provided that the aerosol-above-cloud events are easily identified.

  11. Direct Observations of Excess Solar Absorption by Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pilewskie, Peter; Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of solar flux in the cloudy tropical atmosphere reveal that solar absorption by clouds is anomalously large when compared to theoretical estimates. The ratio of cloud forcing at an altitude of 20 kilometers to that at the surface is 1.58 rather than 1.0 as predicted by models. These results were derived from a cloud radiation experiment in which identical instrumentation was deployed on coordinated stacked aircraft. These findings indicate a significant difference between measurements and theory and imply that the interaction between clouds and solar radiation is poorly understood.

  12. Observational Cosmology Using Absorption Lines in Quasar Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaee, A.

    2016-09-01

    Distant, highly luminous quasars are important cosmological probes for a variety of astrophysical questions: the first generation of galaxies, the star formation history and metal enrichment in the early Universe, the growth of the first super massive black holes (SMBHs), the role of feedback from quasars and SMBHs in galaxy evolution, the epoch of reionization, etc. In addition, they are used as background illuminating source that reveal any object located by chance on the line of sight. I will present our group works in these issues that can be done using absorption lines in the quasar spectra.

  13. Densities in Diffuse Molecular Clouds as Determined from Observations of CO Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryder Picard, Trevor; Indriolo, Nick; Goldsmith, Paul

    2016-01-01

    One parameter that is important to interstellar chemistry is the density of H2, but direct density measurement is impossible. We must therefore rely on methods of estimation based on the observable effects that H2 density has on other molecules. One such effect is the excitation of CO through collisions with H2, which is imprinted in the relative populations between CO rotational levels. Spectroscopic observations were made along 17 sight lines targeting ro-vibrational transitions out of the 0 ≤ J ≤ 6 levels in the fundamental band of CO. These absorption features were analyzed to determine level-specific CO column densities, allowing us to express the relative populations between adjacent energy levels as excitation temperatures. By utilizing the analysis of Goldsmith (2013), which relates H2 density to CO excitation temperatures, we inferred upper and lower limits on the H2 density in several clouds. Many of our results are consistent with those found by Goldsmith (2013) and suggest sight lines probing diffuse molecular clouds (n(H2) ≈ 10 - 103 cm-3), although some likely sample denser material (n(H2) ≥ 103 cm-3). We also see a trend for individual sight lines where the inferred density increases when determined from higher J-level pairs. We discuss these findings and the future applicability of observations of CO in the infrared for constraining interstellar gas densities.

  14. PAHs and the Diffuse Interstellar Bands. What have we Learned from the New Generation of Laboratory and Observational Studies?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2005-01-01

    Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are an important and ubiquitous component of carbon-bearing materials in space. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands (UIR bands) and PAH spectral features are now being used as new probes of the ISM. PAHs are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). In the model dealing with the interstellar spectral features, PAHs are present as a mixture of radicals, ions and neutral species. PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge for laboratory astrophysics is to reproduce (in a realistic way) the physical conditions that exist in the emission and/or absorption interstellar zones, An extensive laboratory program has been developed at NASA Ames to characterize the physical and chemical properties of PAHs in astrophysical environments and to describe how they influence the radiation and energy balance in space and the interstellar chemistry. In particular, laboratory experiments provide measurements of the spectral characteristics of interstellar PAH analogs from the ultraviolet and visible range to the infrared range for comparison with astronomical data. This paper will focus on the recent progress made in the laboratory to measure the direct absorption spectra of neutral and ionized PAHs in the gas phase in the near-W and visible range in astrophysically relevant environments. These measurements provide data on PAHs and nanometer-sized particles that can now be directly compared to astronomical observations. The harsh physical conditions of the IS medium - characterized by a low temperature, an absence of collisions and strong V W radiation fields - are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions are formed from the neutral

  15. Real-time monitoring of reactive species in downstream etch reactor by VUV broad-band absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, R.; Vallier, L.; Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma etching of nanometric size, high aspect-ratio structures is more challenging at each new technological node. Remote plasmas are beginning to find use when damages on nanostructures by ion bombardment become critical or when etching with high selectivity on different materials present on the wafer is necessary (i . e . tungsten oxide etching with fluorine and hydrogen containing plasmas in remote reactor from AMAT). Furthermore, it is expected that downstream plasma will replace many wet chemical etching processes to alleviate the issue of pattern collapses caused by capillary forces when nanometer size high aspect ratio structures are immersed in liquids. In these downstream plasmas, radicals are the main active species and a control of their density is of prime importance. Most of gases used and radicals produced in etching plasmas (HBr, BrCl, Br2, NF3, CH2F2,...) have strong absorption bands in the vacuum UV spectral region and we have shown that very low concentration of these species can be detected by VUV absorption. We have recently improved the technique by using a VUV CCD camera, instead of the PMT, which render possible the Broad-Band absorption spectroscopy in the 120-200 nm range, with a deuterium lamp, or a laser produced xenon arc lamp as light source. The multi-spectral detection ability of the CCD reduces the acquisition time to less than 1 second and can permit the real time control of the process control.

  16. Ground-based Photon Path Measurements from Solar Absorption Spectra of the O2 A-band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Z.; Wennberg, P. O.; Cageao, R. P.; Pongetti, T. J.; Toon, G. C.; Sander, S. P.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution solar absorption spectra obtained from Table Mountain Facility (TMF, 34.38degN, 117.68degW, 2286 m elevation) have been analyzed in the region of the O2 A-band. The photon paths of direct sunlight in clear sky cases are retrieved from the O2 absorption lines and compared with ray-tracing calculations based on the solar zenith angle and surface pressure. At a given zenith angle, the ratios of retrieved to geometrically derived photon paths are highly precise (approx.0.2%), but they vary as the zenith angle changes. This is because current models of the spectral lineshape in this band do not properly account for the significant absorption that exists far from the centers of saturated lines. For example, use of a Voigt function with Lorentzian far wings results in an error in the retrieved photon path of as much as 5%, highly correlated with solar zenith angle. Adopting a super-Lorentz function reduces, but does not completely eliminate this problem. New lab measurements of the lineshape are required to make further progress.

  17. Semi-Empirical Validation of the Cross-Band Relative Absorption Technique for the Measurement of Molecular Mixing Ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S

    2013-01-01

    Studies were performed to carry out semi-empirical validation of a new measurement approach we propose for molecular mixing ratios determination. The approach is based on relative measurements in bands of O2 and other molecules and as such may be best described as cross band relative absorption (CoBRA). . The current validation studies rely upon well verified and established theoretical and experimental databases, satellite data assimilations and modeling codes such as HITRAN, line-by-line radiative transfer model (LBLRTM), and the modern-era retrospective analysis for research and applications (MERRA). The approach holds promise for atmospheric mixing ratio measurements of CO2 and a variety of other molecules currently under investigation for several future satellite lidar missions. One of the advantages of the method is a significant reduction of the temperature sensitivity uncertainties which is illustrated with application to the ASCENDS mission for the measurement of CO2 mixing ratios (XCO2). Additional advantages of the method include the possibility to closely match cross-band weighting function combinations which is harder to achieve using conventional differential absorption techniques and the potential for additional corrections for water vapor and other interferences without using the data from numerical weather prediction (NWP) models.

  18. Symmetry-Breaking in Cationic Polymethine Dyes: Part 2. Shape of Electronic Absorption Bands Explained by the Thermal Fluctuations of the Solvent Reaction Field.

    PubMed

    Masunov, Artëm E; Anderson, Dane; Freidzon, Alexandra Ya; Bagaturyants, Alexander A

    2015-07-02

    The electronic absorption spectra of the symmetric cyanines exhibit dramatic dependence on the conjugated chain length: whereas short-chain homologues are characterized by the narrow and sharp absorption bands of high intensity, the long-chain homologues demonstrate very broad, structureless bands of low intensity. Spectra of the intermediate homologues combine both features. These broad bands are often explained using spontaneous symmetry-breaking and charge localization at one of the termini, and the combination of broad and sharp features was interpreted as coexistence of symmetric and asymmetric species in solution. These explanations were not supported by the first principle simulations until now. Here, we employ a combination of time-dependent density functional theory, a polarizable continuum model, and Franck-Condon (FC) approximation to predict the absorption line shapes for the series of 2-azaazulene and 1-methylpyridine-4-substituted polymethine dyes. To simulate inhomogeneous broadening by the solvent, the molecular structures are optimized in the presence of a finite electric field of various strengths. The calculated FC line shapes, averaged with the Boltzmann weights of different field strengths, reproduce the experimentally observed spectra closely. Although the polarizable continuum model accounts for the equilibrium solvent reaction field at absolute zero, the finite field accounts for the thermal fluctuations in the solvent, which break the symmetry of the solute molecule. This model of inhomogeneous broadening opens the possibility for computational studies of thermochromism. The choice of the global hybrid exchange-correlation functional SOGGA11-X, including 40% of the exact exchange, plays the critical role in the success of our model.

  19. Infrared absorption by volcanic stratospheric aerosols observed by ISAMS

    SciTech Connect

    Grainger, R.G.; Lambert, A.; Taylor, F.W.; Remedios, J.J.; Rodgers, C.D.; Corney, M. ); Kerridge, B.J. )

    1993-06-18

    The upper atmosphere research satellite was lofted shortly after the Mt. Pinatubo volcano erupted, and is estimated to have injected 20 million metric tons of sulphur dioxide into the stratosphere. This gas typically is converted to sulphuric acid by interactions with water droplets in the stratosphere. These droplets are typically not saturated in acid density, so the sticking fraction is very high. The improved stratospheric and mesospheric sounder makes measurements in 14 infrared channels from 4 to 17 [mu]m. The authors have used the available infrared data channels to model the distribution and density of sulfuric acid aerosols in the stratospheric band about the equator as a result of this volcanic eruption. Knowing the spectral properties of the aerosol load will aid in modeling the radiative and climatic impacts of this volcanic ejecta.

  20. Method for improving terahertz band absorption spectrum measurement accuracy using noncontact sample thickness measurement.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Zhao, Xiaoyan; Su, Haixia; Yan, Fang; Zhang, Han

    2012-07-10

    The terahertz absorption spectrum has a complex nonlinear relationship with sample thickness, which is normally measured mechanically with limited accuracy. As a result, the terahertz absorption spectrum is usually determined incorrectly. In this paper, an iterative algorithm is proposed to accurately determine sample thickness. This algorithm is independent of the initial value used and results in convergent calculations. Precision in sample thickness can be improved up to 0.1 μm. A more precise absorption spectrum can then be extracted. By comparing the proposed method with the traditional method based on mechanical thickness measurements, quantitative analysis experiments on a three-component amino acid mixture shows that the global error decreased from 0.0338 to 0.0301.

  1. Absorption and emission line shapes in the O2 atmospheric bands - Theoretical model and limb viewing simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abreu, Vincent J.; Bucholtz, A.; Hays, P. B.; Ortland, D.; Skinner, W. R.

    1989-01-01

    A multiple scattering radiative transfer model has been developed to carry out a line-by-line calculation of the absorption and emission limb measurements that will be made by the High Resolution Doppler Imager to be flown on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite. The multiple scattering model uses the doubling and adding methods to solve the radiative transfer equation, modified to take into account a spherical inhomogeneous atmosphere. Representative absorption and emission line shapes in the O2 1Sigma(+)g - 3Sigma(-)g atmospheric bands (A,B, and gamma) and their variation with altitude are presented. The effects of solar zenith angle, aerosol loading, surface albedo, and cloud height on the line shapes are also discussed.

  2. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Analysis of ERTS-1 images of Nevada has followed two courses: comparative lineament mapping and spectral reflectance evaluation. The comparative lineament mapping was conducted by mapping lineaments on 9 x 9 inch prints of MSS bands 5 and 7, transferring the data to a base map, and comparing the results with existing geologic maps. The most significant results are that lineaments are more numerous on the band 7 images, and approximately 100 percent more were mapped than appear on existing maps. Geologic significance of these newly mapped lineaments will not be known until they are checked in the field: many are probably faults. Spectral analysis has been limited to visual comparison among the four MSS bands. In general, higher scene contrast is shown in the near infrared bands (6 and 7) than in the visible wavelength bands (4 and 5). The economic implications of these results derive chiefly from the greater efficiency that can be obtained by using near infrared as well as visible wavelength images.

  3. Non-uniform temperature and species concentration measurements in a laminar flame using multi-band infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liu Hao; Lau, Lok Yin; Ren, Wei

    2017-03-01

    We report in situ measurements of non-uniform temperature, H2O and CO2 concentration distributions in a premixed methane-air laminar flame using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). A mid-infrared, continuous-wave, room-temperature interband cascade laser (ICL) at 4183 nm was used for the sensitive detection of CO2 at high temperature.The H2O absorption lines were exploited by one distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser at 1343 nm and one ICL at 2482 nm to achieve multi-band absorption measurements with high species concentration sensitivity, high temperature sensitivity, and immunity to variations in ambient conditions. A novel profile-fitting function was proposed to characterize the non-uniform temperature and species concentrations along the line-of-sight in the flame by detecting six absorption lines of CO2 and H2O simultaneously. The flame temperature distribution was measured at different heights above the burner (5-20 mm), and compared with the thermocouple measurement with heat-transfer correction. Our TDLAS measured temperature of the central flame was in excellent agreement (<1.5% difference) with the thermocouple data.The TDLAS results were also compared with the CFD simulations using a detailed chemical kinetics mechanism (GRI 3.0) and considering the heat loss to the surroundings.The current CFD simulation overpredicted the flame temperature in the gradient region, but was in excellent agreement with the measured temperature and species concentration in the core of the flame.

  4. Experimental demonstration of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with a broad and flat high absorption band.

    PubMed

    Huang, Li; Chowdhury, Dibakar Roy; Ramani, Suchitra; Reiten, Matthew T; Luo, Sheng-Nian; Taylor, Antoinette J; Chen, Hou-Tong

    2012-01-15

    We present the design, numerical simulations and experimental measurements of terahertz metamaterial absorbers with a broad and flat absorption top over a wide incidence angle range for either transverse electric or transverse magnetic polarization depending on the incident direction. The metamaterial absorber unit cell consists of two sets of structures resonating at different but close frequencies. The overall absorption spectrum is the superposition of individual components and becomes flat at the top over a significant bandwidth. The experimental results are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  5. Theoretical study on the photofragment branching ratios and anisotropy parameters of ICl in the second absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Takahide; Yabushita, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    Potential energy curves, transition dipole moments, and non-adiabatic coupling terms of the excited states of ICl molecule have been obtained by the spin-orbit configuration interaction method to examine the branching ratios and the anisotropy parameters of the photodissociation process in the second absorption band. The calculation of the branching ratios with the time-dependent coupled Schrödinger equations, including the quantum interference effect between the 0+(III) and 0+(IV) states, shows good agreement with recent experiments, thus resolves the long standing disagreement. The contribution of the quantum interference effect to the photodissociation process is discussed based on a time-dependent perturbation treatment.

  6. Higher-order mode absorption measurement of X-band choke-mode cavities in a radial line structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Hao; Shi, Jiaru; Wu, Xiaowei; Chen, Huaibi

    2016-04-01

    An experiment is presented to study the higher-order mode (HOM) suppression of X-band choke-mode structures with a vector network analyzer (VNA). Specific radial line disks were built to test the reflection from the corresponding damping load and different choke geometries. The mismatch between the radial lines and the VNA was calibrated through a special multi-short-load calibration method. The measured reflections of different choke geometries showed good agreement with the theoretical calculations and verified the HOM absorption feature of each geometric design.

  7. Analysis of functional groups in atmospheric aerosols by infrared spectroscopy: sparse methods for statistical selection of relevant absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahama, Satoshi; Ruggeri, Giulia; Dillner, Ann M.

    2016-07-01

    Various vibrational modes present in molecular mixtures of laboratory and atmospheric aerosols give rise to complex Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectra. Such spectra can be chemically informative, but they often require sophisticated algorithms for quantitative characterization of aerosol composition. Naïve statistical calibration models developed for quantification employ the full suite of wavenumbers available from a set of spectra, leading to loss of mechanistic interpretation between chemical composition and the resulting changes in absorption patterns that underpin their predictive capability. Using sparse representations of the same set of spectra, alternative calibration models can be built in which only a select group of absorption bands are used to make quantitative prediction of various aerosol properties. Such models are desirable as they allow us to relate predicted properties to their underlying molecular structure. In this work, we present an evaluation of four algorithms for achieving sparsity in FT-IR spectroscopy calibration models. Sparse calibration models exclude unnecessary wavenumbers from infrared spectra during the model building process, permitting identification and evaluation of the most relevant vibrational modes of molecules in complex aerosol mixtures required to make quantitative predictions of various measures of aerosol composition. We study two types of models: one which predicts alcohol COH, carboxylic COH, alkane CH, and carbonyl CO functional group (FG) abundances in ambient samples based on laboratory calibration standards and another which predicts thermal optical reflectance (TOR) organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) mass in new ambient samples by direct calibration of infrared spectra to a set of ambient samples reserved for calibration. We describe the development and selection of each calibration model and evaluate the effect of sparsity on prediction performance. Finally, we ascribe

  8. X/X/Ka-band prime focus feed antenna for the Mars Observer beacon spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, P.; Reilly, H.; Esquivel, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an X/X/Ka-band feed design concept demonstration are presented. The purpose is to show the feasibility of adding a Ka-band beacon to the Mars Observer spacecraft. Scale model radiation patterns were made and analyzed.

  9. Iron absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron rich zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. A lineament study of the Nevada test site is near completion. Two base maps (1:500,000) have been prepared, one of band 7 lineaments and the other of band 5 lineaments. In general, more lineaments and more faults are seen on band 5. About 45% of the lineaments appear to be faults and contacts, the others being predominantly streams, roads, railway tracks, and mountain crests. About 25% of the lineaments are unidentified so far. Special attention is being given to unmapped extensions of faults, groups of unmapped lineaments, and known mineralized areas and alteration zones. Earthquake epicenters recorded from 1869 to 1963 have been plotted on the two base maps. Preliminary examination as yet indicates no basic correlation with the lineaments. Attempts are being made to subtract bands optically, using an I2S viewer, an enlarger, and a data color viewer. Success has been limited so far due to technical difficulties, mainly vignetting and poor light sources, within the machines. Some vegetation and rock type differences, however, have been discerned.

  10. Shape of impurity electronic absorption bands in a nematic liquid crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Aver`yanov, E.M.

    1995-02-01

    It is shown that the anisotropic intermolecular impurity-matrix interactions, statistical orientation properties, and the electronic structure of the uniaxial impurity molecules considerably affect the spectral moments of the impurity electronic adsorption bands in a nematic liquid crystal. 15 refs., 3 figs.

  11. Cesium Absorption Spectrum Perturbed by Argon: Observation of Non-Lorentzian Wing Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    CESIUM ABSORPTION SPECTRUM PERTURBED BY ARGON : OBSERVATION OF NON-LORENTZIAN WING PROPERTIES THESIS Gordon E. Lott, Second Lieutenant, USAF AFIT...PERTURBED BY ARGON : OBSERVATION OF NON-LORENTZIAN WING PROPERTIES THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of Engineering Physics Graduate School of...PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT / APPLPHY / ENP / 12-MOS CESIUM ABSORPTION SPECTRUM PERTURBED BY ARGON : OBSERVATION OF NON-LORENTZIAN

  12. PIC Simulations of Banded Chorus Events from Van Allen Probes Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, X.; Cowee, M.; Friedel, R. H.; Gary, S. P.; Hospodarsky, G. B.; Kletzing, C.; Liu, K.; MacDonald, E.; Reeves, G. D.; Skoug, R. M.; Winske, D.

    2013-12-01

    Banded chorus emissions are whistler waves with two bands separated by a narrow gap at 0.5ωce (ωce is the elctron gyro-frequency) in the frequency spectrum, often observed in the inner magnetosphere. The physical reason for the gap is still puzzling the space community. To better understand banded chorus generation, we identify occurrences of banded chorus in the Van Allen Probes EMFISIS data. Prameters derived from observations are used as initial conditions for our linear theory and nonlinear particle-in-cell simulations. By comparing our simulation results with electron pitch angle distributions from HOPE and wave spectra from EMFISIS, we will test some hypotheses for generation of banded chorus. LA-UR-13-26132.

  13. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-angstroms diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), ubiquitous absorption features in astronomical spectra, have been known since early this century and now number more than a hundred. Ranging from 4,400 angstroms to the near infrared, they differ markedly in depth, width and shape, making the concept of a single carrier unlikely. Whether they are due to gas or grains is not settled, but recent results suggest that the DIB carriers are quite separate from the grains that cause visual extinction. Among molecular candidates the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been proposed as the possible carriers of some of the DIBs, and we present here laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10+ in neon and argon matrices. The strongest absorption feature falls at 4,435 +/- 5 angstroms in the argon matrix and 4,395 +/- 5 angstroms in the neon matrix, both close to the strong 4,430-angstroms DIB. If this or a related pyrene-like species is responsible for this particular band, it must account for 0.2% of all cosmic carbon. The ion also shows an intense but puzzling broad continuum, extending from the ultraviolet to the visible, similar to what is seen in the naphthalene cation and perhaps therefore a common feature of all PAH cations. This may provide an explanation of how PAHs convert a large fraction of interstellar radiation from ultraviolet and visible wavelengths down to the infrared.

  14. ESO Diffuse Interstellar Bands Large Exploration Survey (EDIBLES) - Merging Observations and Laboratory Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2016-01-01

    The Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs) are a set of 500 absorption bands that are detected in the spectra of stars with interstellar clouds in the line of sight. DIBs are found from the NUV to the NIR in the spectra of reddened stars spanning different interstellar environments in our local, and in other galaxies. DIB carriers are a significant part of the interstellar chemical inventory. They are stable and ubiquitous in a broad variety of environments and play a unique role in interstellar physics/chemistry. It has long been realized that the solving of the DIB problem requires a strong synergy between astronomical observations, laboratory astrophysics, and astrophysical modeling of line-of-sights. PAHs are among the molecular species that have been proposed as DIB carriers. We will present an assessment of the PAH-DIB model in view of the progress and the advances that have been achieved over the past years through a series of studies involving astronomical observations of DIBs, laboratory simulation of interstellar analogs for neutrals and ionized PAHs, theoretical calculations of PAH spectra and the modelization of diffuse and translucent interstellar clouds. We will present a summary of what has been learned from these complementary studies, the constraints that can now be derived for the PAHs as DIB carriers in the context of the PAH-DIB model and how these constraints can be applied to the EDIBLES project. The spectra of several neutral and ionized PAHs isolated in the gas phase at low temperature have been measured in the laboratory under experimental conditions that mimic interstellar conditions and are compared with an extensive set of astronomical spectra of reddened, early type stars. The comparisons of astronomical and laboratory data provide upper limits for the abundances of specific neutral PAH molecules and ions along specific lines-of-sight. Something that is not attainable from infrared observations alone. We present the characteristics of the

  15. Calibration of VIIRS F1 Sensor Fire Detection Band Using lunar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McIntire, Jeff; Efremova, Boryana; Xiong, Xiaoxiong

    2012-01-01

    Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Fight 1 (Fl) sensor includes a fire detection band at roughly 4 microns. This spectral band has two gain states; fire detection occurs in the low gain state above approximately 345 K. The thermal bands normally utilize an on-board blackbody to provide on-orbit calibration. However, as the maximum temperature of this blackbody is 315 K, the low gain state of the 4 micron band cannot be calibrated in the same manner as the rest of the thermal bands. Regular observations of the moon provide an alternative calibration source. The lunar surface temperature has been recently mapped by the DIVINER sensor on the LRO platform. The periodic on-board high gain calibration along with the DIVINER surface temperatures was used to determine the emissivity and solar reflectance of the lunar surface at 4 microns; these factors and the lunar data are then used to fit the low gain calibration coefficients of the 4 micron band. Furthermore, the emissivity of the lunar surface is well known near 8.5 microns due to the Christiansen feature (an emissivity maximum associated with Si-O stretching vibrations) and the solar reflectance is negligible. Thus, the 8.5 micron band is used for relative calibration with the 4 micron band to de-trend any temporal variations. In addition, the remaining thermal bands are analyzed in a similar fashion, with both calculated emissivities and solar reflectances produced.

  16. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  17. High energy electron irradiation of interstellar carbonaceous dust analogs: Cosmic ray effects on the carriers of the 3.4 µm absorption band.

    PubMed

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J

    2016-11-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity vs electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 10(8) yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 10(7) yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds.

  18. High energy electron irradiation of interstellar carbonaceous dust analogs: Cosmic ray effects on the carriers of the 3.4 µm absorption band

    PubMed Central

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2017-01-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM), but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity vs electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 108 yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 107 yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds. PMID:28133388

  19. High-energy Electron Irradiation of Interstellar Carbonaceous Dust Analogs: Cosmic-ray Effects on the Carriers of the 3.4 μm Absorption Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maté, Belén; Molpeceres, Germán; Jiménez-Redondo, Miguel; Tanarro, Isabel; Herrero, Víctor J.

    2016-11-01

    The effects of cosmic rays on the carriers of the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band have been investigated in the laboratory. This band is attributed to stretching vibrations of CH3 and CH2 in carbonaceous dust. It is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears in dense clouds. Destruction of CH3 and CH2 by cosmic rays could become relevant in dense clouds, shielded from the external ultraviolet field. For the simulations, samples of hydrogenated amorphous carbon (a-C:H) have been irradiated with 5 keV electrons. The decay of the band intensity versus electron fluence reflects a-C:H dehydrogenation, which is well described by a model assuming that H2 molecules, formed by the recombination of H atoms liberated through CH bond breaking, diffuse out of the sample. The CH bond destruction rates derived from the present experiments are in good accordance with those from previous ion irradiation experiments of HAC. The experimental simplicity of electron bombardment has allowed the use of higher-energy doses than in the ion experiments. The effects of cosmic rays on the aliphatic components of cosmic dust are found to be small. The estimated cosmic-ray destruction times for the 3.4 μm band carriers lie in the 108 yr range and cannot account for the disappearance of this band in dense clouds, which have characteristic lifetimes of 3 × 107 yr. The results invite a more detailed investigation of the mechanisms of CH bond formation and breaking in the intermediate region between diffuse and dense clouds.

  20. Presence of terrestrial atmospheric gas absorption bands in standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance curves in the near-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Green, R O

    1995-09-20

    The solar irradiance curves compiled by Wehrli [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Publ. 615 (World Radiation Center, Davosdorf, Switzerland, 1985)] and by Neckel and Labs [Sol. Phys. 90, 205 (1984)] are widely used. These curves were obtained based on measurements of solar radiation from the ground and from aircraft platforms. Contaminations in these curves by atmospheric gaseous absorptions were inevitable. A technique for deriving the transmittance spectrum of the Sun's atmosphere from high-resolution (0.01 cm(-1)) solar occultation spectra measured above the Earth's atmosphere by the use of atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) aboard the space shuttle is described. The comparisons of the derived ATMOS solar transmittance spectrum with the two solar irradiance curves show that he curve derived by Wehrli contains many absorption features in the 2.0-2.5-µm region that are not of solar origin, whereas the curve obtained by Neckel and Labs is completely devoid of weak solar absorption features that should be there. An Earth atmospheric oxygen band at 1.268 µm and a water-vapor band near 0.94 µm are likely present in the curve obtained by Wehrli. It is shown that the solar irradiance measurement errors in some narrow spectral intervals can be as large as 20%. An improved solar irradiance spectrum is formed by the incorporation of the solar transmittance spectrum derived from the ATMOS data into the solar irradiance spectrum from Neckel and Labs. The availability of a new solar spectrum from 50 to 50 000 cm(-1) from the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is also discussed.

  1. Infrared, visible and ultraviolet absorptions of transition metal doped ZnS crystals with spin-polarized bands

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, J.H.; Ding, J.W.; Cao, J.X.; Zhang, Y.L.

    2011-03-15

    The formation energies, electronic structures and optical properties of TM:ZnS systems (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) are investigated by using the first principles method. It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures have about the same stability, and thus can coexist in the TM:ZnS system. From the wurtzite TM:ZnS, especially, a partially filled intermediate band (IB) is obtained at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}, while it is absent at TM=Mn{sup 2+} and Co{sup 2+}. The additional absorptions are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet (UV) regions, due to the completely spin-polarized IB at Fermi level. The results are very helpful for both the designs and applications of TM:ZnS opto-electronics devices, such as solar-cell prototype. -- Graphical abstract: Absorption coefficients of w-TM{sub x}Zn{sub 1-x}S crystals (TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Mn{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 2+}, Co{sup 2+} and Ni{sup 2+}) at x=0.028. The results may be helpful for the design and applications of TM:ZnS devices, especially for the new high efficiency solar-cell prototype, UV detector and UV LEDs. Display Omitted Research highlights: > It is found that the wurtzite and zinc-blende structures can coexist in TM:ZnS. > An intermediate band is obtained in TM:ZnS at TM=Cr{sup 2+}, Ni{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 2+}. > The absorption coefficients are obtained in infrared, visible and ultraviolet regions.

  2. Synergic use of TOMS and Aeronet Observations for Characterization of Aerosol Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, O.; Bhartia, P. K.; Dubovik, O.; Holben, B.; Siniuk, A.

    2003-01-01

    The role of aerosol absorption on the radiative transfer balance of the earth-atmosphere system is one of the largest sources of uncertainty in the analysis of global climate change. Global measurements of aerosol single scattering albedo are, therefore, necessary to properly assess the radiative forcing effect of aerosols. Remote sensing of aerosol absorption is currently carried out using both ground (Aerosol Robotic Network) and space (Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer) based observations. The satellite technique uses measurements of backscattered near ultraviolet radiation. Carbonaceous aerosols, resulting from the combustion of biomass, are one of the most predominant absorbing aerosol types in the atmosphere. In this presentation, TOMS and AERONET retrievals of single scattering albedo of carbonaceous aerosols, are compared for different environmental conditions: agriculture related biomass burning in South America and Africa and peat fires in Eastern Europe. The AERONET and TOMS derived aerosol absorption information are in good quantitative agreement. The most absorbing smoke is detected over the African Savanna. Aerosol absorption over the Brazilian rain forest is less absorbing. Absorption by aerosol particles resulting from peat fires in Eastern Europe is weaker than the absorption measured in Africa and South America. This analysis shows that the near UV satellite method of aerosol absorption characterization has the sensitivity to distinguish different levels of aerosol absorption. The analysis of the combined AERONET-TOMS observations shows a high degree of synergy between satellite and ground based observations.

  3. On the sub-band gap optical absorption in heat treated cadmium sulphide thin film deposited on glass by chemical bath deposition technique

    SciTech Connect

    Chattopadhyay, P.; Karim, B.; Guha Roy, S.

    2013-12-28

    The sub-band gap optical absorption in chemical bath deposited cadmium sulphide thin films annealed at different temperatures has been critically analyzed with special reference to Urbach relation. It has been found that the absorption co-efficient of the material in the sub-band gap region is nearly constant up to a certain critical value of the photon energy. However, as the photon energy exceeds the critical value, the absorption coefficient increases exponentially indicating the dominance of Urbach rule. The absorption coefficients in the constant absorption region and the Urbach region have been found to be sensitive to annealing temperature. A critical examination of the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient indicates two different kinds of optical transitions to be operative in the sub-band gap region. After a careful analyses of SEM images, energy dispersive x-ray spectra, and the dc current-voltage characteristics, we conclude that the absorption spectra in the sub-band gap domain is possibly associated with optical transition processes involving deep levels and the grain boundary states of the material.

  4. Broad Band Light Absorption and High Photocurrent of (In,Ga)N Nanowire Photoanodes Resulting from a Radial Stark Effect.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Bogdanoff, Peter; Corfdir, Pierre; Brandt, Oliver; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-12-21

    The photoelectrochemical properties of (In,Ga)N nanowire photoanodes are investigated using H2O2 as a hole scavenger to prevent photocorrosion. Under simulated solar illumination, In0.16Ga0.84N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy show a high photocurrent of 2.7 mA/cm(2) at 1.2 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode. This value is almost the theoretical maximum expected from the corresponding band gap (2.8 eV) for homogeneous bulk material without taking into account surface effects. These nanowires exhibit a higher incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency over a broader wavelength range and a higher photocurrent than a compact layer with higher In content of 28%. These results are explained by the combination of built-in electric fields at the nanowire sidewall surfaces and compositional fluctuations in (In,Ga)N, which gives rise to a radial Stark effect. This effect enables spatially indirect transitions at energies much lower than the band gap. The resulting broad band light absorption leads to high photocurrents. This benefit of the radial Stark effect in (In,Ga)N nanowires for solar harvesting applications opens up the perspective to break the theoretical limit for photocurrents.

  5. Direct observation of single layer graphene oxide reduction through spatially resolved, single sheet absorption/emission microscopy.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Denis A; Morozov, Yurii V; McDonald, Matthew P; Vietmeyer, Felix; Hodak, Jose H; Kuno, Masaru

    2014-06-11

    Laser reduction of graphene oxide (GO) offers unique opportunities for the rapid, nonchemical production of graphene. By tuning relevant reduction parameters, the band gap and conductivity of reduced GO can be precisely controlled. In situ monitoring of single layer GO reduction is therefore essential. In this report, we show the direct observation of laser-induced, single layer GO reduction through correlated changes to its absorption and emission. Absorption/emission movies illustrate the initial stages of single layer GO reduction, its transition to reduced-GO (rGO) as well as its subsequent decomposition upon prolonged laser illumination. These studies reveal GO's photoreduction life cycle and through it native GO/rGO absorption coefficients, their intrasheet distributions as well as their spatial heterogeneities. Extracted absorption coefficients for unreduced GO are α405 nm ≈ 6.5 ± 1.1 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 2.1 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 1.1 ± 0.3 × 10(4) cm(-1) while corresponding rGO α-values are α405 nm ≈ 21.6 ± 0.6 × 10(4) cm(-1), α520 nm ≈ 16.9 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1), and α640 nm ≈ 14.5 ± 0.4 × 10(4) cm(-1). More importantly, the correlated absorption/emission imaging provides us with unprecedented insight into GO's underlying photoreduction mechanism, given our ability to spatially resolve its kinetics and to connect local rate constants to activation energies. On a broader level, the developed absorption imaging is general and can be applied toward investigating the optical properties of other two-dimensional materials, especially those that are nonemissive and are invisible to current single molecule optical techniques.

  6. Ion irradiation of carbonaceous interstellar analogues. Effects of cosmic rays on the 3.4 μm interstellar absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godard, M.; Féraud, G.; Chabot, M.; Carpentier, Y.; Pino, T.; Brunetto, R.; Duprat, J.; Engrand, C.; Bréchignac, P.; D'Hendecourt, L.; Dartois, E.

    2011-05-01

    Context. A 3.4 μm absorption band (around 2900 cm-1), assigned to aliphatic C-H stretching modes of hydrogenated amorphous carbons (a-C:H), is widely observed in the diffuse interstellar medium, but disappears or is modified in dense clouds. This spectral difference between different phases of the interstellar medium reflects the processing of dust in different environments. Cosmic ray bombardment is one of the interstellar processes that make carbonaceous dust evolve. Aims: We investigate the effects of cosmic rays on the interstellar 3.4 μm absorption band carriers. Methods: Samples of carbonaceous interstellar analogues (a-C:H and soot) were irradiated at room temperature by swift ions with energy in the MeV range (from 0.2 to 160 MeV). The dehydrogenation and chemical bonding modifications that occurred during irradiation were studied with IR spectroscopy. Results: For all samples and all ions/energies used, we observed a decrease of the aliphatic C-H absorption bands intensity with the ion fluence. This evolution agrees with a model that describes the hydrogen loss as caused by the molecular recombination of two free H atoms created by the breaking of C-H bonds by the impinging ions. The corresponding destruction cross section and asymptotic hydrogen content are obtained for each experiment and their behaviour over a large range of ion stopping powers are inferred. Using elemental abundances and energy distributions of galactic cosmic rays, we investigated the implications of these results in different astrophysical environments. The results are compared to the processing by UV photons and H atoms in different regions of the interstellar medium. Conclusions: The destruction of aliphatic C-H bonds by cosmic rays occurs in characteristic times of a few 108 years, and it appears that even at longer time scales, cosmic rays alone cannot explain the observed disappearance of this spectral signature in dense regions. In diffuse interstellar medium, the formation

  7. Fluorinated graphene oxide for enhanced S and X-band microwave absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sudeep, P. M.; Vinayasree, S.; Mohanan, P.; Ajayan, P. M.; Narayanan, T. N.; Anantharaman, M. R.

    2015-06-01

    Here we report the microwave absorbing properties of three graphene derivatives, namely, graphene oxide (GO), fluorinated GO (FGO, containing 5.6 at. % Fluorine (F)), and highly FGO (HFGO, containing 23 at. % F). FGO is known to be exhibiting improved electrochemical and electronic properties when compared to GO. Fluorination modifies the dielectric properties of GO and hence thought of as a good microwave absorber. The dielectric permittivities of GO, FGO, and HFGO were estimated in the S (2 GHz to 4 GHz) and X (8 GHz to 12 GHz) bands by employing cavity perturbation technique. For this, suspensions containing GO/FGO/HFGO were made in N-Methyl Pyrrolidone (NMP) and were subjected to cavity perturbation. The reflection loss was then estimated and it was found that −37 dB (at 3.2 GHz with 6.5 mm thickness) and −31 dB (at 2.8 GHz with 6 mm thickness) in the S band and a reflection loss of −18 dB (at 8.4 GHz with 2.5 mm thickness) and −10 dB (at 11 GHz with 2 mm thickness) in the X band were achieved for 0.01 wt. % of FGO and HFGO in NMP, respectively, suggesting that these materials can serve as efficient microwave absorbers even at low concentrations.

  8. Broad band nonlinear optical absorption measurements of the laser dye IR26 using white light continuum Z-scan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dey, Soumyodeep; Bongu, Sudhakara Reddy; Bisht, Prem Ballabh

    2017-03-01

    We study the nonlinear optical response of a standard dye IR26 using the Z-scan technique, but with the white light continuum. The continuum source of wavelength from 450 nm to 1650 nm has been generated from the photonic crystal fiber on pumping with 772 nm of Ti:Sapphire oscillator. The use of broadband incident pulse enables us to probe saturable absorption (SA) and reverse saturable absorption (RSA) over the large spectral range with a single Z-scan measurement. The system shows SA in the resonant region while it turns to RSA in the non-resonant regions. The low saturation intensity of the dye can be explained based on the simultaneous excitation from ground states to various higher energy levels with the help of composite energy level diagram. The cumulative effects of excited state absorption and thermal induced nonlinear optical effects are responsible for the observed RSA.

  9. Pioneer 11 observations of trapped particle absorption by the Jovian ring and the satellites 1979, J1, J2, and J3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pyle, K. R.; Mckibben, R. B.; Simpson, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Pioneer 11 low energy telescope observation of charged particles around the Jovian satellites Amalthea, 1979 J1, J2, and J3, and the Jupiter ring are examined in the light of Voyager optical data from the same region. Good agreement was found in the absorption features of 0.5-8.7 MeV protons, electrons with energies of 3.4 MeV or more, and medium-Z nuclei. The heavier nuclei are suggested to be oxygen and sulfur particles with energies exceeding 70 MeV/nucleon. The observed intensity features in the regularly spaced radiation bands are interpreted as ring and satellite absorption.

  10. Narrow absorption lines with two observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhi-Fu; Gu, Qiu-Sheng; Chen, Yan-Mei; Cao, Yue

    2015-07-01

    We assemble 3524 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) with repeated observations to search for variations of the narrow C IV λ λ 1548,1551 and Mg II λ λ 2796,2803 absorption doublets in spectral regions shortward of 7000 Å in the observed frame, which corresponds to time-scales of about 150-2643 d in the quasar rest frame. In these quasar spectra, we detect 3580 C IV absorption systems with zabs = 1.5188-3.5212 and 1809 Mg II absorption systems with zabs = 0.3948-1.7167. In term of the absorber velocity (β) distribution in the quasar rest frame, we find a substantial number of C IV absorbers with β < 0.06, which might be connected to absorption of quasar outflows. The outflow absorption peaks at υ ≈ 2000 km s^{-1} and drops rapidly below this peak value. Among 3580 C IV absorption systems, 52 systems (˜1.5 per cent) show obvious variations in equivalent widths in the absorber rest frame (Wr): 16 enhanced, 16 emerged, 12 weakened and 8 disappeared systems, respectively. We find that changes in Wrλ1548 are related neither to the time-scales of the two SDSS observations nor to absorber velocities in the quasar rest frame. Variable absorption in low-ionization species is important to constrain the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. There are two variable Mg II absorption systems measured from SDSS spectra detected by Hacker et al. However, in our Mg II absorption sample, we find that neither shows variable absorption with confident levels of >4σ for λ2796 lines and >3σ for λ2803 lines.

  11. A Preview of AMSR: Airborne C-band Microwave Radiometer (ACMR) Observations from SGP99

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward; Doiron, Terence; Principe, Caleb; Gong, Lei; Shiue, James

    2000-01-01

    Although L-band is generally considered ideal for passive microwave sensing of soil moisture, near-future satellite observing systems such as Advanced Mechanically Scanned Radiometer (AMSR) will provide C-band data for several years before any L-band data might become available. The Southern Great Plains'99 (SGP99) Experiment was designed to generate C-band observations suitable for testing and refinement of AMSR-era soil moisture retrieval algorithms. C-band data collected using the Airborne C-band Microwave Radiometer (ACMR), a new high-accuracy NASA/GSFC instrument, clearly demonstrated a strong response to a 9-day drydown event as well as to differences between the northern (cooler & wetter) and southern (warmer & dryer) areas covered by the P-3 flights. For example, the H-polarized brightness temperatures observed during the first three days of the drydown increased up to 50 K in the northern areas. These observations represent a preview of what we can expect from AMSR, albeit at 3-km spatial resolution vs. approximately 60 km for AMSR. Initial results of soil-vegetation microwave modeling will also be presented to estimate the relative contributions of soil physical temperature, canopy physical temperature, soil moisture, and canopy moisture. Significant radio-frequency interference (RFI) was evident during the experiment, and amelioration strategies will be discussed. The net effect of RFI (an upward bias in brightnesses) when averaged over an AMSR footprint is expected to be more subtle.

  12. On the Use of Difference Bands for Modeling SF_6 Absorption in the 10μm Atmospheric Window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Mbaye; Manceron, Laurent; Roy, P.; Boudon, Vincent; Loete, Michel

    2016-06-01

    To model correctly the SF_6 atmospheric absorption requires the knowledge of the spectroscopic parameters of all states involved in the numerous hot bands in the 10,5μm atmospheric transparency window. However, due to their overlapping, a direct analysis of the hot bands near the 10,5μm absorption of SF_6 in the atmospheric window is not possible. It is necessary to use another strategy, gathering information in the far and mid infrared regions on initial and final states to compute the relevant total absorption. In this talk, we present new results from the analysis of spectra recorded at the AILES beamline at the SOLEIL Synchrotron facility. For these measurements, we used a IFS125HR interferometer combined with the synchrotron radiation in the 100-3200 wn range, coupled to a cryogenic multiple pass cell. The optical path length was varied from 45 to 141m with measuring temperatures between 223 and 153+/-5 K. The new information obtained on νb{2}+νb{4}-νb{5}, 2νb{5}-νb{6} and νb{3}+νb{6}-νb{4} allowed to derive improved parameters for νb{5}, 2νb{5} and νb{3}+νb{6}. In turn, they are used to model the more important νb{3}+νb{5}-νb{5} and νb{3}+νb{6}-νb{6} hot band contributions. By including these new parameters in the XTDS model, we substantially improved the SF_6 parameters used to model the atmosphere. F. Kwabia Tchana, F. Willaert, X. Landsheere, J. M. Flaud, L. Lago, M. Chapuis, P. Roy, L. Manceron. A new, low temperature long-pass cell for mid-IR to THz Spectroscopy and Synchrotron Radiation Use. Rev. Sci. Inst. 84, 093101, (2013) C. Wenger, V. Boudon, M. Rotger, M. Sanzharov, and J.-P. Champion,"XTDS and SPVIEW: Graphical tools for Analysis and Simulation of High Resolution Molecular Spectra", J. Mol. Spectrosc. 251, 102 (2008)

  13. Europa's ultraviolet absorption band (260 to 320 nm) - Temporal and spatial evidence from IUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert, Maureen E.; Nelson, Robert M.; Lane, Arthur L.; Matson, Dennis L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of 33 IUE UV spectra of Europa, obtained from 1978 to 1982 for orbital phase angles of 21 to 343 deg, confirms that the Lane et al. (1981) absorption feature, centered at 280 nm, is most clearly revealed when 223-333 deg orbital phase angle spectra are ratioed to those nearest 90 deg. The feature's strength is noted to have persisted over the 5-year period studied, suggesting that no large endogenically or exogenically generated changes in surface sulfur dioxide concentration have occurred. These results further substantiate the Lane et al. hypothesis that the feature is due to the implantation of Io plasma torus-derived sulfur ions on the Europa trailing side's water-ice surface.

  14. Energy conversion within infrared plasmonic absorption metamaterials for multi-band resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongqian; Su, Lei; Xu, Xiaolun; Zhang, Chenglin; Wang, Binbin

    2015-05-01

    The energy conversion within the cross-shaped plasmonic absorber metamaterials (PAM) was investigated theoretically and numerically in the infrared range based on the Poynting's theorem of electromagnetic energy. From the microscopic details, the heat generation owing to the electric current accounts for the majority of the energy conversion, while the magnetic resonance plays a negligible role. The PAMs possess three distinct resonant peaks standing independently, which are attributed to the polarization sensitive excitation of plasmonic resonance. Field redistribution and enhancement associated with multiplex resonant electromagnetic wave passing through the PAM medium provided insight into the energy conversion processes inside the nanostructure. The research results will assist the design of novel plasmon enhanced infrared detectors with multiple-band detection.

  15. Confinement effect of laser ablation plume in liquids probed by self-absorption of C{sub 2} Swan band emission

    SciTech Connect

    Sakka, Tetsuo; Saito, Kotaro; Ogata, Yukio H.

    2005-01-01

    The (0,0) Swan band of the C{sub 2} molecules in a laser ablation plume produced on the surface of graphite target submerged in water was used as a probe to estimate the density of C{sub 2} molecules in the plume. Observed emission spectra were reproduced excellently by introducing a self-absorption parameter to the theoretical spectral profile expected by a rotational population distribution at a certain temperature. The optical density of the ablation plume as a function of time was determined as a best-fit parameter by the quantitative fitting of the whole spectral profile. The results show high optical densities for the laser ablation plume in water compared with that in air. It is related to the plume confinement or the expansion, which are the important phenomena influencing the characteristics of laser ablation plumes in liquids.

  16. Tentative identification of the 780/cm nu-4 band Q branch of chlorine nitrate in high-resolution solar absorption spectra of the stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Malathy Devi, V.

    1985-01-01

    According to models of the photochemistry of the stratosphere, chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) is an important temporary reservoir of stratospheric chlorine. At night, ClO is believed to combine in a three-body reaction with NO2 to form chlorine nitrate. During daylight, chlorine nitrate is destroyed by photolysis to form free chlorine and NO3. Infrared spectroscopy has the potential to provide a technique for conducting important quantitative measurements of stratospheric chlorine nitrate. The present paper reports a detailed study of spectra in the 780/cm region. This study has led to the tentative identification of the nu-4 band Q branch of ClONO2 as a significant contributor to the observed stratospheric absorption near 780.21 per cm.

  17. Thermodynamic consequence of the new attribution of bands in the electronic absorption spectrum of electron donor-iodine-solvent systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Sergey P.

    1999-06-01

    The subject review pays attention to the peculiarities in behaviour of bands in the electronic absorption spectra of electron donor-iodine-solvent systems, the appearance of which is associated with the intermolecular interaction of molecular iodine with electron donor organic molecules. The new concept of the bands’ attribution to the isomeric equilibrium molecular charge-transfer complexes (CTCs) of CTC-I and CTC-II types is considered. The features of possible phase transitions in the solid state are discussed on the basis of the thermodynamic properties and electronic structures of the CTC-I and CTC-II in electron donor-iodine-solvent systems. The stabilisation of the CTC-II structure with the temperature lowering coincided in many cases with the electrons’ localisation in the solid state structures having charge-transfer bonds.

  18. Is a pyrene-like molecular ion the cause of the 4,430-A diffuse interstellar absorption band?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, F.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    The diffuse interstellar band (DIB) absorption features of astronomical spectra are suggested by recent results to be separable from the grains that cause visual extinction. Attention is presently given to laboratory measurements of the optical spectrum of the pyrene cation C16H10(+), which is one of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular candidates proposed as carriers for DIBs. This ion exhibits an intense but strangely broad continuum similar to that of the naphthalene cation, so that this may be a common feature of all PAH cations and the basis of an explanation for PAHs' converting of an interstellar radiation fraction as large as that from the UV and visible range down to the IR.

  19. Observations of broad-band circular polarization in sunspots - Magnetic field correspondence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Illing, R. M. E.; Landman, D. A.; Mickey, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The present work proposes a general rule relating the polarity of broad-band (spectral range: 5250 A to 5350 A) circular polarization fields observed in sunspots to that of the corresponding magnetic fields. The rule is illustrated with observations of particular spots.

  20. Incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy of the marine boundary layer species I2, IO and OIO.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Stewart; Gherman, Titus; Ruth, Albert A; Orphal, Johannes

    2008-08-14

    The novel combination of incoherent broad-band cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) and a discharge-flow tube for the study of three key atmospheric trace species, I(2), IO and OIO, is reported. Absorption measurements of I(2) and OIO at lambda=525-555 nm and IO at lambda=420-460 nm were made using a compact cavity-enhanced spectrometer employing a 150 W short-arc Xenon lamp. The use of a flow system allowed the monitoring of the chemically short-lived radical species IO and OIO to be conducted over timescales of several seconds. We report detection limits of approximately 26 pmol mol(-1) for I(2) (L=81 cm, acquisition time 60 s), approximately 45 pmol mol(-1) for OIO (L=42.5 cm, acquisition time 5 s) and approximately 210 pmol mol(-1) for IO (L=70 cm, acquisition time 60 s), demonstrating the usefulness of this approach for monitoring these important species in both laboratory studies and field campaigns.

  1. Anomalous band gap behavior in mixed Sn and Pb perovskites enables broadening of absorption spectrum in solar cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Stoumpos, Constantinos C; Chang, Robert P H; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2014-06-04

    Perovskite-based solar cells have recently been catapulted to the cutting edge of thin-film photovoltaic research and development because of their promise for high-power conversion efficiencies and ease of fabrication. Two types of generic perovskites compounds have been used in cell fabrication: either Pb- or Sn-based. Here, we describe the performance of perovskite solar cells based on alloyed perovskite solid solutions of methylammonium tin iodide and its lead analogue (CH3NH3Sn(1-x)Pb(x)I3). We exploit the fact that, the energy band gaps of the mixed Pb/Sn compounds do not follow a linear trend (the Vegard's law) in between these two extremes of 1.55 and 1.35 eV, respectively, but have narrower bandgap (<1.3 eV), thus extending the light absorption into the near-infrared (~1,050 nm). A series of solution-processed solid-state photovoltaic devices using a mixture of organic spiro-OMeTAD/lithium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide/pyridinium additives as hole transport layer were fabricated and studied as a function of Sn to Pb ratio. Our results show that CH3NH3Sn(0.5)Pb(0.5)I3 has the broadest light absorption and highest short-circuit photocurrent density ~20 mA cm(-2) (obtained under simulated full sunlight of 100 mW cm(-2)).

  2. The Fundamental Quadrupole Band of (14)N2: Line Positions from High-Resolution Stratospheric Solar Absorption Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, D. G.; Grunson, M. R.; Farmer, C. B.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this note is to report accurate measurements of the positions of O- and S-branch lines of the (1-0) vibration-rotation quadrupole band of molecular nitrogen ((14)N2) and improved Dunham coefficients derived from a simultaneous least-squares analysis of these measurements and selected infrared and far infrared data taken from the literature. The new measurements have been derived from stratospheric solar occultation spectra recorded with Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) instruments operated at unapodized spectral resolutions of 0.002 and 0.01 /cm. The motivation for the present investigation is the need for improved N2 line parameters for use in IR atmospheric remote sensing investigations. The S branch of the N2 (1-0) quadrupole band is ideal for calibrating the line-of-sight airmasses of atmospheric spectra since the strongest lines are well placed in an atmospheric window, their absorption is relatively insensitive to temperature and is moderately strong (typical line center depths of 10 to 50% in high-resolution ground-based solar spectra and in lower stratospheric solar occultation spectra), and the volume mixing ratio of nitrogen is constant in the atmosphere and well known. However, a recent investigation has'shown the need to improve the accuracies of the N2 fine positions, intensities, air-broadened half-widths, and their temperature dependences to fully exploit this calibration capability (1). The present investigation addresses the problem of improving the accuracy of the N2 line positions.

  3. OH Meinel Band Polar Nightglow in the Mars Atmosphere from MRO CRISM Limb Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clancy, R. T.; Sandor, B. J.; Garcia Munoz, A.; Lefevre, F.; Smith, M. D.; Wolff, M. J.; Murchie, S. L.

    2012-12-01

    Mars Reconnaisssance Orbiter (MRO) CRISM limb observations over the 2010-2012 period present weak hydroxyl emission in the Meinel bands near 1.4 and 2.9 micron wavelengths. This emission is observed in polar nightglow, over latitudes/seasons/altitudes for which O2 singlet delta polar nightglow (1.27, 1.57 microns) has been detected in CRISM limb nearIR spectra (Clancy et al., JGR, in press 2012). Both polar nightglow phenomena result from poleward transport of odd oxygen/hydrogen into the winter polar, upper atmosphere, whereupon descent to 40-70 km altitudes leads to O2 recombination (O+O+M, producing O2 singlet delta emission) and ozone destruction (O3+H, produciing Meinel band emission). We compare the observed OH band emission rates and structure (1-0, 2-1, 3-2, 2-0) to LMD MGCM simulations of polar night odd oxygen and hydrogen distributions (in time and space, eg Lefèvre et al, Nature, 454, 2008) in the context of band emission models employing "sudden death" versus collisional cascade deactivation (García-Muñoz et al, Icarus, 176, 2005). Existing LMD MGCM comparisons with coincident CRISM polar night O2 singelt delta observations provide direct photochemical constraints to support a uniquely diagnostic view of the quenching mechanisms associated with OH Meinel band emission.

  4. Direct observation of asymmetric band structure of bilayer graphene through quantum capacitance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanayama, Kaoru; Nagashio, Kosuke; Nishimura, Tomonori; Toriumi, Akira

    2014-03-01

    Although upper conduction and valence sub-bands in bilayer graphene are known to be asymmetric, a detailed analysis based on the electrical measurements is very limited due to the infirm quality of gate insulator. In this study, the electrical quality of the top-gate Y2O3 insulator is drastically improved by the high-pressure O2 post-deposition annealing at 100 atm and the carrier density of ~8*1013 cm-2 is achieved. In quantum capacitance measurements, the drastic increase of the density of states is observed in addition to the van Hove singularity, suggesting that the Fermi energy reaches upper sub-band. At the same carrier density, the sudden reduction of the conductivity is observed, indicating that the inter-band scattering occurs. The estimated carrier density required to fill the upper sub-bands is different between electron and hole sides, i.e., asymmetric band structure between upper conduction and valence bands is revealed by the electrical measurements.

  5. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; de Sa, S. S.; Martin, S. T.; Alexander, M. L.; Watson, T. B.; Aiken, A. C.; Springston, S. R.; Artaxo, P.

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regarding the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is

  6. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: Method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, X.; Heald, C. L.; Sedlacek, A.; ...

    2016-10-13

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood leading to large uncertainties in modelling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple Absorption Ångström Exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regardingmore » the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new method that decreases the uncertainties associated with estimating BrC absorption. By applying this method to multi-wavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites, we estimate that BrC globally contributes 6-40% of the absorption at 440nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with BC/OA mass ratio. Based on the variability of BC properties and BC/OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.2 m2/g for OA-MAC at 440nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440nm for BrC is generally ~4 world-wide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of Manaus, Brazil) reveal no significant relationship between BrC absorptivity and photochemical aging in typical urban influenced conditions. However, the absorption of BrC measured during the biomass burning season near Manaus is found to decrease with photochemical aging with a lifetime of ~1 day. This lifetime is comparable to

  7. A survey of local interstellar hydrogen from OAO-2 observations of Lyman alpha absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin far ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OAO-2 observed the wavelength region near 1216 A for 69 stars of spectral type B2 or earlier. From the strength of the observed interstellar L sub alpha absorption, atomic hydrogen column densities were derived over distances averaging 300 pc away from the sun. The OAO data were compared to synthetic ultraviolet spectra, originally derived from earlier higher resolution rocket observations, which were computer processed to simulate the effects of absorption by different amounts of hydrogen followed by the instrumental blending.

  8. Three-pulse femtosecond spectroscopy of PbSe nanocrystals: 1S bleach nonlinearity and sub-band-edge excited-state absorption assignment.

    PubMed

    Gdor, Itay; Shapiro, Arthur; Yang, Chunfan; Yanover, Diana; Lifshitz, Efrat; Ruhman, Sanford

    2015-02-24

    Above band-edge photoexcitation of PbSe nanocrystals induces strong below band gap absorption as well as a multiphased buildup of bleaching in the 1Se1Sh transition. The amplitudes and kinetics of these features deviate from expectations based on biexciton shifts and state filling, which are the mechanisms usually evoked to explain them. To clarify these discrepancies, the same transitions are investigated here by double-pump-probe spectroscopy. Re-exciting in the below band gap induced absorption characteristic of hot excitons is shown to produce additional excitons with high probability. In addition, pump-probe experiments on a sample saturated with single relaxed excitons prove that the resulting 1Se1Sh bleach is not linear with the number of excitons per nanocrystal. This finding holds for two samples differing significantly in size, demonstrating its generality. Analysis of the results suggests that below band edge induced absorption in hot exciton states is due to excited-state absorption and not to shifted absorption of cold carriers and that 1Se1Sh bleach signals are not an accurate counter of sample excitons when their distribution includes multiexciton states.

  9. Observation of the single step links of the yrast superdeformed band in {sup 194}Pb

    SciTech Connect

    Hannachi, F.; Lopez-Martens, A.; Schueck, C.

    1996-12-01

    The EUROGAM array has been used to investigate the decay out of the yrast superdeformed (SD) band in {sup 194}Pb. Eigth single step decays from the lowest observed SD states to low-lying states at normal deformation (ND) have been identified. From this observation, the excitation energy (4877 {plus_minus} 1.5 keV) and the spin (6+) of the lowest observed SD state in {sup 194}Pb are established.

  10. Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectrum of the T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 Transition of Acrolein: Analysis of the 0^0_0 Band Rotational Contour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlavacek, Nikolaus C.; McAnally, Michael O.; Drucker, Stephen

    2012-06-01

    Acrolein (propenal, CH_2=CH---CH=O) is the simplest conjugated enal molecule and serves as a prototype for investigating the photochemical properties of larger enals and enones. Acrolein has a coplanar arrangement of heavy atoms in its ground electronic state. Much of the photochemistry is mediated by the T_1(π,π*) state, which has a CH_2--twisted equilibrium structure. In solution, the T_1(π,π*) state is typically accessed via intersystem crossing from an intially prepared planar S_1(n,π*) state. An intermediate in this photophysical transformation is the lowest ^3 (n,π*) state, a planar species with adiabatic excitation energy below S_1 and above T_1(π,π*). The present work focuses on this ^3 (n,π*) intermediate state; it is designated T_1(n,π*) as the lowest-energy triplet state of acrolein having a planar equilibrium structure. The T_1(n,π*) ← S_0 band system, with origin near 412 nm, was first recorded in the 1970s at medium (0.5 cm-1) resolution using a long-path absorption cell. Here we report the cavity ringdown spectrum of the 0^0_0 band, recorded using a pulsed dye laser with 0.1 cm-1 spectral bandwidth. The spectrum was measured under both bulk-gas (room-temperature) and jet-cooled conditions. The band contour in each spectrum was analyzed by using a computer program developed for simulating and fitting the rotational structure of singlet-triplet transitions. The assignment of several resolved sub-band heads in the room-temperature spectrum permitted approximate fitting of the inertial constants for the T_1(n,π*) state. The determined values (cm-1) are A=1.662, B=0.1485, C=0.1363. For the parameters A and (B+C)/2, estimated uncertainties of ± 0.003 cm-1 and ± 0.0004 cm-1, respectively, correspond to a range of values that produce qualitatively satisfactory global agreement with the observed room-temperature contour. The fitted inertial constants were used to simulate the rotational contour of the 0^0_0 band under jet-cooled conditions

  11. Electron concentrations calculated from the lower hybrid resonance noise band observed by Ogo 3.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burtis, W. J.

    1973-01-01

    A noise band at the lower hybrid resonance (LHR) is often detected by the VLF and ELF receivers on Ogo 3, using the electric antenna. In some cases the noise band is at the geometric mean gyrofrequency as measured by the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) magnetometer, and local LHR in a dense H(+) plasma is indicated; in such cases, electron concentration can be calculated, if it is assumed that heavy ions are negligible. Observations at midlatitudes and altitudes of a few earth radii show local concentrations as low as 1.4 electrons/cu cm. In one case the concentrations obtained from the LHR noise band agree with those measured simultaneously by the GSFC ion mass spectrometer within a factor of 2. In another case the concentration is observed to fall by a factor of 2 in 150 km and then to decrease roughly as R to the minus fourth power, in agreement with whistler measurements outside the plasmapause.

  12. Observation of Nonlinear Looped Band Structure of Bose-Einstein condensates in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldschmidt, Elizabeth; Koller, Silvio; Brown, Roger; Wyllie, Robert; Wilson, Ryan; Porto, Trey

    2016-05-01

    We study experimentally the stability of excited, interacting states of bosons in a double-well optical lattice in regimes where the nonlinear interactions are expected to induce ``swallow-tail'' looped band structure. By carefully preparing different initial coherent states and observing their subsequent decay, we observe distinct decay rates, which provide direct evidence for multi-valued band structure. The double well lattice both stabilizes the looped band structure and allows for dynamic preparation of different initial states, including states within the loop structure. We confirm our state preparation procedure with dynamic Gross-Pitaevskii calculations. The excited loop states are found to be more stable than dynamically unstable ground states, but decay faster than expected based on a mean-field stability calculation, indicating the importance of correlations beyond a mean-field description. Now at Georgia Tech Research Institute.

  13. Observations of 2. 3-micron CO bands in 47 Tuc giants

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, R.A.; Briley, M.M.; Smith, G.H. Mount Stromlo and Siding Spring Observatories, Canberra )

    1990-07-01

    The 2.3-micron CO bands of four 47 Tuc red giants have been observed with the AAT Fabry-Perot Infrared Grating Spectrometer with the goal of deriving carbon abundances as well as C-12/C-13 ratios. All four stars have (V-K) values between 3.42 and 3.52 (i.e., Teff = 3950 + or - 70 K), yet show substantial differences in their DDO C(41-42) colors, implying large variations in CN band strengths. Their CO colors also reveal an anticorrelation with CN band strength. The (C-13)O lines at 2.345 microns are seen in the present spectra of all four stars, although they are slightly stronger in the CN-strong/CO-weak stars. Simultaneous fits for (C/A) and C-12/C-13 in the observed spectra indicate that (C/A) is indeed lowest in the CN-strong stars. 51 refs.

  14. Near-midnight observations of nitric oxide delta- and gamma-band chemiluminescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tennyson, P. D.; Feldman, P. D.; Hartig, G. F.; Henry, R. C.

    1986-01-01

    Chemiluminescent nightglow emission of the nitric oxide delta and gamma bands was measured from a sounding rocket launched on April 27, 1981, near local midnight. The integrated band emission rates for this near zenith observation above 205 km were less than 10 Rayleighs. The solar zenith angle was 127 deg. The branching ratio from the C2Pi state to the A2Sigma(+) state of NO was determined from comparison of the total emission rate of the delta band system to that of the gamma band system and found to be 0.30 + or - 0.06. The branching ratios within each of the band systems were found to be consistent with previous theoretical and experimental determinations. The vertical atomic nitrogen distribution, derived with the use of a model atmosphere, was found to have a peak density of 2.0 x 10 to the 7th atoms/cu cm at an altitude of 205 km. The analysis of these data indicate the presence of residual NO emission above 270 km at local midnight on the order of 1 Rayleigh of total band emission.

  15. Microwave absorption properties of LiNb3O8 in X-band prepared by combustion synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goud, J. Pundareekam; Sindam, Bashaiah; Tumuluri, Anil; Raju, K. C. James

    2015-08-01

    Single phase LiNb3O8 powders were prepared using combustion synthesis technique. The powders were prepared by heat treating Li2CO3+Nb2O5/urea mixture in 1:3 ratio. Structural and morphological details have been done to confirm the presence of LiNb3O8. The S-parameters were measured using rectangular waveguide method in the X-band frequency (8.2GHz to 12.4GHz) by Vector Network Analyzer. The dielectric characteristics like dielectric constant (ɛ') and dielectric loss (ɛ″) were calculated using Nicolson-Ross-Weir algorithm. Complex permittivity of 28-0.2j and 26-1.0j at 8.2GHz and 12.4GHz respectively are observed. Reflection loss was derived with permittivity and permeability as input parameters. Microwave absorber thickness is optimized and the RL< -20dB is obtained in the X-band frequency.

  16. Inter-comparison of SMAP, Aquarius and SMOS L-band brightness temperature observations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for launch on January 29, 2015. SMAP will make observations with an L-band radar and radiometer using a shared 6 m rotating reflector antenna. SMAP is a fully polarimetric radiometer with the center frequency of 1.41 GHz. The target accuracy o...

  17. An Observational Study of Intermediate Band Students' Self-Regulated Practice Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miksza, Peter; Prichard, Stephanie; Sorbo, Diana

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate intermediate musicians' self-regulated practice behaviors. Thirty sixth- through eighth-grade students were observed practicing band repertoire individually for 20 min. Practice sessions were coded according to practice frame frequency and duration, length of musical passage selected, most prominent…

  18. Multi-band, multi-epoch observations of the transiting warm Jupiter WASP-80b

    SciTech Connect

    Fukui, Akihiko; Kuroda, Daisuke; Kawashima, Yui; Ikoma, Masahiro; Kurosaki, Kenji; Narita, Norio; Nishiyama, Shogo; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Nagayama, Shogo; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Baba, Haruka; Ryu, Tsuguru; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onozato, Hiroki; Hirano, Teruyuki; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Hori, Yasunori; Nagayama, Takahiro; Tamura, Motohide; Kawai, Nobuyuki; and others

    2014-08-01

    WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K/early-M dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', R{sub c}, and I{sub c} bands) to near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and K{sub s} bands) wavelengths. We observe 5 primary transits, each in 3 or 4 different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with results from previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar abundance and thick cloud atmospheric models at a 1.7σ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in the optical region compared to the NIR region at the 2.9σ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model with equilibrium temperature of 600 K can explain the observed data well, having a discrepancy level of 1.0σ. We also search for transit timing variations, but find no timing excess larger than 50 s from a linear ephemeris. In addition, we conduct 43 day long photometric monitoring of the host star in the optical bands, finding no significant variation in the stellar brightness. Combined with the fact that no spot-crossing event is observed in the five transits, our results confirm previous findings that the host star appears quiet for spot activities, despite the indications of strong chromospheric activities.

  19. Multi-band, Multi-epoch Observations of the Transiting Warm Jupiter WASP-80b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukui, Akihiko; Kawashima, Yui; Ikoma, Masahiro; Narita, Norio; Onitsuka, Masahiro; Ita, Yoshifusa; Onozato, Hiroki; Nishiyama, Shogo; Baba, Haruka; Ryu, Tsuguru; Hirano, Teruyuki; Hori, Yasunori; Kurosaki, Kenji; Kawauchi, Kiyoe; Takahashi, Yasuhiro H.; Nagayama, Takahiro; Tamura, Motohide; Kawai, Nobuyuki; Kuroda, Daisuke; Nagayama, Shogo; Ohta, Kouji; Shimizu, Yasuhiro; Yanagisawa, Kenshi; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Izumiura, Hideyuki

    2014-08-01

    WASP-80b is a warm Jupiter transiting a bright late-K/early-M dwarf, providing a good opportunity to extend the atmospheric study of hot Jupiters toward the lower temperature regime. We report multi-band, multi-epoch transit observations of WASP-80b by using three ground-based telescopes covering from optical (g', R c, and I c bands) to near-infrared (NIR; J, H, and K s bands) wavelengths. We observe 5 primary transits, each in 3 or 4 different bands simultaneously, obtaining 17 independent transit light curves. Combining them with results from previous works, we find that the observed transmission spectrum is largely consistent with both a solar abundance and thick cloud atmospheric models at a 1.7σ discrepancy level. On the other hand, we find a marginal spectral rise in the optical region compared to the NIR region at the 2.9σ level, which possibly indicates the existence of haze in the atmosphere. We simulate theoretical transmission spectra for a solar abundance but hazy atmosphere, finding that a model with equilibrium temperature of 600 K can explain the observed data well, having a discrepancy level of 1.0σ. We also search for transit timing variations, but find no timing excess larger than 50 s from a linear ephemeris. In addition, we conduct 43 day long photometric monitoring of the host star in the optical bands, finding no significant variation in the stellar brightness. Combined with the fact that no spot-crossing event is observed in the five transits, our results confirm previous findings that the host star appears quiet for spot activities, despite the indications of strong chromospheric activities.

  20. Observation and lifetime of the first excited superdeformed band in {sup192}Hg.

    SciTech Connect

    Korichi, A.; Hannachi, F.; Deloncle, I.; Deloncle, I.; Korten, W.; Ahmad, I.; Carpenter, M. P.; Henry, R. G.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Lauritsen, T.; Physics; I.P.N.; C.S.N.S.M.; Inst. fur Strahlen-und Kernphysik Univ.

    1995-02-23

    An excited superdeformed (SD) band has been observed in {sup 192}Hg with the UROGAM spectrometer. It is interpreted as a two quasi-neutron excitation in the {sup 192}Hg SD nucleus. Nuclear level lifetimes have been measured using the Doppler-shift attenuation method. An average transition quadrupole moment of 19.5 {+-} 1.5 b has been obtained which is similar to the value measured in the yeast SD band. These results indicate that the deformation in the {sup 192}Hg SD nucleus is stable despite changes in the occupancy of high-N-orbitals.

  1. Improved Experimental Line Positions for the (1,1) Band of the b 1Σ+ - X 3Σ- Transition of O2 by Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Leah C.; O'Brien, Emily C.; O'Brien, James J.

    2012-06-01

    We report improved experimental line positions for the (1,1) band of the b 1Σ+ - X 3Σ- transition of O2. Results are comparised with previous experimental measurements and predicted values. Additionally, a new method of producing vibrationally hot molecules for use in absorption spectroscopy of stable gas phase molecules is described.

  2. Gemini J-band observations of RX J0806.4-4123

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posselt, B.; Luhman, K. L.

    2016-07-01

    The detection of near-infrared (NIR) excess at the position of a star can indicate either a substellar companion or a disk around the respective star. In this work we probed whether a 2.5σ H-band flux enhancement at the position of the isolated neutron star RX J0806.4-4123 can be confirmed at another NIR wavelength. We observed RX J0806.4-4123 in the J-band with Gemini South equipped with FLAMINGOS-2. There was no significant detection of a J-band source at the neutron star position. However, similarly to the H-band we found a very faint (1.4σ) flux enhancement with a nominal magnitude of J=24.8 ± 0.5. The overall NIR-detection significance is 3.1σ. If real, this emission is too bright to come from the neutron star alone. Deeper near-infrared observations are necessary to confirm or refute the potential NIR excess. The confirmation of such NIR excess could imply that there is a substellar companion or a disk around RX J0806.4-4123. Based on observations obtained at the Gemini Observatory (Program ID: GS-2014B-Q-60) and ESO Paranal Observatory (Program ID: 74.C-0596)

  3. Constraining the Solar Coronal Magnetic Field Strength using Split-band Type II Radio Burst Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishore, P.; Ramesh, R.; Hariharan, K.; Kathiravan, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2016-11-01

    We report on low-frequency radio (85-35 MHz) spectral observations of four different type II radio bursts, which exhibited fundamental-harmonic emission and split-band structure. Each of the bursts was found to be closely associated with a whitelight coronal mass ejection (CME) close to the Sun. We estimated the coronal magnetic field strength from the split-band characteristics of the bursts, by assuming a model for the coronal electron density distribution. The choice of the model was constrained, based on the following criteria: (1) when the radio burst is observed simultaneously in the upper and lower bands of the fundamental component, the location of the plasma level corresponding to the frequency of the burst in the lower band should be consistent with the deprojected location of the leading edge (LE) of the associated CME; (2) the drift speed of the type II bursts derived from such a model should agree closely with the deprojected speed of the LE of the corresponding CMEs. With the above conditions, we find that: (1) the estimated field strengths are unique to each type II burst, and (2) the radial variation of the field strength in the different events indicate a pattern. It is steepest for the case where the heliocentric distance range over which the associated burst is observed is closest to the Sun, and vice versa.

  4. CO2 Dimer: Four Intermolecular Modes Observed via Infrared Combination Bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norooz Oliaee, Jalal; Dehghany, Mehdi; Rezaei, Mojtaba; McKellar, Bob; Moazzen-Ahmadi, Nasser

    2016-06-01

    Study of the carbon dioxide dimer has a long history, but there is only one previous observation of an intermolecular vibration [1]. Here we analyze four new combination bands of (CO2)2 in the CO2 νb{3} region (˜2350 wn), observed using tunable infrared lasers and a pulsed slit-jet supersonic expansion. The previous combination band at 2382.2 wn was simple to assign [1]. A much more complicated band (˜2370 wn) turns out to involve two upper states, one at 2369.0 wn (Bu symmetry), and the other at 2370.0 wn (Au). The spectrum can be nicely fit by including the Coriolis interactions between these states. Another complicated band around 2443 wn also involves two nearby upper states which are highly perturbed in so-far unexplained ways (possibly related to tunneling shifts). With the help of new ab initio calculations [2], we assign the results as follows. The 2369.0 wn band is the combination of the forbidden Ag intramolecular fundamental (probably [1] at about 2346.76 wn) and the intermolecular geared bend (Bu). The 2370.0 wn band is the combination of the same Ag fundamental and the intermolecular torsion (Au). This gives about 22.3 and 23.2 wn for the geared bend and torsion. The previous 2382.2 wn band [1] is the allowed Bu fundamental (2350.771 wn) plus two quanta of the geared bend (Bu), giving 31.509 wn for this overtone. The highly perturbed 2442.7 wn band is the Bu fundamental plus the antigeared bend (Ag), giving about 91.9 wn for the antigeared bend. Finally, the perturbed 2442.1 wn band is due to an unknown combination of modes which gains intensity from the antigeared bend by a Fermi-type interaction. Calculated values [2] are: 20.64 (geared bend), 24.44 (torsion), 32.34 (geared bend overtone), and 92.30 wn (antigeared bend), in good agreement with experiment. \\vskip 0.2 truecm [1] M. Dehghany, A.R.W. McKellar, Mahin Afshari, and N. Moazzen-Ahmadi, Mol. Phys. 108, 2195 (2010). [2] X.-G. Wang, T. Carrington, Jr., and R. Dawes, private communication.

  5. {gamma}-Ray Spectroscopy at the Limits: First Observation of Rotational Bands in {sup 255}Lr

    SciTech Connect

    Ketelhut, S.; Greenlees, P. T.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Jakobsson, U.; Jones, P.; Julin, R.; Juutinen, S.; Leino, M.; Leppaenen, A.-P.; Nyman, M.; Pakarinen, J.; Peura, P.; Rahkila, P.; Ruotsalainen, P.; Saren, J.; Scholey, C.; Sorri, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Ackermann, D.

    2009-05-29

    The rotational band structure of {sup 255}Lr has been investigated using advanced in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic techniques. To date, {sup 255}Lr is the heaviest nucleus to be studied in this manner. One rotational band has been unambiguously observed and strong evidence for a second rotational structure was found. The structures are tentatively assigned to be based on the 1/2{sup -}[521] and 7/2{sup -}[514] Nilsson states, consistent with assignments from recently obtained {alpha} decay data. The experimental rotational band dynamic moment of inertia is used to test self-consistent mean-field calculations using the Skyrme SLy4 interaction and a density-dependent pairing force.

  6. Broad-band and multi-band polarimetric observations of post-AGB and RV Tauri stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akras, S.; Ramirez-Velez, J.; Hiriart, D.; Lopez, M.; Bonanos, A.

    2013-02-01

    We present optical broad-band (UBVRI) aperture polarimetry of 52 post-AGB stars, selected from De Ruyter et al. (2006) and the Torun Catalog, based on the shape of their SED and near-infrared excess. We find 10 (19%) of the stars in our sample to have high polarization (P > 5%), 30 (56%) intermediate/low polarization (1% < P < 5%) and 13 (25%) very low (or non-polarized) polarization (P < 1%). Our observations show clear evidence of asymmetric circumstellar envelopes or equatorial density enhancement around post-AGB stars, probably formed at the beginning of the AGB phase. Some stars exhibit wavelength-independent polarization suggesting scattered light by large dust grains or free electrons (Thomson scattering), while others show wavelength-dependent polarization originated from scattering by small dust grains (Rayleigh scattering). Finally, we conclude that highly polarized sources (P > 3%), show systematically [12] - [25] > 1.5, J - H > 0.5 and J - K > 0.5, clearly separated from the group of RV Tauri stars, which are found to have very low polarization (P < 3%).

  7. Double Bright Band Observations with High-Resolution Vertically Pointing Radar, Lidar, and Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Emory, Amber E.; Demoz, Belay; Vermeesch, Kevin; Hicks, Michael

    2014-01-01

    On 11 May 2010, an elevated temperature inversion associated with an approaching warm front produced two melting layers simultaneously, which resulted in two distinct bright bands as viewed from the ER-2 Doppler radar system, a vertically pointing, coherent X band radar located in Greenbelt, MD. Due to the high temporal resolution of this radar system, an increase in altitude of the melting layer of approximately 1.2 km in the time span of 4 min was captured. The double bright band feature remained evident for approximately 17 min, until the lower atmosphere warmed enough to dissipate the lower melting layer. This case shows the relatively rapid evolution of freezing levels in response to an advancing warm front over a 2 h time period and the descent of an elevated warm air mass with time. Although observations of double bright bands are somewhat rare, the ability to identify this phenomenon is important for rainfall estimation from spaceborne sensors because algorithms employing the restriction of a radar bright band to a constant height, especially when sampling across frontal systems, will limit the ability to accurately estimate rainfall.

  8. Collision-Induced Absorption by H2 Pairs in the Second Overtone Band at 298 and 77.5 K: Comparison between Experimental and Theoretical Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brodbeck, C.; Bouanich, J.-P.; van-Thanh, Nguyen; Fu, Y.; Borysow, A.

    1999-01-01

    The collision-induced spectra of hydrogen in the region of the second overtone at 0.8 microns have been recorded at temperatures of 298 and 77.5 K and for gas densities ranging from 100 to 800 amagats. The spectral profile defined by the absorption coefficient per squared density varies significantly with the density, so that the binary absorption coefficient has been determined by extrapolations to zero density of the measured profiles. Our extrapolated measurements and our recent ab initio quantum calculation are in relatively good agreement with one another. Taking into account the very weak absorption of the second overtone band, the agreement is, however, not as good as it has become (our) standard for strong bands.

  9. Weak Hard X-Ray Emission from Two Broad Absorption Line Quasars Observed with NuStar: Compton-Thick Absorption or Intrinsic X-Ray Weakness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Craig, W. W..; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Hickox, R.; Madsen, K. K.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; Risaliti, G.; Saez, C.; Teng, S. H.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2013-01-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain approx. or equal to 400-600 hard X-ray (is greater than or equal to 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed N(sub H) is less than or equal to 10(exp24) cm(exp-2). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N(sub H) 7 × 10(exp 24) cm(exp-2) if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe Ka line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  10. WEAK HARD X-RAY EMISSION FROM TWO BROAD ABSORPTION LINE QUASARS OBSERVED WITH NuSTAR: COMPTON-THICK ABSORPTION OR INTRINSIC X-RAY WEAKNESS?

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, B.; Brandt, W. N.; Alexander, D. M.; Hickox, R.; Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Stern, D.; Bauer, F. E.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Comastri, A.; Fabian, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Fiore, F.; Hailey, C. J.; Matt, G.; Ogle, P.; and others

    2013-08-01

    We present Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR) hard X-ray observations of two X-ray weak broad absorption line (BAL) quasars, PG 1004+130 (radio loud) and PG 1700+518 (radio quiet). Many BAL quasars appear X-ray weak, probably due to absorption by the shielding gas between the nucleus and the accretion-disk wind. The two targets are among the optically brightest BAL quasars, yet they are known to be significantly X-ray weak at rest-frame 2-10 keV (16-120 times fainter than typical quasars). We would expect to obtain Almost-Equal-To 400-600 hard X-ray ({approx}> 10 keV) photons with NuSTAR, provided that these photons are not significantly absorbed (N{sub H} {approx}< 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2}). However, both BAL quasars are only detected in the softer NuSTAR bands (e.g., 4-20 keV) but not in its harder bands (e.g., 20-30 keV), suggesting that either the shielding gas is highly Compton-thick or the two targets are intrinsically X-ray weak. We constrain the column densities for both to be N{sub H} Almost-Equal-To 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 24} cm{sup -2} if the weak hard X-ray emission is caused by obscuration from the shielding gas. We discuss a few possibilities for how PG 1004+130 could have Compton-thick shielding gas without strong Fe K{alpha} line emission; dilution from jet-linked X-ray emission is one likely explanation. We also discuss the intrinsic X-ray weakness scenario based on a coronal-quenching model relevant to the shielding gas and disk wind of BAL quasars. Motivated by our NuSTAR results, we perform a Chandra stacking analysis with the Large Bright Quasar Survey BAL quasar sample and place statistical constraints upon the fraction of intrinsically X-ray weak BAL quasars; this fraction is likely 17%-40%.

  11. Microwave-assisted synthesis of graphene-Ni composites with enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zetao; Sun, Xin; Li, Guoxian; Xue, Hairong; Guo, Hu; Fan, Xiaoli; Pan, Xuchen; He, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Recently, graphene has been applied as a new microwave absorber because of its high dielectric loss and low density. Nevertheless, the high dielectric constant of pristine graphene has caused unbalanced electromagnetic parameters and results in a bad impedance matching characteristic. In this study, we report a facile microwave-assisted heating approach to produce reduced graphene oxide-nickel (RGO-Ni) composites. The phase and morphology of as-synthesized RGO-Ni composites are characterized by XRD, Raman, FESEM and TEM. The results show that Ni nanoparticles with a diameter around 20 nm are grown densely and uniformly on the RGO sheets. In addition, enhanced microwave absorption properties in Ku-band of RGO-Ni composites is mainly due to the synergistic effect of dielectric loss and magnetic loss and the dramatically electron polarizations caused by the formation of large conductive network. The minimum reflection loss of RGO-Ni-2 composite with the thickness of 2 mm can reaches -42 dB at 17.6 GHz. The RGO-Ni composite is an attractive candidate for the new type of high performance microwave absorbing material.

  12. High resolution absorption cross sections in the transmission window region of the Schumann-Runge bands and Herzberg continuum of O2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Cheung, A. S.-C.; Freeman, D. E.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1992-01-01

    Results are presented on measurements, conducted in the wavelength region 180-195 nm, and at different pressures of oxygen (between 2.5-760 torr) in order to separate the pressure-dependent absorption from the main cross sections, of the absorption cross sections of the Schumann-Runge bands in the window region between the rotational lines of S-R bands of O2. The present cross sections supersede the earlier published cross sections (Yoshino et al., 1983). The combined cross sections are presented graphically; they are available at wavenumber intervals of about 0.1/cm from the National Space Science Data Center. The Herzberg continuum cross sections are derived after subtracting calculated contributions from the Schumann-Runge bands. These are significantly smaller than any previous measurements.

  13. Effect of thickness on microwave absorptive behavior of La-Na doped Co-Zr barium hexaferrites in 18.0-26.5 GHz band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arora, Amit; Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal

    2017-02-01

    In this research, the microwave properties of Lanthanum-Sodium doped Cobalt-Zirconium barium hexaferrites, intended as microwave absorbers, are analyzed on Vector Network Analyzer in K-band. The results indicate that the doping has resulted in lowering of real permittivity and enhancement of dielectric losses. Real permeability has shown increase while magnetic losses have shown decrease in value with doping. All these four properties have shown very small variation with frequency in the scanned frequency range which indicates the relaxation type of behavior. Microwave absorption characteristics of these compositions are analyzed with change in sample thickness. The results demonstrate that the matching frequency of the microwave absorber shifts towards lower side of frequency band with increase in thickness. The complete analysis of the prepared microwave absorbers shows a striking achievement with very low reflection loss and wide absorption bandwidth for all the six compositions in 18-26.5 GHz frequency band.

  14. Deriving brown carbon from multiwavelength absorption measurements: method and application to AERONET and Aethalometer observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuan; Heald, Colette L.; Sedlacek, Arthur J.; de Sá, Suzane S.; Martin, Scot T.; Lizabeth Alexander, M.; Watson, Thomas B.; Aiken, Allison C.; Springston, Stephen R.; Artaxo, Paulo

    2016-10-01

    The radiative impact of organic aerosols (OA) is a large source of uncertainty in estimating the global direct radiative effect (DRE) of aerosols. This radiative impact includes not only light scattering but also light absorption from a subclass of OA referred to as brown carbon (BrC). However, the absorption properties of BrC are poorly understood, leading to large uncertainties in modeling studies. To obtain observational constraints from measurements, a simple absorption Ångström exponent (AAE) method is often used to separate the contribution of BrC absorption from that of black carbon (BC). However, this attribution method is based on assumptions regarding the spectral dependence of BC that are often violated in the ambient atmosphere. Here we develop a new AAE method which improves upon previous approaches by using the information from the wavelength-dependent measurements themselves and by allowing for an atmospherically relevant range of BC properties, rather than fixing these at a single assumed value. We note that constraints on BC optical properties and mixing state would help further improve this method. We apply this method to multiwavelength absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) measurements at AERONET sites worldwide and surface aerosol absorption measurements at multiple ambient sites. We estimate that BrC globally contributes up to 40 % of the seasonally averaged absorption at 440 nm. We find that the mass absorption coefficient of OA (OA-MAC) is positively correlated with the BC / OA mass ratio. Based on the variability in BC properties and BC / OA emission ratio, we estimate a range of 0.05-1.5 m2 g-1 for OA-MAC at 440 nm. Using the combination of AERONET and OMI UV absorption observations we estimate that the AAE388/440 nm for BrC is generally ˜ 4 worldwide, with a smaller value in Europe (< 2). Our analyses of observations at two surface sites (Cape Cod, to the southeast of Boston, and the GoAmazon2014/5 T3 site, to the west of

  15. Experimental Observation of Quantum Confinement in the Conduction Band of CdSe Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, J I; Meulenberg, R W; Hanif, K M; Mattoussi, H; Klepeis, J E; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T

    2006-12-15

    Recent theoretical descriptions as to the magnitude of effect that quantum confinement has on he conduction band (CB) of CdSe quantum dots (QD) have been conflicting. In this manuscript, we experimentally identify quantum confinement effects in the CB of CdSe QDs for the first time. Using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, we have unambiguously witnessed the CB minimum shift to higher energy with decreasing particle size and have been able to compare these results to recent theories. Our experiments have been able to identify which theories correctly describe the CB states in CdSe QDs. In particular, our experiments suggest that multiple theories describe the shifts in the CB of CdSe QDs and are not mutually exclusive.

  16. XANES: observation of quantum confinement in the conduction band of colloidal PbS quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demchenko, I. N.; Chernyshova, M.; He, X.; Minikayev, R.; Syryanyy, Y.; Derkachova, A.; Derkachov, G.; Stolte, W. C.; Piskorska-Hommel, E.; Reszka, A.; Liang, H.

    2013-04-01

    The presented investigations aimed at development of inexpensive method for synthesized materials suitable for utilization of solar energy. This important issue was addressed by focusing, mainly, on electronic local structure studies with supporting x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis of colloidal galena nano-particles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) synthesized using wet chemistry under microwave irradiation. Performed x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis revealed an evidence of quantum confinement for the sample with QDs, where the bottom of the conduction band was shifted to higher energy. The QDs were found to be passivated with oxides at the surface. Existence of sulfate/sulfite and thiosulfate species in pure PbS and QDs, respectively, was identified.

  17. Observations of purely compressional waves in the upper ULF band observed by the Van Allen Probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posch, J. L.; Engebretson, M. J.; Johnson, J.; Kim, E. H.; Thaller, S. A.; Wygant, J. R.; Kletzing, C.; Smith, C. W.; Reeves, G. D.

    2014-12-01

    Purely compressional electromagnetic waves, also denoted fast magnetosonic waves, equatorial noise, and ion Bernstein modes, can both heat thermal protons and accelerate electrons up to relativistic energies. These waves have been observed both in the near-equatorial region in the inner magnetosphere and in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Although these waves have been observed by various types of satellite instruments (DC and AC magnetometers and electric field sensors), most recent studies have used data from AC sensors, and many have been restricted to frequencies above ~50 Hz. We report here on a survey of ~200 of these waves, based on DC electric and magnetic field data from the EFW double probe and EMFISIS fluxgate magnetometer instruments, respectively, on the Van Allen Probes spacecraft during its first two years of operation. The high sampling rate of these instruments makes it possible to extend observational studies of the lower frequency population of such waves to lower L shells than any previous study. These waves, often with multiple harmonics of the local proton gyrofrequency, were observed both inside and outside the plasmapause, in regions with plasma number densities ranging from 10 to >1000 cm-3. Wave occurrence was sharply peaked near the magnetic equator and occurred at L shells from below 2 to ~6 (the spacecraft apogee). Waves appeared at all local times but were more common from noon to dusk. Outside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized broadly across noon. Inside the plasmapause, occurrence maximized in the dusk sector, in an extended plasmasphere. Every event occurred in association with a positive gradient in the HOPE omnidirectional proton flux in the range between 2 keV and 10 keV. The Poynting vector, determined for 8 events, was in all cases directed transverse to B, but with variable azimuth, consistent with earlier models and observations.

  18. Modelling of Collision Induced Absorption Spectra Of H2-H2 Pairs for the Planetary Atmospheres Structure: The Second Overtone Band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Borysow, Jacek I.

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of the proposal was to model the collision induced, second overtone band of gaseous hydrogen at low temperatures. The aim of this work is to assist planetary scientists in their investigation of planetary atmospheres, mainly those of Uranus and Neptune. The recently completed extended database of collision induced dipole moments of hydrogen pairs allowed us, for the first time, to obtain dipole moment matrix elements responsible for the roto-vibrational collision induced absorption spectra of H2-H2 in the second overtone band. Despite our numerous attempts to publish those data, the enormous volume of the database did not allow us to do this. Instead, we deposited the data on a www site. The final part of this work has been partially supported by NASA, Division for Planetary Atmospheres. In order to use our new data for modelling purpose, we first needed to test how well we can reproduce the existing experimental data from theory, when using our new input data. Two papers resulted from this work. The obtained agreement between theoretical results and the measurements appeared to be within 10-30%. The obviously poorer agreement than observed for the first H2 overtone, the fundamental, and the rototranslational bands can be attributed to the fact that dipole moments responsible for the second overtone are much weaker, therefore susceptible to larger numerical uncertainties. At the same time, the intensity of the second overtone band is much weaker and therefore it is much harder to be measured accurately in the laboratory. We need to point out that until now, no dependable model of the 2nd overtone band was available for modelling of the planetary atmospheres. The only one, often referred to in previous works on Uranian and Neptune's atmospheres, uses only one lineshape, with one (or two) parameter(s) deduced at the effective temperature of Uranus (by fitting the planetary observation). After that, the parameter(s) was(were) made temperature

  19. Observation of mini-band formation in the ground and high-energy electronic states of super-lattice solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usuki, Takanori; Matsuochi, Kouki; Nakamura, Tsubasa; Toprasertpong, Kasidit; Fukuyama, Atsuhiko; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Ikari, Tetsuo

    2016-03-01

    Multiple Quantum wells (MQWs) have been studied as one promising material for high-efficiency nextgeneration solar cells. However, a portion of photo-excited carriers recombine in MQWs, resulting in the degradation of cell performance. Super-lattice (SL) structures, where quantum states in neighboring quantum wells strongly couple with each other, have been proposed for the carrier collection improvement via the tunneling transport through mini-bands. Therefore, it is important to characterize mini-band formation in various types of SL structures. We examined p-i-n GaAs-based solar cells whose i layers contain 20 stacks of InGaAs/GaAsP MQW structures with 2.1-nm GaAsP barriers (thin-barrier cell), with 2.1-nm barriers and 3-nm GaAs interlayers in between GaAsP barriers and InGaAs wells (stepbarrier cell), and with 7.8-nm barriers (thick-barrier cell). We investigated the optical absorption spectra of the SL solar cells using piezoelectric photo-thermal (PPT) spectroscopy. In the thick-barrier cell, one exciton peak was observed near the absorption edge of MQWs. On the other hand, we confirmed a split of the exciton peak for the thin-barrier SL, suggesting the formation of mini-band. Moreover, in the step-barrier cell, the mini-band at the ground state disappears since thick GaAs interlayers isolate each quantum-well ground state and, instead, the mini-band formation of highenergy states could be observed. By estimating from the energy-level calculation, this is attributed to the mini-band formation of light-hole states. This can well explain the improvement of carrier collection efficiency (CCE) of the thinbarrier and the step-barrier cells compared with the thick-barrier cell.

  20. Ozone : First Observation of the 2ν_1+3ν_2+ν_3 Band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbe, A.; de Backer-Barilly, M.-R.; Thomas, X.; von der Heyden, P.; Tuyterev, Vl. G.

    2010-06-01

    This work continuous the systematic study of ozone in the infrared. Thanks to available predictions of band centres and rotational constants and the improvement of signal/noise ratios of observed spectra, we are able to observe weaker and weaker bands. It is the case of the 2ν_1+3ν_2+ν_3 band, which lies in the 5160 cm-1 spectral range. The spectrum has been recorded with the FTS of GSMA, with a path length of 36 metres and a pressure of 41.0 Torr. The transitions are derived with a precision better than 1× 10-3 cm-1 for wavenumbers and 10% for the intensities. The analyse has been performed using effective Hamiltonian, and transition moment operators. 430 transitions have been assigned, with J=34, Ka=11. They are reproduced with an rms = 2× 10-3 cm-1, close to the experimental accuracy. Only one level (24_3) has found to be slightly perturbed (Obs-Calc=-0.011 cm-1). The perturber has easily been identified, as the 24_2 level of the (302)state. It is particularly interesting that this level was known, derived from our analyse of the (302)-(001) band, with a shift (Obs-Calc=+0.011 cm-1), confirming the validity of both analyses. We present here the results, with spectroscopic parameters (including the resonance with the (302) state, effective transition moment operators, integrated band intensities, portion of created linelists available for databanks and examples of agreements between observed and calculated spectra. Vl.G. Tyuterev, S.A. Tashkun, D.W. Schwenke, P. Jensen, T. Cours, A. Barbe, M. Jacon, Chem. Phys. Letter, 316, 271-279, (2000). L. Régalia, Thesis Reims, (1996). M.-R. De Backer-Barilly, A. Barbe, Vl.G. Tyuterev, Molecular Physics, 102, 1707-1716, (2004).

  1. Investigation of the optical-absorption bands of Nb4+ and Ti3+ in lithium niobate using magnetic circular dichroism and optically detected magnetic-resonance techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reyher, H.-J.; Schulz, R.; Thiemann, O.

    1994-08-01

    The magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of the absorption of Nb4+Li and Ti3+Li centers in LiNbO3 has been selectively measured by applying optically detected magnetic resonance. The attribution of a well-known broad and unstructured absorption band peaking at 1.6 eV to the Nb4+Li bound small polaron is now unambiguously confirmed. In the MCD spectrum of the isoelectronic Ti3+Li center, bands show up, which closely resemble the MCD bands at 1.6 eV of this bound small polaron. This striking similarity is explained by a cluster model, representing both defects. Either TiLi or NbLi is at the center of this cluster. In both cases, the small polaron is bound to the cluster, and its MCD bands correspond to intervalence transfer transitions within the constituents of the cluster. A study of the spin-orbit coupling of the molecular orbitals of the cluster allows one to analyze the structure of the MCD bands at 2.9 eV of Ti3+Li have no counterpart in the Nb4+Li spectrum. These bands are assigned to transitions to excited states, which are specific to the impurity and are related to the 10Dq transitions known for the crystal field states of a d1 ion.

  2. High-resolution observations of the 6815-A band of methane in the major planets

    SciTech Connect

    Baines, K.H.; Schempp, W.V.; Smith, W.H.

    1983-12-01

    High-resolution (0.1-A) spectra of the 6815-A band of methane are presented for Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Spectra for Uranus, Neptune, and the equatorial region of Saturn were acquired with the SPIFI (Smith, Hicks, and Born (1978) at the 2.2-m telescope of the Mauna-Kea Observatory during May and June 1980. Additional spectra were obtained for Jupiter and the northern temperate and polar regions of Saturn in December 1980 and January 1981 from Kitt Peak National Obsevatory's McMath Solar Telescope. The spectra show a dichotomy in strength of methane absorption between Jupiter-Saturn and Uranus-Neptune. A simple model analysis, based on homogeneous scattering models, is unable to resolve whether this dichotomy is due to an actual increase in the methane mixing ratio with solar distance or to the temperature dependence of line strengths and absorption pathlengths in these atmospheres. If the rotational quantum number for the prominent 6818.9-A feature is J less than 4, then significant aerosol extinction must exist within the visibly accessible portion of Uranus' atmosphere for the methane mixing ratio to be greater than the solar value.

  3. Broad-band X-ray observations of CIR X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maisack, M.; Staubert, R.; Balucinska-Church, M.; Skinner, G.; Doebereiner, S.; Englhauser, J.; Aref'ev, V. A.; Efremov, V. V.; Sunyaev, R. A.

    1995-08-01

    We present broad-band (2-88 keV) X-ray observations of the X-ray binary Cir X-1 with the TTM and HEXE instruments on board of the Mir space station. The observations were made in January/February 1989. The spectrum is best described by a model with 3 components: a blackbody at low energies, an iron line and a Comptonized hard continuum. The spectrum is variable during our observations; when the Comptonized component becomes harder, the spectrum becomes softer below 15 keV. The high-energy spectrum resembles that of X-ray binary pulsars.

  4. Observation of high-spin bands with large moments of inertia in 124Xe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Somnath; Singh, A. K.; Hagemann, G. B.; Sletten, G.; Herskind, B.; Døssing, T.; Ragnarsson, I.; Hübel, H.; Bürger, A.; Chmel, S.; Wilson, A. N.; Rogers, J.; Carpenter, M. P.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Khoo, T. L.; Kondev, F. G.; Lauritsen, T.; Zhu, S.; Korichi, A.; Stefanova, E. A.; Fallon, P.; Nyakó, B. M.; Timár, J.; Juhász, K.

    2016-09-01

    High-spin states in 124Xe have been populated using the 80Se(48Ca,4 n ) reaction at a beam energy of 207 MeV and high-multiplicity, γ -ray coincidence events were measured using the Gammasphere spectrometer. Six high-spin bands with large moments of inertia, similar to those observed in neighboring nuclei, have been observed. The experimental results are compared with calculations within the framework of the cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model. It is suggested that the configurations of the bands involve excitations of protons across the Z =50 shell gap coupled to neutrons within the N =50 -82 shell or excited across the N =82 shell closure.

  5. Observation of high-spin bands with large moments of inertia in Xe124

    DOE PAGES

    Nag, Somnath; Singh, A. K.; Hagemann, G. B.; ...

    2016-09-07

    In this paper, high-spin states in 124Xe have been populated using the 80Se(48Ca, 4n) reaction at a beam energy of 207 MeV and high-multiplicity, γ-ray coincidence events were measured using the Gammasphere spectrometer. Six high-spin rotational bands with moments of inertia similar to those observed in neighboring nuclei have been observed. The experimental results are compared with calculations within the framework of the Cranked Nilsson-Strutinsky model. Finally, it is suggested that the configurations of the bands involve excitations of protons across the Z = 50 shell gap coupled to neutrons within the N = 50 - 82 shell or excitedmore » across the N = 82 shell closure.« less

  6. Probing the gamma-ray variability in 3C 279 using broad-band observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, B.; Krichbaum, T. P.; Lee, S.-S.; Sokolovsky, K.; Kang, S.; Byun, D.-Y.; Mosunova, D.; Zensus, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    We present the results of a broad-band radio-to-GeV observing campaign organized to get a better understanding of the radiation processes responsible for the γ-ray flares observed in 3C 279. The total intensity and polarization observations of the source were carried out between 2013 December 28 and 2014 January 03 using the Fermi-Large Area Telescope, Swift-XRT, Swift-UVOT, and Korean VLBI Network telescopes. A prominent flare observed in the optical/near-UV passbands was found to be correlated with a concurrent γ-ray flare at a confidence level >95 per cent, which suggests a co-spatial origin of the two. Moreover, the flaring activity in the two regimes was accompanied by no significant spectral variations. A peak in the X-ray light curve coincides with the peaks of the fractional polarization curves at 43 and 86 GHz radio bands. No prominent variation was noticed for the total intensity and the electric vector position angle observations at radio bands during this period. We noticed a possible hint of steepening of the radio spectrum with an increase in percentage polarization, which suggests that the radio polarization variations could be simply due to a spectral change. In a simple scenario, the correlated optical/γ-ray flares could be caused by the same population of emitting particles. The coincidence of the increase in radio polarization with the X-ray flux supports the picture that X-rays are produced via inverse-Compton scattering of radio photons. The observed fractional variability for the γ-ray flare ˜0.23 does not exceed that in the optical regime, which is inconsistent with what we usually observe for 3C 279; it could be due to different dependencies of the magnetic field and the external radiation field energy density profiles along the jet.

  7. Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright bands during MC3E

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumjian, Matthew R.; Mishra, Subashree; Giangrande, Scott E.; Toto, Tami; Ryzhkov, Alexander V.; Bansemer, Aaron

    2016-04-01

    Polarimetric radar observations increasingly are used to understand cloud microphysical processes, which is critical for improving their representation in cloud and climate models. In particular, there has been recent focus on improving representations of ice collection processes (e.g., aggregation and riming), as these influence precipitation rate, heating profiles, and ultimately cloud life cycles. However, distinguishing these processes using conventional polarimetric radar observations is difficult, as they produce similar fingerprints. This necessitates improved analysis techniques and integration of complementary data sources. The Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) provided such an opportunity. Quasi-vertical profiles of polarimetric radar variables in two MC3E stratiform precipitation events reveal episodic melting layer sagging. Integrated analyses using scanning and vertically pointing radar and aircraft measurements reveal that saggy bright band signatures are produced when denser, faster-falling, more isometric hydrometeors (relative to adjacent times) descend into the melting layer. In one case, strong circumstantial evidence for riming is found during bright band sagging times. A bin microphysical melting layer model successfully reproduces many aspects of the signature, supporting the observational analysis. If found to be a reliable indicator of riming, saggy bright bands could be a proxy for the presence of supercooled liquid water in stratiform precipitation, which may provide important information for mitigating aircraft icing risks and for constraining microphysical models.

  8. Standard Observing Bands: Is Now the Time to Replace S/X with X/Ka?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, C. S.; Lanyi, G. E.; Naudet, C. J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we will argue that the VLBI community should be developing a road map to transition from S/X to simultaneous X and Ka-band (32 GHz) observations. There are both negative and positive reasons for planning such a transition. On the negative side, we will outline concerns that S-band observations may be headed toward obsolescence. On the positive side, we will refer to evidence that X/Ka has potential for providing a more stable reference frame than S/X. We will propose timetables for a transition to X/Ka observing starting from the current status of X/Ka and plans that are now taking shape. First X/Ka fringes were obtained in 2001 with the Deep Space Network. Future plans will be discussed including a proposed X/Ka-band upgrade to the VLBA. Lastly, we will consider the need for a period of overlap between S/X and X/Ka so that the long and rich history of astrometric and geodetic VLBI is not compromised.

  9. Standard Observing Bands: Is Now the Time to Replace S/X with X/Ka?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobs, Christopher S.; Lanyi, G. E.; Naudet, C. J.

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we will argue that the VLBI community should be developing a road map to transition from S/X to simultaneous X and Ka-band (32 GHz) observations. There are both negative and positive reasons for planning such a transition. On the negative side, we will outline concerns that S-band observations may be headed toward obsolescence. On the positive side, we will refer to evidence that X/Ka has potential for providing a more stable reference frame than S/X. We will propose timetables for a transition to X/Ka observing starting from the current status of X/Ka and plans that are now taking shape. First X/Ka fringes were obtained in 2001 with the Deep Space Network. Future plans will be discussed including a proposed X/Ka-band upgrade to the VLBA. Lastly, we will consider the need for a period of overlap between S/X and X/Ka so that the long and rich history of astrometric and geodetic VLBI is not compromised.

  10. DEEP U BAND AND R IMAGING OF GOODS-SOUTH: OBSERVATIONS, DATA REDUCTION AND FIRST RESULTS ,

    SciTech Connect

    Nonino, M.; Cristiani, S.; Vanzella, E.; Dickinson, M.; Reddy, N.; Rosati, P.; Grazian, A.; Giavalisco, M.; Kuntschner, H.; Fosbury, R. A. E.; Daddi, E.

    2009-08-01

    We present deep imaging in the U band covering an area of 630 arcmin{sup 2} centered on the southern field of the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS). The data were obtained with the VIMOS instrument at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) Very Large Telescope. The final images reach a magnitude limit U {sub lim} {approx} 29.8 (AB, 1{sigma}, in a 1'' radius aperture), and have good image quality, with full width at half-maximum {approx}0.''8. They are significantly deeper than previous U-band images available for the GOODS fields, and better match the sensitivity of other multiwavelength GOODS photometry. The deeper U-band data yield significantly improved photometric redshifts, especially in key redshift ranges such as 2 < z < 4, and deeper color-selected galaxy samples, e.g., Lyman break galaxies at z {approx} 3. We also present the co-addition of archival ESO VIMOS R-band data, with R {sub lim} {approx} 29 (AB, 1{sigma}, 1'' radius aperture), and image quality {approx}0.''75. We discuss the strategies for the observations and data reduction, and present the first results from the analysis of the co-added images.

  11. The wide band spectral observation of high mass x-ray binary 4u1700-37 with suzaku (II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Yuu; Sasaki, Chikako; Kokubun, Motohide

    4U1700-37 is a high mass X-ray binary discovered by Uhuru satellite, whose companion star HD153919 is the brightest one in the visible light. 4U1700-37 was observed with Suzaku from September 13th to 14th, 2006. The observational period corresponded to an orbital phase of 0.30-0.72, and the XIS mode was set to be 1/4 window mode with 1 sec Burst mode. We have divided all observation data into 1000 sec periods and individually fitted the extracted spectra by the cut off power-law model. Several results were obtained from light curves of the best-fit parameters. The normalization of power-law and line flux was fluctuating by a factor of 10, and the absorption was also making a variation such order. On the other hand, the power-law index approximately stayed in a range of 0.7-1.2, except a short period in which the value dropped smaller than 0. The cutoff and folding energy stayed comparatively flat, changing between 4 and 14 keV, 5 and 25 keV, respectively. The line center energy almost remained constant. We will report these results on the wide-band spectral properties and temporal behaviors of 4U1700-37.

  12. Highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules in low-pressure inductively-coupled plasmas detected by high sensitivity ultra-broad-band optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Marinov, Daniil; Carbone, Emile; Chabert, Pascal; Booth, Jean-Paul

    2015-08-01

    Inductively-coupled plasmas in pure O2 (at pressures of 5-80 mTorr and radiofrequency power up to 500 W) were studied by optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral range 200-450 nm, showing the presence of highly vibrationally excited O2 molecules (up to vʺ = 18) by Schumann-Runge band absorption. Analysis of the relative band intensities indicates a vibrational temperature up to 10,000 K, but these hot molecules only represent a fraction of the total O2 density. By analysing the (11-0) band at higher spectral resolution the O2 rotational temperature was also determined, and was found to increase with both pressure and power, reaching 900 K at 80 mTorr 500 W. These measurements were achieved using a new high-sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy setup, based on a laser-plasma light source, achromatic optics and an aberration-corrected spectrograph. This setup allows the measurement of weak broadband absorbances due to a baseline variability lower than 2   ×   10-5 across a spectral range of 250 nm.

  13. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  14. Radiative analysis of global mean temperature trends in the middle atmosphere: Effects of non-locality and secondary absorption bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomichev, V. I.; Jonsson, A. I.; Ward, W. E.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we provide a refined and extended assignment of past and future temperature changes relative to previous analyses and describe and evaluate the relevance of vertical coupling and non-linear and secondary radiative mechanisms for the interpretation of climatic temperature variations in the middle atmosphere. Because of their nature, the latter mechanisms are not adequately accounted for in most regression analyses of temperature trends as a function of local constituent variations. These mechanisms are examined using (1) globally averaged profiles from transient simulations with the Canadian Middle Atmosphere Model (CMAM) forced by changes in greenhouse gases and ozone depleting substances and (2) a one-dimensional radiative-equilibrium model forced using the diagnosed global mean changes in radiatively active constituents as derived from the CMAM model runs. The conditions during the periods 1975 to 1995 and 2010 to 2040 (during which the rates of change in ozone and CO2 differ) provide a suitable contrast for the role of the non-linear and non-local mechanisms being evaluated in this paper to be clearly differentiated and evaluated. Vertical coupling of radiative transfer effects and the influence of secondary absorption bands are important enough to render the results of multiple linear regression analyses between the temperature response and constituent changes misleading. These effects are evaluated in detail using the 1D radiative-equilibrium model using profiles from the CMAM runs as inputs. In order to explain the differences in the CMAM temperature trends prior to and after 2000 these other radiative effects must be considered in addition to local changes in the radiatively active species. The middle atmosphere temperature cools in response to CO2 and water vapor increases, but past and future trends are modulated by ozone changes.

  15. Sea surface Ka-band radar cross-section from field observations in the Black Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yurovsky, Yury; Kudryavtsev, Vladimir; Grodsky, Semyon; Chapron, Bertrand

    2016-04-01

    An interest in Ka-band radar backscattering from the ocean surface is growing due to better spatial resolution and more accurate Doppler anomaly estimate. But, available empirical models of Ka-band cross-section are quite scarce and sometime controversial. Here we present multi-year (2009-2015) field measurements of Ka-band co-polarized (VV and HH) sea surface normalized radar cross-section (NRCS) from research platform in the Black sea collected in a wide range of observation and sea state conditions. The data are fitted by polynomial function of incidence angle, azimuth and wind speed with accounting for measured radar antenna pattern. This empirical NRCS is compared with published Ka- and Ku-band data. Our Ka-band NRCS is close to Ku-band, but is 5-7 dB higher than 'pioneer' measurements by Masuko et al. (1986). Following the two-scale Bragg paradigm, the NRCS is split into polarized (Bragg) and non-polarized components and analyzed in terms of polarization ratio (VV/HH) and polarization difference (VV-HH) to estimate wave spectra at the Bragg wave number. Non-polarized component dominates at low incidence angles <30° due to specular reflection from regular surface. At larger incidence angles, the relative non-polarized contribution decreases, but grows again at HH-polarization approaching 0.7-0.8 at 65° for 10 m/s wind speed, suggesting that backscattering from breaking waves dominates HH NRCS at low grazing angles. At high incidence angles (>60°) NRCS azimuth dependency is unimodal (upwind peak) for HH and bimodal (with up- and downwind peaks) for VV polarization. This again can be attributed to different backscattering mechanisms for VV and HH polarizations. With decreasing of incidence angle, up- to downwind ratio tends to 1, and under light wind conditions (4-6 m/s) can be less than 1. The same situation is observed for polarization difference, which reflects Bragg backscattering properties only. This effect can be explained by enhanced roughness on

  16. Soil Moisture Estimation by Assimilating L-Band Microwave Brightness Temperature with Geostatistics and Observation Localization

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects. PMID:25635771

  17. Soil moisture estimation by assimilating L-band microwave brightness temperature with geostatistics and observation localization.

    PubMed

    Han, Xujun; Li, Xin; Rigon, Riccardo; Jin, Rui; Endrizzi, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    The observation could be used to reduce the model uncertainties with data assimilation. If the observation cannot cover the whole model area due to spatial availability or instrument ability, how to do data assimilation at locations not covered by observation? Two commonly used strategies were firstly described: One is covariance localization (CL); the other is observation localization (OL). Compared with CL, OL is easy to parallelize and more efficient for large-scale analysis. This paper evaluated OL in soil moisture profile characterizations, in which the geostatistical semivariogram was used to fit the spatial correlated characteristics of synthetic L-Band microwave brightness temperature measurement. The fitted semivariogram model and the local ensemble transform Kalman filter algorithm are combined together to weight and assimilate the observations within a local region surrounding the grid cell of land surface model to be analyzed. Six scenarios were compared: 1_Obs with one nearest observation assimilated, 5_Obs with no more than five nearest local observations assimilated, and 9_Obs with no more than nine nearest local observations assimilated. The scenarios with no more than 16, 25, and 36 local observations were also compared. From the results we can conclude that more local observations involved in assimilation will improve estimations with an upper bound of 9 observations in this case. This study demonstrates the potentials of geostatistical correlation representation in OL to improve data assimilation of catchment scale soil moisture using synthetic L-band microwave brightness temperature, which cannot cover the study area fully in space due to vegetation effects.

  18. Cloud top height retrieval using the imaging polarimeter (3MI) top-of-atmosphere reflectance measurements in the oxygen absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Munro, Rose

    2016-04-01

    The determination of cloud top height from a satellite has a number of applications both for climate studies and aviation safety. A great variety of methods are applied using both active and passive observation systems in the optical and microwave spectral regions. One of the most popular methods with good spatial coverage is based on the measurement of outgoing radiation in the spectral range where oxygen strongly absorbs incoming solar light. Clouds shield tropospheric oxygen reducing the depth of the corresponding absorption line as detected by a satellite instrument. Radiative transfer models are used to connect the solar light reflectance, e.g., in the oxygen A-band located around 761nm, and the cloud top height. The inverse problem is then solved e.g. using look-up tables, to determine the cloud top height. In this paper we propose a new fast and robust oxygen A-band method for the retrieval of cloud altitude using the Multi-viewing Multi-channel Multi-polarization Imaging instrument (3MI) on board the EUMETSAT Polar System Second Generation (EPS-SG). The 3MI measures the intensity at the wavelengths of 410, 443, 490, 555, 670, 763, 765, 865, 910, 1370, 1650, and 2130nm, and (for selected channels) the second and third Stokes vector components which allows the degree of linear polarization and the polarization orientation angle of reflected solar light to be derived at up to 14 observation angles. The instrument response function (to a first approximation) can be modelled by a Gaussian distribution with the full width at half maximum (FWHM) equal to 20nm for all channels except 765nm, 865nm, 1370nm, 1650nm, and 2130nm, where it is equal to 40nm. The FWHM at 763nm (the oxygen A-band location) is equal to 10nm. The following 3MI channels are used in the retrieval procedure: 670, 763, and 865nm. The channels at 670 and 865 nm are not affected by the oxygen absorption. The channel at 763nm is affected by the oxygen concentration vertical profile. The higher

  19. Origin of absorption peaks in reflection loss spectrum in Ku- frequency band of Co-Zr substituted strontium hexaferrites prepared using sucrose precursor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Chawla, S. K.; Kaur, Prabhjyot

    2017-03-01

    This study presents the detailed explanation of the factors, contributing towards the absorption peaks in reflection loss spectrum of hexaferrites. Cobalt-Zirconium substituted strontium hexaferrites, synthesized using sucrose precursor sol-gel technique, were analyzed in 12.4-18 GHz frequency range. The concepts of impedance matching through quarter wavelength condition, complex thickness, dielectric phase angle and attenuation constant have been used to determine the location as well as intensity of absorption peaks. This study also demonstrates the potential application of three compositions of this series with doping content (x)==0.0, 0.6 and 0.8 as an effective microwave absorbers in Ku-frequency band.

  20. Observations of shadow bands at the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980.

    PubMed

    Marschall, L A; Mahon, R; Henry, R C

    1984-12-01

    Photoelectric observations of short term light variations (shadow bands) at the 16 Feb. 1980 total solar eclipse have been made using a set of spatially separated PIN diodes. Light variations in a bandpass of 1-500 Hz were detected during the half-minutes preceding and following the total phase. Fourier analysis of the noise spectrum of the variations reveals a sharp drop-off for frequencies above 50 Hz and an overall spectrum quite similar to previously reported power spectra of stellar scintillation. This is consistent with an atmospheric origin for the shadow bands. Cross-correlations between the detector outputs are low, suggesting a short persistence time for the turbulent elements causing the patterns.

  1. Observations of shadow bands at the total solar eclipse of 16 February 1980

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marschall, L. A.; Mahon, R.; Henry, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Photoelectric observations of short term light variations (shadow bands) at the 16 Feb. 1980 total solar eclipse have been made using a set of spatially separated PIN diodes. Light variations in a bandpass of 1-500 Hz were detected during the half-minutes preceding and following the total phase. Fourier analysis of the noise spectrum of the variations reveals a sharp drop-off for frequencies above 50 Hz and an overall spectrum quite similar to previously reported power spectra of stellar scintillation. This is consistent with an atmospheric origin for the shadow bands. Cross-correlations between the detector outputs are low, suggesting a short persistence time for the turbulent elements causing the patterns.

  2. Observations of LHR noise with banded structure by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P. M.

    1983-01-01

    The measurement of electrostatic noise near the lower hybrid frequency made by the sounding rocket S29 barium-GEOS is reported. The noise is related to the spin of the rocket and reaches well below the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. Above the altitude of 300 km the noise shows banded structure roughly organized by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously with the banded structure a signal near the hydrogen cyclotron frequency is detected. This signal is also spin modulated. The character of the noise strongly suggests that it is locally generated by the rocket payload disturbing the plasma. If this interpretation is correct, plasma wave experiments on other spacecrafts are expected to observe similar phenomena.

  3. Direct observation of the band structure in bulk hexagonal boron nitride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henck, Hugo; Pierucci, Debora; Fugallo, Giorgia; Avila, José; Cassabois, Guillaume; Dappe, Yannick J.; Silly, Mathieu G.; Chen, Chaoyu; Gil, Bernard; Gatti, Matteo; Sottile, Francesco; Sirotti, Fausto; Asensio, Maria C.; Ouerghi, Abdelkarim

    2017-02-01

    A promising route towards nanodevice applications relies on the association of graphene and transition metal dichalcogenides with hexagonal boron nitride (h -BN ). Due to its insulating nature, h -BN has emerged as a natural substrate and gate dielectric for graphene-based electronic devices. However, some fundamental properties of bulk h -BN remain obscure. For example, the band structure and the position of the Fermi level have not been experimentally resolved. Here, we report a direct observation of parabolic dispersions of h -BN crystals using high-resolution angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We find that h -BN exfoliation on epitaxial graphene enables overcoming the technical difficulties of using ARPES with insulating materials. We show trigonal warping of the intensity maps at constant energy. The valence-band maxima are located around the K points, 2.5 eV below the Fermi level, thus confirming the residual p -type character of typical h -BN .

  4. Observations of the high latitude far ultraviolet background in the 1040-1080 A band

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bixler, J.; Bowyer, S.; Grewing, M.

    1984-01-01

    Observations of the far ultraviolet background at high galactic latitudes in a band from 1040-1080 A were carried out with a rocket-borne 1 meter telescope and a 0.23 square degree field of view photometer. The photometer had a sharp cutoff shortward of 1040 A and a sensitivity at hydrogen Lyman alpha of a factor of 0.0001 below its sensitivity at 1060 A. A second photometer monitored geocoronal hydrogen Lyman alpha emission enabling an accurate evaluation of counts due to this background. The hydrogen Lyman alpha flux contributed only 17 percent of the total counts detected in the cosmic background detector. An upper limit to the emission in the 1040-1080 A band of 9700 photons per sq cm-s-sr-A is obtained. This upper limit is compared with previous measurements and theoretical predictions.

  5. EL2 deep level defects and above-band gap two-photon absorption in high gain lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Wang, Wei; Niu, Hongjian; Zhang, Xianbin; Ji, Weili

    2005-01-01

    Experiments of a lateral semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switch, both linear and nonlinear mode of the switch were observed when the switch was triggered by 1064 nm laser pulses, with energy of 1.9 mJ and the pulse width of 60 ns, and operated at biased electric field of 4.37 kV/cm. It"s wavelength is longer than 876nm, but the experiments indicate that the semi-insulating GaAs photoconductive switches can absorb 1064 nm laser obviously, which is out of the absorption range of the GaAs material. It is not possible to explain this behavior by using intrinsic absorption mechanism. We think that there are two mostly kinds of absorption mechanisms play a key part in absorption process, they are the two-steps-single-photon absorption that based on the EL2 energy level and two-photon absorption.

  6. Experimental observation of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the two plasmon decay instability and resonance absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D.A.

    1981-01-01

    The interaction of intense microwaves with an inhomogeneous plasma is studied in two experimental devices. In the first device an investigation was made of microwave absorption and electron heating due to the parametric decay of microwaves into electron plasma waves (Two Plasmon Decay instability, TPDI), modeling a process which can occur near the quarter critical surface in laser driven pellets. P-polarized microwave (f = 1.2 GHz, P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 12 kW) are applied to an essentially collisionless, inhomogeneous plasma, in an oversized waveguide, in the U.C. Davis Prometheus III device. The initial density scale length near the quarter critical surface is quite long (L/lambda/sub De/ approx. = 3000 or k/sub 0/L approx. = 15). The observed threshold power for the TPDI is quite low (P/sub T/approx. = 0.1 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ approx. = 0.1). Near the threshold the decay waves only occur near the quarter critical surface. As the incident power is increased above threshold, the decay waves spread to lower densities, and for P/sub 0/ greater than or equal to lkW, (v/sub os//v/sub e/ greater than or equal to 0.3) suprathermal electron heating is strong for high powers (T/sub H/ less than or equal to 12 T/sub e/ for P/sub 0/ less than or equal to 8 kW or v/sub os//v/sub e/ less than or equal to 0.9).

  7. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  8. Extending ALFALFA: Reducing L-Band Wide Observations of Optically Selected Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Evan; O'Donoghue, Aileen A.; Haynes, Martha P.; Koopmann, Rebecca A.; Undergraduate ALFALFA Team

    2016-01-01

    Observations of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster were completed at the Arecibo Observatory in the spring and summer of 2015. 161 targets were observed, selected by photometry criteria such as magnitude and shape from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. The targets, some too dim to be detected by Arecibo's ALFA drift scanner, were observed with the L-Band Wide detector. Once reductions in an IDL environment were done, these data were matched to the targets from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the GALEX/MAST catalog. 115 of the 161 targets observed had positive detections, a 71% success rate. Comparing the galaxies that were detected against the galaxies that were not detected (by the L-Band Wide receiver) will allow us to refine our method of using photometric data to select HI-rich galaxies in the 2000 km/s to 9000 km/s range to refine our selection for the Arecibo Pisces-Perseus Supercluster Survey (APPSS), which uses the same method of target selection.

  9. FUSE Observations of O VI Absorption in the Local Interstellar Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegerle, W. R.; Jenkins, E. B.; Shelton, R. L.; Bowen, D. V.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We report the results of an initial Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) survey of O VI Lambda 1032 absorption along the lines of sight to eleven nearby white dwarfs, ten of which are within the Local Bubble (LB; d < or approximately equal 100 pc). A goal of this survey is to investigate the possible formation of O VI in the conductive interfaces between cool (about 10(exp 4) K) clouds immersed in the presumably hot (10(exp 6) K) gas within the LB. This mechanism is often invoked to explain the widespread presence of 0 VI throughout the Galactic disk. We find no 0 VI absorption toward two stars, and the column densities along three additional sight lines are quite low; N(O VI) about 5 x 10(exp 13)/sq cm. In several directions, we observe rather broad, shallow absorption with N(O VI) about 1 - 2 x 10(exp 13)/sq cm. Models of conductive interfaces predict narrow profiles with N(OVI) > or about equal to 10(exp 13)/sq cm per interface, in the absence of a significant transverse magnetic field. Hence, our observations of weak 0 VI absorption indicate that conduction is being quenched, possibly by non-radial magnetic fields. Alternatively, the gas within the LB may not be hot. Breitschwerdt & Schmutzler have proposed a model for the LB in which an explosive event within a dense cloud created rapid expansion and adiabatic cooling, resulting in a cavity containing gas with a kinetic temperature of T about 50,000 K, but with an ionization state characteristic of much hotter gas. This model has a number of attractive features, but appears to predict significantly more O VI than we observe.

  10. The source of 3-μm absorption in Jupiter’s clouds: Reanalysis of ISO observations using new NH3 absorption models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M.

    2010-11-01

    A prominent characteristic of jovian near-IR spectra is the widely distributed presence of a strong absorption at wavelengths from about 2.9 μm to 3.1 μm, first noticed in a 3-μm spectrum obtained by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 1996. While Brooke et al. (Brooke, T.Y., Knacke, R.F., Encrenaz, T., Drossart, P., Crisp, D., Feuchtgruber, H. [1998]. Icarus 136, 1-13) were able to fit the ISO spectrum very well using ammonia ice as the sole source of particulate absorption, Irwin et al. (Irwin, P.G.J., Weir, A.L., Taylor, F.W., Calcutt, S.B., Carlson, R.W. [2001]. Icarus 149, 397-415) noted that their best-fit cloud model implied a strong absorption at 2 μm that was not observed in Galileo NIMS spectra, raising questions about the source of the absorption. Subsequent significant revisions in ammonia gas absorption models (Bowles, N., Calcutt, S., Irwin, P., Temple, J. [2008]. Icarus 196, 612-614) also raised questions about these conclusions because ammonia gas absorption overlaps regions of ammonia ice absorption. Our reanalysis, based on improved ammonia absorption models, finds that the ISO spectrum can be well fit by models that include both NH 3 ice and solid NH 4SH, with the latter substance providing most of the absorption. The component due to NH 3 is very possibly due to NH 3 present as a coating on either large ( r ˜ 15 μm) NH 4SH particles in a deeper layer at ˜550 mb or on small ( r ˜ 0.3 μm) photochemical haze particles in a lower pressure layer at ˜370 mb. Neither option creates conflict with the lack of significant NH 3 absorption features at thermal wavelengths.

  11. Enhanced Microwave Absorption Properties by Tuning Cation Deficiency of Perovskite Oxides of Two-Dimensional LaFeO3/C Composite in X-Band.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Wang, Lai-Sen; Ma, Yating; Zheng, Hongfei; Lin, Liang; Zhang, Qinfu; Chen, Yuanzhi; Qiu, Yulong; Peng, Dong-Liang

    2017-03-01

    Development of microwave absorption materials with tunable thickness and bandwidth is particularly urgent for practical applications but remains a great challenge. Here, two-dimensional nanocomposites consisting of perovskite oxides (LaFeO3) and amorphous carbon were successfully obtained through a one pot with heating treatment using sodium chloride as a hard template. The tunable absorption properties were realized by introducing A-site cation deficiency in LaFeO3 perovskite. Among the A-site cation-deficient perovskites, La0.62FeO3/C (L0.62FOC) has the best microwave absorption properties in which the maximum absorption is -26.6 dB at 9.8 GHz with a thickness of 2.94 mm and the bandwidth range almost covers all X-band. The main reason affecting the microwave absorption performance was derived from the A-site cation deficiency which induced more dipoles polarization loss. This work proposes a promising method to tune the microwave absorption performance via introducing deficiency in a crystal lattice.

  12. Quantitative photoluminescence of broad band absorbing melanins: a procedure to correct for inner filter and re-absorption effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riesz, Jennifer; Gilmore, Joel; Meredith, Paul

    2005-07-01

    We report methods for correcting the photoluminescence emission and excitation spectra of highly absorbing samples for re-absorption and inner filter effects. We derive the general form of the correction, and investigate various methods for determining the parameters. Additionally, the correction methods are tested with highly absorbing fluorescein and melanin (broadband absorption) solutions; the expected linear relationships between absorption and emission are recovered upon application of the correction, indicating that the methods are valid. These procedures allow accurate quantitative analysis of the emission of low quantum yield samples (such as melanin) at concentrations where absorption is significant.

  13. Method for calculating and observing microwave absorption by a sphere in a single mode rectangular cavity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1991-01-01

    A new theory of microwave absorption by a lossy dielectric sphere in a single mode rectangular cavity has been recently developed. The absorption was treated in the framework of an electromagnetic scattering problem. That theory is summarized here and calculated results that bear on optimizing the processing of materials are illustrated. Methods for observing power absorption and other results predicted by the scattering model are discussed. Cavity perturbation theory provides a bridge between theoretical calculations and experimental observations, and a special problem that arises when an established version of cavity perturbation theory is applied to spheres is identified, analyzed, and resolved. The direct problem of predicting shifts in frequency and Q from model calculations is discussed for a sphere in a cavity when the sphere's complex dielectric constant is known. Also, the inverse problem of determining the complex dielectric constants from measured values of those shifts is considered. The small sphere limit, where an electrostatic or quasistatic model is valid, is treated in detail, and planned work on parallel problems for larger spheres is described.

  14. Soil Moisture Retrievals Using L-band Radiometer Observations in SMEX02: Successes and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, W. L.; Limaye, A. S.; Laymon, C. A.

    2004-05-01

    Measurements at L-band are widely considered to be optimal for soil moisture remote sensing, taking into account emitting depth and complications arising from roughness and vegetation. Although there is no operational satellite-borne L-band radiometer today, plans are underway to deploy one by the end of the decade. During the Soil Moisture Experiments in 2002 (SMEX02), the Passive and Active L and S-band (PALS) instrument was flown over the Walnut Creek Watershed in Iowa. This agricultural region was selected to facilitate testing of microwave remote sensing algorithms under conditions of highly variable and sometimes dense vegetation cover. L-band brightness temperature observations from PALS were used to retrieve near-surface soil moisture for conditions representative of the dominant corn and soybean land covers in the watershed. Sensitivities of the retrieved soil moisture to surface temperature, surface roughness and the vegetation B parameter have been evaluated for both crops. Retrievals for corn were found to be highly sensitive to the vegetation B parameter, while retrievals for soybeans were most sensitive to surface roughness. The vegetation water content of approximately 4 kg/m2 for the corn sites appears to be high enough to make soil moisture retrievals problematic, but retrievals appear relatively robust for soybeans with a vegetation water content of 0.3-0.7 kg/m2. For both corn and soybeans there is considerable overlap in the parameter spaces (combinations of surface roughness and vegetation B parameter) that yield accurate moisture retrievals for three wet days analyzed, but these parameter values do not translate well to dry conditions. This may indicate potential deficiencies in the roughness and vegetation correction algorithms for agricultural areas and raises concerns about global operational soil moisture retrieval from satellite-borne microwave sensors.

  15. Strong interlayer coupling mediated giant two-photon absorption in MoS e2 /graphene oxide heterostructure: Quenching of exciton bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Rituraj; Aneesh, J.; Yadav, Rajesh Kumar; Sanda, Suresh; Barik, A. R.; Mishra, Ashish Kumar; Maji, Tuhin Kumar; Karmakar, Debjani; Adarsh, K. V.

    2016-04-01

    A complex few-layer MoS e2 /graphene oxide (GO) heterostructure with strong interlayer coupling was prepared by a facile hydrothermal method. In this strongly coupled heterostructure, we demonstrate a giant enhancement of two-photon absorption that is in stark contrast to the reverse saturable absorption of a weakly coupled MoS e2 /GO heterostructure and saturable absorption of isolated MoS e2 . Spectroscopic evidence of our study indicates that the optical signatures of isolated MoS e2 and GO domains are significantly modified in the heterostructure, displaying a direct coupling of both domains. Furthermore, our first-principles calculations indicate that strong interlayer coupling between the layers dramatically suppresses the MoS e2 excitonic bands. We envision that our findings provide a powerful tool to explore different optical functionalities as a function of interlayer coupling, which may be essential for the development of device technologies.

  16. Thickness and Composition Tailoring of K- and Ka-Band Microwave Absorption of BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 Ferrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Sukhleen Bindra; Pubby, Kunal; Singh, Charanjeet

    2017-02-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the electromagnetic and microwave absorption properties of M-type barium hexaferrites with chemical formula BaCo x Ti x Fe(12-2 x)O19 ( x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 1.0) in K and Ka band. Characterization techniques such as x-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy were applied to confirm ferrite formation. The frequency dependence of the complex permittivity and complex permeability was studied for prepared ferrite samples in the frequency range from 18 GHz to 40 GHz. Factors such as the quarter-wavelength condition, impedance matching, high dielectric-magnetic losses, as well as ferromagnetic resonance were investigated to determine their contribution to the absorption characteristics. It was found that the quarter-wavelength ( λ/4) model could be successfully applied to predict and understand the position as well as number of reflection peaks in the microwave absorption spectrum. The origin of the reflection loss peaks is explained and verified based on calculations of input impedance, loss tangent, and ferromagnetic resonance. Reflection loss analysis revealed that all six compositions exhibited reflection loss peaks (absorption >90%) at their matching thicknesses and frequencies. Therefore, these ferrites are potential candidates for use in electromagnetic shielding applications requiring low reflectivity in K and Ka band.

  17. Observation of Dirac-like band dispersion in LaAgSb2

    DOE PAGES

    Shi, X.; Richard, P.; Wang, Kefeng; ...

    2016-02-16

    In this paper, we present a combined angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) and first-principles calculations study of the electronic structure of LaAgSb2 in the entire first Brillouin zone. We observe a Dirac-cone-like structure in the vicinity of the Fermi level formed by the crossing of two linear energy bands, as well as the nested segments of a Fermi surface pocket emerging from the cone. In conclusion, our ARPES results show the close relationship of the Dirac cone to the charge-density-wave ordering, providing consistent explanations for exotic behaviors in this material.

  18. Estimating Sea Surface Salinity and Wind Using Combined Passive and Active L-Band Microwave Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yueh, Simon H.; Chaubell, Mario J.

    2012-01-01

    Several L-band microwave radiometer and radar missions have been, or will be, operating in space for land and ocean observations. These include the NASA Aquarius mission and the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, both of which use combined passive/ active L-band instruments. Aquarius s passive/active L-band microwave sensor has been designed to map the salinity field at the surface of the ocean from space. SMAP s primary objectives are for soil moisture and freeze/thaw detection, but it will operate continuously over the ocean, and hence will have significant potential for ocean surface research. In this innovation, an algorithm has been developed to retrieve simultaneously ocean surface salinity and wind from combined passive/active L-band microwave observations of sea surfaces. The algorithm takes advantage of the differing response of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter to salinity, wind speed, and direction, thus minimizing the least squares error (LSE) measure, which signifies the difference between measurements and model functions of brightness temperatures and radar backscatter. The algorithm uses the conjugate gradient method to search for the local minima of the LSE. Three LSE measures with different measurement combinations have been tested. The first LSE measure uses passive microwave data only with retrieval errors reaching 1 to 2 psu (practical salinity units) for salinity, and 1 to 2 m/s for wind speed. The second LSE measure uses both passive and active microwave data for vertical and horizontal polarizations. The addition of active microwave data significantly improves the retrieval accuracy by about a factor of five. To mitigate the impact of Faraday rotation on satellite observations, the third LSE measure uses measurement combinations invariant under the Faraday rotation. For Aquarius, the expected RMS SSS (sea surface salinity) error will be less than about 0.2 psu for low winds, and increases to 0.3 psu at 25 m/s wind speed

  19. Observation of electron excitation into silicon conduction band by slow-ion surface neutralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shchemelinin, S.; Breskin, A.

    2017-03-01

    Bare reverse biased silicon photodiodes were exposed to 3 eV He+, Ne+, Ar+, N2+, N+ and H2O+ ions. In all cases an increase of the reverse current through the diode was observed. This effect and its dependence on the ionization energy of the incident ions and on other factors are qualitatively explained in the framework of Auger-type surface neutralization theory. Amplification of the ion-induced charge was observed with an avalanche photodiode under high applied bias. The observed effect can be considered as ion-induced internal potential electron emission into the conduction band of silicon. To the best of our knowledge, no experimental evidence of such effect was previously reported. Possible applications are discussed.

  20. Observations of the J = 10 manifold of the pure rotational band of phosphine on Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Rank, D. M.

    1986-01-01

    Saturn was observed in the vicinity of the J = 10 manifold of the pure rotational band of phosphine on 1984 July 10 and 12 from NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory with the facility far-infrared cooled grating spectrometer. On each night observations of the full disk plus rings were made at 4 to 6 discrete wavelengths which selectively sampled the manifold and the adjacent continuum. The previously reported detection of this manifold is confirmed. After subtraction of the flux due to the rings, the data are compared with disk-averaged models of Saturn. It is found that PH3 must be strongly depleted above the thermal inversion (approx. 70 mbar). The best fitting models consistent with other observational constaints indicate that PH3 is significantly depleted at even deeper atmospheric levels ( or = 500 mbar), implying an eddy diffusion coefficient for Saturn of 10 to the 4 cm sq/sec.

  1. Observations of the J = 10 manifold of the pure rotational band of phosphine on Saturn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haas, M. R.; Erickson, E. F.; Goorvitch, D.; Mckibbin, D. D.; Rank, D. M.

    1985-01-01

    Saturn was observed in the vicinity of the J = 10 manifold of the pure rotational band of phosphine on 1984 July 10 and 12 from NASA's Kuiper Airborne Observatory with the facility far-infrared cooled grating spectrometer. On each night observations of the full disk plus rings were made at 4 to 6 discrete wavelengths which selectively sampled the manifold and the adjacent continuum. The previously reported detection of this manifold is confirmed. After subtraction of the flux due to the rings, the data are compared with disk-averaged models of Saturn. It is found that PH3 must be strongly depleted above the thermal inversion (approx. 70 mbar). The best fitting models consistent with other observational constraints indicate that PH3 is significantly depleted at even deeper atmospheric levels (or = 500 mbar), implying an eddy diffusion coefficient for Saturn of 10 to the 4 cm sq/sec.

  2. Direct Observation of Band Structure Modifications in Nanocrystals of CsPbBr3 Perovskite.

    PubMed

    Lin, Junhao; Gomez, Leyre; de Weerd, Chris; Fujiwara, Yasufumi; Gregorkiewicz, Tom; Suenaga, Kazutomo

    2016-11-09

    We investigate the variation of the bandgap energy of single quantum dots of CsPbBr3 inorganic halide perovskite as a function of size and shape and upon embedding within an ensemble. For that purpose, we make use of valence-loss electron spectroscopy with Z-contrast annular dark-field (ADF) imaging in a state-of-the-art low-voltage monochromatic scanning transmission electron microscope. In the experiment, energy absorption is directly mapped onto individual quantum dots, whose dimensions and location are simultaneously measured to the highest precision. In that way, we establish an intimate relation between quantum dot size and even shape and its bandgap energy on a single object level. We explicitly follow the bandgap increase in smaller quantum dots due to quantum confinement and demonstrate that it is predominantly governed by the smallest of the three edges of the cuboidal perovskite dot. We also show the presence of an effective coupling between proximal dots in an ensemble, leading to band structure modification. These unique insights are directly relevant to the development of custom-designed quantum structures and solids which will be realized by purposeful assemblage of individually characterized and selected quantum dots, serving as building blocks.

  3. A study of the structure of the ν1(HF) absorption band of the СH3СN…HF complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gromova, E. I.; Glazachev, E. V.; Bulychev, V. P.; Koshevarnikov, A. M.; Tokhadze, K. G.

    2015-09-01

    The ν1(HF) absorption band shape of the CH3CN…HF complex is studied in the gas phase at a temperature of 293 K. The spectra of gas mixtures CH3CN/HF are recorded in the region of 4000-3400 cm-1 at a resolution from 0.1 to 0.005 cm-1 with a Bruker IFS-120 HR vacuum Fourier spectrometer in a cell 10 cm in length with wedge-shaped sapphire windows. The procedure used to separate the residual water absorption allows more than ten fine-structure bands to be recorded on the low-frequency wing of the ν1(HF) band. It is shown that the fine structure of the band is formed primarily due to hot transitions from excited states of the low-frequency ν7 librational vibration. Geometrical parameters of the equilibrium nuclear configuration, the binding energy, and the dipole moment of the complex are determined from a sufficiently accurate quantum-chemical calculation. The frequencies and intensities for a number of spectral transitions of this complex are obtained in the harmonic approximation and from variational solutions of anharmonic vibrational problems.

  4. Evaluation of Detector-to-Detector and Mirror Side Differences for Terra MODIS Reflective Solar Bands Using Simultaneous MISR Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Angal, A.; Barnes, W.

    2011-01-01

    The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) is one of the five Earth-observing instruments on-board the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth-Observing System(EOS) Terra spacecraft, launched in December 1999. It has 36 spectral bands with wavelengths ranging from 0.41 to 14.4 mm and collects data at three nadir spatial resolutions: 0.25 km for 2 bands with 40 detectors each, 0.5 km for 5 bands with 20 detectors each and 1 km for the remaining 29 bands with 10 detectors each. MODIS bands are located on four separate focal plane assemblies (FPAs) according to their spectral wavelengths and aligned in the cross-track direction. Detectors of each spectral band are aligned in the along-track direction. MODIS makes observations using a two-sided paddle-wheel scan mirror. Its on-board calibrators (OBCs) for the reflective solar bands (RSBs) include a solar diffuser (SD), a solar diffuser stability monitor (SDSM) and a spectral-radiometric calibration assembly (SRCA). Calibration is performed for each band, detector, sub-sample (for sub-kilometer resolution bands) and mirror side. In this study, a ratio approach is applied to MODIS observed Earth scene reflectances to track the detector-to-detector and mirror side differences. Simultaneous observed reflectances from the Multi-angle Imaging Spectroradiometer (MISR), also onboard the Terra spacecraft, are used with MODIS observed reflectances in this ratio approach for four closely matched spectral bands. Results show that the detector-to-detector difference between two adjacent detectors within each spectral band is typically less than 0.2% and, depending on the wavelengths, the maximum difference among all detectors varies from 0.5% to 0.8%. The mirror side differences are found to be very small for all bands except for band 3 at 0.44 mm. This is the band with the shortest wavelength among the selected matching bands, showing a time-dependent increase for the mirror side difference. This

  5. Complexities in pyroxene compositions derived from absorption band centers: Examples from Apollo samples, HED meteorites, synthetic pure pyroxenes, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We reexamine the relationship between pyroxene composition and near-infrared absorption bands, integrating measurements of diverse natural and synthetic samples. We test an algorithm (PLC) involving a two-part linear continuum removal and parabolic fits to the 1 and 2 μm bands—a computationally simple approach which can easily be automated and applied to remote sensing data. Employing a suite of synthetic pure pyroxenes, the PLC technique is shown to derive similar band centers to the modified Gaussian model. PLC analyses are extended to natural pyroxene-bearing materials, including (1) bulk lunar basalts and pyroxene separates, (2) diverse lunar soils, and (3) HED meteorites. For natural pyroxenes, the relationship between composition and absorption band center differs from that of synthetic pyroxenes. These differences arise from complexities inherent in natural materials such as exsolution, zoning, mixing, and space weathering. For these reasons, band center measurements of natural pyroxene-bearing materials are compositionally nonunique and could represent three distinct scenarios (1) pyroxene with a narrow compositional range, (2) complexly zoned pyroxene grains, or (3) a mixture of multiple pyroxene (or nonpyroxene) components. Therefore, a universal quantitative relationship between band centers and pyroxene composition cannot be uniquely derived for natural pyroxene-bearing materials without additional geologic context. Nevertheless, useful relative relationships between composition and band center persist in most cases. These relationships are used to interpret M3 data from the Humboldtianum Basin. Four distinct compositional units are identified (1) Mare Humboldtianum basalts, (2) distinct outer basalts, (3) low-Ca pyroxene-bearing materials, and (4) feldspathic materials.

  6. Properties of L-band interferograms derived from ALOS/PALSAR radar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zebker, H. A.; Rosen, P. A.; Hager, B.

    2007-12-01

    We present here L-band radar interferograms derived from ALOS/PALSAR satellite observations over several different Earth surface terrains. These InSAR images are representative of data that would be collected by the proposed DESDynI radar mission. We have examined interferograms over Hawaii, Greenland, Egypt, and California, which present surfaces covered by light vegetation, dense tropical forests, vegetation-free desert, and many ice facies. The interferograms exhibit very high correlation when compared to the C-band radar data commonly available from other existing satellites, yielding improved spatial coverage and reliable temporal sampling. In many cases the acquisitions are fully polarimetric, so that we can compare how the polarization state affects the statistics of the interferometric echoes. Specific results to date show that the use of L-band data rather than C-band permits much more comprehensive deformation modeling of rift events in Hawaii and of creep along faults, with little difference between interferograms formed from co- and cross-polarized returns. Ice from the wet snow, percolation, and dry snow zones in Greenland often correlates well (>50%) even with the PALSAR six-week repeat interval. Observable fringe patterns are seen in the Hawaiian rain forest in many locations over this same orbit interval. Interferograms derived from HH and VV data over ice and vegetation are very similar, and HV InSAR data are similarly correlated when allowance is made for the lower signal to noise ratio, even though considerable volume scatter occurs. Cross-interferograms show that the HH return is rather uncorrelated with the VV return, but that a small shift in the mean phase is present in HH-HV difference interferograms. This could be due to a real several cm shift in the phase center of the echo, but we are currently considering whether this apparent phase shift results from cross-polarized contamination of the radar return. With more frequent repeat

  7. Band gap opening in strongly compressed diamond observed by x-ray energy loss spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gamboa, E. J.; Fletcher, L. B.; Lee, H. J.; MacDonald, M. J.; Zastrau, U.; Gauthier, M.; Gericke, D. O.; Vorberger, J.; Granados, E.; Hastings, J. B.; Glenzer, S. H.

    2016-01-25

    The extraordinary mechanical and optical properties of diamond are the basis of numerous technical applications and make diamond anvil cells a premier device to explore the high-pressure behavior of materials. However, at applied pressures above a few hundred GPa, optical probing through the anvils becomes difficult because of the pressure-induced changes of the transmission and the excitation of a strong optical emission. Such features have been interpreted as the onset of a closure of the optical gap in diamond, and can significantly impair spectroscopy of the material inside the cell. In contrast, a comparable widening has been predicted for purely hydrostatic compressions, forming a basis for the presumed pressure stiffening of diamond and resilience to the eventual phase change to BC8. We here present the first experimental evidence of this effect at geo-planetary pressures, exceeding the highest ever reported hydrostatic compression of diamond by more than 200 GPa and any other measurement of the band gap by more than 350 GPa. We here apply laser driven-ablation to create a dynamic, high pressure state in a thin, synthetic diamond foil together with frequency-resolved x-ray scattering as a probe. The frequency shift of the inelastically scattered x-rays encodes the optical properties and, thus, the behavior of the band gap in the sample. Using the ultra-bright x-ray beam from the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), we observe an increasing direct band gap in diamond up to a pressure of 370 GPa. This finding points to the enormous strains in the anvils and the impurities in natural Type Ia diamonds as the source of the observed closure of the optical window. Our results demonstrate that diamond remains an insulating solid to pressures approaching its limit strength.

  8. First observation of 628 CO 2 isotopologue band at 3.3 μm in the atmosphere of Venus by solar occultation from Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertaux, Jean-Loup; Vandaele, Ann Carine; Wilquet, Valérie; Montmessin, F.; Dahoo, R.; Villard, E.; Korablev, O.; Fedorova, A.

    2008-05-01

    The new ESA Venus Express orbiter is the first mission applying the probing technique of solar and stellar occultation to the atmosphere of Venus, with the SPICAV/SOIR instrument. SOIR is a new type of spectrometer used for solar occultations in the range 2.2-4.3 μm. Thanks to a high spectral resolving power R˜15,000-20,000 (unprecedented in planetary space exploration), a new gaseous absorption band was soon detected in the atmospheric transmission spectra around 2982 cm -1, showing a structure resembling an unresolved Q branch and a number of isolated lines with a regular wave number pattern. This absorption could not be matched to any species contained in HITRAN or GEISA databases, but was found very similar to an absorption pattern observed by a US team in the spectrum of solar light reflected by the ground of Mars [Villanueva, G.L., Mumma, M.J., Novak, R.E., Hewagama, T., 2008. Icarus 195 (1), 34-44]. This team then suggested to us that the absorption was due to an uncatalogued transition of the 16O 12C 18O molecule. The possible existence of this band was soon confirmed from theoretical considerations by Perevalov and Tashkun. Some SOIR observations of the atmospheric transmission are presented around 2982 cm -1, and rough calculations of line strengths of the Q branch are produced, based on the isotopic ratio measured earlier in the lower atmosphere of Venus. This discovery emphasizes the role of isotopologues of CO 2 (as well as H 2O and HDO) as important greenhouse gases in the atmosphere of Venus.

  9. Observational studies on the near-infrared unidentified emission bands in galactic H II regions

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, Tamami I.; Onaka, Takashi; Sakon, Itsuki; Ohsawa, Ryou; Bell, Aaron C.; Ishihara, Daisuke; Shimonishi, Takashi

    2014-03-20

    Using a large collection of near-infrared spectra (2.5-5.4 μm) of Galactic H II regions and H II region-like objects, we perform a systematic investigation of astronomical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) features. Thirty-six objects were observed using the infrared camera on board the AKARI satellite as a part of a director's time program. In addition to the well known 3.3-3.6 μm features, most spectra show a relatively weak emission feature at 5.22 μm with sufficient signal-to-noise ratios, which we identify as the PAH 5.25 μm band (previously reported). By careful analysis, we find good correlations between the 5.25 μm band and both the aromatic hydrocarbon feature at 3.3 μm and the aliphatic hydrocarbon features at around 3.4-3.6 μm. The present results give us convincing evidence that the astronomical 5.25 μm band is associated with C-H vibrations, as suggested by previous studies, and show its potential to probe the PAH size distribution. The analysis also shows that the aliphatic-to-aromatic ratio of I {sub 3.4-3.6} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm} decreases against the ratio of the 3.7 μm continuum intensity to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub cont,} {sub 3.7} {sub μm}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}, which is an indicator of the ionization fraction of PAHs. The midinfrared color of I {sub 9} {sub μm}/I {sub 18} {sub μm} also declines steeply against the ratio of the hydrogen recombination line Brα at 4.05 μm to the 3.3 μm band, I {sub Brα}/I {sub 3.3} {sub μm}. These facts indicate possible dust processing inside or at the boundary of ionized gas.

  10. Substitutional Electron and Hole Doping of WSe2 : Synthesis, Electrical Characterization, and Observation of Band-to-Band Tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, R.; Chuang, H. J.; Koehler, M. R.; Combs, N.; Patchen, A.; Zhou, Z. X.; Mandrus, D.

    2017-03-01

    Transition-metal dichalcogenides (TMDs) such as MoS2 , MoSe2 , and WSe2 have emerged as promising two-dimensional semiconductors. Many anticipated applications of these materials require both p -type and n -type TMDs with long-term doping stability. Here, we report on the synthesis of substitutionally doped WSe2 crystals using Nb and Re as p - and n -type dopants, respectively. Hall coefficient and gate-dependent transport measurements reveal drastically different doping properties between nominally 0.5% Nb- and 0.5% Re-doped WSe2 . While 0.5% Nb-doped WSe2 (WSe2∶Nb ) is degenerately hole doped with a nearly temperature-independent carrier density of approximately 1019 cm-3 , electrons in 0.5% Re-doped WSe2 (WSe2 ∶Re ) are largely trapped in localized states below the mobility edge and exhibit thermally activated behavior. Charge transport in both WSe2∶Nb and WSe2 ∶Re is found to be limited by Coulomb scattering from ionized impurities. Furthermore, we fabricate vertical van der Waals-junction diodes consisting of multilayers of WSe2∶Nb and WSe2 ∶Re . Finally, we demonstrate reverse rectifying behavior as a direct proof of band-to-band tunneling in our WSe2∶Nb /WSe2∶Re diodes.

  11. Five intermolecular vibrations of the CO2 dimer observed via infrared combination bands.

    PubMed

    Norooz Oliaee, J; Dehghany, M; Rezaei, Mojtaba; McKellar, A R W; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N

    2016-11-07

    The weakly bound van der Waals dimer (CO2)2 has long been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. Here, we study its low frequency intermolecular vibrations by means of combination bands in the region of the CO2 monomer ν3 fundamental (≈2350 cm(-1)), which are observed using a tunable infrared laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. With the help of a recent high level ab initio calculation by Wang, Carrington, and Dawes, four intermolecular frequencies are assigned: the in-plane disrotatory bend (22.26 cm(-1)); the out-of-plane torsion (23.24 cm(-1)); twice the disrotatory bend (31.51 cm(-1)); and the in-plane conrotatory bend (92.25 cm(-1)). The disrotatory bend and torsion, separated by only 0.98 cm(-1), are strongly mixed by Coriolis interactions. The disrotatory bend overtone is well behaved, but the conrotatory bend is highly perturbed and could not be well fitted. The latter perturbations could be due to tunneling effects, which have not previously been observed experimentally for CO2 dimer. A fifth combination band, located 1.3 cm(-1) below the conrotatory bend, remains unassigned.

  12. Five intermolecular vibrations of the CO2 dimer observed via infrared combination bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norooz Oliaee, J.; Dehghany, M.; Rezaei, Mojtaba; McKellar, A. R. W.; Moazzen-Ahmadi, N.

    2016-11-01

    The weakly bound van der Waals dimer (CO2)2 has long been of considerable theoretical and experimental interest. Here, we study its low frequency intermolecular vibrations by means of combination bands in the region of the CO2 monomer ν3 fundamental (≈2350 cm-1), which are observed using a tunable infrared laser to probe a pulsed supersonic slit jet expansion. With the help of a recent high level ab initio calculation by Wang, Carrington, and Dawes, four intermolecular frequencies are assigned: the in-plane disrotatory bend (22.26 cm-1); the out-of-plane torsion (23.24 cm-1); twice the disrotatory bend (31.51 cm-1); and the in-plane conrotatory bend (92.25 cm-1). The disrotatory bend and torsion, separated by only 0.98 cm-1, are strongly mixed by Coriolis interactions. The disrotatory bend overtone is well behaved, but the conrotatory bend is highly perturbed and could not be well fitted. The latter perturbations could be due to tunneling effects, which have not previously been observed experimentally for CO2 dimer. A fifth combination band, located 1.3 cm-1 below the conrotatory bend, remains unassigned.

  13. Observation of low field microwave absorption in co-doped ZnO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahule, Tebogo S.; Srinivasu, Vijaya V.; Das, Jayashree

    2016-10-01

    Room temperature low field microwave absorption (LFMA) in magnetic materials find application in microwave absorbers and low field sensors. However not all the magnetic materials show LFMA and the phenomenon is not fully understood. We report on the observation of low field microwave absorption (LFMA) or the non-resonant microwave absorption (NRMA) in the transition metal (TM) co-doped ZnO samples of the composition Zn1-x(TM:TM)xO synthesized by solid state reaction technique. LFMA peaks and hysteresis matches very well with that of the magnetization hysteresis loop and the anisotropy fields at room temperature similar to the reports in the literature for other magnetic systems. However we show through our careful experiments that such a correlation between LFMA and the magnetization does not survive at low temperatures and particularly at 10 K the LFMA hysteresis collapses in our TM co-doped ZnO system; whereas the magnetization hysteresis loop becomes very big and anisotropy field becomes bigger in the range of kOe. We interpret the LFMA as field dependent surface impedance or eddy current losses, in terms of a possible role of anomalous hall resistivity that follows magnetization and the ordinary hall resistivity that only follows the applied field. We then argue that LFMA accordingly follows magnetization or applied field when AHE or OHE dominates respectively. Also we confirm the absence of LFMA signals in the rare earth co-doped ZnO system.

  14. A Vegetation Correction Methodology for Time Series Based Soil Moisture Retrieval From C-band Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Alicia T.; O'Neil, P. E.; vanderVelde, R.; Gish, T.

    2008-01-01

    A methodology is presented to correct backscatter (sigma(sup 0)) observations for the effect of vegetation. The proposed methodology is based on the concept that the ratio of the surface scattering over the total amount of scattering (sigma(sup 0)(sub soil)/sigma(sup 0)) is only affected by the vegetation and can be described as a function of the vegetation water content. Backscatter observations sigma(sup 0) from the soil are not influenced by vegetation. Under bare soil conditions (sigma(sup 0)(sub soil)/sigma(sup 0)) equals 1. Under low to moderate biomass and soil moisture conditions, vegetation affects the observed sigma(sup 0) through absorption of the surface scattering and contribution of direct scattering by the vegetation itself. Therefore, the contribution of the surface scattering is smaller than the observed total amount of scattering and decreases as the biomass increases. For dense canopies scattering interactions between the soil surface and vegetation elements (e.g. leaves and stems) also become significant. Because these higher order scattering mechanisms are influenced by the soil surface, an increase in (sigma(sup 0)(sub soil)/sigma(sup 0)) may be observed as the biomass increases under densely vegetated conditions. This methodology is applied within the framework of time series based approach for the retrieval of soil moisture. The data set used for this investigation has been collected during a campaign conducted at USDA's Optimizing Production Inputs for Economic and Environmental Enhancement OPE-3) experimental site in Beltsville, Maryland (USA). This campaign took place during the corn growth cycle from May 10th to 0ctober 2nd, 2002. In this period the corn crops reached a vegetation water content of 5.1 kg m(exp -2) at peak biomass and a soil moisture range varying between 0.00 to 0.26 cubic cm/cubic cm. One of the deployed microwave instruments operated was a multi-frequency (C-band (4.75 GHz) and L-band (1.6 GHz)) quad-polarized (HH, HV

  15. Observation of interface band bending on GaAs/AlAs heterostructures by scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarid, Dror; Yao, Xiaowei; Workman, Richard K.; Peterson, Charles A.; Fallahi, Mahmoud

    1998-05-01

    The electronic structure at the interface of GaAs/AlAs multilayers grown by molecular beam epitaxy is investigated on the (110) surface using scanning tunneling microscopy. The valence band bending, which is produced by an interface dipole layer, is observed from cross-sectional profiles exhibiting spike structures. It is found that the transition region of the AlAs/GaAs interface (3.0 - 4.0 nm) is smaller than that of the GaAs/AlAs interface (4.0 - 5.0 nm). Similar spike structures showing a transition region of 3.5 - 4.5 nm are also observed at the GaAs/Al0.6Ga0.4As interface.

  16. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure.

    PubMed

    Simakov, Evgenya I; Arsenyev, Sergey A; Buechler, Cynthia E; Edwards, Randall L; Romero, William P; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G; Wisniewski, Eric E; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-12

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  17. Simultaneous observations of optical lightning from space and LF band lightning waveforms from the ground

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Sato, Mitsuteru; Ushio, Tomoo; Morimoto, Takeshi; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Suzuki, Makoto; Ishida, Ryohei; Sakamoto, Yuji; Wu, Ting; Kawasaki, Zen

    2017-01-01

    Observations of optical lightning data with a photometer (PH4) at wavelengths of 599-900 nm on the International Space Station were conducted simultaneously with observations of low-frequency (LF) electromagnetic waves with a ground-based LF lightning locating system. The relationship between the PH4 light curve and electromagnetic waveforms in the LF band was examined for 11 lightning events. The PH4 sensor detected a small optical change even for weak light emitted from lightning discharges in clouds, including preliminary breakdown. Particularly, return strokes, including subsequent return strokes, showed a clear relationship between radiated LF waves and optical waveforms. For negative return strokes, we found a clear correlation between the absolute optical intensity and peak current. The slope of the regression line is 9.7 × 10-8 kA W-1 with an intercept of 9.9 kA.

  18. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-01

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic-band-gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have the potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  19. Modelling Ground Based X- and Ku-Band Observations of Tundra Snow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasurak, A.; King, J. M.; Kelly, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    As part of a radar-based remote sensing field experiment in Churchill, Manitoba ground based Ku- and X-band scatterometers were deployed to observe changing tundra snowpack conditions from November 2010 to March 2011. The research is part of the validation effort for the Cold Regions Hydrology High-resolution Observatory (CoReH2O) mission, a candidate in the European Space Agency's Earth Explorer program. This paper focuses on the local validation of the semi-empirical radiative transfer (sRT) model proposed for use in snow property retrievals as part of the CoReH2O mission. In this validation experiment, sRT was executed in the forward mode, simulating backscatter to assess the ability of the model. This is a necessary precursor to any inversion attempt. Two experiments are considered, both conducted in a hummocky tundra environment with shallow snow cover. In both cases, scatterometer observations were acquired over a field of view of approximately 10 by 20 meters. In the first experiment, radar observations were made of a snow field and then repeated after the snow had been removed. A ground-based scanning LiDAR system was used to characterize the spatial variability of snow depth through measurements of the snow and ground surface. Snow properties were determined in the field of view from two snow pits, 12 density core measurements, and Magnaprobe snow depth measurements. In the second experiment, a site was non-destructively observed from November through March, with snow properties measured out-of-scene, to characterize the snow evolution response. The model results from sRT fit the form of the observations from the two scatterometer field experiments but do not capture the backscatter magnitude. A constant offset for the season of 5 dB for X-band co- and cross-polarization response was required to match observations, in addition to a 3 dB X- and Ku-band co-polarization offset after the 6th of December. To explain these offsets, it is recognized that the two

  20. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; ...

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. Wemore » conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.« less

  1. Observation of Wakefield Suppression in a Photonic-Band-Gap Accelerator Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Arsenyev, Sergey A.; Buechler, Cynthia E.; Edwards, Randall L.; Romero, William P.; Conde, Manoel; Ha, Gwanghui; Power, John G.; Wisniewski, Eric E.; Jing, Chunguang

    2016-02-10

    We report experimental observation of higher order mode (HOM) wakefield suppression in a room-temperature traveling-wave photonic band gap (PBG) accelerating structure at 11.700 GHz. It has been long recognized that PBG structures have potential for reducing long-range wakefields in accelerators. The first ever demonstration of acceleration in a room-temperature PBG structure was conducted in 2005. Since then, the importance of PBG accelerator research has been recognized by many institutions. However, the full experimental characterization of the wakefield spectrum and demonstration of wakefield suppression when the accelerating structure is excited by an electron beam has not been performed to date. We conducted an experiment at the Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) test facility and observed wakefields excited by a single high charge electron bunch when it passes through a PBG accelerator structure. Lastly, excellent HOM suppression properties of the PBG accelerator were demonstrated in the beam test.

  2. Direct Observation of the Coherent Nuclear Response after the Absorption of a Photon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebel, M.; Schnedermann, C.; Bassolino, G.; Taylor, G.; Watts, A.; Kukura, P.

    2014-06-01

    How molecules convert light energy to perform a specific transformation is a fundamental question in photophysics. Ultrafast spectroscopy reveals the kinetics associated with electronic energy flow, but little is known about how absorbed photon energy drives nuclear motion. Here we used ultrabroadband transient absorption spectroscopy to monitor coherent vibrational energy flow after photoexcitation of the retinal chromophore. In the proton pump bacteriorhodopsin, we observed coherent activation of hydrogen-out-of-plane wagging and backbone torsional modes that were replaced by unreactive coordinates in the solution environment, concomitant with a deactivation of the reactive relaxation pathway.

  3. RESONANT ABSORPTION OF TRANSVERSE OSCILLATIONS AND ASSOCIATED HEATING IN A SOLAR PROMINENCE. I. OBSERVATIONAL ASPECTS

    SciTech Connect

    Okamoto, Takenori J.; Pontieu, Bart De; Doorsselaere, Tom Van; Yokoyama, Takaaki

    2015-08-10

    Transverse magnetohydrodynamic waves have been shown to be ubiquitous in the solar atmosphere and can, in principle, carry sufficient energy to generate and maintain the Sun’s million-degree outer atmosphere or corona. However, direct evidence of the dissipation process of these waves and subsequent heating has not yet been directly observed. Here we report on high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution observations of a solar prominence that show a compelling signature of so-called resonant absorption, a long hypothesized mechanism to efficiently convert and dissipate transverse wave energy into heat. Aside from coherence in the transverse direction, our observations show telltale phase differences around 180° between transverse motions in the plane-of-sky and line-of-sight velocities of the oscillating fine structures or threads, and also suggest significant heating from chromospheric to higher temperatures. Comparison with advanced numerical simulations support a scenario in which transverse oscillations trigger a Kelvin–Helmholtz instability (KHI) at the boundaries of oscillating threads via resonant absorption. This instability leads to numerous thin current sheets in which wave energy is dissipated and plasma is heated. Our results provide direct evidence for wave-related heating in action, one of the candidate coronal heating mechanisms.

  4. Tracking the complex absorption in NGC 2110 with two Suzaku observations

    SciTech Connect

    Rivers, Elizabeth; Markowitz, Alex; Rothschild, Richard; Bamba, Aya; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Okajima, Takashi; Terashima, Yuichi; Ueda, Yoshihiro

    2014-05-10

    We present spectral analysis of two Suzaku observations of the Seyfert 2 galaxy, NGC 2110. This source has been known to show complex, variable absorption which we study in depth by analyzing these two observations set 7 yr apart and by comparing them to previously analyzed observations with the XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. We find that there is a relatively stable, full-covering absorber with a column density of ∼3× 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}, with an additional patchy absorber that is likely variable in both column density and covering fraction over timescales of years, consistent with clouds in a patchy torus or in the broad line region. We model a soft emission line complex, likely arising from ionized plasma and consistent with previous studies. We find no evidence for reflection from an accretion disk in this source with contribution from neither relativistically broadened Fe Kα line emission, nor from a Compton reflection hump.

  5. The Hubble Space Telescope quasar absorption line key project. III - First observational results on Milky Way gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Lu, Limin; Bahcall, John N.; Bergeron, Jacqueline; Boksenberg, Alec; Hartig, George F.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Kirhakos, Sofia; Lockman, Felix J.; Sargent, W. L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Absorption lines found near zero redshift due to Milky Way disk and halo gas in the spectra of 15 quasars observed with the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS) of the HST at a resolution of about 230 km/s are reported. Results show that Milky Way absorption lines comprise about 44 percent of all absorption lines seen in the first group of Key Project FOS spectra. Milky Way lines were observed for 3C 273 and H1821 + 643. Limits to the Mg-to-H abundance ratio obtained for very high velocity Mg II absorption detections imply gas-phase Mg abundances for the very high velocity gas ranging from more than 0.059 to more than 0.32 times the solar abundance. In all cases where high-velocity H I emission is seen, corresponding high-velocity metal-line absorption is observed.

  6. Conduction-band electronic states of YbInCu{sub 4} studied by photoemission and soft x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yuki; Kurihara, Hidenao; Maso, Hiroyuki; Tobimatsu, Komei; Sato, Hitoshi; Shimada, Kenya; Namatame, Hirofumi; Hiraoka, Koichi; Kojima, Kenichi; Ohkochi, Takuo; Fujimori, Shin-ichi; Takeda, Yukiharu; Saitoh, Yuji; Mimura, Kojiro; Ueda, Shigenori; Yamashita, Yoshiyuki; Yoshikawa, Hideki; Kobayashi, Keisuke; Oguchi, Tamio; Taniguchi, Masaki

    2011-09-15

    We have studied conduction-band (CB) electronic states of a typical valence-transition compound YbInCu{sub 4} by means of temperature-dependent hard x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (HX-PES) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} core states taken at h{nu}=5.95 keV, soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} core absorption region around h{nu}{approx}935 eV, and soft x-ray photoemission spectroscopy (SX-PES) of the valence band at the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} absorption edge of h{nu}=933.0 eV. With decreasing temperature below the valence transition at T{sub V}=42 K, we have found that (1) the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} and In 3d{sub 5/2} peaks in the HX-PES spectra exhibit the energy shift toward the lower binding-energy side by {approx}40 and {approx}30 meV, respectively, (2) an energy position of the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak in the XAS spectrum is shifted toward higher photon-energy side by {approx}100 meV, with an appearance of a shoulder structure below the Cu 2p{sub 3/2} main absorption peak, and (3) an intensity of the Cu L{sub 3}VV Auger spectrum is abruptly enhanced. These experimental results suggest that the Fermi level of the CB-derived density of states is shifted toward the lower binding-energy side. We have described the valence transition in YbInCu{sub 4} in terms of the charge transfer from the CB to Yb 4f states.

  7. Contribution of the transition moments, form of the absorption band, exciton, and the correlation effects in the linear and nonlinear optical properties of conjugated polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Ponce, Javier Alejandro

    2017-04-01

    This work compares the linear and nonlinear optical properties of polyenes and polyenynes. The simulation was made for finite and infinite conjugation of conjugated polymers, such as polyacetylene, β-carotene, bis (p-toluene sulfonate) (PTS) polyenyne, and a short conjugated polyenyne poly-2,6-decadyin-1,6-ylene azelate (PHDAz). The resonance energy and degree of conjugation are determined by fitting the linear absorption spectra. These parameters are then used for calculating the two photon and third-order nonlinear optical properties. The contribution of the transition moment, the form of the absorption band, the exciton, and phonons in the optical properties are determined. The difference of the experimental values is assigned to correlation effects. We found that the exciton, the correlation effects, and the conduction band are more important in the optical properties of polyenynes than of polyenes. In this way, the dependence of the optical properties of polyenynes on the conduction band makes it possible to increase their nonlinear optical properties by interaction with photons (θ ≈ 0). The dependence of the optical properties on the conduction band also produces that the finiteness of the conjugation strongly decreases the optical properties of polyenynes in relation to polyenes with similar conjugation. On the other hand, the phonons are more important in the optical properties of polyenes than of polyenynes. Consequently, the band is indirect for the studied polyenes and direct for the polyenynes. Therefore, the nonlinear optical properties in the resonance frequency of polyenyne PTS are higher than those for polyacetylene. We also found that asymmetric oscillations of χ(3) in the Brillouin zone increases the χ(3) final value in polyenynes. In addition, we found a change of sign of the wave function coefficients by the Peierls distortion of polyenes to become polyenynes, but this change of sign does not affect the optical properties. As a corollary

  8. Satellite observations of energy-banded ions during large geomagnetic storms: Event studies, statistics, and comparisons to source models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Cattell, C. A.; Kozyra, J. U.; Thomsen, M. F.; Lavraud, B.

    2016-07-01

    Energy-banded ions from tens to ten thousands of eV are observed in the low-latitude auroral and subauroral zones during every large (minimum Dst < -150 nT) geomagnetic storm encountered by the FAST satellite. The banded ions persist for many FAST orbits, lasting up to 12 h, in both the northern and southern hemispheres. The energy-banded ions often have more than six distinct bands, and the O+, He+, and H+ bands are often observed at the same energies. The bands are extensive in latitude (~50-75° on the dayside, often extending to 45°) and magnetic local time, covering all magnetic local time over the data set of storms. The distributions are peaked in the perpendicular direction at the altitudes of the FAST satellite (~350-4175 km), although in some cases the precipitating component dominates for the lowest energy bands. At the same time, for some of the events studied in detail, long-lasting intervals of field-aligned energy dispersed ions from ~100 eV to 40 keV are seen in Los Alamos National Laboratory geosynchronous observations, primarily on the dayside and after magnetosheath encounters (i.e., highly compressed magnetosphere). We present both case and statistical studies of the banded ions. These bands are a new phenomenon associated with all large storms, which are distinctly different from other banded populations, and are not readily interpreted using previous models for particle sources, transport, and loss. The energy-banded ions are an energetically important component of the inner magnetosphere during the most intense magnetic storms.

  9. AKARI OBSERVATIONS OF BROWN DWARFS. III. CO, CO{sub 2}, AND CH{sub 4} FUNDAMENTAL BANDS AND PHYSICAL PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect

    Sorahana, S.; Yamamura, I.

    2012-12-01

    We investigate variations in the strengths of three molecular bands, CH{sub 4} at 3.3 {mu}m, CO at 4.6 {mu}m, and CO{sub 2} at 4.2 {mu}m, in 16 brown dwarf spectra obtained by AKARI. Spectral features are examined along the sequence of source classes from L1 to T8. We find that the CH{sub 4} 3.3 {mu}m band is present in the spectra of brown dwarfs later than L5, and the CO 4.6 {mu}m band appears in all spectral types. The CO{sub 2} absorption band at 4.2 {mu}m is detected in late-L and T-type dwarfs. To better understand brown dwarf atmospheres, we analyze the observed spectra using the Unified Cloudy Model. The physical parameters of the AKARI sample, i.e., atmospheric effective temperature T {sub eff}, surface gravity log g, and critical temperature T {sub cr}, are derived. We also model IRTF/SpeX and UKIRT/CGS4 spectra in addition to the AKARI data in order to derive the most probable physical parameters. Correlations between the spectral type and the modeled parameters are examined. We confirm that the spectral-type sequence of late-L dwarfs is not related to T {sub eff}, but instead originates as a result of the effect of dust.

  10. The Rovibrational Intensities of Five Absorption Bands of (12)C(16)O2 Between 5218 and 5349/cm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giver, Lawrence P.; Brown, Linda R.; Chackerian, Charles, Jr.; Freedman, Richard S.; Gore, Warren J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Absolute line intensities, band intensities, and Herman-Wallis parameters were measured for the (01(sup 1)2)(sub I) from (00(sup 0)0)(sub I) perpendicular band of (12)C(16)O2 centered at 5315/cm, along with the three nearby associated hot bands: (10(sup 0)2)(sub II) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5248/cm, (02(sup 2))(sub I) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5291/cm, and (10(sup 0)2)(sub I) from (01(sup 1)0)(sub I) at 5349/cm. The nearby parallel hot band (30(sup 0))(sub I) from (10(sup 0)0)(sub II) at 5218/cm was also included in this study.

  11. Equatorial Precession in the Control Software of the Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jakeman, Hali L.

    2013-01-01

    The Ka-Band Object Observation and Monitoring, or KaBOOM, project is designed mainly to track and characterize near Earth objects. However, a smaller goal of the project would be to monitor pulsars and study their radio frequency signals for use as a clock in interstellar travel. The use of pulsars and their timing accuracy has been studied for decades, but never in the Ka-band of the radio frequency spectrum. In order to begin the use of KaBOOM for this research, the control systems need to be analyzed to ensure its capability. Flaws in the control documentation leave it unclear as to whether the control software processes coordinates from the J200 epoch. This experiment will examine the control software of the Intertronic 12m antennas used for the KaBOOM project and detail its capabilities in its "equatorial mode." The antennas will be pointed at 4 chosen points in the sky on several days while probing the virtual azimuth and elevation (horizon coordinate) registers. The input right ascension and declination coordinates will then be converted separately from the control software to horizontal coordinates and compared, thus determining the ability of the control software to process equatorial coordinates.

  12. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids

    PubMed Central

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y. C.; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M.; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials. PMID:24043795

  13. Isotropic band gaps and freeform waveguides observed in hyperuniform disordered photonic solids.

    PubMed

    Man, Weining; Florescu, Marian; Williamson, Eric Paul; He, Yingquan; Hashemizad, Seyed Reza; Leung, Brian Y C; Liner, Devin Robert; Torquato, Salvatore; Chaikin, Paul M; Steinhardt, Paul J

    2013-10-01

    Recently, disordered photonic media and random textured surfaces have attracted increasing attention as strong light diffusers with broadband and wide-angle properties. We report the experimental realization of an isotropic complete photonic band gap (PBG) in a 2D disordered dielectric structure. This structure is designed by a constrained optimization method, which combines advantages of both isotropy due to disorder and controlled scattering properties due to low-density fluctuations (hyperuniformity) and uniform local topology. Our experiments use a modular design composed of Al2O3 walls and cylinders arranged in a hyperuniform disordered network. We observe a complete PBG in the microwave region, in good agreement with theoretical simulations, and show that the intrinsic isotropy of this unique class of PBG materials enables remarkable design freedom, including the realization of waveguides with arbitrary bending angles impossible in photonic crystals. This experimental verification of a complete PBG and realization of functional defects in this unique class of materials demonstrate their potential as building blocks for precise manipulation of photons in planar optical microcircuits and has implications for disordered acoustic and electronic band gap materials.

  14. Absorption Bands at 4300 and 6000-8000Å as Signs of Silicate and Organic Matter Separation and Formation of Hydrated Silicates in KBOs and Similar Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busarev, V. V.; Dorofeeva, V. A.; Makalkin, A. B.

    2004-12-01

    Recent spectral observations of some Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) (Boehnhardt et al.: 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 47-50; Fornasier S. et al., 2004, Astron. Astrophys. 421, 353-363) discovered characteristic absorption bands at 4300 and 6000-8000Å in reflectance spectra of the bodies. Spectral positions and other parameters of the features are similar to those found in reflectance spectra of terrestrial phyllosilicates (e. g., Clark et al., 1990, J. Geophys. Res. 95, 12653-12680; Busarev et al., 2004, The new ROSETTA targets (L. Colangeli et al., eds.), 79-83), CI- and CM-carbonaceous chondrites (e. g., Busarev and Taran, 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 933-936), primitive C-, P-, D-, F- and G-class asteroids (Vilas and Gaffey, 1989, Science 246, 790-792) and hydrated M-, S- and E-class asteroids (Busarev and Taran, 2002, Proc. of ACM 2002, 933-936). Hence, these absorption bands may be considered as universal indicators of hydrated silicates on celestial solid bodies including KBOs. However, before phyllosilicates were formed, an aqueous media should spring up and exist a considerable time in the bodies. One more important factor for the spectral features of hydrated silicates to be observed, it is probably an aqueous separation of silicate and darkening CHON (PAH plus more light organic compounds) components in the bodies. To check the assumptions we have performed some calculations (Busarev et al., 2003, Earth, Moon, and Planets 92, 345-357) applicable to KBOs and analogous silicate-icy bodies existed for the first time in the formation zones of neighbouring giant planets. According to the calculations, the decay of the short-lived 26Al at the early stage of the bodies' evolution and their mutual collisions (at velocities >1.5 km s-1) at the subsequent stage were probably the main sources of heating sufficient for melting water ice in their interiors. Because of these processes, an internal ocean of liquid water covered with ˜10-km crust of dirty ice could originate in

  15. L-Band Polarimetric InSAR Observations of Greenland Ice Sheets using ALOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A.; Zebker, H.

    2008-12-01

    The ALOS PALSAR instrument has acquired L-band (23.6 cm wavelength) fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) observations of Greenland with 10 meter single-look resolution. We examine images from a strip in northern Greenland extending from latitudes of 75 degrees N to 80 degrees N, which covers the dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones of the Greenland ice sheet, as well as the rocky coastal area. Images for repeat-pass interferometry with a 350 meter baseline were acquired at a 46 day interval in March and April 2007. The images from the two dates are coregistered by cross-correlating the HH observations, and we observe fringes in all polarizations in the dry snow, percolation, and wet snow zones, and also in the stable parts of the rocky coastal area. In the dry snow zone of inner Greenland, we observe significantly higher coherence in the HH-HH interferograms (around 0.7) compared to the HV-HV interferograms (around 0.4), and similarly higher coherence in the VV-VV interferogram compared to the VH-VH interferogram. These differences between co-polarized and cross-polarized signals result from volume scattering and lower SNR in the cross-polarized channels. They indicate that scalar models do not fully describe L-band microwave scattering from firn. On each observation date, the phase difference between the HH and the HV returns is almost constant over the dry snow zone of the interior of Greenland. However, there is significant variability in the phase difference between HH and HV returns closer to the coast. The phase difference between the VV and VH returns shows similar behavior, again indicating a difference between co-polarized and cross-polarized scattering mechanisms. We derive polarization signatures for the various scattering regions in the Greenland ice sheets to better understand the scattering mechanisms involved. We model the firn in the dry snow zone as a layered medium with rough interfaces between the layers, and we use the

  16. Space-Borne Ku-Band Radar Observations of Extreme Surface Water Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nghiem, S. V.

    2005-12-01

    Acceleration of the global water cycle may lead to an exacerbation of hydrologic extremes. A multitude of extreme events has occurred in the last decade over the world including droughts, floods, record snow accumulation, and minimal ice cover with severe environmental and socioeconomic impacts. This paper presents an overview of the capabilities of space-borne Ku-band radar to measure extreme conditions of surface water including liquid and solid phases on land, ice, and oceans. Ku-band backscatter data acquired globally by the QuikSCAT satellite scatterometer are used to obtain the results. Hurricane Katrina in 2005 is the deadliest and costliest in U.S. with far-reaching impacts. Radar results of surface water over southern and eastern U.S. reveal the extreme extent of precipitation water deposited on land surface compared to the case of Hurricane Ivan in 2004. Radar monitoring of surface water pattern in California shows the extreme prolonged duration of precipitation-induced water in the 2005 wettest winter season over a century causing widespread flooding and landslide. For drought monitoring, radar maps of precipitation frequency over the U.S. Midwest in summer seasons indicate a sharp change to a severe drought in 2003 from the most frequent rains in 2000. Kenya experienced the worst drought in 45 years affecting more than 3 million people in 2000 when the radar data over Nairobi identified the collapse of the long rain season. Since then, satellite radar time-series up to July 2005 shows the consistency of the annual bimodal precipitation seasons suggesting an improvement in the local drought conditions. In cold land regions, backscatter data map seasonal snowmelt processes showing large variabilities in time and in space over the northern hemisphere. Satellite Ku-band radar measurements of snow accumulation on the Greenland ice sheet identify and map the record snow accumulation in the first quarter of 2005, verified with field observations and

  17. Using OMI Observations to Measure Aerosol Absorption of Biomass Burning Aerosols Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torres, Omar; Bhartia, P. K.; Jethva, Hiren

    2011-01-01

    The presence of absorbing aerosol layers above clouds is unambiguously detected by the TOMS/OMI UV Aerosol Index (AI) that uses satellite observations at two near-UV channels. A sensitivity study using radiative transfer calculations shows that the AI signal of resulting from the presence of aerosols above clouds is mainly driven by the aerosol absorption optical depth and the optical depth of the underlying cloud. Based on these results, an inversion algorithm has been developed to retrieve the aerosol optical depth (AOD) of aerosol layers above clouds. In this presentation we will discuss the sensitivity analysis, describe the retrieval approach, and present results of applications of the retrieval method to OMI observations over the South Atlantic Ocean. Preliminary error analyses, to be discussed, indicate that the AOD can be underestimated (up to -30%) or overestimated (up to 60%) depending on algorithmic assumptions.

  18. The Broad-band X-Ray Spectrum of IC 4329A from a Joint NuSTAR/Suzaku Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Madejski, G.; Fuerst, F.; Matt, G.; Elvis, M.; Harrison, F. A.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Madsen, K. K.; Marinucci, A.; Rivers, E.; Stern, D.; Walton, D. J.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-06-01

    We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku and NuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found to be modest ({\\sim }6 \\times 10^{21} {\\, cm^{-2}\\,}), and does not introduce any significant curvature in the Fe K band. We are able to place a strong constraint on the presence of a broadened Fe Kα line (E_rest=6.46^{+0.08}_{-0.07} \\, keV with \\sigma =0.33^{+0.08}_{-0.07} \\, keV and EW=34^{+8}_{-7} \\, eV), though we are not able to constrain any of the parameters of a relativistic reflection model. These results highlight the range in broad Fe K line strengths observed in nearby, bright, active galactic nuclei (roughly an order of magnitude), and imply a corresponding range in the physical properties of the inner accretion disk in these sources. We have also updated our previously reported measurement of the high-energy cutoff of the hard X-ray emission using both observatories rather than just NuSTAR alone: E cut = 186 ± 14 keV. This high-energy cutoff acts as a proxy for the temperature of the coronal electron plasma, enabling us to further separate this parameter from the plasma's optical depth and to update our results for these parameters as well. We derive kT=50^{+6}_{-3} \\, keV with \\tau =2.34^{+0.16}_{-0.11} using a spherical geometry, kT = 61 ± 1 keV with τ = 0.68 ± 0.02 for a slab geometry, with both having an equivalent goodness-of-fit.

  19. Microphysical processes observed by X band polarimetric radars during the evolution of storm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Troemel, Silke; Simmer, Clemens

    2014-05-01

    Polarimetric radars are now widely used for characterizing storm systems since they offer significant information for the improvement for atmospheric models and numerical weather prediction. Their observations allow a detailed insight into macro- and micro-physical processes during the spatial and temporal evolution of storm systems. In the frame of the initiative for High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2), which focuses on improving the accuracy of climate models in relation to cloud and precipitation processes, the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) was designed to provide a critical model evaluation at scales covered by Large Eddy Simulation (LES) models, which in turn will be used to better understand sub-grid variability and microphysical properties and processes parameterized by larger scale models. Three X-band polarimetric radars deployed in Bonn (BoXPol) and in the vicinity of Juelich (JuXPol and KiXPol), Germany, were operated together with other instruments during the HOPE campaign, in order to obtain a holistic view of precipitation systems covering both macro- and microscopic processes. Given the variability of polarimetric moments observed by polarimetric radars, the corresponding microphysical processes occurring during the development of storm cells thus can be inferred accordingly. This study focuses on the microscopic processes of storm systems which were observed by RHI (range-height indicator) scans of the three X band radars. The two frequently observed microphysical processes during the HOPE campaign, coalescence and differential sedimentation, will be shown, and the evolution of droplet size distributions (DSDs) will be also analyzed. The associated DSDs which are retrieved using radar measured polarimetric moments are further verified by the polarimetric forward operator where the assumptions of non-spherical hydrometeors have been embedded. The results indicate that the estimated

  20. Water-vapor absorption line measurements in the 940-nm band by using a Raman-shifted dye laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Zhiping; Wilkerson, Thomas D.; Singh, Upendra N.

    1993-01-01

    We report water-vapor absorption line measurements that are made by using the first Stokes radiation (930-982 nm) with HWHM 0.015/cm generated by a narrow-linewidth, tunable dye laser. Forty-five absorption line strengths are measured with an uncertainty of 6 percent and among them are fourteen strong lines that are compared with previous measurements for the assessment of spectral purity of the light source. Thirty air-broadened linewidths are measured with 8 percent uncertainty at ambient atmospheric pressure with an average of 0.101/cm. The lines are selected for the purpose of temperature-sensitive or temperature-insensitive lidar measurements. Results for these line strengths and linewidths are corrected for broadband radiation and finite laser linewidth broadening effects and compared with the high-resolution transmission molecular absorption.

  1. Role of charge separation on two-step two photon absorption in InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creti, A.; Tasco, V.; Cola, A.; Montagna, G.; Tarantini, I.; Salhi, A.; Al-Muhanna, A.; Passaseo, A.; Lomascolo, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we report on the competition between two-step two photon absorption, carrier recombination, and escape in the photocurrent generation mechanisms of high quality InAs/GaAs quantum dot intermediate band solar cells. In particular, the different role of holes and electrons is highlighted. Experiments of external quantum efficiency dependent on temperature and electrical or optical bias (two-step two photon absorption) highlight a relative increase as high as 38% at 10 K under infrared excitation. We interpret these results on the base of charge separation by phonon assisted tunneling of holes from quantum dots. We propose the charge separation as an effective mechanism which, reducing the recombination rate and competing with the other escape processes, enhances the infrared absorption contribution. Meanwhile, this model explains why thermal escape is found to predominate over two-step two photon absorption starting from 200 K, whereas it was expected to prevail at lower temperatures (≥70 K), solely on the basis of the relatively low electron barrier height in such a system.

  2. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    SciTech Connect

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Lisenkov, Sergey; Pendyala, Chandrashekhar; Sunkara, Mahendra K.; Menon, Madhu

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  3. Visible-light absorption and large band-gap bowing of GaN1-xSbx from first principles

    DOE PAGES

    Sheetz, R. Michael; Richter, Ernst; Andriotis, Antonis N.; ...

    2011-08-01

    Applicability of the Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys for practical realization of photoelectrochemical water splitting is investigated using first-principles density functional theory incorporating the local density approximation and generalized gradient approximation plus the Hubbard U parameter formalism. Our calculations reveal that a relatively small concentration of Sb impurities is sufficient to achieve a significant narrowing of the band gap, enabling absorption of visible light. Theoretical results predict that Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys with 2-eV band gaps straddle the potential window at moderate to low pH values, thus indicating that dilute Ga(Sbx)N1-x alloys could be potential candidates for splitting water under visible light irradiation.

  4. Calculating Effect of Point Defects on Optical Absorption Spectra of III-V Semiconductor Superlattices Based on (8x8) k-dot-p Band Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Danhong; Iurov, Andrii; Gumbs, Godfrey; Cardimona, David; Krishna, Sanjay

    For a superlattice which is composed of layered zinc-blende structure III-V semiconductor materials, its realistic anisotropic band structures around the Gamma-point are calculated by using the (8x8)k-dot-p method with the inclusion of the self-consistent Hartree potential and the spin-orbit coupling. By including the many-body screening effect, the obtained band structures are further employed to calculate the optical absorption coefficient which is associated with the interband electron transitions. As a result of a reduced quasiparticle lifetime due to scattering with point defects in the system, the self-consistent vertex correction to the optical response function is also calculated with the help of the second-order Born approximation.

  5. Trapped H2O in SiO condensate - An explanation for the 3 micron band observed toward the Galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wada, S.; Sakata, A.; Tokunaga, A. T.

    1991-01-01

    An SiO condensate containing trapped and adsorbed H2O was produced in the laboratory. The SiO condensate is not a silicate; it is an amorphous silicon suboxide material. The micron absorption of trapped H2O in this condensate matches very closely the 3 micron absorption band of the Galactic center source IRS 7.

  6. Predissociation linewidths of the (1,0)-(12,0) Schumann-Runge absorption bands of O2 in the wavelength region 179-202 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, A. S.-C.; Yoshino, K.; Esmond, J. R.; Chiu, S. S.-L.; Freeman, D. E.

    1990-01-01

    A nonlinear least-squares method of retrieving predissociation linewidths from the experimental absolute absorption cross sections of Yoshino et al. (1983) has been applied to the (1,0)-(12,0) Schumann-Runge bands of oxygen. The predissociation linewidths deduced are larger than the theoretical predictions of Julienne (1976) and the latest measurements of Lewis et al. (1986). The larger linewidths found will have an impact on calculations of solar flux penetration into the earth atmosphere and of the photodissociation rates of trace species in the upper atmosphere.

  7. The GROUSE project. III. Ks-band observations of the thermal emission from WASP-33b

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Mooij, E. J. W.; Brogi, M.; de Kok, R. J.; Snellen, I. A. G.; Kenworthy, M. A.; Karjalainen, R.

    2013-02-01

    Context. In recent years, day-side emission from about a dozen hot Jupiters has been detected through ground-based secondary eclipse observations in the near-infrared. These near-infrared observations are vital for determining the energy budgets of hot Jupiters, since they probe the planet's spectral energy distribution near its peak. Aims: The aim of this work is to measure the Ks-band secondary eclipse depth of WASP-33b, the first planet discovered to transit an A-type star. This planet receives the highest level of irradiation of all transiting planets discovered to date. Furthermore, its host-star shows pulsations and is classified as a low-amplitude δ Scuti. Methods: As part of our GROUnd-based Secondary Eclipse (GROUSE) project we have obtained observations of two separate secondary eclipses of WASP-33b in the Ks-band using the LIRIS instrument on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT). The telescope was significantly defocused to avoid saturation of the detector for this bright star (K ~ 7.5). To increase the stability and the cadence of the observations, they were performed in staring mode. We collected a total of 5100 and 6900 frames for the first and the second night respectively, both with an average cadence of 3.3 s. Results: On the second night the eclipse is detected at the 12 -σ level, with a measured eclipse depth of 0.244-0.020+0.027%. This eclipse depth corresponds to a brightness temperature of 3270-160+115 K. The measured brightness temperature on the second night is consistent with the expected equilibrium temperature for a planet with a very low albedo and a rapid re-radiation of the absorbed stellar light. For the other night the short out-of-eclipse baseline prevents good corrections for the stellar pulsations and systematic effects, which makes this dataset unreliable for eclipse depth measurements. This demonstrates the need of getting a sufficient out-of-eclipse baseline. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http

  8. Ka-band and X-band observations of the solar corona aquired during the Cassini 2002 superior conjunction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morabito, D. D.

    2002-01-01

    A superior solar conjunction occurs when the sun lies near the signal path of a source as observed from the Earth. Interplanetary spacecraft sent to the planets typically encounter one or more solar conjunctions during their mission lifetimes. During these periods, the signals sent to and from the spacecraft encounter degradation due to the intervening charged particles of the solar corona.

  9. Resonance-Enhanced Raman Scattering of Ring-Involved Vibrational Modes in the (1)B(2u) Absorption Band of Benzene, Including the Kekule Vibrational Modes ν(9) and ν(10).

    PubMed

    Willitsford, Adam H; Chadwick, C Todd; Kurtz, Stewart; Philbrick, C Russell; Hallen, Hans

    2016-02-04

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy provides much stronger Raman signal levels than its off-resonant counterpart and adds selectivity by excitation tuning. Raman preresonance of benzene has been well studied. On-resonance studies, especially at phonon-allowed absorptions, have received less attention. In this case, we observe resonance of many of the vibration modes associated motion of the carbons in the ring while tuning over the (1)B2u absorption, including the related ν9 (CC stretch Herzberg notation, ν14 Wilson notation) and ν10 (CH-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν15 Wilson notation) vibrational modes along with the ν2 (CC-stretch or ring-breathing Herzberg notation, ν1 Wilson notation) mode and multiples of the ν18 (CCC-parallel bend Herzberg notation, ν6 Wilson notation) vibrational mode. The ring-breathing mode is found to mix with the b2u modes creating higher frequency composites. Through the use of an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) to tune through the (1)B2u absorption band of liquid benzene, a stiffening (increase in energy) of the vibrational modes is observed as the excitation wavelength nears the (1)B2u absorption peak of the isolated molecule (vapor) phase. The strongest resonance amplitude observed is in the 2 × ν18 (e2g) mode, with nearly twice the intensity of the ring-breathing mode, ν2. Several overtones and combination modes, especially with ν2 (a1g), are also observed to resonate. Raman resonances on phonon-allowed excitations are narrow and permit the measurement of vibrations not Raman-active in the ground state.

  10. Multi-Sightline Observation of Narrow Absorption Lines in Lensed Quasar SDSS J1029+2623

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Saez, Cristian; Charlton, Jane C.; Eracleous, Michael; Chartas, George; Bauer, Franz E.; Inada, Naohisa; Uchiyama, Hisakazu

    2016-07-01

    We exploit the widely separated images of the lensed quasar SDSS J1029+2623 ({z}{em} = 2.197, θ = 22.″5) to observe its outflowing wind through two different sightlines. We present an analysis of three observations, including two with the Subaru telescope in 2010 February and 2014 April, separated by four years, and one with the Very Large Telescope, separated from the second Subaru observation by ˜2 months. We detect 66 narrow absorption lines (NALs), of which 24 are classified as intrinsic NALs that are physically associated with the quasar based on partial coverage analysis. The velocities of intrinsic NALs appear to cluster around values of {v}{ej} ˜ 59,000, 43,000, and 29,000 km s-1, which is reminiscent of filamentary structures obtained by numerical simulations. There are no common intrinsic NALs at the same redshift along the two sightlines, implying that the transverse size of the NAL absorbers should be smaller than the sightline distance between two lensed images. In addition to the NALs with large ejection velocities of {v}{ej} > 1000 km s-1, we also detect broader proximity absorption lines (PALs) at {z}{abs} ˜ {z}{em}. The PALs are likely to arise in outflowing gas at a distance of r ≤ 620 pc from the central black hole with an electron density of n e ≥8.7 × 103 cm-3. These limits are based on the assumption that the variability of the lines is due to recombination. We discuss the implications of these results on the three-dimensional structure of the outflow.

  11. In situ atomic force microscopy observation of hydrogen absorption/desorption by Palladium thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Itoko; Sakaki, Kouji; Nakamura, Yumiko; Akiba, Etsuo

    2011-12-01

    Grain structure changes in Pd thin film during hydrogen absorption and desorption were observed by in situ atomic force microscopy. The as-sputtered film had a smooth flat surface with 20-30 nm grains. Film that absorbed hydrogen showed buckling, caused by the compressive stress due to lattice expansion as Pd metal reacted with hydrogen to form the hydride. Grains on the buckles were agglomerated and deformed unlike those on flat areas beside the buckles. Film that absorbed and then desorbed hydrogen still showed some buckling; however, many buckles shrank and flattened when the compressive stress of lattice expansion was released during desorption. On both the remaining and the shrunken buckles, grain agglomeration was retained; whereas, the deformed grains reverted back to their original form. X-ray diffraction indicated compressive residual stress in the as-sputtered film and tensile residual stress in the film after hydrogen absorption/desorption. These results indicate that irreversible grain agglomeration is related to residual tensile stress in the film although agglomeration occurs only on the buckled areas.

  12. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  13. Constraining the Variation of the Fine-structure Constant with Observations of Narrow Quasar Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10-5, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (- 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10-5 in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10-5, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (- 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10-5. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (- 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10-5. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of quasar absorption lines are not yet capable of

  14. Observation of variable hybridized-band gaps in Eu-intercalated graphene.

    PubMed

    Sung, Sijin; Kim, Sooran; Lee, Paengro; Kim, Jingul; Ryu, Min-Tae; Park, Heemin; Kim, Kyoo; Min, Byung; Chung, Jinwook

    2017-03-27

    We report europium (Eu)-induced changes in the π-band of graphene (G) formed on 6H-SiC(0001) surface by a combined study of photoemission measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Our photoemission data reveal that Eu intercalates upon annealing at 120 °C into the region between graphene and buffer layer (BL) to form a G/Eu/BL system, where a band gap of 0.29 eV opens at room temperature. This band gap is found to increase further to 0.48 eV upon cooling down to 60 K. Our DFT calculations suggest that the increased band gap originates from the enhanced hybridization between graphene π-Eu 4f band due to the increased magnetic ordering upon cooling. These Eu atoms continue to intercalate further down below the BL to produce a bilayer graphene (G/BL/Eu) upon annealing at 300 °C. The π-band stemming from the BL then exhibits another band gap of 0.37 eV, which appears to be a gap due to the strong hybridization between the π-band of the BL and the Eu 4f band. The Eu-intercalated graphene thus illustrates an example of versatile band gaps formed under different thermal treatments, which may play a critical role for future applications in graphene-based electronics.

  15. Global Mini-RF S-Band Observations of the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, J. T.; Bussey, B.; Patterson, G. W.

    2012-12-01

    The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) carries with it NASA's Mini-RF instrument, which has returned high-quality radar of all regions of the Moon. Mini-RF is a hybrid-polarized, side-looking, synthetic aperture radar that showcases the power of radar science in a small package transmitting and receiving in both S-band (12.6 cm) and X-band (4.2 cm) [1, 3]. Unique observations Mini-RF has collected in S-band (sensitive to materials 0.1 to 1.26 meters in size and depth) include near complete coverage of the lunar North and South Poles (~99% coverage) and ~67% of the lunar globe with relatively unrestricted viewing geometries [2, 4]. This includes never before observed radar coverage of western Orientale and the farside Feldspathic Highlands and South Pole Aitken basin terranes (FHT and SPA, respectively). These regions are not visible from Earth-based radar observatories such as, Arecibo Radar and Green Bank Telescopes [2]. Here, we present orthorectified Mini-RF global S-band products at 100 m/pixel that augment previous Earth-based and orbital (i.e., Chandrayaan-1's Mini-SAR) radar data sets of the Moon [5-9]. An often-used radar analysis parameter is the circular polarization ratio (CPR), which is defined as the ratio of the same sense relative to the opposite sense polarized returns. Specular echoes from the lunar surface that are smooth at wavelength scales will return low CPR values, while scattering from rough surfaces generate CPR values approaching one or greater. Another analysis parameter employed by [5] and used here to corroborate CPR interpretations referred to as an m-chi decomposition, leverage three physical parameter measurements in a single RGB image for analyses. These paremeters include double bounce backscatter (db; e.g., dihedral, volume ice), randomly polarized materials (vs; i.e., volume scattering), and single bounce backscatter (bs; e.g., Bragg scattering). Mini-RF mapping of the global Moon suggest a wide range of CPR values (0 - 1

  16. Wide-banded NTC radiation: local to remote observations by the four Cluster satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Décréau, P. M. E.; Aoutou, S.; Denazelle, A.; Galkina, I.; Rauch, J.-L.; Vallières, X.; Canu, P.; Rochel Grimald, S.; El-Lemdani Mazouz, F.; Darrouzet, F.

    2015-10-01

    The Cluster multi-point mission offers a unique collection of non-thermal continuum (NTC) radio waves observed in the 2-80 kHz frequency range over almost 15 years, from various view points over the radiating plasmasphere. Here we present rather infrequent case events, such as when primary electrostatic sources of such waves are embedded within the plasmapause boundary far from the magnetic equatorial plane. The spectral signature of the emitted electromagnetic waves is structured as a series of wide harmonic bands within the range covered by the step in plasma frequency encountered at the boundary. Developing the concept that the frequency distance df between harmonic bands measures the magnetic field magnitude B at the source (df = Fce, electron gyrofrequency), we analyse three selected events. The first one (studied in Grimald et al., 2008) presents electric field signatures observed by a Cluster constellation of small size (~ 200 to 1000 km spacecraft separation) placed in the vicinity of sources. The electric field frequency spectra display frequency peaks placed at frequencies fs = n df (n being an integer), with df of the order of Fce values encountered at the plasmapause by the spacecraft. The second event, taken from the Cluster tilt campaign, leads to a 3-D view of NTC waves ray path orientations and to a localization of a global source region at several Earth radii (RE) from Cluster (Décréau et al., 2013). The measured spectra present successive peaks placed at fs ~ (n+ 1/2) df. Next, considering if both situations might be two facets of the same phenomenon, we analyze a third event. The Cluster fleet, configured into a constellation of large size (~ 8000 to 25 000 km spacecraft separation), allows us to observe wide-banded NTC waves at different distances from their sources. Two new findings can be derived from our analysis. First, we point out that a large portion of the plasmasphere boundary layer, covering a large range of magnetic latitudes, is

  17. The velocity distribution of interstellar gas observed in strong UV absorption lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowie, L. L.; York, D. G.

    1978-01-01

    Observations of three strong interstellar UV absorption lines of N I (1199 A), N II (1083 A), and Si III (1206 A) in 47 stars of widely varying distance and a variety of spectral types are analyzed to obtain a velocity distribution function for the interstellar gas. A technique based on the maximum and minimum velocities observed along a line of sight is adopted because of heavy line blending, and results are discussed for both power-law and exponential distribution functions. The expected distribution of radiative-phase supernova remnants (SNRs) in the interstellar medium is calculated as a function of SNR birthrate and of the interstellar density in which they evolve. The results are combined with observed distance estimates, and it is shown that an interstellar density in excess of 0.1 per cu cm would be required to keep the SNRs sufficiently confined so that their cross sections are consistent with the observed number of components. The alternative possibility is considered that SNRs do not enter the radiative phase before escaping from the Galaxy or colliding with neighboring remnants.

  18. Near- and far-infrared observations of interplanetary dust bands from the COBE diffuse infrared background experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiesman, William J.; Hauser, Michael G.; Kelsall, Thomas; Lisse, Carey M.; Moseley, S. Harvey, Jr.; Reach, William T.; Silverberg, Robert F.; Stemwedel, Sally W.; Weiland, Janet L.

    1995-01-01

    Data from the Diffuse Infrared Background Experiment (DIRBE) instrument aboard the Cosmic Background Explorer Satellite (COBE) spacecraft have been used to examine the near and far infrared signatures of the interplanetary dust (IPD) bands. Images of the dust band pairs at ecliptic latitudes of +/- 1.4 deg and +/- 10 deg have been produced at DIRBE wavelengths from 1.25 to 100 micrometers. The observations at the shorter wavelengths provide the first evidence of scattered sunlight from particles responsible for the dust bands. It is found that the grains in the bands and those in the smooth IPD cloud have similar spectral energy distributions, suggesting similar compositions and possibly a common origin. The scattering albedos from 1.25 to 3.5 micrometers for the grains in the dust bands and those in the IPD cloud are 0.22 and 0.29, respectively. The 10 deg band pair is cooler (185 +/- 10 K) than the smooth interplanetary dust cloud (259 +/- 10 K). From both parallactic and thermal analyses, the implied location of the grains responsible for the peak brightness of the 10 deg band pair is 2.1 +/- 0.1 AU the Sun A parallactic distance of 1.4 +/- 0.2 AU is found for the peak of the 1.4 deg band pair.

  19. Observation of Banded Spherulites in Pure poly(L-lactide) and its Miscible Blends with Amorphous Polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Xu,J.; Guo, B.; Zhou, J.; Li, L.; Wu, J.; Kowalczuk, M.

    2005-01-01

    Banded spherulites of pure poly(l-lactide) (PLLA) were observed via the 'crystallization after annealing' procedure, while only common spherulites were obtained via the 'direct isothermal crystallization' procedure. Wide angle X-ray diffraction revealed that the two types of spherulites had the same crystal lattice of a-modification. Atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the alternative negative and positive birefringent bands resulted from the alternative edge-on and flat-on lamellar orientations in the spherulites. Furthermore, the effect of thermal history on the spherulitic morphology was investigated in details. The PLLA samples melted for longer time or those with lower melting point were more likely to form banded spherulites. The possibility that the change of molecular weight was a determining factor of banding was excluded by the results on differently prepared samples with the same molecular weight. Therefore, we conclude that it was complete melting of the crystalline residues that favored formation of PLLA banded spherulites. Blending of PLLA with atactic poly(d, l-lactide) or poly[(R, S)-3-hydroxybutyrate], led to reduced band spacing. Effect of blending on the chain mobility, spherulite growth kinetics, supercooling and lamellar surface energy was quantitatively studied, which suggests that the blending-reduced band spacing cannot be attributed to the above factors. Therefore, there are other blending-relevant factors leading to the reduced band spacing.

  20. A Midsummer Night's Dream: Thermal Inertia of Oberon and Titania from Q- Band Observations of Eclipses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Delbo', Marco; Trilling, David; Stansberry, John; Hestroffer, Daniel; Maris, Michele; van Cleve, Jeffrey; Tozzi, Gian Paolo; Tanga, Paolo; Thuillot, William

    2008-02-01

    We will measure for the first time the thermal inertia of the surfaces of the Uranian satellites Oberon and Titania by observing them during and around solar eclipses due to Uranus. The eclipse events of the Uranian satellites in 2007-2008 represent a unique and rare opportunity, occurring every 42 years, to measure their thermal inertia. We will obtain time-resolved Q-band imaging of the satellites using T-ReCS on Gemini South, and model their thermal response to the eclipse event using a rough-surface thermophysical model. The thermal inertia depends on the density, conductivity and heat capacity of the surface material, and so provides constraints on the composition and physical nature of the surface. In addition, our targets are comparable in size to the icy dwarf-planets Eris, 2003 EL_61, 2005 FY_9, and (perhaps) Sedna. It is not currently possible to place good constraints on the thermal inertia of those objects; our observations afford an opportunity to make that measurement for analogs of those more distant, primitive bodies.

  1. Observation of upconversion fluorescence and stimulated emission based on three-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Q.; Lin, S.; Xu, L.; Yang, F.; Yang, Y.; Pan, L.; Sun, C.; Li, Y.; Sun, G.; Jiang, Z.

    2005-06-01

    The observations of three-photon-induced frequency-upconversion fluorescence and the highly directional stimulated visible emission in two dyes, 4-[p-(dicyanoethylamino) styryl]-N-methylpyridinium iodide (abbreviated as CEASP) and the complex of CEASP and Ce(NO3) (abbreviated as CEASP-Ce), are reported. The photographs of the forward amplified spontaneous emissions spots, pumped by an optical parametric oscillator idler with a pulse width of 8 ns and a wavelength of 1.3 μ m, are shown. The upconversion fluorescence produced both in dimethyl formamide solution and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) polymer spans from green to red, with a cubic dependence on the pump light intensity. The experimental results imply that the existence of the lanthanide ion Ce3 + sensitizes the nonlinear absorption and emission.

  2. Observation of nonlinear bands in near-field scanning optical microscopy of a photonic-crystal waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.; Huisman, S. R.; Ctistis, G. Mosk, A. P.; Pinkse, P. W. H.; Korterik, J. P.; Herek, J. L.

    2015-01-21

    We have measured the photonic bandstructure of GaAs photonic-crystal waveguides with high resolution in energy as well as in momentum using near-field scanning optical microscopy. Intriguingly, we observe additional bands that are not predicted by eigenmode solvers, as was recently demonstrated by Huisman et al. [Phys. Rev. B 86, 155154 (2012)]. We study the presence of these additional bands by performing measurements of these bands while varying the incident light power, revealing a non-linear power dependence. Here, we demonstrate experimentally and theoretically that the observed additional bands are caused by a waveguide-specific near-field tip effect not previously reported, which can significantly phase-modulate the detected field.

  3. Atmospheric monitoring in the millimetre and submillimetre bands for cosmological observations: CASPER2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Petris, M.; De Gregori, S.; Decina, B.; Lamagna, L.; Pardo, J. R.

    2013-02-01

    Cosmological observations from ground at millimetre and submillimetre wavelengths are affected by atmospheric absorption and consequent emission. The low- and high-frequency (sky-noise) fluctuations of atmospheric performance necessitate careful observational strategies and/or instrumental technical solutions. Measurements of atmospheric emission spectra are necessary for accurate calibration procedures as well as for site-testing statistics. CASPER2, an instrument designed to explore the 90-450 GHz (3-15 cm-1) spectral region, was developed and had its operation verified in the Alps. A Martin-Puplett interferometer (MPI) operates by comparing sky radiation, coming from a field of view (FOV) of 28 arcmin (full width at half-maximum) and collected by a 62-cm-diameter Pressman-Camichel telescope, with a reference source. The signals at the two output ports of the interferometer are detected by two bolometers cooled to 300 mK inside a wet cryostat. Three different but complementary interferometric techniques can be performed with CASPER2: amplitude modulation (AM), fast-scan (FS) and phase modulation (PM). An altazimuthal mount allows sky pointing, possibly co-aligned with the optical axis of the 2.6-m-diameter telescope of MITO (Millimetre and Infrared Testagrigia Observatory, Italy). The optimal time-scale to average acquired spectra is inferred by Allan variance analysis at five fiducial frequencies. We present the motivation for and design of the atmospheric spectrometer CASPER2. The procedure adopted to calibrate the instrument and the preliminary performance of it are described. Instrument capabilities were checked during the summer observational campaign at MITO in 2010 July by measuring atmospheric emission spectra with the three procedures.

  4. Limitations to Dual Frequency Ionosphere Corrections for Frequency Switched K-Q-Band Observations with the VLBA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyi, Gabor; Gordon, David; Sovers, Ojars J.

    2004-01-01

    A series of VLBA experiments were carried out at K and Q bands for astrometry and imaging within the KQ VLBI Survey Collaboration. The paired K and Q observations of each source are separated by approximately 3 minutes of time. We investigate the delay effect of the ionosphere between K and Q bands involving the interscan separation. This differential delay effect is intermixed with the differential fluctuation effect of the troposphere.

  5. Sub-Band Gap Absorption in As-Deposited and Annealed nc-CdSe Thin Films Using Constant Photocurrent Method (CPM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Kriti; Al-Kabbi, A. S.; Singh, Baljinder; Saini, G. S. S.; Tripathi, S. K.

    2011-12-01

    Nanocrystalline CdSe thin films have been prepared by thermal vaccum evaporation technique using Inert Gas Condensation method using Argon as inert gas. XRD confirms the crystalline cubic nature of nc-CdSe thin films. The optical band gap is calculated for as deposited nc-CdSe and it comes out to be 2.1 eV. CPM has been used to measure sub-band gap absorption in nanocrystalline CdSe thin films. The thin films of nc-CdSe have been annealed at 80 °C for one hour and sub-bandgap absorption in annealed samples has also been calculated. Slope of Urbach tail which is a measure of disorder in both as deposited and annealed samples has been calculated. In the case of as deposited nc-CdSe thin films, Urbach slope is 354 meV. It decreases to the value 198 meV after annealing which shows structural disorder decreases after annealing.

  6. First calibration and visible band observations of Khayyam, a Tunable Spatial Heterodyne Spectroscopy (SHS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, S.; Harris, W.; Corliss, J.

    2013-12-01

    We present initial results from observations of wide-field targets using new instrumentation based on an all-reflective spatial heterodyne spectrometer (SHS). SHS instruments are quasi common path two-beam Fourier transform spectrometers that produce 2-D spatial interference patterns without the requirement for moving parts. The utility of SHS comes from its combination of a wide input acceptance angle (0.5-1°), high resolving power (of order ~10^5), compact format, high dynamic range, and relaxed optical tolerances compared with other interferometer designs. This combination makes them extremely useful for velocity resolved for observations of wide field targets from both small and large telescopes. We have constructed both narrow band pass and broadly tunable designs at fixed focal plane facilities on Mt Hamilton and Kitt Peak. This report focuses on the tunable instrument at Mt Hamilton, which is at the focus of the Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT). The CAT provides a test case for on-axis use of SHS, and the impact of the resulting field non-uniformity caused by the spider pattern will be discussed. Observations of several targets will be presented that demonstrate the capabilities of SHS, including comet C/2012 S1 (ISON), Jupiter, and both the day sky and night glow. Raw interferometric data and transformed power spectra will be shown and evaluated in terms of instrumental stability. Khayyam, The Tunable all-reflective Special Heterodyne Spectrometer (SHS) that has being characterized at the Coudé Auxiliary Telescope (CAT) on Mt. Hamilton.

  7. Observation of several chlorine nitrate (ClONO2) bands in stratospheric infrared spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zander, R.; Rinsland, C. P.; Farmer, C. B.; Brown, L. R.; Norton, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    Four of the most prominent and sharpest infrared absorption features of chlorine nitrate at 780.2, 807.7, 809.4, and 1292.6/cm have been observed in a series of infrared solar spectra obtained at an unapodized spectral resolution of 0.01/cm, using the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy instrument from on-board Sapcelab 3. A quantitative analysis of the nu4 Q branch at 780.2/cm has provided insight into the concentration of ClONO2 between 19 and 40 km altitude. While the mean profile deduced from three sunset occultations near 30 deg N latitude exhibits a shape close to that predicted by model calculations, its concentrations in the 20 to 32 km altitude range are, however, about 30 percent larger, reaching a peak concentration of 9 x 10 to the 8th molecules/cu cm at 25 km. The concentrations above 32 km, deduced from one sunrise occultation at 47 deg JS, are even larger than the corresponding sunset values at 30 deg N latitude. Some of these discrepancies may be caused by the rather large uncertainty in the assumed Q branch strength.

  8. Uniform Supersonic Expansion for FTIR Absorption Spectroscopy: The nu(5) Band of (NO)(2) at 26 K.

    PubMed

    Benidar; Georges; Le Doucen R; Boissoles; Hamon; Canosa; Rowe

    2000-01-01

    A high-resolution Fourier transform interferometer (Bruker IFS 120 HR) was combined with a uniform supersonic expansion produced by means of axisymmetric Laval nozzles. The geometry profile of the nozzle enabled us to work under precise thermodynamic and kinetic conditions. The effect of the cooling rate of different nozzles on cluster nucleation is illustrated. The experimental sensitivity was tested by recording the nu(5) band of (NO)(2) at 26 K. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  9. Absorption/transmission measurements of PSAP particle-laden filters from the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Presser, Cary; Nazarian, Ashot; Conny, Joseph M.; Chand, Duli; Sedlacek, Arthur; Hubbe, John M.

    2016-12-02

    Absorptivity measurements with a laser-heating approach, referred to as the laser-driven thermal reactor (LDTR), were carried out in the infrared and applied at ambient (laboratory) nonreacting conditions to particle-laden filters from a three-wavelength (visible) particle/soot absorption photometer (PSAP). Here, the particles were obtained during the Biomass Burning Observation Project (BBOP) field campaign. The focus of this study was to determine the particle absorption coefficient from field-campaign filter samples using the LDTR approach, and compare results with other commercially available instrumentation (in this case with the PSAP, which has been compared with numerous other optical techniques).

  10. A Multi-Band Analytical Algorithm for Deriving Absorption and Backscattering Coefficients from Remote-Sensing Reflectance of Optically Deep Waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Zhong-Ping; Carder, Kendall L.

    2001-01-01

    A multi-band analytical (MBA) algorithm is developed to retrieve absorption and backscattering coefficients for optically deep waters, which can be applied to data from past and current satellite sensors, as well as data from hyperspectral sensors. This MBA algorithm applies a remote-sensing reflectance model derived from the Radiative Transfer Equation, and values of absorption and backscattering coefficients are analytically calculated from values of remote-sensing reflectance. There are only limited empirical relationships involved in the algorithm, which implies that this MBA algorithm could be applied to a wide dynamic range of waters. Applying the algorithm to a simulated non-"Case 1" data set, which has no relation to the development of the algorithm, the percentage error for the total absorption coefficient at 440 nm a (sub 440) is approximately 12% for a range of 0.012 - 2.1 per meter (approximately 6% for a (sub 440) less than approximately 0.3 per meter), while a traditional band-ratio approach returns a percentage error of approximately 30%. Applying it to a field data set ranging from 0.025 to 2.0 per meter, the result for a (sub 440) is very close to that using a full spectrum optimization technique (9.6% difference). Compared to the optimization approach, the MBA algorithm cuts the computation time dramatically with only a small sacrifice in accuracy, making it suitable for processing large data sets such as satellite images. Significant improvements over empirical algorithms have also been achieved in retrieving the optical properties of optically deep waters.

  11. Cirrus cloud optical and microphysical property retrievals from eMAS during SEAC4RS using bi-spectral reflectance measurements within the 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Kerry; Platnick, Steven; Arnold, G. Thomas; Holz, Robert E.; Veglio, Paolo; Yorks, John; Wang, Chenxi

    2016-04-01

    Previous bi-spectral imager retrievals of cloud optical thickness (COT) and effective particle radius (CER) based on the Nakajima and King (1990) approach, such as those of the operational MODIS cloud optical property retrieval product (MOD06), have typically paired a non-absorbing visible or near-infrared wavelength, sensitive to COT, with an absorbing shortwave or mid-wave infrared wavelength sensitive to CER. However, in practice it is only necessary to select two spectral channels that exhibit a strong contrast in cloud particle absorption. Here it is shown, using eMAS observations obtained during NASA's SEAC4RS field campaign, that selecting two absorbing wavelength channels within the broader 1.88 µm water vapor absorption band, namely the 1.83 and 1.93 µm channels that have sufficient differences in ice crystal single scattering albedo, can yield COT and CER retrievals for thin to moderately thick single-layer cirrus that are reasonably consistent with other solar and IR imager-based and lidar-based retrievals. A distinct advantage of this channel selection for cirrus cloud retrievals is that the below-cloud water vapor absorption minimizes the surface contribution to measured cloudy top-of-atmosphere reflectance, in particular compared to the solar window channels used in heritage retrievals such as MOD06. This reduces retrieval uncertainty resulting from errors in the surface reflectance assumption and reduces the frequency of retrieval failures for thin cirrus clouds.

  12. Precision X-band radio Doppler and ranging navigation: Mars Observer interplanetary cruise scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estefan, J. A.; Thurman, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    This article describes an error covariance analysis based on a Mars Observer mission scenario; the study was performed to establish the navigation performance that can potentially be achieved in a demonstration of precision two-way X-band (8.4-GHz) Doppler and ranging with the Mars Observer spacecraft planned for next year, and to evaluate the sensitivity of the predicted performance to variations in ground system error modeling assumptions. Orbit determination error statistics computed for a 182-day Doppler and ranging data arc predicted Mars approach orbit determination accuracies of about 0.45 micro-rad in an angular sense, using a conservative ground system error model as a baseline. When less-conservative error model assumptions were employed, it was found that orbit determination accuracies of 0.19 to 0.30 micro-rad could be obtained; the level of accuracy of the assumed Mars ephemeris is about 0.11 micro-rad. In comparison, Doppler-only performance with the baseline error model was predicted to be about 1.30 to 1.51 micro-rad, although it was found that when improved station location accuracies and Global Positioning System-based tropospheric calibration accuracies were assumed, accuracies of 0.44 to 0.52 micro-rad were predicted. In the Doppler plus ranging cases, the results were relatively insensitive to variations in ranging system and station delay calibration uncertainties of a few meters and tropospheric zenith delay calibration uncertainties of a few centimeters.

  13. Observation of the nu(6) + nu(9) Band of Ketene via Resonant Coriolis Interaction with nu(8).

    PubMed

    Gruebele; Johns; Nemes

    1999-12-01

    We observed and analyzed a b-axis Coriolis resonance between higher J states of the nu(6) + nu(9) combination band and the nu(8) fundamental of ketene in the spectral region 940-970 cm(-1). The interaction resonantly couples K(a) = 1 states of the combination band to K(a) = 0 states of the fundamental and also affects K(a) = 1, 2 states in the fundamental. Due to the involvement of strongly asymmetry-split low K levels, the rotational constants and band origin of nu(6) + nu(9) could be accurately determined and are discussed in the light of high-quality anharmonic force fields. The Coriolis coupling parameter, zeta(b)(8,6+9), is very precisely determined. A smaller perturbation, which could not be fully analyzed, is tentatively attributed to K(a) = 2 upper states in the nu(5) + nu(9) band. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Azimuthal instability of the interface in a shear banded flow by direct visual observation.

    PubMed

    Decruppe, J P; Bécu, L; Greffier, O; Fazel, N

    2010-12-17

    The stability of the shear banded flow of a Maxwellian fluid is studied from an experimental point of view using rheology and flow visualization with polarized light. We show that the one-layer homogeneous flow cannot sustain shear rates corresponding to the end of the stress plateau. The high shear rate branch is not found and the shear stress oscillates at the end of the plateau. An azimuthal instability appears: the shear induced band becomes unstable and the interface between the two bands undulates in time and space with a period τ, a wavelength λ and a wave vector k parallel to the direction of the tangential velocity.

  15. The characteristics of the O2 Herzberg II and Chamberlain bands observed with VIRTIS/Venus Express

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Migliorini, A.; Piccioni, G.; Gérard, J. C.; Soret, L.; Slanger, T. G.; Politi, R.; Snels, M.; Drossart, P.; Nuccilli, F.

    2013-03-01

    The oxygen Venus nightglow emissions in the visible spectral range have been known since the early observations from the Venera spacecraft. Recent observations with the VIRTIS instrument on board Venus Express allowed us to re-examine the Herzberg II system of O2 and to further study its vertical distribution, in particular the (0-ν″ with ν″ = 7-13) bands. The present work describes the vertical profile of the observed bands and relative intensities from limb observation data. The wavelength-integrated intensities of the Herzberg II bands, with ν″ = 7-11, are inferred from the recorded spectra. The resulting values lie in the range of 84-116 kR at the altitudes of maximum intensity, which are found to lie in the range of 93-98 km. Three bands of the Chamberlain system, centered at 560 nm, 605 nm, and 657 nm have been identified as well. Their emission peak is located at about 100 km, 4 km higher than the Herzberg II bands. For the first time, the O2 nightglow emissions were investigated simultaneously in the visible and in the IR spectral range, showing a good agreement between the peak position for the Herzberg II and the O2(aΔg-XΣg-) bands. An airglow model, proposed by Gérard et al. (Gérard, J.C., Soret, L., Migliorini, A., Piccioni, G. [2013]. Icarus.) starting from realistic O and CO2 vertical distributions derived from Venus-Express observations, allows reproduction of the observed profiles for the three O2 systems.

  16. Efficient tissue ablation using a laser tunable in the water absorption band at 3 microns with little collateral damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nierlich, Alexandra; Chuchumishev, Danail; Nagel, Elizabeth; Marinova, Kristiana; Philipov, Stanislav; Fiebig, Torsten; Buchvarov, Ivan; Richter, Claus-Peter

    2014-03-01

    Lasers can significantly advance medical diagnostics and treatment. At high power, they are typically used as cutting tools during surgery. For lasers that are used as knifes, radiation wavelengths in the far ultraviolet and in the near infrared spectral regions are favored because tissue has high contents of collagen and water. Collagen has an absorption peak around 190 nm, while water is in the near infrared around 3,000 nm. Changing the wavelength across the absorption peak will result in significant differences in laser tissue interactions. Tunable lasers in the infrared that could optimize the laser tissue interaction for ablation and/or coagulation are not available until now besides the Free Electron Laser (FEL). Here we demonstrate efficient tissue ablation using a table-top mid-IR laser tunable between 3,000 to 3,500 nm. A detailed study of the ablation has been conducted in different tissues. Little collateral thermal damage has been found at a distance above 10-20 microns from the ablated surface. Furthermore, little mechanical damage could be seen in conventional histology and by examination of birefringent activity of the samples using a pair of cross polarizing filters.

  17. Observation of potassium-intercalated carbon nanotubes and their valence-band excitation spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, S.; Tomita, M.

    1996-04-01

    Second-stage potassium-intercalated carbon nanotubes were synthesized in a specially designed ultrahigh vacuum analytical electron microscope and their valence-band excitation spectra in the region of the π+σ plasmon were measured by electron energy loss spectroscopy. The carbon nanostructures consisted of graphene sheets. Potassium was deposited in an ultrahigh vacuum at room temperature. As a result, a second stage of intercalated nanotubes was found to be formed close to the surface. The energy loss spectra of the intercalated nanotubes showed humps at about 16, 19, and 22 eV, in addition to those of unintercalated tubes. This suggests that intercalation modified the band structure of the interlayer bands and/or the σ(σ*) bands.

  18. Absolute Absorption Intensities in the Fundamental nu2 and nu5 Bands of 12CH3F.

    PubMed

    Lepère; Blanquet; Walrand; Tarrago

    1998-06-01

    The absolute strengths of 93 lines belonging to the nu2 and nu5 bands of methyl fluoride were measured in the range of 1416-1503 cm-1 using a tunable diode-laser (TDL) spectrometer. These experimental line intensities were obtained from the equivalent width method. The intensities were analyzed within a dyad system, required to account properly for the strong Coriolis coupling between nu2 and nu5. The fit to the experimental data led to the determination of the dipole moment derivatives partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq2 and partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq5, as well as the first-order Herman-Wallis correction in K to partial differentialµ/ partial differentialq5. The intensities were reproduced with an overall standard deviation of 1.44%, to be compared with a mean experimental uncertainty equal to 1.58%. The values derived for the vibrational band strengths of nu2 and nu5 are 2.124 (18) cm-2.atm-1 and 36.96 cm-2.atm-1 at 296 K, respectively. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  19. Observation of interface band structure by ballistic-electron-emission microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, L. D.; Kaiser, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper reports an advanced ballistic electron spectroscopy technique that was used to directly measure semiconductor band structure properties at a subsurface interface. Two interface systems having contrasting band structures were investigated by this method: Au-Si and Au-GaAs. It is concluded that the proposed method, based on scanning tunneling microscopy, enables the spatially resolved carrier-transport spectroscopy of interfaces.

  20. Observations of copolar correlation coefficient through a bright band at vertical incidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zrnic, D. S.; Raghavan, R.; Chandrasekar, V.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses an application of polarimetric measurements at vertical incidence. In particular, the correlation coefficients between linear copolar components are examined, and measurements obtained with the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL)'s and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)'s polarimetric radars are presented. The data are from two well-defined bright bands. A sharp decrease of the correlation coefficient, confined to a height interval of a few hundred meters, marks the bottom of the bright band.

  1. Examples L-Band Interference will be Presented and Discussed, as well as the Importance of L-Band Soil Moisture Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Edward

    2010-01-01

    Examples of L-band interference will be presented and discussed, as well as the importance of L-band soil moisture observations, as part of this one-day GEOSS workshop XXXVII on "Data Quality and Radio Spectrum Allocation Impact on Earth Observations" will address the broad challenges of data quality and the impact of generating reliable information for decision makers who are Earth data users but not necessarily experts in the Earth observation field. GEO has initiated a data quality assessment task (DA-09-01a) and workshop users will review and debate the directions and challenges of this effort. Radio spectrum allocation is an element of data availability and data quality, and is also associated with a GEO task (AR-06-11). A recent U.S. National Research Council report on spectrum management will be addressed as part of the workshop. Key representatives from industry, academia, and government will provide invited talks on these and related issues that impact GEOSS implementation.

  2. Observations on the relation between alcohol absorption and the rate of gastric emptying.

    PubMed Central

    Holt, S

    1981-01-01

    Alcohol (ethanol) is absorbed slowly from the stomach and rapidly from the small intestine, and the rate of its absorption depends on the rate of gastric emptying. When gastric emptying is fast, the absorption of alcohol is fast. When gastric emptying is slow the absorption of alcohol is delayed and peak blood alcohol concentrations are reduced. Alterations of the gastric emptying rate, which may have a physiologic, pharmacologic or pathologic cause, markedly influence the rate of alcohol absorption. The gastric emptying rate makes an important contribution to inter- and intraindividual variations in the rate of alcohol absorption and therefore the timing and magnitude of the acute intoxicating effect of an oral dose of alcohol. PMID:7459787

  3. Frequency band enlargement of the penetrator seismometer and its application to moonquake observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Ryuhei; Nébut, Tanguy; Shiraishi, Hiroaki; Lognonné, Philippe; Kobayashi, Naoki; Tanaka, Satoshi

    2015-07-01

    Seismic data obtained over a broad frequency range are very useful in investigation of the internal structures of the Earth and other planetary bodies. However, planetary seismic data acquired through the NASA Apollo and Viking programs were obtained only over a very limited frequency range. To obtain effective seismic data over a broader frequency range on planetary surfaces, broadband seismometers suitable for planetary seismology must be developed. In this study, we have designed a new broadband seismometer based on a short-period seismometer whose resonant frequency is 1 Hz for future geophysical missions. The seismometer is of an electromagnetic type, light weight, small size and has good shock-durability, making it suitable for being loaded onto a penetrator, which is a small, hard-landing probe developed in the LUNAR-A Project, a previous canceled mission. We modified the short-period seismometer so as to have a flat frequency response above about 0.1 Hz and the detection limit could be lowered to cover frequencies below the frequency. This enlargement of the frequency band will allow us to investigate moonquakes for lower frequency components in which waveforms are less distorted because strong scattering due to fractured structures near the lunar surface is likely to be suppressed. The modification was achieved simply by connecting a feedback circuit to the seismometer, without making any mechanical changes to the short-period sensor. We have confirmed that the broadband seismometer exhibits the frequency response as designed and allows us to observe long-period components of small ground motions. Methods to improve the performance of the broadband seismometer from the current design are also discussed. These developments should promise to increase the opportunity for application of this small and tough seismometer in various planetary seismological missions.

  4. First laboratory detection of an absorption line of the first overtone electric quadrupolar band of N2 by CRDS near 2.2 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čermák, P.; Vasilchenko, S.; Mondelain, D.; Kassi, S.; Campargue, A.

    2017-01-01

    The extremely weak 2-0 O(14) electric quadrupole transition of N2 has been detected by very high sensitivity Cavity Ring Down spectroscopy near 4518 cm-1. It is the first N2 absorption line in the first overtone band reported so far from laboratory experiments. By combining a feedback narrowed Distributed Feedback laser diode with a passive cell tracking technique, a limit of detection of αmin ∼ 1.2 × 10-11 cm-1 was achieved after one day of spectra averaging. The N2 2-0 O(14) line position and line intensity (about 1.5 × 10-30 cm/molecule) agree with calculated values provided in the HITRAN2012 database.

  5. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M; Friedel, Reinhard H; Funsten, Herbert O; Gary, S Peter; Hospodarsky, George B; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D; Skoug, Ruth M; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr <Ω e , where Ω e is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃Ω e /2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ∼Ω e /2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  6. Assess Calibration Consistency of MODIS and AVHRR Thermal Infrared Bands Using SNO Observations Corrected for Atmospheric Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Aisheng; Xie, Yong; Xiong, Xiaoxiong; Chu, I-Wen

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring environmental changes from space requires extremely well-calibrated observations to achieve the necessary high accuracy and stability. The calibration differences between the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) thermal bands provide a valuable quality assessment of the instrument performance. This letter compares the calibration differences between the Aqua MODIS and NOAA-18 AVHRR bands at 11.0 and 12.0 /Lm using simultaneous nadir overpass observations obtained in nearly parallel orbits. Impacts due to the relative spectral-response differences between the two sensors are estimated by MODTRAN simulations with real-time atmospheric profiles of temperature, water vapor, atmospheric pressure and ozone, and surface skin temperatures. Results show that the temperature difference after the removal of atmospheric impacts is within 0.30 K (or 0.40% in radiance) across the effective calibration range (or the 1l.0 l'm band/channel. For the 12.0 pm band, the differences are OAO K (or 0.50%) at the typical radiance and up to 0.70 K (or 0.90%) close to the maximum radiance, indicating an excellent calibration consistency between MODIS and AVHRR for both bands.

  7. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr<Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr≃Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ˜Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  8. meso-meso linked porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-porphyrin hybrid arrays and their triply linked tapes exhibiting strong absorption bands in the NIR region.

    PubMed

    Mori, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Takayuki; Lee, Sangsu; Lim, Jong Min; Kim, Dongho; Osuka, Atsuhiro

    2015-02-11

    We describe the synthesis and characterization of directly meso-meso linked porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-porphyrin hybrid oligomers and their triply linked (completely fused) hybrid tapes. meso-meso Linked Ni(II) porphyrin-[26]hexaphyrin-Ni(II) porphyrin trimers were prepared by methanesulfonic acid-catalyzed cross-condensation of meso-formyl Ni(II) porphyrins with a 5,10-diaryltripyrrane followed by oxidation with 2,3-dichloro-5,6-dicyano-1,4-benzoquinone (DDQ). The Ni(II) porphyrin moieties were converted to Zn(II) porphyrins via an indirect route involving reduction of the [26]hexaphyrin to its 28π congener, acid-induced denickelation, oxidation of the [28]hexaphyrin, and finally Zn(II) ion insertion. Over the course of these transformations, porphyrin-[28]hexaphyrin-porphyrin trimers have been revealed to take on a Möbius aromatic twisted structure for the [28]hexaphyrin segment. Oxidation of meso-meso linked hybrid trimer bearing 5,15-diaryl Zn(II) porphyrins with DDQ/Sc(OTf)3 under mild conditions resulted in meso-meso coupling oligomerization, affording the corresponding dimeric (hexamer), trimeric (nonamer), and tetrameric (dodecamer) oligomers. On the other hand, oxidation of a meso-meso linked hybrid trimer bearing 5,10,15-triaryl Zn(II) porphyrin terminals with DDQ/Sc(OTf)3 under harsher conditions afforded a meso-meso, β-β, β-β triply linked hybrid porphyrin tape, which displays a sharp and intense absorption band at 1912 nm. Comparison of this extremely red-shifted absorption band with those of Zn(II) porphyrin tapes suggests that the bathochromic-shifting capability of a [26]hexaphyrin unit is large, almost equivalent to that of four individual Zn(II) porphyrin units. As demonstrated, the fusion of porphyrins to [26]hexaphyrin offers an efficient means to expand their conjugation networks, significantly expanding the capabilities attainable for these chromophores.

  9. Microwave absorption in X and Ku band frequency of cotton fabric coated with Ni-Zn ferrite and carbon formulation in polyurethane matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, K. K.; Abbas, S. M.; Goswami, T. H.; Abhyankar, A. C.

    2014-08-01

    The present study highlights various microwave properties, i.e. reflection, transmission, absorption and reflection loss, of the coated cotton fabric [formulation: Ni-Zn ferrite (Ni 0.5Zn0.5Fe2O4) and carbon black (acetylene black) at concentrations of 30, 40, 50, 60 and70 g of ferrite and 5 g carbon in each 100 ml polyurethane] evaluated at 8-18 GHz frequency. The uniform density of filling materials in coated fabrics (dotted marks in SEM micrograph) indicates homogeneous dispersion of conducting fillers in polyurethane and the density of filling material cluster increases with increase in ferrite concentration. SEM images also show uniform coating of conducting fillers/resin system over individual fibers and interweave spaces. The important parameters governing the microwave properties of coated fabrics i.e. permittivity and permeability, S-parameters, reflection loss, etc. were studied in a HVS free space microwave measurement system. The lossy character of coated fabric is found to increase with increase of ferrite content; the ferrite content decreases the impedance and increases the permittivity and permeability values. The 1.6-1.8 mm thick coated fabric sample (40 wt% ferrite, 3 wt% carbon and 57 wt% PU) has shown about 40% absorption, 20% transmission and 40% reflectance in X (8.2-12.4 GHz) and Ku (12-18 GHz) frequency bands. The reflection loss at 13.5 GHz has shown the highest peak value (22.5 dB) due to coated sample optical thickness equal to λ/4 and more than 7.5 dB in entire Ku band. Owing to its thin and flexible nature, the coated fabric can be used as apparel in protecting human being from hazardous microwaves and also as radar camouflage covering screen in defense.

  10. Observations of magnetospheric ionization enhancements using upper-hybrid resonance noise band data from the RAE-1 satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    Noise bands associated with the upper-hybrid resonance were used to provide direct evidence for the existence of regions of enhanced density in the equatorial magnetosphere near L = 2. Density enhancements ranging from several percent to as high as 45 percent are observed with radial dimensions of several hundred kilometers. The enhancement characteristics strongly suggest their identification as magnetospheric whistler ducts.

  11. Light absorption and morphological properties of soot-containing aerosols observed at an East Asian outflow site, Noto Peninsula, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Sayako; Nakayama, Tomoki; Taketani, Fumikazu; Adachi, Kouji; Matsuki, Atsushi; Iwamoto, Yoko; Sadanaga, Yasuhiro; Matsumi, Yutaka

    2016-03-01

    The coating of black carbon (BC) with inorganic salts and organic compounds can enhance the magnitude of light absorption by BC. To elucidate the enhancement of light absorption of aged BC particles and its relation to the mixing state and morphology of individual particles, we conducted observations of particles at an Asian outflow site in Noto Peninsula, Japan, in the spring of 2013. Absorption and scattering coefficients at 405, 532, and 781 nm and mass concentrations/mixing states of refractory BC in PM2.5 were measured using a three-wavelength photoacoustic soot spectrometer and a single-particle soot photometer (SP2), respectively, after passage through a thermodenuder (TD) maintained at 300 or 400 °C or a bypass line maintained at room temperature (25 °C). The average enhancement factor of BC light absorption due to coating was estimated by comparing absorption coefficients at 781 nm for particles that with and without passing through the TD at 300 °C and was found to be 1.22. The largest enhancements (> 1.30) were observed under high absorption coefficient periods when the air mass was long-range transported from urban areas in China. Aerosol samples were also analyzed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) equipped with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer. The morphological features and mixing states of soot-containing particles of four samples collected during the high absorption events were analyzed by comparing microphotographs before and after the evaporation of beam-sensitive materials by irradiation with a high-density electron beam. The majority of the soot in all samples was found as mixed particles with sulfate-containing spherules or as clusters of such spherules. For samples showing high enhancement (> 1.30) of BC light absorption, the TEM showed that the internally mixed soot-containing particles tended to have a more spherical shape and to be thickly coated. The SP2 measurements also suggested that the proportion of thickly coated

  12. Some observations about the components of transonic fan noise from narrow-band spectral analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saule, A. V.

    1974-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative spectral analyses are presented that give the broadband-noise, discrete-tone, and multiple-tone properties of the noise generated by a full-scale high-bypass single-stage axial-flow transonic fan (fan B, NASA Quiet Engine Program). The noise components were obtained from narrow-band spectra in conjunction with 1/3-octave-band spectra. Variations in the pressure levels of the noise components with fan speed, forward-quadrant azimuth angle, and frequency are presented and compared. The study shows that much of the apparent broadband noise on 1/3-octave-band plots consists of a complex system of shaft-order tones. The analyses also indicate the difficulties in determining or defining noise components, especially the broadband level under the discrete tones. The sources which may be associated with the noise components are discussed.

  13. Combined observations of Arctic sea ice with near-coincident colocated X-band, C-band, and L-band SAR satellite remote sensing and helicopter-borne measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, A. M.; King, J. A.; Doulgeris, A. P.; Gerland, S.; Singha, S.; Spreen, G.; Busche, T.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we compare colocated near-coincident X-, C-, and L-band fully polarimetry SAR satellite images with helicopter-borne ice thickness measurements acquired during the Norwegian Young sea ICE 2015 (N-ICE2015) expedition in the region of the Arctic Ocean north of Svalbard in April 2015. The air-borne surveys provide near-coincident snow plus ice thickness, surface roughness data, and photographs. This unique data set allows us to investigate how the different frequencies can complement one another for sea ice studies, but also to raise awareness of limitations. X-band and L-band satellite scenes were shown to be a useful complement to the standard SAR frequency for sea ice monitoring (C-band) for lead ice and newly formed sea ice identification. This may be in part be due to the frequency but also the high spatial resolution of these sensors. We found a relatively low correlation between snow plus ice thickness and surface roughness. Therefore, in our dataset ice thickness cannot directly be observed by SAR which has important implications for operational ice charting based on automatic segmentation.

  14. Optimization of absorption bands of dye-sensitized and perovskite tandem solar cells based on loss-in-potential values.

    PubMed

    Sobuś, Jan; Ziółek, Marcin

    2014-07-21

    A numerical study of optimal bandgaps of light absorbers in tandem solar cell configurations is presented with the main focus on dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and perovskite solar cells (PSCs). The limits in efficiency and the expected improvements of tandem structures are investigated as a function of total loss-in-potential (V(L)), incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) and fill factor (FF) of individual components. It is shown that the optimal absorption onsets are significantly smaller than those derived for multi-junction devices. For example, for double-cell devices the onsets are at around 660 nm and 930 nm for DSSCs with iodide based electrolytes and at around 720 nm and 1100 nm for both DSSCs with cobalt based electrolytes and PSCs. Such configurations can increase the total sunlight conversion efficiency by about 35% in comparison to single-cell devices of the same VL, IPCE and FF. The relevance of such studies for tandem n-p DSSCs and for a proposed new configuration for PSCs is discussed. In particular, it is shown that maximum total losses of 1.7 V for DSSCs and 1.4 V for tandem PSCs are necessary to give any efficiency improvement with respect to the single bandgap device. This means, for example, a tandem n-p DSSC with TiO2 and NiO porous electrodes will hardly work better than the champion single DSSC. A source code of the program used for calculations is also provided.

  15. Precipitation and microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band radars and ground-based instrumentation during HOPE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Xinxin; Evaristo, Raquel; Simmer, Clemens; Handwerker, Jan; Trömel, Silke

    2016-06-01

    This study presents a first analysis of precipitation and related microphysical processes observed by three polarimetric X-band Doppler radars (BoXPol, JuXPol and KiXPol) in conjunction with a ground-based network of disdrometers, rain gauges and vertically pointing micro rain radars (MRRs) during the High Definition Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction (HD(CP)2) Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) during April and May 2013 in Germany. While JuXPol and KiXPol were continuously observing the central HOPE area near Forschungszentrum Jülich at a close distance, BoXPol observed the area from a distance of about 48.5 km. MRRs were deployed in the central HOPE area and one MRR close to BoXPol in Bonn, Germany. Seven disdrometers and three rain gauges providing point precipitation observations were deployed at five locations within a 5 km × 5 km region, while three other disdrometers were collocated with the MRR in Bonn. The daily rainfall accumulation at each rain gauge/disdrometer location estimated from the three X-band polarimetric radar observations showed very good agreement. Accompanying microphysical processes during the evolution of precipitation systems were well captured by the polarimetric X-band radars and corroborated by independent observations from the other ground-based instruments.

  16. NuSTAR and XMM-NEWTON Observations of NGC 1365: Extreme Absorption Variability and a Constant Inner Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walton, D. J.; Risaliti, G.; Harrison, F. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Miller, J. M.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Brenneman, L. W.; Christensen, F. E.; Craig, W. W.; Elvis, M.; Fuerst, F.; Gandhi, P.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Hailey, C. J.; Kara, E.; Luo, B.; Madsen, K. K.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Parker, M. L.; Reynolds, C. S.; Rivers, E.; Ross, R. R.; Stern, D.; Zhang, W. W.

    2014-06-01

    We present a spectral analysis of four coordinated NuSTAR+XMM-Newton observations of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. These exhibit an extreme level of spectral variability, which is primarily due to variable line-of-sight absorption, revealing relatively unobscured states in this source for the first time. Despite the diverse range of absorption states, each of the observations displays the same characteristic signatures of relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. Through time-resolved spectroscopy, we find that the strength of the relativistic iron line and the Compton reflection hump relative to the intrinsic continuum are well correlated, which is expected if they are two aspects of the same broadband reflection spectrum. We apply self-consistent disk reflection models to these time-resolved spectra in order to constrain the inner disk parameters, allowing for variable, partially covering absorption to account for the vastly different absorption states that were observed. Each of the four observations is treated independently to test the consistency of the results obtained for the black hole spin and the disk inclination, which should not vary on observable timescales. We find both the spin and the inclination determined from the reflection spectrum to be consistent, confirming that NGC 1365 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole; in all cases the dimensionless spin parameter is constrained to be a* > 0.97 (at 90% statistical confidence or better).

  17. NuSTAR and XMM-Newton observations of NGC 1365: Extreme absorption variability and a constant inner accretion disk

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, D. J.; Harrison, F. A.; Fuerst, F.; Grefenstette, B. W.; Madsen, K. K.; Risaliti, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Miller, J. M.; Arevalo, P.; Ballantyne, D. R.; Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Brenneman, L. W.; Elvis, M.; Christensen, F. E.; Gandhi, P.; Hailey, C. J.; Luo, B.; Marinucci, A.; and others

    2014-06-10

    We present a spectral analysis of four coordinated NuSTAR+XMM-Newton observations of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 1365. These exhibit an extreme level of spectral variability, which is primarily due to variable line-of-sight absorption, revealing relatively unobscured states in this source for the first time. Despite the diverse range of absorption states, each of the observations displays the same characteristic signatures of relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disk. Through time-resolved spectroscopy, we find that the strength of the relativistic iron line and the Compton reflection hump relative to the intrinsic continuum are well correlated, which is expected if they are two aspects of the same broadband reflection spectrum. We apply self-consistent disk reflection models to these time-resolved spectra in order to constrain the inner disk parameters, allowing for variable, partially covering absorption to account for the vastly different absorption states that were observed. Each of the four observations is treated independently to test the consistency of the results obtained for the black hole spin and the disk inclination, which should not vary on observable timescales. We find both the spin and the inclination determined from the reflection spectrum to be consistent, confirming that NGC 1365 hosts a rapidly rotating black hole; in all cases the dimensionless spin parameter is constrained to be a* > 0.97 (at 90% statistical confidence or better).

  18. Optimal design and loss mechanism analysis of microwave absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composites with broad absorption band and good polarization stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Guangchao; Jiang, Jianjun; He, Yun; Bie, Shaowei

    2016-04-01

    A microwave-absorbing unidirectional SiC fiber composite with wide absorption and good polarization stability was designed by genetic algorithm. The anisotropic nature of unidirectional fiber composites was considered in the design by characterizing tensor permittivity. This special composite is composed of two kinds of SiC fibers that separately exhibit relatively high conductivity and low conductivity. The electromagnetic loss mechanism of this composite was examined for polarizations that differ in the electric field of the incident wave, applied either in the direction of the fiber or in the transverse direction, perpendicular to the fibers. For both polarizations, the absorption band of our composite can reach 6 GHz and the lowest microwave reflectivity was about -20 dB over a range of 8-18 GHz. When the electric field is polarized parallel to fibers, strong coupling among the high-conductivity fibers can induce a strong current and thus efficiently dissipate the electromagnetic energy. When the electric field is polarized perpendicular to fibers, the electromagnetic loss mechanism in the composite resembles the electric energy loss in capacitors and currents in the transverse direction are obstructed by the fibers resulting in attenuation of the electromagnetic energy in the matrix.

  19. Highly ordered monolayer/bilayer TiO2 hollow sphere films with widely tunable visible-light reflection and absorption bands.

    PubMed

    Li, Jie; Qin, Yao; Jin, Chao; Li, Ying; Shi, Donglu; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; Gan, Lihua; Yang, Jinhu

    2013-06-07

    Monolayer and bilayer TiO2 hollow hemisphere/sphere (THH/THS) films consisting of highly ordered hexagonal-patterned THHs/THSs with thin shells of ~10 nm and different diameters of ~170 and ~470 nm have been prepared by templating of two-dimensional polystyrene sphere (PS) assembly films coupled with TiO2 sputtering/wet coating approaches. Owing to their precisely adjustable structural parameters, such as THH/THS shape and diameter as well as film layer thickness, the prepared THH/THS films exhibit widely tunable visible-light reflection and absorption bands, i.e. from 380 to 850 nm for reflection and 390 to 520 nm for absorption, respectively. The mechanism of the novel optical behaviors of the THH/THS films has been discussed in depth, combined with some calculations according to Bragg's law. In addition, photocatalytic experiments of RhB degradation employing the THH/THS films as recyclable catalysts have been conducted. The THH/THS films with controlled structures and precisely tunable optical properties are attractive for a wide range of applications, such as recyclable catalysts for photocatalysis, efficient oxide electrodes or scattering layers for solar cells, gas-permeable electrode materials for high-performance sensors and so on.

  20. Iron-absorption band analysis for the discrimination of iron-rich zones. [infrared spectral reflectance of Nevada iron deposits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowan, L. C. (Principal Investigator)

    1974-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Most major rock units and unaltered and altered areas in the study area can be discriminated on the basis of visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity differences recorded from satellite altitude. These subtle spectral differences are detectable by digital ratioing of the MSS bands and subsequent stretching to increase the contrast to enhance spectral differences. Hydrothermally altered areas appear as anomalous color patches within the volcanic-rock areas. A map has been prepared which can be regarded as an excellent reconnaissance exploration map, for use in targeting areas for more detailed geological, geochemical, and geophysical studies. Mafic and felsic rock types are easily discriminated on the color stretched-ratio composite. The ratioing process minimizes albedo effects, leaving only the recorded characteristic spectral response. The spectra of unaltered rocks appear different from those of altered rocks, which are typically dominated by limonite and clay minerals. It seems clear that differences in spectral shape can provide a basis for discrimination of geologic material, although the relations between visible and near-infrared spectral reflectivity and mineralogical composition are not yet entirely understood.

  1. Electromagnetic properties and microwave absorption properties of BaTiO 3-carbonyl iron composite in S and C bands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rui-gang, Yang

    2011-07-01

    BaTiO3 powders are prepared by sol-gel method. The carbonyl iron powder is prepared via thermal decomposition of iron pentacarbonyl. Then BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite with different mixture ratios was prepared using the as-prepared material. The structure, morphology, and properties of the composites are characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and a network analyzer. The complex permittivity and reflection loss of the composites have been measured at different microwave frequencies in S- and C-bands employing vector network analyzer model PNA 3629D vector. The effect of the mass ratio of BaTiO3/carbonyl iron on the microwave loss properties of the composites is investigated. A possible microwave absorbing mechanism of BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite has been proposed. The BaTiO3-carbonyl iron composite can find applications in suppression of electromagnetic interference, and reduction of radar signature.

  2. Strain and temperature dependent absorption spectra studies for identifying the phase structure and band gap of EuTiO3 perovskite films.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Kai; Zhao, Run; Zhang, Peng; Deng, Qinglin; Zhang, Jinzhong; Li, Wenwu; Hu, Zhigao; Yang, Hao; Chu, Junhao

    2015-12-21

    Post-annealing has been approved to effectively relax the out-of-plane strain in thin films. Epitaxial EuTiO3 (ETO) thin films, with and without strain, have been fabricated on (001) LaAlO3 substrates by pulsed laser deposition. The absorption and electronic transitions of the ETO thin films are investigated by means of temperature dependent transmittance spectra. The antiferrodistortive phase transition can be found at about 260-280 K. The first-principles calculations indicate there are two interband electronic transitions in ETO films. Remarkably, the direct optical band gap and higher interband transition for ETO films show variation in trends with different strains and temperatures. The strain leads to a band gap shrinkage of about 240 meV while the higher interband transition an expansion of about 140 meV. The hardening of the interband transition energies in ETO films with increasing temperature can be attributed to the Fröhlich electron-phonon interaction. The behavior can be linked to the strain and low temperature modified valence electronic structure, which is associated with rotations of the TiO6 octahedra.

  3. Observation of a Rotational Band in the Odd-Z Transfermium Nucleus {sub 101}{sup 251}Md

    SciTech Connect

    Chatillon, A.; Theisen, Ch.; Bouchez, E.; Clement, E.; Goergen, A.; Huerstel, A.; Korten, W.; Le Coz, Y.; Wilson, J. N.; Dorvaux, O.; Gall, B. J. P.; Khalfallah, F.; Rousseau, M.; Eeckhaudt, S.; Grahn, T.; Greenlees, P. T.; Jones, P.

    2007-03-30

    A rotational band has been unambiguously observed in an odd-proton transfermium nucleus for the first time. An in-beam {gamma}-ray spectroscopic study of {sub 101}{sup 251}Md has been performed using the {gamma}-ray array JUROGAM combined with the gas-filled separator RITU and the focal plane device GREAT. The experimental results, compared to Hartree-Fock-Bogolyubov calculations, lead to the interpretation that the rotational band is built on the [521]1/2{sup -} Nilsson state.

  4. L band brightness temperature observations over a corn canopy during the entire growth cycle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (T¬B) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characte...

  5. Case Studies for UV, O2-A Band and Polarimetric Airborne Remote Sensing Observations of Coastal Waters: Implications for Atmospheric Correction.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhary, J.; van Diedenhoven, B.; Knobelspiesse, K. D.; Cairns, B.; Wasilewski, A. P.; Mccubbin, I. B.

    2014-12-01

    A major challenge for spaceborne observations of ocean color is to correct for atmospheric scattering, which typically contributes ≥85% to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiance and varies substantially with aerosols. Ocean color missions traditionally analyze TOA radiance in the near-infrared (NIR), where the ocean is black, to constrain the TOA atmospheric scattering in the visible (VIS). However, this procedure is limited by insufficient sensitivity of NIR radiance to absorption and vertical distribution of aerosols, and by uncertainties in the extrapolation of aerosol properties from the NIR to the VIS. To improve atmospheric correction for ocean color observations, one needs to change the traditional procedure for this correction and/or increase the aerosol information. The instruments proposed for the Pre-Aerosol, Clouds, and ocean Ecosystem (PACE) mission include ultraviolet and Oxygen A-band observations, as well as multispectral and multiangle polarimetry, to increase the aerosol information content. However no studies have been performed on whether such observations contain sufficient aerosol information, and on how to use this information, to substantially improve atmospheric correction. To study the atmospheric correction capabilities of PACE-like instruments, we are conducting field experiments off the Coast of California to obtain high-altitude airborne and in-situ observations of water-leaving radiance. The airborne data sets consist of hyperspectral radiance between 380-2500 nm by the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer, and narrow-band multiangle polarimetric data between 410-2250 nm by the Research Scanning Polarimeter. We discuss the quality of and comparisons between these data sets, and their differential sensitivities to variations in aerosol properties and ocean color.

  6. Observations of Multi-band Structures in Double Star TC-1 PEACE Electron and HIA Ion Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohan Narasimhan, K.; Fazakerley, A. N.; Grimald, S.; Dandouras, I. S.; Mihaljcic, B.; Kistler, L. M.; Owen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Several authors have reported inner magnetosphere observations of proton distributions confined to narrow energy bands in the range 1 - 25 keV (Smith and Hoffman (1974), etc). These structures have been described as "nose structures", with reference to their appearance in energy-time spectrograms and are also known as "bands" if they occur for extended periods of time. Multi-nose structures have been observed if 2 or more noses appear at the same time (Vallat et al., 2007). Gaps between "noses" (or "bands") have been explained in terms of the competing corotation, convection and magnetic gradient drifts. Charge exchange losses in slow drift paths for steady state scenarios and the role of substorm injections have also been considered (Li et al., 2000; Ebihara et al., 2004). We analyse observations of electron and ion multi-band structures frequently seen in Double-Star TC1 PEACE and HIA data. We present results from statistical surveys conducted using data from the duration of the mission. Furthermore, using a combination of both statistics and simulations, we test previous theories as to possible formation mechanisms and explore other possible explanations.

  7. Whistler Anisotropy Instabilities as the Source of Banded Chorus: Van Allen Probes Observations and Particle-in-Cell Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gary, S. Peter; Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Min, Kyungguk; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-01

    Magnetospheric banded chorus events are enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr <Ωe where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ~=Ωe / 2 . Here two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from HOPE instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. Observations show a three-component electron model consisting of a dense, cold (a few tens of eV) population, a less dense, warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a still less dense, hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. Simulations show that the warm component drives quasi-electrostatic upper-band chorus, and the hot component drives electromagnetic lower-band chorus; the gap near Ωe / 2 follows from growth of the two distinct instabilities.

  8. Voyager 1 imaging and IRIS observations of Jovian methane absorption and thermal emission: Implications for cloud structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Kupferman, P. N.; Hart, H.

    1984-01-01

    Images from three filters of the Voyager 1 wide angle camera are used to measure the continuum reflectivity and spectral gradient near 6000 A and the 6190 A band methane/continuum ratio for a variety of cloud features in Jupiter's atmosphere. The dark barge features in the North Equatorial Belt have anomalously strong positive continuum spectral gradients suggesting unique composition. Methane absorption is shown at unprecedented spatial scales for the Great Red Spot and its immediate environment, for a dark barge feature in the North Equatorial Belt, and for two hot spot and plume regions in the North Equatorial Belt. Methane absorption and five micrometer emission are correlated in the vicinity of the Great Red Spot but are anticorrelated in one of the plume hot spot regions. Methane absorption and simultaneous maps of five micrometer brightness temperature is quantitatively compared to realistic cloud structure models which include multiple scattering at five micrometer as well as in the visible. Variability in H2 quadrupole lines are also investigated.

  9. Voyager 1 imaging and IRIS observations of Jovian methane absorption and thermal emission - Implications for cloud structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, R. A.; Kupferman, P. N.; Hart, H.

    1985-01-01

    Images from three filters of the Voyager 1 wide angle camera are used to measure the continuum reflectivity and spectral gradient near 6000 A and the 6190 A band methane/continuum ratio for a variety of cloud features in Jupiter's atmosphere. The dark barge features in the North Equatorial Belt have anomalously strong positive continuum spectral gradients suggesting unique composition. Methane absorption is shown at unprecedented spatial scales for the Great Red Spot and its immediate environment, for a dark barge feature in the North Equatorial Belt, and for two hot spot and plume regions in the North Equatorial Belt. Methane absorption and five micrometer emission are correlated in the vicinity of the Great Red Spot but are anticorrelated in one of the plume hot spot regions. Methane absorption and simultaneous maps of five micrometer brightness temperature are quantitatively compared to realistic cloud structure models which include multiple scattering at five micrometer as well as in the visible. Variability in H2 quadrupole lines are also investigated.

  10. Femtosecond time-domain observation of atmospheric absorption in the near-infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. J.; Monchocé, Sylvain; Zhang, Chunmei; Brown, Graham G.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    As light propagates through a medium, absorption caused by electronic or rovibrational transitions is evident in the transmitted spectrum. The incident electromagnetic field polarizes the medium and the absorption is due to the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility. In the time domain, the field establishes a coherence in the medium that radiates out of phase with the initial field. This coherence can persist for tens of picoseconds in atmospheric molecules such as H2O . We propagate a few-cycle laser pulse centered at 1.8 μ m through the atmosphere and measure the long-lasting molecular coherence in the time domain by high-order harmonic cross correlation. The measured optical free-induction decay of the pulse is compared with a calculation based on the calculated rovibrational spectrum of H2O absorption.

  11. Observation of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Shiyong; Fang, Yun; Xie, Donghua; Feng, Wei; Wen, Chenhaoping; Song, Qi; Chen, Qiuyun; Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Yun; Luo, Liuzhu; Xie, Binping; Lai, Xinchun; Feng, Donglai; Feng Group Team; Lai Group Team

    The search for novel materials with Dirac cone band dispersion is one of the most challenging and important works for both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here, we studied the electronic structure of FeSe thin films grown on SrTiO3 substrates by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We reveal the existence of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films thicker than 1 Unit Cell below the nematic transition temperature, whose apexes are located -10 meV below Fermi energy. The evolution of electronic structures for FeSe thin films as function of temperature, thickness and cobalt doping are systematically studied. The Dirac cones are found to be coexisted with the nematicity in FeSe, disappear when nematicity is suppressed. Our results provide useful guidelines for understanding the novel electronic structure, nematicity and superconductivity in FeSe system..

  12. Observation of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films by photoemission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, S. Y.; Fang, Y.; Xie, D. H.; Feng, W.; Wen, C. H. P.; Song, Q.; Chen, Q. Y.; Zhang, W.; Zhang, Y.; Luo, L. Z.; Xie, B. P.; Lai, X. C.; Feng, D. L.

    2016-03-01

    The search for novel materials with Dirac cone band dispersion is one of the most challenging and important works for both fundamental physics and technological applications. Here, we studied the electronic structure of FeSe thin films grown on SrTi O3 substrates by angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES). We revealed the existence of Dirac cone band dispersions in FeSe thin films thicker than 1 unit cell below the nematic transition temperature, whose apexes are located -10 meV below Fermi energy. The evolution of electronic structures for FeSe thin films as a function of temperature, thickness, and cobalt doping were systematically studied. The Dirac cones coexist with the nematicity in FeSe and disappear when nematicity is suppressed. Our results provide useful guidelines for understanding the novel electronic structure, nematicity, and superconductivity in the FeSe system.

  13. 3-D-Observation of Matrix of MIL 090657 Meteorite by Absorption-Phase Tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyama, Sugimoto; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Matsuno, Junya; Miyake, Akira; Nakano, Tsukasa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Takeuchi, Akihisa; Takigawa, Aki; Takayama, Akiko; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko; Burton, Aaron S.; Messenger, Scott

    2017-01-01

    MIL 090657 meteorite (CR2.7) is one of the least altered primitive carbonaceous c hondrites [1]. This meteorite has amorphous silicates like GEMS (glass with embedded metal and sulfide), which are characteristically contained in cometary dust, in matrix [2,3] as with the Paris meteorite [4]. Three lithologies have been recognized; lithology-1 (L 1) dominated by submicron anhydrous silicates, lithology-2 (L2) by GEMS-like amorphous silicates and lithology-3 (L3) by phyllosilicates [2]. Organic materials are abundant in L 1 and L2 [2,3]. L 1 and L2 were further divided into sub-lithology respectively based on their textures and compositions [5]. These studies were performed by 2D SEM and TEM observations of sample surfaces and thin sections that are unable to reveal what constitute each lithology and how these lithologies are distributed and related to each other. This information will provide important insights into alteration and aggregation processes on asteroids and in the early solar nebula. In this study, MIL 090657 matrix was examined in 3D using two types of X-ray tomography; DET (dual-energy tomography) [6] and SIXM (scanning-imaging X-ray microscopy) [7]. Mineral phases can be discriminated based on absorption contrasts at two different X-ray energies in DET. In SIXM, materials composed of light elements such as water or organic materials can be identified based on phase and absorption contrasts. By combining these methods, we can discriminate not only organic materials from voids but also hydrous alteration products, such as hydrated silicates and carbonates, from anhydrous minerals [8]. In this study, we first observed cross sections of MIL 090657 matrix fragments C1 00 mm) in detail using FE-SEM/ EDS. Based on the results, three house-shaped samples (3 0 -50 mm) were extracted from L 1, L2 and their boundary (H1, H3 and H5, respectively) using FIB. 3D imaging of these samples were conducted at BL47XU of SPring-8, a synchrotron radiation facility, with

  14. Laser remote sensing of atmospheric temperature by observing resonant absorption of oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalshoven, J. E., Jr.; Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.

    1981-01-01

    A dual-frequency system is used to demonstrate the measurement of atmospheric temperature, through laser energy absorption monitoring at the center of an O2 resonant absorption line near 770 nm. It is shown that the average temperature of a 1 km path can be determined within 1.0 C, with a noise level of 0.3 C. An iterative algebraic expression for this method was developed, and is shown to be applicable in the troposphere; the effects of pressure and humidity on temperature determination were made clear by the algorithm and found to be small near the earth's surface.

  15. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, K. L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; Postigo, A. De Ugarte; Holland, S. T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P. T.; Osborne, J. P.; Prochaska, J. X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E. S.; Starling, R. L. C.; Tanvir, N. R.; van der Horst, A. J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F. J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A. P.; Briggs, M. S.; Burrows, D. N.; Castro-Tirado, A. J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P. A.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A. W.; Kennea, J. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I. A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-11-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in the radio by the Very Large Array. The redshift of z = 3.355 +/- 0.005 was determined by Keck/High Resolution Echelle Spectrometer (HIRES) and confirmed by RTT150 and NOT. The prompt gamma/X-ray emission, detected over 0.3-103 keV, systematically softens over time, with Epeak moving from ~600 keV at the start to ~40 keV around 100s after the trigger; alternatively, this spectral evolution could be identified with the blackbody temperature of a quasi-thermal model shifting from ~60 to ~3keV over the same time interval. The first optical detection was made at 38s, but the smooth, featureless profile of the full optical coverage implies that this is originated from the afterglow component, not from the pulsed/flaring prompt emission. Broad-band optical and X-ray coverage of the afterglow at the start of the final X-ray decay (~8ks) reveals a spectral break between the optical and X-ray bands in the range of 1015-2 × 1016Hz. The decay profiles of the X-ray and optical bands show that this break initially migrates blueward to this frequency and then subsequently drifts redward to below the optical band by ~3 × 105s. GRB 080810 was very energetic, with an isotropic energy output for the prompt component of 3 × 1053 and 1.6 × 1052 erg for the afterglow; there is no evidence for a jet break in the afterglow up to 6d following the burst. This paper is dedicated to the memory of Professor Martin Turner, who sadly passed away during its writing. Martin was an influential figure in X-ray Astronomy and an excellent PhD supervisor. He will be greatly missed. E-mail: kpa@star.le.ac.uk ‡ NASA postdoctoral program fellow.

  16. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  17. Sequential electronic and structural transitions in VO2 observed using X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Suhas; Strachan, John Paul; Pickett, Matthew D; Bratkovsky, Alexander; Nishi, Yoshio; Williams, R Stanley

    2014-11-26

    The popular dual electronic and structural transitions in VO2 are explored using X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy with high spatial and spectral resolutions. It is found that during both heating and cooling, the electronic transition always precedes the structural Peierls transition. Between the two transitions, there are intermediate states that are spectrally isolated here.

  18. FURTHER EXPERIMENTS ON THE ABSORPTION OF IONS BY PLANTS, INCLUDING OBSERVATIONS ON THE EFFECT OF LIGHT

    PubMed Central

    Hoagland, D. R.; Davis, A. R.

    1923-01-01

    1. The conditions of illumination were found to exert a very significant influence on absorption of ions from dilute solution by Nitella. These conditions were also found to influence the penetration of Br and NO3 into the cell sap. 2. It is concluded that absorption of ions by plants from dilute solutions involves energy exchanges, with light as the ultimate source of the energy. It is suggested that the absorption is intimately related to growth and metabolism. 3. One ion may affect the removal from solution or penetration into the cell sap of another ion present in the same solution, even in solutions of extremely low concentration. It is probable that all three types of relations may exist—anion to anion, cation to cation, and anion to cation. 4. The sulfate and phosphate ions exerted far less influence on the absorption of nitrate than did chlorine and bromine ions. It is suggested as a possibility that sulfate does not penetrate readily to those surfaces at which chlorine, bromine, nitrate, and other ions may become effective. PMID:19872049

  19. Suzaku and XMM-Newton observations of the North Polar Spur: Charge exchange or ISM absorption?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Liyi; Mao, Junjie; Costantini, Elisa; Kaastra, Jelle

    2016-10-01

    By revisiting the Suzaku and XMM-Newton data of the North Polar Spur, we discovered that the spectra are inconsistent with the traditional model consisting of pure thermal emission and neutral absorption. The most prominent discrepancies are the enhanced O vii and Ne ix forbidden-to-resonance ratios, and a high O viii Lyβ line relative to other Lyman series. A collisionally ionized absorption model can naturally explain both features, while a charge exchange component can only account for the former. By including the additional ionized absorption, the plasma in the North Polar Spur can be described by a single-phase collisional ionization equilibrium (CIE) component with a temperature of 0.25 keV, and nitrogen, oxygen, neon, magnesium, and iron abundances of 0.4-0.8 solar. The abundance pattern of the North Polar Spur is well in line with those of the Galactic halo stars. The high nitrogen-to-oxygen ratio reported in previous studies can be migrated to the large transmission of the O viii Lyα line. The ionized absorber is characterized by a balance temperature of 0.17-0.20 keV and a column density of 3-5 × 1019 cm-2. Based on the derived abundances and absorption, we speculate that the North Polar Spur is a structure in the Galactic halo, so that the emission is mostly absorbed by the Galactic interstellar medium in the line of sight.

  20. A search for formic acid in the upper troposphere - A tentative identification of the 1105-per cm nu-6 band Q branch in high-resolution balloon-borne solar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.; Rinsland, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Infrared solar absorption spectra recorded at 0.02-per cm resolution during a balloon flight from Alamogordo, NM (33 deg N), on March 23, 1981, have been analyzed for the possible presence of absorption by formic acid (HCOOH). An absorption feature at 1105 per cm has been tentatively identified in upper tropospheric spectra as due to the nu-6 band Q branch. A preliminary analysis indicates a concentration of about 0.6 ppbv and 0.4 ppbv near 8 and 10 km, respectively.

  1. K'-band observations of the evil eye galaxy: Are the optical and near-infrared dust albedos identical?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witt, Adolf N.; Lindell, Rebecca S.; Block, David L.; Evans, Rhodri

    1994-01-01

    New measurements of the reduction of the V-band surface brightness across the prominent dust feature in the galaxy NGC 4826 are compared with corresponding increases in the V-K' color within the context of radiative transfer models invoking both absorption and scattering. The K'-band surface brightness is found to be higher than expected from standard dust models. We interpret the difference as resulting from a high effective dust albedo at K', with a likely value in excess of 0.8, provided the near-IR extinction curve in NGC 4826 is identical to the Galactic one. The high effective albedo may result from scattering by dust with a maximum grain size at least twice as large as assumed by standard models, a conclusion already indirectly hinted at by recent studies of dust star-forming regions and reflection nebulae. At least part of the high effective albedo at K' may result from near-IR nonequilibrium continuum emission attributable to very small grains.

  2. Some features observed by the L-band push broom microwave radiometer over the Konza Prairie during 1985-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. R.

    1995-12-01

    Airborne L-band radiometric measurements were conducted over the Konza Prairie near Manhattan, Kansas, in the summers of 1985, 1987, 1988, and 1989 to study the relationship among surface microwave emission, soil moisture, and vegetation cover. The annual surface treatments that were applied to the watersheds in the experimental area appeared to show a significant impact on the surface microwave emission. A watershed that was burned every year showed a better sensitivity to soil moisture variation than those burned less frequently. This feature persisted even though the radiometric measurements were made over those watersheds that were burned in the same year. It was concluded that the burning process might not completely remove a thatch layer of efficient microwave absorption, which was developed through years of accumulation of senescent vegetation. Results from the analysis of these radiometric data sets also suggest the need of an adequate estimation of vegetation biomass in order to obtain a reliable retrieval of surface soil moisture from L-band radiometric measurements. On the basis of the data acquired from the 1987 and 1989 field campaigns, the push broom microwave radiometer (PBMR) measurements are likely to give errors of the order of ±0.065 g/cm3 in surface soil moisture estimation if there are no measurements of vegetation biomass. Measurements of vegetation biomass to an accuracy of ±0.46 kg/m2 improve the corresponding PBMR estimation of surface soil moisture to an accuracy of ±0.032 g/cm3.

  3. High-dispersion spectroscopic observations of Venus during 1968 and 1969 II. The carbon-dioxide band at 8689A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schorn, R. A. J.; Woszczyk, A.; Young, L. D. G.

    1974-01-01

    Thirty well-exposed photographic plates showing the spectrum of the carbon dioxide band at 8689A in the atmosphere of Venus were obtained during 1968 and 1969. All spectra were obtained at a dispersion of 2 A/mm for Venus phase angles varying from 10 deg. to 126 deg. Rotational temperatures ranging from 236 K to 274 K were found. The average value of the rotational temperature is 246 + or - 1 K (one standard deviation); for 1967 observations, the rotational temperatures ranged from 222 to 248 K, with an average value of 238 + or - 4 K. The variation of the equivalent width of the 8689A band, with Venus phase angle, was very similar for the two sets of observations (53 plates). The temporal variations, of approximately 30 percent, were comparable with the phase variations over this limited range of phase angle.

  4. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; Funsten, Herbert O.; Gary, S. Peter; Hospodarsky, George B.; Kletzing, Craig; Kurth, William; Larsen, Brian A.; Liu, Kaijun; MacDonald, Elizabeth A.; Reeves, Geoffrey D.; Skoug, Ruth M.; Winske, Dan

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a banded chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.

  5. Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap

    SciTech Connect

    Doiron, Serge; Hache, Alain; Winful, Herbert G.

    2007-08-15

    We present space-time-resolved measurements of electromagnetic pulses tunneling through a coaxial electromagnetic band gap structure. The results show that during the tunneling process the field distribution inside the barrier is an exponentially decaying standing wave whose amplitude increases and decreases as it slowly follows the temporal evolution of the input pulse. At no time is a pulse maximum found inside the barrier, and hence the transmitted peak is not the incident peak that has propagated to the exit. The results support the quasistatic interpretation of tunneling dynamics and confirm that the group delay is not the traversal time of the input pulse peak.

  6. Resonance Raman intensity analysis of the excited state proton transfer dynamics of 2-nitrophenol in the charge-transfer band absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Yaqiong; Wang Huigang; Zhang Shuqiang; Pei Kemei; Zheng Xuming; Lee Phillips, David

    2006-12-07

    Resonance Raman spectra were obtained for 2-nitrophenol in cyclohexane solution with excitation wavelengths in resonance with the charge-transfer (CT) proton transfer band absorption. These spectra indicate that the Franck-Condon region photodissociation dynamics have multidimensional character with motion along more than 15 normal modes: the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 12} (1326 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend {nu}{sub 23} (564 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CO stretch+NO stretch+CC stretch {nu}{sub 14} (1250 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch+COH bend {nu}{sub 15} (1190 cm{sup -1}); the nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 17} (1134 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 22} (669 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCN bend {nu}{sub 27} (290 cm{sup -1}), the nominal NO{sub 2} bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 21} (820 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCO bend+CNO bend {nu}{sub 25} (428 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CC stretch {nu}{sub 7} (1590 cm{sup -1}), the nominal NO stretch {nu}{sub 8} (1538 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CCC bend+NO{sub 2} bend {nu}{sub 20} (870 cm{sup -1}), the nominal CC stretch {nu}{sub 6} (1617 cm{sup -1}), the nominal COH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 11} (1382 cm{sup -1}), nominal CCH bend+CC stretch {nu}{sub 9} (1472 cm{sup -1}). A preliminary resonance Raman intensity analysis was done and the results for 2-nitrophenol were compared to previously reported results for nitrobenzene, p-nitroaniline, and 2-hydroxyacetophenone. The authors briefly discuss the differences and similarities in the CT-band absorption excitation of 2-nitrophenol relative to those of nitrobenzene, p-nitroaniline, and 2-hydroxyacetophenone.

  7. Evidencing the transition from Mode I cracking to dilation banding: Results from physical experiments with fractographic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, S.; Chemenda, A.; Petit, J.; Ambre, J.; Geo-Fracnet-Géoazur

    2010-12-01

    The mechanism of quasi-brittle fracture/rupture remains one of the central problems in different domains of material science/mechanics including geomechanics. There are basically two approaches to this problem. One is the fracture mechanics dealing with stability conditions of cracks characterized by a strong stress concentration at the tips causing crack propagation. The other approach is the formation of deformation localization bands as constitutive instabilities, whose onset in quasi-brittle rocks can be considered as corresponding to the inception of rupture. We investigate the conditions of applicability of these end-member approaches and show a continuous transition from one to another with an increase in the confining pressure P in the experimental extension tests on a synthetic physical rock analogue (granular, frictional, cohesive and dilatant) material GRAM1. Discontinuities/fractures perpendicular to the least (axial) stress σ3 were generated in GRAM1 samples. These fractures form dynamically and are of two types defined by the mean stress σ or P. When σ is very small, the fractures form through mode I cracking with σ3 equal to the material tensile strength. The fracture walls have smooth surfaces in this case. Increase in σ causes increase in σ3 at fracturing, which becomes less negative and reaches small positive (compression) values, while the failure still occurs along a discontinuity perpendicular to σ3. Thus, the discontinuities generated starting from a certain σ value cannot be mode I fractures. Increase in σ also results in changes in the relief of the surfaces of discontinuities after their postmortem opening (separation of the walls): the surfaces become rougher, with the topography features forming faint/delicate plumose patterns very similar to those on the geological joint walls. SEM observations of the unopened discontinuities show that they represent several grain sizes-thick bands of a material which underwent a heterogeneous

  8. Observation of spontaneous spin-splitting in the band structure of an n-type zinc-blende ferromagnetic semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anh, Le Duc; Hai, Pham Nam; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-12-01

    Large spin-splitting in the conduction band and valence band of ferromagnetic semiconductors, predicted by the influential mean-field Zener model and assumed in many spintronic device proposals, has never been observed in the mainstream p-type Mn-doped ferromagnetic semiconductors. Here, using tunnelling spectroscopy in Esaki-diode structures, we report the observation of such a large spontaneous spin-splitting energy (31.7-50 meV) in the conduction band bottom of n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As, which is surprising considering the very weak s-d exchange interaction reported in several zinc-blende type semiconductors. The mean-field Zener model also fails to explain consistently the ferromagnetism and the spin-splitting energy of (In,Fe)As, because we found that the Curie temperature values calculated using the observed spin-splitting energies are much lower than the experimental ones by a factor of 400. These results urge the need for a more sophisticated theory of ferromagnetic semiconductors.

  9. Observation of spontaneous spin-splitting in the band structure of an n-type zinc-blende ferromagnetic semiconductor

    PubMed Central

    Anh, Le Duc; Hai, Pham Nam; Tanaka, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Large spin-splitting in the conduction band and valence band of ferromagnetic semiconductors, predicted by the influential mean-field Zener model and assumed in many spintronic device proposals, has never been observed in the mainstream p-type Mn-doped ferromagnetic semiconductors. Here, using tunnelling spectroscopy in Esaki-diode structures, we report the observation of such a large spontaneous spin-splitting energy (31.7–50 meV) in the conduction band bottom of n-type ferromagnetic semiconductor (In,Fe)As, which is surprising considering the very weak s-d exchange interaction reported in several zinc-blende type semiconductors. The mean-field Zener model also fails to explain consistently the ferromagnetism and the spin-splitting energy of (In,Fe)As, because we found that the Curie temperature values calculated using the observed spin-splitting energies are much lower than the experimental ones by a factor of 400. These results urge the need for a more sophisticated theory of ferromagnetic semiconductors. PMID:27991502

  10. CAROLS: A New Airborne L-Band Radiometer for Ocean Surface and Land Observations

    PubMed Central

    Zribi, Mehrez; Pardé, Mickael; Boutin, Jacquline; Fanise, Pascal; Hauser, Daniele; Dechambre, Monique; Kerr, Yann; Leduc-Leballeur, Marion; Reverdin, Gilles; Skou, Niels; Søbjærg, Sten; Albergel, Clement; Calvet, Jean Christophe; Wigneron, Jean Pierre; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Rius, Antonio; Tenerelli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    The “Cooperative Airborne Radiometer for Ocean and Land Studies” (CAROLS) L-Band radiometer was designed and built as a copy of the EMIRAD II radiometer constructed by the Technical University of Denmark team. It is a fully polarimetric and direct sampling correlation radiometer. It is installed on board a dedicated French ATR42 research aircraft, in conjunction with other airborne instruments (C-Band scatterometer—STORM, the GOLD-RTR GPS system, the infrared CIMEL radiometer and a visible wavelength camera). Following initial laboratory qualifications, three airborne campaigns involving 21 flights were carried out over South West France, the Valencia site and the Bay of Biscay (Atlantic Ocean) in 2007, 2008 and 2009, in coordination with in situ field campaigns. In order to validate the CAROLS data, various aircraft flight patterns and maneuvers were implemented, including straight horizontal flights, circular flights, wing and nose wags over the ocean. Analysis of the first two campaigns in 2007 and 2008 leads us to improve the CAROLS radiometer regarding isolation between channels and filter bandwidth. After implementation of these improvements, results show that the instrument is conforming to specification and is a useful tool for Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite validation as well as for specific studies on surface soil moisture or ocean salinity. PMID:22346599

  11. Lidar and radar measurements of the melting layer: observations of dark and bright band phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Girolamo, P.; Summa, D.; Cacciani, M.; Norton, E. G.; Peters, G.; Dufournet, Y.

    2012-05-01

    Multi-wavelength lidar measurements in the melting layer revealing the presence of dark and bright bands have been performed by the University of BASILicata Raman lidar system (BASIL) during a stratiform rain event. Simultaneously radar measurements have been also performed from the same site by the University of Hamburg cloud radar MIRA 36 (35.5 GHz), the University of Hamburg dual-polarization micro rain radar (24.15 GHz) and the University of Manchester UHF wind profiler (1.29 GHz). Measurements from BASIL and the radars are illustrated and discussed in this paper for a specific case study on 23 July 2007 during the Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study (COPS). Simulations of the lidar dark and bright band based on the application of concentric/eccentric sphere Lorentz-Mie codes and a melting layer model are also provided. Lidar and radar measurements and model results are also compared with measurements from a disdrometer on ground and a two-dimensional cloud (2DC) probe on-board the ATR42 SAFIRE. Measurements and model results are found to confirm and support the conceptual microphysical/scattering model elaborated by Sassen et al. (2005).

  12. Structure of positive parity bands and observation of magnetic rotation in 108Ag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sethi, Jasmine; Palit, R.

    2015-10-01

    The interplay of nuclear forces among the neutron particles (holes) and proton holes (particles) in the odd-odd nuclei gives rise to a variety of shapes and hence novel modes of excitations. The odd-odd nuclei in the A ~ 110 region have proton holes in the g9/2 orbital and the neutron particles in the h11/2 orbitals. A systematic study of shears mechanism in A ~ 110 region indicates the presence of magnetic rotation (MR) phenomenon in Ag and In isotopes. Therefore, the structure of doubly odd 108Ag nucleus was probed in two different reactions, i.e, 100Mo(11B, 4n)108Ag at 39 MeV and 94Zr(18O, p3n)108Ag at 72 MeV beam energies. The emitted γ-rays were detected using the Indian National Gamma Array (INGA) at TIFR, Mumbai. A significant number of new transitions and energy levels were identified. Lifetime measurements, using the Doppler shift attenuation method, have been carried out for a positive parity dipole band. Tilted Axis Cranking (TAC) calculations have been performed for two positive parity dipole bands.

  13. Vertical Air Motion Estimates from W-band Radar Doppler Spectra Observed during DYNAMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, C. R.; Gibson, J. S.; Fairall, C. W.

    2014-12-01

    During the DYNAMO field campaign, a vertically pointing NOAA W-band (94 GHz) radar was mounted on the R/V Revelle to sample a wide range of clouds from shallow warm clouds to high cirrus clouds. The Doppler velocity spectra often contained multiple peak structures. In warm clouds, multiple peaks were due to cloud droplets and drizzle droplets in the same radar pulse volume. And in rainfall beneath well-defined reflectivity dim-bands near the melting layer, the multiple peaks were due to Mie scattering signatures from raindrops larger than 1.6 mm. This presentation will describe a method of identifying multiple peaks in Doppler spectra and then determining if the multiple peaks were due to cloud and drizzle droplets or due to large raindrops exciting a Mie scattering signature. In both cases, the multiple peak structure provides a signature to estimate vertical air motion. For spectra containing cloud droplets, the symmetric peak is a tracer used to estimate the air motion. For spectra with asymmetric shapes and large downward Doppler velocities, the Mie scattering notch is used to estimate the air motion. Examples of the retrieval procedure will be provided at the conference.

  14. Dual band 550/1200 GHz wideband spectrometer for planetary observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlecht, Erich T.; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Jarnot, Robert F.; Thomas, Bertrand; Raffanti, Rick; Lin, Robert

    2012-10-01

    NASA and ESA are planning missions to Jupiter and its moons. There is strong interest in a submillimeter/Terahertz spectroscopic heterodyne instrument covering the bands 520 to 600 GHz and 1100 to 1300 GHz. Therefore, we are developing a prototype instrument incorporating unique features not previously developed for planetary instrumentation. These include (1) extremely wide, rapid tunability. The Herschel/HIFI astronomical instrument, is also wideband, but far larger. It incorporates a 3.5 meter telescope on a spacecraft massing over three tons orbiting near Earth, versus our 20 kg Jupiter spectrometer. Hence, we have developed a wideband low-phase-noise synthesizer pumping two Schottky diode LO multiplier chains outputting 520 to 600 and 550 to 650 GHz. Also based on Schottky diodes are (b) 550 and 1200 GHz room temperature mixers. The high frequency mixer is subharmonically pumped; the lower balanced fundamental. To analyze the IF signals from the mixers, (c) ASIC based digital polyphase spectrometers consuming only a few Watts each are being incorporated into the instrument. Finally, since signals for both receivers come from one telescope, we include a new (d) compact dual band low-loss optical bench. It uses the fact that each receiver accepts one polarization, making a polarizing beam splitter sufficient to split the beam with minimal loss.

  15. Observations on germ band development in the cellar spider Pholcus phalangioides.

    PubMed

    Turetzek, Natascha; Prpic, Nikola-Michael

    2016-11-01

    Most recent studies of spider embryonic development have focused on representatives of the species-rich group of entelegyne spiders (over 80 % of all extant species). Embryogenesis in the smaller spider groups, however, is less well studied. Here, we describe the development of the germ band in the spider species Pholcus phalangioides, a representative of the haplogyne spiders that are phylogenetically the sister group of the entelegyne spiders. We show that the transition from radially symmetric embryonic anlage to the bilaterally symmetric germ band involves the accumulation of cells in the centre of the embryonic anlage (primary thickening). These cells then disperse all across the embryonic anlage. A secondary thickening of cells then appears in the centre of the embryonic anlage, and this thickening expands and forms the segment addition zone. We also confirm that the major part of the opisthosoma initially develops as a tube shaped structure, and its segments are then sequentially folded down on the yolk during inversion. This special mode of opisthosoma formation has not been reported for entelegyne spiders, but a more comprehensive sampling of this diverse group is necessary to decide whether this peculiarity is indeed lacking in the entelegyne spiders.

  16. Evaluating the potential use of a high-resolution X-band polarimetric radar observations in Urban Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostou, Marios N.; Kalogiros, John; Marzano, Frank S.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baldini, Luca; Nikolopoulos, EfThymios; Montopoli, Mario; Picciotti, Errico

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean area concentrates the major natural risks related to the water cycle, including heavy precipitation and flash-flooding during the fall season. Every year in central and south Europe we witness several fatal and economical disasters from severe storm rainfall triggering Flash Floods, and its impacts are increasing worldwide, but remain very difficult to manage. The spatial scale of flash flood occurrence is such that its vulnerability is often focused on dispersed urbanization, transportation and tourism infrastructures (De Marchi and Scolobig 2012). Urbanized and industrialized areas shows peculiar hydrodynamic and meteo-oceanographic features and they concentrate the highest rates of flash floods and fatal disasters. The main causes of disturbance being littoral urban development and harbor activities, the building of littoral rail- and highways, and the presence of several polluted discharges. All the above mentioned characteristics limit our ability to issue timely flood warnings. Precipitation estimates based on raingauge networks are usually associated with low coverage density, particularly at high altitudes. On the other hand, operational weather radar networks may provide valuable information of precipitation at these regimes but reliability of their estimates is often limited due to retrieval (e.g. variability in the reflectivity-to-rainfall relationship) and spatial extent constrains (e.g. blockage issues, overshooting effects). As a result, we currently lack accurate precipitation estimates over urban complex terrain areas, which essentially means that we lack accurate knowledge of the triggering factor for a number of hazards like flash floods and debris flows/landslides occurring in those areas. A potential solution to overcome sampling as well as retrieval uncertainty limitations of current observational networks might be the use of network of low-power dual-polarization X-band radars as complement to raingauges and gap-filling to

  17. Observationally determined Fe II oscillator strengths. [interstellar and quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Steenberg, M.; Shull, J. M.; Seab, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    Absorption oscillator strengths for 21 Fe II resonance lines, have been determined using a curve-of-growth analysis of interstellar data from the Copernicus and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellites. In addition to slight changes in strengths of the far-UV lines, new f-values are reported for wavelength 1608.45, a prominent line in interstellar and quasar absorption spectra, and for wavelength 2260.08, a weak, newly identified linen in IUE interstellar spectra. An upper limit on the strength of the undetected line at 2366.867 A (UV multiplet 2) is set. Using revised oscillator strengths, Fe II column densities toward 13 OB stars are derived. The interstellar depletions, (Fe/H), relative to solar values range between factors of 10 and 120.

  18. Matching High-z Observations of Damped Ly-α Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamer, Jacob; Maller, Ariyeh; Somerville, Rachel S.

    2016-01-01

    Damped Lyman Alpha Absorption systems, the highest column density quasar absorption systems, can place tight constraints on models of galaxy formation. While many current models can match the properties of these objects at z ~ 2-3, all current models severely underestimate their abundances at z~5. We study the ability of a semi-analytic model to match the line density of damped systems and find that serious changes to the model must be made. If gas disks give rise to these systems, then more baryons must be in HI than is currently assumed in the model, either because fewer stars are formed or less gas is ejected by supernova. In addition, the disks must be much larger than assumed in the model. Alternatively, gas outflows could account for much of the cross section, placing constraints on the physics of supernova feedback.

  19. Observation of Wakefield Generation in Left-Handed Band of Metamaterial-Loaded Waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, S.; Spentzouris, L.; Liu, W.; Gai, W.; Power, J. G.

    2009-01-22

    We report on a design of a TM-mode based metamaterial-loaded waveguide. Network analyzer measurements demonstrated a left-handed propagation region for the TM11 mode at around 10 GHz. A beamline experiment was performed with the metamaterial-loaded waveguide. In this experiment, a 6 MeV electron beam passes through the waveguide and generates a wakefield, via the Cherenkov radiation mechanism. We detected a signal in the left-handed frequency band at 10 GHz. This is an indirect demonstration of reverse Cherenkov radiation as discussed in several papers. Cherenkov radiation in artificially constructed materials (metamaterials, MTM) can provide unusual, engineered features that can be advantageous for particle detector design.

  20. Shear band foliation as an indicator of sense of shear: Field observations in central Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weijermars, Ruud; Rondeel, Harm E.

    1984-10-01

    The Macizo de Nevera, a Paleozoic basement inlier surrounded by essentially flat-lying Mesozoic cover rocks of central Spain, exhibits an extremely consistent system of steep, dextral strike-slip faults. Different faults have a variable amount of displacement, but their en echelon arrangement and similar sense of displacement imply a cogenetic origin. A maximum displacement of 1.0 km, corresponding to an averaged angular shear strain of 1.5 and peak values of 6.6, occurs along the central part of the 6-km-long Truchas ductile shear zone. An early axial-plane cleavage is locally deflected into the Truchas shear zone and superposed by coarse shear band foliation. The consistent angular relationship between the new foliation and the shear zone boundary confirms the megascopic sense of shear.

  1. Mixing state and spectral absorption of atmospheric aerosols observed at a marine background site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayetano, M. G.; Lee, K. Y.; Kim, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    Mineral dust and sea salt particles are portions of atmospheric aerosols in Korea due to the periodic transport of loess dust particles from Gobi and Taklimakan deserts in west China, as well as the sea salt enrichment of atmospheric particles from the seas surrounding the Korean peninsula [Kim et al., 2009; Sahu et al., 2009]. Carbonaceous particles and secondary inorganic aerosols (sulphates and nitrates) are ubiquitous due to the proliferating biomass burning [Ryu et al., 2004], as well as the increasing use of fossil fuels locally and by regional transport from neighbouring countries. Collectively, when these aerosols are transported, their compositions are further modified due to the aging process, impacting their physico-chemical properties including spectral absorption. In order to investigate the spectral response of the absorption under different ambient aerosol conditions, measurements have been conducted at a marine background site in Korea (Deokjeok Island. 37° 13' 33" N, 126° 8' 51" E) during the spring (13 days) and fall (8 days) seasons of 2009 using an aethalometer (Magee AE31), a nephelometer (Optec NGN2a) and other supporting instruments (PILS-IC, PM2.5 cyclone samplers for off-line OC/EC measurements). It has been found that spring aerosols were dominated by sulphate-rich and carbonaceous-rich fractions (21.4%±8.0% and 28.8%±7.9%, respectively), with an Angström exponent of absorption, αabs = 1.3±0.1 at 370-950 nm. The fall season aerosols were grouped based on their chemical composition as acidic aerosols, dust-enriched, and seasalt-enriched aerosols. Angström exponent of absorption, αabs for acidic aerosols was obtained to be 1.3±0.2 at 370-950 nm. However, dust enriched aerosols showed increased absorption in the short UV-Vis range (370-590 nm), which can be attributed to their mixing with light absorbing aerosols. Different types of aerosols exhibit different spectral absorption characteristics depending on their composition and

  2. Modeling of collision-induced infrared absorption spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band at temperatures from 20 to 500 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Chunguang; Borysow, Aleksandra

    1995-01-01

    A simple formalism is presented that permits quick computations of the low-resolution, rotovibrational collision-induced absorption (RV CIA) spectra of H2 pairs in the first overtone band of hydrogen, at temperatures from 20 to 500 K. These spectra account for the free-free transitions. The sharp dimer features, originating from the bound-free, free-bound, and bound-bound transitions are ignored, though their integrated intensities are properly accounted for. The method employs spectral model line- shapes with parameters computed from the three lowest spectral moments. The moments are obtained from first principles expressed as analytical functions of temperature. Except for the sharp dimer features, which are absent in this model, the computed spectra reproduce closely the results of exact quantum mechanical lineshape computations. Comparisons of the computed spectra with existing experimental data also show good agreement. The work interest for the modeling of the atmospheres of the outer planets in the near-infrared region of the spectrum. The user-friendly Fortran program developed here is available on request from the authors.

  3. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-01

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO2 (a-SiO2) exposed to 60Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a-SiO2, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a-SiO2. The full width at half maximum for a-SiO2 is larger by ˜40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a-SiO2 network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a-SiO2.

  4. Ti3C2 MXenes with Modified Surface for High-Performance Electromagnetic Absorption and Shielding in the X-Band.

    PubMed

    Han, Meikang; Yin, Xiaowei; Wu, Heng; Hou, Zexin; Song, Changqing; Li, Xinliang; Zhang, Litong; Cheng, Laifei

    2016-08-17

    Electromagnetic (EM) absorbing and shielding composites with tunable absorbing behaviors based on Ti3C2 MXenes are fabricated via HF etching and annealing treatment. Localized sandwich structure without sacrificing the original layered morphology is realized, which is responsible for the enhancement of EM absorbing capability in the X-band. The composite with 50 wt % annealed MXenes exhibits a minimum reflection loss of -48.4 dB at 11.6 GHz, because of the formation of TiO2 nanocrystals and amorphous carbon. Moreover, superior shielding effectiveness with high absorption effectiveness is achieved. The total and absorbing shielding effectiveness of Ti3C2 MXenes in a wax matrix with a thickness of only 1 mm reach values of 76.1 and 67.3 dB, while those of annealed Ti3C2 MXenes/wax composites are 32 and 24.2 dB, respectively. Considering the promising performance of Ti3C2 MXenes with the modified surface, this work is expected to open the door for the expanded applications of MXenes family in EM absorbing and shielding fields.

  5. Inhomogeneous broadening and peak shift of the 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies in SiO{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Kajihara, Koichi; Skuja, Linards; Hosono, Hideo

    2014-10-21

    The peak parameters of radiation-induced 7.6 eV optical absorption band of oxygen vacancies (Si-Si bonds) were examined for high-purity synthetic α-quartz and amorphous SiO{sub 2} (a‐SiO{sub 2}) exposed to {sup 60}Co γ-rays. The peak shape is asymmetric with the steeper edge at the lower energy side both in α-quartz and a‐SiO{sub 2}, and the peak energy is larger for α-quartz than that for a‐SiO{sub 2}. The full width at half maximum for a‐SiO{sub 2} is larger by ∼40-60% than that for α-quartz, and it increases with an increase in the disorder of the a‐SiO{sub 2} network, which is enhanced by raising the temperature of preannealing before irradiation, i.e., fictive temperature. These data are interpreted from the viewpoint of the site-to-site distribution of the Si-Si bond length in a‐SiO{sub 2}.

  6. Temperature dependence of the intensity of the vibration-rotational absorption band ν2 of H2O trapped in an argon matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitsevich, G.; Doroshenko, I.; Malevich, A..; Shalamberidze, E.; Sapeshko, V.; Pogorelov, V.; Pettersson, L. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    Using two sets of effective rotational constants for the ground (000) and the excited bending (010) vibrational states the calculation of frequencies and intensities of vibration-rotational transitions for J″ = 0 - 2; and J‧ = 0 - 3; was carried out in frame of the model of a rigid asymmetric top for temperatures from 0 to 40 K. The calculation of the intensities of vibration-rotational absorption bands of H2O in an Ar matrix was carried out both for thermodynamic equilibrium and for the case of non-equilibrium population of para- and ortho-states. For the analysis of possible interaction of vibration-rotational and translational motions of a water molecule in an Ar matrix by 3D Schrödinger equation solving using discrete variable representation (DVR) method, calculations of translational frequencies of H2O in a cage formed after one argon atom deleting were carried out. The results of theoretical calculations were compared to experimental data taken from literature.

  7. Experimental Observation of a Topological Band Gap Opening in Ultracold Fermi Gases with Two-Dimensional Spin-Orbit Coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Zengming; Huang, Lianghui; Peng, Peng; Li, Donghao; Chen, Liangchao; Xu, Yong; Zhang, Chuanwei; Wang, Pengjun; Zhang, Jing

    2016-12-01

    The recent experimental realization of synthetic spin-orbit coupling (SOC) opens a new avenue for exploring novel quantum states with ultracold atoms. However, in experiments for generating two-dimensional SOC (e.g., Rashba type), a perpendicular Zeeman field, which opens a band gap at the Dirac point and induces many topological phenomena, is still lacking. Here, we theoretically propose and experimentally realize a simple scheme for generating two-dimensional SOC and a perpendicular Zeeman field simultaneously in ultracold Fermi gases by tuning the polarization of three Raman lasers that couple three hyperfine ground states of atoms. The resulting band gap opening at the Dirac point is probed using spin injection radio-frequency spectroscopy. Our observation may pave the way for exploring topological transport and topological superfluids with exotic Majorana and Weyl fermion excitations in ultracold atoms.

  8. Observation of ultrafast Q-band fluorescence in horse heart cytochrome c in reduced and oxidized forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suemoto, Tohru; Ebihara, Hideaki; Nakao, Hiroyuki; Nakajima, Makoto

    2011-01-01

    The dynamics of fluorescence from horse heart cytochrome c is investigated in reduced (ferrous) and oxidized (ferric) forms by a streak camera and an up-conversion technique under B-band excitation at 415 nm. In the reduced form, we found the Q-band emission at 550 and 600 nm originated from the S1 state in a short time range. A very broad continuum observed from 440 to 660 nm had only shown a slow component and was assigned to impurity. In the reduced form, the lifetime of S1 was determined to be 120 fs by using the up-conversion technique. In the oxidized form, the S1 lifetime was estimated to be 21 fs. These values are consistent with the values estimated from the quantum yield in order of their magnitude.

  9. An observation of LHR noise with banded structure by the sounding rocket S29 Barium-GEOS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koskinen, H. E. J.; Holmgren, G.; Kintner, P. M.

    1982-01-01

    The measurement of electrostatic and obviously locally produced noise near the lower hybrid frequency made by the sounding rocket S29 Barium-GEOS is reported. The noise is strongly related to the spin of the rocket and reaches well below the local lower hybrid resonance frequency. Above the altitude of 300 km the noise shows banded structure roughly organized by the hydrogen cyclotron frequency. Simultaneously with the banded structure, a signal near the hydrogen cyclotron frequency is detected. This signal is also spin related. The characteristics of the noise suggest that it is locally generated by the rocket payload disturbing the plasma. If this interpretation is correct we expect plasma wave experiments on other spacecrafts, e.g., the space shuttle to observe similar phenomena.

  10. Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediate–band

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikawa, H. Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C.

    2014-07-07

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using wide–gap matrix material, InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs, for realizing intermediate–band solar cells (IBSCs) with two–step photon–absorption. The plane–wave expanded Burt–Foreman operator ordered 8–band k·p theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of two–step photon–absorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P, which is lattice–matched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of two–step photon–absorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In{sub 0.48}Ga{sub 0.52}P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

  11. Proposal of high efficiency solar cells with closely stacked InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P quantum dot superlattices: Analysis of polarized absorption characteristics via intermediate-band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, H.; Kotani, T.; Kuzumoto, Y.; Izumi, M.; Tomomura, Y.; Hamaguchi, C.

    2014-07-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic structures and polarized absorption properties of quantum dot superlattices (QDSLs) using wide-gap matrix material, InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSLs, for realizing intermediate-band solar cells (IBSCs) with two-step photon-absorption. The plane-wave expanded Burt-Foreman operator ordered 8-band k . p theory is used for this calculation, where strain effect and piezoelectric effect are taken into account. We find that the absorption spectra of the second transitions of two-step photon-absorption can be shifted to higher energy region by using In0.48Ga0.52P, which is lattice-matched material to GaAs substrate, as a matrix material instead of GaAs. We also find that the transverse magnetic polarized absorption spectra in InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSL with a separate IB from the rest of the conduction minibands can be shifted to higher energy region by decreasing the QD height. As a result, the second transitions of two-step photon-absorption by the sunlight occur efficiently. These results indicate that InAs/In0.48Ga0.52P QDSLs are suitable material combination of IBSCs toward the realization of ultrahigh efficiency solar cells.

  12. Whistler anisotropy instabilities as the source of banded chorus: Van Allen Probes observations and particle-in-cell simulations

    DOE PAGES

    Fu, Xiangrong; Cowee, Misa M.; Friedel, Reinhard H.; ...

    2014-10-22

    Magnetospheric banded chorus is enhanced whistler waves with frequencies ωr < Ωe, where Ωe is the electron cyclotron frequency, and a characteristic spectral gap at ωr ≃ Ωe/2. This paper uses spacecraft observations and two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations in a magnetized, homogeneous, collisionless plasma to test the hypothesis that banded chorus is due to local linear growth of two branches of the whistler anisotropy instability excited by two distinct, anisotropic electron components of significantly different temperatures. The electron densities and temperatures are derived from Helium, Oxygen, Proton, and Electron instrument measurements on the Van Allen Probes A satellite during a bandedmore » chorus event on 1 November 2012. The observations are consistent with a three-component electron model consisting of a cold (a few tens of eV) population, a warm (a few hundred eV) anisotropic population, and a hot (a few keV) anisotropic population. The simulations use plasma and field parameters as measured from the satellite during this event except for two numbers: the anisotropies of the warm and the hot electron components are enhanced over the measured values in order to obtain relatively rapid instability growth. The simulations show that the warm component drives the quasi-electrostatic upper band chorus and that the hot component drives the electromagnetic lower band chorus; the gap at ~Ωe/2 is a natural consequence of the growth of two whistler modes with different properties.« less

  13. Observing heme doming in myoglobin with femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Levantino, M.; Lemke, H. T.; Schirò, G.; ...

    2015-07-01

    We report time-resolved X-ray absorption measurements after photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin performed at the LCLS X-ray free electron laser with nearly 100 fs (FWHM) time resolution. Data at the Fe K-edge reveal that the photoinduced structural changes at the heme occur in two steps, with a faster (~70 fs) relaxation preceding a slower (~400 fs) one. We tentatively attribute the first relaxation to a structural rearrangement induced by photolysis involving essentially only the heme chromophore and the second relaxation to a residual Fe motion out of the heme plane that is coupled to the displacement of myoglobin F-helix.

  14. Observation of Ortho-Para Dependence of Pressure Broadening Coefficient in Acetylene νb{1}+νb{3} Vibration Band Using Dual-Comb Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwakuni, Kana; Okubo, Sho; Inaba, Hajime; Onae, Atsushi; Hong, Feng-Lei; Sasada, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Koichi MT

    2016-06-01

    We observe that the pressure-broadening coefficients depend on the ortho-para levels. The spectrum is taken with a dual-comb spectrometer which has the resolution of 48 MHz and the frequency accuracy of 8 digit when the signal-to-noise ratio is more than 20. In this study, about 4.4-Tz wide spectra of the P(31) to R(31) transitions in the νb{1}+νb{3} vibration band of 12C_2H_2 are observed at the pressure of 25, 60, 396, 1047, 1962 and 2654 Pa. Each rotation-vibration absorption line is fitted to Voight function and we determined pressure-broadening coefficients for each rotation-vibration transition. The Figure shows pressure broadening coefficient as a function of m. Here m is J"+1 for R and -J" for P-branch. The graph shows obvious dependence on ortho and para. We fit it to Pade function considering the population ratio of three-to-one for the ortho and para levels. This would lead to detailed understanding of the pressure boarding mechanism. S. Okubo et al., Applied Physics Express 8, 082402 (2015)

  15. L Band Brightness Temperature Observations Over a Corn Canopy During the Entire Growth Cycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Alicia T.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.; vanderVelde, Rogier; Lang, Roger H.; Gish, Timothy

    2011-01-01

    During a field campaign covering the 2002 corn growing season, a dual polarized tower mounted L-band (1.4 GHz) radiometer (LRAD) provided brightness temperature (T(sub B)) measurements at preset intervals, incidence and azimuth angles. These radiometer measurements were supported by an extensive characterization of land surface variables including soil moisture, soil temperature, vegetation biomass, and surface roughness. During the period from May 22, 2002 to August 30, 2002 a range of vegetation water content (W) of 0.0 to 4.3 kg/square m, ten days of radiometer and ground measurements were available. Using this data set, the effects of corn vegetation on surface emissions are investigated by means of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model. Additionally, the impact of roughness on the surface emission is quantified using T(sub B) measurements over bare soil conditions. Subsequently, the estimated roughness parameters, ground measurements and horizontally (H)-polarized T(sub B) are employed to invert the H-polarized transmissivity (gamma-h) for the monitored corn growing season.

  16. Rain effects on the hurricane observations over the ocean by C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guosheng; Li, Xiaofeng; Perrie, William; Zhang, Biao; Wang, Lei

    2016-01-01

    A composite radar scattering model composed of the atmosphere radiative transfer model, and the ocean surface Bragg wave theory is developed to analyze the impact of hurricane rain on the normalized radar-backscatter cross section (NRCS) measured in the VV and cross-polarized C-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) channels. The model results are validated against SAR and SFMR measured wind speeds and rain rates for two hurricane cases. The contribution of rain to the NRCS is backscatter from two parts: the atmosphere column and the ocean surface. In the atmosphere, microwave attenuation and the rain-induced volume backscattering are simulated by the model. We find that the impact of raindrops in the atmosphere is almost negligible for the VV polarization, but important for the cross polarization. On the ocean surface, comparisons between our model and other existing models without rain lead to the conclusion that the VV polarization NRCS can be simulated reasonably well without considering the non-Bragg scattering mechanisms. Similar to the wave breaking mechanism, the microwave diffraction on the craters, crowns, and stalks, produced by rain drops, is also negligible for VV polarization. However, the non-Bragg scattering is important for the cross-polarized NRCS simulations. Finally, we performed simulations to understand the VV-polarized NRCS behavior under different wind speeds at various rain rates.

  17. Measurement of the Earth-Observer-1 Satellite X-Band Phased Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perko, Kenneth; Dod, Louis; Demas, John

    2003-01-01

    The recent launch and successful orbiting of the EO-1 Satellite has provided an opportunity to validate the performance of a newly developed X-Band transmit-only phased array aboard the satellite. This paper will compare results of planar near-field testing before and after spacecraft installation as well as on-orbit pattern characterization. The transmit-only array is used as a high data rate antenna for relaying scientific data from the satellite to earth stations. The antenna contains distributed solid-state amplifiers behind each antenna element that cannot be monitored except for radiation pattern measurements. A unique portable planar near-field scanner allows both radiation pattern measurements and also diagnostics of array aperture distribution before and after environmental testing over the ground-integration and prelaunch testing of the satellite. The antenna beam scanning software was confirmed from actual pattern measurements of the scanned beam positions during the spacecraft assembly testing. The scanned radiation patterns on-orbit were compared to the near-field patterns made before launch to confirm the antenna performance. The near-field measurement scanner has provided a versatile testing method for satellite high gain data-link antennas.

  18. Swift broad band observations of the Black Hole transient GRS 1716-249

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Santo, Melania; D'Ai', Antonino; Bassi, Tiziana; Segreto, Alberto; Belloni, Tomaso; Cusumano, Giancarlo; Parola, Valentina La

    2017-02-01

    We report on Swift observations of the ongoing outburst of the Black Hole Transient (BHT) GRS 1716-249 (ATel #9876, #9895). We analyzed both XRT and BAT data of three Swift ToO pointings performed on 2017 January 28, 29 and 30 (Target ID 34924, segments 1, 2, 3). The XRT count rate is about 90 count/s and therefore the observations have been performed in window-timing mode.

  19. Calibration of the EDGES High-band Receiver to Observe the Global 21 cm Signature from the Epoch of Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monsalve, Raul A.; Rogers, Alan E. E.; Bowman, Judd D.; Mozdzen, Thomas J.

    2017-01-01

    The EDGES High-Band experiment aims to detect the sky-average brightness temperature of the 21 cm signal from the epoch of reionization in the redshift range 14.8≳ z≳ 6.5. To probe this redshifted signal, EDGES High-Band conducts single-antenna measurements in the frequency range 90–190 MHz from the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory in Western Australia. In this paper, we describe the current strategy for calibration of the EDGES High-Band receiver and report calibration results for the instrument used in the 2015–2016 observational campaign. We propagate uncertainties in the receiver calibration measurements to the antenna temperature using a Monte Carlo approach. We define a performance objective of 1 mK residual rms after modeling foreground subtraction from a fiducial temperature spectrum using a five-term polynomial. Most of the calibration uncertainties yield residuals of 1 mK or less at 95 % confidence. However, current uncertainties in the antenna and receiver reflection coefficients can lead to residuals of up to 20 mK even in low-foreground sky regions. These dominant residuals could be reduced by (1) improving the accuracy in reflection measurements, especially their phase, (2) improving the impedance match at the antenna-receiver interface, and (3) decreasing the changes with frequency of the antenna reflection phase.

  20. Influence of Scleral Buckling Surgery with Encircling Band on Subfoveal Choroidal Thickness in Long-Term Observations

    PubMed Central

    Laudańska-Olszewska, Iwona; Gozdek, Piotr; Maroszyński, Mariusz; Amon, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this study is the presentation of subfoveal choroidal thickness with enhanced depth imaging spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (EDI-OCT) several months after scleral buckling with encircling band surgery. Methods. 48 patients who underwent scleral buckling with encircling band surgery for unilateral rhegmatogenous retinal detachment were included in the retrospective observational study. The mean time from scleral buckling surgery to the final EDI-OCT examination was 22±6.7 months. We compare choroidal thickness between operated and fellow eyes. Results. In all patients, the macula was detached before the surgery. The subfoveal choroidal thickness in 48 treated eyes was 260.9±45.8 µm (range 155–383 µm) and in the fellow eyes was 217.5±36.7 µm (range 98–326 µm). The subfoveal choroidal thickness of eyes after scleral buckling surgery in long-term EDI-OCT examination was significantly thicker (P<0.001) than in fellow eyes. Conclusions. The subfoveal choroid in eyes undergoing encircling band surgery was significantly thicker than in fellow eyes. We suspect that this may be the result of reduced choroidal blood flow. It also seems that the width and size of the material used in scleral buckling surgery may affect a change in the choroid circulation and increase subfoveal choroidal thickness. PMID:23841077

  1. Polarimetric C-/X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar Observations of Melting Sea Ice in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casey, J. A.; Beckers, J. F.; Brossier, E.; Haas, C.

    2013-12-01

    Operational ice information services rely heavily on space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data for the production of ice charts to meet their mandate of providing timely and accurate sea ice information to support safe and efficient marine operations. During the summer melt period, the usefulness of SAR data for sea ice monitoring is limited by the presence of wet snow and melt ponds on the ice surface, which can mask the signature of the underlying ice. This is a critical concern for ice services whose clients (e.g. commercial shipping, cruise tourism, resource exploration and extraction) are most active at this time of year when sea ice is at its minimum extent, concentration and thickness. As a result, there is a need to further quantify the loss of ice information in SAR data during the melt season and to identify what information can still be retrieved about ice surface conditions and melt pond evolution at this time of year. To date the majority of studies have been limited to analysis of single-polarization C-band SAR data. This study will investigate the potential complimentary and unique sea ice information that polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data can provide to supplement the information available from traditional single co-polarized C-band SAR data. A time-series of polarimetric C- and X-band SAR data was acquired over Jones Sound in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago, in the vicinity of the Grise Fiord, Nunavut. Five RADARSAT-2 Wide Fine Quad-pol images and 11 TerraSAR-X StripMap dual-pol (HH/VV) images were acquired. The time-series begins at the onset of melt in early June and extends through advanced melt conditions in late July. Over this period several ponding and drainage events and two snowfall events occurred. Field observations of sea ice properties were collected using an Ice Mass Balance (IMB) buoy, hourly photos from a time-lapse camera deployed on a coastal cliff, and manual in situ measurements of snow thickness and melt pond depth

  2. Electronic structure of an [FeFe] hydrogenase model complex in solution revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy using narrow-band emission detection.

    PubMed

    Leidel, Nils; Chernev, Petko; Havelius, Kajsa G V; Schwartz, Lennart; Ott, Sascha; Haumann, Michael

    2012-08-29

    High-resolution X-ray absorption spectroscopy with narrow-band X-ray emission detection, supported by density functional theory calculations (XAES-DFT), was used to study a model complex, ([Fe(2)(μ-adt)(CO)(4)(PMe(3))(2)] (1, adt = S-CH(2)-(NCH(2)Ph)-CH(2)-S), of the [FeFe] hydrogenase active site. For 1 in powder material (1(powder)), in MeCN solution (1'), and in its three protonated states (1H, 1Hy, 1HHy; H denotes protonation at the adt-N and Hy protonation of the Fe-Fe bond to form a bridging metal hydride), relations between the molecular structures and the electronic configurations were determined. EXAFS analysis and DFT geometry optimization suggested prevailing rotational isomers in MeCN, which were similar to the crystal structure or exhibited rotation of the (CO) ligands at Fe1 (1(CO), 1Hy(CO)) and in addition of the phenyl ring (1H(CO,Ph), 1HHy(CO,Ph)), leading to an elongated solvent-exposed Fe-Fe bond. Isomer formation, adt-N protonation, and hydride binding caused spectral changes of core-to-valence (pre-edge of the Fe K-shell absorption) and of valence-to-core (Kß(2,5) emission) electronic transitions, and of Kα RIXS data, which were quantitatively reproduced by DFT. The study reveals (1) the composition of molecular orbitals, for example, with dominant Fe-d character, showing variations in symmetry and apparent oxidation state at the two Fe ions and a drop in MO energies by ~1 eV upon each protonation step, (2) the HOMO-LUMO energy gaps, of ~2.3 eV for 1(powder) and ~2.0 eV for 1', and (3) the splitting between iron d(z(2)) and d(x(2)-y(2)) levels of ~0.5 eV for the nonhydride and ~0.9 eV for the hydride states. Good correlations of reduction potentials to LUMO energies and oxidation potentials to HOMO energies were obtained. Two routes of facilitated bridging hydride binding thereby are suggested, involving ligand rotation at Fe1 for 1Hy(CO) or adt-N protonation for 1HHy(CO,Ph). XAES-DFT thus enables verification of the effects of ligand

  3. A database of synthetic photometry in the GALEX ultraviolet bands for the stellar sources observed with the International Ultraviolet Explorer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beitia-Antero, Leire; Gómez de Castro, Ana I.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) has produced the largest photometric catalogue of ultraviolet (UV) sources. As such, it has defined the new standard bands for UV photometry: the near UV band (NUV) and the far UV band (FUV). However, due to brightness limits, the GALEX mission has avoided the Galactic plane which is crucial for astrophysical research and future space missions. Aims: The International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellite obtained 63 755 spectra in the low dispersion mode (λ/δλ 300) during its 18-year lifetime. We have derived the photometry in the GALEX bands for the stellar sources in the IUE Archive to extend the GALEX database with observations including the Galactic plane. Methods: Good quality spectra have been selected for the IUE classes of stellar sources. The GALEX FUV and NUV magnitudes have been computed using the GALEX transmission curves, as well as the conversion equations between flux and magnitudes provided by the mission. Results: Consistency between GALEX and IUE synthetic photometries has been tested using white dwarfs (WD) contained in both samples. The non-linear response performance of GALEX inferred from this data agrees with the results from GALEX calibration. The photometric database is made available to the community through the services of the Centre de Données Stellaires at Strasbourg (CDS). The catalogue contains FUV magnitudes for 1628 sources, ranging from FUV = 1.81 to FUV = 18.65 mag. In the NUV band, the catalogue includes observations for 999 stars ranging from NUV = 3.34 to NUV = 17.74 mag. Conclusions: UV photometry for 1490 sources not included in the GALEX AIS GR5 catalogue is provided; most of them are hot (O-A spectral type) stars. The sources in the catalogue are distributed over the full sky, including the Galactic plane. Full Tables A.1 and B.1 are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (http://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  4. Feshbach enhanced s-wave scattering of fermions: direct observation with optimized absorption imaging

    PubMed Central

    Genkina, D; Aycock, LM; Stuhl, BK; Lu, H-I; Williams, RA; Spielman, IB

    2016-01-01

    We directly measured the normalized s-wave scattering cross-section of ultracold 40K atoms across a magnetic-field Feshbach resonance by colliding pairs of degenerate Fermi gases (DFGs) and imaging the scattered atoms. We extracted the scattered fraction for a range of bias magnetic fields, and measured the resonance location to be B0 = 20.206(15) mT with width Δ = 1.0(5) mT. To optimize the signal-to-noise ratio of atom number in scattering images, we developed techniques to interpret absorption images in a regime where recoil induced detuning corrections are significant. These imaging techniques are generally applicable to experiments with lighter alkalis that would benefit from maximizing signal-to-noise ratio on atom number counting at the expense of spatial imaging resolution. PMID:26903778

  5. Observing heme doming in myoglobin with femtosecond X-ray absorption spectroscopya)

    PubMed Central

    Levantino, M.; Lemke, H. T.; Schirò, G.; Glownia, M.; Cupane, A.; Cammarata, M.

    2015-01-01

    We report time-resolved X-ray absorption measurements after photolysis of carbonmonoxy myoglobin performed at the LCLS X-ray free electron laser with nearly 100 fs (FWHM) time resolution. Data at the Fe K-edge reveal that the photoinduced structural changes at the heme occur in two steps, with a faster (∼70 fs) relaxation preceding a slower (∼400 fs) one. We tentatively attribute the first relaxation to a structural rearrangement induced by photolysis involving essentially only the heme chromophore and the second relaxation to a residual Fe motion out of the heme plane that is coupled to the displacement of myoglobin F-helix. PMID:26798812

  6. Absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts of fundamental and first overtone bands for OH stretching vibration of methanol upon methanol-pyridine complex formation in CCl4: analysis by NIR/IR spectroscopy and DFT calculations.

    PubMed

    Futami, Yoshisuke; Ozaki, Yasushi; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2016-02-21

    Infrared (IR) and near infrared (NIR) spectra were measured for methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in carbon tetrachloride. Upon the formation of the methanol-pyridine complex, the frequencies of both the fundamental and first overtone bands of the OH stretching vibration shifted to lower frequencies, and the absorption intensity of the fundamental increased significantly, while that of the first overtone decreased markedly. By using quantum chemical calculations, we estimated the absorption intensities and frequencies of the fundamental and first overtone bands for the OH stretching vibration based on the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation. The calculated results well reproduced the experimental results. The molecular vibration potentials and dipole moment functions of the OH stretching vibration modes were compared between methanol and the methanol-pyridine complex in terms of absorption intensity changes and frequency shifts. The large change in the dipole moment function was found to be the main cause for the variations in absorption intensity for the fundamental and first overtone bands.

  7. Polarimetric radar and aircraft observations of saggy bright bands during MC3E

    DOE PAGES

    Matthew R. Kumjian; Giangrande, Scott E.; Mishra, Subashree; ...

    2016-03-19

    Polarimetric radar observations increasingly are used to understand cloud microphysical processes, which is critical for improving their representation in cloud and climate models. In particular, there has been recent focus on improving representations of ice collection processes (e.g., aggregation, riming), as these influence precipitation rate, heating profiles, and ultimately cloud life cycles. However, distinguishing these processes using conventional polarimetric radar observations is difficult, as they produce similar fingerprints. This necessitates improved analysis techniques and integration of complementary data sources. Furthermore, the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) provided such an opportunity.

  8. Interpretation of the Minkowski bands in Grw + 70 deg 8247.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Angel, J. R. P.

    1972-01-01

    Demonstration on the basis of the spectral structure of circular polarization in Grw + 70 deg 8247, that the absorption bands are at least in part molecular in origin. The spectrum of molecular helium has strong bands coincident with several of the Minkowski bands and, in particular, at high temperature shows a strong band head at about 4125 A. Helium molecules could be formed in sufficient density to give the absorption features in the star if it has a pure helium atmosphere. The Zeeman effect in molecular helium can explain in general the observed spectral features in the polarization and also may be responsible for the continuum polarization.

  9. Observations and Analysis of Extended Tail Toward Red in the Diffuse Interstellar Bands of Herschel 36

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, Takeshi; Welty, Daniel E.; Johnson, Sean; York, Donald G.; Hobbs, Lew M.; Dahlstrom, Julie

    2013-06-01

    In the studies of the Diffuse Interstellar Bands (DIBs), the sightline toward Herschel 36 near the center of the HII region Messier 8 is unique. It shows spectra of CH^+ and CH in the first excited level indicating the presence of a cloud with high radiative temperature. The heating is most likely due to far infrared emission from the adjacent intense infrared source Her 36 SE at a distance of 0.25" from Her 36. The effect of the high radiative temperature on some DIBs is spectacular. It produces on a normally symmetric bell-shape line a very prominent Extended Tail toward Red (ETR) on prototypical DIBs λ 5780.5, λ 5797.1, and λ 6613 while other DIBs λ 5849.8, λ 6196.0, and λ 6379.3 are little affected. We interpret this as indicating that the carriers of the former 3 DIBs that are seriously affected by the radiation are polar molecules and the pronounced ETRs are the result of the decrease of rotational constant B (3 - 5 %) upon electronic excitation. High J rotational levels are pumped radiatively and with the negative (B' - B) produces the ETR. We have developed a model calculation of rotational distribution taking into account of both radiative and collisional processes. In view of the complexity of the problem linear molecules are considered. 7 parameters enter into the calculation but we find the fractional variation of B and the radiative temperature T_r are the most decisive. Although molecules with a general shape is beyond the scope of this work, we conclude that the 3 DIBs which show the pronounced ETRs are due to polar molecules and the requirement of high variation of B indicates that the molecules are not that large perhaps composed of 3-6 heavy atoms. The 3 DIBs that do not show the pronounced ETRs are likely due to non-polar molecules or large polar molecules with small fractional variation of B. Goto, M., Stecklum, B., Linz, H., Feldt, M., Henning, Th., Pascucci, I., and Usuda, T. 2006, ApJ, 649 299. Oka, T., Welty, D. E., Johnson, S., York

  10. Observation of charge transfer cascades in α-Fe2O3/IrOx photoanodes by operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Minguzzi, Alessandro; Naldoni, Alberto; Lugaresi, Ottavio; Achilli, Elisabetta; D'Acapito, Francesco; Malara, Francesco; Locatelli, Cristina; Vertova, Alberto; Rondinini, Sandra; Ghigna, Paolo

    2017-02-22

    Electrochemical devices for energy conversion and storage are central for a sustainable economy. The performance of electrodes is driven by charge transfer across different layer materials and an understanding of the mechanistics is pivotal to gain improved efficiency. Here, we directly observe the transfer of photogenerated charge carriers in a photoanode made of hematite (α-Fe2O3) and a hydrous iridium oxide (IrOx) overlayer, which plays a key role in photoelectrochemical water oxidation. Through the use of operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), we probe the change in occupancy of the Ir 5d levels during optical band gap excitation of α-Fe2O3. At potentials where no photocurrent is observed, electrons flow from the α-Fe2O3 photoanode to the IrOx overlayer. In contrast, when the composite electrode produces a sustained photocurrent (i.e., 1.4 V vs. RHE), a significant transfer of holes from the illuminated α-Fe2O3 to the IrOx layer is clearly demonstrated. The analysis of the operando XAS spectra further suggests that oxygen evolution actually occurs both at the α-Fe2O3/electrolyte and α-Fe2O3/IrOx interfaces. These findings represent an important outcome for a better understanding of composite photoelectrodes and their use in photoelectrochemical systems, such as hydrogen generation or CO2 reduction from sunlight.

  11. Absorption Properties of Mediterranean Aerosols Obtained from Multi-year Ground-based and Satellite Remote Sensing Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mallet, M.; Dubovik, O.; Nabat, P.; Dulac, F.; Kahn, R.; Sciare, J.; Paronis, D.; Leon, J. F.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol absorption properties are of high importance to assess aerosol impact on regional climate. This study presents an analysis of aerosol absorption products obtained over the Mediterranean Basin or land stations in the region from multi-year ground-based AERONET and satellite observations with a focus on the Absorbing Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD), Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) and their spectral dependence. The AAOD and