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Sample records for absorption cells designed

  1. Optical design of transparent metal grids for plasmonic absorption enhancement in ultrathin organic solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Inho; Lee, Taek Seong; Jeong, Doo Seok; Lee, Wook Seong; Kim, Won Mok; Lee, Kyeong-Seok

    2013-07-01

    Transparent metal grid combining with plasmonic absorption enhancement is a promising replacement to indium tin oxide thin films. We numerically demonstrate metal grids in one or two dimension lead to plasmonic absorption enhancements in ultrathin organic solar cells. In this paper, we study optical design of metal grids for plasmonic light trapping and identify different plasmonic modes of the surface plasmon polaritons excited at the interfaces of glass/metal grids, metal grids/active layers, and the localized surface plasmon resonance of the metal grids using numerical calculations. One dimension metal grids with the optimal design of a width and a period lead to the absorption enhancement in the ultrathin active layers of 20 nm thickness by a factor of 2.6 under transverse electric polarized light compared to the case without the metal grids. Similarly, two dimensional metal grids provide the absorption enhancement by a factor of 1.8 under randomly polarized light. PMID:24104493

  2. Spectral Absorption Depth Profile: A Step Forward to Plasmonic Solar Cell Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Mohammad K.; Mukhaimer, Ayman W.; Drmosh, Qasem A.

    2016-07-01

    Absorption depth profile, a deterministic and key factor that defines the quality of excitons generation rate in optoelectronic devices, is numerically predicted using finite different time domain analysis. A typical model, nanoparticles array on silicon slab, was devised considering the concept of plasmonic solar cell design. The trend of spectral absorption depth profile distributions at various wavelengths of the solar spectrum, 460 nm, 540 nm, 650 nm, 815 nm, and 1100 nm, was obtained. A stronger and well-distributed absorption profile was obtained at ˜650 nm of the solar spectrum (i.e. ˜1.85 eV, c-Si bandgap), although the absorbing layer was affected more than a half micron depth at shorter wavelengths. Considering the observations obtained from this simulation, we have shown a simple two-step method in fabricating ultra-pure silver (Ag) nanoparticles that can be used as plasmonic nanoscatterers in a thin film solar cell. The morphology and elemental analysis of as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was confirmed by field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM) and FESEM-coupled electron diffraction spectroscopy. The size of the as-fabricated Ag nanoparticles was found to range from 50 nm to 150 nm in diameter. Further investigations on structural and optical properties of the as-fabricated specimen were carried out using ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption, photoluminesce, and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Preferential growth of ZnO along {002} was confirmed by XRD pattern that was more intense and broadened at increasing annealing temperatures. The lattice parameter c was found to increase, whereas grain size increased with increasing annealing temperature. The optical bandgap was also observed to decrease from 3.31 eV to 3.25 eV at increasing annealing temperatures through UV-Vis measurements. This parallel investigation on optical properties by simulation is in line with experimental studies and, in fact, facilitates devising optimum process cost for

  3. Design for strong absorption in a nanowire array tandem solar cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Anttu, Nicklas

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are a promising candidate for next-generation solar cells. However, the optical response of nanowires is, due to diffraction effects, complicated to optimize. Here, we optimize through optical modeling the absorption in a dual-junction nanowire-array solar cell in terms of the Shockley-Quessier detailed balance efficiency limit. We identify efficiency maxima that originate from resonant absorption of photons through the HE11 and the HE12 waveguide modes in the top cell. An efficiency limit above 40% is reached in the band gap optimized Al0.10Ga0.90As/In0.34Ga0.66As system when we allow for different diameter for the top and the bottom nanowire subcell. However, for experiments, equal diameter for the top and the bottom cell might be easier to realize. In this case, we find in our modeling a modest 1-2% drop in the efficiency limit. In the Ga0.51In0.49P/InP system, an efficiency limit of η = 37.3% could be reached. These efficiencies, which include reflection losses and sub-optimal absorption, are well above the 31.0% limit of a perfectly-absorbing, idealized single-junction bulk cell, and close to the 42.0% limit of the idealized dual-junction bulk cell. Our results offer guidance in the choice of materials and dimensions for nanowires with potential for high efficiency tandem solar cells. PMID:27574019

  4. Design for strong absorption in a nanowire array tandem solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yang; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Anttu, Nicklas

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are a promising candidate for next-generation solar cells. However, the optical response of nanowires is, due to diffraction effects, complicated to optimize. Here, we optimize through optical modeling the absorption in a dual-junction nanowire-array solar cell in terms of the Shockley-Quessier detailed balance efficiency limit. We identify efficiency maxima that originate from resonant absorption of photons through the HE11 and the HE12 waveguide modes in the top cell. An efficiency limit above 40% is reached in the band gap optimized Al0.10Ga0.90As/In0.34Ga0.66As system when we allow for different diameter for the top and the bottom nanowire subcell. However, for experiments, equal diameter for the top and the bottom cell might be easier to realize. In this case, we find in our modeling a modest 1–2% drop in the efficiency limit. In the Ga0.51In0.49P/InP system, an efficiency limit of η = 37.3% could be reached. These efficiencies, which include reflection losses and sub-optimal absorption, are well above the 31.0% limit of a perfectly-absorbing, idealized single-junction bulk cell, and close to the 42.0% limit of the idealized dual-junction bulk cell. Our results offer guidance in the choice of materials and dimensions for nanowires with potential for high efficiency tandem solar cells. PMID:27574019

  5. Design and operation of an in situ high pressure reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Bare, S. R.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S. D.; Mickelson, G. E.; Modica, F. S.; UOP LLC; EXAFS Analysis

    2007-01-01

    The design and initial operation of an in situ catalysis reaction cell for x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements at high pressure is described. The design is based on an x-ray transparent tube fabricated from beryllium. This forms a true plug flow reactor for catalysis studies. The reactor is coupled to a portable microprocessor-controlled versatile feed system, and incorporates on-line analysis of reaction products. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a NiRe/carbon catalyst at 4 bar are used to illustrate the performance of the reactor.

  6. Design and Operation of a High Pressure Reaction Cell for in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Yang, N.; Kelly, S.; Mickelson, G.; Modica, F.

    2007-01-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements of catalytic reactions have been instrumental in advancing the understanding of catalytic processes. These measurements require an in situ catalysis reaction cell with unique properties. Here we describe the design and initial operation of an in situ/operando catalysis reaction cell for transmission X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements. The cell is designed: to be an ideal catalytic reactor with no mass transfer effects; to give the same conversion and selectivity under similar space velocities as standard laboratory micro-reactors; to be operational temperatures up to 600 {sup o}C and pressures up to 14 bar; to be X-ray transparent allowing XAS measurement to be collected in transmission for all elements with Z {>=} 23 (vanadium K-edge at 5.5 keV); to measure the actual catalyst bed temperature; to not use o-ring seals, or water cooling; to be robust, compact, easy to assemble, and use, and relatively low cost to produce. The heart of the cell is fabricated from an X-ray transparent beryllium tube that forms a plug flow reactor. XAFS data recorded during the reduction of a Re/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a function of hydrogen pressure from 0.05 to 8 bar, and from a Pt-Sn/{gamma}-A{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst during n-heptane reforming are given as initial examples of the versatility of the reactor.

  7. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  8. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.

    2015-07-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.

  9. Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer absorption spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-index semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large absorption cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral absorption properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity absorption at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom absorption spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335

  10. Design of plasmonic backcontact nanogratings for broadband and polarization-insensitive absorption enhancement in thin-film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firoozi, Arezoo; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    We discuss the rules for designing nanostructured plasmonic backcontact of thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells using two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (2D-FDTD) method. A novel efficient quasi-periodic plasmonic nanograting is designed. Numerical calculations demonstrate that broadband and polarization-insensitive absorption enhancement is achieved by the proposed structure which is based on a supercell geometry containing N subcells in each of which there is one Ag nanowire deposited on the backcontact of the solar cell. The proposed structure offers the possibility of controlling the number and location of photonic and plasmonic modes and outperforms the periodic plasmonic nanogratings which only utilize plasmonic resonances. We start by tuning the plasmonic mode of one subcell and then construct the supercell based on the final design of the subcell. Our findings show that with a proper choice of key parameters of the nanograting, several photonic and plasmonic modes can be excited across the entire spectral region where crystalline silicon (c-Si) is absorbing. The absorption enhancement is significant, particularly in the long wavelength region where c-Si is weakly absorbing.

  11. GAX absorption cycle design process

    SciTech Connect

    Priedeman, D.K.; Christensen, R.N.

    1999-07-01

    This paper presents an absorption system design process that relies on computer simulations that are validated by experimental findings. An ammonia-water absorption heat pump cycle at 3 refrigeration tons (RT) and chillers at 3.3 RT and 5 RT (10.5 kW, 11.6 kW, and 17.6 kW) were initially modeled and then built and tested. The experimental results were used to calibrate both the cycle simulation and the component simulations, yielding computer design routines that could accurately predict component and cycle performance. Each system was a generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle, and all were sized for residential and light commercial use, where very little absorption equipment is currently used. The specific findings of the 5 RT (17.6 kW) chiller are presented. Modeling incorporated a heat loss from the gas-fired generator and pressure drops in both the evaporator and absorber. Simulation results and experimental findings agreed closely and validated the modeling method and simulation software.

  12. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  13. Design and simulation of a biconic multipass absorption cell for the frequency stabilization of the reference seeder laser in IPDA lidar.

    PubMed

    Mu, Yongji; Du, Juan; Yang, Zhongguo; Sun, Yanguang; Liu, Jiqiao; Hou, Xia; Chen, Weibiao

    2016-09-01

    The design process and simulation method of a multipass absorption cell used for the frequency stabilization of the reference seeder laser in integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar are presented. On the basis of the fundamental theory of the Herriott multipass cell comprising two spherical mirrors, the initial parameters of the multipass cell, which has an optical path greater than 10 m and consists of two biconic mirrors, were calculated. More than 30 light spots were distributed on each mirror, and the distance between adjacent spots was mostly optimized to greater than six times the beam waist. After optimization, the simulated transmittance spectrum and associated differential signal were obtained. The interference induced by surface scattering was also simulated, and its influence on the differential signal was analyzed. A correspondence between the simulated results and the testing data was observed. PMID:27607288

  14. Design and development of back reflectors for improved light coupling and absorption enhancement in thin MQW solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Freundlich, Alex

    2015-03-01

    Optimization of non-planar antireflective coating and back- (or front-) surface texturing are widely studied to further reduce the reflection losses and increase the sunlight absorption path in solar cells. Back reflectors have been developed from perfect mirror to textured mirror in order to further increase light path, which can significantly improve the efficiency and allow for much thinner devices. A Lambertian surface, which has the most random texture, can theoretically raise the light path to 4n2 times that of a smooth surface. It's a challenge however to fabricate ideal Lambertian texture, especially in a fast and low cost way. In this work we have developed a method to overcome this challenge that combines the use of laser interference lithography (LIL) and selective wet etching. The approach allows for a rapid wafer scale texture processing with sub-wavelength (nano)- scale control of the pattern and the pitch. The technique appears as being particularly attractive for the development of ultra-thin III-V devices, or in overcoming the weak sub-bandgap absorption in devices incorporating quantum dots or quantum wells. Preliminary results on the application of the technique for the development of back reflector for 1-1.3 eV (MQW bearing) GaAs solar cells are presented.

  15. Design and Economic Potential of an Integrated High-Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Combined Cooling, Heat, and Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, Kyle S.

    Clean distributed generation power plants can provide a much needed balance to our energy infrastructure in the future. A high-temperature fuel cell and an absorption chiller can be integrated to create an ideal combined cooling, heat, and power system that is efficient, quiet, fuel flexible, scalable, and environmentally friendly. With few real-world installations of this type, research remains to identify the best integration and operating strategy and to evaluate the economic viability and market potential of this system. This thesis informs and documents the design of a high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller demonstration system at a generic office building on the University of California, Irvine (UCI) campus. This work details the extension of prior theoretical work to a financially-viable power purchase agreement (PPA) with regard to system design, equipment sizing, and operating strategy. This work also addresses the metering and monitoring for the system showcase and research and details the development of a MATLAB code to evaluate the economics associated with different equipment selections, building loads, and economic parameters. The series configuration of a high-temperature fuel cell, heat recovery unit, and absorption chiller with chiller exhaust recirculation was identified as the optimal system design for the installation in terms of efficiency, controls, ducting, and cost. The initial economic results show that high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller systems are already economically competitive with utility-purchased generation, and a brief case study of a southern California hospital shows that the systems are scalable and viable for larger stationary power applications.

  16. Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction

    DOEpatents

    Zaidi, Saleem H.; Gee, James M.

    2005-02-22

    Enhanced light absorption of solar cells and photodetectors by diffraction is described. Triangular, rectangular, and blazed subwavelength periodic structures are shown to improve performance of solar cells. Surface reflection can be tailored for either broadband, or narrow-band spectral absorption. Enhanced absorption is achieved by efficient optical coupling into obliquely propagating transmitted diffraction orders. Subwavelength one-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-dependent, wavelength-selective absorption in solar cells and photodetectors, while two-dimensional structures are designed for polarization-independent, wavelength-selective absorption therein. Suitable one and two-dimensional subwavelength periodic structures can also be designed for broadband spectral absorption in solar cells and photodetectors. If reactive ion etching (RIE) processes are used to form the grating, RIE-induced surface damage in subwavelength structures can be repaired by forming junctions using ion implantation methods. RIE-induced surface damage can also be removed by post RIE wet-chemical etching treatments.

  17. Closed-Cycle He-Cooled Absorption Cells Designed for a Bruker IFS-125HR: First Results Between 79 K and 297K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Arlan W.; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2010-06-01

    Gas absorption cells specifically designed to achieve stable temperatures down to ˜70 K to fit inside the sample compartment of an evacuated Bruker (IFS-125HR) Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) have been developed at Connecticut College, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In operation, the temperature-controlled cooling by a closed-cycle helium refrigerator achieved a temperature stability of ±0.01 K. The unwanted absorption features initially observed from cryo-deposits formed on the outside cell windows were eliminated by adding an internal vacuum shroud box around the coolable cell to isolate it from residual gases in the evacuated FTS chambers. The effects of vibrations arising from the closed-cycle helium refrigerator upon the FTS spectra were characterized. Using this set up, high resolution spectra of several methane isotopologues (such as 12CH_4, 13CH_4 and 12CH_3D) broadened by N_2, were recorded in the 1230 to 1850 cm-1 spectral region. Such data are needed to characterize the temperature dependence of line shapes at very low temperatures for remote sensing of outer planets and their moons. Results from the initial analysis of the R(2) manifold of the ν_4 fundamental band of 13CH_4 are discussed to examine whether the N_2-broadened half width coefficients follow a simple exponential temperature-dependence over the entire 80 - 296 K temperature range. This initial test was very successful, proving that a high precision Fourier transform spectrometer can be easily configured for spectroscopic studies at very low temperatures relevant to planetary atmospheres. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  18. Closed-cycle He-cooled Absorption Cells Designed For A Bruker Ifs-125hr: First Results Between 79 - 297 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Keeyoon; Mantz, A. W.; Smith, M. A. H.; Brown, L. R.; Crawford, T. J.; Malathy Devi, V.; Benner, D. Chris

    2010-10-01

    Gas absorption cells specifically designed to achieve stable temperatures down to 66K were developed at Connecticut College to fit inside the sample compartment of an evacuated Bruker (IFS-125HR) Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The temperature-controlled cooling by a closed-cycle helium refrigerator achieved a temperature stability of ±0.01 K. Such temperature control is essential to characterize the temperature dependence of line shapes at the very low temperatures found in outer planets and their moons. In operation, the effects of vibrations arising from the closed-cycle helium refrigerator upon the FTS spectra were minimized. Initial unwanted absorption features from cryo-deposits on the cell windows were eliminated by adding a separately-pumped vacuum shroud box around the coolable cell to isolate it from residual gases in the evacuated FTS chambers. Using this setup, high resolution spectra of several methane isotopologues (12CH4, 13CH4 and 12CH3D) broadened by N2, were recorded in the 1230 to 1850 cm-1 spectral region. Initial analysis of the R(2) manifold of the v4 fundamental band of 13CH4 examined whether the N2-broadened half width coefficients follow a simple power-law temperature-dependence over the entire 80 - 296 K temperature range. The results from this work were published by Sung et al. [1]. Low-temperature spectra of ethane [2-3] and carbon monoxide have also been recorded. This research is supported by NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program. [1] K. Sung et al., J. Mol. Spectrosc. (2010) doi:10.1016/j.jms.2010.05.004. [2] V. Malathy Devi et al., JQSRT (2010) submitted. [3] L. R. Brown et al., adjacent poster.

  19. Design and application of a new cell for in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy investigations of metal-atmosphere interfaces.

    PubMed

    Kleber, Ch; Kattner, J; Frank, J; Hoffmann, H; Kraft, M; Schreiner, M

    2003-01-01

    A new experimental setup for studying reactions occurring in the metal-atmosphere interface by applying in situ infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) is presented. It consists of a gas-mixing unit, where the moist air is generated with or without corrosive gases, the reaction cell for the in situ investigations, and an optical system coupled with a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectrometer. For testing the unit, a specimen of pure copper was used, where the growth of Cu2O on the polished surface could be observed during time-resolved measurements in synthetic air containing 80% RH (relative humidity). For comparison of the experimental results obtained, a computer simulation program was developed in order to calculate the peak position, the peak height, the peak width, and the thickness of the surface layer formed during the atmospheric corrosion. The simulation software is based on the four-phase model of covered surfaces. PMID:14610941

  20. Temperature variable long path cell for absorption measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shetter, R. E.; Davidson, J. A.; Cantrell, C. A.; Calvert, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    The design and construction of a long path cell for absorption measurements at temperatures ranging from 215-470 K and at pressures from vacuum to 10 atm are described. The cell consists of three concentric stainless-steel tubes; the innermost tube is 6.5-in. in internal diameter, has a volume of about 47 l, and contains White-type optics, six thermocouples, and a gas input tube; and the outermost tube provides a vacuum Dewar around the inner assembly. The optical design and temperature control system for the long path temperature variable cell are examined. The long path cell is applicable for analyzing temperature and pressure dependence of spectra and reaction rates of gases, and the cell has flow and photolysis capabilities for studying transient species and photochemically initiated reactions. A diagram of the cell is provided.

  1. Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B.

    2011-05-04

    In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

  2. Design for Manufacturing for Energy Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Prete, A.; Primo, T.; Papadia, G.; Manisi, B.

    2011-05-01

    In the typical scenario of a helicopter crash, impact with the ground is preceded by a substantially vertical drop, with the result that a seated occupant of a helicopter experiences high spinal loads and pelvic deceleration during such crash due to the sudden arresting of vertical downward motion. It has long been recognized that spinal injuries to occupants of helicopters in such crash scenario can be minimized by seat arrangements which limit the deceleration to which the seated occupant is subjected, relative to the helicopter, to a predetermined maximum, by allowing downward movement of the seated occupant relative to the helicopter, at the time of impact with the ground, under a restraining force which, over a limited range of such movement, is limited to a predetermined maximum. In practice, significant benefits, in the way of reduced injuries and reduced seriousness of injuries, can be afforded in this way in such crash situations even where the extent of such controlled vertical movement permitted by the crashworthy seat arrangement is quite limited. Important increase of accident safety is reached with the installation of crashworthy shock absorbers on the main landing gear, but this solution is mostly feasible on military helicopters with long fixed landing gear. Seats can then give high contribution to survivability. Commonly, an energy absorber is a constant load device, if one excludes an initial elastic part of the load-stroke curve. On helicopter seats, this behavior is obtained by plastic deformation of a metal component or scraping of material. In the present work the authors have studied three absorption systems, which differ in relation to their shape, their working conditions and their constructive materials. All the combinations have been analyzed for applications in VIP helicopter seats.

  3. Binary TLBO algorithm assisted for designing plasmonic nano bi-pyramids-based absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhlaghi, Majid; Emami, Farzin; Nozhat, Najmeh

    2014-07-01

    A new efficient binary optimization method based on Teaching-Learning-Based Optimization (TLBO) algorithm is proposed to design an array of plasmonic nano bi-pyramids in order to achieve maximum absorption coefficient spectrum. In binary TLBO, a group of learners consisting of a matrix with binary entries controls the presence ('1') or the absence ('0') of nanoparticles in the array. Simulation results show that absorption coefficient strongly depends on the localized position of plasmonic nanoparticles. Non-periodic structures have more appropriate response in term of absorption coefficient. This approach is useful in optical applications such as solar cells and plasmonic nano antenna.

  4. Metal nanoparticles enhanced optical absorption in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Wanlu; Liu, Fang; Qu, Di; Xu, Qi; Huang, Yidong

    2011-12-01

    The plasmonic enhanced absorption for thin film solar cells with silver nanoparticles (NPs) deposited on top of the amorphous silicon film (a-Si:H) solar cells and embedded inside the active layer of organic solar cells (OSCs) has been simulated and analyzed. Obvious optical absorption enhancement is obtained not only at vertical incidence but also at oblique incidence. By properly adjusting the period and size of NPs, an increased absorption enhancement of about 120% and 140% is obtained for a-Si:H solar cells and OSCs, respectively.

  5. Measurements of scattering and absorption in mammalian cell suspensions

    SciTech Connect

    Mourant, J.R.; Johnson, T.M.; Freyer, J.P.

    1996-03-01

    During the past several years a range of spectroscopies, including fluorescence and elastic-scatter spectroscopy, have been investigated for optically based detection of cancer and other tissue pathologies. Both elastic-scatter and fluorescence signals depend, in part, on scattering and absorption properties of the cells in the tissue. Therefore an understanding of the scattering and absorption properties of cells is a necessary prerequisite for understanding and developing these techniques. Cell suspensions provide a simple model with which to begin studying the absorption and scattering properties of cells. In this study we have made preliminary measurements of the scattering and absorption properties of suspensions of mouse mammary carcinoma cells (EMT6) over a broad wavelength range (380 nm to 800 nm).

  6. Modified Sagnac interferometer for contact-free length measurement of a direct absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Elandaloussi, Hadj; Rouillé, Christian; Marie-Jeanne, Patrick; Janssen, Christof

    2016-03-10

    Accurate path length measurements in absorption cells are recurrent requirements in quantitative molecular absorption spectroscopy. A new twin path laser interferometer for length measurements in a simple direct path absorption geometry is presented, along with a full uncertainty budget. The path in an absorption cell is determined by measuring the optical path length change due to the diminution of the refractive index when the cell originally filled with nitrogen gas is evacuated. The performance of the instrument based on a stabilized HeNe laser is verified by comparison with the results of direct mechanical length measurements of a roughly 45 mm long, specially designed absorption cell. Due to a resolution of about 1/300 of a HeNe fringe, an expanded (coverage factor k=2) uncertainty of 16 μm in the length measurement is achieved, providing an expanded relative uncertainty of 3.6·10⁻⁴ for the length of our test absorption cell. This value is about 8 times lower than what has been reported previously. The instrument will be useful for precision measurements of absorption cross sections of strong absorbers which require short light paths, such as ozone, halogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and volatile organic compounds in the UV. PMID:26974791

  7. Extreme light absorption by multiple plasmonic layers on upgraded metallurgical grade silicon solar cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duck Hyun; Kwon, Jae Young; Maldonado, Stephen; Tuteja, Anish; Boukai, Akram

    2014-01-01

    We fabricate high-efficiency, ultrathin (∼12 μm), flexible, upgraded metallurgical-grade polycrystalline silicon solar cells with multiple plasmonic layers precisely positioned on top of the cell to dramatically increase light absorption. This scalable approach increases the optical absorptivity of our solar cells over a broad range of wavelengths, and they achieve efficiencies η ≈ 11%. Detailed studies on the electrical and optical properties of the developed solar cells elucidate the light absorption contribution of each individual plasmonic layer. Finite-difference time-domain simulations were also performed to yield further insights into the obtained results. We anticipate that the findings from this work will provide useful design considerations for fabricating a range of different solar cell systems. PMID:24611793

  8. Optical absorption of several nanostructures arrays for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhaopeng; Qiao, Huiling; Huangfu, Huichao; Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Jingwei; Wang, Haiyan

    2015-12-01

    To improve the efficiency and reduce the cost of solar cells, it's important to enhance the light absorption. Within the visible solar spectrum based on optimization simulations by COMSOL Multiphysics, the optical absorption of silicon cylindrical nanowires, nanocones and inverted nanocones was calculated respectively. The results reveal that the average absorption for the nanocones between 400 and 800 nm is 70.2%, which is better than cylindrical nanowires (55.3%), inverted nanocones (42.3%) and bulk silicon (42.2%). In addition, more than 95% of light from 630 to 800 nm is reflected for inverted nanocones, which can be used to enhance infrared reflection in photovoltaic devices.

  9. Nickel hydrogen cell design: A designer's aspect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rehm, Raymond

    1992-01-01

    Information is given to give insight into the methodology of nickel hydrogen cell design and the decipherment of the battery cell reference guide that was distributed to many of Gates Energy Products' customers. Cell design, stacking design, charge capacity, and dynamic response are discussed in general terms.

  10. Enhanced light absorption in thin-film solar cells with light propagation direction conversion.

    PubMed

    Suemune, Ikuo

    2013-05-01

    Enhancement of optical absorption in thin-film solar cells (TF-SCs) has been the long-lasting issue to achieve high efficiencies. Grating couplers have been studied for the conversion of incident light into guided modes propagating along TF-SCs to extend optical path for higher optical absorption. However the wavelength band for the efficient conversion remained relatively narrow and the overall improvement of TF-SC efficiencies has been limited. This paper demonstrates that the grating height design as well as the phase matching condition is important for the enhancement of optical absorption in TF-SCs with the calculation of short-circuit currents as a figure of merit for optimization. The influence of the light absorption coefficients and grating coupling strengths on the light absorption bandwidth is also discussed. PMID:24104442

  11. Increasing efficiency in intermediate band solar cells with overlapping absorptions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna, Akshay; Krich, Jacob J.

    2016-07-01

    Intermediate band (IB) materials are promising candidates for realizing high efficiency solar cells. In IB photovoltaics, photons are absorbed in one of three possible electronic transitions—valence to conduction band, valence to intermediate band, or intermediate to conduction band. With fully concentrated sunlight, when the band gaps have been chosen appropriately, the highest efficiency IB solar cells require that these three absorptions be non-overlapping, so absorbed photons of fixed energy contribute to only one transition. The realistic case of overlapping absorptions, where the transitions compete for photons, is generally considered to be a source of loss. We show that overlapping absorptions can in fact lead to significant improvements in IB solar cell efficiencies, especially for IB that are near the middle of the band gap. At low to moderate concentration, the highest efficiency requires overlapping absorptions. We use the detailed-balance method and indicate how much overlap of the absorptions is required to achieve efficiency improvements, comparing with some known cases. These results substantially broaden the set of materials that can be suitable for high-efficiency IB solar cells.

  12. Limiting resolution of linear absorption spectroscopy in thin gas cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, A. Ch.

    2010-06-01

    The most narrow sub-Doppler frequency resonances in the linear absorption of monochromatic radiation that propagates in the normal direction through a cell containing a layer of rarefied gas medium with a thickness smaller than or on the order of the wavelength of this radiation are theoretically studied. The calculation is performed using as an example a three-dimensional gas cell shaped like a rectangular parallelepiped. It is shown that the width and amplitude of considered sub-Doppler resonances (in the vicinity of centers of rather weak quantum transitions) significantly depend on the transit relaxation of atomic particles, which is determined by their transit times through the irradiated region of the cell both in longitudinal and in transverse directions. The restrictions of the approximation of the planar one-dimensional cell that was previously used in such calculations are determined. Possible applications of linear absorption resonances in ultrathin (nanometer) gas cells as references for optical frequency standards are discussed.

  13. Direct single-mode fibre-coupled miniature White cell for laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühnreich, Benjamin; Höh, Matthias; Wagner, Steven; Ebert, Volker

    2016-02-01

    We present the design, setup, and characterization of a new lens-free fibre-coupled miniature White cell for extractive gas analysis using direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS). The construction of this cell is based on a modified White cell design and allows for an easy variation of the absorption length in the range from 29 cm to 146 cm. The design avoids parasitic absorption paths outside the cell by using direct, lensless fibre coupling and allows small physical cell dimensions and cell volumes. To characterize the cell performance, different H2O and CH4 concentration levels were measured using dTDLAS. Detection limits of 2.5 ppm ṡ m for CH4 (at 1.65 μm) and 1.3 ppm ṡ m for H2O (at 1.37 μm) were achieved. In addition, the gas exchange time and its flow-rate dependence were determined for both species and found to be less than 15 s for CH4 and up to a factor of thirteen longer for H2O.

  14. Do epidermal lens cells facilitate the absorptance of diffuse light?

    PubMed

    Brodersen, Craig R; Vogelmann, Thomas C

    2007-07-01

    Many understory plants rely on diffuse light for photosynthesis because direct light is usually scattered by upper canopy layers before it strikes the forest floor. There is a considerable gap in the literature concerning the interaction of direct and diffuse light with leaves. Some understory plants have well-developed lens-shaped epidermal cells, which have long been thought to increase the absorption of diffuse light. To assess the role of epidermal cell shape in capturing direct vs. diffuse light, we measured leaf reflectance and transmittance with an integrating sphere system using leaves with flat (Begonia erythrophylla, Citrus reticulata, and Ficus benjamina) and lens-shaped epidermal cells (B. bowerae, Colocasia esculenta, and Impatiens velvetea). In all species examined, more light was absorbed when leaves were irradiated with direct as opposed to diffuse light. When leaves were irradiated with diffuse light, more light was transmitted and more was reflected in both leaf types, resulting in absorptance values 2-3% lower than in leaves irradiated with direct light. These data suggest that lens-shaped epidermal cells do not aid the capture of diffuse light. Palisade and mesophyll cell anatomy and leaf thickness appear to have more influence in the capture and absorption of light than does epidermal cell shape. PMID:21636475

  15. Microwave Resonator Measurements of Atmospheric Absorption Coefficients: A Preliminary Design Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, Steven J.; Spilker, Thomas R.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary design study examined the feasibility of using microwave resonator measurements to improve the accuracy of atmospheric absorption coefficients and refractivity between 18 and 35 GHz. Increased accuracies would improve the capability of water vapor radiometers to correct for radio signal delays caused by Earth's atmosphere. Calibration of delays incurred by radio signals traversing the atmosphere has applications to both deep space tracking and planetary radio science experiments. Currently, the Cassini gravity wave search requires 0.8-1.0% absorption coefficient accuracy. This study examined current atmospheric absorption models and estimated that current model accuracy ranges from 5% to 7%. The refractivity of water vapor is known to 1% accuracy, while the refractivity of many dry gases (oxygen, nitrogen, etc.) are known to better than 0.1%. Improvements to the current generation of models will require that both the functional form and absolute absorption of the water vapor spectrum be calibrated and validated. Several laboratory techniques for measuring atmospheric absorption and refractivity were investigated, including absorption cells, single and multimode rectangular cavity resonators, and Fabry-Perot resonators. Semi-confocal Fabry-Perot resonators were shown to provide the most cost-effective and accurate method of measuring atmospheric gas refractivity. The need for accurate environmental measurement and control was also addressed. A preliminary design for the environmental control and measurement system was developed to aid in identifying significant design issues. The analysis indicated that overall measurement accuracy will be limited by measurement errors and imprecise control of the gas sample's thermodynamic state, thermal expansion and vibration- induced deformation of the resonator structure, and electronic measurement error. The central problem is to identify systematic errors because random errors can be reduced by averaging

  16. Infrared-laser spectroscopy using a long-pathlength absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.C.; Briesmeister, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption measurements in an ordinary cell may require typically a few torr pressure of sample gas. At these pressures the absorption lines are usually pressure-broadened and, therefore, closely spaced transitions are poorly resolved even at diode-laser resolution. This situation is greatly improved in Doppler-limited spectroscopy at extremely low sample pressures. Two very long-pathlength absorption cells were developed to be used in conjunction with diode lasers. They were designed to operate at controlled temperatures with the optical pathlength variable up to approx. 1.5 km. Not only very low sample pressures are used for studies with such cells but also the spectroscopic sensitivity is enhanced over conventional methods by a factor of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/, improving the analytical capability of measuring particle densities to the order of 1 x 10'' molecules/cm/sup 3/. This paper presents some analytical aspects of the diode laser spectroscopy using the long-pathlength absorption cells in the areas of absorption line widths, pressure broadening coefficients, isotope composition measurements and trace impurity analysis.

  17. Design and synthesis of liquid crystals with controlled absorption properties in the midwave infrared region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tripathi, Suvagata

    The infrared region of electromagnetic radiation is attractive for communication applications as the scattering is lower compared to that in the visible spectrum. Infrared lasers are widely used in bar-code scanners, laser rangefinders and topology mapping applications. Typically, the direction of a laser beam is altered by mechanically moving a mirror or a lens. But this process can impose severe limitations on critical performance parameters (longevity, precision, response time etc.) of the device. Thus, electro-optic control of the direction of the beam is highly desired. Commercial liquid crystals (LCs) are less than ideal for this purpose because they almost invariably have several absorption bands in the infrared region. For example, several absorption bands exist in the mid-infrared region (3-5 mum) due to common structure features found in LCs such as CH, CH 2, CH3 and CN. In the off-resonance regions, the baseline absorption coefficient can take very high value (up to alpha ~10/cm). This absorption loss becomes especially significant if the optical path is long. As the molecular vibration frequency (o) depends upon the spring constant (kappa) and the effective mass (m) of a diatomic group by the equation = √(kappa/m), replacement of hydrogen atoms in a molecule with heavier atoms can shift the absorptions to the far infrared region, thus making the midwave infrared region more transparent. Another strategy has been to develop high birefringence LCs so that lower liquid crystal cell gap can be used, thus minimizing the absorption loss due to the LC layer. But most of these materials have problems with UV stability. In the scope of this thesis, several strategies are investigated to mitigate the absorption loss in the midwave infrared region. The ultimate goal of this thesis is to develop LCs that will have both high birefringence and low absorption properties in the midwave-infrared region. Another goal of the thesis is to develop materials for

  18. Absorption properties of micellar lipid metabolites into Caco2 cells.

    PubMed

    Tsuzuki, Wakako

    2007-07-01

    To elucidate the absorption characteristics of dietary lipids in the human intestine, we investigated the cellular uptake of lipid metabolites using a differential monolayer of the Caco2 cells. As lipid metabolites, several free fatty acids and 2-monoacylglycerols, were formed a mixed micelle by bile salts and lysophospholipids and they were supplied to the Caco2 cells. To estimate the effect of the mixed micelles on the permeability of cells' membranes during incubation with the mixed micelles, the transepitherial electrical resistance (TEER) value was monitored, and no pronounced changes of TEER was detected. This suggested that mixed micelles did not affect their cellular properties of the barrier measured by TEER. The lipid metabolites transferred from the mixed micelle into the Caco2 cells were determined quantitatively by an enzymatic colorimetric method and were done by thin layer chromatography (TLC) for a species of acylglycerols. These highly sensitive methods enabled us to monitor the transepithelial transports of various kinds of non-isotope-labeled various lipid metabolites. Newly re-synthesized triacylglycerols were accumulated in Caco2 cells after 30 min incubation with the mixed micelles, and their amounts increased gradually for 4 h. The secretion of re-esterified triacylglycerols into a basolateral medium from the Caco2 cells began at 2 h after the mixed micelles were added to the apical medium. The intake of external lipid metabolites by the Caco2 cells were evaluated by an initial 2-h incubation with the mixed micelles. For example, 2-monomyristin and 2-monopalmitin were more rapidly transferred into the Caco2 cells from the mixed micelles than 2-monocaprin was. On the other hand, the absorption rates of capric acid, lauric acid and myristic acid by the cells were larger than those of stearic acid and oleic acid. It revealed that the side-chain structure of these lipid metabolites affected their absorption by the Caco2 cells. The results of this

  19. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system. PMID:23187280

  20. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gultekin, David H.; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  1. NMR imaging of cell phone radiation absorption in brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Gultekin, David H; Moeller, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    A method is described for measuring absorbed electromagnetic energy radiated from cell phone antennae into ex vivo brain tissue. NMR images the 3D thermal dynamics inside ex vivo bovine brain tissue and equivalent gel under exposure to power and irradiation time-varying radio frequency (RF) fields. The absorbed RF energy in brain tissue converts into Joule heat and affects the nuclear magnetic shielding and the Larmor precession. The resultant temperature increase is measured by the resonance frequency shift of hydrogen protons in brain tissue. This proposed application of NMR thermometry offers sufficient spatial and temporal resolution to characterize the hot spots from absorbed cell phone radiation in aqueous media and biological tissues. Specific absorption rate measurements averaged over 1 mg and 10 s in the brain tissue cover the total absorption volume. Reference measurements with fiber optic temperature sensors confirm the accuracy of the NMR thermometry. PMID:23248293

  2. Microwave absorptions of ultrathin conductive films and designs of frequency-independent ultrathin absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Sucheng; Anwar, Shahzad; Lu, Weixin; Hang, Zhi Hong; Hou, Bo E-mail: phyhoubo@gmail.com; Shen, Mingrong; Wang, Chin-Hua

    2014-01-15

    We study the absorption properties of ultrathin conductive films in the microwave regime, and find a moderate absorption effect which gives rise to maximal absorbance 50% if the sheet (square) resistance of the film meets an impedance matching condition. The maximal absorption exhibits a frequency-independent feature and takes place on an extremely subwavelength scale, the film thickness. As a realistic instance, ∼5 nm thick Au film is predicted to achieve the optimal absorption. In addition, a methodology based on metallic mesh structure is proposed to design the frequency-independent ultrathin absorbers. We perform a design of such absorbers with 50% absorption, which is verified by numerical simulations.

  3. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 107 cm-3. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  4. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Stockett, M. H.; Lawler, J. E.

    2012-03-15

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10{sup 7} cm{sup -3}. A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena.

  5. A cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell.

    PubMed

    Stockett, M H; Lawler, J E

    2012-03-01

    A novel absorption cell has been developed to enable a spectroscopic survey of a broad range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) under astrophysically relevant conditions and utilizing a synchrotron radiation continuum to test the still controversial hypothesis that these molecules or their ions could be carriers of the diffuse interstellar bands. The cryogenic circulating advective multi-pass absorption cell resembles a wind tunnel; molecules evaporated from a crucible or injected using a custom gas feedthrough are entrained in a laminar flow of cryogenically cooled buffer gas and advected into the path of the synchrotron beam. This system includes a multi-pass optical White cell enabling absorption path lengths of hundreds of meters and a detection sensitivity to molecular densities on the order of 10(7) cm(-3). A capacitively coupled radio frequency dielectric barrier discharge provides ionized and metastable buffer gas atoms for ionizing the candidate molecules via charge exchange and the Penning effect. Stronger than expected clustering of PAH molecules has slowed efforts to record gas phase PAH spectra at cryogenic temperatures, though such clusters may play a role in other interstellar phenomena. PMID:22462957

  6. Ultrathin optical design for organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man, J. X.; Luo, D. Y.; Yu, L. M.; Wang, D. K.; Liu, Z.; Lu, Z. H.

    2015-05-01

    A trilayer ultrathin-film model concept had been adapted to maximize optical absorption of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) with a structure of transparent-electrode/highly-absorbing active material/metal. As demonstrated, device with the structure of ITO/Lead phthalocyanine (SubPc):Buckerminster fullerene (C60) (1:4 wt%)/Al had been studied. It is found that more than 90% optical absorption can be obtained in the device with a broaden wavelength range of 480-620 nm. The calculated optical electric fields shows that the unusually high optical absorption is due to the enhanced optical interference inside the OPVs device. This work paved a new way to design the OPVs device.

  7. A novel design of plasmon-induced absorption sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Zhai, Xiang; Wang, Ling-Ling; Luo, Xin; Liu, Gui-Dong; Liu, Jian-Ping; Xia, Sheng-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    We present a plasmon-induced absorption (PIA) sensor formed by using a notched metallic film and a metallic ground plane separated by dielectric gratings, suggesting perfect absorption and high sensitivity up to ∼105. The absorption mechanism for the narrow-band sensor involves the phase-dependent coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance and the Fabry–Perot resonance. The intensity and lineshape of the PIA resonance can be controlled by optimizing the coupling distance and thickness of the dielectric gratings, respectively. In particular, the underlying physics and critical condition for pronounced PIA resonance are illustrated by the coupled Lorentzian oscillator model.

  8. Transition between columnar absorptive cells and goblet cells in the rat jejunal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kurosumi, K; Shibuichi, I; Tosaka, H

    1981-11-01

    Electron microscopic observation of the jejunal epithelium of rats demonstrated morphological evidence of a transition between columnar absorptive cells and growing goblet cells. The columnar cells in both the villi and crypts have features suggestive of absorptive functions. They are provided with apical invaginations continuous to the intermicrovillous space. Absorbed lipid is observed in small vesicles in the terminal web layer, and chylomicrons derived here from are contained in large vacuoles near the Golgi apparatus. Ferritin particles artificially infused into the gut lumen were absorbed into the vacuoles in the subapical zone of columnar cells of suckling rats. Growing goblet cells situated in the crypt epithelium contain surface invaginations and lysosomes which are the same in structure as those found in absorptive cells nearby. Fat droplets evidently absorbed by the growing goblet cell were observed among immature mucus droplets. Artificially infused ferritin particles were found in vacuoles and lysosomes near the Golgi apparatus of some goblet cells of suckling rats. Some goblet cells on the intestinal villi of suckling rats looked immature and their microvilli and cytoplasmic matrix were clear like those of columnar absorptive cells. The transition between these goblet cells with clear cytoplasm and the mature goblet cells with dark cytoplasm was observed. These morphological evidences indicate that some of columnar cells already differentiated to absorptive cells are capable of transforming into mucus-producing (goblet) cells. It is suggested that not only undifferentiated columnar cells in the crypt base but also considerably differentiated columnar cells with absorptive function can differentiate into goblet cells. PMID:7325782

  9. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, William S.

    1993-01-01

    A device for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid therebetween and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data.

  10. Light absorption cell combining variable path and length pump

    DOEpatents

    Prather, W.S.

    1993-12-07

    A device is described for use in making spectrophotometric measurements of fluid samples. In particular, the device is a measurement cell containing a movable and a fixed lens with a sample of the fluid there between and through which light shines. The cell is connected to a source of light and a spectrophotometer via optic fibers. Movement of the lens varies the path length and also pumps the fluid into and out of the cell. Unidirectional inlet and exit valves cooperate with the movable lens to assure a one-way flow of fluid through the cell. A linear stepper motor controls the movement of the lens and cycles it from a first position closer to the fixed lens and a second position farther from the fixed lens, preferably at least 10 times per minute for a nearly continuous stream of absorption spectrum data. 2 figures.

  11. Microlens array induced light absorption enhancement in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqing; Elshobaki, Moneim; Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Noack, Max A; Ho, Kai-Ming; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-03-28

    Over the last decade, polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted a lot of attention and highest power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are now close to 10%. Here we employ an optical structure - the microlens array (MLA) - to increase light absorption inside the active layer, and PCE of PSCs increased even for optimized devices. Normal incident light rays are refracted at the MLA and travel longer optical paths inside the active layers. Two PSC systems - poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:(6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC70BM) - were investigated. In the P3HT:PCBM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and the PCE of an optimized device by ∼4.3%. In the PCDTBT:PC70BM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and PCE by more than 10%. In addition, simulations incorporating optical parameters of all structural layers were performed and they support the enhancement of absorption in the active layer with the assistance of MLA. Our results show that utilizing MLA is an effective strategy to further increase light absorption in PSCs, in which optical losses account for ∼40% of total losses. MLA also does not pose materials processing challenges to the active layers since it is on the other side of the transparent substrate. PMID:23407762

  12. Operando X-ray absorption and infrared fuel cell spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, Emily A.; Kendrick, Ian; Jia, Qingying; Grice, Corey; Segre, Carlo U.; Smotkin, Eugene S.

    2011-11-17

    A polymer electrolyte fuel cell enables operando X-ray absorption and infrared spectroscopy of the membrane electrode assembly catalytic layer with flowing fuel and air streams at controlled temperature. Time-dependent X-ray absorption near edge structure spectra of the Pt and Ni edge of Pt based catalysts of an air-breathing cathode show that catalyst restructuring, after a potential step, has time constants from minutes to hours. The infrared Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed on Pt at 100, 200, 300 and 400 mV vs. hydrogen reference electrode were obtained. The Stark tuning plots of CO adsorbed at 400 mV exhibit a precipitous drop in frequency coincident with the adsorption potential. The turn-down potential decreases relative to the adsorption potential and is approximately constant after 300 mV. These Stark tuning characteristics are attributed to potential dependent adsorption site selection by CO and competitive adsorption processes.

  13. Comparative study of light absorption enhancement in ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with conformal parabolaconical nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Wensheng; Gu, Min

    2014-04-01

    Light trapping design is of critical importance for ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells. Three modelling methods are adopted for the amorphous silicon layer. The best modelling method is identified to achieve high-quality simulation results. Then, parabolaconical nanoarrays are introduced into ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells to study the design principle of high light absorption. Because a trade-off factor is often involved in solar cell consideration, light absorption is investigated for ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells with four conformal nanostructures, where a parabolaconical Ag nanoarray and a parabolaconical Al:ZnO nanoarray are included, respectively. Meanwhile, two height/radius ratios of 1 and 3 are considered, respectively. As a result, three promising structures and their respective optimal parameters are obtained. When the height/radius ratio is 1, the optimal absorption enhancement is 53.9% for a-Si:H solar cells with conformal parabolaconical Ag nanoarrays at a radius of 120 nm. When the height/radius ratio becomes 3, the optimal absorption enhancement is increased to 61.9% at a radius of 50 nm. Under the ratio of 3, it is found that the light absorption enhancement is 65.0% for the solar cells with conformal Al:ZnO nanoarrays. These design principles can provide an effective guide for the research and development of low-cost ultrathin a-Si:H solar cells.

  14. Measurement of UV absorption of single living cell for cell manipulation using NIR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Hong, Jong Wook

    2009-02-01

    Optical UV absorption of single human living cells ranging from 200 nm to 360 nm was measured in situ for the study of cell manipulation using the near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser . Human breast living cells of MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 were used in this experiment. The selective photo-disruptions of single living cell and its sub-organelle (nucleus) were also demonstrated using the tightly focused 790 nm wavelength femtosecond laser with pulse duration of 110 fs. It was found that each living cell has its own absorption spectrum in UV wavelength ranges. It was also inferred that intrinsic absorption spectrum is attributed to the amount of DNA and protein of living cell. For the study of photo-disruption of single cell using the multi-photon absorption excited by the NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the origin UV absorption spectrum of targeted living cell is important and fundamental information to understand nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent living cell.

  15. Absorption and Metabolism Characteristics of Rutin in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaofang; Song, Jinhui; Shi, Xiaopeng; Miao, Shan; Li, Yan

    2013-01-01

    The intestinal absorption and metabolism characteristics of the potentially beneficial polyphenol rutin were studied by measuring the intracellular accumulation and transport of rutin into Caco-2 cells with the sensitive and reliable analytical method of HPLC-coupled tandem mass spectrometry. Rutin and glucuronidated rutin were absorbed differently by the basolateral and apical membranes, and rutin showed differential permeability through the apical and basolateral sides. Approximately 33% of the rutin was metabolized to glucuronidated rutin, and the intracellular concentration of glucuronidated rutin was much lower than that of parent rutin. P-glycoprotein and multidrug-resistant proteins 2 and 3 were involved in the transmembrane transport and intracellular accumulation of rutin by Caco-2 cells. These results suggest that a specific transport system mediates rutin movement across the apical membrane in Caco-2 cells and that metabolic enzymes are important for this process. PMID:24198722

  16. Absorptive carbon nanotube electrodes: Consequences of optical interference loss in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tait, Jeffrey G.; de Volder, Michaël F. L.; Cheyns, David; Heremans, Paul; Rand, Barry P.

    2015-04-01

    A current bottleneck in the thin film photovoltaic field is the fabrication of low cost electrodes. We demonstrate ultrasonically spray coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) layers as opaque and absorptive metal-free electrodes deposited at low temperatures and free of post-deposition treatment. The electrodes show sheet resistance as low as 3.4 Ω □-1, comparable to evaporated metallic contacts deposited in vacuum. Organic photovoltaic devices were optically simulated, showing comparable photocurrent generation between reflective metal and absorptive CNT electrodes for photoactive layer thickness larger than 600 nm when using archetypal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) : (6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) cells. Fabricated devices clearly show that the absorptive CNT electrodes display comparable performance to solution processed and spray coated Ag nanoparticle devices. Additionally, other candidate absorber materials for thin film photovoltaics were simulated with absorptive contacts, elucidating device design in the absence of optical interference and reflection.A current bottleneck in the thin film photovoltaic field is the fabrication of low cost electrodes. We demonstrate ultrasonically spray coated multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) layers as opaque and absorptive metal-free electrodes deposited at low temperatures and free of post-deposition treatment. The electrodes show sheet resistance as low as 3.4 Ω □-1, comparable to evaporated metallic contacts deposited in vacuum. Organic photovoltaic devices were optically simulated, showing comparable photocurrent generation between reflective metal and absorptive CNT electrodes for photoactive layer thickness larger than 600 nm when using archetypal poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) : (6,6)-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) cells. Fabricated devices clearly show that the absorptive CNT electrodes display comparable performance to solution processed and spray coated Ag nanoparticle

  17. Microstructure based model for sound absorption predictions of perforated closed-cell metallic foams.

    PubMed

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille; Panneton, Raymond

    2010-10-01

    Closed-cell metallic foams are known for their rigidity, lightness, thermal conductivity as well as their low production cost compared to open-cell metallic foams. However, they are also poor sound absorbers. Similarly to a rigid solid, a method to enhance their sound absorption is to perforate them. This method has shown good preliminary results but has not yet been analyzed from a microstructure point of view. The objective of this work is to better understand how perforations interact with closed-cell foam microstructure and how it modifies the sound absorption of the foam. A simple two-dimensional microstructural model of the perforated closed-cell metallic foam is presented and numerically solved. A rough three-dimensional conversion of the two-dimensional results is proposed. The results obtained with the calculation method show that the perforated closed-cell foam behaves similarly to a perforated solid; however, its sound absorption is modulated by the foam microstructure, and most particularly by the diameters of both perforation and pore. A comparison with measurements demonstrates that the proposed calculation method yields realistic trends. Some design guides are also proposed. PMID:20968350

  18. Photonic crystals for improving light absorption in organic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duché, D. Le Rouzo, J.; Masclaux, C.; Gourgon, C.

    2015-02-07

    We theoretically and experimentally study the structuration of organic solar cells in the shape of photonic crystal slabs. By taking advantage of the optical properties of photonic crystals slabs, we show the possibility to couple Bloch modes with very low group velocities in the active layer of the cells. These Bloch modes, also called slow Bloch modes (SBMs), allow increasing the lifetime of photons within the active layer. Finally, we present experimental demonstration performed by using nanoimprint to directly pattern the standard poly-3-hexylthiophène:[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butiryc acid methyl ester organic semiconductor blend in thin film form in the shape of a photonic crystal able to couple SBMs. In agreement with the model, optical characterizations will demonstrate significant photonic absorption gains.

  19. Gas cell for in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Drisdell, W. S.; Kortright, J. B.

    2014-07-15

    A simple gas cell design, constructed primarily from commercially available components, enables in situ soft X-ray transmission-absorption spectroscopy of materials in contact with gas at ambient temperature. The cell has a minimum X-ray path length of 1 mm and can hold gas pressures up to ∼300 Torr, and could support higher pressures with simple modifications. The design enables cycling between vacuum and gas environments without interrupting the X-ray beam, and can be fully sealed to allow for measurements of air-sensitive samples. The cell can attach to the downstream port of any appropriate synchrotron beamline, and offers a robust and versatile method for in situ measurements of certain materials. The construction and operation of the cell are discussed, as well as sample preparation and proper spectral analysis, illustrated by examples of spectral measurements. Potential areas for improvement and modification for specialized applications are also mentioned.

  20. Fuel cell design and assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myerhoff, Alfred (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel bipolar cooling plate, fuel cell design and method of assembly of fuel cells. The bipolar cooling plate used in the fuel cell design and method of assembly has discrete opposite edge and means carried by the plate defining a plurality of channels extending along the surface of the plate toward the opposite edges. At least one edge of the channels terminates short of the edge of the plate defining a recess for receiving a fastener.

  1. Broadband Absorption Enhancement in Thin Film Solar Cells Using Asymmetric Double-Sided Pyramid Gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshal, Mohamed A.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-07-01

    A design for a highly efficient modified grating crystalline silicon (c-Si) thin film solar cell is demonstrated and analyzed using the two-dimensional (2-D) finite element method. The suggested grating has a double-sided pyramidal structure. The incorporation of the modified grating in a c-Si thin film solar cell offers a promising route to harvest light into the few micrometers active layer. Furthermore, a layer of silicon nitride is used as an antireflection coating (ARC). Additionally, the light trapping through the suggested design is significantly enhanced by the asymmetry of the top and bottom pyramids. The effects of the thickness of the active layer and facet angle of the pyramid on the spectral absorption, ultimate efficiency (η), and short-circuit current density (J sc) are investigated. The numerical results showed 87.9% efficiency improvement over the conventional thin film c-Si solar cell counterpart without gratings.

  2. White cell design considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-01-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  3. White cell design considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannan, Paul

    1989-11-01

    The White cell is a unit-magnification image relay system consisting of three noncoaxial spherical mirrors of equal curvature. The cell is used to provide a long optical path in a relatively small physical space. Multiple reflections are used, in a manner similar to a unstable laser resonator. A particular application is an optical delay line on the input of a streak camera to allow for the finite triggering time of the sweep start. This paper addresses the first- and third-order properties of the White cell. A displacement sensitivity analysis is included.

  4. Activation of rat intestinal mucosal mast cells by fat absorption.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yong; Sakata, Yasuhisa; Yang, Qing; Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Yoder, Stephanie; Langhans, Wolfgang; Tso, Patrick

    2012-06-01

    Previous studies have linked certain types of gut mucosal immune cells with fat intake. We determined whether fat absorption activates intestinal mucosal mast cells (MMC), a key component of the gut mucosal immune system. Conscious intestinal lymph fistula rats were used. The mesenteric lymph ducts were cannulated, and the intraduodenal (i.d.) tubes were installed for the infusion of Liposyn II 20% (an intralipid emulsion). Lymphatic concentrations of histamine, rat MMC protease II (RMCPII), a specific marker of rat intestinal MMC degranulation, and prostaglandin D(2) (PGD(2)) were measured by ELISA. Intestinal MMC degranulation was visualized by immunofluorescent microscopy of jejunum sections taken at 1 h after Liposyn II gavage. Intraduodenal bolus infusion of Liposyn II 20% (4.4 kcal/3 ml) induced approximately a onefold increase in lymphatic histamine and PGD(2), ∼20-fold increase in lymphatic RMCPII, but only onefold increase in peripheral serum RMCPII concentrations. Release of RMCPII into lymph increased dose dependently with the amount of lipid fed. In addition, i.d. infusion of long-chain triacylglycerol trilinolein (C18:2 n-6, the major composite in Liposyn II) significantly increased the lymphatic RMCPII concentration, whereas medium-chain triacylglycerol tricaprylin (C8:0) did not alter lymph RMCPII secretion. Immunohistochemistry image revealed the degranulation of MMC into lamina propria after lipid feeding. These novel findings indicate that intestinal MMC are activated and degranulate to release MMC mediators to the circulation during fat absorption. This action of fatty acid is dose and chain length dependent. PMID:22461027

  5. Light Scattering and Absorption Studies of Sickle Cell Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim-Shapiro, Daniel

    1997-11-01

    The use of physical techniques has been very important in understanding the pathophysiology of sickle cell disease. In particular, light scattering and absorption studies have been used to measure the kinetics of sickle cell hemoglobin polymerization and depolymerization (melting). The theory of sickle cell polymerization that has been derived and tested by these methods has not only led to an increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease but has also led to improved treatment strategies. Sickle cell disease effects about 1 out of 600 people of African descent born in the United States. The disease is caused by a mutant form of hemoglobin (the oxygen transporting molecule in the blood), hemoglobin S (HbS), which differs from normal adult hemoglobin by the substitution of a single amino acid for another. The polymerization of HbS, which occurs under conditions of low oxygen pressure, causes distortion and increased rigidity of the sickle red blood cell that leads to blockage of the capillaries and a host of resulting complications. The disease is associated with tissue damage, severe painful crises and a high degree of mortality. Light scattering studies of purified HbS and whole cells (conducted by F.A. Ferrone, J. Hofrichter, W.A. Eaton, and their associates) have been used to determine the mechanism of HbS polymerization. Polymerization will generally not occur when the hemoglobin is in an oxygen-rich environment. The question is, when HbS is rapidly deoxygenated (as it is when going from the lungs to the tissues) what is the kinetics of polymerization? Photolysis methods were used to rapidly deoxygenate HbS and light scattering was used as a function of time to measure the kinetics of polymerization. Polarized light scattering may be a more effective way to measure polymer content than total intensity light scattering. It was found that no polymerization occurs during a period of time called the delay time and subsequent polymerization occurs

  6. A flow-through x-ray absorption spectroscopy cell for characterization of powder catalysts in the working state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odzak, J. F.; Argo, A. M.; Lai, F. S.; Gates, B. C.; Pandya, K.; Feraria, L.

    2001-10-01

    We report the design and demonstration of an x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) cell used for the characterization of solid (powder) catalysts in operation with gas-phase reactants. The use of powder samples removes complications arising from mass transfer limitations in pressed wafer samples, the typical form of catalyst used in other in situ XAS cells. The new cell allows collection of XAS data at temperatures ranging from about 230 to 470 K, gas flow rates ranging from about 10 to 500 ml min-1, and pressures ranging from about 1 to 3 atm. The cell is designed to function nearly as a plug flow reactor.

  7. Enhancing light absorption within the carrier transport length in quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yulan; Hara, Yukihiro; Miller, Christopher W; Lopez, Rene

    2015-09-10

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells have attracted tremendous attention because of their tunable absorption spectrum window and potentially low processing cost. Recently reported quantum junction solar cells represent a promising approach to building a rectifying photovoltaic device that employs CQD layers on each side of the p-n junction. However, the ultimate efficiency of CQD solar cells is still highly limited by their high trap state density in both p- and n-type CQDs. By modeling photonic structures to enhance the light absorption within the carrier transport length and by ensuring that the carrier generation and collection efficiencies were both augmented, our work shows that overall device current density could be improved. We utilized a two-dimensional numerical model to calculate the characteristics of patterned CQD solar cells based on a simple grating structure. Our calculation predicts a short circuit current density as high as 31  mA/cm2, a value nearly 1.5 times larger than that of the conventional flat design, showing the great potential value of patterned quantum junction solar cells. PMID:26368966

  8. Electrochemical cell design

    DOEpatents

    Arntzen, John D.

    1978-01-01

    An electrochemical cell includes two outer electrodes and a central electrode of opposite polarity, all nested within a housing having two symmetrical halves which together form an offset configuration. The outer electrodes are nested within raised portions within the side walls of each housing half while the central electrode sealingly engages the perimetric margins of the side-wall internal surfaces. Suitable interelectrode separators and electrical insulating material electrically isolate the central electrode from the housing and the outer electrodes. The outer electrodes are electrically connected to the internal surfaces of the cell housing to provide current collection. The nested structure minimizes void volume that would otherwise be filled with gas or heavy electrolyte and also provides perimetric edge surfaces for sealing and supporting at the outer margins of frangible interelectrode separator layers.

  9. Absorption and emission in defective cholesteric liquid crystal cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gevorgyan, A. H.; Harutyunyan, M. Z.; Matinyan, G. K.; Oganesyan, K. B.; Rostovtsev, Yu V.; Kurizki, G.; Scully, M. O.

    2016-04-01

    We investigated peculiarities of absorption, emission and photonic density of states of a cholesteric liquid crystal with an isotropic defect layer inside. The influence of the defect layer position on absorption and emission in the system was studied. It was shown that for non-diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is in the centre of the system; and for diffracting circularly polarized incident light absorption/emission is maximum if the defect is shifted from the centre of the system to its left border from where light is incident. We also investigated influence of the defect layer thickness and those parameters which characterize loss and gain on absorption and emission. The influence of anisotropic absorption in the cholesteric liquid crystal layer on photonic density states was investigated, too.

  10. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  11. High Lifetime Solar Cell Processing and Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, R. M.

    1985-01-01

    In order to maximize efficiency a solar cell must: (1) absorb as much light as possible in electron-hole production, (2) transport as large a fraction as possible of the electrons to the n-type terminal and holes to the p-type terminal without their first recombining, and (3) produce as high as possible terminal voltage. Step (1) is largely fixed by the spectrum of sunlight and the fundamental absorption characteristics of silicon, although some improvements are possible through texturizing induced light trapping and back surface reflectors. Steps (2) and (3) are, however, dependent on the recombination mechanisms of the cell. The recombination, on the contrary, is strongly influenced by cell processing and design. Some of the lessons during the development of point-contact-cell are discussed. Cell dependence on recombination, surface recombination, and contact recombination are discussed. Results show the overwhelming influence of contact recombination on the operation of the cell when the other sources of recombination are reduced by careful processing.

  12. Compact optical cell system for vacuum ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroism spectroscopy and its application to aqueous solution sample.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masahito; Yagi-Watanabe, Kazutoshi; Kaneko, Fusae; Nakagawa, Kazumichi

    2008-09-01

    We have designed a compact optical cell for studying the absorption and circular dichroism (CD) of a solution sample in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) region using a temperature control unit. The cell size was 34 mm in diameter and 14 mm in length. Such compactness was obtained by coating the VUV scintillator onto the outside of the back window. Because this scintillator converts the transmitted VUV light to visible light, the outside of this cell is operated under atmospheric pressure. The temperature of the sample solution was maintained in the range of 5 degrees C to 80 degrees C using a temperature control unit with a Peltier thermoelectric element. Changes in the sample temperature were observed by monitoring the absorption intensity of water. Through the study of VUV-CD spectra of ammonium camphor-10-sulfonate aqueous solutions and the transmitted spectrum of an empty cell, it was concluded that this cell unit has sufficient performance for use in VUV spectroscopy. PMID:18473342

  13. Spectral Fingerprinting of Individual Cells Visualized by Cavity-Reflection-Enhanced Light-Absorption Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshiyuki; Yamamoto, Takayuki; Minamikawa, Takeo; Takamatsu, Tetsuro; Nagai, Takeharu

    2015-01-01

    The absorption spectrum of light is known to be a “molecular fingerprint” that enables analysis of the molecular type and its amount. It would be useful to measure the absorption spectrum in single cell in order to investigate the cellular status. However, cells are too thin for their absorption spectrum to be measured. In this study, we developed an optical-cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopic microscopy method for two-dimensional absorption imaging. The light absorption is enhanced by an optical cavity system, which allows the detection of the absorption spectrum with samples having an optical path length as small as 10 μm, at a subcellular spatial resolution. Principal component analysis of various types of cultured mammalian cells indicates absorption-based cellular diversity. Interestingly, this diversity is observed among not only different species but also identical cell types. Furthermore, this microscopy technique allows us to observe frozen sections of tissue samples without any staining and is capable of label-free biopsy. Thus, our microscopy method opens the door for imaging the absorption spectra of biological samples and thereby detecting the individuality of cells. PMID:25950513

  14. Design of Prodrugs to Enhance Colonic Absorption by Increasing Lipophilicity and Blocking Ionization

    PubMed Central

    Nofsinger, Rebecca; Clas, Sophie-Dorothee; Sanchez, Rosa I.; Walji, Abbas; Manser, Kimberly; Nissley, Becky; Balsells, Jaume; Nair, Amrithraj; Dang, Qun; Bennett, David Jonathan; Hafey, Michael; Wang, Junying; Higgins, John; Templeton, Allen; Coleman, Paul; Grobler, Jay; Smith, Ronald; Wu, Yunhui

    2014-01-01

    Prodrugs are chemistry-enabled drug delivery modifications of active molecules designed to enhance their pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and/or biopharmaceutical properties. Ideally, prodrugs are efficiently converted in vivo, through chemical or enzymatic transformations, to the active parent molecule. The goal of this work is to enhance the colonic absorption of a drug molecule with a short half-life via a prodrug approach to deliver sustained plasma exposure and enable once daily (QD) dosing. The compound has poor absorption in the colon and by the addition of a promoiety to block the ionization of the molecule as well as increase lipophilicity, the relative colonic absorption increased from 9% to 40% in the retrograde dog colonic model. A combination of acceptable solubility and stability in the gastrointestinal tract (GI) as well as permeability was used to select suitable prodrugs to optimize colonic absorption. PMID:24566521

  15. Design of multi-stopband metamaterial plates for absorption of broadband elastic waves and vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Hao; Pai, P. F.

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents the modeling technique, working mechanism and design guidelines for acoustic multi-stopband metamaterial plates for broadband elastic wave absorption and vibration suppression. The metamaterial plate is designed by integrating two-DOF (degree of freedom) mass-spring subsystems with an isotropic plate to act as vibration absorbers. For an infinite metamaterial plate without damping, a unit cell is modeled using the extended Hamilton's principle, and two stopbands are obtained by dispersion analysis on the averaged three-DOF model. For a finite metamaterial plate with boundary conditions and damping, shear-deformable conforming plate elements are used to model the whole plate, and stopbands and their dynamic effects are investigated by frequency response analysis and transient analysis by direct numerical integration. Influences of absorbers' resonant frequencies and damping ratios, plate's boundary conditions and dimensions, and working plate-absorber modes are thoroughly investigated. Results show that the metamaterial plate is essentially based on the concept of conventional vibration absorbers. The local resonance of the two-DOF subsystems generates two stopbands, and the inertial forces generated by the resonant vibrations of absorbers straighten the plate and attenuate/stop wave propagation. Each stopband's bandwidth can be increased by increasing the absorber mass and/or reducing the isotropic plate's unit cell mass. Moreover, a high damping ratio for the secondary absorber can combine the two stopbands into one wide stopband for vibration suppression, and a low damping ratio for the primary absorber warrants absorbers' quick response to steady and/or transient excitations.

  16. Waveguide design parameters impact on absorption in graphene coated silicon photonic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Kovacevic, Goran; Yamashita, Shinji

    2016-02-22

    In this paper, we propose a new way of estimating the absorption in graphene coated silicon wire waveguides based on a self-developed, modified 2D Finite Difference Method, and use it to obtain a detailed absorption dependency of the waveguide design. For the first time, we observe peaks in the TM mode absorption curves, as well as the reversals of the dominantly absorbed mode with waveguide design variation, both of which have not been predicted previously theoretically, but have been implied through experimental results. We also provide a qualitative explanation of our novel numerical results, and explain how these results can be utilized in optimization of various graphene based integrated devices like optical modulators, photodetectors and optical polarizers. PMID:26907015

  17. Design, synthesis and characterization of captopril prodrugs for enhanced percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Moss, Gary P; Gullick, Darren R; Cox, Paul A; Alexander, Cameron; Ingram, Matthew J; Smart, John D; Pugh, W John

    2006-02-01

    Most drugs are designed primarily for oral administration, but the activity and stability profiles desirable for this route often make them unsuitable for transdermal delivery. We were therefore interested in designing analogues of captopril, a model drug with poor percutaneous penetration, for which the sustained steady-state blood plasma level associated with transdermal delivery (and which is unattainable orally) would be particularly beneficial. Quantitative structure-permeability relationships (QSPRs) predicted that ester and thiol prodrug derivatives of captopril would have lower maximal transdermal flux (J(m)) than the parent drug, since the increases in permeability coefficient (k(p)) of prodrugs would be outweighed by the reductions in aqueous solubility. Therefore, the aim of this study was to synthesize a series of prodrugs of captopril and to determine if a QSPR model could be used to design therapeutically viable prodrugs. Molecules with the highest predicted k(p) values were synthesized and characterized, and J(m) measured in Franz diffusion cells from saturated aqueous donor across porcine skin (fresh and frozen). In-vitro metabolism was also measured. Captopril and the prodrugs crossed the skin relatively freely, with J(m) being highest for ethyl to butyl esters. Substantial first-order metabolism of the prodrugs was observed, suggesting that their enhanced percutaneous absorption was complemented by their metabolic performance. The results suggested that QSPR models provided excellent enhancements in drug delivery. This was not seen at higher lipophilicities, suggesting that issues of solubility need to be considered in conjunction with any such use of a QSPR model. PMID:16451744

  18. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-12-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques. PMID:27216604

  19. Recent Progress Towards Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Enhanced Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zerui; Ji, Haining; Yu, Peng; Wang, Zhiming

    2016-05-01

    Quantum dot solar cells, as a promising candidate for the next generation solar cell technology, have received tremendous attention in the last 10 years. Some recent developments in epitaxy growth and device structures have opened up new avenues for practical quantum dot solar cells. Unfortunately, the performance of quantum dot solar cells is often plagued by marginal photon absorption. In this review, we focus on the recent progress made in enhancing optical absorption in quantum dot solar cells, including optimization of quantum dot growth, improving the solar cells structure, and engineering light trapping techniques.

  20. Design of porous C@Fe3O4 hybrid nanotubes with excellent microwave absorption.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fanbin; Wei, Wei; Chen, Xiangnan; Xu, Xiaoling; Jiang, Man; Jun, Lu; Wang, Yong; Zhou, Zuowan

    2016-01-28

    An efficient method was developed to fabricate a porous hybridizing nanotubes structure of amorphous carbon interspersed among Fe3O4 (C@Fe3O4) with a ∼200 nm diameter and ∼70 nm wall thickness. The as-structured porous nanotubes with ferromagnetic behaviour exhibited excellent microwave absorption properties, including a strong ability to attenuate the electromagnetic (EM) wave, and they are also lightweight. Adding only 10 wt% of the as-prepared sample into paraffin can show a maximum reflection loss of -45.0 dB at 6.18 GHz with a sample thickness of 3.4 mm. The absorption mechanism, which results from its porous nanotubes structure, multi-interfaces, dielectric-magnetic integration and geometric effect, is proposed to explain the excellent EM absorption performance. Furthermore, the synthesis strategy presented herein can be expended as a facile approach to synthesizing related carbon-based nanostructures for functional design and applications. PMID:26698330

  1. Design and synthesis of new optical-power-limiting chromophores with enhanced two-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Charles W.; Elandaloussi, El H.; Casstevens, Martin K.; Kumar, Deepak N.; Weibel, John F.; Burzynski, Ryszard

    1999-10-01

    There has been considerable recent interest in the design of new organic chromophores, oligomers and polymers with potentially large two-photon cross-sections for a variety of applications that span such diverse areas as photo-dynamic therapy to optical power limiting of nanosecond and picosecond laser pulses. One particularly attractive system is based on poly[p-phenylene vinylene] (PPV) oligomers containing electron-donating substituents. We have recently designed and synthesized several PPV dimers with bis- diphenylamino) donor groups attached to the terminal phenyl rings, and have demonstrated that these materials have very large two-photon cross-sections for nanosecond pulses. It is probable that these enhanced cross-sections are due to excited state absorption following the initial two-photon absorption. We have also examined bis- (diphenylamino)diphenylpolyenes, and more recently extended our design concept to dendrimer structures based on bis- (diphenylamino)stilbene repeat units. Initial studies on the dendrimer structures and bis-(diphenylamino)-PPV dimer reveal extremely large two-photon cross-sections which we have also ascribed to probable excited-state absorption. The efficacy of this design approach will be discussed, as well as projected future design paradigms for even greater TPA enhancement.

  2. Computational and experimental study of a multi-layer absorptivity enhanced thin film silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajimirza, Shima; Howell, John R.

    2014-08-01

    We report on the computational design, fabrication and validation of a multi-layer silicon based thin film solar cell. The cell structure consists of a thin absorber layer of amorphous silicon deposited on a back-reflector aluminum layer and coated on top with ITO transparent conductive oxide. The structure is mounted on a glass substrate. We first use constrained optimization techniques along with numerical solvers of the electromagnetic equations (i.e. FDTD) to tune the geometry of the design. The resulting structure suggests that photon absorptivity in the thin film silicon can be enhanced by as much as 100% over the uncoated layer. The proposed design is then fabricated using thin film deposition techniques, along with a control sample of bare silicon absorber for comparison. AFM imaging and spectrophotometry experiments are applied to image and record the surface roughness and measure the reflectivity spectrum of the sample. Using the measured reflectivity spectrum, we then use inverse optimization to estimate the realized thin film dimensions, deposition error and unwanted oxidation volume. At the end, we use a statistical Monte Carlo analysis as a second method of verification to demonstrate that the measured spectra are in accordance with the expected curves from simulation, and to estimate the effects of fabrication error.

  3. Low-cost, heated, and/or cooled flow-through cell for transmission x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentoft, R. E.; Deutsch, S. E.; Gates, B. C.

    1996-06-01

    A transmission x-ray absorption spectroscopy cell that can be used for air-sensitive samples with in situ treatment is described. The cell is designed with a relatively small size for use with air-sensitive powdered catalyst samples that must be loaded in a glove box. Samples can be treated in situ with gas flow or vacuum and temperature control up to 500 °C. The cell is constructed of stainless steel and designed for durability as well as ease of repair. The cells are vacuum tight and equipped with beryllium windows sealed with vacuum O-ring flanges for easy loading. Each cell, with all parts excluding the windows, costs about 2700.

  4. Light absorption enhancement in thin-film solar cells using whispering gallery modes in dielectric nanospheres

    SciTech Connect

    Grandidier, Jonathan; Callahan, Dennis M; Munday, Jeremy N; Atwater, Harry A.

    2011-03-07

    A novel approach to increasing light absorption in thin-film solar cells is demonstrated. This new method involves redirecting the incident sunlight into the cell via coupling to the whispering gallery modes of dielectric spheres, which lie atop the cell. Such a scheme leads to a predicted current enhancement of >12% for a-Si.

  5. Significant light absorption enhancement in silicon thin film tandem solar cells with metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Boyuan; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yinan; Jia, Baohua

    2016-05-01

    Enhancing the light absorption in microcrystalline silicon bottom cell of a silicon-based tandem solar cell for photocurrent matching holds the key to achieving the overall solar cell performance breakthroughs. Here, we present a concept for significantly improving the absorption of both subcells simultaneously by simply applying tailored metallic nanoparticles both on the top and at the rear surfaces of the solar cells. Significant light absorption enhancement as large as 56% has been achieved in the bottom subcells. More importantly the thickness of the microcrystalline layer can be reduced by 57% without compromising the optical performance of the tandem solar cell, providing a cost-effective strategy for high performance tandem solar cells.

  6. Significant light absorption enhancement in silicon thin film tandem solar cells with metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Cai, Boyuan; Li, Xiangping; Zhang, Yinan; Jia, Baohua

    2016-05-13

    Enhancing the light absorption in microcrystalline silicon bottom cell of a silicon-based tandem solar cell for photocurrent matching holds the key to achieving the overall solar cell performance breakthroughs. Here, we present a concept for significantly improving the absorption of both subcells simultaneously by simply applying tailored metallic nanoparticles both on the top and at the rear surfaces of the solar cells. Significant light absorption enhancement as large as 56% has been achieved in the bottom subcells. More importantly the thickness of the microcrystalline layer can be reduced by 57% without compromising the optical performance of the tandem solar cell, providing a cost-effective strategy for high performance tandem solar cells. PMID:27040376

  7. Alternative designs for nanocrystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madhavan, Atul

    Nanocrystalline silicon is an attractive material for solar cells. It has very small grains, about 20 nm, and yet its electronic properties are very similar to those of crystalline silicon. The material exhibits smaller mobilities than crystalline Silicon, but the minority carrier lifetimes are reasonable. It is known that the properties of the material depend critically upon deposition parameters, in particular, the degree of grain boundary passivation achieved during growth and grain size. Previous work has shown that as the material grows, the grains tend to agglomerate into a cluster, and the development of this cluster leads to poorer electronic properties. The traditional method for overcoming such clustering has been to change the hydrogen to silane dilution ratio as the material grows, keeping the material near its crystalline to amorphous transition zone. However, this method is dependent upon the precise growth chemistry and is not suitable for mass production. In this project, we develop a new device design, a superlattice comprising alternating layers of amorphous and nanocrystalline silicon, which allows one to precisely control the agglomeration of grains without having to resort to hydrogen profiling techniques. We study structural properties such as grain size and the degree of crystallnity, and electronic properties such as carrier diffusion lengths and defect densities. We show that an appropriate design of the superlattice allows one to minimize defect densities and maximize carrier diffusion lengths. We also study how to reduce series resistance in solar cells, and show that an appropriate combination of superlattice and contacts can lead to devices with high fill factors and good solar cell efficiencies. We also report on a new discovery, namely that the optical absorption itself depends critically upon grain size. Larger grain sizes, up to 50 nm, lead to increased optical absorption, a totally unexpected and very useful discovery for devices

  8. Plasmon coupled 2D random medium for enhanced absorption in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bingi, Jayachandra; Vadakke Matham, Murukeshan

    2015-07-01

    Random textures are proved to be better for energy harvesting in solar cells. In this research, we have studied the absorption properties of a random dielectric medium with plasmonic nanostructures in it. This structure has shown significant enhancement in broad band absorption of light spectrum and higher extinction of near infrared wavelengths. We also discuss several strategies to improve the solar cell efficiency based on dielectric and plasmonic random media. Finally, a comparative study of solar cell efficiencies with flat, periodic and random structures as active medium and back reflectors is carried out with a proposal for possible potential solar cell configurations.

  9. Design of plasmonic photodetector with high absorptance and nano-scale active regions.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jingshu; Wu, Zhiwei; Li, Yuan; Zhao, Yanli

    2016-08-01

    We propose a novel plasmonic photodetector with high responsivity, utilizing nano-scale active regions. This design can be applied to diverse materials (group III-V or IV materials) and different operation wavelengths covering the O-U bands. The periodic structure utilizing Surface Plasmon Polariton Bloch Waves (SPP-BWs) has low optical power loss. FDTD simulation shows an absorptance of 74.4% which means a responsivity of about 0.74 A/W at 1550 nm. The low capacitance brings low noise, reduced power consumption, and a high electrical bandwidth which is estimated to be 140 GHz. Among the plasmonic PDs with inherent high speeds but low responsivities, our design makes the obvious progress on improving the absorptance. PMID:27505787

  10. Management of light absorption in extraordinary optical transmission based ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashooq, Kishwar; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2016-05-01

    Although ultra-thin-film solar cells can be attractive in reducing the cost, they suffer from low absorption as the thickness of the active layer is usually much smaller than the wavelength of incident light. Different nano-photonic techniques, including plasmonic structures, are being explored to increase the light absorption in ultra-thin-film solar cells. More than one layer of active materials with different energy bandgaps can be used in tandem to increase the light absorption as well. However, due to different amount of light absorption in different active layers, photo-generated currents in different active layers will not be the same. The current mismatch between the tandem layers makes them ineffective in increasing the efficiency. In this work, we investigate the light absorption properties of tandem solar cells with two ultra-thin active layers working as two subcells and a metal layer with periodically perforated holes in-between the two subcells. While the metal layer helps to overcome the current mismatch, the periodic holes increase the absorption of incident light by helping extraordinary optical transmission of the incident light from the top to the bottom subcell, and by coupling the incident light to plasmonic and photonic modes within ultra-thin active layers. We extensively study the effects of the geometry of holes in the intermediate metal layer on the light absorption properties of tandem solar cells with ultra-thin active layers. We also study how different metals in the intermediate layer affect the light absorption; how the geometry of holes in the intermediate layer affects the absorption when the active layer materials are changed; and how the intermediate metal layer affects the collection of photo-generated electron-hole pairs at the terminals. We find that in a solar cell with 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester top subcell and copper indium gallium selenide bottom subcell, if the periodic holes in the metal layer are square or

  11. Cell damage in near-infrared multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, K.; Liang, H.; Berns, M. W.; Tromberg, B. J.

    1996-07-01

    We report on cell damage of single cells confined in continuous-wave (cw), near-infrared (NIR) multimode optical traps as a result of multiphoton absorption phenomena. Trapping beams at NIR wavelengths less than 800 nm are capable of damaging cells through a two-photon absorption process. Cell damage is more pronounced in multimode cw traps compared with single-frequency true cw NIR traps because of transient power enhancement by longitudinal mode beating. Partial mode locking in tunable cw Ti:sapphire lasers used as trapping beam sources can produce unstable subnanosecond pulses at certain wavelengths that amplify multiphoton absorption effects significantly. We recommend the use of single-frequency long-wavelength NIR trapping beams for optical micromanipulation of vital cells.

  12. Absorption enhancement in thin film a-Si solar cells with double-sided SiO2 particle layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Le; Wang, Qing-Kang; Shen, Xiang-Qian; Chen, Wen; Huang, Kun; Liu, Dai-Ming

    2015-10-01

    Light absorption enhancement is very important for improving the power conversion efficiency of a thin film a-Si solar cell. In this paper, a thin-film a-Si solar cell model with double-sided SiO2 particle layers is designed, and then the underlying mechanism of absorption enhancement is investigated by finite difference time domain (FDTD) simulation; finally the feasible experimental scheme for preparing the SiO2 particle layer is discussed. It is found that the top and bottom SiO2 particle layers play an important role in anti-reflection and light trapping, respectively. The light absorption of the cell with double-sided SiO2 layers greatly increases in a wavelength range of 300 nm-800 nm, and the ultimate efficiency increases more than 22% compared with that of the flat device. The cell model with double-sided SiO2 particle layers reported here can be used in varieties of thin film solar cells to further improve their performances. Project supported by the National High-Tech Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2011AA050518), the University Research Program of Guangxi Education Department, China (Grant No. LX2014288), and the Natural Science Foundation of Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region, China (Grant No. 2013GXNSBA019014).

  13. Design considerations for enhancing absorption in semiconductors on metals through surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Bohn, Christopher D; Agrawal, Amit; Lee, Youngmin; Choi, Charles J; Davis, Matthew S; Haney, Paul M; Lezec, Henri J; Szalai, Veronika A

    2014-04-01

    Surface plasmon polaritons have attracted attention for energy applications such as photovoltaic and photoelectrochemical cells because of their ability to improve optical absorption in thin films. We show that surface plasmon polaritons enhance absorption most significantly in materials with small positive real permittivity and large positive imaginary permittivity, e.g. organics or CdTe. Additional losses, accounting for dissipation in the metal and the existence of a cutoff frequency above which polaritons are no longer bound, are incorporated into efficiency calculations. Owing to these losses, devices with optical absorption based solely on SPPs will necessarily always have a lower efficiency than that predicted by the Shockley-Queisser limit. Calculations are presented for specific materials, including crystalline and amorphous Si, GaAs, CdTe, a P3HT:PCBM blend, α-Fe2O3 and rutile TiO2, as well as for general materials of arbitrary permittivity. Guidelines for selecting absorber materials and determining whether specific materials are good candidates for improving optical absorption with SPPs are presented. PMID:24557085

  14. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles. PMID:23592631

  15. Spectral properties of molecular iodine in absorption cells filled to specified saturation pressure.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Šarbort, Martin; Acef, Ouali; Burck, Frédéric Du; Chiodo, Nicola; Holá, Miroslava; Číp, Ondřej; Lazar, Josef

    2014-11-01

    We present the results of measurement and evaluation of spectral properties of iodine absorption cells filled at certain saturation pressure. A set of cells made of borosilicate glass instead of common fused silica was tested for their spectral properties in greater detail with special care for the long-term development of the absorption media purity. The results were compared with standard fused silica cells and the high quality of iodine was verified. A measurement method based on an approach relying on measurement of linewidth of the hyperfine transitions is proposed as a novel technique for iodine cell absorption media purity evaluation. A potential application in laser metrology of length is also discussed. PMID:25402909

  16. Absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashko, Pavlo; Peresunko, Olexander; Zelinska, Natalia; Alonova, Marina

    2014-08-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  17. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application. PMID:25607485

  18. Semi-active control of piezoelectric coating's underwater sound absorption by combining design of the shunt impedances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yang; Li, Zhaohui; Huang, Aigen; Li, Qihu

    2015-10-01

    Piezoelectric shunt damping technology has been applied in the field of underwater sound absorption in recent years. In order to achieve broadband echo reduction, semi-active control of sound absorption of multi-layered piezoelectric coating by shunt damping is significant. In this paper, a practical method is proposed to control the underwater sound absorption coefficients of piezoelectric coating layers by combining design of the shunt impedance that allows certain sound absorption coefficients at setting frequencies. A one-dimensional electro-acoustic model of the piezoelectric coating and the backing is established based on the Mason equivalent circuit theory. First, the shunt impedance of the coating is derived under the constraint of sound absorption coefficient at one frequency. Then, taking the 1-3 piezoelectric composite coating as an example, the sound absorption properties of the coating shunted to the designed shunt impedance are investigated. Next, on the basis of that, an iterative method for two constrained frequencies and an optimizing algorithm for multiple constrained frequencies are provided for combining design of the shunt impedances. At last, an experimental sample with four piezoelectric material layers is manufactured, of which the sound absorption coefficients are measured in an impedance tube. The experimental results show good agreement with the finite element simulation results. It is proved that a serial R-L circuit can control the peak frequency, maximum and bandwidth of the sound absorption coefficient and the combining R-L circuits shunted to multiple layers can control the sound absorption coefficients at multiple frequencies.

  19. Design of multilayered grating couplers as key elements of a fully integrated IR-absorption sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasberger, Juergen; Jakoby, Bernhard

    2008-08-01

    For the online characterization of fluids regarding their chemical composition, the miniaturization of an IR-absorption sensor at application-specific distinguished wavelengths for the mid-IR-region promises outstanding features. Utilizing micromachining technology facilitates the integration of all required components (including thermal emitter and detector) into a complete sensor system. The absorption is sensed in the evanescent field of an appropriately designed slab mono-mode waveguide (ZnSe, n=2.42) residing on a BaF2-substrate (n=1.44), which represents the central element of the system. A typical application for such a system is, e.g., the characterization of engine oil oxidation in terms of the absorption at 5.85 μm as an indicator for deterioration. The thermal generation and detection of mid-IR-radiation is preferred over expensive and sophisticated quantum well devices. However, the spatial and non-coherent character of thermally generated IR-radiation requires an extension of the numerical methods established for coherent light sources for a proper design of the system's grating couplers, which act as key elements determining the system performance. These couplers yield efficient coupling into and out of the sensing waveguide and provide the required spectral filtering at the same time. In the actually projected implementation, a multilayer waveguide Si/BaF2/ZnSe is used, where the silicon substrate practically represents a rear-reflector in the grating region featuring several advantages compared to simpler grating couplers. In this contribution we discuss the modelling of the coupling of non-coherent, thermally generated and detected IR-radiation by means of these multilayer grating couplers in the context of a fully integrated IR-absorption sensor system.

  20. Control of absorptive and reflective mechanism to optimize noise barrier design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Wai-Fat

    Noise generated from transportation systems can be effectively reduced by the erection of absorptive barriers. However, environmental engineers have long been aware of the conflict between the acoustic performance and structural durability of the absorptive material held inside the barriers. To optimize the design, the abatement of the diffraction noise at top of the barrier is not the only consideration, but the reflection noise is also an important factor. In this dissertation, it is attempted to combine the advantages of absorptive and diffusive mechanism on the barrier to reduce the diffraction and reflection noise. From the experimental result, it is found that the reflecting property of high frequency sound wave is similar with the optical wave. However, the reflecting property of low frequency sound wave is relatively complicated. For the prediction of the reflection effect, the image source with virtual barrier model is developed. This program can locate the critical reflection zone with the different tilted angles of barrier. With the aid of the data, a partial tilted barrier with special panel absorber is designed. The special panel absorber composes of a vibrating metal membrane which is fixed tightly on a structural frame and the narrow air backing partitions inside. Since the span of the new design is shortened and the boundary is fixed, the stiffness and damping are relatively higher than the traditional one. Thus design of panel absorber utilizing structural damping instead of air damping improves the structural durability and acoustic absorption performance. To abate the diffraction noise from the top of barriers, the extended V-shape barrier is developed. The upper part of barrier towards is extended the side near of source to increase the height of shadow zone behind the barrier. The concept of V-shape device is providing two separates obstacle structure along the line of sight between source and receiver, the sound is diffracted over the top

  1. Coherent population trapping on 87Rb atoms in small-size absorption cells with buffer gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermak, S. V.; Petrenko, M. V.; Semenov, V. V.

    2016-02-01

    Coherent population trapping (CPT) on 87Rb atoms in neon atmosphere has been studied in small-size glass absorption cells under conditions of pumping with narrow-band laser radiation at the D2 line of the main doublet. Parameters of the absorption signal have been measured in 3-mm-diameter cells at buffer gas (Ne) pressures varied within 200-400 Torr, cell temperatures within 65-120°C, and pumping radiation power densities within 30-400 μW/cm2. Optimum values of the buffer gas pressures, cell temperature, and pumping power are determined at which the short-term instability of the resonance line is at minimum. Orientational shifts of the CPT resonance signal in gas-filled cells and small-size cells with antirelaxation coating have been compared.

  2. Optofluidic single-cell absorption flow analyzer for point-of-care diagnosis of malaria.

    PubMed

    Banoth, Earu; Kasula, Vamshi Krishna; Jagannadh, Veerendra Kalyan; Gorthi, Sai Siva

    2016-06-01

    In this work, an optofluidic flow analyzer, which can be used to perform malaria diagnosis at the point-of-care is demonstrated. The presented technique is based on quantitative optical absorption measurements carried out on a single cell level for a given population of Human Red Blood Cells (RBCs). By measuring the optical absorption of each RBC, the decrease in the Hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in the cytoplasm of the cell due to the invasion of malarial parasite is detected. Cells are assessed on a single cell basis, as they pass through a microfluidic channel. The proposed technique has been implemented with inexpensive off-the-shelf components like laser diode, photo-detector and a micro-controller. The ability of the optofluidic flow analyzer to asses about 308,049 cells within 3 minutes has been demonstrated. The presented technique is capable of detecting very low parasitemia levels with high sensitivity. PMID:26192714

  3. The role of front and back electrodes in parasitic absorption in thin-film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccard, Mathieu; Cuony, Peter; Hänni, Simon; Stuckelberger, Michael; Haug, Franz-Josef; Meillaud, Fanny; Despeisse, Matthieu; Ballif, Christophe

    2014-07-01

    When it comes to parasitic absorption in thin-film silicon solar cells, most studies focus on one electrode only, most of the time the substrate (in n-i-p configuration) or superstrate (in p-i-n configuration). We investigate here simultaneously the influence of the absorption in both front and back electrodes on the current density of tandem micromorph solar cells in p-i-n configuration. We compare four possible combinations of front and back electrodes with two different doping levels, but identical sheet resistance and identical light-scattering properties. In the infrared part of the spectrum, parasitic absorption in the front or back electrode is shown to have a similar effect on the current generation in the cell, which is confirmed by modeling. By combining highly transparent front and back ZnO electrodes and high-quality silicon layers, a micromorph device with a stabilized efficiency of 11.75% is obtained.

  4. Reciprocal regulation of the primary sodium absorptive pathways in rat intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Coon, Steven; Kekuda, Ramesh; Saha, Prosenjit; Sundaram, Uma

    2011-03-01

    Sodium absorption in the mammalian small intestine occurs predominantly by two primary pathways that include Na/H exchange (NHE3) and Na-glucose cotransport (SGLT1) on the brush border membrane (BBM) of villus cells. However, whether NHE3 and SGLT1 function together to regulate intestinal sodium absorption is unknown. Nontransformed small intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-18) were transfected with either NHE3 or SGLT1 small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and were grown in confluent monolayers on transwell plates to measure the effects on Na absorption. Uptake studies were performed as well as molecular studies to determine the effects on NHE3 and SGLT1 activity. When IEC-18 monolayers were transfected with silencing NHE3 RNA, the cells demonstrated decreased NHE3 activity as well as decreased NHE3 mRNA and protein. However, in NHE3 siRNA-transected cells, SGLT1 activity, mRNA, and protein in the BBM were significantly increased. Thus, inhibition of NHE3 expression regulates the expression and function of SGLT1 in the BBM of intestinal epithelial cells. In addition, IEC-18 cells transected with silencing SGLT1 RNA demonstrated an inhibition of Na-dependent glucose uptake and a decrease in SGLT1 activity, mRNA, and protein levels. However, in these cells, Na/H exchange activity was significantly increased. Furthermore, NHE3 mRNA and protein levels were also increased. Therefore, the inhibition of SGLT1 expression stimulates the transcription and function of NHE3 and vice versa in the BBM of intestinal epithelial cells. Thus this study demonstrates that the major sodium absorptive pathways together function to regulate sodium absorption in epithelial cells. PMID:21148403

  5. Multilayer thin film design for far ultraviolet polarizers using an induced transmission and absorption technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Torr, Douglas G.

    1993-01-01

    An explanation of induced transmission for spectral regions excluding the far ultraviolet (FUV) is given to better understand how induced transmission and absorption can be used to design effective polarizers in the FUV spectral region. We achieve high s-polarization reflectance and a high degree of polarization (P equals (Rs-Rp)/(Rs+Rp)) by means of a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on an opaque thick film of Al as the substrate. For example, our polarizer designed for the Lyman-alpha line (lambda equals 121.6 nm) has 87.95 percent reflectance for the s-polarization case and 0.43 percent for the p-polarization case, with a degree of polarization of 99.03 percent. If a double reflection polarizer is made with this design, it will have a degree of polarization of 99.99 percent and s-polarization throughput of 77.35 percent.

  6. Enhancing energy absorption in quantum dot solar cells via periodic light-trapping microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Christopher Wayne; Fu, Yulan; Lopez, Rene

    2016-09-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) solar cells prove to be promising devices for optoelectronic applications due to their tunable absorption range, deep infrared absorption capabilities, and straightforward processability. However, there remains a need to further enhance their device performance—particularly when one has to adhere to strict physical limitations on their physical structure. Here we present a three-dimensional numerical model of CQD solar cells in COMSOL Multiphysics based on the finite element method. With this model we have simulated the optical characteristics of several CQD solar cells across varying photonic structures and physical parameters to investigate how distinct photonic structures may enhance the light absorption and current output of CQD solar cells using identical physical parameters. Of the many cells simulated, one notable model increased the predicted current in the active layer PbS by 69.33% as compared to a flat solar cell with identical physical parameters, and produced a current of 24.18 mA cm‑2 by implementing a cross-shaped photonic structure built on top of a flat substrate of glass and ITO. This cross-shaped model serves as a key example of how unique photonic structures can be implemented to further enhance light absorption.

  7. The effect of particle vertical positioning on the absorption enhancement in plasmonic organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shu-Yi; Borca-Tasciuc, Diana-Andra; Kaminski, Deborah A.

    2012-06-01

    The light absorption enhancement of an organic solar cell with plasmonic nanoparticles (NP) embedded in the active layer is studied employing 3D finite element simulation. The effect of the vertical positioning of the particle monolayer inside the active layer is elucidated. The results indicate that the highest enhancement is obtained when the particles lay at the bottom of the active layer, an organization less difficult to control accurately in practice. The paper also discusses the difference in the absorption enhancement obtained for two existing definitions currently used in the literature. The results show that models assessing absorption by taking both host and nanoparticles into consideration may overpredict the enhancement even when integration is carried out only over the wavelength interval where the host absorption dominates.

  8. Non-resonant below-bandgap two-photon absorption in quantum dot solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tian; Dagenais, Mario

    2015-04-27

    We study the optically nonlinear sub-bandgap photocurrent generation facilitated by an extended tailing distribution of states in an InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) solar cell. The tailing states function as both the energy states for low energy photon absorption and the photocarriers extraction pathway. One of the biggest advantages of our method is that it can clearly differentiate the photocurrent due to one-photon absorption (1PA) process and two-photon absorption (2PA) process. Both 1PA and 2PA photocurrent generation efficiency in an InAs/GaAs QD device operated at 1550 nm have been quantitatively evaluated. A two-photon absorption coefficient β = 5.7 cm/GW is extracted.

  9. Absorption and quasiguided mode analysis of organic solar cells with photonic crystal photoactive layers.

    PubMed

    Tumbleston, John R; Ko, Doo-Hyun; Samulski, Edward T; Lopez, Rene

    2009-04-27

    We analyze optical absorption enhancements and quasiguided mode properties of organic solar cells with highly ordered nanostructured photoactive layers comprised of the bulk heterojunction blend, poly-3-hexylthiophene/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and a low index of refraction conducting material (LICM). This photonic crystal geometry is capable of enhancing spectral absorption by approximately 17% in part due to the excitation of quasiguided modes near the band edge of P3HT:PCBM. A nanostructure thickness between 200 nm and 300 nm is determined to be optimal, while the LICM must have an index of refraction approximately 0.3 lower than P3HT:PCBM to produce absorption enhancements. Quasiguided modes that differ in lifetime by an order of magnitude are also identified and yield absorption that is concentrated in the P3HT:PCBM flash layer. PMID:19399146

  10. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  11. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2015-10-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  12. Design of Cellular Composite Sandwich Panels for Maximum Blast Resistance Via Energy Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Jennifer Righman; Su, Hong

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a design methodology for optimizing the energy absorption under blast loads of cellular composite sandwich panels. A combination of dynamic finite element analysis (FEA) and simplified analytical modeling techniques are used. The analytical modeling calculates both the loading effects and structural response resulting from user-input charge sizes and standoff distances and offers the advantage of expediting iterative design processes. The FEA and the analytical model results are compared and contrasted then used to compare the energy response of various cellular composite sandwich panels under blast loads, where various core shapes and dimensions are the focus. As a result, it is concluded that the optimum shape consists of vertically-oriented webs while the optimum dimensions can be generally described as those which cause the most inelasticity without failure of the webs. These dimensions are also specifically quantified for select situations. This guidance is employed, along with the analytical method developed by the authors and considerations of the influences of material properties, to suggest a general design procedure that is a simple yet sufficiently accurate method for design. The suggested design approach is also demonstrated through a design example.

  13. Rational molecular design towards Vis/NIR absorption and fluorescence by using pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY and its highly conjugated structures for organic photovoltaics.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Soji; Iino, Taku; Saeki, Akinori; Seki, Shu; Kobayashi, Nagao

    2015-02-01

    Pyrrolopyrrole aza-BODIPY (PPAB) developed in our recent study from diketopyrrolopyrrole by titanium tetrachloride-mediated Schiff-base formation reaction with heteroaromatic amines is a highly potential chromophore due to its intense absorption and fluorescence in the visible region and high fluorescence quantum yield, which is greater than 0.8. To control the absorption and fluorescence of PPAB, particularly in the near-infrared (NIR) region, further molecular design was performed using DFT calculations. This results in the postulation that the HOMO-LUMO gap of PPAB is perturbed by the heteroaromatic moieties and the aryl-substituents. Based on this molecular design, a series of new PPAB molecules was synthesized, in which the largest redshifts of the absorption and fluorescence maxima up to 803 and 850 nm, respectively, were achieved for a PPAB consisting of benzothiazole rings and terthienyl substituents. In contrast to the sharp absorption of PPAB, a PPAB dimer, which was prepared by a cross-coupling reaction of PPAB monomers, exhibited panchromatic absorption across the UV/Vis/NIR regions. With this series of PPAB chromophores in hand, a potential application of PPAB as an optoelectronic material was investigated. After identifying a suitable PPAB molecule for application in organic photovoltaic cells based on evaluation using time-resolved microwave conductivity measurements, a maximized power conversion efficiency of 1.27 % was achieved. PMID:25533757

  14. Optimizing light absorption in a thin-film p-i-n solar cell using a quasi-periodic grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atalla, Mahmoud R. M.

    2014-03-01

    A p-i-n solar cell is best suited for strong absorbers with poor collection capabilities. However, the absorption naturally decreases at photon energies close to the electronic bandgap of the semiconductor. We hypothesized that a quasi-periodic surface textures in the role of diffraction gratings at the back contact can efficiently scatter light increasing the optical path length inside the absorber layer. The effect of quasi-periodic corrugated backing metallic contact of various types was studied theoretically. To help optimizing the design of the quasi periodic grating the corresponding canonical problem was considered. The absorption of light was calculated using the rigorous coupled-wave approach. The n- and i-layers consist of isotropic nonhomogeneous multilayered semiconductor.

  15. Improving optical absorptivity of natural dyes for fabrication of efficient dye-sensitized solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmatzadeh, Reza; Mohammadi, Ahmad

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and cheap dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using natural dyes from Pastinaca sativa and Beta vulgaris. Natural dyes are environmentally and economically superior to ruthenium-based dyes because they are nontoxic and cheap. However, the conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells based on natural dyes is low. One way to improve the DSSC performance is to enhance the absorptivity of extracted dyes. We investigated the influence of various factors in the extraction process, such as utilization of different extraction approaches, the acidity of extraction solvent, and different compounds of solvents on the optical absorption spectra. It was found that we could considerably enhance the optical absorptivity of dye and consequently the performance of DSSC by choosing a proper mixture of ethanol and water for extracting solvent and also the acidity of dye solution.

  16. Broadband absorption enhancement in plasmonic thin-film solar cells with grating surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Li; Huo, Yiping; Zhao, Kaijun; Zhao, Ting; Li, Yuan

    2015-10-01

    The plasmonic thin-film solar cells with grating surface is structured and simulated by Comsol Multiphysics software using finite element method. The absorption efficiency of solar cells has been systemically studied by considering structure characteristic parameters. The absorption of grating surface cell is much broader and stronger than that of smooth surface on a-Si at the wavelength from 400 to 700 nm. The value of total absorption efficiency (TAE) increases from 47% to 69.3%. The embedded Ag nanoparticle array contributes to the improvement of the absorption of a-Si at longer wavelength range. The localized surface plasmon resonance is induced by Ag nanoparticles, and so that the TAE is increased to 75.1% when the radius of nanoparticle is 60 nm at the bottom of a-Si with periodic width 200 nm. The grating surface always plays a role to suppress light scattering from the active region, so more light can be absorbed again by a-Si in the infrared-region. Therefore, the results have significance in providing a theoretical foundation for the applications of thin-film solar cell.

  17. Multilayer Thin Film Polarizer Design for Far Ultraviolet using Induced Transmission and Absorption Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jongmin; Zukic, Muamer; Wilson, Michele M.; Park, Jung Ho; Torr, Douglas G.

    1994-01-01

    Good theoretical designs of far ultraviolet polarizers have been reported using a MgF2/Al/MgF2 three layer structure on a thick Al layer as a substrate. The thicknesses were determined to induce transmission and absorption of p-polarized light. In these designs Al optical constants were used from films produced in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV: 10(exp -10) torr). Reflectance values for polarizers fabricated in a conventional high vacuum (p approx. 10(exp -6 torr)) using the UHV design parameters differed dramatically from the design predictions. Al is a highly reactive material and is oxidized even in a high vacuum chamber. In order to solve the problem other metals have been studied. It is found that a larger reflectance difference is closely related to higher amplitude and larger phase difference of Fresnel reflection coefficients between two polarizations at the boundary of MgF2/metal. It is also found that for one material a larger angle of incidence from the surface normal brings larger amplitude and phase difference. Be and Mo are found good materials to replace Al. Polarizers designed for 121.6 nm with Be at 60 deg and with Mo at 70 deg are shown as examples.

  18. Clean coal technology III 10 MW demonstration of gas suspension absorption. Final public design report

    SciTech Connect

    1995-06-01

    This report provides the nonproprietary design information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA)`` Demonstration Project at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emission Research (CER). The 10 MW Demonstration of GSA program is designed to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating the flue gas from a boiler burning high sulfur coal. This project involves design, manufacturing, construction and testing of a retrofitted GSA system. This report presents a nonproprietary description of the technology and overall process performance requirements, plant location and plant facilities. The process, mechanical, structural and electrical design of the GSA system as well as project cost information are included. It also includes a description the modification or alterations made during the course of construction and start-up. Plant start-up provisions, environmental considerations and control, monitoring and safety considerations are also addressed for the process. This report, initially drafted in 1993, covers design information available prior to startup of the demonstration project. It does not reflect the results obtained in that project, which is now complete.

  19. Random Conjugated Copolymers with Panchromatic Absorption for High-Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Jae Woong; Jo, Won Ho

    2013-03-01

    One of the most important issues for polymer solar cells (PSCs) is to develop conjugated polymers with broad light absorption, high mobility and appropriate orientation to provide effective pathways to electrode. Particularly, the broad light absorption of the polymer is important to enhance the power conversion efficiency because the limited absorption leads to low current in comparison with other inorganic-based solar cells. A fascinating approach to extend light absorption is the synthesis of copolymers composed of several chromophores. Among various building blocks, diketopyrrolo[3,4-c]pyrrole (DPP) and 6,6'-[3,3']biindolylidene-2,2'-dione (isoindigo) have attracted much interest since they are easily accessible and exhibit promising optoelectronic properties. Here, we report random conjugated copolymers consisting of DPP and isoindigo as co-electron acceptor of donor-acceptor conjugated polymer. The random copolymers exhibited not only broad light absorption but also low-lying HOMO levels. Also, the predominant face-on orientation of the copolymers is beneficial for vertical charge transport in PSCs. The combination of excellent optoelectrical properties and favorable molecular conformation makes copolymers promising candidate for active material in high performance PSCs.

  20. In vitro characterization of the intestinal absorption of methylmercury using a Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Marta; Vélez, Dinoraz; Devesa, Vicenta

    2014-02-17

    Methylmercury (CH3Hg) is one of the forms of mercury found in food, particularly in seafood. Exposure to CH3Hg is associated with neurotoxic effects during development. In addition, methylmercury has been classified by the International Agency for Research on Cancer as a possible human carcinogen. Although the diet is known to be the main source of exposure, few studies have characterized the mechanisms involved in the absorption of this contaminant. The present study examines the absorption process using the Caco-2 cell line as a model of the intestinal epithelium. The results indicate that transport across the intestinal cell monolayer in an absorptive direction occurs mainly through passive transcellular diffusion. This mechanism coexists with carrier-mediated transcellular transport, which has an active component. The participation of H(+)- and Na(+)-dependent transport was observed. Inhibition tests point to the possible participation of amino acid transporters (B(0,+) system, L system, and/or y(+)L system) and organic anion transporters (OATs). Our study suggests the participation in CH3Hg absorption of transporters that have already been identified as being responsible for the transport of this species in other systems, although further studies are needed to confirm their participation in intestinal absorption. It should be noted that CH3Hg experiences important cellular acumulation (48-78%). Considering the toxic nature of this contaminant, this fact could affect intestinal epithelium function. PMID:24397474

  1. The absorption of ultraviolet light by cell nuclei. A technique for identifying neoplastic change

    SciTech Connect

    Baisden, C.R.; Booker, D.; Wright, R.D. )

    1989-11-01

    A technique for measuring the absorption of 260-nm ultraviolet light by cell nuclei is described. The results of such measurements of normal thyroid epithelial cells and benign and malignant thyroid neoplastic cells demonstrate a progressive increase in absorbance that correlates with the histologic appearance of neoplasia. The possible theoretic basis for this phenomenon is explored. The increased nuclear absorbance observed in neoplastic cells is hypothesized to result from the disruption of hydrogen bonds between the DNA base pairs, which allows unwinding of the double helix and loss of the normal control of mitosis.

  2. Nano-crystalline silicon solar cell architecture with absorption at the classical 4n2 limit

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Rana; Xu, Chun

    2011-07-04

    We develop a periodically patterned conformal photonic-plasmonic crystal based solar architecture for a nano-crystalline silicon solar cell, through rigorous scattering matrix simulations. The solar cell architecture has a periodic array of tapered silver nano-pillars as the back-reflector coupled with a conformal periodic structure at the top of the cell. The absorption and maximal current, averaged over the entire range of wavelengths, for this solar cell architecture is at the semi-classical 4n{sup 2} limit over a range of common thicknesses (500-1500 nm) and slightly above the 4n{sup 2} limit for a 500 nm nc-Si cell. The absorption exceeds the 4n{sup 2} limit, corrected for reflection loss at the top surface. The photonic crystal cell current is enhanced over the flat Ag back-reflector by 60%, for a thick 1000 nm nc-Si layer, where predicted currents exceed 31 mA/cm{sup 2}. The conformal structure at the top surface focuses light within the absorber layer. There is plasmonic concentration of light, with intensity enhancements exceeding 7, near the back reflector that substantially enhances absorption.

  3. Applications of Two-Photon Absorption in Medicine and Biology Enabled by Specially Designed Biological Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobizhev, M.

    2008-05-01

    We quantitatively study how the two-photon absorption (2PA) properties of biological molecules depend on their structure. 2PA is advantageous over regular one-photon absorption because of deeper penetration and more localized excitation in biological tissues. However, 2PA cross sections of biological chromophores are usually rather small to be useful in real life applications. Using quantum-mechanical few-level description of molecular electronic states, we interpret our data and predict new structures with considerably increased 2PA cross sections. These new materials either synthesized or genetically engineered make 2PA-based techniques applicable in medicine and biology. We show how our new porphyrin photosensitizers with drastically enhanced 2PA (˜1000 times compared to regular porphyrins) can be used for in vivo two-photon-induced closing of blood vessels in Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The second example describes the application of fluorescent proteins in two-photon laser microscopy of biological cells. We demonstrate how the 2PA properties of fluorescent proteins can be considerably improved by smart mutations of the environment of chromophore inside the protein.

  4. Integration of a molten carbonate fuel cell with a direct exhaust absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalef, Pere; Samuelsen, Scott

    A high market value exists for an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product throughout the world. While high-temperature, molten carbonate fuel cells are being commercially deployed with combined heat and power (CHP) and absorption chillers are being commercially deployed with heat engines, the energy efficiency and environmental attributes of an integrated high-temperature fuel cell-absorption chiller product are singularly attractive for the emerging distributed generation (DG) combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) market. This study addresses the potential of cooling production by recovering and porting the thermal energy from the exhaust gas of a high-temperature fuel cell (HTFC) to a thermally activated absorption chiller. To assess the practical opportunity of serving an early DG-CCHP market, a commercially available direct fired double-effect absorption chiller is selected that closely matches the exhaust flow and temperature of a commercially available HTFC. Both components are individually modeled, and the models are then coupled to evaluate the potential of a DG-CCHP system. Simulation results show that a commercial molten carbonate fuel cell generating 300 kW of electricity can be effectively coupled with a commercial 40 refrigeration ton (RT) absorption chiller. While the match between the two "off the shelf" units is close and the simulation results are encouraging, the match is not ideal. In particular, the fuel cell exhaust gas temperature is higher than the inlet temperature specified for the chiller and the exhaust flow rate is not sufficient to achieve the potential heat recovery within the chiller heat exchanger. To address these challenges, the study evaluates two strategies: (1) blending the fuel cell exhaust gas with ambient air, and (2) mixing the fuel cell exhaust gases with a fraction of the chiller exhaust gas. Both cases are shown to be viable and result in a temperature drop and flow rate increase of the

  5. Proliferation and mRNA expression of absorptive villous cell markers and mineral transporters in prolactin-exposed IEC-6 intestinal crypt cells.

    PubMed

    Teerapornpuntakit, Jarinthorn; Wongdee, Kannikar; Thongbunchoo, Jirawan; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2012-06-01

    During pregnancy and lactation, prolactin (PRL) enhances intestinal absorption of calcium and other minerals for fetal development and milk production. Although an enhanced absorptive efficiency is believed to mainly result from the upregulation of mineral transporters in the absorptive villous cells, some other possibilities, such as PRL-enhanced crypt cell proliferation and differentiation to increase the absorptive area, have never been ruled out. Here, we investigated cell proliferation and mRNA expression of mineral absorption-related genes in the PRL-exposed IEC-6 crypt cells. As expected, the cell proliferation was not altered by PRL. Inasmuch as the mRNA expressions of villous cell markers, including dipeptidylpeptidase-4, lactase and glucose transporter-5, were not increased, PRL was not likely to enhance crypt cell differentiation into the absorptive villous cells. In contrast to the previous findings in villous cells, PRL was found to downregulate the expression of calbindin-D(9k), claudin-3 and occludin in IEC-6 crypt cells, while having no effect on transient receptor potential vanilloid family channels-5/6, plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA)-1b and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger-1 expression. In conclusion, IEC-6 crypt cells did not respond to PRL by increasing proliferation or differentiation into villous cells. The present results thus supported the previous hypothesis that PRL enhanced mineral absorption predominantly by increasing transporter expression and activity in the absorptive villous cells. PMID:22281785

  6. Modelling and design of high performance indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, Sandra L.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1989-01-01

    A first principles pn junction device model has predicted new designs for high voltage, high efficiency InP solar cells. Measured InP material properties were applied and device parameters (thicknesses and doping) were adjusted to obtain optimal performance designs. Results indicate that p/n InP designs will provide higher voltages and higher energy conversion efficiencies than n/p structures. Improvements to n/p structures for increased efficiency are predicted. These new designs exploit the high absorption capabilities, relatively long diffusion lengths, and modest surface recombination velocities characteristic of InP. Predictions of performance indicate achievable open-circuit voltage values as high as 943 mV for InP and a practical maximum AM0 efficiency of 22.5 percent at 1 sun and 27 C. The details of the model, the optimal InP structure and the effect of individual parameter variations on device performance are presented.

  7. Design of landfill daily cells.

    PubMed

    Panagiotakopoulos, D; Dokas, I

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this paper is to study the behaviour of the landfill soil-to-refuse (S/R) ratio when size, geometry and operating parameters of the daily cell vary over realistic ranges. A simple procedure is presented (1) for calculating the cell parameters values which minimise the S/R ratio and (2) for studying the sensitivity of this minimum S/R ratio to variations in cell size, final refuse density, working face length, lift height and cover thickness. In countries where daily soil cover is required, savings in landfill space could be realised following this procedure. The sensitivity of minimum S/R to variations in cell dimensions decreases with cell size. Working face length and lift height affect the S/R ratio significantly. This procedure also offers the engineer an additional tool for comparing one large daily cell with two or more smaller ones, at two different working faces within the same landfill. PMID:11720268

  8. Automation of cell-based drug absorption assays in 96-well format using permeable support systems.

    PubMed

    Larson, Brad; Banks, Peter; Sherman, Hilary; Rothenberg, Mark

    2012-06-01

    Cell-based drug absorption assays, such as Caco-2 and MDCK-MDR1, are an essential component of lead compound ADME/Tox testing. The permeability and transport data they provide can determine whether a compound continues in the drug discovery process. Current methods typically incorporate 24-well microplates and are performed manually. Yet the need to generate absorption data earlier in the drug discovery process, on an increasing number of compounds, is driving the use of higher density plates. A simple, more efficient process that incorporates 96-well permeable supports and proper instrumentation in an automated process provides more reproducible data compared to manual methods. Here we demonstrate the ability to perform drug permeability and transport assays using Caco-2 or MDCKII-MDR1 cells. The assay procedure was automated in a 96-well format, including cell seeding, media and buffer exchanges, compound dispense, and sample removal using simple robotic instrumentation. Cell monolayer integrity was confirmed via transepithelial electrical resistance and Lucifer yellow measurements. Proper cell function was validated by analyzing apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical movement of rhodamine 123, a known P-glycoprotein substrate. Apparent permeability and efflux data demonstrate how the automated procedure provides a less variable method than manual processing, and delivers a more accurate assessment of a compound's absorption characteristics. PMID:22357561

  9. Narrowing of sub-Doppler saturated-absorption resonances in multilayer gas cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Izmailov, A. Ch.

    2014-07-01

    We have studied theoretically nontrivial specific features of sub-Doppler resonances of saturated absorption in a multilayer gas cell with a rarefied gas medium, which is a compact analog of a large number of plane-parallel atomic beams. Spatially separated saturating and probing monochromatic laser beams that co- and counterpropagate (at the same frequency) in this cell have been considered. In this situation, the action of the light radiation of the saturating beam on the probing beam is determined by optically pumped atoms that fly between the beams under conditions that the longitudinal components of their velocities experience selection due to a specific geometry of the multilayer cell. Such a selection leads to a narrowing of the sub-Doppler resonance in the absorption of the probing beam and decreases the difference between the structures of this resonance for the cases of co- and counterpropagation of the saturating radiation. We have found that, in the considered multilayer cell, the effective width of the sub-Doppler resonance can be smaller (by a factor of about 1.5) than the extremely narrow characteristic width of the well-known Lamb dip in spectroscopy of saturated absorption in the standard gas cell. Results of this study can be used in atomic spectroscopy of ultrahigh resolution and for the laser-frequency stabilization.

  10. Fano-induced solar absorption enhancement in thin organic photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, Khai Q.; Alù, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    We explore the enhancement mechanisms associated with combined Fano resonances in metasurfaces, demonstrating enhanced absorption efficiency of thin-film organic solar cells over a moderately broad bandwidth of operation. An integrated AM1.5G (air mass 1.5 global solar energy) absorption enhancement of up to 44.6% is obtained, corresponding to an increase in solar absorption at normal incidence from 48% to 69.4%. Fano resonances are induced in arrays of four asymmetric-arranged nanodisks (nanopillars) with small inter-disk gaps, incorporated into an organic thin-film. They are shown to play a dominant role in light-trapping enhancement, mediated by combined localized surface plasmon resonances.

  11. Dielectric gratings for wide-angle, broadband absorption by thin film photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esteban, R.; Laroche, M.; Greffet, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    Optical management is essential to increase absorption in thin photovoltaic cells. In this article, full electromagnetic simulations show that a back mirror and a one-dimensional front SiC sawtooth grating of ˜1 μm dimensions can significantly increase absorption in a thin layer under light concentration. A 50 nm thick GaSb active layer in the described configuration absorbs ˜66% of the incident solar photons above the band gap for a concentration equivalent to a numerical aperture NA=1/√2 . This absorption represents a ˜76% or 26% increase over the same structure but with the grating removed or substituted by an ideal antireflection coating, respectively.

  12. Design of Miniaturized Double-Negative Material for Specific Absorption Rate Reduction in Human Head

    PubMed Central

    Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a double-negative triangular metamaterial (TMM) structure, which exhibits a resounding electric response at microwave frequency, was developed by etching two concentric triangular rings of conducting materials. A finite-difference time-domain method in conjunction with the lossy-Drude model was used in this study. Simulations were performed using the CST Microwave Studio. The specific absorption rate (SAR) reduction technique is discussed, and the effects of the position of attachment, the distance, and the size of the metamaterials on the SAR reduction are explored. The performance of the double-negative TMMs in cellular phones was also measured in the cheek and the tilted positions using the COMOSAR system. The TMMs achieved a 52.28% reduction for the 10 g SAR. These results provide a guideline to determine the triangular design of metamaterials with the maximum SAR reducing effect for a mobile phone. PMID:25350398

  13. Design of microresonator quantum well intensity modulators based on an absorption blue-shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Pile, B.; Taylor, G. W.

    2011-09-01

    A micro resonator quantum well intensity modulator for operation in the wavelength band around 1μm is described. High efficiency 90° bends are used to form the resonator and also provide optimal coupling to the external waveguide. The benefits are to reduce loss, to relax the lithography requirements and to provide more flexible contact designs to the modulator. The characteristics of modulator are analyzed using optical simulation tools and based on measured absorption parameters. The modulator operates with two distinctly different electrode configurations which are both based on the index change calculated using Kramers-Kronig relations. A model including parasitic is developed for HSPICE transient simulations and run in the AGILENT ADS environment. The performance parameters are determined to be an extinction ratio of 10.4dB, a bandwidth of 33GHz, and a dc power less than 1mW for device dimensions of 16×6μm2.

  14. Development of a Fast-Response Ultraviolet Absorption Ozone Sensor: Design and First Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avallone, L. M.; Kalnajs, L. E.

    2005-12-01

    Ozone is one of the most important trace gases in the atmosphere. In the stratosphere it absorbs solar ultraviolet radiation, serving a dual role by protecting life on earth from UV damage and by influencing the temperature structure of that part of the atmosphere. In the lower troposphere, ozone is a pollutant formed by photochemical transformations of anthropogenic emissions such as nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons. In the tropopause region, ozone serves as a powerful greenhouse gas by virtue of its absorption feature at 9.6 μm. Hence, gaining a better understanding of the distribution and variability of ozone abundances and the chemical and dynamical processes that determine the distributions is a critical scientific objective. We have designed a fast-response sensor to measure ozone by ultraviolet absorption. An early version of this instrument flew on two airborne campaigns - COBRA (1999, UND Cessna Citation) and SOLVE (1999/00, DC-8, Arctic) - where it provided 10-second measurements of ozone throughout the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. Recent laboratory work has resulted in vastly improved instrument electronics, allowing for 10 Hz measurements with a precision of better than 20 ppb. Instrument performance and sensitivity have been demonstrated with ground-based measurements in the Antarctic and airborne measurements from the NASA WB-57F during the Plume Ultrafast Measurements Acquisition (PUMA) project. The instrument is compact, lightweight (less than 35 lbs), and power-efficient (less than 100 W), so it is also ideally suited to the UAV environment where power and payload weight are restricted. In this presentation we describe the instrument design and illustrate its performance throughout the troposphere and lower stratosphere.

  15. Analyzing the effect of absorption and refractive index on image formation in high numerical aperture transmission microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Ryan L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    Transmission bright-field microscopy is the clinical mainstay for disease diagnosis where image contrast is provided by absorptive and refractive index differences between tissue and the surrounding media. Different microscopy techniques often assume one of the two contrast mechanisms is negligible as a means to better understand the tissue scattering processes. This particular work provides better understanding of the role of refractive index and absorption within Optical Projection Tomographic Microscopy (OPTM) through the development of a generalized computational model based upon the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The model mimics OPTM by simulating axial scanning of the objective focal plane through the cell to produce projection images. These projection images, acquired from circumferential positions around the cell, are reconstructed into isometric three-dimensional images using the filtered backprojection normally employed in Computed Tomography (CT). The model provides a platform to analyze all aspects of bright-field microscopes, such as the degree of refractive index matching and the numerical aperture, which can be varied from air-immersion to high NA oil-immersion. In this preliminary work, the model is used to understand the effects of absorption and refraction on image formation using micro-shells and idealized nuclei. Analysis of absorption and refractive index separately provides the opportunity to better assess their role together as a complex refractive index for improved interpretation of bright-field scattering, essential for OPTM image reconstruction. This simulation, as well as ones in the future looking at other effects, will be used to optimize OPTM imaging parameters and triage efforts to further improve the overall system design.

  16. A Water Vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR Design for Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Mead, Patricia F.

    2004-01-01

    This system study proposes the deployment of a water vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system on an Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform. The Altair offers improved payload weight and volume performance, and longer total flight time as compared to other commercial UAV's. This study has generated a preliminary design for an Altair based water vapor DIAL system. The design includes a proposed DIAL schematic, a review of mechanical challenges such as temperature and humidity stresses on UAV deployed DIAL systems, an assessment of the available capacity for additional instrumentation (based on the proposed design), and an overview of possible weight and volume improvements associated with the use of customized electronic and computer hardware, and through the integration of advanced fiber-optic and laser products. The results of the study show that less than 17% of the available weight, less than 19% of the volume capacity, and approximately 11% of the electrical capacity is utilized by the proposed water vapor DIAL system on the Altair UAV.

  17. Design and fabrication of solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaughnessy, T. P.

    1978-01-01

    A program conducted for design, fabrication and evaluation of twelve silicon solar cell modules is described. The purpose of the program was to develop a module design consistent with the requirements and objectives of JPL specification and to also incorporate elements of new technologies under development to meet LSSA Project goals. Module development emphasized preparation of a technically and economically competitive design based upon utilization of ion implanted solar cells and a glass encapsulation system. The modules fabricated, tested and delivered were of nominal 2 X 2 foot dimensions and 20 watt minimum rating. Basic design, design rationale, performance and results of environmental testing are described.

  18. Effect of cell-penetrating peptides on the nasal absorption of insulin.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko; Isowa, Koichi; Imai, Jun; Takayama, Kozo

    2009-01-19

    The goal of this study was to evaluate whether cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) affect the nasal absorption of insulin. L- or D-forms of penetratin, or the L- or D-forms of octaarginine (L- or D-R8), was used as first time for nasal insulin delivery. Furthermore, the concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in nasal lavage fluid was determined and a histopathological study of nasal respiratory epithelium was conducted. CPPs dramatically increased nasal insulin absorption, and it was more pronounced for L- and D-penetratin than L- or D-R8. L-penetratin was the most effective promoter of insulin absorption compared with others CPPs. A dose-dependent relationship of L-penetratin and insulin bioavailability was statically significant. The pharmacological availability and bioavailability of nasally administered insulin was up to 76.7% and 50.7% relative to the subcutaneous route, respectively. In contrast, increasing the D-penetratin concentration decreased the efficiency of nasal insulin absorption. There was no significant difference in the release of LDH in nasal lavage fluid and the integrity of nasal respiratory epithelium when L-penetratin was present. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that L-penetratin markedly increased the permeability of insulin across the nasal membrane without causing detectable damage to the integrity of cells in the nasal respiratory mucosa. PMID:18930084

  19. Enhanced absorption in tandem solar cells by applying hydrogenated In2O3 as electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Guanchao; Steigert, Alexander; Manley, Phillip; Klenk, Reiner; Schmid, Martina

    2015-11-01

    To realize the high efficiency potential of perovskite/chalcopyrite tandem solar cells in modules, hydrogenated In2O3 (IO:H) as electrode is investigated. IO:H with an electron mobility of 100 cm2 V-1 s-1 is demonstrated. Compared to the conventional Sn doped In2O3 (ITO), IO:H exhibits a decreased electron concentration and leads to almost no sub-bandgap absorption up to the wavelength of 1200 nm. Without a trade-off between transparency and lateral resistance in the IO:H electrode, the tandem cell keeps increasing in efficiency as the IO:H thickness increases and efficiencies above 22% are calculated. In contrast, the cells with ITO as electrode perform much worse due to the severe parasitic absorption in ITO. This indicates that IO:H has the potential to lead to high efficiencies, which is otherwise constrained by the parasitic absorption in conventional transparent conductive oxide electrode for tandem solar cells in modules.

  20. Proposing a Caco-2/HepG2 cell model for in vitro iron absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Scheers, Nathalie M; Almgren, Annette B; Sandberg, Ann-Sofie

    2014-07-01

    The Caco-2 cell line is well established as an in vitro model for iron absorption. However, the model does not reflect the regulation of iron absorption by hepcidin produced in the liver. We aimed to develop the Caco-2 model by introducing human liver cells (HepG2) to Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2 and HepG2 epithelia were separated by a liquid compartment, which allowed for epithelial interaction. Ferritin levels in cocultured Caco-2 controls were 21.7±10.3 ng/mg protein compared to 7.7±5.8 ng/mg protein in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The iron transport across Caco-2 layers was increased when liver cells were present (8.1%±1.5% compared to 3.5%±2.5% at 120 μM Fe). Caco-2 cells were exposed to 0, 80 and 120 μM Fe and responded with increased hepcidin production at 120 μM Fe (3.6±0.3 ng/ml compared to 2.7±0.3 ng/ml). The expression of iron exporter ferroportin in Caco-2 cells was decreased at the hepcidin concentration of 3.6 ng/ml and undetectable at external addition of hepcidin (10 ng/ml). The apical transporter DMT1 was also undetectable at 10 ng/ml but was unchanged at the lower concentrations. In addition, we observed that sourdough bread, in comparison to heat-treated bread, increased the bioavailability of iron despite similar iron content (53% increase in ferritin formation, 97% increase in hepcidin release). This effect was not observed in monocultured Caco-2 cells. The Caco-2/HepG2 model provides an alternative approach to in vitro iron absorption studies in which the hepatic regulation of iron transport must be considered. PMID:24746839

  1. Design considerations for miniaturized PEM fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, Jeremy P.; Maynard, Helen L.

    In this paper, we consider the design of a miniaturized proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell for powering 0.5-20 W portable telecommunication and computing devices. Our design is implemented on a silicon substrate to take advantage of advanced silicon processing technology in order to minimize production costs. The reduced length scales afforded by silicon processing allow us to consider designs that would be prohibited by excessive Ohmic losses in larger systems. We employ a mathematical model to quantify the effects of the secondary current distribution on two competing cell designs. In addition to the design of the cell itself, we discuss key integration issues and engineering trade-offs relevant to all miniaturized fuel cell systems: air movement, fuel delivery and water balance, thermal management and load handling.

  2. Cascading metallic gratings for broadband absorption enhancement in ultrathin plasmonic solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wen, Long; Sun, Fuhe; Chen, Qin

    2014-04-14

    The incorporation of plasmonic nanostructures in the thin-film solar cells (TFSCs) is a promising route to harvest light into the nanoscale active layer. However, the light trapping scheme based on the plasmonic effects intrinsically presents narrow-band resonant enhancement of light absorption. Here we demonstrate that by cascading metal nanogratings with different sizes atop the TFSCs, broadband absorption enhancement can be realized by simultaneously exciting multiple localized surface plasmon resonances and inducing strong coupling between the plasmonic modes and photonic modes. As a proof of concept, we demonstrate of 66.5% in the photocurrent in an ultrathin amorphous silicon TFSC with two-dimensional cascaded gratings over the reference cell without gratings.

  3. Solution spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L.; Song, I.

    1995-06-12

    A purpose-built spectroelectrochemical cell for in situ fluorescence XAFS (X-ray Absorption Fine Structure) measurements of bulk solution species during constant-potential electrolysis is described. The cell performance was demonstrated by the collection of europium L{sub 3}-edge XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) throughout the course of electrolysis of an aqueous solution of EuCl{sub 3}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O in 1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The europium L{sub 3}-edge resonances reported here for the Eu{sup III} and Eu{sup II} ions demonstrate that their 2p{sub 3/2} {yields} 5d electronic transition probabilities are not the same.

  4. Performance of a Herriott Cell, Designed for Variable Temperatures between 296 and 20 K

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mondelain, Didier; Camy-Peyret, Claude; Mantz, Arlan W.; Tang, Emma; Valentin, Alain

    2007-01-01

    We designed, fabricated and tested a multipath Herriott cell (or off-axis spherical mirror interferometer) to achieve low temperature absorption measurements. The cell is fabricated entirely from copper and the 15 cm radius of curvature copper mirrors have gold coated reflective surfaces. The cell was tested at temperatures between 296 and 30 K with a folded absorption path length of 5.37 m utilizing a lead salt tunable diode laser. Short term temperature stability (1 h) of the Herriott cell is better than 0.005 K under normal operating conditions with a temperature uniformity better than 0.01 K (not measurable). The cell was tested by performing collisional cooling experiments on 13C16O2 in helium at temperatures between 70 and 20 K and by performing more traditional pressure broadening and shift measurements on molecular infrared absorption lines at temperatures between 300 and about 80 K on 13C16O2 methane.

  5. Utility of physiologically based absorption modeling in implementing Quality by Design in drug development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyuan; Lionberger, Robert A; Davit, Barbara M; Yu, Lawrence X

    2011-03-01

    To implement Quality by Design (QbD) in drug development, scientists need tools that link drug products properties to in vivo performance. Physiologically based absorption models are potentially useful tools; yet, their utility of QbD implementation has not been discussed or explored much in the literature. We simulated pharmacokinetics (PK) of carbamazepine (CBZ) after administration of four oral formulations, immediate-release (IR) suspension, IR tablet, extended-release (XR) tablet and capsule, under fasted and fed conditions and presented a general diagram of a modeling and simulation strategy integrated with pharmaceutical development. We obtained PK parameters and absorption scale factors (ASFs) by deconvolution of the PK data for IR suspension under fasted condition. The model was validated for other PK profiles of IR formulations and used to predict PK for XR formulations. We explored three key areas where a modeling and simulation approach impacts QbD. First, the model was used to help identify optimal in vitro dissolution conditions for XR formulations. Second, identification of critical formulations variables was illustrated by a parameter sensitivity analysis of mean particle radius for the IR tablet that showed a PK shift with decreased particle radius, C (max) was increased and T (max) was decreased. Finally, virtual trial simulations allowed incorporation of inter-subject variability in the model. Virtual bioequivalence studies performed for two test formulations suggested that an in vitro dissolution test may be a more sensitive discriminative method than in vivo PK studies. In summary, a well-validated predictive model is a potentially useful tool for QbD implementation in drug development. PMID:21207216

  6. Design improvements in LiBr absorption chillers for solar applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Bourne, J. R.; Ben-Dror, J.; Kimchi, Y.; Vardi, I.

    1981-02-01

    The present article describes a theoretical evaluation of two design improvements made in a lithium bromide absorption chiller which contribute substantially to its performance in solar application. One is the addition of a solution preheater which allows for a considerable reduction in generator size and cost, and improves performance at part load. The other is the addition of an auxiliary generator which enables the chiller to operate at nominal capacity or higher at all times, while utilizing to a maximum the solar radiation available at the time, however small. This is an effective solution to the problem of backup required in all solar-powered systems. The evaluation has been performed by computer simulation and results are presented for the performance of the unit with different configurations of the above systems. The results indicate the limitations on the part of the load to be supplied by the preheater. They point toward the advantage of using an auxiliary generator in a separate shell from the solar-powered generator and with a separate condenser. Operating curves for the chiller with the design improvements are given.

  7. Modular L-design of hydride atomizers for atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Řezáčová, Olga; Dědina, Jiří

    2009-07-01

    A novel modular L-shaped design of hydride atomizer for atomic absorption spectrometry is described. It makes it possible to replace the optical tube of the atomizer and, mainly, to employ optical tubes made also from other materials than fused quartz. The design is useful mainly for further improvement of hydride atomizers based on the multiatomizer concept. Employing selenium hydride as the analyte and arsine as the interferent, a preliminary evaluation of performance of three types of L-shaped multiatomizers based on various optical tubes in terms of sensitivity, linearity of calibration graph and resistance to atomization interferences is made. The "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer was employed as a reference. The L-shaped multiatomizer with the optical tube analogous to that employed in the "classical" T-shaped multiatomizer offers virtually the same performance as the reference multiatomizer. Optical tube made of fused quartz with holes with smaller diameters does not offer significantly better performance compared to the reference T-shaped multiatomizer. However, the L-shaped multiatomizer with optical tube fabricated from porous quartz glass overpowers all the other multiatomizers substantially in terms of the resistance against interferences: even the maximum As interferent concentration of 5 µg ml - 1 does not significantly influence the observed signal. This should be compared with multiatomizers based on plain fused quartz tubes with holes: tolerance limit around 0.5 µg ml - 1 ; interferent concentration of 1 µg ml - 1 causing 20% signal depression.

  8. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments. PMID:21343997

  9. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centomo, P.; Meneghini, C.; Zecca, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 °C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O2, H2, H2O2, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  10. Nanostructured metallic rear reflectors for thin solar cells: balancing parasitic absorption in metal and large-angle scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Claire E. R.; Pillai, Supriya; Green, Martin A.

    2015-12-01

    Rear reflectors for solar cells comprised of metal films with periodic arrays of nanoscale features on their surface can provide significantly enhanced light trapping in the absorber layer. However these structures can also result in significantly increased parasitic absorption into the metal layer at various wavelengths of light. Conversely these highly absorbing resonances can also coincide with the wavelengths which display the largest enhancement to the cell's photocurrent. As such it is important to understand the underlying causes for such photocurrent enhancements and losses in the metal in order to design the optimum structure for use. 3D Finite-difference-time-domain simulations have been used to model a variety of structures and analyze the spatial distribution of absorption within different materials which make up the structure, the angles at which light will be scattered from the rear surface, as well as the idealized short circuit current from each structure integrated across the AM1.5 spectrum. These reveal the properties of these modes at resonant wavelengths at which absorption into both materials is enhanced. Despite the enhanced coupling of light into the metal at these wavelengths, the amount of light scattered back into the absorber at large angles is also significantly boosted. For a large variety of geometries, the impact of this large angle scattering dominates leading to significant increases to a cell's photocurrent. Our simulations allow us to understand the contributions of multiple plasmonic effects occurring in such structures, allowing selection of the most suitable geometries to achieve large-angle scattering in a desired wavelength range.

  11. Doubling absorption in nanowire solar cells with dielectric shell optical antennas.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun-Kyung; Zhang, Xing; Hill, David J; Song, Kyung-Deok; Park, Jin-Sung; Park, Hong-Gyu; Cahoon, James F

    2015-01-14

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) often exhibit efficient, broadband light absorption despite their relatively small size. This characteristic originates from the subwavelength dimensions and high refractive indices of the NWs, which cause a light-trapping optical antenna effect. As a result, NWs could enable high-efficiency but low-cost solar cells using small volumes of expensive semiconductor material. Nevertheless, the extent to which the antenna effect can be leveraged in devices will largely determine the economic viability of NW-based solar cells. Here, we demonstrate a simple, low-cost, and scalable route to dramatically enhance the optical antenna effect in NW photovoltaic devices by coating the wires with conformal dielectric shells. Scattering and absorption measurements on Si NWs coated with shells of SiN(x) or SiO(x) exhibit a broadband enhancement of light absorption by ∼ 50-200% and light scattering by ∼ 200-1000%. The increased light-matter interaction leads to a ∼ 80% increase in short-circuit current density in Si photovoltaic devices under 1 sun illumination. Optical simulations reproduce the experimental results and indicate the dielectric-shell effect to be a general phenomenon for groups IV, II-VI, and III-V semiconductor NWs in both lateral and vertical orientations, providing a simple route to approximately double the efficiency of NW-based solar cells. PMID:25546325

  12. Enhancing the absorption capabilities of thin-film solar cells using sandwiched light trapping structures.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, S; Kirah, K; Ghannam, R; Khalil, A S G; Anis, W

    2015-06-10

    A novel structure for thin-film solar cells is simulated with the purpose of maximizing the absorption of light in the active layer and of reducing the parasitic absorption in other layers. In the proposed structure, the active layer is formed from an amorphous silicon thin film sandwiched between silicon nanowires from above and photonic crystal structures from below. The upper electrical contact consists of an indium tin oxide layer, which serves also as an antireflection coating. A metal backreflector works additionally as the other contact. The simulation was done using a new reliable, efficient and generic optoelectronic approach. The suggested multiscale simulation model integrates the finite-difference time-domain algorithm used in solving Maxwell's equation in three dimensions with a commercial simulation platform based on the finite element method for carrier transport modeling. The absorption profile, the external quantum efficient, and the power conversion efficiency of the suggested solar cell are calculated. A noticeable enhancement is found in all the characteristics of the novel structure with an estimated 32% increase in the total conversion efficiency over a cell without any light trapping mechanisms. PMID:26192857

  13. Potential of optical design in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krc, J.; Campa, A.; Smole, F.; Topic, M.

    2006-04-01

    The potential of three advanced optical designs in tandem micromorph silicon solar cells are analysed by means of optical simulations: enhanced light scattering, intermediate reflector (interlayer) and antireflective coating (ARC) on glass. The effects on quantum efficiency, QE, and short circuit current density, J SC, of the top and bottom cell are investigated. In case of enhanced light scattering, the role of haze parameter and angular distribution function of scattered light is analysed separately. High haze parameter improves light trapping in top and bottom cell. However, the improvement in QE and J SC of the bottom cell is limited at higher haze parameters due to increased absorption in top cell and increased optical losses in realistic textured ZnO/Ag back contact. Broad ADF plays an important role for improving the performances of both, top and bottom cell. The role of refractive index of an interlayer between top and bottom cell is analysed. Significant increases in QE and J SC of the top cell are revealed for small refractive indexes of the interlayer (n < 2.0). At the same time noticeable decrease in the performance of the bottom cell is observed. Optimisation of thickness and refractive index of a single-layer ARC on glass is carried out in order to obtain maximal J SC either in top or in bottom cell. Moderate increases in J SC and QE are obtained for optimised ARC parameters. Among the three optical designs, the greatest potential, considering the improvements in both cells, is revealed for enhanced light scattering.

  14. Quality cell therapy manufacturing by design.

    PubMed

    Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Timmins, Nicholas E; Zandstra, Peter W

    2016-04-01

    Transplantation of live cells as therapeutic agents is poised to offer new treatment options for a wide range of acute and chronic diseases. However, the biological complexity of cells has hampered the translation of laboratory-scale experiments into industrial processes for reliable, cost-effective manufacturing of cell-based therapies. We argue here that a solution to this challenge is to design cell manufacturing processes according to quality-by-design (QbD) principles. QbD integrates scientific knowledge and risk analysis into manufacturing process development and is already being adopted by the biopharmaceutical industry. Many opportunities to incorporate QbD into cell therapy manufacturing exist, although further technology development is required for full implementation. Linking measurable molecular and cellular characteristics of a cell population to final product quality through QbD is a crucial step in realizing the potential for cell therapies to transform healthcare. PMID:27054995

  15. Cesium oscillator strengths measured with a multiple-path-length absorption cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Exton, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption-oscillator-strength measurements for the principal series in cesium were measured using a multiple-path-length cell. The optical arrangement included a movable transverse path for checking the uniformity of the alkali density along the length of the cell and which also allowed strength measurements to be made simultaneously on both strong and weak lines. The strengths measured on the first 10 doublets indicate an increasing trend in the doublet ratio. The individual line strengths are in close agreement with the high resolution measurements of Pichler (1974) and with the calculations of Norcross (1973).

  16. Solar cell array design handbook, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rauschenbach, H. S.

    1976-01-01

    Twelve chapters discuss the following: historical developments, the environment and its effects, solar cells, solar cell filters and covers, solar cell and other electrical interconnections, blocking and shunt diodes, substrates and deployment mechanisms, material properties, design synthesis and optimization, design analysis, procurement, production and cost aspects, evaluation and test, orbital performance, and illustrative design examples. A comprehensive index permits rapid locating of desired topics. The handbook consists of two volumes: Volume 1 is of an expository nature while Volume 2 contains detailed design data in an appendix-like fashion. Volume 2 includes solar cell performance data, applicable unit conversion factors and physical constants, and mechanical, electrical, thermal optical, magnetic, and outgassing material properties. Extensive references are provided.

  17. Advanced cell designs for welded arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Giuliano, M.; Wohlgemuth, J.

    1982-08-01

    In this paper the authors present some solar cell design innovations and associated process technology which can result in practical welded contacts for interconnection into arrays. The principal problem with welded contacts on solar cells relates to electrical and mechanical damage to the shallow diffused front junction of the cell. Design approaches are presented which result in a deeper pn junction under the weld contact point. This moves the location of the junction to a safer distance below the region of heat and pressure resulting from the welding operation. The methods presented can be used with various welding techniques including parallel gap welding, ultrasonic welding, laser spot welding or thermo-compression bonding. Design approaches include the development of a eutectic bonding technique to provide weldable contacts on front and back of the solar cell, as well as a novel integral feedthrough approach which permits welding of both contacts on the back of the cell.

  18. A novel cell compatible impingement system to study in vitro drug absorption from dry powder aerosol formulations.

    PubMed

    Bur, Michael; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Huwer, Hanno; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2009-06-01

    A modified Astra type multistage liquid impinger (MSLI) with integrated bronchial cell monolayers was used to study deposition and subsequent drug absorption on in vitro models of the human airway epithelial barrier. Inverted cell culture of Calu-3 cells on the bottom side of cell culture filter inserts was integrated into a compendial MSLI. Upside down cultivation did not impair the barrier function, morphology and viability of Calu-3 cells. Size selective deposition with subsequent absorption was studied for three different commercially available dry powder formulations of salbutamol sulphate and budesonide. After deposition without size separation the absorption rates from the aerosol formulations differed but correlated with the size of the carrier lactose particles. However, after deposition in the MSLI, simulating relevant impaction and causing the separation of small drug crystals from the carrier lactose, the absorption rates of the three formulations were identical, confirming the bioequivalence of the three formulations. PMID:18771729

  19. Designer T cells by T cell receptor replacement.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Neudorfer, Julia; Weinhold, Monika; Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Noessner, Elfriede; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Charo, Jehad; Schendel, Dolores J; Blankenstein, Thomas; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2006-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is a convenient method to produce antigen-specific T cells for adoptive therapy. However, the expression of two TCR in T cells could impair their function or cause unwanted effects by mixed TCR heterodimers. With five different TCR and four different T cells, either mouse or human, we show that some TCR are strong--in terms of cell surface expression--and replace weak TCR on the cell surface, resulting in exchange of antigen specificity. Two strong TCR are co-expressed. A mouse TCR replaces human TCR on human T cells. Even though it is still poorly understood why some TCRalpha/beta combinations are preferentially expressed on T cells, our data suggest that, in the future, designer T cells with exclusive tumor reactivity can be generated by T cell engineering. PMID:17051621

  20. Designing the inner surface corrugations of hollow fibers to enhance CO2 absorption efficiency.

    PubMed

    Fashandi, Hossein; Zarrebini, Mohammad; Ghodsi, Ali; Saghafi, Reza

    2016-08-15

    For the first time, a low cost strategy is introduced to enhance the efficiency of CO2 absorption using gas-liquid membrane contactors. This is implemented by designing the corrugations in the inner layer of poly(vinyl chloride) hollow fibers (PVC HFs) through changing the bore fluid composition. In fact, the number of corrugations in the HF inner layer is engineered via changing the phase separation time within the inner layer. Such that expedited phase separation leads to highly corrugated inner layer. In contrast, decelerated phase separation is responsible for reduced number of inner layer corrugations. Phase separation causes the initial polymer solution with low viscoelastic moduli to be transferred into polymer-rich domains with high viscoelastic moduli. These domains resist against stretching-induced radial forces toward the center of HF; therefore, the inner layer of HF buckles. Delayed phase separation defers formation of polymer-rich domains and hence, HF with less corrugated inner surface is expected. The phase separation within the HF inner layer is controlled through changing the rate of solvent/nonsolvent exchange. This is conducted by variation the solvent content in the bore fluid; as higher as solvent content, as slower as solvent/nonsolvent exchange. PMID:27179177

  1. Design of mini-multi-gas monitoring system based on IR absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Qiu-lin; Zhang, Wen-dong; Xue, Chen-yang; Xiong, Ji-jun; Ma, You-chun; Wen, Fen

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, a novel non-dispersive infrared ray (IR) gas detection system is described. Conventional devices typically include several primary components: a broadband source (usually an incandescent filament), a rotating chopper shutter, a narrow-band filter, a sample tube and a detector. But we mainly use the mini-multi-channel detector, electrical modulation means and mini-gas-cell structure. To solve the problems of gas accidents in coal mines, and for family safety that results from using gas, this new IR detection system with integration, miniaturization and non-moving parts has been developed. It is based on the principle that certain gases absorb infrared radiation at specific (and often unique) wavelengths. The infrared detection optics principle used in developing this system is mainly analyzed. The idea of multi-gas detection is introduced and guided through the analysis of the single-gas detection. Through researching the design of cell structure, a cell with integration and miniaturization has been devised. By taking a single-chip microcomputer (SCM) as intelligence handling, the functional block diagram of a gas detection system is designed with the analyzing and devising of its hardware and software system. The way of data transmission on a controller area network (CAN) bus and wireless data transmission mode is explained. This system has reached the technology requirement of lower power consumption, mini-volume, wide measure range, and is able to realize multi-gas detection.

  2. Elucidation of the Intestinal Absorption Mechanism of Celastrol Using the Caco-2 Cell Transwell Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Li, Jie; Liu, Lu; Zhang, Yichuan; Luo, Yili; Zhang, Xiaoli; Yang, Peng; Zhang, Manna; Yu, Weifeng; Qu, Shen

    2016-08-01

    Celastrol, a triterpenoid isolated from stem (caulis) of Celastrus orbiculatus Thunb. (Celastraceae), has been known to have various pharmacological effects, including anti-inflammatory, anticancer, and antioxidant activities. However, the mechanism of the intestinal absorption of celastrol is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the intestinal absorption of celastrol using the Caco-2 cell transwell model. First, the bidirectional transport of celastrol in Caco-2 cell monolayers was observed. Then, the effects of time, concentration, temperature, paracellular pathway, and efflux transport inhibition on the transport of celastrol across the Caco-2 cell monolayers were investigated. The P-glycoprotein inhibitor verapamil and cyclosporin A, the multidrug resistance protein 2 inhibitor MK571, and the breast cancer resistance protein inhibitor reserpine were used. Additionally, the effects of celastrol on the activity of P-glycoprotein were evaluated using the rhodamine 123 uptake assay. In this study, we found that the intestinal transport of celastrol was a time- and concentration-dependent active transport. The paracellular pathway was not involved in the transport of celastrol, and the efflux of celastrol was energy dependent. The results indicated that celastrol is a substrate of P-glycoprotein but not multidrug resistance protein 2 or the breast cancer resistance protein. In addition, celastrol could not affect the uptake of rhodamine 123 in Caco-2 cells, which indicated that celastrol could not inhibit or induce the activity of P-glycoprotein. PMID:27159672

  3. SYNCHROTRON RADIATION, FREE ELECTRON LASER, APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR TECHNOLOGY, ETC.: A new cell for X-ray absorption spectroscopy study under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Li-Rong; Che, Rong-Zheng; Liu, Jing; Du, Yong-Hua; Zhou, Ying-Li; Hu, Tian-Dou

    2009-08-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful technique for the investigation of the local environment around selected atoms in condensed matter. XAFS under pressure is an important method for the synchrotron source. We design a cell for a high pressure XAFS experiment. Sintered boron carbide is used as the anvils of this high pressure cell in order to obtain a full XAFS spectrum free from diffraction peaks. In addition, a hydraulic pump was adopted to make in-suit pressure modulation. High quality XAFS spectra of ZrH2 under high pressure (up to 13 GPa) were obtained by this cell.

  4. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-03-01

    The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, commercial design development, and prototype system field trials. The program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size field test to the commercial design. FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) is in the later stage of the multiyear program for development and verification of carbonate fuel cell based power plants supported by DOE/NETL with additional funding from DOD/DARPA and the FuelCell Energy team. FCE has scaled up the technology to full-size and developed DFC{reg_sign} stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment technology to meet product requirements, and acquired high rate manufacturing capabilities to reduce cost. FCE has designed submegawatt (DFC300A) and megawatt (DFC1500 and DFC3000) class fuel cell products for commercialization of its DFC{reg_sign} technology. A significant progress was made during the reporting period. The reforming unit design was optimized using a three-dimensional stack simulation model. Thermal and flow uniformities of the oxidant-In flow in the stack module were improved using computational fluid dynamics based flow simulation model. The manufacturing capacity was increased. The submegawatt stack module overall cost was reduced by {approx}30% on a per kW basis. An integrated deoxidizer-prereformer design was tested successfully at submegawatt scale using fuels simulating digester gas, coal bed methane gas and peak shave (natural) gas.

  5. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, A. S.; Debefve, L. M.; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A.; Ouldchikh, S.; Bare, Simon R.; Basset, J.-M.; Gates, B. C.

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities—to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions—to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported.

  6. Transmission and fluorescence X-ray absorption spectroscopy cell/flow reactor for powder samples under vacuum or in reactive atmospheres.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, A S; Debefve, L M; Bendjeriou-Sedjerari, A; Ouldchikh, S; Bare, Simon R; Basset, J-M; Gates, B C

    2016-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy is an element-specific technique for probing the local atomic-scale environment around an absorber atom. It is widely used to investigate the structures of liquids and solids, being especially valuable for characterization of solid-supported catalysts. Reported cell designs are limited in capabilities-to fluorescence or transmission and to static or flowing atmospheres, or to vacuum. Our goal was to design a robust and widely applicable cell for catalyst characterizations under all these conditions-to allow tracking of changes during genesis and during operation, both under vacuum and in reactive atmospheres. Herein, we report the design of such a cell and a demonstration of its operation both with a sample under dynamic vacuum and in the presence of gases flowing at temperatures up to 300 °C, showing data obtained with both fluorescence and transmission detection. The cell allows more flexibility in catalyst characterization than any reported. PMID:27475549

  7. Photodynamic cancer therapy: fluorescence localization and light absorption spectra of chlorophyll-derived photosensitizers inside cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Rueck, Angelika C.; Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Westphal-Frosch, Christel

    1992-07-01

    The first prerequisite for an optimum effect of photodynamic therapy with chlorophyll- derived photosensitizers is irradiation at the S1 absorption maximum in the red spectral region. This absorption maximum changes its position due to molecular association by 20 to 100 nm depending on the subcellular environment, and must be determined by direct absorption spectrometry in the region of subcellular sensitizer localization. Fluorescence- intensifying video microscopy allows for localization of the sensitizer storage site at or near the Galgi apparatus of OAT 75 small-cell lung carcinoma cells. The absorption maximum at 760 nm taken from spectra of single cells and cell layers determines the postulated optimum condition for dye laser irradiation with bacteriopheophorbide-a-methyl-ester as the sensitizer.

  8. Alginate Inhibits Iron Absorption from Ferrous Gluconate in a Randomized Controlled Trial and Reduces Iron Uptake into Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wawer, Anna A.; Harvey, Linda J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Perez-Moral, Natalia; Sharp, Paul; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous in vitro results indicated that alginate beads might be a useful vehicle for food iron fortification. A human study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that alginate enhances iron absorption. A randomised, single blinded, cross-over trial was carried out in which iron absorption was measured from serum iron appearance after a test meal. Overnight-fasted volunteers (n = 15) were given a test meal of 200 g cola-flavoured jelly plus 21 mg iron as ferrous gluconate, either in alginate beads mixed into the jelly or in a capsule. Iron absorption was lower from the alginate beads than from ferrous gluconate (8.5% and 12.6% respectively, p = 0.003). Sub-group B (n = 9) consumed the test meals together with 600 mg calcium to determine whether alginate modified the inhibitory effect of calcium. Calcium reduced iron absorption from ferrous gluconate by 51%, from 11.5% to 5.6% (p = 0.014), and from alginate beads by 37%, from 8.3% to 5.2% (p = 0.009). In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells were designed to explore the reasons for the difference between the previous in vitro findings and the human study; confirmed the inhibitory effect of alginate. Beads similar to those used in the human study were subjected to simulated gastrointestinal digestion, with and without cola jelly, and the digestate applied to Caco-2 cells. Both alginate and cola jelly significantly reduced iron uptake into the cells, by 34% (p = 0.009) and 35% (p = 0.003) respectively. The combination of cola jelly and calcium produced a very low ferritin response, 16.5% (p<0.001) of that observed with ferrous gluconate alone. The results of these studies demonstrate that alginate beads are not a useful delivery system for soluble salts of iron for the purpose of food fortification. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01528644 PMID:25391138

  9. Analyzing cell structure and dynamics with confocal light scattering and absorption spectroscopic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Le; Vitkin, Edward; Fang, Hui; Zaman, Munir M.; Andersson, Charlotte; Salahuddin, Saira; Modell, Mark D.; Freedman, Steven D.; Hanlon, Eugene B.; Itzkan, Irving; Perelman, Lev T.

    2007-02-01

    We recently developed a new microscopic optical technique capable of noninvasive analysis of cell structure and cell dynamics on the submicron scale [1]. It combines confocal microscopy, a well-established high-resolution microscopic technique, with light scattering spectroscopy (LSS) and is called confocal light absorption and scattering spectroscopic (CLASS) microscopy. CLASS microscopy requires no exogenous labels and is capable of imaging and continuously monitoring individual viable cells, enabling the observation of cell and organelle functioning at scales on the order of 100 nm. To test the ability of CLASS microscopy to monitor cellular dynamics in vivo we performed experiments with human bronchial epithelial cells treated with DHA and undergoing apoptosis. The treated and untreated cells show not only clear differences in organelle spatial distribution but time sequencing experiments on a single cell show disappearance of certain types of organelles and change of the nuclear shape and density with the progression of apoptosis. In summary, CLASS microscopy provides an insight into metabolic processes within the cell and opens doors for the noninvasive real-time assessment of cellular dynamics. Noninvasive monitoring of cellular dynamics with CLASS microscopy can be used for a real-time dosimetry in a wide variety of medical and environmental applications that have no immediate observable outcome, such as photodynamic therapy, drug screening, and monitoring of toxins.

  10. Designing Biomaterials To Direct Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Liechty, William B.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    As stem cells are a cornerstone of regenerative medicine, research efforts have been extensively focused on controlling their self-renewal and differentiation. It is well known that stem cells are tightly regulated by a combination of physical and chemical factors from their complex extracellular surroundings; thus, conventional cell culture approaches based purely on using soluble factors to direct stem cell fate have resulted in limited success. To account for the complexities of native stem-cell niches, biomaterials are actively investigated as artificial extracellular matrices in order to mimic the natural microenvironment. This Perspective highlights important areas related to the design of biomaterials to control stem cell behavior, such as cell-responsive ligands, mechanical signals, and delivery of soluble factors. PMID:23136849

  11. Designing biomaterials to direct stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Liechty, William B; Khademhosseini, Ali; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-11-27

    As stem cells are a cornerstone of regenerative medicine, research efforts have been extensively focused on controlling their self-renewal and differentiation. It is well-known that stem cells are tightly regulated by a combination of physical and chemical factors from their complex extracellular surroundings; thus, conventional cell culture approaches based purely on using soluble factors to direct stem cell fate have resulted in limited success. To account for the complexities of native stem-cell niches, biomaterials are actively investigated as artificial extracellular matrices in order to mimic the natural microenvironment. This Perspective highlights important areas related to the design of biomaterials to control stem cell behavior, such as cell-responsive ligands, mechanical signals, and delivery of soluble factors. PMID:23136849

  12. Cryogenic Absorption Cells Operating Inside a Bruker IFS-125HR: First Results for 13CH4 at 7 Micrometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sung, K.; Mantz, A. W.; Smith, M. A. H.; Brown, L. R.; Crawford, T. J.; Devi, V. M.; Benner, D. C.

    2010-01-01

    New absorption cells designed specifically to achieve stable temperatures down to 66 K inside the sample compartment of an evacuated Bruker IFS-125HR Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS) were developed at Connecticut College and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). The temperature stabilized cryogenic cells with path lengths of 24.29 and 20.38 cm were constructed of oxygen free high conductivity (OFHC) copper and fitted with wedged ZnSe windows using vacuum tight indium seals. In operation, the temperature-controlled cooling by a closed-cycle helium refrigerator achieved stability of 0.01 K. The unwanted absorption features arising from cryodeposits on the cell windows at low temperatures were eliminated by building an internal vacuum shroud box around the cell which significantly minimized the growth of cryodeposits. The effects of vibrations from the closed-cycle helium refrigerator on the FTS spectra were characterized. Using this set up, several high-resolution spectra of methane isotopologues broadened with nitrogen were recorded in the 1200-1800 per centimeter spectral region at various sample temperatures between 79.5 and 296 K. Such data are needed to characterize the temperature dependence of spectral line shapes at low temperatures for remote sensing of outer planets and their moons. Initial analysis of a limited number of spectra in the region of the R(2) manifold of the v4 fundamental band of 13CH4 indicated that an empirical power law used for the temperature dependence of the N2-broadened line widths would fail to fit the observed data in the entire temperature range from 80 to 296 K; instead, it follows a temperature-dependence similar to that reported by Mondelain et al. [17,18]. The initial test was very successful proving that a high precision Fourier transform spectrometer with a completely evacuated optical path can be configured for spectroscopic studies at low temperatures relevant to the planetary atmospheres.

  13. Computational design of small organic dyes with strong visible absorption by controlled quinoidization of the thiophene unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yi Yin; Tu, Wei Han; Manzhos, Sergei

    2014-02-01

    We present rational design of phenothiazine dyes by controlled quinoidization of the thiophene unit. We systematically study the effect of electron-withdrawing functional groups including pseudo- and super-halogens. We propose a new dye where a fumaronitrile unit induces an increase in the bond length alternation and a concurrent red shift in the absorption spectrum vs. the parent dye. The visible absorption peak is predicted at 520 nm, in CH2Cl2 vs. 450 nm for the parent dye. The LUMO and HOMO levels of the new dye are suitable for injection into TiO2 and regeneration by available redox shuttles, respectively.

  14. Gas cell based on optical contacting for fundamental spectroscopy studies with initial reference absorption spectrum of H2O vapor at 1723 K and 0.0235 bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melin, Scott T.; Sanders, Scott T.

    2016-09-01

    A gas cell, using optically contacted sapphire windows to form a hot vapor seal, has been created for high temperature fundamental spectroscopy studies. It is designed to operate at temperatures from 280-2273 K and pressures from vacuum to 1.3 bar. Using the cell in conjunction with an external cavity diode laser spectrometer, a reference H2O vapor absorption spectrum at P=0.0235±0.0036 bar and T=1723±6 K was measured with 0.0001 cm-1 resolution over the 7326-7598 cm-1 range. Comparison of the measured spectrum to simulations reveals errors in both the HITEMP and BT2 databases. This work establishes heated static cell capabilities at temperatures well above the typical limit of approximately 1300 K set by quartz material properties. This paper addresses the design of the cell as well as the cell's limitations.

  15. Insights Gained from Testing Alternate Cell Designs

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; G. K. Housley; M. S. Sohal; D. G. Milobar; Thomas Cable

    2009-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, initially developed by the Forschungszentrum Jülich and now manufactured by the French ceramics firm St. Gobain. These cells have an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. They were initially developed as fuel cells, but are being tested as electrolytic cells in the INL test stands. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed another fuel cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. The NASA cell is structurally symmetrical, with both electrodes supporting the thin electrolyte and containing micro-channels for gas diffusion. This configuration is called a bi

  16. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Unknown

    2000-01-01

    The FCE PDI program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the current full-size field test to the commercial design. The specific objectives selected to attain the overall program goal are: Define power plant requirements and specifications; Establish the design for a multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant; Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial-scale manufacturing facility; Define the stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment packaging arrangement, and module designs; Acquire capability to support developmental testing of stacks and critical BOP equipment to prepare for commercial design; and Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues, and design, build and field test a modular prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness for commercial entry.

  17. Human epithelial cancer cells studied using combined AFM-IR absorption nanoimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Eamonn; Al-Majomaie, Rasoul; Zerulla, Dominic; Al-Rubeai, Mohammed; Rice, James H.

    2014-05-01

    Several recent studies have described the use of infrared (IR) nanoimaging for non-invasive chemical discrimination of subcellular features and intracellular exogenous agents. In this work we outline a number of improvements in both quantitative IR nanoimage analysis and optical system improvements which enable recovery of nanoscale subcellular chemical localization with improved chemical precision. Additionally, we demonstrate how a combination of IR absorption nanoimaging and topographic data can produce subcellular chemical density and complexity maps, which can illustrate several cellular features of interest, including the label free localization of nuclei for both healthy and cancerous cell lines with sub 40nm accuracy. As many cell processes related to disease are governed by the position and dynamics of subcellular features, we present the ability to map biochemical inhomogeneity of cancer cells at nanoscale resolution as a means to explore the subcellular biomechanics underlying carcinogenesis.

  18. Spectroscopy of 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atom in an external absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagayev, S. N.; Baraulya, V. I.; Bonert, A. E.; Goncharov, A. N.; Seydaliev, M. R.

    2001-09-01

    The results of saturated absorption spectroscopy of the intercombination 1S0- 3P1 transition of magnesium atoms at 457 nm in an external absorption cell are presented. A laser system based on a Ti:Sa laser with frequency doubling in a LBO nonlinear crystal was used in these experiments. Saturated absorption resonances of magnesium in an external cell at the 1S0- 3P1 transition have been obtained for the first time. Pressure broadening of resonances equal to 12.5±1.5 kHz/mTorr has been measured.

  19. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  20. An immortal cell line to study the role of endogenous CFTR in electrolyte absorption.

    PubMed

    Bell, C L; Quinton, P M

    1995-01-01

    The intact human reabsorptive sweat duct (RD) has been a reliable model for investigations of the functional role of "endogenous" CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) in normal and abnormal electrolyte absorptive function. But to overcome the limitations imposed by the use of fresh, intact tissue, we transformed cultured RD cells using the chimeric virus Ad5/SV40 1613 ori-. The resultant cell line, RD2(NL), has remained differentiated forming a polarized epithelium that expressed two fundamental components of absorption, a cAMP activated Cl- conductance (GCl) and an amiloride-sensitive Na+ conductance (GNa). In the unstimulated state, there was a low level of transport activity; however, addition of forskolin (10(-5) M) significantly increased the Cl- diffusion potential (Vt) generated by a luminally directed Cl- gradient from -15.3 +/- 0.7 mV to -23.9 +/- 1.1 mV, n = 39; and decreased the transepithelial resistance (Rt) from 814.8 +/- 56.3 omega.cm2 to 750.5 +/- 47.5 omega.cm2, n = 39, (n = number of cultures). cAMP activation, anion selectivity (Cl- > I- > gluconate), and a dependence upon metabolic energy (metabolic poisoning inhibited GCl), all indicate that the GCl expressed in RD2(NL) is in fact CFTR-GCl. The presence of an apical amiloride-sensitive GNa was shown by the amiloride (10(-5) M) inhibition of GNa as indicated by a reduction of Vt and equivalent short circuit current by 78.0 +/- 3.1% and 77.9 +/- 2.6%, respectively, and an increase in Rt by 7.2 +/- 0.8%, n = 36. In conclusion, the RD2(NL) cell line presents the first model system in which CFTR-GCl is expressed in a purely absorptive tissue.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7535636

  1. Mapping the amide I absorption in single bacteria and mammalian cells with resonant infrared nanospectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldassarre, L.; Giliberti, V.; Rosa, A.; Ortolani, M.; Bonamore, A.; Baiocco, P.; Kjoller, K.; Calvani, P.; Nucara, A.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared (IR) nanospectroscopy performed in conjunction with atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a novel, label-free spectroscopic technique that meets the increasing request for nano-imaging tools with chemical specificity in the field of life sciences. In the novel resonant version of AFM-IR, a mid-IR wavelength-tunable quantum cascade laser illuminates the sample below an AFM tip working in contact mode, and the repetition rate of the mid-IR pulses matches the cantilever mechanical resonance frequency. The AFM-IR signal is the amplitude of the cantilever oscillations driven by the thermal expansion of the sample after absorption of mid-IR radiation. Using purposely nanofabricated polymer samples, here we demonstrate that the AFM-IR signal increases linearly with the sample thickness t for t \\gt 50 nm, as expected from the thermal expansion model of the sample volume below the AFM tip. We then show the capability of the apparatus to derive information on the protein distribution in single cells through mapping of the AFM-IR signal related to the amide-I mid-IR absorption band at 1660 cm-1. In Escherichia Coli bacteria we see how the topography changes, observed when the cell hosts a protein over-expression plasmid, are correlated with the amide I signal intensity. In human HeLa cells we obtain evidence that the protein distribution in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus is uneven, with a lateral resolution better than 100 nm.

  2. Is selective absorption of ultrasoft x-rays biologically important in mammalian cells?

    PubMed

    Goodhead, D T; Thacker, J; Cox, R

    1981-11-01

    This paper tests whether photon absorption processes in particular atomic element(s) may be responsible for the observed high relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of ultrasoft X-rays. The effectiveness of titanium K characteristic X-rays (4.55 keV) is compared with previous observations for aluminium (1.5 keV) and carbon (0.28 keV) K ultrasoft X-rays. For a given absorbed dose, five times more Ti K than Al K photons are absorbed in phosphorus; since Al K X-rays are observed to be more effective in killing human and hamster cells it is concluded that absorption in phosphorus does not play a dominant lethal role. This is supported by the observation that the absolute number of Al K photons absorbed in phosphorus of DNA of human fibroblasts is less than 1 per lethal event. For no element is the relative number of absorbed photons of the three X-ray energies even approximately proportional to their observed RBEs. The effectiveness of ultrasoft X-rays is apparently not due to selective absorption but rather to the secondary electrons; consequently the mechanism of action should be common to the large numbers of low energy secondary electrons produced by most other ionising radiations, including gamma-rays. PMID:7323149

  3. NMR imaging of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized cells, and kombu algal biosorbents.

    PubMed

    Nestle, N F; Kimmich, R

    1996-09-01

    In this contribution, an NMR imaging study of heavy metal absorption in alginate, immobilized-cell biosorbents, and kombu (Laminaria japonica) algal biomass is presented. This method provides the good possibility of directly monitoring the time evolution of the spatial distribution of the ions in the materials. From these results, we demonstrate that rare earth ions are absorbed with a steep reaction front that can be described very well with a modified shrinking core model, while copper ions are absorbed with a more diffuse front. PMID:18629817

  4. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  5. Towards the development of simple methods for determining normal absorptances of open-cell foams based on opaque materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guévelou, Simon; Rousseau, Benoit; Domingues, Gilberto; Vicente, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    The knowledge of the normal spectral absorptances of open-cell foams used as volumetric solar receivers is required to finely compute their thermal efficiencies. For this purpose, absorptances of a set of virtual open-cell foams of varying porosities, beforehand generated by using a numerical generator, are computed thanks to a ray tracing code. This work details the contribution of the intrinsic optical properties of the solid phase to the normal spectral absorptance of open-cell foams, through the statistical analysis of both the path and the events undergone by a ray, which is permitted by the ray tracing code. This study allows us to propose a robust and linear relationship that links the normal spectral absorptance to the porosity and the intrinsic optical properties of the solid phase, which is considered as optically thick.

  6. Advances in fuel cell vehicle design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauman, Jennifer

    Factors such as global warming, dwindling fossil fuel reserves, and energy security concerns combine to indicate that a replacement for the internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicle is needed. Fuel cell vehicles have the potential to address the problems surrounding the ICE vehicle without imposing any significant restrictions on vehicle performance, driving range, or refuelling time. Though there are currently some obstacles to overcome before attaining the widespread commercialization of fuel cell vehicles, such as improvements in fuel cell and battery durability, development of a hydrogen infrastructure, and reduction of high costs, the fundamental concept of the fuel cell vehicle is strong: it is efficient, emits zero harmful emissions, and the hydrogen fuel can be produced from various renewable sources. Therefore, research on fuel cell vehicle design is imperative in order to improve vehicle performance and durability, increase efficiency, and reduce costs. This thesis makes a number of key contributions to the advancement of fuel cell vehicle design within two main research areas: powertrain design and DC/DC converters. With regards to powertrain design, this research first analyzes various powertrain topologies and energy storage system types. Then, a novel fuel cell-battery-ultracapacitor topology is presented which shows reduced mass and cost, and increased efficiency, over other promising topologies found in the literature. A detailed vehicle simulator is created in MATLAB/Simulink in order to simulate and compare the novel topology with other fuel cell vehicle powertrain options. A parametric study is performed to optimize each powertrain and general conclusions for optimal topologies, as well as component types and sizes, for fuel cell vehicles are presented. Next, an analytical method to optimize the novel battery-ultracapacitor energy storage system based on maximizing efficiency, and minimizing cost and mass, is developed. This method can be applied

  7. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2004-08-01

    The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where the fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report.

  8. Molten carbonate fuel cell stack design options

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Petri, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Significant strides in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) life and performance have been made during the last 20 years. Results include single cell performance improvement from 10 watts/ft/sup 2/ to 120 watts/ft/sup 2/, testing of several sub-scale stacks, and significant reductions in cost. In the 1980s, attention has turned toward stack-related issues including component dimensional and structural stability, cathode dissolution, sulfur poisoning, hardware design, electrolyte management, carbon dioxide conservation, internal reforming, and systems considerations. This paper discusses MCFC stack hardware design options and present a brief introduction to MCFC technology. 4 refs., 8 figs.

  9. Molten carbonate fuel cell stack design options

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Petri, R.J.

    1986-03-01

    Significant strides in molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) life and performance have been made during the last 20 years. Results include single cell performance improvement from 10 watts/ft/sup 2/ to 120 watts/ft/sup 2/, testing of several sub-scale stacks, and significant reductions in cost. In the 1980's, attention has turned toward stack-related issues including component dimensional and structural stability, cathode dissolution, sulfur poisoning, hardware design, electrolyte management, carbon dioxide conservation, internal reforming, and systems considerations. This paper discusses MCFC stack hardware design options and present a brief introduction to MCFC technology. 4 references, 8 figures.

  10. Disentangling vibronic and solvent broadening effects in the absorption spectra of coumarin derivatives for dye sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Cerezo, Javier; Avila Ferrer, Francisco J; Santoro, Fabrizio

    2015-05-01

    We simulate from first-principles the absorption spectra of five structure-related coumarin derivatives utilized in dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), investigating the vibronic and solvent contributions to the position and width of the spectra in ethanol. Ground and excited state potential energy surfaces (PESs) are modeled by Density Functional Theory (DFT) and its time-dependent (TD) expression for the excited state (TD-DFT). The solute vibronic structure associated with the spectrum is calculated by a TD formalism, accounting for both Duschinsky and temperature effects, while solvent inhomogeneous broadening is evaluated according to Marcus' theory, computing the solvent reorganization energy by the state-specific implementation of the polarizable continuum model (PCM) within TD-DFT. We adopted both the standard hybrid PBE0 and the range separated CAM-B3LYP functionals showing that the latter performs better both concerning the vibronic and solvent-induced contributions to the absorption lineshape. The different predictions of the two functionals are then rationalized in terms of the charge transfer (CT) character of the transitions showing that, in this class of compounds, it is strongly dependent on the nuclear structure. Such a dependence introduces a bias in the PBE0 PES that has a drastic impact on the vibronic spectra. We show that both the intrinsic vibronic structure and the solvent broadening play a relevant role in differentiating the absorption width of the five dyes. In this sense, our results provide a guide to understand the sources of spectral broadening of this family of dyes, a valuable help for a rational design of new molecules to improve DSSC devices. PMID:25848730

  11. Update on designing and building minimal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C.; Forster, Anthony C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Minimal cells comprise only the genes and biomolecular machinery necessary for basic life. Synthesizing minimal and minimized cells will improve understanding of core biology, enhance development of biotechnology strains of bacteria, and enable evolutionary optimization of natural and unnatural biopolymers. Design and construction of minimal cells is proceeding in two different directions: “top-down” reduction of bacterial genomes in vivo and “bottom-up” integration of DNA/RNA/protein/membrane syntheses in vitro. Major progress in the last 5 years has occurred in synthetic genomics, minimization of the Escherichia coli genome, sequencing of minimal bacterial endosymbionts, identification of essential genes, and integration of biochemical systems. PMID:20638265

  12. Absorption spectra and photovoltaic characterization of chlorophyllins as sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    PubMed

    Calogero, Giuseppe; Citro, Ilaria; Crupi, Cristina; Di Marco, Gaetano

    2014-11-11

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) based on Chlorine-e6 (Chl-e6), a Chlorophyll a derivative, and Chl-e6 containing Cu, have been investigated by carrying out incident photon to current efficiency (IPCE) and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The effect of the metallic ion and the influence of the solvent polarity on the dye aggregation and their absorption bands have been analysed by performing electronic absorption measurements. The dependence of the photoelectrochemical parameters of these DSSCs on the electrolyte by the addition of pyrimidine and/or pyrrole has been discussed in details. For the first time I-V curves for a DSSC based on copper Chl-e6 dye have been shown and compared with Zn based chlorophyllin. Furthermore, the performance of a Cu-Chl-e6 based DSSC has been deeply improved by a progressive optimization of the TiO2 multilayer photoanode overcoming the best data reported in literature so far for this dye. It's worth to emphasize that, the analysis reported in this paper supplies very useful information which paves the way to further detailed studies turned to the employment of natural pigments as sensitizers for solar cells. PMID:24892526

  13. High reflected cubic cavity as long path absorption cell for infrared gas sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jia; Gao, Qiang; Zhang, Zhiguo

    2014-10-01

    One direct and efficient method to improve the sensitivity of infrared gas sensors is to increase the optical path length of gas cells according to Beer-Lambert Law. In this paper, cubic shaped cavities with high reflected inner coating as novel long path absorption cells for infrared gas sensing were developed. The effective optical path length (EOPL) for a single cubic cavity and tandem cubic cavities were investigated based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measuring oxygen P11 line at 763 nm. The law of EOPL of a diffuse cubic cavity in relation with the reflectivity of the coating, the port fraction and side length of the cavity was obtained. Experimental results manifested an increase of EOPL for tandem diffuse cubic cavities as the decrease of port fraction of the connecting aperture f', and the EOPL equaled to the sum of that of two single cubic cavities at f'<0.01. The EOPL spectra at infrared wavelength range for different inner coatings including high diffuse coatings and high reflected metallic thin film coatings were deduced.

  14. Novel focal point multipass cell for absorption spectroscopy on small sized atmospheric pressure plasmas.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jörn; Hänel, Mattis; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    A novel focal point multipass cell (FPMPC) was developed, in which all laser beams propagate through a common focal point. It is exclusively constructed from standard optical elements. Main functional elements are two 90(∘) off-axis parabolic mirrors and two retroreflectors. Up to 17 laser passes are demonstrated with a near-infrared laser beam. The number of laser passes is precisely adjustable by changing the retroreflector distance. At the focal point beams are constricted to fit through an aperture of 0.8 mm. This is shown for 11 beam passes. Moreover, the fast temporal response of the cell permits investigation of transient processes with frequencies up to 10 MHz. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the FPMPC for atmospheric pressure plasma jets, laser absorption spectroscopy on the lowest excited argon state (1s5) was performed on a 1 MHz argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. From the obtained optical depth profiles, the signal-to-noise ratio was deduced. It is shown that an elevation of the laser pass number results in an proportional increase of the signal-to-noise ratio making the FPMPC an appropriate tool for absorption spectroscopy on plasmas of small dimensions. PMID:27131664

  15. Absorption of 3(2H)-furanones by human intestinal epithelial Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Stadler, Nicole Christina; Somoza, Veronika; Schwab, Wilfried

    2009-05-13

    A number of 3(2H)-furanones are synthesized by fruits and have been found in cooked foodstuffs, where they impart flavor and odor because of their low perception thresholds. They show genotoxic properties in model studies but are also ranked among the antioxidants and anticarcinogens. This study examined the efficiency of intestinal absorption and metabolic conversion of 3(2H)-furanones by using Caco-2 cell monolayers as an intestinal epithelial cell model. The permeability of each agent was measured in both the apical to basal and basal to apical directions. 2,5-Dimethyl-4-methoxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMMF) showed the highest absorption rate in all experiments, while similar amounts of 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone (HDMF), 4-hydroxy-2(or 5)-ethyl-5(or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF), and 4-hydroxy-5-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HMF) were taken up. HDMF-glucoside was almost not absorbed but was hydrolyzed to a small extent. The transport of 3(2H)-furanones could not be saturated even at levels of 500 microM and occurred in both directions. Because the uptake was only slightly reduced by apical hyperosmolarity, passive diffusion by paracellular transport is proposed. PMID:19338346

  16. Novel focal point multipass cell for absorption spectroscopy on small sized atmospheric pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winter, Jörn; Hänel, Mattis; Reuter, Stephan

    2016-04-01

    A novel focal point multipass cell (FPMPC) was developed, in which all laser beams propagate through a common focal point. It is exclusively constructed from standard optical elements. Main functional elements are two 90∘ off-axis parabolic mirrors and two retroreflectors. Up to 17 laser passes are demonstrated with a near-infrared laser beam. The number of laser passes is precisely adjustable by changing the retroreflector distance. At the focal point beams are constricted to fit through an aperture of 0.8 mm. This is shown for 11 beam passes. Moreover, the fast temporal response of the cell permits investigation of transient processes with frequencies up to 10 MHz. In order to demonstrate the applicability of the FPMPC for atmospheric pressure plasma jets, laser absorption spectroscopy on the lowest excited argon state (1s5) was performed on a 1 MHz argon atmospheric pressure plasma jet. From the obtained optical depth profiles, the signal-to-noise ratio was deduced. It is shown that an elevation of the laser pass number results in an proportional increase of the signal-to-noise ratio making the FPMPC an appropriate tool for absorption spectroscopy on plasmas of small dimensions.

  17. Light absorption and conversion in solar cell based on Si:O alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scapellato, G. G.; Rubino, M.; Crupi, I.; Di Marco, S.; Simone, F.; Mirabella, S.

    2013-08-01

    Thin film Si:O alloys have been grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition, as intrinsic or highly doped (1 to 5 at. % of B or P dopant) layers. UV-visible/near-infrared spectroscopy revealed a great dependence of the absorption coefficient and of the optical gap (Eg) on the dopant type and concentration, as Eg decreases from 2.1 to 1.9 eV, for the intrinsic or highly p-doped sample, respectively. Thermal annealing up to 400 °C induces a huge H out-diffusion which causes a dramatic absorption increase and a reduction of Eg, down to less than 1.8 eV. A prototypal solar cell has been fabricated using a 400 nm thick, p-i-n structure made of Si:O alloy embedded within flat transparent conductive oxides. Preliminary electrical analyses show a photovoltaic (PV) effect with an open circuit voltage of 0.75 V and a spectral conversion efficiency blue-shifted in comparison to a-Si:H based cell, as expected since the higher Eg in Si:O alloy. These data are presented and discussed, suggesting Si:O alloy as promising material for PV device fabrication.

  18. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Design Improvement

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    This annual report provides results of Energy Research Corporation`s technical approach to performing the program `Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) Product Design Improvement` covered under the DOE-ERC Cooperative Agreement DE-FC21-95MC31184. This work is supported by DOE/METC and DOD/DARPA as well as ERC Team funds. The objective of the DOE-sponsored program is to advance the direct carbonate fuel cell technology to a level suitable for commercial entry for civilian applications. The overall objective of the DOD/DARPA initiative is to adapt the civilian 2 MW-Class fuel cell power plant for dual fuel DOD applications. This program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from the power plant demonstration status to the commercial entry early production unit design stage. The specific objectives which will allow attainment of these overall program goals are: (1) Provide environmental information to support DOE evaluation with respect to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), (2) Define market-responsive power plant requirements and specifications, (3) Establish design for multifuel, low-cost, modular, market-responsive power plant, (4) Resolve power plant manufacturing issues and define the design for the commercial manufacturing facility, (5) Acquire capabilities to support developmental testing of 0370 stacks and BOP equipment as required to prepare for commercial design, and (6) Resolve stack and BOP equipment technology issues and design, build, and field test a modular commercial prototype power plant to demonstrate readiness of the power plant for commercial entry.

  19. N-acetylcysteine inhibits Na+ absorption across human nasal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rochat, Thierry; Lacroix, Jean-Silvain; Jornot, Lan

    2004-10-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is a widely used mucolytic drug in patients with a variety of respiratory disorders. The mechanism of action is based on rupture of the disulfide bridges of the high molecular glycoproteins present in the mucus, resulting in smaller subunits of the glycoproteins and reduced viscosity of the mucus. Because Na(+) absorption regulates airway surface liquid volume and thus the efficiency of mucociliary clearance, we asked whether NAC affects the bioelectric properties of human nasal epithelial cells. A 24-h basolateral treatment with 10 mM of NAC decreased the transepithelial potential difference and short-circuit current (I(SC)) by 40%, and reduced the amiloride-sensitive current by 50%, without affecting the transepithelial resistance. After permeabilization of the basolateral membranes of cells with amphotericin B in the presence of a mucosal-to-serosal Na(+) gradient (135:25 mM), NAC inhibited 45% of the amiloride-sensitive current. The Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase pump activity and the basolateral K(+) conductance were not affected by NAC treatment. NAC did not alter total cell mRNA and protein levels of alpha-epithelial Na(+) channel (EnaC) subunit, but reduced abundance of alpha-ENaC subunits in the apical cell membrane as quantified by biotinylation. This effect can be ascribed to the sulphydryl (SH) group of NAC, since N-acetylserine and S-carboxymethyl-l-cysteine were ineffective. Given the importance of epithelial Na(+) channels in controlling the thin layer of fluid that covers the surface of the airways, the increase in the fluidity of the airway mucus following NAC treatment in vivo might be in part related to downregulation of Na(+) absorption and consequently water transport. PMID:15281093

  20. Structure-induced resonant tail-state regime absorption in polymer: fullerene bulk-heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfadler, Thomas; Kiel, Thomas; Stärk, Martin; Werra, Julia F. M.; Matyssek, Christian; Sommer, Daniel; Boneberg, Johannes; Busch, Kurt; Weickert, Jonas; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we present resonant tail-state regime absorption enhanced organic photovoltaics. We combine periodically structured TiO2 bottom electrodes with P3HT-PCBM bulk-heterojunction solar cells in an inverted device configuration. The wavelength-scale patterns are transferred to the electron-selective bottom electrodes via direct laser interference patterning, a fast method compatible with roll-to-roll processing. Spectroscopic and optoelectronic device measurements suggest polarization-dependent absorption enhancement along with photocurrent generation unambiguously originating from the population of tail states. We discuss the effects underlying these absorption patterns with the help of electromagnetic simulations using the discontinuous Galerkin time domain method. For this, we focus on the total absorption spectra along with spatially resolved power loss densities. Our simulations stress the tunability of the absorption resonances towards arbitrary wavelength regions.

  1. The absorption chiller in large scale solar pond cooling design with condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone

    SciTech Connect

    Tsilingiris, P.T. )

    1992-07-01

    The possibility of using solar ponds as low-cost solar collectors combined with commercial absorption chillers in large scale solar cooling design is investigated. The analysis is based on the combination of a steady-state solar pond mathematical model with the operational characteristics of a commercial absorption chiller, assuming condenser heat rejection in the upper convecting zone (U.C.Z.). The numerical solution of the nonlinear equations involved leads to results which relate the chiller capacity with pond design and environmental parameters, which are also employed for the investigation of the optimum pond size for a minimum capital cost. The derived cost per cooling kW for a 350 kW chiller ranges from about 300 to 500 $/kW cooling. This is almost an order of magnitude lower than using a solar collector field of evacuated tube type.

  2. Properties of the Carrol system and a machine design for solar-powered, air cooled, absorption space cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-05-01

    The name Carrol was selected as a convenient shorthand designation for a prime candidate chemical system comprising ethylene glycol-lithium bromide as an absorbent mixture with water as a refrigerant. The instrumentation, methods of handling data and numerical results from a systematic determination of Carrol property data required to design an air cooled absorption machine based on this chemical system are described. These data include saturation temperature, relative enthalpy, density, specific heat capacity, thermal conductivity, viscosity and absorber film heat transfer coefficient as functions of solution temperature and Carrol concentration over applicable ranges. For each of the major components of the absorption chiller, i.e., generator, chiller, absorber, condenser, heat exchanger, purge and controls, the report contains an assembly drawing and the principal operating characteristics of that component.

  3. Broadband absorption enhancement in plasmonic nanoshells-based ultrathin microcrystalline-Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Miele, Ermanno; Panaro, Simone; Wang, Hai; Toma, Andrea; Alabastri, Alessandro; De Angelis, Francesco; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti

    2016-01-01

    With the objective to conceive a plasmonic solar cell with enhanced photocurrent, we investigate the role of plasmonic nanoshells, embedded within a ultrathin microcrystalline silicon solar cell, in enhancing broadband light trapping capability of the cell and, at the same time, to reduce the parasitic loss. The thickness of the considered microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) layer is only ~1/6 of conventional μc-Si based solar cells while the plasmonic nanoshells are formed by a combination of silica and gold, respectively core and shell. We analyze the cell optical response by varying both the geometrical and optical parameters of the overall device. In particular, the nanoshells core radius and metal thickness, the periodicity, the incident angle of the solar radiation and its wavelength are varied in the widest meaningful ranges. We further explain the reason for the absorption enhancement by calculating the electric field distribution associated to resonances of the device. We argue that both Fabry-Pérot-like and localized plasmon modes play an important role in this regard. PMID:27080420

  4. Broadband absorption enhancement in plasmonic nanoshells-based ultrathin microcrystalline-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raja, Waseem; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Miele, Ermanno; Panaro, Simone; Wang, Hai; Toma, Andrea; Alabastri, Alessandro; de Angelis, Francesco; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti

    2016-04-01

    With the objective to conceive a plasmonic solar cell with enhanced photocurrent, we investigate the role of plasmonic nanoshells, embedded within a ultrathin microcrystalline silicon solar cell, in enhancing broadband light trapping capability of the cell and, at the same time, to reduce the parasitic loss. The thickness of the considered microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) layer is only ~1/6 of conventional μc-Si based solar cells while the plasmonic nanoshells are formed by a combination of silica and gold, respectively core and shell. We analyze the cell optical response by varying both the geometrical and optical parameters of the overall device. In particular, the nanoshells core radius and metal thickness, the periodicity, the incident angle of the solar radiation and its wavelength are varied in the widest meaningful ranges. We further explain the reason for the absorption enhancement by calculating the electric field distribution associated to resonances of the device. We argue that both Fabry-Pérot-like and localized plasmon modes play an important role in this regard.

  5. Parasitic Absorption Reduction in Metal Oxide-Based Transparent Electrodes: Application in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Werner, Jérémie; Geissbühler, Jonas; Dabirian, Ali; Nicolay, Sylvain; Morales-Masis, Monica; Wolf, Stefaan De; Niesen, Bjoern; Ballif, Christophe

    2016-07-13

    Transition metal oxides (TMOs) are commonly used in a wide spectrum of device applications, thanks to their interesting electronic, photochromic, and electrochromic properties. Their environmental sensitivity, exploited for gas and chemical sensors, is however undesirable for application in optoelectronic devices, where TMOs are used as charge injection or extraction layers. In this work, we first study the coloration of molybdenum and tungsten oxide layers, induced by thermal annealing, Ar plasma exposure, or transparent conducting oxide overlayer deposition, typically used in solar cell fabrication. We then propose a discoloration method based on an oxidizing CO2 plasma treatment, which allows for a complete bleaching of colored TMO films and prevents any subsequent recoloration during following cell processing steps. Then, we show that tungsten oxide is intrinsically more resilient to damage induced by Ar plasma exposure as compared to the commonly used molybdenum oxide. Finally, we show that parasitic absorption in TMO-based transparent electrodes, as used for semitransparent perovskite solar cells, silicon heterojunction solar cells, or perovskite/silicon tandem solar cells, can be drastically reduced by replacing molybdenum oxide with tungsten oxide and by applying a CO2 plasma pretreatment prior to the transparent conductive oxide overlayer deposition. PMID:27338079

  6. Can plasmonic Al nanoparticles improve absorption in triple junction solar cells?

    PubMed Central

    Yang, L.; Pillai, S.; Green, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles located on the illuminated surface of a solar cell can perform the function of an antireflection layer, as well as a scattering layer, facilitating light-trapping. Al nanoparticles have recently been proposed to aid photocurrent enhancements in GaAs photodiodes in the wavelength region of 400–900 nm by mitigating any parasitic absorption losses. Because this spectral region corresponds to the top and middle sub-cell of a typical GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple junction solar cell, in this work, we investigated the potential of similar periodic Al nanoparticles placed on top of a thin SiO2 spacer layer that can also serve as an antireflection coating at larger thicknesses. The particle period, diameter and the thickness of the oxide layers were optimised for the sub-cells using simulations to achieve the lowest reflection and maximum external quantum efficiencies. Our results highlight the importance of proper reference comparison, and unlike previously published results, raise doubts regarding the effectiveness of Al plasmonic nanoparticles as a suitable front-side scattering medium for broadband efficiency enhancements when compared to standard single-layer antireflection coatings. However, by embedding the nanoparticles within the dielectric layer, they have the potential to perform better than an antireflection layer and provide enhanced response from both the sub-cells. PMID:26138405

  7. Can plasmonic Al nanoparticles improve absorption in triple junction solar cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, L.; Pillai, S.; Green, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    Plasmonic nanoparticles located on the illuminated surface of a solar cell can perform the function of an antireflection layer, as well as a scattering layer, facilitating light-trapping. Al nanoparticles have recently been proposed to aid photocurrent enhancements in GaAs photodiodes in the wavelength region of 400-900 nm by mitigating any parasitic absorption losses. Because this spectral region corresponds to the top and middle sub-cell of a typical GaInP/GaInAs/Ge triple junction solar cell, in this work, we investigated the potential of similar periodic Al nanoparticles placed on top of a thin SiO2 spacer layer that can also serve as an antireflection coating at larger thicknesses. The particle period, diameter and the thickness of the oxide layers were optimised for the sub-cells using simulations to achieve the lowest reflection and maximum external quantum efficiencies. Our results highlight the importance of proper reference comparison, and unlike previously published results, raise doubts regarding the effectiveness of Al plasmonic nanoparticles as a suitable front-side scattering medium for broadband efficiency enhancements when compared to standard single-layer antireflection coatings. However, by embedding the nanoparticles within the dielectric layer, they have the potential to perform better than an antireflection layer and provide enhanced response from both the sub-cells.

  8. Broadband absorption enhancement in plasmonic nanoshells-based ultrathin microcrystalline-Si solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Waseem; Bozzola, Angelo; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Miele, Ermanno; Panaro, Simone; Wang, Hai; Toma, Andrea; Alabastri, Alessandro; De Angelis, Francesco; Zaccaria, Remo Proietti

    2016-01-01

    With the objective to conceive a plasmonic solar cell with enhanced photocurrent, we investigate the role of plasmonic nanoshells, embedded within a ultrathin microcrystalline silicon solar cell, in enhancing broadband light trapping capability of the cell and, at the same time, to reduce the parasitic loss. The thickness of the considered microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si) layer is only ~1/6 of conventional μc-Si based solar cells while the plasmonic nanoshells are formed by a combination of silica and gold, respectively core and shell. We analyze the cell optical response by varying both the geometrical and optical parameters of the overall device. In particular, the nanoshells core radius and metal thickness, the periodicity, the incident angle of the solar radiation and its wavelength are varied in the widest meaningful ranges. We further explain the reason for the absorption enhancement by calculating the electric field distribution associated to resonances of the device. We argue that both Fabry-Pérot-like and localized plasmon modes play an important role in this regard. PMID:27080420

  9. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2005-03-01

    The program was designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE, formerly Energy Research Corporation) from an early state of development for stationary power plant applications. The current program efforts were focused on technology and system development, and cost reduction, leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, in Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations, or at distributed locations near the customers such as hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FCE has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300A, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented DFC{reg_sign} technology, where a hydrocarbon fuel is directly fed to the fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to the existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating and air conditioning. Several sub-MW power plants based on the DFC design are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Several one-megawatt power plant design was verified by operation on natural gas at FCE. This plant is currently installed at a customer site in King County, WA under another US government program and is currently in operation. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste

  10. Design and construction of a femtosecond pulse autocorrelator using two-photon absorption in a luminescent diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arthur, M. A. G.; Rojo, R. R.; Jamasbi, N.; Mohebi, M.

    2003-06-01

    In this work, we present the design and construction of a femtosecond laser pulse autocorrelator, based on the two-photon absorption process in a light emitting diode (LED). Compared with traditional autocorrelators based on nonlinear crystals, this autocorrelator has the advantages of lower cost and greater ease of alignment. The intensity and interferometric autocorrelation traces obtained with this device for a titanium-sapphire laser with pulses that are less than 100 fs long, are also presented.

  11. An Analysis of a Micro Cogeneration System Composed of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell, Microturbine, and H2O/LiBr Absorption Refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Motohiro; Yoshida, Hideo; Iwamoto, Yuhei; Ueda, Akio

    A micro cogeneration system composed of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and a microturbine (MT) and an absorption refrigerator is analyzed thermodynamically. The performance analysis is conducted on the basis of the balance of macroscopic mass and energy with additional empirical correlations and operating data. First, the basic characteristics of the power generation (SOFC+MT) section and the absorption refrigerator section are clarified. Second, under the conditions of the cell temperature of 900 °C and the turbine inlet temperature of 900 °C, the optimum design points are determined. Furthermore, the annual energy saving obtained by the present system is also evaluated in the light of energy-use data for Japan. As a result, the annual fuel consumption is reduced by 32%, 36% and 42%, for apartments, offices and hotels, respectively.

  12. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H. C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2003-12-19

    The ongoing program is designed to advance the carbonate fuel cell technology from full-size proof-of-concept field test to the commercial design. DOE has been funding Direct FuelCell{reg_sign} (DFC{reg_sign}) development at FuelCell Energy, Inc. (FCE) for stationary power plant applications. The program efforts are focused on technology and system optimization for cost reduction leading to commercial design development and prototype system field trials. FCE, Danbury, CT, is a world-recognized leader for the development and commercialization of high efficiency fuel cells that can generate clean electricity at power stations or in distributed locations near the customer, including hospitals, schools, universities, hotels and other commercial and industrial applications. FuelCell Energy has designed three different fuel cell power plant models (DFC300, DFC1500 and DFC3000). FCE's power plants are based on its patented Direct FuelCell technology, where the fuel is directly fed to fuel cell and hydrogen is generated internally. These power plants offer significant advantages compared to existing power generation technologies--higher fuel efficiency, significantly lower emissions, quieter operation, flexible siting and permitting requirements, scalability and potentially lower operating costs. Also, the exhaust heat by-product can be used for cogeneration applications such as high-pressure steam, district heating, and air conditioning. Several FCE sub-megawatt power plants are currently operating in Europe, Japan and the US. Because hydrogen is generated directly within the fuel cell module from readily available fuels such as natural gas and waste water treatment gas, DFC power plants are ready today and do not require the creation of a hydrogen infrastructure. Product improvement progress made during the reporting period in the areas of technology, manufacturing processes, cost reduction and balance of plant equipment designs is discussed in this report. FCE's DFC

  13. Bioactive Dietary Polyphenols Inhibit Heme Iron Absorption in A Dose-Dependent Manner in Human Intestinal Caco-2 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qianyi; Kim, Eun-Young; Lindsay, Elizabeth Ann; Han, Okhee

    2011-01-01

    Although heme iron is an important form of dietary iron, its intestinal absorption mechanism remains elusive. Our previous work revealed that (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and grape seed extract (GSE) markedly inhibited intestinal heme iron absorption by reducing the basolateral iron export in Caco-2 cells. The aims of this study were to examine whether small amounts of EGCG, GSE and green tea extract (GT) could inhibit heme iron absorption, and to test whether the inhibitory action of polyphenols could be offset by ascorbic acid. A heme-55Fe absorption study was conducted by adding various concentrations of EGCG, GSE and GT to Caco-2 cells in the absence and presence of ascorbic acid. Polyphenolic compounds significantly inhibited heme-55Fe absorption in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of ascorbic acid did not modulate the inhibitory effect of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption when the cells were treated with polyphenols at a concentration of 46 mg/L. However, ascorbic acid was able to offset or reverse the inhibitory effects of polyphenolic compounds when lower concentrations of polyphenols were added (≤ 4.6 mg/L). Ascorbic acid modulated the heme iron absorption without changing the apical heme uptake, the expression of the proteins involved in heme metabolism and basolateral iron transport, and heme oxygenase activity, indicating that ascorbic acid may enhance heme iron absorption by modulating the intracellular distribution of 55Fe. These results imply that the regular consumption of dietary ascorbic acid can easily counteract the inhibitory effects of low concentrations of dietary polyphenols on heme iron absorption but cannot counteract the inhibitory actions of high concentrations of polyphenols. PMID:22417433

  14. Asymmetric PML for the absorption of waves. Application to mesh refinement in electromagnetic particle-in-cell plasma simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Vay, J.-L.; Adam, J.-C.; Heron, A.

    2003-09-24

    We present an extension of the Berenger Perfectly Matched Layer with additional terms and tunable coefficients which introduce some asymmetry in the absorption rate. We show that the discretized version of the new PML offers superior absorption rates than the discretized standard PML under a plane wave analysis. Taking advantage of the high rates of absorption of the new PML, we have devised a new strategy for introducing the technique of Mesh Refinement into electromagnetic Particle-In-Cell plasma simulations. We present the details of the algorithm as well as a 2-D example of its application to laser-plasma interaction in the context of fast ignition.

  15. Light absorption processes and optimization of ZnO/CdTe core-shell nanowire arrays for nanostructured solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michallon, Jérôme; Bucci, Davide; Morand, Alain; Zanuccoli, Mauro; Consonni, Vincent; Kaminski-Cachopo, Anne

    2015-02-01

    The absorption processes of extremely thin absorber solar cells based on ZnO/CdTe core-shell nanowire (NW) arrays with square, hexagonal or triangular arrangements are investigated through systematic computations of the ideal short-circuit current density using three-dimensional rigorous coupled wave analysis. The geometrical dimensions are optimized for optically designing these solar cells: the optimal NW diameter, height and array period are of 200 ± 10 nm, 1-3 μm and 350-400 nm for the square arrangement with CdTe shell thickness of 40-60 nm. The effects of the CdTe shell thickness on the absorption of ZnO/CdTe NW arrays are revealed through the study of two optical key modes: the first one is confining the light into individual NWs, the second one is strongly interacting with the NW arrangement. It is also shown that the reflectivity of the substrate can improve Fabry-Perot resonances within the NWs: the ideal short-circuit current density is increased by 10% for the ZnO/fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)/ideal reflector as compared to the ZnO/FTO/glass substrate. Furthermore, the optimized square arrangement absorbs light more efficiently than both optimized hexagonal and triangular arrangements. Eventually, the enhancement factor of the ideal short-circuit current density is calculated as high as 1.72 with respect to planar layers, showing the high optical potentiality of ZnO/CdTe core-shell NW arrays.

  16. Molten carbonate fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    P. Voyentzie; T. Leo; A. Kush; L. Christner; G. Carlson; C. Yuh

    1998-12-20

    Drawing on the manufacture, field test, and post-test experience of the sixteen Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP) stacks, ERC is finalizing the next generation commercial entry product design. The second generation cells are 50% larger in area, 40% lighter on equal geometric area basis, and 30% thinner than the earlier design. These improvements have resulted in doubling of the full-height stack power. A low-cost and high-strength matrix has also been developed for improving product ruggedness. The low-cost advanced cell design incorporating these improvements has been refined through six short stack tests. Power production per cell of two times the SCDP maximum power operation, over ten thermal cycles, and overall operating flexibility with respect to load and thermal changes have been demonstrated in these short stack tests. An internally insulated stack enclosure has been designed and fabricated to eliminate the need for an inert gas environment during operation. ERC has acquired the capability for testing 400kW full-height direct fuel ceil (DFC) stack and balance-of-plant equipment. With the readiness of the power plant test facility, the cell package design, and the stack module, full-height stack testing has begun. The first full- height stack incorporating the post-SCDP second generation design was completed. The stack reached a power level of 253 kW, setting a world record for the highest power production from the advanced fuel cell system. Excellent performance uniformity at this power level affirmed manufacturing reproducibility of the components at the factory. This unoptimized small size test has achieved pipeline natural gas to DC electricity conversion efficiency of 47% (based on lower heating value - LHV) including the parasitic power consumed by the BOP equipment; that should translate to more than 50% efficiency in commercial operation, before employing cogeneration. The power plant system also operated smoothly. With the success of this

  17. Effects of docosahexaenoic acid and sardine oil diets on the ultrastructure of jejunal absorptive cells in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Tamura, M; Suzuki, H

    1996-01-01

    The influence of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and sardine oil diets on the ultrastructure of jejunal absorptive cells was studied. Adult male Crj:CD-1 (ICR) mice were fed a fat-free semisynthetic diet supplemented with 5% (by weight) purified DHA ethyl ester, refined sardine oil, or palm oil. The mice received the DHA or palm oil diets for 7 days (groups 1 and 2) and the refined sardine oil or palm oil diets for 30 days (groups 3 and 4). There were significant ultrastructural changes in the jejunal absorptive cells between the mice fed on the palm oil diet and those receiving the DHA and sardine oil diets. The endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of some jejunal absorptive cells in the mice fed on the palm oil diet for 7 and 30 days developed vacuolation on the upper site of the nucleus. In contrast, many granules, which appeared to be lipid droplets, were observed in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus of the jejunal absorptive cells in the DHA and sardine oil diet groups. These results suggest that ultrastructural differences in the jejunal absorptive cells between mice in the omega-3 fatty acid and palm oil diet groups may be associated with the changes in lipid metabolism. PMID:9001686

  18. Electrochemical Cell Design With A Hollow Gate

    DOEpatents

    Romero, Antonio; Oweis, Salah; Chagnon, Guy; Staniewicz, Robert; Briscoe, Douglas

    2000-02-01

    An electrochemical cell having a spiral winding around a central core, wherein the central core is provided with longitudinal grooves on its outer surface to facilitate electrolyte filing and accommodate overpressure. The core itself improves dissipation of heat generated along the center of the cell, and the hollow core design allows the cell core to have a larger radius, permitting the "jelly roll" winding to begin at a larger radius and thereby facilitate the initial turns of the winding by decreasing the amount of bending required of the electrode laminate at the beginning of the winding operation. The hollow core also provides mechanical support end-to-end. A pair of washers are used at each end of the cell to sandwich current collection tabs in a manner that improves electrical and thermal conductivity while also providing structural integrity.

  19. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Characterization of a Li/S Cell

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Ye, Yifan; Kawase, Ayako; Song, Min-Kyu; Feng, Bingmei; Liu, Yi-Sheng; Marcus, Matthew A.; Feng, Jun; Cairns, Elton J.; Guo, Jinghua; Zhu, Junfa

    2016-01-11

    The X-ray absorption spectroscopy technique has been applied to study different stages of the lithium/sulfur (Li/S) cell life cycle. We investigated how speciation of S in Li/S cathodes changes upon the introduction of CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide, CH3(CH2)15N+(CH3)3Br₋) and with charge/discharge cycling. The introduction of CTAB changes the synthesis reaction pathway dramatically due to the interaction of CTAB with the terminal S atoms of the polysulfide ions in the Na2Sx solution. For the cycled Li/S cell, the loss of electrochemically active sulfur and the accumulation of a compact blocking insulating layer of unexpected sulfur reaction products on the cathode surface duringmore » the charge/discharge processes make the capacity decay. Lastly, a modified coin cell and a vacuum-compatible three-electrode electro-chemical cell have been introduced for further in-situ/in-operando studies.« less

  20. MOLTEN CARBONATE FUEL CELL PRODUCT DESIGN IMPROVEMENT

    SciTech Connect

    H.C. Maru; M. Farooque

    2002-02-01

    The carbonate fuel cell promises highly efficient, cost-effective and environmentally superior power generation from pipeline natural gas, coal gas, biogas, and other gaseous and liquid fuels. FuelCell Energy, Inc. has been engaged in the development of this unique technology, focusing on the development of the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC{reg_sign}). The DFC{reg_sign} design incorporates the unique internal reforming feature which allows utilization of a hydrocarbon fuel directly in the fuel cell without requiring any external reforming reactor and associated heat exchange equipment. This approach upgrades waste heat to chemical energy and thereby contributes to a higher overall conversion efficiency of fuel energy to electricity with low levels of environmental emissions. Among the internal reforming options, FuelCell Energy has selected the Indirect Internal Reforming (IIR)--Direct Internal Reforming (DIR) combination as its baseline design. The IIR-DIR combination allows reforming control (and thus cooling) over the entire cell area. This results in uniform cell temperature. In the IIR-DIR stack, a reforming unit (RU) is placed in between a group of fuel cells. The hydrocarbon fuel is first fed into the RU where it is reformed partially to hydrogen and carbon monoxide fuel using heat produced by the fuel cell electrochemical reactions. The reformed gases are then fed to the DIR chamber, where the residual fuel is reformed simultaneously with the electrochemical fuel cell reactions. FuelCell Energy plans to offer commercial DFC power plants in various sizes, focusing on the subMW as well as the MW-scale units. The plan is to offer standardized, packaged DFC power plants operating on natural gas or other hydrocarbon-containing fuels for commercial sale. The power plant design will include a diesel fuel processing option to allow dual fuel applications. These power plants, which can be shop-fabricated and sited near the user, are ideally suited for distributed power

  1. Theoretical Characterization of Zinc Phthalocyanine and Porphyrin Analogs for Organic Solar Cell Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theisen, Rebekah

    The absorption spectra of metal-centered phthalocyanines (MPc's) have been investigated since the early 1960's. With improved experimental techniques to characterize this class of molecules the band assignments have advanced. The characterization remains difficult with historic disagreements. A new push for characterization came with a wave of interest in using these molecules for absorption/donor molecules in organic photovoltaics. The use of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) became of particular interest, in addition to novel research being done for azaporphyrin analogs of ZnPc. A theoretical approach is taken to research the excited states of these molecules using time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Most theoretical results for the first excited state in ZnPc are in only limited agreement with experiment (errors near 0.1 eV or higher). This research investigates ZnPc and 10 additional porphyrin analogs. Excited-state properties are predicted for 8 of these molecules using ab initio computational methods and symmetry breaking for accurate time- dependent self-consistent optimization. Franck-Condon analysis is used to predict the Q-band absorption spectra for all 8 of these molecules. This is the first time that Franck-Condon analysis has been reported in absolute units for any of these molecules. The first excited-state energy for ZnPc is found to be the closest to experiment thus far using a range-separated meta-GGA hybrid functional. The theoretical results are used to find a trend in the novel design of new porphyrin analog molecules.

  2. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_2". The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 10.1007/978-3-642-13917-8_4, some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  3. Induction Cell Design Tradeoffs and Examples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reginato, Louis L.; Briggs*, Richard J.

    A brief history of induction accelerator development was covered in Chap. 2. The induction accelerators constructed since the early 1960s can be categorized as short-pulse if the pulse duration is less than 100 ns and long-pulse if it is longer. The distinction between short-pulse and long-pulse is arbitrary; it mainly reflects the type of magnetic material that was typically used in the cell. Examples of short-pulse induction accelerators are the electron ring accelerator (ERA, Δ t=30 ns) [1], the advanced test accelerator (ATA, Δ t=70 ns) [2] and the experimental test accelerator (ETA-II, Δ t=70 ns) [3]. Examples of long-pulse accelerators are the Astron (Δ t=400 ns) [4, 5] and the second axis of the dual axis radiographic hydro test accelerator (DARHT-II, Δ t=2{,}000 ns) [6]. In this chapter the cell design of several of these accelerators will be described in detail. We will discuss how the physics, economics, and space requirements often lead to a non-optimum design from the accelerator systems vantage point. Although modulators are covered in Chap. 4 , some specific designs will be discussed on how the constant voltage (flat-top) was achieved in concert with the cell design and compensation network .

  4. Spectroscopy in an extremely thin vapor cell: Comparing the cell-length dependence in fluorescence and in absorption techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Varzhapetyan, T.; Sarkisyan, A.; Malakyan, Yu.; Papoyan, A.; Lezama, A.; Bloch, D.; Ducloy, M.

    2004-06-01

    We compare the behavior of absorption and of resonance fluorescence spectra in an extremely thin Rb vapor cell as a function of the ratio of L/λ , with L the cell thickness (L˜150 1800 nm) and λ the wavelength of the Rb D2 line (λ=780 mn) . The Dicke-type coherent narrowing [

    G. Dutier et al., Europhys. Lett. 63, 35 (2003)
    ] is observed only in transmission measurements, in the linear regime, with its typical collapse and revival, which reaches a maximum for L= (2n+1) λ/2 ( n integer). It is shown not to appear in fluorescence, whose behavior-amplitude, and spectral width, is more monotonic with L . Conversely, at high-intensity, the sub-Doppler saturation effects are shown to be the most visible in transmission around L=nλ .

  5. Glass-type hydrogen and deuterium absorption cells developed for D/H ratio measurements in the Martian atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, T D; Okano, S; Abe, T; Fukunishi, H; Ito, K

    1997-04-01

    Hydrogen and deuterium absorption cells of a new glass type have been developed for the D/H ratio measurements on the Japanese Mars mission PLANET-B. The H/D cells work as narrow-band rejection filters for the H/D Lyman-alpha line, respectively, when the H or D atoms are produced at a heated filament inside the cells. The absorption profiles of the cells were successfully measured with a high-resolution vacuum ultraviolet spectrometer with a wavelength resolution of 6.6 x 10(-4) nm. The derived optical thickness was found to be ~7 and ~14 for the hydrogen and deuterium cells, respectively. It was also found that the derived temperature of atomic gas ranges between the temperature of the cell wall and that of the heated filament, and it increases with increasing filament temperature. The measured profiles showed that the absorption efficiencies of the developed absorption cells are sufficient to observe the D/H ratios of the Martian atmosphere. PMID:18253198

  6. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N.; Tilford, Charles A.; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A.; Smith, Ronald L.; Vig, Balvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5–7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells. PMID:24300234

  7. A new experimental cell for in situ and operandoX-ray absorption measurements in heterogeneous catalysis.

    PubMed

    Girardon, J S; Khodakov, A Y; Capron, M; Cristol, S; Dujardin, C; Dhainaut, F; Nikitenko, S; Meneau, F; Bras, W; Payen, E

    2005-09-01

    A new X-ray absorption cell dedicated to in situ and operando experiments in heterogeneous catalysis has been built and tested. The cell consists of several boron nitride and stainless steel plates linked together using graphite seals. It allows the measurement of XANES and EXAFS spectra of heterogeneous catalysts within a wide range of photon energies in transmission mode under the flow of various oxidative and reductive gas mixtures at elevated temperatures. The cell is compact and easy to build. Catalysts are loaded into the cell as powders. The use of boron nitride and a small beam pathlength in the cell result in a low absorption of the X-ray beam at lower energies. The cell was tested by in situ characterizing cobalt species during oxidative and reductive pre-treatments of a silica-supported Fischer-Tropsch catalyst. An operando study of methanol conversion over alumina-supported molybdenum catalysts was also carried out. PMID:16120995

  8. Resonance-induced absorption enhancement in colloidal quantum dot solar cells using nanostructured electrodes.

    PubMed

    Mahpeykar, Seyed Milad; Xiong, Qiuyang; Wang, Xihua

    2014-10-20

    The application of nanostructured indium-doped tin oxide (ITO) electrodes as diffraction gratings for light absorption enhancement in colloidal quantum dot solar cells is numerically investigated using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. Resonant coupling of the incident diffracted light with supported waveguide modes in light absorbing layer at particular wavelengths predicted by grating far-field projection analysis is shown to provide superior near-infrared light trapping for nanostructured devices as compared to the planar structure. Among various technologically feasible nanostructures, the two-dimensional nano-branch array is demonstrated as the most promising polarization-independent structure and proved to be able to maintain its performance despite structural imperfections common in fabrication. PMID:25607315

  9. Nanosphere lithography for improved absorption in thin crystalline silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Yuanchih; Payne, David N. R.; Pollard, Michael E.; Pillai, Supriya; Bagnall, Darren M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the last decade, plasmonic nanoparticle arrays have been extensively studied for their light trapping potential in thin film solar cells. However, the commercial use of such arrays has been limited by complex and expensive fabrication techniques such as e-beam lithography. Nanosphere lithography (NSL) is a promising low-cost alternative for forming regular arrays of nanoscale features. Here, we use finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations to determine the optical enhancement due to nanosphere arrays embedded at the rear of a complete thin film device. Array parameters including the nanosphere pitch and diameter are explored, with the FDTD model itself first validated by comparing simulations of Ag nanodisc arrays with optical measurements of pre-existing e-beam fabricated test structures. These results are used to guide the development of a nanosphere back-reflector for 20 μm thin crystalline silicon cells. The deposition of polystyrene nanosphere monolayers is optimized to provide uniform arrays, which are subsequently incorporated into preliminary, proof of concept device structures. Absorption and photoluminescence measurements clearly demonstrate the potential of nanosphere arrays for improving the optical response of a solar cell using economical and scalable methods.

  10. Broadband light absorption enhancement in moth's eye nanostructured organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Weixia; Cui, Yanxia; Yang, Qingyi; Lo, Ming-Fai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Zhu, Furong

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive study on inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) with a moth's eye nanostructured (MEN) active layer was carried out. Performance of the MEN-based OSCs and the corresponding control planar cells, fabricated with blend of poly[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-bA] dithiophene-2, 6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2- ethylhexyl) carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]-thiophenediyl] (PTB7):[6,6]- phenyl-C70- butyric-acid-methyl-ester (PC70BM) was analyzed. The efficiency of the MEN-based OSCs was optimized by adjusting the height of MEN pattern in the active layer. Our experimental and theoretical results reveal that the MEN pattern enhances light absorption in the PTB7:PC70BM active layer, especially over the long wavelength region. This leads to a 7.8% increase in short circuit current density and a 6.1% increase in power conversion efficiency over those of the control planar cell.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of biomimetic dye molecules for solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, Peter L.; Liu Xiaosong; Himpsel, F. J.; Yang Wanli

    2009-11-21

    Dye-sensitized solar cells are potentially inexpensive alternatives to traditional semiconductor solar cells. In order to optimize dyes for solar cells we systematically investigate the electronic structure of a variety of porphyrins and phthalocyanines. As a biological model system we use the heme group in cytochrome c which plays a role in biological charge transfer processes. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of the N 1s and C 1s edges reveals the unoccupied molecular orbitals and the orientation of the molecules in thin films. The transition metal 2p edges reflect the oxidation state of the central metal atom, its spin state, and the ligand field of the surrounding N atoms. The latter allows tuning of the energy position of the lowest unoccupied orbital by several tenths of an eV by tailoring the molecules and their deposition. Fe and Mn containing phthalocyanines oxidize easily from +2 to +3 in air and require vacuum deposition for obtaining a reproducible oxidation state. Chlorinated porphyrins, on the other hand, are reduced from +3 to +2 during vacuum deposition at elevated temperatures. These findings stress the importance of controlled thin film deposition for obtaining photovoltaic devices with an optimum match between the energy levels of the dye and those of the donor and acceptor electrodes, together with a molecular orientation for optimal overlap between the {pi} orbitals in the direction of the carrier transport.

  12. Development of nanostructured luminophor coating for broadening of solar cell absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryuchyn, A. A.; Beliak, Ie. V.

    2014-10-01

    One of the major concerns in the area of high efficient solar cell production is a substantial shift between the solar radiation spectra and optical absorption spectra of a photoelectric transducer that significantly reduces solar cell efficiency. We propose a concept which based on coating of conventional and cheap photoelectric transducer with a luminophor that transmits longer wavelengths of the sunlight, absorbs shorter wavelengths and converts them into longer ones by the value of the Stocks shift. While photoluminescent light is not collimated and thus losses may reach up to 50% of converted light, it was also proposed to make micropattern formation at photoelectric transducer surface. We propose synthesizing of specific materials based on composite pyrazoline dyes with addition of polymethylmethacrylate, polystyrene and UV-laquers. It was revealed that synthesized luminophor coating are characterized by sufficiently enough Stocks shift (200-400 nm), high quantum yield (near 80%) and stability under circumstances of long term radiation. Further research demonstrated potential of the significant characteristic's improvement by introducing of organic dye molecules in the white zeolite matrix with additional laser annealing at low intensity. Experimental results have shown that photoluminescent spectrum of pyrazoline dye didn't change shape, bandwidth and amplitude for last 10 years. It was decided that obtained stability is being caused by porous matrix of white zeolite. Simulation of the solar cell functioning helped to understand physics of the process and simplify problem of microrelief and luminophor optimal parameters search.

  13. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M.; Meneghini, C.

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  14. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  15. A thermophilic microbial fuel cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Sarah M.; Vuoriranta, Pertti; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are reactors able to generate electricity by capturing electrons from the anaerobic respiratory processes of microorganisms. While the majority of MFCs have been tested at ambient or mesophilic temperatures, thermophilic systems warrant evaluation because of the potential for increased microbial activity rates on the anode. MFC studies at elevated temperatures have been scattered, using designs that are already established, specifically air-cathode single chambers and two-chamber designs. This study was prompted by our previous attempts that showed an increased amount of evaporation in thermophilic MFCs, adding unnecessary technical difficulties and causing excessive maintenance. In this paper, we describe a thermophilic MFC design that prevents evaporation. The design was tested at 57 °C with an anaerobic, thermophilic consortium that respired with glucose to generate a power density of 375 mW m -2 after 590 h. Polarization and voltage data showed that the design works in the batch mode but the design allows for adoption to continuous operation.

  16. Generation of enterocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells for drug absorption and metabolism studies in human small intestine

    PubMed Central

    Ozawa, Tatsuya; Takayama, Kazuo; Okamoto, Ryota; Negoro, Ryosuke; Sakurai, Fuminori; Tachibana, Masashi; Kawabata, Kenji; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Enterocytes play an important role in drug absorption and metabolism. However, a widely used enterocyte model, Caco-2 cell, has difficulty in evaluating both drug absorption and metabolism because the expression levels of some drug absorption and metabolism-related genes in these cells differ largely from those of human enterocytes. Therefore, we decided to generate the enterocyte-like cells from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells (hiPS-ELCs), which are applicable to drug absorption and metabolism studies. The efficiency of enterocyte differentiation from human iPS cells was significantly improved by using EGF, SB431542, and Wnt3A, and extending the differentiation period. The gene expression levels of cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and peptide transporter 1 in the hiPS-ELCs were higher than those in Caco-2 cells. In addition, CYP3A4 expression in the hiPS-ELCs was induced by treatment with 1, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 or rifampicin, which are known to induce CYP3A4 expression, indicating that the hiPS-ELCs have CYP3A4 induction potency. Moreover, the transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER) value of the hiPS-ELC monolayer was approximately 240 Ω*cm2, suggesting that the hiPS-ELC monolayer could form a barrier. In conclusion, we succeeded in establishing an enterocyte model from human iPS cells which have potential to be applied for drug absorption and metabolism studies. PMID:26559489

  17. Overview of the IFMIF test cell design

    SciTech Connect

    Moeslang, A.; Daum, E.; Haines, J.R.; Williams, D.M.; Jitsukawa, S.; Noda, K.; Viola, R.

    1996-10-01

    The Conceptual Design Activity (CDA) for the International Fusion Materials Irradiation Facility (IFMIF) has entered its second and final year, and an outline design has been developed. Initial evaluations of the potential of this high flux, high intensity D-Li source have shown that the main materials testing needs can be fulfilled. According to these needs, Vertical Test Assemblies will accommodate test modules for the high flux (0.5 liter, 20 dpa/a, 250-1000 C), the medium flux (6 liter, 1-20 dpa/a, 250-1000 C), the low flux (7.5 liter, 0.1-1 dpa/a), and the very low flux (> 100 liter, 0.01-0.1 dpa/a) regions. Detailed test matrices have been defined for the high and medium flux regions, showing that on the basis of small specimen test technologies, a database for an engineering design of an advanced fusion reactor (DEMO) can be established for a variety of structural materials and ceramic breeders. The design concepts for the Test Cell, including test assemblies, remote handling equipment and Hot Cell Facilities with capacity for investigating all irradiation specimens at the IFMIF site are described.

  18. Anticipating designer drug-resistant cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Frangione, Mark L; Lockhart, John H; Morton, Daniel T; Pava, Libia M; Blanck, George

    2015-07-01

    Successful use of anticancer designer drugs is likely to depend on simultaneous combinations of these drugs to minimize the development of resistant cancer cells. Considering the knowledge base of cancer signaling pathways, mechanisms of designer drug resistance should be anticipated, and early clinical trials could be designed to include arms that combine new drugs specifically with currently US Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved drugs expected to blunt alternative signaling pathways. In this review, we indicate examples of alternative signal pathways for recent anticancer drugs, and the use of original, Python-based software to systematically identify signaling pathways that could facilitate resistance to drugs targeting a particular protein. Pathway alternatives can be assessed at http://www.alternativesignalingpathways.com, developed with this review article. PMID:25697478

  19. Transforming growth factor-beta1 inhibits tissue engineering cartilage absorption via inducing the generation of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Chichi; Bi, Wei; Gong, Yiming; Ding, Xiaojun; Guo, Xuehua; Sun, Jian; Cui, Lei; Yu, Youcheng

    2016-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to explore the mechanisms of transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 inhibiting the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. We transfected TGF-β1 gene into bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) and co-cultured with interferon (IFN)-γ and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α and CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes. We then characterized the morphological changes, apoptosis and characterization of chondrogenic-committed cells from TGF-β1(+) BMMSCs and explored their mechanisms. Results showed that BMMSCs apoptosis and tissue engineering cartilage absorption in the group with added IFN-γ and TNF-α were greater than in the control group. In contrast, there was little BMMSC apoptosis and absorption by tissue engineering cartilage in the group with added CD4(+) CD25(-) T lymphocytes; Foxp3(+) T cells and CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells were found. In contrast, no type II collagen or Foxp3(+) T cells or CD25(+) CD39(+) T cells was found in the TGF-β1(-) BMMSC group. The data suggest that IFN-γ and TNF-α induced BMMSCs apoptosis and absorption of tissue engineering cartilage, but the newborn regulatory T (Treg) cells inhibited the function of IFN-γ and TNF-α and protected BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage. TGF-β1not only played a cartilage inductive role, but also inhibited the absorption of tissue engineering cartilage. The pathway proposed in our study may simulate the actual reaction procedure after implantation of BMMSCs and tissue engineering cartilage in vivo. PMID:23868873

  20. Cold vapor-solid phase microextraction using amalgamation in different Pd-based substrates combined with direct thermal desorption in a modified absorption cell for the determination of Hg by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Vanesa; Costas-Mora, Isabel; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    In this work, different Pd-based substrates (i.e. Pd wire, Pd-coated stainless steel wire and Pd-coated SiO 2) are tried for microextraction of Hg prior to its release into a modified quartz T-cell so as to develop a cost-effective, sensitive and easy-to-handle coupling between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and atomic absorption spectrometry. The new design allows a direct sample injection from the SPME device into a quartz T-cell thus avoiding analyte dilution. Mercury amalgamation onto a Pd wire provided the best performance in respect to sensitivity and fiber lifetime, but Pd wires could not be implemented in the SPME device due to their poor mechanical characteristics. On the contrary, Pd-coated SiO 2 fibers could be easily adapted to the typical sampling device used for SPME. Narrow time-dependent absorption signal profiles that could be integrated within 25 s were obtained. The detection limit was 90 pg mL -1 of Hg, and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 4.3%.

  1. Nanostructured conformal hybrid solar cells: a promising architecture towards complete charge collection and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iza, Diana C.; Muñoz-Rojas, David; Musselman, Kevin P.; Weickert, Jonas; Jakowetz, Andreas C.; Sun, Haiyan; Ren, Xin; Hoye, Robert L. Z.; Lee, Joon H.; Wang, Haiyan; Schmidt-Mende, Lukas; MacManus-Driscoll, Judith L.

    2013-08-01

    We introduce hybrid solar cells with an architecture consisting of an electrodeposited ZnO nanorod array (NRA) coated with a conformal thin layer (<50 nm) of organic polymer-fullerene blend and a quasi-conformal Ag top contact (Thin/NR). We have compared the performance of Thin/NR cells to conventional hybrid cells in which the same NRAs are completely filled with organic blend (Thick/NR). The Thin/NR design absorbs at least as much light as Thick/NR cells, while charge extraction is significantly enhanced due to the proximity of the electrodes, resulting in a higher current density per unit volume of blend and improved power conversion efficiency. The NRAs need not be periodic or aligned and hence can be made very simply.

  2. Nanostructured conformal hybrid solar cells: a promising architecture towards complete charge collection and light absorption

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We introduce hybrid solar cells with an architecture consisting of an electrodeposited ZnO nanorod array (NRA) coated with a conformal thin layer (<50 nm) of organic polymer-fullerene blend and a quasi-conformal Ag top contact (Thin/NR). We have compared the performance of Thin/NR cells to conventional hybrid cells in which the same NRAs are completely filled with organic blend (Thick/NR). The Thin/NR design absorbs at least as much light as Thick/NR cells, while charge extraction is significantly enhanced due to the proximity of the electrodes, resulting in a higher current density per unit volume of blend and improved power conversion efficiency. The NRAs need not be periodic or aligned and hence can be made very simply. PMID:23965048

  3. New concept design of differential absorption lidar: fusion of DIAL and TDLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkine, Alexandre; Lau, Brian; Lim, Alan; Jaeger, Wolfgang; Tulip, John

    2007-10-01

    We propose a new approach to range-resolved remote gas sensing in the atmosphere based on a combination of a DIAL and tunable-laser diode spectroscopy (TDLS) methods. To add range-resolving capabilities to a TDLS sensor we propose to arrange a group of retroreflectors (RRs) dividing an absorption path into adjacent measurement sections similar to those utilized by conventional DIAL systems. We implemented two techniques for the interrogation of the RRs: 1) scanning a beam of a continuous-wave laser over RRs sequentially; 2) using a time delay between returns from different RRs illuminated with a pulsed laser. We employed scanning technique with a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating near 1389 nm. A single-pulse interrogation method was demonstrated with a 10.9-μm quantum cascade laser (QCL) suitable for detection of ammonia, ethylene and water vapor in the atmosphere. Gas sensing and ranging was performed over distances varying from ~ 1 m up to ~ 1 km. Using VCSEL we attained a 0.5-s time resolution in gas concentration profiling with a 10-cm spatial resolution. Minimum interrogation time of a group of RRs was ~ 9 ms. A new generation of differential absorption LIDARs can be developed for range-resolved gas sensing in the atmosphere over distances up to ~ 1 km. The instruments can be used for a variety of applications ranging from fencing industrial areas to monitor fluxes of atmospheric pollutants to continuous air quality control in populated areas

  4. Design and performance of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer for airborne formaldehyde measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wert, B. P.; Fried, A.; Rauenbuehler, S.; Walega, J.; Henry, B.

    2003-06-01

    A tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer (TDLAS) was modified for high-precision and high-time-resolution formaldehyde (CH2O) measurements. This enhanced system was deployed in both the clean and polluted troposphere, as part of aircraft missions (TOPSE 2000, TexAQS 2000, and TRACE-P 2001) and ground-based missions (SOS 1999). Measurements of very constant ambient CH2O concentrations were used to determine instrument precisions, which were stable under normal operating conditions, with the exception of brief aircraft cabin pressure changes. Precisions of 15-50 pptv (1σ) were typically achieved for 1 min of averaging, corresponding to absorptions of 0.5-1.7 × 10-6, 3-5 times better than the previous version of the instrument (1998). Responsible modifications included improved temperature and pressure control of instrument components and the use of more stable optical mounts. During the TexAQS 2000 aircraft mission (polluted continental troposphere), measurements of 1 s time resolution were reported. Instrument accuracy was validated by calibration cross checks, interference tests, sample transmission tests, and field comparisons with a DOAS system.

  5. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-01

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  6. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  7. Rational Design of Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Small Molecules as Donating Materials for Organic Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Ruifa; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A series of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small molecules have been designed to explore their optical, electronic, and charge transport properties as organic solar cell (OSCs) materials. The calculation results showed that the designed molecules can lower the band gap and extend the absorption spectrum towards longer wavelengths. The designed molecules own the large longest wavelength of absorption spectra, the oscillator strength, and absorption region values. The optical, electronic, and charge transport properties of the designed molecules are affected by the introduction of different π-bridges and end groups. We have also predicted the mobility of the designed molecule with the lowest total energies. Our results reveal that the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for OSC materials. Additionally, the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for electron and/or hole transport materials. On the basis of our results, we suggest that molecules under investigation are suitable donors for [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and its derivatives as acceptors of OSCs. PMID:26343640

  8. Rational Design of Diketopyrrolopyrrole-Based Small Moleculesas Donating Materials for Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Ruifa; Wang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    A series of diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small molecules have been designed to explore their optical, electronic, and charge transport properties as organic solar cell(OSCs) materials. The calculation results showed that the designed molecules can lower the band gap and extend the absorption spectrum towards longer wavelengths.The designed molecules own the large longest wavelength of absorption spectra,the oscillator strength, and absorption region values. The optical, electronic, and charge transport properties of the designed molecules are affected by the introduction of different π-bridges and end groups. We have also predicted the mobility of the designed molecule with the lowest total energies. Our results reveal that the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for OSC materials. Additionally, the designed molecules are expected to be promising candidates for electron and/or hole transport materials. On the basis of our results, we suggest that molecules under investigation are suitable donors for[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and its derivatives as acceptors of OSCs. PMID:26343640

  9. Engineering CAR-T Cells: Design Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Shivani; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2016-01-01

    Despite being empirically designed based on a simple understanding of TCR signaling, T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have been remarkably successful in treating patients with advanced refractory B cell malignancies. However, many challenges remain in improving the safety and efficacy of this therapy and extending it toward the treatment of epithelial cancers. Other aspects TCR signaling beyond those directly provided by CD3ζ and CD28 phosphorylation strongly influence a T cell’s ability to differentiate and acquire full effector functions. Here, we discuss how the principles of TCR recognition, including spatial constraints, Kon/Koff rates, and synapse formation, along with in-depth analysis of CAR signaling might be applied to develop safer and more effective synthetic tumor targeting receptors. PMID:26169254

  10. Design of a safe cylindrical lithium/thionyl chloride cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. H.

    1983-01-01

    Cell design criteria were established which can result in a safe lithium/thionyl chloride cell. A cell vent, a low area internal anode cell, cell balance and composition of the cathode-electrolyte solution were found to be important factors in the design of a safe cell. In addition to routine testing, both undischarged and discharged cells were subjected to electrical abuse, environmental abuse and mechanical abuse without disassembly.

  11. Plasmonic and photonic designs for light trapping in thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liming

    Thin film solar cells are promising to realize cheap solar energy. Compared to conventional wafer cells, they can reduce the use of semiconductor material by 90%. The efficiency of thin film solar cells, however, is limited due to insufficient light absorption. Sufficient light absorption at the bandgap of semiconductor requires a light path more than 10x the thickness of the semiconductor. Advanced designs for light trapping are necessary for solar cells to absorb sufficient light within a limited volume of semiconductor. The goal is to convert the incident light into a trapped mode in the semiconductor layer. In this dissertation, a critical review of currently used methods for light trapping in solar cells is presented. The disadvantage of each design is pointed out including insufficient enhancement, undesired optical loss and undesired loss in carrier transport. The focus of the dissertation is light trapping by plasmonic and photonic structures in thin film Si solar cells. The performance of light trapping by plasmonic structures is dependent on the efficiency of photon radiation from plasmonic structures. The theory of antenna radiation is used to study the radiation by plasmonic structures. In order to achieve efficient photon radiation at a plasmonic resonance, a proper distribution of surface charges is necessary. The planar fishnet structure is proposed as a substitution for plasmonic particles. Large particles are required in order to resonate at the bandgap of semiconductor material. Hence, the resulting overall thickness of solar cells with large particles is large. Instead, the resonance of fishnet structure can be tuned without affecting the overall cell thickness. Numerical simulation shows that the enhancement of light absorption in the active layer is over 10x compared to the same cell without fishnet. Photons radiated from the resonating fishnet structure travel in multiple directions within the semiconductor layer. There is enhanced field

  12. X-ray absorption and electrochemical studies of direct methanol fuel cell catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Zurawski, D.J.; Aldykiewicz, A.J. Jr.; Baxter, S.F.; Krumpelt, M.

    1996-12-31

    In order for polymer electrolyte fuel cells to operate directly on methanol instead of hydrogen, a distinct advantage for portable applications, methanol oxidation must be catalyzed effectively in the acidic environment of the cell. Platinum-ruthenium and platinum-ruthenium oxide are generally considered to be the most active catalysts for this purpose. The presence of ruthenium significantly enhances the activity of platinum in these catalysts, for reasons not yet fully understood. We are using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and electrochemical techniques to evaluate the mechanisms proposed to account for this enhancement in order to further improve the catalyst`s activity. We are considering three enhancement mechanisms. An intermediate in the oxidation of methanol on platinum is carbon monoxide and its oxidation is the rate-determining step in the overall oxidation mechanism. It has been proposed that ruthenium facilitates the removal of carbon monoxide from the platinum surface. First, it has been proposed that ruthenium decreases the strength of the platinum-carbon monoxide bond. Carbon monoxide bonds to the catalyst by interacting with the d-band of platinum, therefore a change in the d-band occupancy of platinum as a result of alloying may influence the bond strength of carbon monoxide. Another proposed enhancement mechanism involves lowering of the potential for the formation of the CO-oxidizing species. Finally, the binary catalysts may have a structure which is more conducive to the methanol dehydrogenation and carbon monoxide reactions. Based on these three proposed enhancement mechanisms, a goal of this study is to correlate catalyst electronic properties, structure, and oxidation state with the performance of proton-exchange membrane (Nafion) direct methanol fuel cells.

  13. Surface plasmon enhanced infrared absorption in P3HT-based organic solar cells: the effect of infrared sensitizer (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Sungmo; Nardes, Alexandre M.; Rourke, Devin; van de Lagemaat, Jao; Kopidakis, Nikos; Park, Wounjhang

    2015-10-01

    We have theoretically and experimentally investigated the effects of Ag-grating electrode on the performance of polymer:fullerene based bulk heterojunction organic solar cells. First, an integrated numerical model has been developed, which is capable of describing both the optical and the electrical properties simultaneously. The Ag-grating patterned back electrode was then designed to enhance the absorption in sub-bandgap region of P3HT:PCBM binary devices. Laser interference lithography and metal lift-off technique were adopted to realize highly-uniform and large-area nanograting patterns. We measured almost 5 times enhancement of the external quantum efficiency at the surface plasmon resonance wavelength. However, the overall improvement in power conversion efficiency was not significant due to the low intrinsic absorption of active layer in this sub-bandgap region. We, then, investigated about the effect of surface plasmon on the ternary device of P3HT:Si-PCPDTBT:ICBA. It was demonstrated that the infrared absorption by the Si-PCPDTBT sensitizer can be substantially enhanced by matching the surface plasmon resonance to the sensitizer absorption band. Besides, we also observed an additional enhancement in the visible range which is due to the scattering effect of the gratings. An overall short-circuit current enhancement of up to 40% was predicted numerically. We have then fabricated the device by the lamination technique and observed a 30% increase in the short circuit current. Plasmon enhancement of sensitized organic solar cell presents a promising pathway to high-efficiency, broadband-absorbing polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction organic solar cells.

  14. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption. PMID:26216471

  15. Optical Design and Analysis of Textured a-Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hegedus, S.; Paulson, P. D.; Sopori, B.

    2002-05-01

    The effect of texture on enhancement and losses in photocurrent in a-Si solar cells is explored using PVOPTICS software and measurements on a-Si device structures. The texture angle has a major impact on light trapping and internal reflection. Increasing the angle causes better internal trapping in the i-layer, but also higher SnO2/a-Si reflection losses, as well as SnO2 and metal absorption losses. Parasitic absorption in the textured SnO2 due to back reflected light is 1-2 mA/cm2 for typical designs. N-i-p cells have a fundamental advantage over p-i-n cells since the textured TCO is at the rear of the device leading to lower losses.

  16. The design of efficient surface-plasmon-enhanced ultra-thin polymer-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Adam; McClean, Éadaoin; Leipold, David; Zerulla, Dominic; Runge, Erich

    2011-08-01

    Polymer based solar cells are particularly attractive because of their mechanical flexibility and potential for low-cost fabrication. Although significant progress has been made, their efficiency is reduced strongly due to recombination processes that scale with the thickness of the active layer. A theoretical study of periodic plasmonic solar cell enhancement is presented, including a design for demonstrating high efficiency while using a significantly reduced active layer thicknesses. This is achieved through the superposition of toothgrating structures of multiple periodicities along a silver reflecting layer. Through finite-difference time-domain calculations, it was possible to optimize the overall spectral response of the cell yielding surface plasmon resonances at predetermined wavelengths. The improved solar cell design results in a system with increased absorption, allowing for the desired reduction in active layer thickness while also enhancing the performance of the cell over a wide wavelength range.

  17. Detecting Newcastle disease virus in combination of RT-PCR with red blood cell absorption.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jianzhong; Liu, Chengqian

    2011-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) has limited sensitivity when treating complicated samples, such as feces, waste-water in farms, and nucleic acids, protein rich tissue samples, all the factors may interfere with the sensitivity of PCR test or generate false results. In this study, we developed a sensitive RT-PCR, combination of red blood cell adsorption, for detecting Newcastle disease virus (NDV). One pair of primers which was highly homologous to three NDV pathotypes was designed according to the consensus nucleocapsid protein (NP) gene sequence. To eliminate the interfere of microbes and toxic substances, we concentrated and purified NDV from varied samples utilizing the ability of NDV binding red blood cells (RBCs). The RT-PCR coupled with red blood cell adsorption was much more sensitive in comparison with regular RT-PCR. The approach could also be used to detect other viruses with the property of hemagglutination, such as influenza viruses. PMID:21535888

  18. Ketoconazole activates Cl- conductance and blocks Cl- and fluid absorption by cultured cystic fibrosis (CFPAC-1) cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, U; Kersting, D; Spring, K R

    1993-01-01

    The role of arachidonic acid metabolites in the regulation of apical cell membrane Cl- conductance and transepithelial transport of fluid and Cl- by cultured pancreatic cells from cystic fibrosis (CFPAC-1) and corrected (PAC-1) cell lines was evaluated by the use of inhibitors. CFPAC-1 cells did not exhibit an apical membrane Cl- conductance, absorbed Cl- and fluid, and did not respond to stimulation or inhibition of cAMP action. PAC-1 cells exhibited a cAMP-responsive apical Cl- conductance, which was blocked by indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor. Ketoconazole, an epoxygenase inhibitor, had virtually no effects on PAC-1 cell Cl- conductance but caused CFPAC-1 cells to develop a cAMP-insensitive Cl- conductance, blocked Cl- and fluid absorption, and reduced transepithelial electrical resistance. Ketoconazole treatment effectively reversed the cystic fibrosis defect in these cultured cells. PMID:7683418

  19. A high-temperature in situ cell with a large solid angle for fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure measurement.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naoyoshi; Kobayashi, Makoto; Okada, Yukari; Suzuki, Takuya; Nitani, Hiroaki; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Abe, Hitoshi; Wada, Takahiro; Mukai, Shingo; Uehara, Hiromitsu; Ariga, Hiroko; Takakusagi, Satoru; Asakura, Kiyotaka

    2015-03-01

    We present the design and performance of a high-temperature in situ cell with a large solid angle for fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectra. The cell has a large fluorescence XAFS window (116 mm(ϕ)) near the sample in the cell, realizing a large half-cone angle of 56°. We use a small heater (25 × 35 mm(2)) to heat the sample locally to 873 K. We measured a Pt-SnO2 thin layer on a Si substrate at reaction conditions having a high activity. In situ measurement enables the analysis of the difference XAFS spectra between before and during the reaction to reveal the structure change during the operation. PMID:25832248

  20. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Robert W.; Wang, Baojun

    2015-01-01

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field. PMID:25579192

  1. Designer cell signal processing circuits for biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Robert W; Wang, Baojun

    2015-12-25

    Microorganisms are able to respond effectively to diverse signals from their environment and internal metabolism owing to their inherent sophisticated information processing capacity. A central aim of synthetic biology is to control and reprogramme the signal processing pathways within living cells so as to realise repurposed, beneficial applications ranging from disease diagnosis and environmental sensing to chemical bioproduction. To date most examples of synthetic biological signal processing have been built based on digital information flow, though analogue computing is being developed to cope with more complex operations and larger sets of variables. Great progress has been made in expanding the categories of characterised biological components that can be used for cellular signal manipulation, thereby allowing synthetic biologists to more rationally programme increasingly complex behaviours into living cells. Here we present a current overview of the components and strategies that exist for designer cell signal processing and decision making, discuss how these have been implemented in prototype systems for therapeutic, environmental, and industrial biotechnological applications, and examine emerging challenges in this promising field. PMID:25579192

  2. Design of programmable intelligent cell phone jammer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elangovan, Divya; Ravi, Aswin

    2011-12-01

    The usage of cell phones has increased enormously; at present silence and security is the need of the hour in many places. This can be done by using cell phone jammer, which blocks all the signals. This paper describes the design of an enhanced technique for jamming the cell phone signals. Our main objective is to concentrate on a specific band of frequency, which makes communication possible, by jamming this frequency we block out the specific signal that are responsible for making the call. This method enables the jammer to be more precise and effective, so precise that it can focus on specific area and allowing the programmer to define the area. The major advancement will be that emergency services can be availed which is very crucial in case of any calamity, they are intelligent devices as they act only after they receive signals and also it has a lesser power consumption than existing models. This technique has infinite potentials and sure can this be modified to match all our imaginations.

  3. Parallel Transmission Pulse Design with Explicit Control for the Specific Absorption Rate in the Presence of Radiofrequency Errors

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Adrian; Schiavi, Emanuele; Eryaman, Yigitcan; Herraiz, Joaquin L.; Gagoski, Borjan; Adalsteinsson, Elfar; Wald, Lawrence L.; Guerin, Bastien

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A new framework for the design of parallel transmit (pTx) pulses is presented introducing constraints for local and global specific absorption rate (SAR) in the presence of errors in the radiofrequency (RF) transmit chain. Methods The first step is the design of a pTx RF pulse with explicit constraints for global and local SAR. Then, the worst possible SAR associated with that pulse due to RF transmission errors (“worst-case SAR”) is calculated. Finally, this information is used to re-calculate the pulse with lower SAR constraints, iterating this procedure until its worst-case SAR is within safety limits. Results Analysis of an actual pTx RF transmit chain revealed amplitude errors as high as 8% (20%) and phase errors above 3° (15°) for spokes (spiral) pulses. Simulations show that using the proposed framework, pulses can be designed with controlled “worst-case SAR” in the presence of errors of this magnitude at minor cost of the excitation profile quality. Conclusion Our worst-case SAR-constrained pTx design strategy yields pulses with local and global SAR within the safety limits even in the presence of RF transmission errors. This strategy is a natural way to incorporate SAR safety factors in the design of pTx pulses. PMID:26147916

  4. Extension to PV OPTICS to include front electrode design in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guhabiswas, Debraj

    Proper optical designing of solar cells and modules is of paramount importance towards achieving high photovoltaic conversion efficiencies. Modeling softwares such as PV OPTICS, BIRANDY and SUNRAYS have been created to aid such optical designing of cells and modules; but none of these modeling packages take the front metal electrode architecture of a solar cell into account. A new model, has been developed to include the front metal electrode architecture to finished solar cells for optical calculations. This has been implemented in C++ in order to add a new module to PV OPTICS (NREL's photovoltaic modeling tool) to include front metallization patterns for optical design and simulation of solar cells. This new addition also calculates the contribution of light that diffuses out of the illuminated (non-metallized) regions to the solar cell current. It also determines the optical loss caused by the absorption in the front metal and separates metallic losses due to front and back contacts. This added capability also performs the following functions: • calculates the total current that can be generated in a solar cell due to optical absorption in each region, including the region beneath the front metal electrodes for the radiation spectrum of AM 1.5, • calculates various losses in the solar cell due to front electrode shading, metal absorption, and reflectance, • makes a plot of how light is absorbed in the metal as well as silicon under the shaded region in the solar cell. Although Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) is the numerical technique of choice to solve Maxwell's equations for a propagating electromagnetic wave, it is both time consuming and very demanding on the computer processors. Furthermore, for complicated geometric structures, FDTD poses various limitations. Hence, ray tracing has been chosen as the means of implementing this new model. This new software has been used to carry out a detailed investigation on the effect of various parameters of

  5. Study on the Coordination Structure of Pt Sorbed on Bacterial Cells Using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV) was reduced to Pt(II) on the cell’s surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials. PMID:25996945

  6. Broadband absorption enhancement in organic solar cells with an antenna layer through surface-plasmon mediated energy transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Yu; Feng, Jing; Zhang, Xu-Lin; Xu, Ming; Chen, Qi-Dai; Wu, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Hong-Bo

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated a strategy to realize broadband enhanced absorption in the top-incident inverted organic solar cells (OSCs) by employing an external antenna layer on top of the periodic corrugated metallic anode. Surface-plasmon polaritons (SPPs) are excited on the opposite interfaces of the periodic corrugated metallic anode, which mediate the energy transfer from the antenna layer to the active layer through the anode. The absorption of the OSCs is significantly broadened and enhanced by tuning the SPP resonance to coincide with both the emission of the antenna and the absorption of the active material. The power conversion efficiency exhibits an enhancement of 16% compared to that of the OSCs without the antenna layer.

  7. Design of coated standing nanowire array solar cell performing beyond the planar efficiency limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2016-05-01

    The single standing nanowire (SNW) solar cells have been proven to perform beyond the planar efficiency limits in both open-circuit voltage and internal quantum efficiency due to the built-in concentration and the shifting of the absorption front. However, the expandability of these nano-scale units to a macro-scale photovoltaic device remains unsolved. The main difficulty lies in the simultaneous preservation of an effective built-in concentration in each unit cell and a broadband high absorption capability of their array. Here, we have provided a detailed theoretical guideline for realizing a macro-scale solar cell that performs furthest beyond the planar limits. The key lies in a complementary design between the light-trapping of the single SNWs and that of the photonic crystal slab formed by the array. By tuning the hybrid HE modes of the SNWs through the thickness of a coaxial dielectric coating, the optimized coated SNW array can sustain an absorption rate over 97.5% for a period as large as 425 nm, which, together with the inherited carrier extraction advantage, leads to a cell efficiency increment of 30% over the planar limit. This work has demonstrated the viability of a large-size solar cell that performs beyond the planar limits.

  8. Design principles for single standing nanowire solar cells: going beyond the planar efficiency limits

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Yang; Ye, Qinghao; Shen, Wenzhong

    2014-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires (NWs) have long been used in photovoltaic applications but restricted to approaching the fundamental efficiency limits of the planar devices with less material. However, recent researches on standing NWs have started to reveal their potential of surpassing these limits when their unique optical property is utilized in novel manners. Here, we present a theoretical guideline for maximizing the conversion efficiency of a single standing NW cell based on a detailed study of its optical absorption mechanism. Under normal incidence, a standing NW behaves as a dielectric resonator antenna, and its optical cross-section shows its maximum when the lowest hybrid mode (HE11δ) is excited along with the presence of a back-reflector. The promotion of the cell efficiency beyond the planar limits is attributed to two effects: the built-in concentration caused by the enlarged optical cross-section, and the shifting of the absorption front resulted from the excited mode profile. By choosing an optimal NW radius to support the HE11δ mode within the main absorption spectrum, we demonstrate a relative conversion-efficiency enhancement of 33% above the planar cell limit on the exemplary a-Si solar cells. This work has provided a new basis for designing and analyzing standing NW based solar cells. PMID:24810591

  9. Unified Electromagnetic-Electronic Design of Light Trapping Silicon Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boroumand, Javaneh; Das, Sonali; Vázquez-Guardado, Abraham; Franklin, Daniel; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-08-01

    A three-dimensional unified electromagnetic-electronic model is developed in conjunction with a light trapping scheme in order to predict and maximize combined electron-photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells. The comparison between a bare and light trapping cell shows significant enhancement in photon absorption and electron collection. The model further demonstrates that in order to achieve high energy conversion efficiency, charge separation must be optimized through control of the doping profile and surface passivation. Despite having a larger number of surface defect states caused by the surface patterning in light trapping cells, we show that the higher charge carrier generation and collection in this design compensates the absorption and recombination losses and ultimately results in an increase in energy conversion efficiency. The fundamental physics behind this specific design approach is validated through its application to a 3 μm thick functional light trapping solar cell which shows 192% efficiency enhancement with respect to the bare cell of same thickness. Such a unified design approach will pave the path towards achieving the well-known Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit for c-Si in thin-film (<30 μm) geometries.

  10. Unified Electromagnetic-Electronic Design of Light Trapping Silicon Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boroumand, Javaneh; Das, Sonali; Vázquez-Guardado, Abraham; Franklin, Daniel; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional unified electromagnetic-electronic model is developed in conjunction with a light trapping scheme in order to predict and maximize combined electron-photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells. The comparison between a bare and light trapping cell shows significant enhancement in photon absorption and electron collection. The model further demonstrates that in order to achieve high energy conversion efficiency, charge separation must be optimized through control of the doping profile and surface passivation. Despite having a larger number of surface defect states caused by the surface patterning in light trapping cells, we show that the higher charge carrier generation and collection in this design compensates the absorption and recombination losses and ultimately results in an increase in energy conversion efficiency. The fundamental physics behind this specific design approach is validated through its application to a 3 μm thick functional light trapping solar cell which shows 192% efficiency enhancement with respect to the bare cell of same thickness. Such a unified design approach will pave the path towards achieving the well-known Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit for c-Si in thin-film (<30 μm) geometries. PMID:27499446

  11. Unified Electromagnetic-Electronic Design of Light Trapping Silicon Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Boroumand, Javaneh; Das, Sonali; Vázquez-Guardado, Abraham; Franklin, Daniel; Chanda, Debashis

    2016-01-01

    A three-dimensional unified electromagnetic-electronic model is developed in conjunction with a light trapping scheme in order to predict and maximize combined electron-photon harvesting in ultrathin crystalline silicon solar cells. The comparison between a bare and light trapping cell shows significant enhancement in photon absorption and electron collection. The model further demonstrates that in order to achieve high energy conversion efficiency, charge separation must be optimized through control of the doping profile and surface passivation. Despite having a larger number of surface defect states caused by the surface patterning in light trapping cells, we show that the higher charge carrier generation and collection in this design compensates the absorption and recombination losses and ultimately results in an increase in energy conversion efficiency. The fundamental physics behind this specific design approach is validated through its application to a 3 μm thick functional light trapping solar cell which shows 192% efficiency enhancement with respect to the bare cell of same thickness. Such a unified design approach will pave the path towards achieving the well-known Shockley-Queisser (SQ) limit for c-Si in thin-film (<30 μm) geometries. PMID:27499446

  12. Improvement in Suppression of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Light With Iodine Absorption Cells for Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Buggele, Alvin E

    1997-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh scattering using iodine absorption cells is an effective technique for obtaining density, temperature, and velocity measurements in high speed confined flows. By tuning a single frequency laser to a strong iodine absorption line, stray scattered laser light can be greatly suppressed. For example, the minimum transmission predicted by an iodine absorption model calculation is less than 10(exp -5) at the 18788.44/cm line using a 200 mm absorption cell containing iodine vapor at 0.46 T. Measurements obtained by other researches using a CW Nd:YAG laser agree with the model calculations. However, measurements made by us and by others using Q-switched, injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG lasers only show minimum transmission of about 3 x 10(exp -3). This greatly reduces the applicability of the filtered Rayleigh scattering technique using these lasers in experiments having large amounts of stray scattered laser light. The purposes of the present study are to characterize the spectrum of the excess light transmitted by the iodine cell and to make changes to the laser to reduce the transmitted laser light. Transmission data as a function of laser frequency for the iodine absorption line at 18788.44/cm are presented. A planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to characterize the frequency spectrum of the light passed through the cell. Measurements taken with the laser tuned to the center of the iodine absorption line show the light transmitted through the iodine cell to have a component with a bandwidth of about 40 GHz. This is probably caused by other modes in the laser that exist in spite of the single frequency injection beam. A second broadband component was also observed, possibly caused by the laser flash lamps or by fluorescence. An intracavity etalon was installed in the laser oscillator cavity to suppress the 40 GHz component. Measurements taken with the etalon tuned to the injection frequency showed a reduction in the transmitted

  13. Design of Advanced Atmospheric Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Luck, William S., Jr.; DeYoung, Russell J.

    1999-01-01

    The measurement of atmospheric water vapor is very important for understanding the Earth's climate and water cycle. The lidar atmospheric sensing experiment (LASE) is an instrument designed and operated by the Langley Research Center for high precision water vapor measurements. The design details of a new water vapor lidar detection system that improves the measurement sensitivity of the LASE instrument by a factor of 10 are discussed. The new system consists of an advanced, very low noise, avalanche photodiode (APD) and a state-of-the-art signal processing circuit. The new low-power system is also compact and lightweight so that it would be suitable for space flight and unpiloted atmospheric vehicles (UAV) applications. The whole system is contained on one small printed circuit board (9 x 15 sq cm). The detection system is mounted at the focal plane of a lidar receiver telescope, and the digital output is read by a personal computer with a digital data acquisition card.

  14. Design of emitter structures based on resonant perfect absorption for thermophotovoltaic applications.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan J; Ungaro, Craig; Sun, Keye; Gupta, Mool C; Gray, Stephen K

    2015-11-30

    We report a class of thermophotovoltaic emitter structures built upon planar films that support resonant modes, known as perfectly-absorbing modes, that facilitate an exceptional optical response for selective emission. These planar structures have several key advantages over previously-proposed designs for TPV applications: they are simple to fabricate, are stable across a range of temperatures and conditions, and are capable of achieving some of the highest spectral efficiencies reported of any class of emitter structure. Utilization of these emitters leads to exceptionally high device efficiencies under low operating temperature conditions, which should open new opportunities for waste heat management. We present a theoretical framework for understanding this performance, and show that this framework can be leveraged as a search algorithm for promising candidate structures. In addition to providing an efficient theoretical methodology for identifying high-performance emitter structures, our methodology provides new insight into underlying design principles and should pave way for future design of structures that are simple to fabricate, temperature stable, and possess exceptional optical properties. PMID:26698788

  15. Enhanced absorption in tandem solar cells by applying hydrogenated In{sub 2}O{sub 3} as electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, Guanchao Manley, Phillip; Steigert, Alexander; Klenk, Reiner; Schmid, Martina

    2015-11-23

    To realize the high efficiency potential of perovskite/chalcopyrite tandem solar cells in modules, hydrogenated In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (IO:H) as electrode is investigated. IO:H with an electron mobility of 100 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} is demonstrated. Compared to the conventional Sn doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} (ITO), IO:H exhibits a decreased electron concentration and leads to almost no sub-bandgap absorption up to the wavelength of 1200 nm. Without a trade-off between transparency and lateral resistance in the IO:H electrode, the tandem cell keeps increasing in efficiency as the IO:H thickness increases and efficiencies above 22% are calculated. In contrast, the cells with ITO as electrode perform much worse due to the severe parasitic absorption in ITO. This indicates that IO:H has the potential to lead to high efficiencies, which is otherwise constrained by the parasitic absorption in conventional transparent conductive oxide electrode for tandem solar cells in modules.

  16. Designing under Constraints: Cell Phone Case Design Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, Kevin; Grubbs, Michael E.; Ernst, Jeremy

    2014-01-01

    Engineering design has been suggested as a viable instructional approach for Technology Education (TE) to intentionally provide students the opportunity to apply multidisciplinary concepts to solve ill-defined design challenges (Wells & Ernst, 2012; Sanders & Wells, 2010; Wicklein, 2006). Currently, the context for design challenges in TE…

  17. Parametric Design Studies on a Direct Liquid Feed Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Nakamura, B.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric design studies were carried out on a direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell employing 1 M MeOH fuel, air and oxygen as oxidant in a 2 inch x 2 inch cell employing polymeric electrolyte membranes. Measurements include voltage-current output parameters, methanol crossover rate, and impedance as a function of several design and operational variables. Design variables are described.

  18. Nanostructuring for enhanced absorption and carrier collection in CZTS-based solar cells: Coupled optical and electrical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelraouf, Omar A. M.; Allam, Nageh K.

    2016-04-01

    Earth-abundant Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is being considered as a potential photon-absorbing layer for low cost thin film solar cells. Nanostructured light trapping is recently investigated as a technique for enhancing the efficiency of CZTS solar cells. Herein, we used coupled electrical and optical modeling for different combinations of nanostructured CZTS solar cells to guide optimization of such nanostructures. The model is validated by a comparison of simulated I-V curves with previously reported experimental data. A very good agreement is achieved. Simulations are used to demonstrate that nanostructures can be tailored to maximize the absorption, carrier generation, carrier collection, and efficiency in CZTS solar cells. All proposed nanostructured solar cells showed enhancement in the overall conversion efficiency.

  19. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  20. Efficient Vacuum-Deposited Ternary Organic Solar Cells with Broad Absorption, Energy Transfer, and Enhanced Hole Mobility.

    PubMed

    Shim, Hyun-Sub; Moon, Chang-Ki; Kim, Jihun; Wang, Chun-Kai; Sim, Bomi; Lin, Francis; Wong, Ken-Tsung; Seo, Yongsok; Kim, Jang-Joo

    2016-01-20

    The use of multiple donors in an active layer is an effective way to boost the efficiency of organic solar cells by broadening their absorption window. Here, we report an efficient vacuum-deposited ternary organic photovoltaic (OPV) using two donors, 2-((2-(5-(4-(diphenylamino)phenyl)thieno[3,2-b]thiophen-2-yl)thiazol-5-yl)methylene)malononitrile (DTTz) for visible absorption and 2-((7-(5-(dip-tolylamino)thiophen-2-yl)benzo[c]-[1,2,5]thiadiazol-4-yl)methylene)malononitrile (DTDCTB) for near-infrared absorption, codeposited with C70 in the ternary layer. The ternary device achieved a power conversion efficiency of 8.02%, which is 23% higher than that of binary OPVs. This enhancement is the result of incorporating two donors with complementary absorption covering wavelengths of 350 to 900 nm with higher hole mobility in the ternary layer than that of binary layers consisting of one donor and C70, combined with energy transfer from the donor with lower hole mobility (DTTz) to that with higher mobility (DTDCTB). This structure fulfills all the requirements for efficient ternary OPVs. PMID:26714649

  1. Clarifying the chemical state of additives in membranes for polymer electrolyte fuel cells by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanuma, Toshihiro; Itoh, Takanori

    2016-02-01

    Cerium and manganese compounds are used in the membrane for polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) as radical scavengers to mitigate chemical degradation of the membrane. The chemical states of cerium and manganese in the membrane were investigated using a fluorescence X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. Membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to open circuit voltage (OCV) condition, under which hydroxyl radicals attack the membrane; a shift in absorption energy in X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra was compared between Ce- and Mn-containing membranes before and after OCV testing. In the case of the Ce-containing MEA, there was no significant difference in XANES spectra before and after OCV testing, whereas in the case of the Mn-containing MEA, there was an obvious shift in XANES absorption energy after OCV testing, indicating that Mn atoms with higher valence state than 2+ exist in the membrane after OCV testing. This can be attributed to the difference in the rate of reduction; the reaction of Ce4+ with ·OOH is much faster than that of Mn3+ with ·OOH, leaving some of the Mn atoms with higher valence state. It was confirmed that cerium and manganese redox couples reduced the attack from radicals, mitigating membrane degradation.

  2. New silicon cell design concepts for 20 percent AMI efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, M.

    1982-01-01

    The basic design principles for obtaining high efficiency in silicon solar cells are reviewed. They critically involve very long minority carrier lifetimes, not so much to attain high collection efficiency, but primarily for increased output voltages. Minority carrier lifetime, however, is sensitive to radiation damage, and particularly in low resistivity silicon, on which the high efficiency design is based. Radiation resistant space cells will therefore have to follow differing design principles than high efficiency terrestrial cells.

  3. Thermal design of lithium bromide-water solution vapor absorption cooling system for indirect evaporative cooling for IT pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Digvijay Ramkrishna

    Nowadays with increase use of internet, mobile there is increase in heat which ultimately increases the efficient cooling system of server room or IT POD. Use of traditional ways of cooling system has ultimately increased CO2 emission and depletion of CFC's are serious environmental issues which led scientific people to improve cooling techniques and eliminate use of CFC's. To reduce dependency on fossil fuels and 4environmental friendly system needed to be design. For being utilizing low grade energy source such as solar collector and reducing dependency on fossil fuel vapour absorption cooling system has shown a great driving force in today's refrigeration systems. This LiBr-water aabsorption cooling consists of five heat exchanger namely: Evaporator, Absorber, Solution Heat Exchanger, Generator, Condenser. The thermal design was done for a load of 23 kW and the procedure was described in the thesis. There are 120 servers in the IT POD emitting 196 W of heat each on full load and some of the heat was generated by the computer placed inside the IT POD. A detailed procedure has been discussed. A excel spreadsheet was to prepared with varying tube sizes to see the effect on flows and ultimately overall heat transfer coefficient.

  4. A flow-through reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations.

    PubMed

    Ferrer, Pilar; da Silva, Iván; Rubio-Zuazo, Juan; Alfonso, Belén F; Trobajo, Camino; Khainakov, Sergei; Garcia, Jose R; Garcia-Granda, Santiago; Castro, Germán R

    2012-01-01

    A portable powder-liquid high-corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniques. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway by a porous membrane, under forced liquid reflux circulation. Owing to the short pathway of the X-ray beam through the cell, XRD and XAS measurements can be carried out in transmission configuration/mode. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector, depending on specific experimental requirements in terms of space or time resolution. Crystallization processes, heterogeneous catalytic processes and several varieties of experiments can be followed by these techniques with this cell. Two experiments were carried out to demonstrate the cell feasibility: the phase transformations of layered titanium phosphates in boiling aqueous solutions of phosphoric acid, and the reaction of copper carbonate and L-isoleucine amino acid powders in boiling aqueous solution. In this last case the shrinking of the solid reactants and the formation of Cu(isoleucine)(2) is observed. The crystallization processes and several phase transitions have been observed during the experiments, as well as an unexpected reaction pathway. PMID:22186649

  5. Omnidirectional and broadband optical absorption enhancement in small molecule organic solar cells by a patterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 transparent anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Hao, Yuying; Zhang, Ye; Cui, Yanxia; Ji, Ting; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We designed and calculated a novel organic solar cell (OSC) with MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) grating as transparent anode and the patterned copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)/fullerence (C60) as active layer. The numerical results indicate that a broadband, omnidirectional light absorption enhancement is realized by utilizing such a one-dimensional (1D) grating with core-shell structure. The total absorption efficiency of the active layer over the wavelength range from 400 to 900 nm is enhanced by 178.88%, 19.44% and 99.16% relative to the equivalent planar cell considering the weight of air-mass 1.5 global (AM 1.5G) solar spectrum at normally incident transverse magnetic (TM), transverse electric (TE) and TM/TE hybrid polarized light, respectively. The improved light trapping is attributed to the multiple modes hybridization of propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), localized surface plasmons (LSPs) and the strong coupling of SPP waves at TM polarization along with the Floquet modes at TE polarization. Furthermore, the proposed optimized architecture also exhibits an expected short-circuit current density (Jsc) with the value of 11.11 mA/cm2 in theory, which is increased by 116.6% compared with that of the planar control device.

  6. Results of Analysis on the Design Variable Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasanth, K. L.

    1985-01-01

    Sealed Nickel-Cadmium aerospace cells play a very important role in the mission of the satellite. There has been a constant effort to improve the cycle life, energy density, and reliability of these cells by many manufacturers and users. The Design Variable Cell Program is one systematic approach started by NASA in collaboration with General Electric (GE) towards that goal. Nine important designs were selected for evaluation. Fifty-two nickel-cadmium cells each of 12 Ah nominal capacity manufactured by GE were sent to the Navel weapons Support Center for evaluation of different design variables with which these cells were built.

  7. SiN{sub x} layers on nanostructured Si solar cells: Effective for optical absorption and carrier collection

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Yunae; Kim, Eunah; Gwon, Minji; Kim, Dong-Wook E-mail: dwkim@ewha.ac.kr; Park, Hyeong-Ho; Kim, Joondong E-mail: dwkim@ewha.ac.kr

    2015-10-12

    We compared nanopatterned Si solar cells with and without SiN{sub x} layers. The SiN{sub x} layer coating significantly improved the internal quantum efficiency of the nanopatterned cells at long wavelengths as well as short wavelengths, whereas the surface passivation helped carrier collection of flat cells mainly at short wavelengths. The surface nanostructured array enhanced the optical absorption and also concentrated incoming light near the surface in broad wavelength range. Resulting high density of the photo-excited carriers near the surface could lead to significant recombination loss and the SiN{sub x} layer played a crucial role in the improved carrier collection of the nanostructured solar cells.

  8. Increased Potassium Absorption Confers Resistance to Group IA Cations in Rubidium-Selected Suspension Cells of Brassica napus1

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Daniel D.

    1989-01-01

    Cell lines of suspension cultures of Brassica napus cv. Jet Neuf were identified for their ability to tolerate 100 millimolar Rb+, a level which was double the normally lethal concentration. Ten spontaneous isolates were obtained from approximately 5 × 107 cells, one of which was reestablished as a cell suspension. This cell line, JL5, was also resistant to the other group IA cations— Li+, Na+, K+, and Cs+—and this trait was stable for at least 30 cell generations in the absence of Rb+ selection pressure. The growth characteristics were similar to those of sensitive cells under nonselective conditions. The selected JL5 cells were shown by analysis to have effected more net accumulation of K+ and Rb+ and less of Na+ than did the unselected cells. JL5 and unselected cells after 14 days of culture in basal medium contained 597.2 and 258.2 micromoles of K per gram dry weight, respectively. Michaelis-Menten kinetic analysis of K+ influx showed that JL5 possessed an elevated phase 1 Vmax, but there was no alteration in its Km. This is the first time that a plant mutation has been shown to have both increased influx and net absorption of a major essential cation. Images Figure 1 PMID:16667201

  9. Statistical Design of Experiments on Fabrication of Bilayer Tablet of Narrow Absorption Window Drug: Development and In vitro characterisation

    PubMed Central

    Jivani, R. R.; Patel, C. N.; Jivani, N. P.

    2012-01-01

    The current study involves the fabrication of oral bioadhesive bilayer matrices of narrow absorption window drug baclofen and the optimisation of their in vitro drug release and characterisation. Statistical design of experiments, a computer-aided optimisation technique, was used to identify critical factors, their interactions and ideal process conditions that accomplish the targeted response(s). A central composite design was employed to systematically optimise the drug delivery containing a polymer, filler and compression force. The values of ratio of different grades of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, microcrystalline cellulose and compression force were varied to be fitted in design. Drug release at 1 h (Q1), 4 h (Q4), 8 h (Q8), 12 h (Q12), and hardness were taken as responses. Tablets were prepared by direct compression methods. The compressed tablets were evaluated for their hardness, weight variation, friability, content uniformity and diameter. Counter plots were drawn and optimum formulation was selected by desirability function. The formulations were checked for their ex vivo mucoadhesion. The experimental value of Q1, Q4, Q8, Q12 and hardness for check-point batch was found to be 31.64, 45.82, 73.27, 98.95% and 4.4 kg/cm2, respectively. The release profile indicates Highuchi kinetics (Fickian transport) mechanism. The results of the statistical analysis of the data demonstrated significant interactions amongst the formulation variables, and the desirability function was demonstrated to be a powerful tool to predict the optimal formulation for the bilayer tablet. PMID:23626385

  10. Design and fabrication of silver-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, M. G.

    1975-01-01

    The design and fabrication of silver-hydrogen secondary cells capable of delivering higher energy densities than comparable nickel-cadmium and nickel-hydrogen cells and relatively high cycle life is presented. An experimental task utilizing single electrode pairs for the optimization of the individual electrode components, the preparation of a design for lightweight 20Ahr cells, and the fabrication of four 20Ahr cells in heavy wall test housing containing electrode stacks of the lightweight design are described. The design approach is based on the use of a single cylindrical self-contained cell with a stacked disc sequence of electrodes. The electrode stack design is based on the use of NASA- Astropower Separator Material, PPF fuel cell anodes, an intercell electrolyte reservoir concept and sintered silver electrodes. Results of performance tests are given.

  11. Design Rules for Efficient Organic Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Z.; Mühlbacher, D.; Morana, M.; Koppe, M.; Scharber, M. C.; Waller, D.; Dennler, G.; Brabec, C. J.

    There has been an intensive search for cost-effective photovoltaics since the development of the first solar cells in the 1950s [1-3]. Among all the alternative technologies to silicon-based pn-junction solar cells, organic solar cells are the approach that could lead to the most significant cost reduction [4]. The field of organic photovoltaics (OPV) is composed of organic/inorganic nanostructures, like the dyesensitized solar cell, multilayers of small organic molecules and mixtures of organic materials (bulk-heterojunction solar cell). A review of several so-called organic photovoltaic (OPV) technologies was recently presented [5].

  12. Transformation of electromagnetically induced transparency into absorption in a thermal potassium optical cell with spin preserving coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzini, S.; Lucchesini, A.; Marinelli, C.; Marmugi, L.; Gateva, S.; Tsvetkov, S.; Cartaleva, S.

    2016-03-01

    We report a new experimental approach where an order of magnitude enhancement of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) resonance contrast, thus making it similar to that of the EIT resonance contrast is observed under the same conditions. The EIA signal results from the interaction of a weak probe beam with a ground state that has been driven by the pump (counter-propagating) beam. Probe absorption spectra are presented where the laser frequency is slowly detuned over the D1 line of 39K vapor contained in a cell with a PDMS antirelaxation coating. In addition to the frequency detuning, a magnetic field orthogonal to the laser beams is scanned around zero value at a higher rate. With both laser beams linearly polarized, an EIT resonance is observed. However, changing the pump beam polarization from linear to circular reverses the resonance signal from EIT to EIA.

  13. Broadband light absorption enhancement in dye-sensitized solar cells with Au-Ag alloy popcorn nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qi; Liu, Fang; Liu, Yuxiang; Cui, Kaiyu; Feng, Xue; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, we present an investigation on the use of Au-Ag alloy popcorn-shaped nanoparticles (NPs) to realise the broadband optical absorption enhancement of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). Both simulation and experimental results indicate that compared with regular plasmonic NPs, such as nano-spheres, irregular popcorn-shaped alloy NPs exhibit absorption enhancement over a broad wavelength range due to the excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) at different wavelengths. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) of DSCs is enhanced by 16% from 5.26% to 6.09% by incorporating 2.38 wt% Au-Ag alloy popcorn NPs. Moreover, by adding a scattering layer on the exterior of the counter electrode, the popcorn NPs demonstrate an even stronger ability to increase the PCE by 32% from 5.94% to 7.85%, which results from the more efficient excitation of the LSP mode on the popcorn NPs.

  14. PEM Fuel Cells Redesign Using Biomimetic and TRIZ Design Methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fung, Keith Kin Kei

    Two formal design methodologies, biomimetic design and the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving, TRIZ, were applied to the redesign of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Proof of concept prototyping was performed on two of the concepts for water management. The liquid water collection with strategically placed wicks concept demonstrated the potential benefits for a fuel cell. Conversely, the periodic flow direction reversal concepts might cause a potential reduction water removal from a fuel cell. The causes of this water removal reduction remain unclear. In additional, three of the concepts generated with biomimetic design were further studied and demonstrated to stimulate more creative ideas in the thermal and water management of fuel cells. The biomimetic design and the TRIZ methodologies were successfully applied to fuel cells and provided different perspectives to the redesign of fuel cells. The methodologies should continue to be used to improve fuel cells.

  15. Involvement of Concentrative Nucleoside Transporter 1 in Intestinal Absorption of Trifluridine Using Human Small Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Koichi; Yoshisue, Kunihiro; Chiba, Masato; Nakanishi, Takeo; Tamai, Ikumi

    2015-09-01

    TAS-102, which is effective for refractory metastatic colorectal cancer, is a combination drug of anticancer trifluridine (FTD; which is derived from pyrimidine nucleoside) and FTD-metabolizing enzyme inhibitor tipiracil hydrochloride (TPI) at a molecular ratio of 1:0.5. To evaluate the intestinal absorption mechanism of FTD, the uptake and transcellular transport of FTD by human small intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) monolayer as a model of human intestinal epithelial cells was investigated. The uptake and membrane permeability of FTD by HIEC monolayers were saturable, Na(+) -dependent, and inhibited by nucleosides. These transport characteristics are mostly comparable with those of concentrative nucleoside transporters (CNTs). Moreover, the uptake of FTD by CNT1-expressing Xenopus oocytes was the highest among human CNT transporters. The obtained Km and Vmax values of FTD by CNT1 were 69.0 μM and 516 pmol/oocyte/30 min, respectively. The transcellular transport of FTD by Caco-2 cells, where CNT1 is heterologously expressed, from apical to basolateral side was greater than that by Mock cells. In conclusion, these results demonstrated that FTD exhibits high oral absorption by the contribution of human CNT1. PMID:25900515

  16. Design, fabrication, test, qualification, and price analysis of third generation design solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The fabrication of solar cell modules is detailed with emphasis upon laminating and interconnecting the panels that hold the simicrystalline silicon cells. Design problems and enviromental tests are described as well as performance characteristics.

  17. Design, fabrication, test, qualification, and price analysis of third generation design solar cell modules

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-10-01

    The fabrication of solar cell modules is detailed with emphasis upon laminating and interconnecting the panels that hold the simicrystalline silicon cells. Design problems and enviromental tests are described as well as performance characteristics.

  18. How Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design Affects Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gacerez, Albert T; Arellano, Benjamine; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been developed to treat tumors and have shown great success against B cell malignancies. Exploiting modular designs and swappable domains, CARs can target an array of cell surface antigens and, upon receptor-ligand interactions, direct signaling cascades, thereby driving T cell effector functions. CARs have been designed using receptors, ligands, or scFv binding domains. Different regions of a CAR have each been found to play a role in determining the overall efficacy of CAR T cells. Therefore, this review provides an overview of CAR construction and common designs. Each CAR region is discussed in the context of its importance to a CAR's function. Additionally, the review explores how various engineering strategies have been applied to CAR T cells in order to regulate CAR T cell function and activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2590-2598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27163336

  19. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Håkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-15

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 ml{sub n}/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25–500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and 2% Ag − Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  20. An in situ sample environment reaction cell for spatially resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of powders and small structured reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chu; Gustafson, Johan; Merte, Lindsay R.; Evertsson, Jonas; Norén, Katarina; Carlson, Stefan; Svensson, Hâkan; Carlsson, Per-Anders

    2015-03-01

    An easy-to-use sample environment reaction cell for X-ray based in situ studies of powders and small structured samples, e.g., powder, pellet, and monolith catalysts, is described. The design of the cell allows for flexible use of appropriate X-ray transparent windows, shielding the sample from ambient conditions, such that incident X-ray energies as low as 3 keV can be used. Thus, in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurements in either transmission or fluorescence mode are facilitated. Total gas flows up to about 500 mln/min can be fed while the sample temperature is accurately controlled (at least) in the range of 25-500 °C. The gas feed is composed by a versatile gas-mixing system and the effluent gas flow composition is monitored with mass spectrometry (MS). These systems are described briefly. Results from simultaneous XAS/MS measurements during oxidation of carbon monoxide over a 4% Pt/Al2O3 powder catalyst are used to illustrate the system performance in terms of transmission XAS. Also, 2.2% Pd/Al2O3 and 2% Ag - Al2O3 powder catalysts have been used to demonstrate X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy in fluorescence mode. Further, a 2% Pt/Al2O3 monolith catalyst was used ex situ for transmission XANES. The reaction cell opens for facile studies of structure-function relationships for model as well as realistic catalysts both in the form of powders, small pellets, and coated or extruded monoliths at near realistic conditions. The applicability of the cell for X-ray diffraction measurements is discussed.

  1. Applications of ``PV Optics`` for solar cell and module design

    SciTech Connect

    Sopori, B.L.; Madjdpour, J.; Chen, W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes some applications of a new optics software package, PV Optics, developed for the optical design of solar cells and modules. PV Optics is suitable for the analysis and design of both thick and thin solar cells. It also includes a feature for calculation of metallic losses related to contacts and back reflectors.

  2. Absorption spectrophotometric, fluorescence and theoretical investigations on supramolecular interaction of a designed bisporphyrin with C 60 and C 70

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Debabrata; Bhattacharya, Sumanta

    2011-08-01

    The present article reports the spectroscopic and theoretical investigations on supramolecular interaction between fullerenes (C 60 and C 70) and a designed bisporphyrin, namely 1, in toluene. Job's method of continuous variation establishes 1:1 stoichiometry of the fullerene/ 1 complexes. Both absorption spectrophotometric and steady-state fluorescence studies reveal effective and selective interaction between fullerenes and 1 as average binding constants ( K) for the C 60/ 1 and C 70/ 1 complexes are enumerated to be 34,700 and 359,925 dm 3 mol -1, respectively. Large selectivity ratio in K, i.e., K/K, indicates that 1 acts as an effective molecular tweezers for C 70 in solution. Time-resolved fluorescence study evokes that the quenching of fluorescence of 1 by fullerenes is of static type in nature. Molecular mechanics calculations in vacuo determine the energies and single projection structures of the supramolecular systems, which provide very good support in favor of strong binding between C 70 and 1.

  3. Design and measurements of the absorption section of an up-conversion device based on PbSe quantum-dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hechster, Elad; Sarusi, Gabby

    2015-12-01

    The absorption section of quantum dots (QD) based night vision devices consists of the OQ sensitizing layer which absorbs the Infrared radiation, the substrate on which the QD are placed, the electrode and, in several cases, a blocking layer that prevents the flow of charge carriers toward the inverse direction. The absorption section plays a dominant role in determining the absorption spectral ranges and the signal-to-noise ratios of the devices. In this work, we show the design of the absorption section of a short wavelength infrared (SWIR) to visible direct up-conversion device. The growth was 300 nm thick PbSe quantum dots (QD) separated by PbSe grain boundaries layer on intrinsic GaAs substrate. Photo-luminescence and absorption measurements suggested that the quantum dots spectral response is blue-shifted to the spectral range in which the up-conversion device is operated i.e., SWIR. We preformed sheet resistance measurements in dark and under illumination that showed that the device exhibits an improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio after annealing ion chloride atmosphere compare with annealing in oxygen atmosphere. These samples have great potential for the use as the absorption section of low-cost, compact, low power consumption, and cooler free up-conversion devices.

  4. Effect of light incidence angle on optical absorption characteristics of low bandgap polymer-based bulk heterojunction organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwan-Yong; Park, Sun-Joo; Kim, Do-Hyun; Kim, Young-Joo

    2014-08-01

    The bulk heterojunction organic solar cell based on thieno[3,4-b]thiophene/benzodithiophene (PTB7) is one of an alternative candidate for traditional silicon-based solar cells owing to its advantages of ease of manufacture, low cost, and flexibility. Currently, many research studies of these devices focus on power conversion efficiency (PCE) enhancement with only normal sunlight incidence. In this study, we have experimentally verified that PCE markedly decreased from 5.51 to 3.47% as incidence angle was changed from 0 to 60°. Using the finite-difference time-domain method, we found that the degeneration of optical absorption is caused by the decreased electrical field intensity in the photoactive layer over the entire wavelength range due to the optical interference profile change. In addition, we confirmed that a higher incidence angle also results in unbalanced charge carrier transport characteristics, resulting in further decrease in solar cell efficiency.

  5. Evaluation of the Intestinal Absorption Mechanism of Casearin X in Caco-2 Cells with Modified Carboxylesterase Activity.

    PubMed

    Moreira da Silva, Rodrigo; Verjee, Sheela; de Gaitani, Cristiane Masetto; Moraes de Oliveira, Anderson Rodrigo; Pires Bueno, Paula Carolina; Cavalheiro, Alberto José; Peporine Lopes, Norberto; Butterweck, Veronika

    2016-04-22

    The clerodane diterpene casearin X (1), isolated from the leaves of Casearia sylvestris, is a potential new drug candidate due to its potent in vitro cytotoxic activity. In this work, the intestinal absorption mechanism of 1 was evaluated using Caco-2 cells with and without active carboxylesterases (CES). An LC-MS method was developed and validated for the quantification of 1. The estimation of permeability coefficients was possible only under CES-inhibited conditions in which 1 is able to cross the Caco-2 cell monolayer. The mechanism is probably by active transport, with no significant efflux, but with a high retention of the compound inside the cells. The enzymatic hydrolysis assay demonstrates the susceptibility of 1 to first-pass metabolism as substrate for specific CES expressed in human intestine. PMID:26990770

  6. Improved light trapping in microcrystalline silicon solar cells by plasmonic back reflector with broad angular scattering and low parasitic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Hairen; Sivec, Laura; Yan, Baojie; Santbergen, Rudi; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H. M.

    2013-04-01

    We show experimentally that the photocurrent of thin-film hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) solar cells can be enhanced by 4.5 mA/cm2 with a plasmonic back reflector (BR). The light trapping performance is improved using plasmonic BR with broader angular scattering and lower parasitic absorption loss through tuning the size of silver nanoparticles. The μc-Si:H solar cells deposited on the improved plasmonic BR demonstrate a high photocurrent of 26.3 mA/cm2 which is comparable to the state-of-the-art textured Ag/ZnO BR. The commonly observed deterioration of fill factor is avoided by using μc-SiOx:H as the n-layer for solar cells deposited on plasmonic BR.

  7. Multi-pass gas cell designed for VOCs analysis by infrared spectroscopy system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Junbo; Wang, Xin; Wei, Haoyun

    2015-10-01

    Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) emitted from chemical, petrochemical, and other industries are the most common air pollutants leading to various environmental hazards. Regulations to control the VOCs emissions have been more and more important in China, which requires specific VOCs measurement systems to take measures. Multi-components analysis system, with an infrared spectrometer, a gas handling module and a multi-pass gas cell, is one of the most effective air pollution monitoring facilities. In the VOCs analysis system, the optical multi-pass cell is required to heat to higher than 150 degree Celsius to prevent the condensation of the component gas. Besides that, the gas cell needs to be designed to have an optical path length that matches the detection sensitivity requirement with a compact geometry. In this article, a multi-pass White cell was designed for the high temperature absorption measurements in a specified geometry requirement. The Aberration theory is used to establish the model to accurately calculate the astigmatism for the reflector system. In consideration of getting the optimum output energy, the dimensions of cell geometry, object mirrors and field mirror are optimized by the ray-tracing visible simulation. Then finite element analysis was used to calculate the thermal analysis for the structure of the external and internal elements for high stability. According to the simulation, the cell designed in this paper has an optical path length of 10 meters with an internal volume of 3 liters, and has good stability between room temperature to 227 degree Celsius.

  8. Designing CAR T cells for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Maus, Marcela V

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells directed against CD19 can mediate long-term durable remissions in B cell malignancies, but bringing a new target antigen to the clinic requires extensive modeling to avoid on-target and off-target toxicity. We recently described a systematic approach to test a new CAR directed against EGFR variant III. PMID:26587317

  9. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface. PMID:27355877

  10. Hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanomaterials with controlled morphology and strong plasmonic absorption for photothermal ablation of cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Guosheng; Shen, Jia; Jiang, Feiran; Hu, Ronggui; Li, Wenyao; An, Lei; Zou, Rujia; Chen, Zhigang; Qin, Zongyi; Hu, Junqing

    2014-03-26

    The molybdenum oxide nanosheets have shown strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in the near-infrared (NIR) region. However, the long alky chains of ligands made them hydrophobic and less biocompatible. To meet the requirements of molybdenum based nanomaterials for use as a future photothermal therapy, a simple hydrothermal route has been developed for hydrophilic molybdenum oxide nanospheres and nanoribbons using a molybdenum precursor and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG). First, molybdenum oxide nanomaterials prepared in the presence of PEG exhibit strong localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) absorption in near-infrared (NIR) region, compared with that of no PEG. Second, elevation of synthetic temperature leads to a gradual transformation of molybdenum oxide nanospheres into nanoribbons, entailing the evolution of an intense LSPR absorption in the NIR region. Third, as-prepared molybdenum oxide nanomaterials coated with PEG possess a hydrophilic property and thus can be directly used for biological applications without additional post treatments. Moreover, molybdenum oxide nanoribbons as a model of photothermal materials can efficiently convert the 980 nm wavelength laser energy into heat energy, and this localized hyperthermia produces the effective thermal ablation of cancer cells, meaning a potential photothermal material. PMID:24564332

  11. Intestinal absorption of forsythoside A in in situ single-pass intestinal perfusion and in vitro Caco-2 cell models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wei; Di, Liu-qing; Wang, Juan; Shan, Jin-jun; Liu, Shi-jia; Ju, Wen-zheng; Cai, Bao-chang

    2012-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the mechanisms underlying the intestinal absorption of the major bioactive component forsythoside A (FTA) extracted from Forsythiae fructus. Methods: An in vitro Caco-2 cell model and a single-pass intestinal perfusion in situ model in SD rats were used. Results: In the in vitro Caco-2 cell model, the mean apparent permeability value (Papp-value) was 4.15×10-7 cm/s in the apical-to-basolateral (AP-BL) direction. At the concentrations of 2.6–10.4 μg/mL, the efflux ratio of FTA in the bi-directional transport experiments was approximately 1.00. After the transport, >96% of the apically loaded FTA was retained on the apical side, while >97% of the basolaterally loaded FTA was retained on the basolateral side. The Papp-values of FTA were inversely correlated with the transepithelial electrical resistance. The paracellular permeability enhancers sodium caprate and EDTA, the P-gp inhibitor verapamil and the multidrug resistance related protein (MRP) inhibitors cyclosporine and MK571 could concentration-dependently increase the Papp-values, while the uptake (OATP) transporter inhibitors diclofenac sodium and indomethacin could concentration-dependently decrease the Papp-values. The intake transporter SGLT1 inhibitor mannitol did not cause significant change in the Papp-values. In the in situ intestinal perfusion model, both the absorption rate constant (Ka) and the effective permeability (Peff-values) following perfusion of FTA 2.6, 5.2 and 10.4 μg/mL via the duodenum, jejunum and ileum had no significant difference, although the values were slightly higher for the duodenum as compared to those in the jejunum and ileum. The low, medium and high concentrations of verapamil caused the largest increase in the Peff-values for duodenum, jejunum and ileum, respectively. Sodium caprate, EDTA and cyclosporine resulted in concentration-dependent increase in the Peff-values. Diclofenac sodium and indomethacin caused concentration-dependent decrease in the

  12. Efficient light scattering in plasmonic light trapping designs for thin film solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Liming; Varadan, Vasundara V.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic structures have been proposed for enhancing light absorption in thin film solar cells, for which insufficient light absorption is a limiting factor for further improvement of efficiency. The optical path of light in the absorber layer of a solar cell is increased due to the enhanced light scattering by plasmonic structures at resonance. This process involves two steps of energy conversion: light-electron and then electron-light. The first step couples optical energy into the kinetic energy of collective electron motions in plasmonic structures, forming oscillating current. This step is easy to implement as long as plasmonic structures are at resonance. The second step releases the energy from electrons to photons. An efficient release of photon energy is a must for solar cell applications and it is dependent on the two competing effects: light scattering and field localization that results in heat loss. Theoretical discussions and simulation work are provided in the paper. The scattering of light by a plasmonic structure is analyzed based on the antenna radiation theory. Three factors are found to be important for the efficiency of a plasmonic light trapping design: the radiation of each unit structure, the array factor and the energy feeding of the structure. An efficient plasmonic light trapping design requires proper considerations of all the three factors.

  13. DEVELOPMENT OF DESIGN TOOLS TO FACILITATE/PROMOTE SUSTAINABLE DESIGN OF PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Objective is to develop and demonstrate 2 sets of of design tools that are applicable to the manufacture of proton exchange membrane fuel cell systems. First set will offer guidance to fuel cell designers for end of life options suited to subassembly. Second set will give fuel ...

  14. Solar Cells from Earth-Abundant Semiconductors with Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Atwater, Harry

    2012-04-30

    Progress is reported in these areas: Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin Film a-Si Solar Cells; Plasmonic Light Trapping in Thin InGaN Quantum Well Solar Cells; and Earth Abundant Cu{sub 2}O and Zn{sub 3}P{sub 2} Solar Cells.

  15. Subterranean Carbon Dioxide Concentration Analysis Utilizing a Scalable Optical Fiber-Based Absorption Cell Array for Carbon Capture and Storage Site Integrity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicks, G. R.; Soukup, B.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    Geologic carbon sequestration is a means to mitigate the increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) by capturing the CO2 at a source such as a power generation facility and storing the captured CO2 in geologic formations. Many technological advances will need to occur for successful carbon sequestration, including near surface monitoring tools and techniques to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University (MSU) are developing a scalable fiber sensor array in a call/return configuration for monitoring near sub-surface CO2 concentrations for the purpose of carbon sequestration site integrity monitoring. The system measures CO2 concentrations through the application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). The instrument utilizes four fiber probes (absorption cells) connected to a detector, a fiber-optic beam splitter, and a 1 x 4 fiber-optic micro-electromechanical (MEMS) switch that can direct the light to one of the four probes, and employs a single tunable distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser with a center wavelength of 2.004 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The fiber sensor array can easily be reconfigured by simply moving the fiber probes. Low cost is achieved by using inexpensive passive components in the probes while limiting the number of the more expensive components including the DFB laser, the detector, and the 1 X 4 MEMS switch. The fiber sensor system was tested over a sixty day period centered on a thirty day controlled CO2 release at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) facility that was developed for sub-surface and near surface carbon sequestration monitoring research. In this presentation, the design of the fiber sensor array system will be presented, along with the system performance during the sixty day monitoring experiment.

  16. E-beam deposited Ag-nanoparticles plasmonic organic solar cell and its absorption enhancement analysis using FDTD-based cylindrical nano-particle optical model.

    PubMed

    Kim, Richard S; Zhu, Jinfeng; Park, Jeung Hun; Li, Lu; Yu, Zhibin; Shen, Huajun; Xue, Mei; Wang, Kang L; Park, Gyechoon; Anderson, Timothy J; Pei, Qibing

    2012-06-01

    We report the plasmon-assisted photocurrent enhancement in Ag-nanoparticles (Ag-NPs) embedded PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM organic solar cells, and systematically investigate the causes of the improved optical absorption based on a cylindrical Ag-NPs optical model which is simulated with a 3-Dimensional finite difference time domain (FDTD) method. The proposed cylindrical Ag-NPs optical model is able to explain the optical absorption enhancement by the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes, and to provide a further understanding of Ag-NPs shape parameters which play an important role to determine the broadband absorption phenomena in plasmonic organic solar cells. A significant increase in the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of the plasmonic solar cell was experimentally observed and compared with that of the solar cells without Ag-NPs. Finally, our conclusion was made after briefly discussing the electrical effects of the fabricated plasmonic organic solar cells. PMID:22714293

  17. Can engineered "designer" T cells outsmart chronic hepatitis B?

    PubMed

    Protzer, U; Abken, H

    2010-01-01

    More than 350 million people worldwide are persistently infected with human heptatitis B virus (HBV) and at risk to develop liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma making long-term treatment necessary. While a vaccine is available and new antiviral drugs are being developed, elimination of persistently infected cells is still a major issue. Recent efforts in adoptive cell therapy are experimentally exploring immunotherapeutic elimination of HBV-infected cells by means of a biological attack with genetically engineered "designer" T cells. PMID:21188203

  18. Geometrical shape design of nanophotonic surfaces for thin film solar cells.

    PubMed

    Nam, W I; Yoo, Y J; Song, Y M

    2016-07-11

    We present the effect of geometrical parameters, particularly shape, on optical absorption enhancement for thin film solar cells based on crystalline silicon (c-Si) and gallium arsenide (GaAs) using a rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) method. It is discovered that the "sweet spot" that maximizes efficiency of solar cells exists for the design of nanophotonic surfaces. For the case of ultrathin, rod array is practical due to the effective optical resonances resulted from the optimum geometry whereas parabola array is viable for relatively thicker cells owing to the effective graded index profile. A specific value of thickness, which is the median value of other two devices tailored by rod and paraboloid, is optimized by truncated shape structure. It is therefore worth scanning the optimum shape of nanostructures in a given thickness in order to achieve high performance. PMID:27410892

  19. Design of Molecular Solar Cells via Feedback from Soft X-ray Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Himpsel, Franz J.

    2015-06-12

    Spectroscopy with soft X-rays was used to develop new materials and novel designs for solar cells and artificial photosynthesis. In order to go beyond the widely-used trial-and-error approach of gradually improving a particular design, we started from the most general layout of a solar cell (or a photo-electrochemical device) and asked which classes of materials are promising for best performance. For example, the most general design of a solar cell consists of a light absorber, an electron donor, and an electron acceptor. These are characterized by four energy levels, which were measured by a combination of spectroscopic X-ray techniques. Tuning synchrotron radiation to the absorption edges of specific elements provided element- and bond-selectivity. The spectroscopic results were complemented by state-of-the-art calculations of the electronic states. These helped explaining the observed energy levels and the orbitals associated with them. The calculations were extended to a large class of materials (for example thousands of porphyrin dye complexes) in order to survey trends in the energy level structure. A few highlights serve as examples: 1) Organic molecules combining absorber, donor, and acceptor with atomic precision. 2) Exploration of highly p-doped diamond films as inert, transparent electron donors. 3) Surface-sensitive characterization of nanorod arrays used as photoanodes in water splitting. 4) Computational design of molecular complexes for efficient solar cells using two photons.

  20. Design of Semiconductor-Based Back Reflectors for High Voc Monolithic Multijunction Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia, I.; Geisz, J.; Steiner, M.; Olson, J.; Friedman, D.; Kurtz, S.

    2012-06-01

    State-of-the-art multijunction cell designs have the potential for significant improvement before going to higher number of junctions. For example, the Voc can be substantially increased if the photon recycling taking place in the junctions is enhanced. This has already been demonstrated (by Alta Devices) for a GaAs single-junction cell. For this, the loss of re-emitted photons by absorption in the underlying layers or substrate must be minimized. Selective back surface reflectors are needed for this purpose. In this work, different architectures of semiconductor distributed Bragg reflectors (DBR) are assessed as the appropriate choice for application in monolithic multijunction solar cells. Since the photon re-emission in the photon recycling process is spatially isotropic, the effect of the incident angle on the reflectance spectrum is of central importance. In addition, the DBR structure must be designed taking into account its integration into the monolithic multijunction solar cells, concerning series resistance, growth economics, and other issues. We analyze the tradeoffs in DBR design complexity with all these requirements to determine if such a reflector is suitable to improve multijunction solar cells.

  1. Design of liposomal formulations for cell targeting.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Eugénia; Gomes, Andreia C; Preto, Ana; Cavaco-Paulo, Artur

    2015-12-01

    Liposomes have gained extensive attention as carriers for a wide range of drugs due to being both nontoxic and biodegradable as they are composed of substances naturally occurring in biological membranes. Active targeting for cells has explored specific modification of the liposome surface by functionalizing it with specific targeting ligands in order to increase accumulation and intracellular uptake into target cells. None of the Food and Drug Administration-licensed liposomes or lipid nanoparticles are coated with ligands or target moieties to delivery for homing drugs to target tissues, cells or subcellular organelles. Targeted therapies (with or without controlled drug release) are an emerging and relevant research area. Despite of the numerous liposomes reviews published in the last decades, this area is in constant development. Updates urgently needed to integrate new advances in targeted liposomes research. This review highlights the evolution of liposomes from passive to active targeting and challenges in the development of targeted liposomes for specific therapies. PMID:26454541

  2. Synergistic Effects of Morphological Control and Complementary Absorption in Efficient All-Small-Molecule Ternary-Blend Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Farahat, Mahmoud E; Patra, Dhananjaya; Lee, Chih-Hao; Chu, Chih-Wei

    2015-10-14

    In this study, we combined two small-molecule donors-a diketopyrrolopyrrole-based small molecule (SMD) and a benzodithiophene-based molecule (BDT6T)-with [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PC61BM) to form ternary blend solar cells. The power conversion efficiency of the binary SMD:PC61BM bulk heterojunction solar cell improved from 4.57 to 6.28% after adding an appropriate amount BDT6T as a guest. We attribute this 37% improvement in device performance to the complementary absorption behavior of BDT6T and SMD, as evidenced by the increase in the short circuit current. After addition of BDT6T to form the ternary blend, the crystallinity and morphology of the active layer were enhanced. For example, the features observed in the ternary active layers were finer than those in the binary blends. This means that BDT6T as a third component in the ternary blend has effective role on both the absorption and the morphology. In addition, adding BDT6T to form the ternary blend also led to an increase in the open-circuit voltage. Our findings suggest that the preparation of such simple all-small-molecule ternary blends can be an effective means of improving the efficiency of photovoltaic devices. PMID:26389528

  3. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Xinguo; Newville, Matthew; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Rivers, Mark L.; Sutton, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within ±3° relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO2 recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO2 glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO2 glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures. PMID:19655966

  4. High quality x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements with long energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, X.; Newville, M.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.

    2009-07-31

    We describe an approach for acquiring high quality x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy spectra with wide energy range at high pressure using diamond anvil cell (DAC). Overcoming the serious interference of diamond Bragg peaks is essential for combining XAFS and DAC techniques in high pressure research, yet an effective method to obtain accurate XAFS spectrum free from DAC induced glitches has been lacking. It was found that these glitches, whose energy positions are very sensitive to the relative orientation between DAC and incident x-ray beam, can be effectively eliminated using an iterative algorithm based on repeated measurements over a small angular range of DAC orientation, e.g., within {+-}3{sup o} relative to the x-ray beam direction. Demonstration XAFS spectra are reported for rutile-type GeO{sub 2} recorded by traditional ambient pressure and high pressure DAC methods, showing similar quality at 440 eV above the absorption edge. Accurate XAFS spectra of GeO{sub 2} glass were obtained at high pressure up to 53 GPa, providing important insight into the structural polymorphism of GeO{sub 2} glass at high pressure. This method is expected be applicable for in situ XAFS measurements using a diamond anvil cell up to ultrahigh pressures.

  5. Solar cells design for low and medium concentrating photovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baig, Hasan; Heasman, Keith C.; Sarmah, Nabin; Mallick, Tapas

    2012-10-01

    The solar cell is the key element of any CPV system, and its design plays an important role in enhancing the performance of the entire system. Special types of cells are required in the CPV systems capable of operating at high concentrations and elevated temperatures. These Concentrator solar cells differ significantly from the usual solar cells in the method of manufacture, the overall cell design and their performance. Systematic design and manufacture of the cell ensures better performance in a given CPV system. A number of factors come into play while designing the solar cell for a specific system these include concentration, cell material properties, expected operating temperature, shape, bus bar configuration and finger spacing. Most of these variables are decided on based on some rules of thumb and PC1D calculations. However, there is scope for design improvement and cell optimization by performing a detailed analysis based on the illumination profile incident on the cell. Recent studies demonstrated the use of Finite element method to analyze the electrical behavior of PV cell under the influence of arbitrarily chosen illumination flux profiles. This study outlines a methodology and analysis procedure while performing a case study of a CPV system under development having a non-uniform illumination profile towards the exit of the concentrator. The LCPV system chosen is the Photovoltaic Facades of Reduced Costs Incorporating Devices with Optically Concentrating Elements (PRIDE) concentrator made of dielectric material. A coupled optical, thermal and electrical analysis is performed on the system to demonstrate the method useful in designing solar cells for low and medium concentrations.

  6. PX series AMTEC cell design, testing and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Borkowski, C.A.; Sievers, R.K.; Hendricks, T.J.

    1997-12-31

    PX (Pluto Express) cell testing and analysis has shown that AMTEC (Alkali Metal Thermal to Electric Conversion) cells can reach the power levels required by proposed RPS (Radioisotope Power Supply) system designs. A major PX cell design challenge was to optimize the power and efficiency of the cell while allowing a broad operational power range. These design optimization issues are greatly dependent on the placement of the evaporation zone. Before the PX-2 and PX-4 cells were built, the results from the PX-1, ATC-2 (artery test cell) and design analysis indicated the need for a thermal bridge between the heat input surface of the cell and the structure supporting the evaporation zone. Test and analytic results are presented illustrating the magnitude of the power transfer to the evaporation zone and the effect of this power transfer on the performance of the cell. Comparisons are also made between the cell test data and analytic results of cell performance to validate the analytic models.

  7. Structure, Optical Absorption, and Performance of Organic Solar Cells Improved by Gold Nanoparticles in Buffer Layers.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingguo; Feng, Shanglei; Li, Meng; Wu, Zhongwei; Fang, Xiao; Wang, Fei; Geng, Dongping; Yang, Tieying; Li, Xiaolong; Sun, Baoquan; Gao, Xingyu

    2015-11-11

    11-Mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA)-stabilized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) embedded in copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) were used as a buffer layer between a poly(3-hexyl-thiophene) (P3HT)/[6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) bulk heterojunction and anodic indium-tin oxide (ITO) substrate. As systematic synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD) experiments demonstrated that the AuNPs present in the buffer layer can improve the microstructure of the active layer with a better lamella packing of P3HT from the surface to the interior, UV-visible absorption spectrum measurements revealed enhanced optical absorption due to the localized surface plasma resonance (LSPR) generated by the AuNPs. The device of ITO/poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate/CuPc:MUA-stabilized AuNPs/P3HT:PCBM/LiF/Al was found with over 24% enhancement of power conversion efficiency (PCE) in comparison with reference devices without AuNPs. This remarkable improvement in PCE should be partially attributed to LSPR generated by the AuNPs and partially to improved crystallization as well as preferred orientation order of P3HT due to the presence of the AuNPs, which would promote more applications of metal NPs in the organic photovoltaic devices and other organic multilayer devices. PMID:26477556

  8. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  9. Design considerations for silicon HLE solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Pao, S. C.; Fossum, J. G.; Sah, C. T.

    1978-01-01

    The high-low (H-L) junction in the emitter region that defines the high-low-junction emitter (HLE) solar cell suppresses the dark emitter recombination current J sub E so that the base recombination current dominates in determining the open-circuit voltage. For silicon cells this enables the achievement of considerably larger values of open-circuit voltage than those achievable in conventional structures. This paper describes experiments that demonstrate the achievement of J sub E suppression (to less than 5 x 10 to the -14th A/sq cm) and large open-circuit voltage (640 mV) in HLE test cells of two distinct types. In the first type (the diffused HLE structure) impurity diffusion forms the H-L junction in the emitter; in the second type (the oxide-charge-induced HLE structure) the H-L junction is formed in emitter material of relatively low doping concentration by an oxide-charge-induced electron accumulation layer.

  10. Absorption chiller optimization and integration for cogeneration and engine-chiller systems. Phase 1 - design. Topical report, April 1985-July 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Kubasco, A.J.

    1986-07-01

    A market study indicates a significant market potential for small commercial cogeneration (50-500 kW) over the next 20 years. The potential exists for 1500 installations per year, 80% of those would be a system composed of Engine-Generator and Heat Recovery Unit with the remainder requiring the addition of an Absorption Chiller. A preliminary design for an advanced Heat Recovery Unit (HRU) was completed. The unit incorporates the capability of supplementary firing of the exhaust gas from the new generation of natural gas fired lean burn reciprocating engines being developed for cogeneration applications. This gives the Heat Recovery Unit greater flexibility in following the thermal load requirements of the building. An applications and design criteria analysis indicated that this was a significant feature for the HRU as it can replace a standard auxiliary boiler thus affording significant savings to the building owner. A design for an advanced absorption chiller was reached which is 15% lower in cost yet 9% more efficient than current off-the-shelf units. A packaged cogeneration system cost and design analysis indicates that a nominal 254 kW cogeneration system incorporating advanced components and packaging concepts can achieve a selling price of less than $880/kW and $700/kW with and without an absorption chiller.

  11. Design principles for nickel hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel hydrogen cells, and more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at LeRC and their contractors. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low Earth orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous orbit (GEO) application. Nickel hydrogen cells have already been successfully flown in an increasing number of GEO missions.

  12. Nickel-Cadmium Cell Design Variable Program Data Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrow, G. W.

    1985-01-01

    A program was undertaken in conjunction with the General Electric Company to evaluate 9 of the more important nickel cadmium aerospace cell designs that are currently being used or that have been used in the past 15 years. Design variables tested in this program included teflonated negative plates, silver treated negative plates, light plate loading level, no positive plate cadmium treatment, plate design of 1968 utilizing both old and new processing techniques, and electrochemically impregnated positive plates. The data acquired from these test packs in a low Earth orbit cycling regime is presented and analyzed here. This data showed conclusively that the cells manufactured with no positive plate cadmium treatment outperformed all other cell designs in all aspects of the program and that the cells with teflonated negative electrodes performed very poorly.

  13. Advanced designs for IPV nickel-hydrogen cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smithrick, J. J.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1984-01-01

    Advanced designs for individual pressure vessel nickel-hydrogen cells have been concieved which should improve the cycle life at deep depths-of-discharge. Features of the designs which are new and not incorporated in either of the contemporary cells (Air Force/Hughes, Comsat) are: (1) use of alternate methods of oxygen recombination, (2) use of serrated edge separators to facilitate movement of gas within the cell while still maintaining required physical contact with the wall wick, and (3) use of an expandable stack to accommodate some of the nickel electrode expansion. The designs also consider electrolyte volume requirements over the life of the cells, and are fully compatible with the Air Force/Hughes design.

  14. Design & Fabrication of a High-Voltage Photovoltaic Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Felder, Jennifer; /North Carolina State U. /SLAC

    2012-09-05

    Silicon photovoltaic (PV) cells are alternative energy sources that are important in sustainable power generation. Currently, applications of PV cells are limited by the low output voltage and somewhat low efficiency of such devices. In light of this fact, this project investigates the possibility of fabricating high-voltage PV cells on float-zone silicon wafers having output voltages ranging from 50 V to 2000 V. Three designs with different geometries of diffusion layers were simulated and compared in terms of metal coverage, recombination, built-in potential, and conduction current density. One design was then chosen and optimized to be implemented in the final device design. The results of the simulation serve as a feasibility test for the design concept and provide supportive evidence of the effectiveness of silicon PV cells as high-voltage power supplies.

  15. Comparison of absorption spectra of adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma cervical tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peresunko, O. P.; Zelinska, N. V.; Prydij, O. G.; Zymnyakov, D. A.; Ushakova, O. V.

    2013-12-01

    We studied a methods of assessment of a connective tissue of cervix in terms of specific volume of fibrous component and an optical density of staining of connective tissue fibers in the stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma. An absorption spectra of blood plasma of the patients suffering from squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma both before the surgery and in postsurgical periods were obtained. Linear dichroism measurements transmittance in polarized light at different orientations of the polarization plane relative to the direction of the dominant orientation in the structure of the sample of biotissues of stroma of squamous cancer and cervix adenocarcinoma were carried. Results of the investigation of the tumor tissues showed that the magnitude of the linear dichroism Δ is insignificant in the researched spectral range λ=280-840 nm and specific regularities in its change observed short-wave ranges.

  16. Understanding Electrocatalytic Pathways in Low and Medium Temperature Fuel Cells: Synchrotron-based In Situ X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Mukerjee, S.; Ziegelbauer, J; Arruda, T; Ramaker, D; Shyam, B

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few decades, researchers have made significant developments in producing more advanced electrocatalytic materials for power generation applications. For example, traditional fuel cell catalysts often involve high-priced precious metals such as Pt. However, in order for fuel cells to become commercially viable, there is a need to reduce or completely remove precious metal altogether. As a result, a myriad of novel, unconventional materials have been explored such as chalcogenides, porphyrins, and organic-metal-macrocycles for low/medium temperature fuel cells as well as enzymatic and microbial fuel cells. As these materials increasingly become more complex, researchers often find themselves in search of new characterization methods, especially those which are allow in situ and operando measurements with element specificity. One such method that has received much attention for analysis of electrocatalytic materials is X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). XAS is an element specific, core level absorption technique which yields structural and electronic information. As a core electron method, XAS requires an extremely bright source, hence a synchrotron. The resulting intensity of synchrotron radiation allow for experiments to be conducted in situ, under electrochemically relevant conditions. Although a bulk-averaging technique requiring rigorous mathematical manipulation, XAS has the added benefit that it can probe materials which possess no long range order. This makes it ideal to characterize nano-scale electrocatalysts. XAS experiments are conducted by ramping the X-ray photon energy while measuring absorption of the incident beam the sample or by counting fluorescent photons released from a sample due to subsequent relaxation. Absorption mode XAS follows the Beer-Lambert Law, {mu}x = log(I{sub 0}/I{sub t}) (1) where {mu} is the absorption coefficient, x is the sample thickness and I{sub 0} and I{sub t} are the intensities of the incident and

  17. Solar cells based on particulate structure of active layer: Investigation of light absorption by an ordered system of spherical submicron silicon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miskevich, Alexander A.; Loiko, Valery A.

    2015-12-01

    Enhancement of the performance of photovoltaic cells through increasing light absorption due to optimization of an active layer is considered. The optimization consists in creation of particulate structure of active layer. The ordered monolayers and multilayers of submicron crystalline silicon (c-Si) spherical particles are examined. The quasicrystalline approximation (QCA) and the transfer matrix method (TMM) are used to calculate light absorption in the wavelength range from 0.28 μm to 1.12 μm. The integrated over the terrestial solar spectral irradiance "Global tilt" ASTM G173-03 absorption coefficient is calculated. In the wavelength range of small absorption index of c-Si (0.8-1.12 μm) the integral absorption coefficient of monolayer can be more than 20 times higher than the one of the plane-parallel plate of the equivalent volume of material. In the overall considered range (0.28-1.12 μm) the enhancement factor up to ~1.45 for individual monolayer is observed. Maximum value of the spectral absorption coefficient approaches unity for multilayers consisting of large amount of sparse monolayers of small particles. Multilayers with variable concentration and size of particles in the monolayer sequences are considered. Absorption increasing by such gradient multilayers as compared to the non-gradient ones is illustrated. The considered structures are promising for creation of high efficiency thin-film solar cells.

  18. Evaluation of metallothionein formation as a proxy for zinc absorption in an in vitro digestion/caco-2 cell culture model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Caco-2 cell metallothionein (MT) formation was studied to determine if MT could be used as a proxy for zinc (Zn) absorption in a cell culture model. MT intracellular concentration was determined by using a cadmium/hemoglobin affinity assay. Cellular Zn uptake was determined in acid digests (5% HNO3)...

  19. Approaches to solar cell design for pulsed laser power receivers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1993-01-01

    Using a laser to beam power from Earth to a photovoltaic receiver in space could be a technology with applications to many space missions. Extremely high average-power lasers would be required in a wavelength range of 700-1000 nm. However, high-power lasers inherently operate in a pulsed format. Existing solar cells are not well designed to respond to pulsed incident power. To better understand cell response to pulsed illumination at high intensity, the PC-1D finite-element computer model was used to analyze the response of solar cells to continuous and pulsed laser illumination. Over 50 percent efficiency was calculated for both InP and GaAs cells under steady-state illumination near the optimum wavelength. The time-dependent response of a high-efficiency GaAs concentrator cell to a laser pulse was modeled, and the effect of laser intensity, wavelength, and bias point was studied. Three main effects decrease the efficiency of a solar cell under pulsed laser illumination: series resistance, L-C 'ringing' with the output circuit, and current limiting due to the output inductance. The problems can be solved either by changing the pulse shape or designing a solar cell to accept the pulsed input. Cell design possibilities discussed are a high-efficiency, light-trapping silicon cell, and a monolithic, low-inductance GaAs cell.

  20. Enhanced light absorption in GaAs solar cells with internal Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tobin, S. P.; Vernon, S. M.; Sanfacon, M. M.; Mastrovito, A.

    The use of epitaxial multilayer dielectric mirrors (Bragg reflectors) as back-surface reflectors in thin-film GaAs solar cells on GaAs and silicon substrates is investigated. Al0.3Ga0.9As/Al0.85Ga0.15As Bragg reflectors were grown by low-pressure MOCVD on GaAs substrates and shown to exhibit near-ideal optical reflectance and structural perfection. Thin GaAs solar cells grown on Bragg reflectors showed increases in short-circuit current (0.5 to 1.0 mA/sq cm) and efficiency (0.7 percentage points) relative to cells without back reflectors. Efficiencies of 24.7 percent at one sun AM1.5 were measured for GaAs cells only 2 microns thick on Bragg reflectors. In addition to the optical enhancements, Bragg reflectors also appear to improve the defect structure of GaAs-on-Si solar cells. This approach should lead to improved efficiency for GaAs-on-Si solar cells and improved radiation resistance on GaAs cells.

  1. Cost-effective nanostructured thin-film solar cell with enhanced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng Hui; Nowak, Regina-Elisabeth; Geißendörfer, Stefan; Vehse, Martin; Reininghaus, Nies; Sergeev, Oleg; von Maydell, Karsten; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Agert, Carsten

    2014-11-01

    Nanostructured transparent conductive electrodes are highly interesting for efficient light management in thin-film solar cells, but they are often costly to manufacture and limited to small scales. This work reports on a low-cost and scalable bottom-up approach to fabricate nanostructured thin-film solar cells. A folded solar cell with increased optical absorber volume was deposited on honeycomb patterned zinc oxide nanostructures, fabricated in a combined process of nanosphere lithography and electrochemical deposition. The periodicity of the honeycomb pattern can be easily varied in the fabrication process, which allows structural optimization for different absorber materials. The implementation of this concept in amorphous silicon thin-film solar cells with only 100 nm absorber layer was demonstrated. The nanostructured solar cell showed approximately 10% increase in the short circuit current density compared to a cell on an optimized commercial textured reference electrode. The concept presented here is highly promising for low-cost industrial fabrication of nanostructured thin-film solar cells, since no sophisticated layer stacks or expensive techniques are required.

  2. The absorptive flux of the anti-epileptic drug substance vigabatrin is carrier-mediated across Caco-2 cell monolayers.

    PubMed

    Nøhr, Martha Kampp; Hansen, Steen Honoré; Brodin, Birger; Holm, René; Nielsen, Carsten Uhd

    2014-01-23

    Vigabatrin is an anti-epileptic drug substance. The oral bioavailability of vigabatrin is high (60-70%), however, little is known about the mechanism(s) mediating the intestinal absorption. The aim of the present study was to identify which solute carrier(s) are involved in the absorption of vigabatrin in Caco-2 cells, a cell culture model of the small intestinal epithelium. The uptake and transepithelial flux of vigabatrin was measured using an LC-MS method for quantification. Transepithelial transport of vigabatrin was shown to be proton-dependent and polarized in the apical-to-basolateral (A-B) direction. The A-B flux of vigabatrin had a saturable component and a passive component, indicating the presence of a carrier system in parallel with a passive permeability. The Michaelis constant, Km, of the transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin was estimated to be 32.8±7.4 mM (n=3-5), whereas the Km of the apical uptake was found to be 12.7±3.7 mM (n=3). The carrier-mediated transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin accounted for 80-95% (50.0-1.0mM) of the total A-B flux. The transepithelial A-B flux (as well as apical uptake) of vigabatrin was significantly decreased upon addition of substrates or inhibitors of the human proton-coupled amino acid transporter (hPAT1) to the apical solution. The present study indicates that the transepithelial A-B flux of vigabatrin is mainly mediated by hPAT1 in Caco-2 cells at dose-relevant concentrations. PMID:24008184

  3. A Change in Envirocare's Disposal Cell Design

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.

    2002-02-25

    Envirocare of Utah, Inc. operates a Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and 11e. disposal facility in the Utah west dessert. Envirocare disposes of LLRW in above ground cells. A seven-foot excavation lined with two feet of clay comprises the cell floor. Approximately 22 feet of waste is then placed in the cell in one-foot thick compacted lifts. The cover system consists of a nine-foot clay radon barrier and three-foot rock erosion barrier. This is required to prevent radon emissions at the surface of the radon barrier from exceeding 20 pCi/m2s, the radon release standard in Criterion 6 of 10 CFR 40. The required thickness of the current clay radon barrier cover was based on the original radon flux model used to evaluate the safety of Envirocare's proposed LLRW and 11e.(2) license operations. Because of the lack of actual measurements, universally conservative values were used for the long-term moisture content and the radon diffusion coefficients of the waste and radon barrier material. Since receiving its license, Envirocare has collected a number of samples from the radon barrier and waste material to determine their actual radon attenuation characteristics, including the long-term moisture content and the associated radon diffusion coefficient. In addition, radon flux measurements have been performed to compare the model calculations with the calculated results. The results from these analyses indicate that the initial modeling input parameters, specifically the long-term moisture content and the radon diffusion coefficient, are more conservative than that needed to ensure compliance with the applicable regulatory requirements.

  4. Plasmonic rear reflectors for thin-film solar cells: design principles from electromagnetic modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Disney, Claire E. R.; Pillai, Supriya; Johnson, Craig M.; Xu, Qi; Green, Martin A.

    2014-10-01

    The use of plasmonic structures to enhance light trapping in solar cells has recently been the focus of significant research, but these structures can be sensitive to various design parameters or require complicated fabrication processes. Nanosphere lithography can produce regular arrays of nanoscale features which could enhance absorption of light into thin films such as those used in novel solar cell designs. Finite-difference-time-domain simulations are used to model a variety of structures producible by this technique and compare them against the use of mirrors as rear reflectors. Through analysis of these simulations, sensitivity of device performance to parameters has been investigated. Variables considered include the feature size and array period, as well as metal and absorber materials selection and thickness. Improvements in idealized photocurrent density are calculated relative to the use of rear mirrors that are a standard for solar cells. The maximum simulated increase to photocurrent density was 3.58mA/cm2 or 21.61% for a 2μm thick Si cell relative to the case where a silver mirror is used as a rear reflector. From this, an initial set of design principles for such structures are developed and some avenues for further investigation are identified.

  5. A new method of VLSI conform design for MOS cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, K. H.; Wach, W.; Mueller-Glaser, K. D.

    An automated method for the design of specialized SSI/LSI-level MOS cells suitable for incorporation in VLSI chips is described. The method uses the symbolic-layout features of the CABBAGE computer program (Hsueh, 1979; De Man et al., 1982), but restricted by a fixed grid system to facilitate compaction procedures. The techniques used are shown to significantly speed the processes of electrical design, layout, design verification, and description for subsequent CAD/CAM application. In the example presented, a 211-transistor, parallel-load, synchronous 4-bit up/down binary counter cell was designed in 9 days, as compared to 30 days for a manually-optimized-layout version and 3 days for a larger, less efficient cell designed by a programmable logic array; the cell areas were 0.36, 0.21, and 0.79 sq mm, respectively. The primary advantage of the method is seen in the extreme ease with which the cell design can be adapted to new parameters or design rules imposed by improvements in technology.

  6. The Role of Sodium-Dependent Glucose Transporter 1 and Glucose Transporter 2 in the Absorption of Cyanidin-3-O-β-Glucoside in Caco-2 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Feng, Dan; Song, Gang; Li, Hua-Wen; Tang, Huan-Wen; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanins have multiple biological activities of benefit to human health. While a few studies have been conducted to evaluate the bioavailability of anthocyanins, the mechanisms of their absorption mechanism remain ill-defined. In the present study, we investigated the absorption mechanism of cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-G) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cy-3-G transport was assessed by measuring the absorptive and efflux direction. Inhibition studies were conducted using the pharmacological agents, phloridzin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), or phloretin, an inhibitor of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The results showed that phloridzin and phloretin significantly inhibited the absorption of Cy-3-G. In addition, Caco-2 cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for SGLT1 or GLUT2 showed significantly decreased Cy-3-G absorption. These siRNA transfected cells also showed a significantly decreased rate of transport of Cy-3-G compared with the control group. These findings suggest that Cy-3-G absorption is dependent on the activities of SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine and that SGLT1 and GLUT2 could be a limiting step for the bioavailability of Cy-3-G. PMID:25314643

  7. The role of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 and glucose transporter 2 in the absorption of cyanidin-3-o-β-glucoside in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zou, Tang-Bin; Feng, Dan; Song, Gang; Li, Hua-Wen; Tang, Huan-Wen; Ling, Wen-Hua

    2014-10-01

    Anthocyanins have multiple biological activities of benefit to human health. While a few studies have been conducted to evaluate the bioavailability of anthocyanins, the mechanisms of their absorption mechanism remain ill-defined. In the present study, we investigated the absorption mechanism of cyanidin-3-O-β-glucoside (Cy-3-G) in human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. Cy-3-G transport was assessed by measuring the absorptive and efflux direction. Inhibition studies were conducted using the pharmacological agents, phloridzin, an inhibitor of sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), or phloretin, an inhibitor of glucose transporter 2 (GLUT2). The results showed that phloridzin and phloretin significantly inhibited the absorption of Cy-3-G. In addition, Caco-2 cells transfected with small interfering RNA (siRNA) specific for SGLT1 or GLUT2 showed significantly decreased Cy-3-G absorption. These siRNA transfected cells also showed a significantly decreased rate of transport of Cy-3-G compared with the control group. These findings suggest that Cy-3-G absorption is dependent on the activities of SGLT1 and GLUT2 in the small intestine and that SGLT1 and GLUT2 could be a limiting step for the bioavailability of Cy-3-G. PMID:25314643

  8. Design of polymeric immunomicrospheres for cell labelling and cell separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Margel, S.

    1978-01-01

    Synthesis of several classes of hydrophylic microspheres applied to cell labeling and cell separation is described. Five classes of cross-linked microspheres with functional groups such as carboxyl, hydroxyl, amide and/or pyridine groups were synthesized. These functional groups were used to bind covalently antibodies and other proteins to the surface of the microspheres. To optimize the derivatisation technique, polyglutaraldehyde immunomicrospheres were prepared and utilized. Specific populations of human and murine lymphocytes were labelled with microspheres synthesized by the emulsion of the ionizing radiation technique. The labelling of the cells by means of microspheres containing an iron core produced successful separation of B from T lymphocytes by means of a magnetic field.

  9. Chlorogenic acid is poorly absorbed, independently of the food matrix: A Caco-2 cells and rat chronic absorption study.

    PubMed

    Dupas, Coralie; Marsset Baglieri, Agnès; Ordonaud, Claire; Tomé, Daniel; Maillard, Marie-Noëlle

    2006-11-01

    According to epidemiologic studies, dietary phenolic antioxidants, such as chlorogenic acid (CQA), could prevent coronary heart diseases and some cancers. Coffee is the main source of CQA in the human diet. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of usual coffee consumption conditions, such as the addition of milk, on CQA bioavailability. Interactions between CQA and milk proteins were shown, using an ultrafiltration technique. These interactions proved to be slightly disrupted during an in vitro digestion process. CQA absorption and bioavailability were then studied in vitro using a Caco-2 cell model coupled with an in vitro digestion process, and in vivo, in a chronic supplementation study in which rats were fed daily coffee or coffee and milk for 3 weeks. Both experiments showed that CQA absorption under its native form is weak, but unmodified by the addition of milk proteins, and slightly reduced by the addition of Maillard reaction products. These data show that there are some interactions between coffee phenolics and milk proteins, but these have no significant effect on CQA bioavailability from coffee in the rat. CQA is poorly absorbed under its native form in the body, when ingested in a realistic food matrix. PMID:17054098

  10. Design Principles for Nickel/Hydrogen Cells and Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, Lawrence H.; Manzo, Michelle A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, Olga D.

    1987-01-01

    Individual-pressure-vessel (IPV) nickel/hydrogen cells and bipolar batteries developed for use as energy-storage subsystems for satelite applications. Design principles applied draw upon extensive background in separator technology, alkaline-fuel-cell technology and several alkaline-cell technology areas. Principals are rather straightforward applications of capillary-force formalisms, coupled with slowly developing data base resulting from careful post-test analyses. Based on preconceived assumptions relative to how devices work and how to be designed so they display longer cycle lives at deep discharge.

  11. BBU design of linear induction accelerator cells for radiography application

    SciTech Connect

    Shang, C.C.; Chen, Y.J.; Gaporaso, G.J.; Houck, T.L.; Molau, N.E.; Focklen, J.; Gregory, S.

    1997-05-06

    There is an ongoing effort to develop accelerating modules for high-current electron accelerators for advanced radiography application. Accelerating modules with low beam-cavity coupling impedances along with gap designs with acceptable field stresses comprise a set of fundamental design criteria. We examine improved cell designs which have been developed for accelerator application in several radiographic operating regimes. We evaluate interaction impedances, analyze the effects of beam structure coupling on beam dynamics (beam break-up instability and corkscrew motion). We also provide estimates of coupling through interesting new high-gradient insulators and evaluate their potential future application in induction cells.

  12. Design and fabrication of a rectenna system to be coupled to photovoltaic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mossavat, Mazda

    Inkjet-printed metamaterials and nanotechnology enabled flexible antennas fabricated on glass or polyester substrates help in further absorption of transmitted radiation through photovoltaic solar cells. Using metamaterials processed by inkjet printing and diffusing it, for a rectenna system coupled with photovoltaic solar cells, as rectifying antenna, an antenna in system in tandem is created. Metamaterials are artificial materials engineered to have properties that may not be found in nature (negative refractive index). When used in an antenna, they increase gain. For efficient solar cell use, nanophotonics on the incident surface or metamaterials under it as a rectenna, can enhance voltage gain in cloudy or rainy condition, which in turn increases the overall efficiency and reduces the amount of material required, thereby cutting costs. Photovoltaic is a field of technology and research related to practical application of photovoltaic cells in producing electricity from light. Cells are described as photovoltaic cells when the light source is not necessarily sunlight but can be lamplight, artificial light, or any other source used for detecting light or other electromagnetic radiation at different light intensity and producing voltage. These can be, for example, infrared detectors, or detectors for measurement of light intensity. Conventional solar cell films are typically manufactured using expensive and slow manufacturing methods, which rely on high-temperature fabrication and finicky `vacuum deposition' processes for depositing solar materials onto substrates (III-V elements). The resultant products are simply too thick to allow for transparency. An important consideration in the development of a commercially viable solar powered cell is the glass substrate. The learning process and skills involved in developing the antenna below a solar cell is a great experience in theory and practice. My main effort will be to design and check performance of different

  13. Designing Cell-Compatible Hydrogels for Biomedical Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seliktar, Dror

    2012-06-01

    Hydrogels are polymeric materials distinguished by high water content and diverse physical properties. They can be engineered to resemble the extracellular environment of the body’s tissues in ways that enable their use in medical implants, biosensors, and drug-delivery devices. Cell-compatible hydrogels are designed by using a strategy of coordinated control over physical properties and bioactivity to influence specific interactions with cellular systems, including spatial and temporal patterns of biochemical and biomechanical cues known to modulate cell behavior. Important new discoveries in stem cell research, cancer biology, and cellular morphogenesis have been realized with model hydrogel systems premised on these designs. Basic and clinical applications for hydrogels in cell therapy, tissue engineering, and biomedical research continue to drive design improvements using performance-based materials engineering paradigms.

  14. Designing synthetic materials to control stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Krishanu; Pollock, Jacob F.; Schaffer, David V.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The microenvironment in which stem cells reside regulates their fate, and synthetic materials have recently been designed to emulate these regulatory processes for various medical applications. Ligands inspired by the natural extracellular matrix, cell-cell contacts, and growth factors have been incorporated into synthetic materials with precisely engineered density and presentation. Furthermore, material architecture and mechanical properties are material design parameters that provide a context for receptor-ligand interactions and thereby contribute to fate determination of uncommitted stem cells. While significant progress has been made in biomaterials development for cellular control, the design of more sophisticated and robust synthetic materials can address future challenges in achieving spatiotemporally control of cellular phenotype and in implementing histocompatible clinical therapies. PMID:17669680

  15. Center for Intelligent Fuel Cell Materials Design

    SciTech Connect

    Santurri, P.R.,; Hartmann-Thompson, C.; Keinath, S.E.

    2008-08-26

    The goal of this work was to develop a composite proton exchange membrane utilizing 1) readily available, low cost materials 2) readily modified and 3) easily processed to meet the chemical, mechanical and electrical requirements of high temperature PEM fuel cells. One of the primary goals was to produce a conducting polymer that met the criteria for strength, binding capability for additives, chemical stability, dimensional stability and good conductivity. In addition compatible, specialty nanoparticles were synthesized to provide water management and enhanced conductivity. The combination of these components in a multilayered, composite PEM has demonstrated improved conductivity at high temperatures and low humidity over commercially available polymers. The research reported in this final document has greatly increased the knowledge base related to post sulfonation of chemically and mechanically stable engineered polymers (Radel). Both electrical and strength factors for the degree of post sulfonation far exceed previous data, indicating the potential use of these materials in suitable proton exchange membrane architectures for the development of fuel cells. In addition compatible, hydrophilic, conductive nano-structures have been synthesized and incorporated into unique proton exchange membrane architectures. The use of post sulfonation for the engineered polymer and nano-particle provide cost effective techniques to produce the required components of a proton exchange membrane. The development of a multilayer proton exchange membrane as described in our work has produced a highly stable membrane at 170°C with conductivities exceeding commercially available proton exchange membranes at high temperatures and low humidity. The components and architecture of the proton exchange membrane discussed will provide low cost components for the portable market and potentially the transportation market. The development of unique components and membrane architecture

  16. Efficient optical absorption enhancement in organic solar cells by using a 2-dimensional periodic light trapping structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zu, Feng-Shuo; Shi, Xiao-Bo; Liang, Jian; Xu, Mei-Feng; Wang, Zhao-Kui E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn Liao, Liang-Sheng E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn; Lee, Chun-Sing E-mail: zkwang@suda.edu.cn

    2014-06-16

    We have investigated the effects induced by periodic nanosphere arrays on the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs). Two-dimensional periodic arrays of polystyrene nanospheres were formed by using a colloidal lithography method together with plasma etching to trim down the size to various degrees on the substrates of OSCs. It is found that the devices prepared on such substrates can have improved light harvesting, resulting in as high as 35% enhancement in power conversion efficiency over that of the reference devices. The measured external quantum efficiency and finite-difference time-domain simulation reveal that the controlled periodic morphology of the substrate can efficiently increase light scattering in the device and thus enhance the absorption of incident light.

  17. Design and performance of a prototype fuel cell powered vehicle

    SciTech Connect

    Lehman, P.A.; Chamberlin, C.E.

    1996-12-31

    The Schatz Energy Research Center (SERC) is now engaged in the Palm Desert Renewable Hydrogen Transportation System Project. The Project involves a consortium which includes the City of Palm Desert, SERC, the U.S. Department of Energy, the South Coast Air Quality Management District, and Sandia and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories. Its goal to develop a clean and sustainable transportation system for a community will be accomplished by producing a fleet of fuel cell vehicles, installing a refueling infrastructure utilizing hydrogen generated from solar and wind power, and developing and staffing a fuel cell service and diagnostic center. We will describe details of the project and performance goals for the fuel cell vehicles and associated peripheral systems. In the past year during the first stage in the project, SERC has designed and built a prototype fuel cell powered personal utility vehicle (PUV). These steps included: (1) Designing, building, and testing a 4.0 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell as a power plant for the PUV. (2) Designing, building and testing peripherals including the air delivery, fuel storage/delivery, refueling, water circulation, cooling, and electrical systems. (3) Devising a control algorithm for the fuel cell power plant in the PUV. (4) Designing and building a test bench in which running conditions in the PUV could be simulated and the fuel cell and its peripheral systems tested. (5) Installing an onboard computer and associated electronics into the PUV (6) Assembling and road testing the PUV.

  18. PV modules, using color solar cells, designed for building

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, N.; Yamashita, H.; Goda, S.

    1994-12-31

    The designs and structures of a photovoltaic module to be installed in a curtain wall were examined with the object of sharply reducing PV power generation costs. As for the design, solar cells of different colors were produced and an opinion survey of designers and other construction-related persons was conducted. Renderings based on color solar cells were prepared using computer graphics. In general, the output of cells decreases for colors other than shades of dark blue. However, there is a good possibility that greater importance will be put on design, including color and surface condition, than on output. In this case, the market share may expand and as a result, the cost may drop. As for the structure, various materials that can be used for a building-material-integrated-module were investigated and methods to install PV modules into building materials were examined. Moreover, experimental module samples fitted with stainless steel sheets and aluminum-sash frames were made.

  19. Solar cells with (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) as absorption layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leibiger, G.; Krahmer, C.; Bauer, J.; Herrnberger, H.; Gottschalch, V.

    2004-12-01

    (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) have been tested for the application in solar cells. Single layers have been grown lattice matched on GaAs using MOVPE at low growth temperatures. Optical properties, i.e. band-gap energies and optical constants have been determined with photoluminescence and spectroscopic ellipsometry. n- and p-Type doping have been achieved with disilane and diethylzinc as doping precursors, respectively. Corresponding free carrier properties are discussed based on Hall measurements. Different solar cell structures with n- and p-doped (BGaIn)As and (InGa)(NAs) as base layer have been grown and successfully tested.

  20. Brush border membrane vesicle and Caco-2 cell line: Two experimental models for evaluation of absorption enhancing effects of saponins, bile salts, and some synthetic surfactants

    PubMed Central

    Moghimipour, Eskandar; Tabassi, Sayyed Abolghassem Sajadi; Ramezani, Mohammad; Handali, Somayeh; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of absorption enhancers in the uptake of hydrophilic compounds. The permeation of the two hydrophilic drug models gentamicin and 5 (6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) across the brush border membrane vesicles and Caco-2 cell lines were evaluated using total saponins of Acanthophyllum squarrosum, Quillaja saponaria, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium glycocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, and Tween 20 as absorption enhancers. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement was utilized to assess the paracellular permeability of cell lines. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was performed to obtain images of the distribution of CF in Caco-2 cells. These compounds were able to loosen tight junctions, thus increasing paracellular permeability. CLSM confirmed the effect of these absorption enhancers on CF transport across Caco-2 lines and increased the Caco-2 permeability via transcellular route. It was also confirmed that the decrease in TEER was transient and reversible after removal of permeation enhancers. PMID:27429925

  1. Brush border membrane vesicle and Caco-2 cell line: Two experimental models for evaluation of absorption enhancing effects of saponins, bile salts, and some synthetic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Moghimipour, Eskandar; Tabassi, Sayyed Abolghassem Sajadi; Ramezani, Mohammad; Handali, Somayeh; Löbenberg, Raimar

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of absorption enhancers in the uptake of hydrophilic compounds. The permeation of the two hydrophilic drug models gentamicin and 5 (6)-carboxyfluorescein (CF) across the brush border membrane vesicles and Caco-2 cell lines were evaluated using total saponins of Acanthophyllum squarrosum, Quillaja saponaria, sodium lauryl sulfate, sodium glycocholate, sodium taurodeoxycholate, and Tween 20 as absorption enhancers. Transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) measurement was utilized to assess the paracellular permeability of cell lines. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was performed to obtain images of the distribution of CF in Caco-2 cells. These compounds were able to loosen tight junctions, thus increasing paracellular permeability. CLSM confirmed the effect of these absorption enhancers on CF transport across Caco-2 lines and increased the Caco-2 permeability via transcellular route. It was also confirmed that the decrease in TEER was transient and reversible after removal of permeation enhancers. PMID:27429925

  2. Effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers on the oral absorption of tripterine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Cao, Wei; Wu, Qingqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop nanostructured-lipid carriers (NLCs) coated with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for improving the oral bioavailability of tripterine. Methods We prepared CPP-coated tripterine-loaded NLCs (CT-NLCs) by using a solvent evaporation method, and determined their physical properties. In vitro drug release was determined by using a dialysis bag diffusion technique, and intestinal toxicity was evaluated by performing MTT assay using Caco-2 cells. In vivo absorption was studied in an in situ rat intestinal perfusion model, and oral bioavailability was examined in beagles. Results The average particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency of the optimized CT-NLCs were 126.7 ± 9.2 nm, 28.7 ± 3.4 mV, and 72.64% ± 1.37%, respectively. The CT-NLCs showed a controlled release profile in vitro and had significantly lower intestinal cytotoxicity than the tripterine solution (P < 0.05). The absorption levels of tripterine from the CT-NLCs in the rat duodenum and jejunum were markedly higher than with tripterine-loaded NLCs without the CPP coating (T-NLCs), and with tripterine solution. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs was greater than that of the T-NLCs and tripterine suspension, and that the time to maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs as well as the T-NLCs, was longer than that of the tripterine suspension. The relative oral bioavailability of the CT-NLCs compared to that of tripterine suspension and T-NLCs were 484.75% and 149.91% respectively. Conclusion The oral bioavailability of tripterine is dramatically increased by CT-NLCs. Therefore, CT-NLCs seem to be a promising carrier for oral delivery of tripterine. PMID:22942642

  3. Evaluation of quartz tubes as atomization cells for gold determination by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morzan, Ezequiel; Piano, Ornela; Stripeikis, Jorge; Tudino, Mabel

    2012-11-01

    This work describes the development of a new analytical procedure able to determine gold by thermospray flame furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (TS-FF-AAS) using nickel tubes (NiT) and quartz tubes (QT) as atomization cells. Experiments involving changes in the flow injection operational parameters, reagent concentrations and sizes of the QT were performed in order to optimize sensitivity. Under the same operational conditions, it was observed that the employment of QT increases the sensitivity of gold determination when compared to the nickel tube. Since solutions of highly concentrated hydrochloric acid showed the best performance as carriers, quartz tubes were also preferred due to its greater tolerance to corrosion by mineral acids in comparison to NiT. In addition, changes in the internal diameter of the QT revealed an important improvement in sensitivity for smaller tubes. Under optimized conditions the main figures of merit showed values close to that of graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry with the addition of an excellent improvement of the sample throughput. They are: LOD (3 s): 0.004 μg mL- 1, sensitivity: 0.306 (μg mL- 1)- 1, RSD% (n = 10, 1 μg mL- 1): 2.5, linear range: 0.01-4 μg mL- 1 and sample throughput: 72 h- 1. This new method was employed for the determination of gold in homeopathic medicines with no need of sample digestion. Validation of the analytical results will be shown. A full discussion of the most relevant findings regarding the role of the atomization cell as a strategic key for improving sensitivity will be also provided.

  4. An Inexpensive High Pressure Optical Absorption Cell for IR-VIS-UV Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodgers, V. E.; Angell, C. A.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an optical cell, suitable for high-pressure studies between at least -130 and +150 degrees Celsius, which may be assembled for about $50. Discusses experimental demonstration of principles involved when using the apparatus, including effects of pressure on coordination of ions in solution and on reaction rates in solution. (JN)

  5. The role of triplet excitons in enhancing polymer solar cell efficiency: a photo-induced absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Guha, Suchi

    2009-03-01

    Inclusion of heavy metal atoms in a polymer backbone allows transitions between the singlet and triplet manifolds. Interfacial dissociation of triplet excitons constitutes a viable mechanism for enhancing photovoltaic (PV) efficiencies in polymer heterojunction-based solar cells, which are now becoming feasible options for solar panels. The PV efficiency from polymer solar cells utilizing a ladder-type poly para phenylene polymer (PhLPPP) with trace quantity of Pd atoms and a fullerene derivative (PCBM) is almost 10 times more than its counterpart (MeLPPP) with no Pd atom. Evidence is presented for the formation of a weak ground-state charge-transfer complex (CTC) in the blended films of PhLPPP and PCBM, using photo- induced absorption (PIA) spectroscopy. Such complexes are not seen in the PIA spectrum of MeLPPP: PCBM blends. Possible mechanisms for the CTC state formation as well as the significance of this to the understanding and optimization of polymer blended solar cells will be discussed.

  6. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  7. (abstract) Scaling Nominal Solar Cell Impedances for Array Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Robert L; Wallace, Matthew T.; Iles, Peter

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses a task the objective of which is to characterize solar cell array AC impedance and develop scaling rules for impedance characterization of large arrays by testing single solar cells and small arrays. This effort is aimed at formulating a methodology for estimating the AC impedance of the Mars Pathfinder (MPF) cruise and lander solar arrays based upon testing single cells and small solar cell arrays and to create a basis for design of a single shunt limiter for MPF power control of flight solar arrays having very different inpedances.

  8. Design and fabrication of wraparound contact silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.; Stella, P. M.; Avery, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    Both dielectric insulation and etched junction contact techniques were evaluated for use in wraparound contact cell fabrication. Since a suitable process for depositing the dielectrics was not achieved, the latter approach was taken. The relationship between loss of back contact and power degradation due to increased series resistance was established and used to design a simple contact configuration for 10 ohm-cm etched wraparound junction contact N/P cells. A slightly deeper junction significantly improved cell curve shape and the associated loss of current was regained by using thinner contact grid fingers. One thousand cells with efficiencies greater than 10.5% were fabricated to demonstrate the process.

  9. The cytotoxic effect of palytoxin on Caco-2 cells hinders their use for in vitro absorption studies.

    PubMed

    Pelin, M; Sosa, S; Della Loggia, R; Poli, M; Tubaro, A; Decorti, G; Florio, C

    2012-02-01

    Palytoxin (PLTX), found in Palythoa zoanthids and Ostreopsis dinoflagellates, has also been detected in crabs and fish, through which it can enter into the food chain. Indeed, PLTX is considered the causative agent of several cases of human seafood poisoning resulting in systemic symptoms. Available epidemiological data on PLTX human toxicity suggest that the intestinal tract may be one of its in vivo targets and its potential site of access into the bloodstream. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the suitability of the human intestinal Caco-2 cell line for evaluating PLTX oral absorption. A detailed analysis of PLTX cytotoxicity revealed a high sensitivity of Caco-2 cells: 4h toxin exposure reduced mitochondrial activity (MTT assay, EC(50) of 8.9±3.7×10(-12)M), cell density (SRB assay, EC(50) of 2.0±0.6×10(-11)M) and membrane integrity (LDH release, EC(50) of 4.5±1.4×10(-9)M and PI uptake, EC(50) of 1.0±0.8×10(-8)M). After low PLTX concentration (1.0×10(-11)M) exposure for 1-8h, followed by 24h recovery time in toxin-free medium, cell density reduction was only partially reversible. These results indicate that, due to the high susceptibility to PLTX cytotoxic effects, Caco-2 cells do not represent an appropriate and reliable model for investigating intestinal barrier permeation by this toxin. PMID:22019895

  10. A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell for in situ X-ray diffraction and absorption studies of heterogeneous powder-liquid reactions and phase transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrer, P.; da Silva, I.; Heyman, C.; Rubio-Zuazo, J.; Castro, G. R.

    2013-03-01

    A portable powder-liquid high corrosion-resistant reaction cell has been designed to follow in situ reactions by X-ray powder diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques in transmission mode. The cell has been conceived to be mounted on the experimental stations for diffraction and absorption of the Spanish CRG SpLine-BM25 beamline at the ESRF. In the case of the diffraction technique, data can be collected with either a point detector or a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using the 2D-CCD camera, the cell can be used for time-resolved in situ studies of phase transitions and reactions. Powder reactants and/or products are kept at a fixed position in a vertical geometry in the X-ray pathway, which is minimized in order to reduce the X-ray absorption by the reaction bath. Sample is fixed by a porous membrane under forced liquid reflux circulation, assuring total powder-liquid contact, with an accurate temperature control in the range from 20 to 220°C.

  11. Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption in GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yanhong; Yan, Xin; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a plasmon-enhanced solar cell structure based on a GaAs nanowire array decorated with metal nanoparticles. The results show that by engineering the metallic nanoparticles, localized surface plasmon could be excited, which can concentrate the incident light and propagate the energy to nanowires. The surface plasmon can dramatically enhance the absorbance of near-bandgap light, and the enhancement is influenced by the size and material of nanoparticles. By optimizing the particle parameters, a large absorbance enhancement of 50 % at 760 nm and a high conversion efficiency of 14.5 % can be obtained at a low diameter and period ratio ( D/ P ratio) of 0.3. The structure is promising for low-cost high-performance nanoscale solar cells.

  12. Plasmon-Enhanced Light Absorption in GaAs Nanowire Array Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhong; Yan, Xin; Wu, Yao; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a plasmon-enhanced solar cell structure based on a GaAs nanowire array decorated with metal nanoparticles. The results show that by engineering the metallic nanoparticles, localized surface plasmon could be excited, which can concentrate the incident light and propagate the energy to nanowires. The surface plasmon can dramatically enhance the absorbance of near-bandgap light, and the enhancement is influenced by the size and material of nanoparticles. By optimizing the particle parameters, a large absorbance enhancement of 50 % at 760 nm and a high conversion efficiency of 14.5 % can be obtained at a low diameter and period ratio (D/P ratio) of 0.3. The structure is promising for low-cost high-performance nanoscale solar cells. PMID:26546326

  13. Mammalian designer cells: Engineering principles and biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Mingqi; Fussenegger, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Biotechnology is a widely interdisciplinary field focusing on the use of living cells or organisms to solve established problems in medicine, food production and agriculture. Synthetic biology, the science of engineering complex biological systems that do not exist in nature, continues to provide the biotechnology industry with tools, technologies and intellectual property leading to improved cellular performance. One key aspect of synthetic biology is the engineering of deliberately reprogrammed designer cells whose behavior can be controlled over time and space. This review discusses the most commonly used techniques to engineer mammalian designer cells; while control elements acting on the transcriptional and translational levels of target gene expression determine the kinetic and dynamic profiles, coupling them to a variety of extracellular stimuli permits their remote control with user-defined trigger signals. Designer mammalian cells with novel or improved biological functions not only directly improve the production efficiency during biopharmaceutical manufacturing but also open the door for cell-based treatment strategies in molecular and translational medicine. In the future, the rational combination of multiple sets of designer cells could permit the construction and regulation of higher-order systems with increased complexity, thereby enabling the molecular reprogramming of tissues, organisms or even populations with highest precision. PMID:26010998

  14. Iron absorption by intestinal epithelial cells: 1. CaCo2 cells cultivated in serum-free medium, on polyethyleneterephthalate microporous membranes, as an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Halleux, C; Schneider, Y J

    1991-04-01

    Iron absorption by intestinal epithelial cells, passage onto plasmatic apotransferrin, and regulation of the process remain largely misunderstood. To investigate this problem, we have set up an in vitro model, consisting in CaCo2 cells (a human colon adenocarcinoma line, which upon cultivation displays numerous differentiation criteria of small intestine epithelial cells). Cells are cultivated in a serum-free medium, containing 1 microgram/ml insulin, 1 ng/ml epidermal growth factor, 10 micrograms/ml albumin-linoleic acid, 100 nM hydrocortisone, and 2 nM T3 on new, transparent, Cyclopore polyethyleneterephthalate microporous membranes coated with type I collagen. Cells rapidly adhere, grow, and form confluent monolayers; after 15 days, scanning electron microscopy reveals numerous uniform microvilli. Domes, which develop on nonporous substrata, are absent on high porosity membranes. Culture medium from upper and lower compartments of microplate inserts and cell lysates were immunoprecipitated after labeling with [3H]glucosamine and leucine; analysis was done by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), followed by autoradiography. [3H]transferrin is found mainly in the lower compartment and in cells; [3H]apolipoprotein B is released in both compartments, and fibronectin almost entirely recovered in the lower compartment; [3H]transferrin receptors and ferritin are only present in cell lysates. Binding experiments also show that transferrin receptors are accessible from the lower compartment. These results suggest that CaCo2 cells, cultivated in synthetic medium on membranes of appropriate porosity, could provide an in vitro model of the intestinal barrier, with the upper compartment of the culture insert corresponding to the apical pole facing the intestinal lumen and the lower one to the basal pole in contact with blood. PMID:1830303

  15. Advanced Silicon Solar Cell Device Physics and Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deceglie, Michael Gardner

    A fundamental challenge in the development and deployment of solar photovoltaic technology is a reduction in cost enabling direct competition with fossil-fuel-based energy sources. A key driver in this cost reduction is optimized device efficiency, because increased energy output leverages all photovoltaic system costs, from raw materials and module manufacturing to installation and maintenance. To continue progress toward higher conversion efficiencies, solar cells are being fabricated with increasingly complex designs, including engineered nanostructures, heterojunctions, and novel contacting and passivation schemes. Such advanced designs require a comprehensive and unified understanding of the optical and electrical device physics at the microscopic scale. This thesis focuses on a microscopic understanding of solar cell optoelectronic performance and its impact on cell optimization. We consider this in three solar cell platforms: thin-film crystalline silicon, amorphous/crystalline silicon heterojunctions, and thin-film cells with nanophotonic light trapping. The work described in this thesis represents a powerful design paradigm, based on a detailed physical understanding of the mechanisms governing solar cell performance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the importance of understanding not just the individual mechanisms, but also their interactions. Such an approach to device optimization is critical for the efficiency and competitiveness of future generations of solar cells.

  16. Preclinical dose number and its application in understanding drug absorption risk and formulation design for preclinical species.

    PubMed

    Wuelfing, W Peter; Daublain, Pierre; Kesisoglou, Filippos; Templeton, Allen; McGregor, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    In the drug discovery setting, the ability to rapidly identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species at high doses from easily measured physical properties is desired. This is due to the large number of molecules being evaluated and their high attrition rate, which make resource-intensive in vitro and in silico evaluation unattractive. High-dose in vivo data from rat, dog, and monkey are analyzed here, using a preclinical dose number (PDo) concept based on the dose number described by Amidon and other authors (Pharm. Res., 1993, 10, 264-270). PDo, as described in this article, is simply calculated as dose (mg/kg) divided by compound solubility in FaSSIF (mg/mL) and approximates the volume of biorelevant media per kilogram of animal that would be needed to fully dissolve the dose. High PDo values were found to be predictive of difficulty in achieving drug exposure (AUC)-dose proportionality in in vivo studies, as could be expected; however, this work analyzes a large data set (>900 data points) and provides quantitative guidance to identify drug absorption risk in preclinical species based on a single solubility measurement commonly carried out in drug discovery. Above the PDo values defined, >50% of all in vivo studies exhibited poor AUC-dose proportionality in rat, dog, and monkey, and these values can be utilized as general guidelines in discovery and early development to rapidly assess risk of solubility-limited absorption for a given compound. A preclinical dose number generated by biorelevant dilutions of formulated compounds (formulated PDo) was also evaluated and defines solubility targets predictive of suitable AUC-dose proportionality in formulation development efforts. Application of these guidelines can serve to efficiently identify compounds in discovery that are likely to present extreme challenges with respect to solubility-limited absorption in preclinical species as well as reduce the testing of poor formulations in vivo, which is a key

  17. Design and Performance Assessment of a Stable Astigmatic Herriott Cell for Trace Gas Measurements on Airborne Platforms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyroff, Christoph; Fried, Alan; Richter, Dirk; Walega, James G.; Zahniser, Mark S.; McManus, J. Barry

    2005-01-01

    The present paper discusses a new, more stable, astigmatic Herriott cell employing carbon fiber stabilizing rods. Laboratory tests using a near-IR absorption feature of CO at 1564.168-nm revealed a factor of two improvement in measurement stability compared with the present commercial design when the sampling pressure was changed by +/-2 Torr around 50 Torr. This new cell should significantly enhance our efforts to measure trace gases employing pathlengths of 100 to 200-meters on airborne platforms with minimum detectable line center absorbances of less than 10(exp -6).

  18. Cancer cell death by design: apoptosis, autophagy and glioma virotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tyler, Matthew A; Ulasov, Ilya V; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-08-01

    Autophagy has been defined as a mechanism by which oncolytic adenoviruses mediate cell killing in some cancers, including malignant glioma. Until recently, however, adenovirus replication was regarded as a process that induced classical apoptosis in the infected cell. We have assessed the method of conditionally replicating adenovirus (CRAd) death in a model of malignant glioma, considering both autophagy and apoptosis as possible mechanisms of virally-induced cell death. Our initial investigations indicated that autophagy was the predominant system in CRAd-induced cell death in glioma. This appeared to be the case in vitro; however, further investigation in vivo shows that CRAds are capable of inducing both apoptotic and autophagic cell death. In this punctum, we summarize our latest research to uncover the method of oncolytic adenovirus-induced cell death in malignant glioma. Elucidating the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis in glioma virotherapy has significant implications for the design of optimal viral vectors. PMID:19430207

  19. Designer Nuclease-Mediated Generation of Knockout THP1 Cells.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Tobias; Schmid-Burgk, Jonathan L; Ebert, Thomas S; Gaidt, Moritz M; Hornung, Veit

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in the field of designer nucleases allow the efficient and specific manipulation of genomic architectures in eukaryotic cell lines. To this end, it has become possible to introduce DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) at user-defined genomic loci. If located in critical coding regions of genes, thus induced DSBs can lead to insertions or deletions (indels) that result in frameshift mutations and thereby the knockout of the target gene. In this chapter, we describe a step-by-step workflow for establishing knockout cell clones of the difficult-to-transfect suspension cell line THP1. The here described protocol encompasses electroporation, cell cloning, and a deep sequencing-based genotyping step that allows the in-parallel analysis of 96 cell clones per gene of interest. Furthermore, we describe the use of the analysis tool OutKnocker that allows rapid identification of cell clones with all-allelic frameshift mutations. PMID:26443227

  20. Soybean extracts increase cell surface ZIP4 abundance and cellular zinc levels: a potential novel strategy to enhance zinc absorption by ZIP4 targeting.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ayako; Ohkura, Katsuma; Takahashi, Masakazu; Kizu, Kumiko; Narita, Hiroshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Miyamae, Yusaku; Masuda, Seiji; Nagao, Masaya; Irie, Kazuhiro; Ohigashi, Hajime; Andrews, Glen K; Kambe, Taiho

    2015-12-01

    Dietary zinc deficiency puts human health at risk, so we explored strategies for enhancing zinc absorption. In the small intestine, the zinc transporter ZIP4 functions as an essential component of zinc absorption. Overexpression of ZIP4 protein increases zinc uptake and thereby cellular zinc levels, suggesting that food components with the ability to increase ZIP4 could potentially enhance zinc absorption via the intestine. In the present study, we used mouse Hepa cells, which regulate mouse Zip4 (mZip4) in a manner indistinguishable from that in intestinal enterocytes, to screen for suitable food components that can increase the abundance of ZIP4. Using this ZIP4-targeting strategy, two such soybean extracts were identified that were specifically able to decrease mZip4 endocytosis in response to zinc. These soybean extracts also effectively increased the abundance of apically localized mZip4 in transfected polarized Caco2 and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells and, moreover, two apically localized mZip4 acrodermatitis enteropathica mutants. Soybean components were purified from one extract and soyasaponin Bb was identified as an active component that increased both mZip4 protein abundance and zinc levels in Hepa cells. Finally, we confirmed that soyasaponin Bb is capable of enhancing cell surface endogenous human ZIP4 in human cells. Our results suggest that ZIP4 targeting may represent a new strategy to improve zinc absorption in humans. PMID:26385990

  1. Determination of inorganic and total mercury by vapor generation atomic absorption spectrometry using different temperatures of the measurement cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaercher, Luiz Eduardo; Goldschmidt, Fabiane; Paniz, José Neri Gottfried; de Moraes Flores, Érico Marlon; Dressler, Valderi Luiz

    2005-06-01

    A simple and inexpensive laboratory-built flow injection vapor generation system coupled to atomic absorption spectrometry (FI-VG AAS) for inorganic and total mercury determination has been developed. It is based on the vapor generation of total mercury and a selective detection of Hg 2 + or total mercury by varying the temperature of the measurement cell. Only the inorganic mercury is measured when the quartz cell is at room temperature, and when the cell is heated to 650 °C or higher the total Hg concentration is measured. The organic Hg concentration in the sample is calculated from the difference between the total Hg and Hg 2 + concentrations. Parameters such as the type of acid (HCl or HNO 3) and its concentration, reductant (NaBH 4) concentration, carrier solution (HCl) flow rate, carrier gas flow rate, sample volume and quartz cell temperature, which influence FI-VG AAS system performance, were systematically investigated. The optimized conditions for Hg 2 + and total Hg determinations were: 1.0 mol l - 1 HCl as carrier solution, carrier flow rate of 3.5 ml min - 1 , 0.1% (m/v) NaBH 4, reductant flow rate of 1.0 ml min - 1 and carrier gas flow rate of 200 ml min - 1 . The relative standard deviation (RSD) is lower than 5.0% for a 1.0 μg l - 1 Hg solution and the limit of quantification (LOQ, 10 s) is 55 ng g - 1 . Certified samples of dogfish muscle (DORM-1 and DORM-2) and non-certified fish samples were analyzed, using a 6.0 mol l - 1 HCl solution for analyte extraction. The Hg 2 + and CH 3Hg + concentrations found were in agreement with certified ones.

  2. Development and characterization of lutein-loaded SNEDDS for enhanced absorption in Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Niamprem, Pattravee; Rujivipat, Soravoot; Tiyaboonchai, Waree

    2014-09-01

    A self-nanoemulsifying drug delivery system (SNEDDS) has been developed for enhanced oral bioavailability of lutein. Its permeation enhancement has been evaluated using monolayers of Caco-2 cells. SNEDDS is composed of a mixture of Lexol® and Emulmetik® 900, Labrasol®, and Tween 80 as oil, surfactant and co-surfactant, respectively. Upon dilution of lutein-loaded SNEDDS with water, a nanoemulsion was obtained in <10 s with spherical droplets of 40-150 nm in diameter. The zeta potential was in the range of -19 to -32 mV. Increasing the ratio of surfactant to co-surfactant decreased the mean droplet size. Dissolution studies showed that lutein was released rapidly (<5 min) from SNEDDS into 0.1 N HCl and pH 6.8 phosphate buffer solution without any aggregation. In vitro studies using Caco-2 cells revealed that lutein-loaded SNEDDS showed shorter lag time and greater (2-fold) cellular accumulation compared with the lutein dispersion. PMID:23985012

  3. Design and programming of systolic array cells for signal processing

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, R.A.W.

    1989-01-01

    This thesis presents a new methodology for the design, simulation, and programming of systolic arrays in which the algorithms and architecture are simultaneously optimized. The algorithms determine the initial architecture, and simulation is used to optimize the architecture. The simulator provides a register-transfer level model of a complete systolic array computation. To establish the validity of this design methodology two novel programmable systolic array cells were designed and programmed. The cells were targeted for applications in high-speed signal processing and associated matrix computations. A two-chip programmable systolic array cell using a 16-bit multiplier-accumulator chip and a semi-custom VLSI controller chip was designed and fabricated. A low chip count allows large arrays to be constructed, but the cell is flexible enough to be a building-block for either one- or two-dimensional systolic arrays. Another more flexible and powerful cell using a 32-bit floating-point processor and a second VLSI controller chip was also designed. It contains several architectural features that are unique in a systolic array cell: (1) each instruction is 32 bits, yet all resources can be updated every cycle, (2) two on-chip interchangeable memories are used, and (3) one input port can be used as either a global or local port. The key issues involved in programming the cells are analyzed in detail. A set of modules is developed which can be used to construct large programs in an effective manner. The utility of this programming approach is demonstrated with several important examples.

  4. Stress analysis for wall structure in mobile hot cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahrin, Muhammad Hannan; Rahman, Anwar Abdul; Hamzah, Mohd Arif; Mamat, Mohd Rizal; Azman, Azraf; Hasan, Hasni

    2016-01-01

    Malaysian Nuclear Agency is developing a Mobile Hot Cell (MHC) in order to handle and manage Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) such as teletherapy heads and irradiators. At present, there are only two units of MHC in the world, in South Africa and China. Malaysian Mobile Hot cell is developed by Malaysian Nuclear Agency with the assistance of IAEA expert, based on the design of South Africa and China, but with improved features. Stress analysis has been performed on the design in order to fulfil the safety requirement in operation of MHC. This paper discusses the loading analysis effect from the sand to the MHC wall structure.

  5. An advanced Ni-Cd battery cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, L.

    1986-01-01

    The evolution of an advanced Ni-Cd space battery cell design continues to prove very promising. High oxygen/hydrogen gas recombination rates (currently up to a C/5 charge rate) and increased electrolyte activation level tolerance (currently up to 5.6 grams Ah of positive capacity) were demonstrated by test. A superior performance, extended life battery cell offering advantages should soon be available for mission applications

  6. Microstructure Optimization in Fuel Cell Electrodes using Materials Design

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dongsheng; Saheli, Ghazal; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Garmestani, Hamid

    2006-08-01

    Abstract A multiscale model based on statistical continuum mechanics is proposed to predict the mechanical and electrical properties of heterogeneous porous media. This model is applied within the framework of microstructure sensitive design (MSD) to guide the design of the microstructure in porous lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) fuel cell electrode. To satisfy the property requirement and compatibility, porosity and its distribution can be adjusted under the guidance of MSD to achieve optimized microstructure.

  7. Innovations in the design of super-large flotation cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence, G.A.

    1995-12-31

    A new super-large 100 m{sup 3} (3,500 ft{sup 3}) pneumatic mechanical flotation cell is now available to meet today`s mineral processing challenges. Several innovative design concepts represent a marked departure from conventional flotation cell designs. The radial discharge from the pump action rotor and the overhung vane type stator is contained in a conical bottom round tank with no dead corners. Peripheral launders collect froth overflowing the entire circumference of the tank and these launders are of a hexagonal design permitting cells to be nested together in a honeycomb fashion. The mechanism drive is either a customized right angle gear reducer or a conventional Vee belt drive. Both drive systems are available with an optional variable frequency control system that permits infinite speed adjustment of the rotor in each flotation cell or group of cells. Results of side-by-side comparative testing between three major manufacturers of super-large pneumatic mechanical flotation cells are discussed. These results were obtained at a large copper concentrator in Chile during several weeks of commercial scale testing.

  8. The Design of a Five-Cell Superconducting RF Module with a PBG Coupler Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenyev, Sergey A; Simakov, Evgenya I

    2012-08-29

    We discuss the problem of incorporating a Photonic Band Gap (PBG) cell into a superconducting accelerating module of 5 cells designed for the operational frequency of 2.1 GHz. The reason for using a PBG cell is to provide a good accelerating mode confinement and good Higher Order Mode (HOM) suppression. PBG cell can potentially be used for placing HOM and fundamental mode couplers. However, because of the naturally higher ratio of the peak magnetic field to the accelerating field in the PBG cell, it should be designed to operate at a lower accelerating gradient than the other cells of the module. This ensures that the probability of quench in the PBG cell would be no higher than in other elliptical cells of the structure.

  9. Design and characterisation of bodipy sensitizers for dye-sensitized NiO solar cells.

    PubMed

    Summers, Gareth H; Lefebvre, Jean-François; Black, Fiona A; Davies, E Stephen; Gibson, Elizabeth A; Pullerits, Tönu; Wood, Christopher J; Zidek, Karel

    2016-01-14

    A series of photosensitizers for NiO-based dye-sensitized solar cells is presented. Three model compounds containing a triphenylamine donor appended to a boron dipyrromethene (bodipy) chromophore have been successfully prepared and characterised using emission spectroscopy, electrochemistry and spectroelectrochemistry, to ultimately direct the design of dyes with more complex structures. Carboxylic acid anchoring groups and thiophene spacers were appended to the model compounds to provide five dyes which were adsorbed onto NiO and integrated into dye-sensitized solar cells. Solar cells incorporating the simple Bodipy-CO₂H dye were surprisingly promising relative to the more complex dye 4. Cell performances were improved with dyes which had increased electronic communication between the donor and acceptor, achieved by incorporating a less hindered bodipy moiety. Further increases in performances were obtained from dyes which contained a thiophene spacer. Thus, the best performance was obtained for 7 which generated a very promising photocurrent density of 5.87 mA cm(-2) and an IPCE of 53%. Spectroelectrochemistry combined with time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy were used to determine the identity and lifetime of excited state species. Short-lived (ps) transients were recorded for 4, 5 and 7 which are consistent with previous studies. Despite a longer lived (25 ns) charge-separated state for 6/NiO, there was no increase in the photocurrent generated by the corresponding solar cell. PMID:26660278

  10. Design of an ultrashort optical transmission cell for vacuum ultraviolet spectroscopy of supercritical fluids.

    PubMed

    Janik, Ireneusz; Marin, Timothy W

    2015-01-01

    We present the design and characteristics of an ultrathin flow cell optimized for vacuum ultraviolet transmission spectroscopy experiments on supercritical fluids. The cell operates satisfactorily at pressures up to 300 bar and temperatures up to 390 °C. The variable path length concept of the cell allows for optical transmission studies of analytes ranging from dense condensed-phase systems to gas-phase systems. The path length of the cell can be adjusted from hundreds of nanometers to hundreds of micrometers by an exchange of a variable thickness spacer sandwiched between two sapphire windows. In the path length range from nanometers to single micrometers, metal vapor deposited on one or both of the two sandwiched optical windows constitute the spacer. Spacers with thicknesses of 2 μm and greater can be constructed from simple commercially available metal foils. The cell has been used to measure the lowest-lying absorption band of water in both the vapor and condensed phases from room temperature up to and above the critical point. It has also found application in the studies of aqueous ions and nonaqueous liquids including various common organic solvents and carbon dioxide. PMID:25638117

  11. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  12. Design principles for nickel-hydrogen cells and batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.; Manzo, M. A.; Gonzalez-Sanabria, O. D.

    1985-01-01

    Nickel-hydrogen cells and, more recently, bipolar batteries have been built by a variety of organizations. The design principles that have been used by the technology group at the NASA Lewis Research Center draw upon their extensive background in separator technology, alkaline fuel cell technology, and several alkaline cell technology areas. These design principles have been incorporated into both the more contemporary individual pressure vessel (IPV) designs that were pioneered by other groups, as well as the more recent bipolar battery designs using active cooling that are being developed at NASA Lewis Research Center and under contract. These principles are rather straightforward applications of capillary force formalisms, coupled with the slowly developing data base resulting from careful post test analyses. The objective of this overall effort is directed towards the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) application where the cycle life requirements are much more severe than the geosynchronous-orbit (GEO) application. A summary of the design principles employed is presented along with a discussion of the recommendations for component pore sizes and pore size distributions, as well as suggested materials of construction. These will be made based on our experience in these areas to show how these design principles have been translated into operating hardware.

  13. Optimization of antireflection coating design for multijunction solar cells and concentrator systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Christopher E.; Desfonds, Eric; Masson, Denis; Fafard, Simon; Carlson, Andrew; Cook, John; Hall, Trevor J.; Hinzer, Karin

    2008-06-01

    Photovoltaic solar cells are a route towards local, environmentally benign, sustainable and affordable energy solutions. Antireflection coatings are necessary to input a high percentage of available light for photovoltaic conversion, and therefore have been widely exploited for silicon solar cells. Multi-junction III-V semiconductor solar cells have achieved the highest efficiencies of any photovoltaic technology, yielding up to 40% in the laboratory and 37% in commercial devices under varying levels of concentrated light. These devices benefit from a wide absorption spectrum (300- 1800 nm), but this also introduces significant challenges for antireflection coating design. Each sub-cell junction is electrically connected in series, limiting the overall device photocurrent by the lowest current-producing junction. Therefore, antireflection coating optimization must maximize the current from the limiting sub-cells at the expense of the others. Solar concentration, necessary for economical terrestrial deployment of multi-junction solar cells, introduces an angular-dependent irradiance spectrum. Antireflection coatings are optimized for both direct normal incidence in air and angular incidence in an Opel Mk-I concentrator, resulting in as little as 1-2% loss in photocurrent as compared to an ideal zero-reflectance solar cell, showing a similar performance to antireflection coatings on silicon solar cells. A transparent conductive oxide layer has also been considered to replace the metallic-grid front electrode and for inclusion as part of a multi-layer antireflection coating. Optimization of the solar cell, antireflection coating, and concentrator system should be considered simultaneously to enable overall optimal device performance.

  14. Luteolin and Quercetin Affect the Cholesterol Absorption Mediated by Epithelial Cholesterol Transporter Niemann–Pick C1-Like 1 in Caco-2 Cells and Rats

    PubMed Central

    Nekohashi, Mari; Ogawa, Mana; Ogihara, Takuo; Nakazawa, Kyoko; Kato, Hisanori; Misaka, Takumi; Abe, Keiko; Kobayashi, Shoko

    2014-01-01

    Niemann–Pick C1-Like 1 (NPC1L1) mediates cholesterol absorption, and ezetimibe is a potent NPC1L1 inhibitor applicable for medication of hypercholesterolemia. Epidemiological studies demonstrated that consumption of polyphenols correlates with a decreased risk for atherosclerosis due to their antioxidant effect. This activity can hardly be attributable to the antioxidant activity only, and we hypothesized that polyphenols inhibit intestinal transport of cholesterol. We elucidated the kinetic parameters of intestinal cholesterol absorption, screened several polyphenols for their ability to specifically inhibit intestinal cholesterol absorption, and determined the inhibitory effects of selected flavonoids in vitro and in vivo. The concentration-dependent uptake of cholesterol by Caco-2 cells obeyed a monophasic saturation process. This indicates the involvement of an active-passive transport, i.e., NPC1L1. Parameters of cholesterol uptake by Caco-2 cells were as follows: Jmax, Kt, and Kd were 6.89±2.96 19.03±11.58 µM, and 0.11±0.02 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. Luteolin and quercetin inhibited cholesterol absorption by Caco-2 cells and human embryonic kidney 293T cells expressing NPC1L1. When preincubated Caco-2 cells with luteolin and quercetin before the assay, cholesterol uptake significantly decreased. The inhibitory effects of these flavonoids were maintained for up to 120 min. The level of inhibition and irreversible effects were similar to that of ezetimibe. Serum cholesterol levels significantly decreased more in rats fed both cholesterol and luteolin (or quercetin), than in those observed in the cholesterol feeding group. As quercetin induced a significant decrease in the levels of NPC1L1 mRNA in Caco-2 cells, the in vivo inhibitory effect may be due to the expression of NPC1L1. These results suggest that luteolin and quercetin reduce high blood cholesterol levels by specifically inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption mediated by NPC1L1

  15. Design of a simple cryogenic system for ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy with a back-reflectance fiber optic probe.

    PubMed

    Vinyard, Andrew; Hansen, Kaj A; Byrd, Ross; Stuart, Douglas A; Hansen, John E

    2014-01-01

    We report a convenient and inexpensive technique for the rapid acquisition of absorption spectra from small samples at cryogenic temperatures using a home built cryostat with novel collection optics. A cylindrical copper block was constructed with a coaxial bore to hold a 4.00 mm diameter electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) tube and mounted on a copper feed in thermal contact with liquid nitrogen. A 6.35 mm diameter hole was bored into the side of the cylinder so a fiber optic cable bundle could be positioned orthogonally to the EPR tube. The light passing through the sample is reflected off of the opposing surfaces of the EPR tube and surrounding copper, back through the sample. The emergent light is then collected using the fiber optic bundle and analyzed using a dispersive spectrometer. Absorption spectra for KMnO4 were measured between 400 and 700 nm. Absorption intensity at 506, 525, 545, and 567 nm was found to be proportional to concentration, displaying Beer's law-like behavior. The EPR tube had an internal diameter of 3.2 mm; the double pass of the probe beam through the sample affords a central path length of about 6.4 mm. Comparing these measurements with those recorded on a conventional tabletop spectrometer using a cuvette with a 10.00 mm path length, we consistently found a ratio between intensities of 0.58 rather than the anticipated 0.64. These 6% smaller values we attribute to the curvature of the EPR tube and transmission/reflection losses. This system is particularly well-suited to studying the kinetics and dynamics of chemical reactions at cryogenic temperatures. The rapid response (100 ms) and multiplex advantage provided the opportunity of recording simultaneous time courses at several wavelengths following initiation of a chemical reaction with a pulsed laser source. PMID:24405962

  16. Microcontroller-based Control Design for Fuel Cell System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Firmansyah, I.; Prihandoko, B.; Suwandi, E.

    2009-09-01

    This paper described the hardware design using microcontroller as main part in for fuel cell controller. The system consist of 500 W rated fuel cell stack, a microcontroller and other components such as solenoid valve, proportional valve, cooling pump and sensors. Microcontroller is so easy and effective for this purpose that main function in controlling the fuel cell system can be operated by this chip due to some additional features which is integrated inside it. The microcontroller is not only responsible for controlling the hardware and receiving the measured data such as temperature, pressure, voltage and current but also for communicating with PC to share the data or even receive the set point.

  17. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  18. Micro-optical designs for angular confinement in solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Jeffrey M.; Feuermann, Daniel; Mashaal, Heylal

    2015-01-01

    We identify and evaluate a variety of efficient and feasible micro-optics for confining the radiative emission of solar cells. The key criteria used for assessing viable designs are (1) high optical efficiency for both the transmission of impinging solar beam radiation and the external recycling of isotropic cell luminescent emission; (2) liberal optical tolerance; (3) compactness and (4) being amenable to fabrication from existing materials and manufacturing processes. Both imaging and nonimaging candidate designs are presented, and their superiority to previous proposals is quantified. The strategy of angular confinement for boosting cell open-circuit voltage-thereby enhancing conversion efficiency-is limited to cells where radiative recombination is the dominant carrier recombination pathway. Optical systems that restrict the angular range for emission of cell luminescence must, by reciprocity, commensurately restrict the angular range for the collection of solar radiation. This, in turn, mandates the introduction of concentrators, but not for the objective of delivering concentrated flux onto the cell. Rather, the optical system must project an acceptably uniform spatial distribution of solar flux onto the cell surface at a nominal averaged irradiance of 1 sun.

  19. Cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  20. Improved cell design for lithium alloy/metal sulfide battery

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.

    1984-03-30

    The disclosed lithium alloy/iron sulfide cell design provides loop-like positive and negative sheet metal current collectors electrically insulated from one another by separator means, the positive collector being located outwardly of the negative collector. The collectors are initially secured within an open-ended cell housing, which allows for collector pretesting for electrical shorts prior to adding any electrode materials and/or electrolyte to the cell. Separate chambers are defined outwardly of the positive collector and inwardly of the negative collector open respectively in opposite directions toward the open ends of the cell housing; and positive and negative electrode materials can be extruded into these respective chambers via the opposite open housing ends. The chambers and cell housing ends can then be sealed closed. A cross wall structurally reinforces the cell housing and also thereby defines two cavities, and paired positive and negative collectors are disposed in each cavity and electrically connected in parallel. The cell design provides for a high specific energy output and improved operating life in that any charge-discharge cycle swelling of the positive electrode material will be inwardly against only the positive collector to minimize shorts caused by the collectors shifting relative to one another.

  1. Mondo Grass Berry Pigment for Visible to Near Infrared Absorption in Dye Sensitized Solar Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desilva, L. A. A.; Pitigala, P. K. D. D. P.; Perera, A. G. U.

    2013-03-01

    The development of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is an exciting field in the low cost renewable energy production. Two major draw backs in the DSSCs are the narrow spectral response and the short term stability. Synthesis of artificial dyes with broad response is important in developing an efficient DSSC. Artificial dyes can add up to the cost of the device; therefore, it is important to identify natural dyes with broad abortion and required energy levels. Work presented here shows a broad spectral response with a natural dye extracted from a Mondo Grass berry (Ophiopogonjaponicus).The dye is extracted by crushing the berries and filtering to remove the pulp. A DSSC sensitized with Mondo Grass dye, and with TiO2 film screen printed on a Florien doped Tin Oxide (FTO) glass and baked for 30 minutes at 450 degree C as the working electrode and Iodine/triiodide red-ox electrolyte as the hole collector was tested for its performance. An open circuit photovoltage of 495 mV and a short circuit photocurrent of 0.6 mA/cm2 were observed under a simulated lamp equivalent to 1 sun illumination and have a broad spectral response extending from 400 nm to 750 nm. This work is supported by COSM at UWG.

  2. Transport mechanisms responsible for the absorption of loracarbef, cefixime, and cefuroxime axetil into human intestinal Caco-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Dantzig, A H; Duckworth, D C; Tabas, L B

    1994-04-20

    Loracarbef, cefixime and cefuroxime axetil are beta-lactam antibiotics that are administered orally. Oral absorption of loracarbef is nearly complete, while that of cefixime and cefuroxime axetil is 30-50%. To investigate this we used the human intestinal cell line Caco-2 that possesses the proton-dependent peptide transporter that takes up cephalexin and cefaclor. Drug uptake was measured at pH 6 by high performance liquid chromatography or with radioactively labelled drug. The initial uptake rate of 1 mM cefixime was lower than that of 1 mM loracarbef. By 2 h both drugs were concentrated intracellularly against a gradient; however, the accumulation of cefixime was only 40% of that of loracarbef. The uptake rate of both drugs was sodium-independent, temperature- and energy-dependent, and was inhibited by dipeptides, cephalexin, cefaclor, but not by amino acids. Kinetic analysis of the concentration-dependence of the uptake rates for loracarbef and cefixime indicated that diffusion and a single transport system were responsible for uptake. The kinetic parameters for loracarbef and cefixime, respectively, were: Km values of 8 and 17 mM and Vmax values of 6.5 and 2 nmol/min per mg protein. Loracarbef and cefixime were competitive inhibitors of each other's uptake. By contrast, cefuroxime axetil was taken up and rapidly hydrolyzed to cefuroxime by Caco-2 cells. Cefuroxime axetil uptake was not dependent on energy and was not affected by dipeptides. Thus, cefuroxime axetil apparently enters Caco-2 cells by simple diffusion. By contrast, loracarbef and cefixime share a common transport mechanism, the proton-dependent dipeptide transporter. Cefixime was taken up less well than loracarbef due to a substantial reduction in the turnover rate and decreased affinity of the transporter for cefixime. PMID:8155686

  3. A flooded-starved design for nickel-cadmium cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thaller, L. H.

    1986-01-01

    A somewhat analogous situation among groupings of alkaline fuel cells is described where the stochastic aspects were much more accurately documented and then it was illustrated how this problem was eliminated using straight forward principles of pore size engineering. This is followed by a suggested method of adapting these same design principles to nickel-cadmium cells. It must be kept in mind that when cells are cycled to typically twenty percent depth of discharge that eighty percent of the weight of the cell is simply dead weight. Some of this dead weight might be put to better use by trading it for a scheme that would increase the time during which the cell would be working more closely to its optimum set of operating parameters.

  4. Improved performance design of gallium arsenide solar cells for space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parekh, R. H.; Barnett, A. M.

    1984-01-01

    An improved design, shallow junction heteroface, n-p, gallium arsenide solar cell for space applications is reported, with a predicted AM0 efficiency in the 21.9 to 23.0 percent range. The optimized n-p structure, while slightly more efficient, has the added advantage of being less susceptible to radiation-induced degradation by virtue of this thin top junction layer. Detailed spectral response curves and an analysis of the loss mechanisms are reported. The details of the design are readily measurable. The optimized designs were reached by quantifying the dominant loss mechanisms and then minimizing them by using computer simulations.

  5. Limitations and design considerations for donor–acceptor systems in luminescent solar concentrators: the effect of coupling-induced red-edge absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacQueen, Rowan W.; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Webb, James E. A.; Falber, Alexander; Thordarson, Pall; Schmidt, Timothy W.

    2016-06-01

    Luminescent solar concentrators (LSCs) use luminescence and waveguiding to concentrate photons within thin dielectric slabs for use in photovoltaic, lighting, and photobioreactor applications. Donor–acceptor systems of organic chromophores are widely used in LSCs to broaden the sunlight absorption range and attempt to reduce loss-inducing reabsorption by the emitting chromophore. We use raytrace simulations across a large parameter space to model the performance of LSCs containing two novel donor–acceptor trimers based on the perylene moiety. We find that under certain conditions, trimers outperform single-dye LSCs as expected. However, at higher concentrations, a slight increase in red-edge absorption by the trimers increases reabsorption and has a deleterious effect on LSC performance. This underscores the large effect that even small changes in the red edge can have, and may discourage the use of donor–acceptor schemes with high interchromophore coupling that promotes red-edge absorption. Finally, we show that for a LSC-PV pair, selecting a PV cell that is well-matched with the LSC emission spectrum has a large effect on the flux gain of the system, and that the systems studied here are well-matched to emerging PV technologies.

  6. Nonlinear observer designs for fuel cell power systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorgun, Haluk

    A fuel cell is an electrochemical device that combines hydrogen and oxygen, with the aid of electro-catalysts, to produce electricity. A fuel cell consists of a negatively charged anode, a positively charged cathode and an electrolyte, which transports protons or ions. A low temperature fuel cell has an electrical potential of about 0.7 Volt when generating a current density of 300--500 mA/cm2. Practical fuel cell power systems will require a combination of several cells in series (a stack) to satisfy the voltage requirements of specific applications. Fuel cells are suitable for a potentially wide variety of applications, from stationary power generation in the range of hundreds of megawatts to portable electronics in the range of a couple of watts. Efficient operation of a fuel cell system requires advanced feedback control designs. Reliable measurements from the system are necessary to implement such designs. However, most of the commercially available sensors do not operate properly in the reformate and humidified gas streams in fuel cell systems. Sensors working varying degrees of success are too big and costly, and sensors that are potentially low cost are not reliable or do not have the required life time [28]. Observer designs would eliminate sensor needs for measurements, and make feedback control implementable. Since the fuel cell system dynamics are highly nonlinear, observer design is not an easy task. In this study we aim to develop nonlinear observer design methods applicable to fuel cell systems. In part I of the thesis we design an observer to estimate the hydrogen partial pressure in the anode channel. We treat inlet partial pressure as an unknown slowly varying parameter and develop an adaptive observer that employs a nonlinear voltage injection term. However in this design Fuel Processing System (FPS) dynamics are not modelled, and their effect on the anode dynamics are treated as plant uncertainty. In part II of the thesis we study the FPS

  7. Laser absorption phenomena in flowing gas devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.; Otis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is presented of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of CW CO2 laser radiation in flowing gases seeded with alkali metals. In order to motivate this development, some simple models are described of several space missions which could use laser powered rocket vehicles. Design considerations are given for a test call to be used with a welding laser, using a diamond window for admission of laser radiation at power levels in excess of 10 kW. A detailed analysis of absorption conditions in the test cell is included. The experimental apparatus and test setup are described and the results of experiments presented. Injection of alkali seedant and steady state absorption of the laser radiation were successfully demonstrated, but problems with the durability of the diamond windows at higher powers prevented operation of the test cell as an effective laser powered thruster.

  8. Two-dimensional angular optical scattering patterns of aerosol particles in the mid-infrared: measurements designed to obtain particle absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aptowicz, Kevin B.; Pan, Yong-Le; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Tober, Richard L.; Chang, Richard K.; Bronk, Burt V.

    2004-03-01

    Real-time and in-situ detection and discrimination of aerosol particles, especially bio-aerosols, continues to be an important challenge. The technique labeled TAOS (Two-dimensional Angular Optical Scattering) characterizes particles based upon the angular distribution of elastically scattered light. The detected angular distribution of light, labeled the TAOS pattern, depends upon the particle"s shape, size, surface features, and its complex refractive index. Thus, the absorptive properties of a particle affect the TAOS pattern. Furthermore, we expect to use this change in the TAOS pattern, which occurs when the particle absorption band includes the input wavelength, to characterize the strength of the absorption. Thus, by illuminating a particle in the mid-infrared wavelength range, high frequency vibrational modes that are unique to the aerosol can be reached and quantified. Spherical aerosol particles (in the diameter range of 50-60 micrometers) were generated via a droplet generator and illuminated by an Interband Cascade (IC) laser designed to emit in the 3-5 micrometers wavelength range. The TAOS pattern of the elastically scattered light was detected with an InSb-focal-plane-array infrared camera.

  9. Design Principles for Cell Phone Learning in EFL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Feihong

    2010-01-01

    Cell phone learning (C-learning), as an instructional approach, has been gaining more and more attention in the field of teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) in the last 10 years. While studies have proved C-learning an effective instructional approach in research settings, a review of literature indicates the lack of design principles to…

  10. Fuel Cell Car Design Project for Freshman Engineering Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duke, Steve R.; Davis, Virginia A.

    2014-01-01

    In the Samuel Ginn College of Engineering at Auburn University, we have integrated a semester long design project based on a toy fuel cell car into our freshman "Introduction to Chemical Engineering Class." The project provides the students a basic foundation in chemical reactions, energy, and dimensional analysis that facilitates…

  11. Modified NASA standard nickel-cadmium cell designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manzo, Michelle A.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental design, parameters, and testing of a modified NASA standard nickel-cadmium cell are discussed. Modifications regarding positive plate loading levels and nickel attack levels, loading levels for the negative plates, interelectrode spacing, and the positive electrode impregnation process are addressed.

  12. Designing degradable hydrogels for orthogonal control of cell microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Kharkar, Prathamesh M.

    2013-01-01

    Degradable and cell-compatible hydrogels can be designed to mimic the physical and biochemical characteristics of native extracellular matrices and provide tunability of degradation rates and related properties under physiological conditions. Hence, such hydrogels are finding widespread application in many bioengineering fields, including controlled bioactive molecule delivery, cell encapsulation for controlled three-dimensional culture, and tissue engineering. Cellular processes, such as adhesion, proliferation, spreading, migration, and differentiation, can be controlled within degradable, cell-compatible hydrogels with temporal tuning of biochemical or biophysical cues, such as growth factor presentation or hydrogel stiffness. However, thoughtful selection of hydrogel base materials, formation chemistries, and degradable moieties is necessary to achieve the appropriate level of property control and desired cellular response. In this review, hydrogel design considerations and materials for hydrogel preparation, ranging from natural polymers to synthetic polymers, are overviewed. Recent advances in chemical and physical methods to crosslink hydrogels are highlighted, as well as recent developments in controlling hydrogel degradation rates and modes of degradation. Special attention is given to spatial or temporal presentation of various biochemical and biophysical cues to modulate cell response in static (i.e., non-degradable) or dynamic (i.e., degradable) microenvironments. This review provides insight into the design of new cell-compatible, degradable hydrogels to understand and modulate cellular processes for various biomedical applications. PMID:23609001

  13. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight. PMID:27405419

  14. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-07-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight.

  15. Comprehensive design of omnidirectional high-performance perovskite solar cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yutao; Xuan, Yimin

    2016-01-01

    The comprehensive design approach is established with coupled optical-electrical simulation for perovskite-based solar cell, which emerged as one of the most promising competitors to silicon solar cell for its low-cost fabrication and high PCE. The selection of structured surface, effect of geometry parameters, incident angle-dependence and polarization-sensitivity are considered in the simulation. The optical modeling is performed via the finite-difference time-domain method whilst the electrical properties are obtained by solving the coupled nonlinear equations of Poisson, continuity, and drift-diffusion equations. The optical and electrical performances of five different structured surfaces are compared to select a best structured surface for perovskite solar cell. The effects of the geometry parameters on the optical and electrical properties of the perovskite cell are analyzed. The results indicate that the light harvesting is obviously enhanced by the structured surface. The electrical performance can be remarkably improved due to the enhanced light harvesting of the designed best structured surface. The angle-dependence for s- and p-polarizations is investigated. The structured surface exhibits omnidirectional behavior and favorable polarization-insensitive feature within a wide incident angle range. Such a comprehensive design approach can highlight the potential of perovskite cell for power conversion in the full daylight. PMID:27405419

  16. Iron speciation in human cancer cells by K-edge total reflection X-ray fluorescence-X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polgári, Zs.; Meirer, F.; Sasamori, S.; Ingerle, D.; Pepponi, G.; Streli, C.; Rickers, K.; Réti, A.; Budai, B.; Szoboszlai, N.; Záray, G.

    2011-03-01

    X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis in combination with synchrotron radiation induced total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF) acquisition was used to determine the oxidation state of Fe in human cancer cells and simultaneously their elemental composition by applying a simple sample preparation procedure consisting of pipetting the cell suspension onto the quartz reflectors. XANES spectra of several inorganic and organic iron compounds were recorded and compared to that of different cell lines. The XANES spectra of cells, independently from the phase of cell growth and cell type were very similar to that of ferritin, the main Fe store within the cell. The spectra obtained after CoCl 2 or NiCl 2 treatment, which could mimic a hypoxic state of cells, did not differ noticeably from that of the ferritin standard. After 5-fluorouracil administration, which could also induce an oxidative-stress in cells, the absorption edge position was shifted toward higher energies representing a higher oxidation state of Fe. Intense treatment with antimycin A, which inhibits electron transfer in the respiratory chain, resulted in minor changes in the spectrum, resembling rather the N-donor Fe-α,α'-dipyridyl complex at the oxidation energy of Fe(III), than ferritin. The incorporation of Co and Ni in the cells was followed by SR-TXRF measurements.

  17. Design and assembly considerations for Redox cells and stacks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalnaker, D. K.; Lieberman, A.

    1981-01-01

    Individual redox flow cells are arranged electrically in series and hydraulically in parallel to form a single assembly called a stack. The hardware currently being tested in the laboratory has an active electrode area of either 310 sq cm or 929 sq cm. Four 310 sq cm stacks, each consisting of 39 active cells, were incorporated into a 1.0 kW preprototype system. The physical design of the stack is very critical to the performance and efficiency of the redox storage sytem. This report will discuss the mechanical aspects of the cell and stack design for the current Redox hardware, with regard to sealing the stack internally as well as externally, minimizing shunt currents and minimizing the electrical resistance of the stack.

  18. Optimal design of one-dimensional photonic crystal back reflectors for thin-film silicon solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Peizhuan; Hou, Guofu Zhang, Jianjun Zhang, Xiaodan; Zhao, Ying

    2014-08-14

    For thin-film silicon solar cells (TFSC), a one-dimensional photonic crystal (1D PC) is a good back reflector (BR) because it increases the total internal reflection at the back surface. We used the plane-wave expansion method and the finite difference time domain (FDTD) algorithm to simulate and analyze the photonic bandgap (PBG), the reflection and the absorption properties of a 1D PC and to further explore the optimal 1D PC design for use in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) solar cells. With identified refractive index contrast and period thickness, we found that the PBG and the reflection of a 1D PC are strongly influenced by the contrast in bilayer thickness. Additionally, light coupled to the top three periods of the 1D PC and was absorbed if one of the bilayers was absorptive. By decreasing the thickness contrast of the absorptive layer relative to the non-absorptive layer, an average reflectivity of 96.7% was achieved for a 1D PC alternatively stacked with a-Si:H and SiO{sub 2} in five periods. This reflectivity was superior to a distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) structure with 93.5% and an Ag film with 93.4%. n-i-p a-Si:H solar cells with an optimal 1D PC-based BR offer a higher short-circuit current density than those with a DBR-based BR or an AZO/Ag-based BR. These results provide new design rules for photonic structures in TFSC.

  19. Defining process design space for monoclonal antibody cell culture.

    PubMed

    Abu-Absi, Susan Fugett; Yang, LiYing; Thompson, Patrick; Jiang, Canping; Kandula, Sunitha; Schilling, Bernhard; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-08-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. During mapping of the process design space, the multidimensional combination of operational variables is studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of productivity and product quality. An efficient methodology to map the design space for a monoclonal antibody cell culture process is described. A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was used as the basis for the process characterization exercise. This was followed by an integrated study of the inoculum stage of the process which includes progressive shake flask and seed bioreactor steps. The operating conditions for the seed bioreactor were studied in an integrated fashion with the production bioreactor using a two stage design of experiments (DOE) methodology to enable optimization of operating conditions. A two level Resolution IV design was followed by a central composite design (CCD). These experiments enabled identification of the edge of failure and classification of the operational parameters as non-key, key or critical. In addition, the models generated from the data provide further insight into balancing productivity of the cell culture process with product quality considerations. Finally, process and product-related impurity clearance was evaluated by studies linking the upstream process with downstream purification. Production bioreactor parameters that directly influence antibody charge variants and glycosylation in CHO systems were identified. PMID:20589669

  20. Probing the Electronic Structure of a Photoexcited Solar Cell Dye with Transient X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Huse, Nils; Cho, Hana; Strader, Matthew L.; Lynch, Michael S.; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Khalil, Munira

    2012-05-01

    This study uses transient X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy and timedependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to directly visualize the charge density around the metal atom and the surrounding ligands following an ultrafast metal-to-ligand charge-transfer (MLCT) process in the widely used RuII solar cell dye, Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). We measure the Ru L-edge XA spectra of the singlet ground (1A1) and the transient triplet (3MLCT) excited state of N34 and perform TD-DFT calculations of 2p core-level excitations, which identify a unique spectral signature of the electron density on the NCS ligands. We find that the Ru 2p, Ru eg, and NCS orbitals are stabilized by 2.0, 1.0, and 0.6 eV, respectively, in the transient 3MLCT state of the dye. These results highlight the role of the NCS ligands in governing the oxidation state of the Ru center.

  1. Observations of interstellar helium with a gas absorption cell - Implications for the structure of the local interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeman, J.; Paresce, F.; Bowyer, S.; Lampton, M.

    1980-01-01

    A photometer sensitive at the 584 A line of He 1, incorporating a helium gas resonance absorption cell, was flown on the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project in July 1975. The instrument observed much of the night-time sky, and returned 42 min of usable data. The data were analyzed by fitting to a model of resonant scattering of solar 584 A flux from nearby interstellar helium. Good model fits were obtained for an interstellar gas bulk velocity vector pointing toward alpha = 72 deg, delta = +15 deg, with speed 20 km/s, with interstellar medium temperatures from 5000 to 20,000 K and with neutral interstellar helium density (8.9 plus or minus 10 to the -3rd/cu cm). In the context of theoretical studies of the interstellar medium by McKee and Ostriker (1977), the results may indicate that the sun lies in the warm, partially ionized periphery of a cold interstellar cloud, surrounded by a high-temperature gas heated by old supernova remnants.

  2. Photonic Design: From Fundamental Solar Cell Physics to Computational Inverse Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Owen Dennis

    Photonic innovation is becoming ever more important in the modern world. Optical systems are dominating shorter and shorter communications distances, LED's are rapidly emerging for a variety of applications, and solar cells show potential to be a mainstream technology in the energy space. The need for novel, energy-efficient photonic and optoelectronic devices will only increase. This work unites fundamental physics and a novel computational inverse design approach towards such innovation. The first half of the dissertation is devoted to the physics of high-efficiency solar cells. As solar cells approach fundamental efficiency limits, their internal physics transforms. Photonic considerations, instead of electronic ones, are the key to reaching the highest voltages and efficiencies. Proper photon management led to Alta Device's recent dramatic increase of the solar cell efficiency record to 28.3%. Moreover, approaching the Shockley-Queisser limit for any solar cell technology will require light extraction to become a part of all future designs. The second half of the dissertation introduces inverse design as a new computational paradigm in photonics. An assortment of techniques (FDTD, FEM, etc.) have enabled quick and accurate simulation of the "forward problem" of finding fields for a given geometry. However, scientists and engineers are typically more interested in the inverse problem: for a desired functionality, what geometry is needed? Answering this question breaks from the emphasis on the forward problem and forges a new path in computational photonics. The framework of shape calculus enables one to quickly find superior, non-intuitive designs. Novel designs for optical cloaking and sub-wavelength solar cell applications are presented.

  3. Design of a hybrid silicon-plasmonic co-propagating coupler operating close to coherent perfect absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanotto, Simone; Melloni, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    By hybrid integration of plasmonic and dielectric waveguide concepts, it is shown that nearly perfect coherent absorption can be achieved in a co-propagating coupler geometry. First, the operating principle of the proposed device is detailed in the context of a more general 2 × 2 lossy coupler formalism. Then, it is shown how to tune the device in a wide region of possible working points, its broadband operation, and the tolerance to fabrication uncertainties. Finally, a complete picture of the electromagnetic modes inside the hybrid structure is analyzed, shining light onto the potentials which the proposed device holds in view of classical and quantum signal processing, nonlinear optics, polarization control, and sensing.

  4. Improvement in efficiency of micromorph tandem silicon solar cells by designing proper interfaces.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiangqian; Wang, Qingkang; Wangyang, Peihua; Huang, Kun; Chen, Le; Liu, Daiming

    2015-11-15

    Efficient light management for micromorph tandem solar cells is achieved in this Letter by the combined application of TiO(2) and SiO(x) interlayers. Here, TiO(2) is incorporated into a ZnO/a-Si interface as an antireflection layer and SiO(x) is incorporated into an a-Si/μc-Si interface as an intermediate reflecting layer. Solar cells with such architecture not only increase the light absorption but also reduce the mismatch losses of current between the top and bottom cells. The key results, as evidenced by the spectral response measurements, are that the total photocurrent increases from 22.62 to 24.35 mA/cm(2), as well as the short circuit current density of the two component cells is reached to a delicate balance. The influences of the interlayer thickness and morphology on the improvement have been investigated using an electromagnetic simulation in order to take full advantage of this design. PMID:26565829

  5. Deliberate Design of TiO2 Nanostructures towards Superior Photovoltaic Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ziqi; Liao, Ting; Sheng, Liyuan; Kou, Liangzhi; Kim, Jung Ho; Dou, Shi Xue

    2016-08-01

    TiO2 nanostructures are being sought after as flexibly utilizable building blocks for the fabrication of the mesoporous thin-film photoelectrodes that are the heart of the third-generation photovoltaic devices, such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs), and the recently promoted perovskite-type solar cells. Here, we report deliberate tailoring of TiO2 nanostructures for superior photovoltaic cells. Morphology engineering of TiO2 nanostructures is realized by designing synthetic protocols in which the precursor hydrolysis, crystal growth, and oligomer self-organization are precisely controlled. TiO2 nanostructures in forms varying from isolated nanocubes, nanorods, and cross-linked nanorods to complex hierarchical structures and shape-defined mesoporous micro-/nanostructures were successfully synthesized. The photoanodes made from the shape-defined mesoporous TiO2 microspheres and nanospindles presented superior performances, owing to the well-defined overall shapes and the inner ordered nanochannels, which allow not only a high amount of dye uptake, but also improved visible-light absorption. This study provides a new way to seek an optimal synthetic protocol to meet the required functionality of the nanomaterials. PMID:27381513

  6. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  7. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  8. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J.; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-03-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400-1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption.

  9. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application.

    PubMed

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-01-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400-1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption. PMID:26935322

  10. Experimental quantification of useful and parasitic absorption of light in plasmon-enhanced thin silicon films for solar cells application

    PubMed Central

    Morawiec, Seweryn; Holovský, Jakub; Mendes, Manuel J.; Müller, Martin; Ganzerová, Kristina; Vetushka, Aliaksei; Ledinský, Martin; Priolo, Francesco; Fejfar, Antonin; Crupi, Isodiana

    2016-01-01

    A combination of photocurrent and photothermal spectroscopic techniques is applied to experimentally quantify the useful and parasitic absorption of light in thin hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) films incorporating optimized metal nanoparticle arrays, located at the rear surface, for improved light trapping via resonant plasmonic scattering. The photothermal technique accounts for the total absorptance and the photocurrent signal accounts only for the photons absorbed in the μc-Si:H layer (useful absorptance); therefore, the method allows for independent quantification of the useful and parasitic absorptance of the plasmonic (or any other) light trapping structure. We demonstrate that with a 0.9 μm thick absorber layer the optical losses related to the plasmonic light trapping in the whole structure are insignificant below 730 nm, above which they increase rapidly with increasing illumination wavelength. An average useful absorption of 43% and an average parasitic absorption of 19% over 400–1100 nm wavelength range is measured for μc-Si:H films deposited on optimized self-assembled Ag nanoparticles coupled with a flat mirror (plasmonic back reflector). For this sample, we demonstrate a significant broadband enhancement of the useful absorption resulting in the achievement of 91% of the maximum theoretical Lambertian limit of absorption. PMID:26935322

  11. Implant Surface Design Regulates Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation and Maturation.

    PubMed

    Boyan, B D; Cheng, A; Olivares-Navarrete, R; Schwartz, Z

    2016-03-01

    Changes in dental implant materials, structural design, and surface properties can all affect biological response. While bulk properties are important for mechanical stability of the implant, surface design ultimately contributes to osseointegration. This article reviews the surface parameters of dental implant materials that contribute to improved cell response and osseointegration. In particular, we focus on how surface design affects mesenchymal cell response and differentiation into the osteoblast lineage. Surface roughness has been largely studied at the microscale, but recent studies have highlighted the importance of hierarchical micron/submicron/nanosurface roughness, as well as surface roughness in combination with surface wettability. Integrins are transmembrane receptors that recognize changes in the surface and mediate downstream signaling pathways. Specifically, the noncanonical Wnt5a pathway has been implicated in osteoblastic differentiation of cells on titanium implant surfaces. However, much remains to be elucidated. Only recently have studies been conducted on the differences in biological response to implants based on sex, age, and clinical factors; these all point toward differences that advocate for patient-specific implant design. Finally, challenges in implant surface characterization must be addressed to optimize and compare data across studies. An understanding of both the science and the biology of the materials is crucial for developing novel dental implant materials and surface modifications for improved osseointegration. PMID:26927483

  12. Solar-cell interconnect design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Useful solar cell interconnect reliability design and life prediction algorithms are presented, together with experimental data indicating that the classical strain cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material does not account for the statistical scatter that is required in reliability predictions. This shortcoming is presently addressed by fitting a functional form to experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data, which thereby yields statistical fatigue curves enabling not only the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, but also the quantitative interpretation of data from accelerated thermal cycling tests. Optimal interconnect cost reliability design algorithms are also derived which may allow the minimization of energy cost over the design life of the array field.

  13. Solar-cell interconnect design for terrestrial photovoltaic modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mon, G. R.; Moore, D. M.; Ross, R. G., Jr.

    1984-11-01

    Useful solar cell interconnect reliability design and life prediction algorithms are presented, together with experimental data indicating that the classical strain cycle (fatigue) curve for the interconnect material does not account for the statistical scatter that is required in reliability predictions. This shortcoming is presently addressed by fitting a functional form to experimental cumulative interconnect failure rate data, which thereby yields statistical fatigue curves enabling not only the prediction of cumulative interconnect failures during the design life of an array field, but also the quantitative interpretation of data from accelerated thermal cycling tests. Optimal interconnect cost reliability design algorithms are also derived which may allow the minimization of energy cost over the design life of the array field.

  14. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  15. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  16. Design and applications of an in situ electrochemical NMR cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaocan; Zwanziger, Josef W.

    2011-01-01

    A device using a three-electrode electrochemical cell (referred to as an ECNMR cell) was successfully constructed that could be used in a standard 5 mm NMR probe to acquire high-resolution NMR spectra while the working electrode was held at a constant electrical potential. The working electrode was a 20 nm thick gold film thermally coated on the outside of an inner 3 mm glass tube. An underlayer consisting of (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxy-silane was coated on the glass surface in order to improve its adhesion to gold. Tests showed prolonged life of the gold film. Details of the design and construction of the ECNMR cell are described. The ECNMR cell could be routinely used in a multi-user service high-resolution NMR instrument under oxygen-free conditions in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents. Different approaches were applied to suppress the noise transmitted between the potentiostat and the NMR spectrometer. These approaches were shown to be effective in reducing background noise in the NMR spectra. The electrochemical and NMR performance of the ECNMR cell is presented. The reduction of 1,4-benzoquinone in both aqueous and non-aqueous solvents was used for testing. The evolution of the in situ ECNMR spectra with time demonstrated that use of the ECNMR cell was feasible. Studies of caffeic acid and 9-chloroanthracene using this ECNMR cell were undertaken to explore its applications, such as monitoring reactions and studying their reaction mechanisms.

  17. Micro-structural design and function of an improved absorptive glass mat (AGM) separator for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, Y.; Kishimoto, K.; Sugiyama, S.; Sakaguchi, S.

    Two important properties of absorptive glass mat (AGM) separators are examined in order to design optimum separators for advanced valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries. Acid stratification in the separator depends on its micro-glass-fibre diameter, and it is found that the extent of stratification can be estimated based on hydrodynamics theory. Decreasing the plate-group pressure of the separator in the wetted state is also investigated, and it is considered that the phenomenon is caused by the balance between the fibre strength and the surface tension of acid solution. Given these results, the way to design AGM separators according to purpose has been identified. Accordingly, a new AGM separator has been developed and this functions both to suppress stratification and to maintain plate-group pressure.

  18. Amplifier design considerations for blood cell counter sampling probes.

    PubMed

    Ferris, C D; Veal, B L

    1986-01-01

    Blood cell counters that operate on the Coulter principle of an electrical resistance change when a cell passes through a small sampling orifice are especially sensitive to electrical noise. The sampling probe is immersed in an electrolyte (isotonic diluent for blood cells), which in itself presents an electrochemically noisy environment. The probe, owing to its large size, acts as an antenna for environmental electrical noise up to 60 Hz. Additionally, the basic Coulter method for cell counting requires a dc potential across the sampling orifice electrodes contained within the probe. This potential produces electrolysis of the diluent and generation of gas bubbles at the electrode surfaces. Sampling (counting) time must be short (less than 30 seconds) to avoid sample heating and an intolerably high noise level as a consequence of ionic motion and gas bubble generation. The resistance change that takes place when a cell passes through the sampling orifice is only a small fraction of a percent, thus noise is a serious problem. Electric noise produces false counts and general degradation of counting function. This paper presents a discussion of a currently used method for signal acquisition and some of the problems encountered in the clinical laboratory. A novel alternative design has been implemented using integrated circuit components, which eliminates many of the problems associated with the use of small bench-type counters. Design philosophy is discussed in detail including presentation of the final circuitry developed. Performance characteristics of the signal acquisition circuitry are presented.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3943959

  19. [THE PHYSICAL CHEMICAL, BIOLOGICAL BASICS OF CELLS ABSORPTION OF UNESTERIFIED FATTY ACIDS; ALBUMIN, CAVEOLIN, CLATHRIN AND LIPID-BINDING PROTEINS OF CYTOPLASM (THE LECTURE)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Shoibonov, B B

    2016-03-01

    From aposition of phylogenetic theory of general pathology, obesity and metabolic syndrome are pathology of fatty cells. However, the first is a pathology of phylogenetically early visceral fatty cells of omentum. They supply with substratum of energy realization of biologic function of trophology, homeostasis, endoecology and adaptation. The visceral fatty cells of omentum have no receptors to insulin and synthesize adaptively insulin and they are not characterized by biologic reaction of proliferation. The obesity is a pathology of late in phylogenesis subcutaneous adpocytes. They are insulin-dependent and supply with substratum of energy realization of one biologic function of locomotion--movement at the expense of constriction of cross-striated miocytes. The adipocytes in terms of adaptation synthesize humoral mediator adponectin and actively implement biologic function of proliferation. Under both aphysiologic conditions increases passive by gradient of concentration, absorption by cells albumin-unbound free fatty acids in unionized form in micellae's composition. The passive aphysiologic absorption of free fatty acids by cells which under intracellular compartmentalization don't oxidize mitochondria results in synthesis, accumulation of triglycerides in cytoplasm of cells which don't implement it physiologically. The aphysiologic absorption of free fatty acids by cells, their etherification in triglyceride, in particular, in phylogenetically late β-cells of islets and either late cardiomyocytes which fatty acids don't synthesize de novo results in development of aphysiologic processes and disorder of function. From position of biology, these cells in vivo are subjected to loss similar to apoptosis. The formation of corpuscles of apoptosis compromise biologic function of endoecology activating biologic reaction of inflammation. PMID:27506107

  20. SGLT-1 Transport and Deglycosylation inside Intestinal Cells Are Key Steps in the Absorption and Disposition of Calycosin-7-O-β-d-Glucoside in Rats.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jian; Zheng, Haihui; Yu, Jia; Zhu, Lijun; Yan, Tongmeng; Wu, Peng; Lu, Linlin; Wang, Ying; Hu, Ming; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2016-03-01

    Hydrolysis by lactase-phloridzin hydrolase (LPH) is the first and critical step in the absorption of isoflavonoid glucosides. However, the absorption characteristics of calycosin-7-O-β-d-glucoside (CG) slightly differ from other isoflavonoid glucosides. In this study, we used the rat intestinal perfusion model and performed pharmacokinetic studies and in vitro experiments to determine the factors influencing CG absorption and disposition. After oral administration of isoflavonoid glucosides, LPH was found to play minimal or no role on the hydrolysis of CG, in contrast to that of daidzin. CG was mainly transported into the small intestinal cells by sodium-dependent glucose transporter 1 (SGLT-1) as intact. This pathway could be the main mechanism underlying the high permeability of CG in the small intestine. CG was likely to be hydrolyzed in enterocytes to its aglycone calycosin by broad-specific β-glucuronides (BSβG) and glucocerebrosidase or rapidly metabolized. Calycosin was also rapidly and extensively metabolized to 3'-glucuronide in the enterocytes and liver, and the glucuronidation rates of calycosin and CG were much higher in the former. The metabolites were also transported into lumen by breast cancer resistance protein and multidrug resistance-associated protein 2. In conclusion, the enterocytes could be an important site for CG absorption, deglycosylation, and metabolism in rats. This study could contribute to the theoretical foundation and mechanism of absorption and disposition of flavonoid compounds. PMID:26658676

  1. NREL Designs Promising New Oxides for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2012-04-01

    High-efficiency, thin-film solar cells require electrical contacts with high electrical conductivity, and the top contact must also have high optical transparency. This need is currently met by transparent conducting oxides (TCOs), which conduct electricity but are 90% transparent to visible light. Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have derived three key design principles for selecting promising materials for TCO contacts. NREL's application of these design principles has resulted in a 10,000-fold improvement in conductivity for one TCO material.

  2. The stem cell laboratory: design, equipment, and oversight.

    PubMed

    Wesselschmidt, Robin L; Schwartz, Philip H

    2011-01-01

    This chapter describes some of the major issues to be considered when setting up a laboratory for the culture of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). The process of establishing a hPSC laboratory can be divided into two equally important parts. One is completely administrative and includes developing protocols, seeking approval, and establishing reporting processes and documentation. The other part of establishing a hPSC laboratory involves the physical plant and includes design, equipment and personnel. Proper planning of laboratory operations and proper design of the physical layout of the stem cell laboratory so that meets the scope of planned operations is a major undertaking, but the time spent upfront will pay long-term returns in operational efficiency and effectiveness. A well-planned, organized, and properly equipped laboratory supports research activities by increasing efficiency and reducing lost time and wasted resources. PMID:21822863

  3. InGaN-based thin film solar cells: Epitaxy, structural design, and photovoltaic properties

    SciTech Connect

    Sang, Liwen; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo; Sumiya, Masatomo

    2015-03-14

    In{sub x}Ga{sub 1−x}N, with the tunable direct bandgaps from ultraviolet to near infrared region, offers a promising candidate for the high-efficiency next-generation thin-film photovoltaic applications. Although the adoption of thick InGaN film as the active region is desirable to obtain efficient light absorption and carrier collection compared to InGaN/GaN quantum wells structure, the understanding on the effect from structural design is still unclear due to the poor-quality InGaN films with thickness and difficulty of p-type doping. In this paper, we comprehensively investigate the effects from film epitaxy, doping, and device structural design on the performances of the InGaN-based solar cells. The high-quality InGaN thick film is obtained on AlN/sapphire template, and p-In{sub 0.08}Ga{sub 0.92}N is achieved with a high hole concentration of more than 10{sup 18 }cm{sup −3}. The dependence of the photovoltaic performances on different structures, such as active regions and p-type regions is analyzed with respect to the carrier transport mechanism in the dark and under illumination. The strategy of improving the p-i interface by using a super-thin AlN interlayer is provided, which successfully enhances the performance of the solar cells.

  4. Optimum design of a fuel-cell powertrain based on multiple design criteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarioglu, Ismail Levent; Czapnik, Bartosch; Bostanci, Emine; Klein, Olaf P.; Schröder, Hendrik; Küçükay, Ferit

    2014-11-01

    As the number of fuel-cell vehicles on the roads increase, the vehicle designs are gaining more importance. Clearly, one major topic in this field is the optimization of powertrain designs. In this design process, the aim of the car manufacturers is to meet the expectations of the potential customer best, while creating a sustainable product. However, due to several trade-offs in the design, it would be non-realistic to expect a single solution that fulfills all design objectives. Therefore, a systematical approach, which includes a trade-off analysis and evaluation methods for this multiobjective design problem, is required. In this paper, a suitable methodology is presented and applied in a case study, where an optimum powertrain design for a typical European long-range passenger car is sought. Simulation-aided powertrain models and scalable component models are used to increase the accuracy of the design process. Furthermore, various visual and quantitative evaluation techniques are applied in order to support the decision making process.

  5. Elucidation of intestinal absorption mechanism of carvedilol-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles using Caco-2 cell line as an in-vitro model.

    PubMed

    Shah, Mansi K; Madan, Parshotam; Lin, Senshang

    2014-07-29

    Abstract Enhanced oral bioavailability of poorly aqueous soluble drugs encapsulated in solid lipid nanoparticles (SLNs) via lymphatic delivery has been documented. Since no in-vitro lymphoid tissue is currently available, human excised Caco-2 cell monolayer could be alternative tissue for development of an in-vitro model to be used as a screening tool before animal studies are undertaken. Therefore, optimized carvedilol-loaded SLNs (FOPT-SLNs) were prepared, characterized, and evaluated using Caco-2 cell line as an in-vitro model. Physical mixture of components of FOPT-SLNs (FOPT-PM) and carvedilol solution were used as control groups. From the studies of effect of SLNs concentration and cells incubation time, suitable carvedilol concentration and incubation time were selected for the model in which cells were subjected to five pretreatments for 24 h or 1 h of cell incubation and then followed with treatment of FOPT-SLNs, FOPT-PM or 100 µg/mL solution of carvedilol, for additional 24 h of cell incubation. The results obtained in this model suggest that main absorption mechanism of FOPT-SLNs could be endocytosis and, more specifically, clathrin-mediated endocytosis. When Transwell® permeable supports were used for the cells, carrier-mediated mechanism for FOPT-SLNs and passive absorption mechanism (transcellular and paracellular) for FOPT-PM and drug solution were concluded. PMID:25069593

  6. Molecular design and synthesis of a pH independent and cell permeant fluorescent dye and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Xiaojie; Liu, Chang; Huang, Kun; Zhang, Siwen; He, Song; Zhao, Liancheng; Zeng, Xianshun

    2015-06-21

    Fluorescent dyes have played crucial roles in the field of molecular imaging as fluorescent fluorophores. In this work, a novel water-soluble and pH-independent fluorescent xanthene dye, a hydroxyl regioisomeric 3',4'-benzorhodol, has been designed and synthesized. Compared with those of rhodol dyes, the absorption (ca. 570 nm) and maximum emission (ca. 620 nm) of the dye are largely red-shifted. Due to its ring-opened zwitterion structure in water media, the dye showed good membrane permeability and distributed in the whole cell cytoplasm upon incubation with live cells. Meanwhile, the dye could be easily modified to probes. The hydrazide derivative of the dye exhibited an excellent Hg(2+) selectivity over other relevant metal ions with a detection limit down to 3 nM. Thus, the excellent fluorescence properties and chemical properties of the dye allow it to be designed as a fluorescent chemosensor and biomarker for biological applications. PMID:25990913

  7. Network design optimization of fuel cell systems and distributed energy devices.

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Whitney G.

    2010-07-01

    This research explores the thermodynamics, economics, and environmental impacts of innovative, stationary, polygenerative fuel cell systems (FCSs). Each main report section is split into four subsections. The first subsection, 'Potential Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Impact of Stationary FCSs,' quantifies the degree to which GHG emissions can be reduced at a U.S. regional level with the implementation of different FCS designs. The second subsection, 'Optimizing the Design of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) FCSs,' discusses energy network optimization models that evaluate novel strategies for operating CHP FCSs so as to minimize (1) electricity and heating costs for building owners and (2) emissions of the primary GHG - carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The third subsection, 'Optimizing the Design of Combined Cooling, Heating, and Electric Power (CCHP) FCSs,' is similar to the second subsection but is expanded to include capturing FCS heat with absorptive cooling cycles to produce cooling energy. The fourth subsection, - Thermodynamic and Chemical Engineering Models of CCHP FCSs,' discusses the physics and thermodynamic limits of CCHP FCSs.

  8. Design and Economic Analysis of a Heating/Absorption Cooling System Operating with Municipal Solid Waste Digester: A Case Study of Gazi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşar, Gökhan; Pooyanfar, Mirparham; Amirabedin, Ehsan; Topal, Hüseyin

    2013-12-01

    Recovering energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the most important issues of energy management in developed countries. This raises even more interest as world fossil fuel reserves diminish and fuel prices rise. Being one of main processes of waste disposal, anaerobic digestion can be used as a means to reduce fossil fuel and electricity consumption as well as reducing emissions. With growing demand for cooling in Turkey, especially during warm seasons and considering the energy costs, utilizing heat-driven absorption cooling systems coupled with an anaerobic digester for local cooling purposes is a potentially interesting alternative for electricity driven compression cooling. The aim of this article is to study the viability of utilizing biogas obtained from MSW anaerobic digestion as the main fuel for heating facilities of Gazi University, Turkey and also the energy source for an absorption cooling system designed for the central library of the aforementioned campus. The results prove that the suggested system is sustainably and financially appealing and has the potential to replace the conventional electricity driven cooling systems with a reasonable net present worth; moreover, it can notably reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  9. Studies on best dose of X-ray for Hep-2 cells by using FTIR, UV-vis absorption spectroscopy and flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Renming; Tang, Weiyue; Kang, Yipu; Si, Minzhen

    2009-08-01

    We report here the use of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) absorption spectroscopy, and flow cytometry (FCM) to analysis the best dose of X-ray for human laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma cell lines (Hep-2). Our analysis indicates specific FTIR and UV-vis spectral differences between X-irradiated and normal Hep-2 cells. In addition, striking spectral differences are seen in FTIR spectra in the ratios at 2925/2958 and 1654/1542 cm -1. These two ratios of the X-irradiated cells for 8 Gy dose group with value of 1.07 ± 0.025 and 1.184 ± 0.013, respectively, were more notable (mean ± S.D., n = 5, P < 0.05) compared with that of the cells for the controls. UV-vis absorption spectra analysis shows X-ray irradiation disturbed the metabolism of phenylalanine and tyrosine intracellular, maybe, which was caused by cell cycle arrest. Spectroscopy analysis suggests 8 Gy is a better dose of X-ray for lowering the canceration degree of Hep-2 cells. Moreover, FCM analysis shows the apoptosis of X-irradiated cells depended on the radiation dose to some extent, but it was not linear. The total apoptosis ratio with value of (20.793 ± 1.133)% ( P < 0.01, n = 5) for the 12 Gy dose group was the maximum, however, the maximum apoptosis ratio per Gray (total apoptosis ratio/radiation dose) was the cells of the 2 Gy dose group with value of (4.887 ± 0.211)% ( P < 0.05, n = 5). Our data suggest that Hep-2 cells are given 2 Gy radiation of X-ray once a time, 8 Gy per week (accumulatively), the effect for lowering the canceration degree and restraining the proliferation of Hep-2 cells will be better.

  10. Optimization of the absorption efficiency of an amorphous-silicon thin-film tandem solar cell backed by a metallic surface-relief grating.

    PubMed

    Solano, Manuel; Faryad, Muhammad; Hall, Anthony S; Mallouk, Thomas E; Monk, Peter B; Lakhtakia, Akhlesh

    2013-02-10

    The rigorous coupled-wave approach was used to compute the plane-wave absorptance of a thin-film tandem solar cell with a metallic surface-relief grating as its back reflector. The absorptance is a function of the angle of incidence and the polarization state of incident light; the free-space wavelength; and the period, duty cycle, the corrugation height, and the shape of the unit cell of the surface-relief grating. The solar cell was assumed to be made of hydrogenated amorphous-silicon alloys and the back reflector of bulk aluminum. The incidence and the grating planes were taken to be identical. The AM1.5 solar irradiance spectrum was used for computations in the 400-1100 nm wavelength range. Inspection of parametric plots of the solar-spectrum-integrated (SSI) absorption efficiency and numerical optimization using the differential evolution algorithm were employed to determine the optimal surface-relief grating. For direct insolation, the SSI absorption efficiency is maximizable by appropriate choices of the period, the duty cycle, and the corrugation height, regardless of the shape of the corrugation in each unit cell of the grating. A similar conclusion also holds for diffuse insolation, but the maximum efficiency for diffuse insolation is about 20% smaller than for direct insolation. Although a tin-doped indium-oxide layer at the front and an aluminum-doped zinc-oxide layer between the semiconductor material and the backing metallic layer change the optimal depth of the periodic corrugations, the optimal period of the corrugations does not significantly change. PMID:23400058

  11. Methanol reformers for fuel cell powered vehicles: Some design considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.; Myles, K.M.

    1990-01-01

    Fuel cells are being developed for use in automotive propulsion systems as alternatives for the internal combustion engine in buses, vans, passenger cars. The two most important operational requirements for a stand-alone fuel cell power system for a vehicle are the ability to start up quickly and the ability to supply the necessary power on demand for the dynamically fluctuating load. Methanol is a likely fuel for use in fuel cells for transportation applications. It is a commodity chemical that is manufactured from coal, natural gas, and other feedstocks. For use in a fuel cell, however, the methanol must first be converted (reformed) to a hydrogen-rich gas mixture. The desired features for a methanol reformer include rapid start-up, good dynamic response, high fuel conversion, small size and weight, simple construction and operation, and low cost. In this paper the present the design considerations that are important for developing such a reformer, namely: (1) a small catalyst bed for quick starting, small size, and low weight; (2) multiple catalysts for optimum operation of the dissociation and reforming reactions; (3) reforming by direct heat transfer partial oxidation for rapid response to fluctuating loads; and (4) thermal independence from the rest of the fuel cell system. 10 refs., 1 fig.

  12. Design, evaluation and recommedation effort relating to the modification of a residential 3-ton absorption cycle cooling unit for operation with solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, R. H.; Anderson, P. P.

    1973-01-01

    The possible use of solar energy powered absorption units to provide cooling and heating of residential buildings is studied. Both, the ammonia-water and the water-lithium bromide cycles, are considered. It is shown that the air cooled ammonia water unit does not meet the criteria for COP and pump power on the cooling cycle and the heat obtained from it acting as a heat pump is at too low a temperature. If the ammonia machine is water cooled it will meet the design criteria for cooling but can not supply the heating needs. The water cooled lithium bromide unit meets the specified performance for cooling with appreciably lower generator temperatures and without a mechanical solution pump. It is recommeded that in the demonstration project a direct expansion lithium bromide unit be used for cooling and an auxiliary duct coil using the solar heated water be employed for heating.

  13. Design, fabrication, test, and qualification and price analysis of third generation design solar cell modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepard, N. F.

    1980-01-01

    The Block 4 shingle type module makes it possible to apply a photovoltaic array to the sloping roof of a residential building by simply nailing the overlapping hexagon shaped shingles to the plywood roof sheathing. This third-generation shingle module design consists of nineteen series connected 100 mm diameter solar cells which are arranged in a closely packed hexagon configuration to provide in excess of 75 watts/sq m of exposed module area under standard operating conditions. The solar cells are individually bonded to the embossed underside of a 4.4 mm thick thermally tempered piece of glass. An experimental silicone pottant was used as the transparent bonding adhesive between the cells and glass. The semi-flexible portion of each shingle module is a composite laminate construction consisting of an outer layer of FLEXSEAL bonded to an inner core of closed cell polyethylene foam. Silaprene is used as the substrate laminating adhesive. The module design has satisfactorily survived qualification testing program which includes 50 thermal cycles between -40 and +90 C, a seven day temperature-humidity exposure test, and a wind resistance test.

  14. Modeling Alveolar Epithelial Cell Behavior In Spatially Designed Hydrogel Microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Katherine Jean Reeder

    The alveolar epithelium consists of two cell phenotypes, elongated alveolar type I cells (AT1) and rounded alveolar type II cells (ATII), and exists in a complex three-dimensional environment as a polarized cell layer attached to a thin basement membrane and enclosing a roughly spherical lumen. Closely surrounding the alveolar cysts are capillary endothelial cells as well as interstitial pulmonary fibroblasts. Many factors are thought to influence alveolar epithelial cell differentiation during lung development and wound repair, including physical and biochemical signals from the extracellular matrix (ECM), and paracrine signals from the surrounding mesenchyme. In particular, disrupted signaling between the alveolar epithelium and local fibroblasts has been implicated in the progression of several pulmonary diseases. However, given the complexity of alveolar tissue architecture and the multitude of signaling pathways involved, designing appropriate experimental platforms for this biological system has been difficult. In order to isolate key factors regulating cellular behavior, the researcher ideally should have control over biophysical properties of the ECM, as well as the ability to organize multiple cell types within the scaffold. This thesis aimed to develop a 3D synthetic hydrogel platform to control alveolar epithelial cyst formation, which could then be used to explore how extracellular cues influence cell behavior in a tissue-relevant cellular arrangement. To accomplish this, a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel network containing enzymatically-degradable crosslinks and bioadhesive pendant peptides was employed as a base material for encapsulating primary alveolar epithelial cells. First, an array of microwells of various cross-sectional shapes was photopatterned into a PEG gel containing photo-labile crosslinks, and primary ATII cells were seeded into the wells to examine the role of geometric confinement on differentiation and multicellular arrangement

  15. Methodology to design a vibration absorption footplate for motorcycle application: From phenomena investigation to prototype performance evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostoni, S.; Cheli, F.; Leo, E.; Pezzola, M.

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this research is to reduce driver vibration exposure by acting on the modal response of key contact structures. The footplate is one of the components with which the driver comes into contact while riding. For this reason, footplate geometry and structural properties were investigated with a view to re-designing this component in order to reduce driver exposure. Due to the massive chassis area on which the footplate is constrained, vibrations induced by engine unbalances easily propagate in quasi-steady conditions on all surrounding components, inducing a width frequency band of load excitation. Even though the footplate geometry allows for fairly high natural frequencies, these could occur in the excitation range. Therefore, the first step of the methodology proposed entails the use of a numerical and experimental (modal analysis) procedure to identify the local vibration modes of the original components to detect if/when/how the resonances of the above mentioned components are excited. Due to an awareness of the weakness of the original solution, structural modifications, using numerical models, were studied. The footplate geometry was modified to minimize nodal displacement of the footrest beam binding. All structural modifications were designed, developed and installed on the vehicle. Finally, in order to predict modification efficiency, both the new footplate and the original one were experimentally compared. The comparison was made by means of modal investigations and by positioning the reference vehicle on a suitable roller test bench in order to simulate real working conditions.

  16. Absorption enhancement through Fabry-Pérot resonant modes in a 430 nm thick InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells solar cell

    SciTech Connect

    Behaghel, B.; Tamaki, R.; Watanabe, K.; Sodabanlu, H.; Vandamme, N.; Dupuis, C.; Bardou, N.; Cattoni, A.; Okada, Y.; Sugiyama, M.; Collin, S.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-02-23

    We study light management in a 430 nm-thick GaAs p-i-n single junction solar cell with 10 pairs of InGaAs/GaAsP multiple quantum wells (MQWs). The epitaxial layer transfer on a gold mirror improves light absorption and increases the external quantum efficiency below GaAs bandgap by a factor of four through the excitation of Fabry-Perot resonances. We show a good agreement with optical simulation and achieve around 10% conversion efficiency. We demonstrate numerically that this promising result can be further improved by anti-reflection layers. This study paves the way to very thin MQWs solar cells.

  17. Simultaneously improving optical absorption of both transverse-electric polarized and transverse-magnetic polarized light for organic solar cells with Ag grating used as transparent electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yongbing; Li, Yuanxing; Su, Runmei

    2014-08-01

    Theoretical simulations are performed to investigate optical performance of organic solar cells with Ag grating electrode. It is demonstrated that optical absorption for both transverse-electric (TE) polarized and transverse-magnetic(TM) polarized light is simultaneously improved when compared with that for the device without the Ag grating. The improvement is respectively attributed to the resonance and the surface plasmon polaritons within the device. After an additional WO3 layer is capped on the Ag grating, absorption of TE-polarized light is further improved due to resonance of double microcavities within the device, and absorption of TM-polarized light is improved by the combined effects of the microcavity resonance and the surface plasmon polaritons. Correspondingly, the short current density for randomly polarized light is improved by 18.1% from that of the device without the Ag grating. Finally, it is demonstrated that high transmission may not be an essential prerequisite for metallic gratings when they are used as transparent electrode since absorption loss caused by low transmission can be compensated by using a capping layer to optimize optical resonance of the WMC structure within the device.

  18. Electromagnetically induced absorption in a three-resonator metasurface system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Ningning; Qu, Kenan; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Agarwal, Girish S.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking the quantum phenomena in metamaterials through coupled classical resonators has attracted enormous interest. Metamaterial analogs of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) enable promising applications in telecommunications, light storage, slow light and sensing. Although the EIT effect has been studied extensively in coupled metamaterial systems, excitation of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) through near-field coupling in these systems has only been sparsely explored. Here we present the observation of the EIA analog due to constructive interference in a vertically coupled three-resonator metamaterial system that consists of two bright and one dark resonator. The absorption resonance is one of the collective modes of the tripartite unit cell. Theoretical analysis shows that the absorption arises from a magnetic resonance induced by the near-field coupling of the three resonators within the unit cell. A classical analog of EIA opens up opportunities for designing novel photonic devices for narrow-band filtering, absorptive switching, optical modulation, and absorber applications. PMID:26023061

  19. Electromagnetically induced absorption in a three-resonator metasurface system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Ningning; Qu, Kenan; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Agarwal, Girish S; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking the quantum phenomena in metamaterials through coupled classical resonators has attracted enormous interest. Metamaterial analogs of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) enable promising applications in telecommunications, light storage, slow light and sensing. Although the EIT effect has been studied extensively in coupled metamaterial systems, excitation of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) through near-field coupling in these systems has only been sparsely explored. Here we present the observation of the EIA analog due to constructive interference in a vertically coupled three-resonator metamaterial system that consists of two bright and one dark resonator. The absorption resonance is one of the collective modes of the tripartite unit cell. Theoretical analysis shows that the absorption arises from a magnetic resonance induced by the near-field coupling of the three resonators within the unit cell. A classical analog of EIA opens up opportunities for designing novel photonic devices for narrow-band filtering, absorptive switching, optical modulation, and absorber applications. PMID:26023061

  20. Modified nanoparticles with cell-penetrating peptide and amphipathic chitosan derivative for enhanced oral colon absorption of insulin: preparation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Mengyuan; Gao, Yuan; Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Liu, Wenyu; Zhong, Haijun; Liu, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    Colon is an ideal absorptive site for oral protein and peptide drug (insulin), and yet it poses multiple barriers against the drug absorption, such as the barriers against the drug diffusion from colon lumen toward the absorptive mucosa and permeation across colon epithelium. In this study, modified nanoparticles (Tat-CS-NPs) with cell-penetrating peptide (Tat) and amphipathic chitosan derivative (a-CS) were used as carriers to improve colonic absorption of the drug. With a-CS as emulsifier and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as matrix material, Tat-CS-NPs were prepared and evaluated in vitro/vivo. Using Caco-2 cell monolayers to imitate the colonic epithelial cells, it was found that the cellular uptake amount and transcellular transportation performance of Tat-CS-NPs were much enhanced compared with those of CS-NPs and PVA-NPs. The efficacy evaluation on diabetic rat models demonstrated that the hypoglycemic effect of Tat-CS-NPs loaded with insulin was 6.89 times higher than that of PVA-NPs, and 1.79 times higher than that of CS-NPs. By gavage of [(99m)Tc] isotope labeled Tat-CS-NPs in mini-pigs and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on pigs' gastrointestinal tract, it was further proved that the nanoparticles could reach colon and produce pharmacological effect. In conclusion, Tat-CS-NPs as vehicles for colon-specific drug delivery may be an efficient approach to improve oral bioavailability of protein and peptide drugs. PMID:26181840

  1. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  2. An optimized top contact design for solar cell concentrators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desalvo, Gregory C.; Barnett, Allen M.

    1985-01-01

    A new grid optimization scheme is developed for point focus solar cell concentrators which employs a separated grid and busbar concept. Ideally, grid lines act as the primary current collectors and receive all of the current from the semiconductor region. Busbars are the secondary collectors which pick up current from the grids and carry it out of the active region of the solar cell. This separation of functions leads to a multithickness metallization design, where the busbars are made larger in cross section than the grids. This enables the busbars to carry more current per unit area of shading, which is advantageous under high solar concentration where large current densities are generated. Optimized grid patterns using this multilayer concept can provide a 1.6 to 20 percent increase in output power efficiency over optimized single thickness grids.

  3. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-04-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer.

  4. Designing of promiscuous inhibitors against pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rahul; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Singla, Deepak; Gautam, Ankur; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer remains the most devastating disease with worst prognosis. There is a pressing need to accelerate the drug discovery process to identify new effective drug candidates against pancreatic cancer. We have developed QSAR models for predicting promiscuous inhibitors using the pharmacological data. Our models achieved maximum Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.86, when evaluated on 10-fold cross-validation. Our models have also successfully validated the drug-to-oncogene relationship and further we used these models to screen FDA approved drugs and tested them in vitro. We have integrated these models in a webserver named as DiPCell, which will be useful for screening and designing novel promiscuous drug molecules. We have also identified the most and least effective drugs for pancreatic cancer cell lines. On the other side, we have identified resistant pancreatic cancer cell lines, which need investigative scanner on them to put light on resistant mechanism in pancreatic cancer. PMID:24728108

  5. Design and development of synthetic microbial platform cells for bioenergy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The finite reservation of fossil fuels accelerates the necessity of development of renewable energy sources. Recent advances in synthetic biology encompassing systems biology and metabolic engineering enable us to engineer and/or create tailor made microorganisms to produce alternative biofuels for the future bio-era. For the efficient transformation of biomass to bioenergy, microbial cells need to be designed and engineered to maximize the performance of cellular metabolisms for the production of biofuels during energy flow. Toward this end, two different conceptual approaches have been applied for the development of platform cell factories: forward minimization and reverse engineering. From the context of naturally minimized genomes,non-essential energy-consuming pathways and/or related gene clusters could be progressively deleted to optimize cellular energy status for bioenergy production. Alternatively, incorporation of non-indigenous parts and/or modules including biomass-degrading enzymes, carbon uptake transporters, photosynthesis, CO2 fixation, and etc. into chassis microorganisms allows the platform cells to gain novel metabolic functions for bioenergy. This review focuses on the current progress in synthetic biology-aided pathway engineering in microbial cells and discusses its impact on the production of sustainable bioenergy. PMID:23626588

  6. Dynamic Modeling in Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells Controller Design

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Li, Qinghe; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-06-28

    In this paper, a dynamic model of the solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power unit is developed for the purpose of designing a controller to regulate fuel flow rate, fuel temperature, air flow rate, and air temperature to maintain the SOFC stack temperature, fuel utilization rate, and voltage within operation limits. A lumped model is used to consider the thermal dynamics and the electro-chemial dynamics inside an SOFC power unit. The fluid dynamics at the fuel and air inlets are considered by using the in-flow ramp-rates.

  7. Real cell overlay measurement through design based metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoo, Gyun; Kim, Jungchan; Park, Chanha; Lee, Taehyeong; Ji, Sunkeun; Jo, Gyoyeon; Yang, Hyunjo; Yim, Donggyu; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Maruyama, Kotaro; Park, Byungjun

    2014-04-01

    Until recent device nodes, lithography has been struggling to improve its resolution limit. Even though next generation lithography technology is now facing various difficulties, several innovative resolution enhancement technologies, based on 193nm wavelength, were introduced and implemented to keep the trend of device scaling. Scanner makers keep developing state-of-the-art exposure system which guarantees higher productivity and meets a more aggressive overlay specification. "The scaling reduction of the overlay error has been a simple matter of the capability of exposure tools. However, it is clear that the scanner contributions may no longer be the majority component in total overlay performance. The ability to control correctable overlay components is paramount to achieve the desired performance.(2)" In a manufacturing fab, the overlay error, determined by a conventional overlay measurement: by using an overlay mark based on IBO and DBO, often does not represent the physical placement error in the cell area of a memory device. The mismatch may arise from the size or pitch difference between the overlay mark and the cell pattern. Pattern distortion, caused by etching or CMP, also can be a source of the mismatch. Therefore, the requirement of a direct overlay measurement in the cell pattern gradually increases in the manufacturing field, and also in the development level. In order to overcome the mismatch between conventional overlay measurement and the real placement error of layer to layer in the cell area of a memory device, we suggest an alternative overlay measurement method utilizing by design, based metrology tool. A basic concept of this method is shown in figure1. A CD-SEM measurement of the overlay error between layer 1 and 2 could be the ideal method but it takes too long time to extract a lot of data from wafer level. An E-beam based DBM tool provides high speed to cover the whole wafer with high repeatability. It is enabled by using the design as a

  8. Designing media for animal cell culture: CHO cells, the industrial standard.

    PubMed

    Landauer, Karlheinz

    2014-01-01

    The success of culturing CHO cells solely depends on functionality of the used media. Cell culture technology is more than 50 years old, and the knowledge of cell requirements increased steadily. In the beginning, animal-sourced components were the key to growth. Nowadays state-of-the-art media do not contain any animal or naturally sourced components. The compositions are based on scientific awareness of the needs of the cells. The result is high lot-to-lot consistency and high performance.In this book section, a method for the development of a synthetic, animal component-free medium is described. The composition is based on public available formulations and information based on the work of many scientists printed in numerous papers and manuscripts. The method shall help beginners to design their own medium, although some knowledge of biochemistry and animal cells is still required. PMID:24297411

  9. Inverted Ultrathin Organic Solar Cells with a Quasi-Grating Structure for Efficient Carrier Collection and Dip-less Visible Optical Absorption

    PubMed Central

    In, Sungjun; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-01-01

    We propose a metallic-particle-based two-dimensional quasi-grating structure for application to an organic solar cell. With the use of oblate spheroidal nanoparticles in contact with an anode of inverted, ultrathin organic solar cells (OSCs), the quasi-grating structure offers strong hybridization between localized surface plasmons and plasmonic gap modes leading to broadband (300~800 nm) and uniform (average ~90%) optical absorption spectra. Both strong optical enhancement in extreme confinement within the active layer (90 nm) and improved hole collection are thus realized. A coupled optical-electrical multi-physics optimization shows a large (~33%) enhancement in the optical absorption (corresponding to an absorption efficiency of ~47%, AM1.5G weighted, visible) when compared to a control OSC without the quasi-grating structure. That translates into a significant electrical performance gain of ~22% in short circuit current and ~15% in the power conversion efficiency (PCE), leading to an energy conversion efficiency (~6%) which is comparable to that of optically-thick inverted OSCs (3–7%). Detailed analysis on the influences of mode hybridization to optical field distributions, exciton generation rate, charge carrier collection efficiency and electrical conversion efficiency is provided, to offer an integrated understanding on the coupled optical-electrical optimization of ultrathin OSCs. PMID:26902974

  10. Inverted Ultrathin Organic Solar Cells with a Quasi-Grating Structure for Efficient Carrier Collection and Dip-less Visible Optical Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    in, Sungjun; Park, Namkyoo

    2016-02-01

    We propose a metallic-particle-based two-dimensional quasi-grating structure for application to an organic solar cell. With the use of oblate spheroidal nanoparticles in contact with an anode of inverted, ultrathin organic solar cells (OSCs), the quasi-grating structure offers strong hybridization between localized surface plasmons and plasmonic gap modes leading to broadband (300~800 nm) and uniform (average ~90%) optical absorption spectra. Both strong optical enhancement in extreme confinement within the active layer (90 nm) and improved hole collection are thus realized. A coupled optical-electrical multi-physics optimization shows a large (~33%) enhancement in the optical absorption (corresponding to an absorption efficiency of ~47%, AM1.5G weighted, visible) when compared to a control OSC without the quasi-grating structure. That translates into a significant electrical performance gain of ~22% in short circuit current and ~15% in the power conversion efficiency (PCE), leading to an energy conversion efficiency (~6%) which is comparable to that of optically-thick inverted OSCs (3-7%). Detailed analysis on the influences of mode hybridization to optical field distributions, exciton generation rate, charge carrier collection efficiency and electrical conversion efficiency is provided, to offer an integrated understanding on the coupled optical-electrical optimization of ultrathin OSCs.

  11. CYP3A4-transfected Caco-2 cells as a tool for understanding biochemical absorption barriers: studies with sirolimus and midazolam.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Carolyn L; Jacobsen, Wolfgang; Christians, Uwe; Benet, Leslie Z

    2004-01-01

    CYP3A4-transfected Caco-2 cells were used as an in vitro system to predict the importance of drug metabolism and transport on overall drug absorption. We examined the transport and metabolism of two drugs; midazolam, an anesthetic agent and CYP3A4 substrate, and sirolimus, an immunosuppressant and a dual CYP3A4/P-glycoprotein (P-gp) substrate, in the presence of cyclosporine (CsA, a CYP3A4/P-gp inhibitor) or N-[4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2-isoquinolinyl)-ethyl]-phenyl]-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamine (GG918) (an inhibitor of P-gp and not CYP3A4). All major CYP3A4 metabolites were formed in the cells (1-OH > 4-OH midazolam and 39-O-desmethyl > 12-OH > 11-OH sirolimus), consistent with results from human liver microsomes. There was no bidirectional transport of midazolam across CYP3A4-transfected Caco-2 cells, whereas there was a 2.5-fold net efflux of sirolimus (1 microM) that disappeared in the presence of CsA or GG918. No change in the absorption rate or extraction ratio (ER) for midazolam was observed when P-gp was inhibited with GG918. Addition of GG918 had a modest impact on the absorption rate and ER for sirolimus (increased 58% and decreased 25%, respectively), whereas a 6.1-fold increase in the absorption rate and a 75% decrease in the ER were found when sirolimus was combined with CsA. Although both midazolam and sirolimus metabolites were preferentially excreted to the apical compartment, only sirolimus metabolites were transported by P-gp as determined from inhibition studies with GG918. Using CYP3A4-transfected Caco-2 cells we determined that, in contrast to P-gp, CYP3A4 is the major factor limiting sirolimus absorption. The integration of CYP3A4 and P-gp into a combined in vitro system was critical to unveil the relative importance of each biochemical barrier. PMID:14569063

  12. Physics design of the DARHT 2nd axis accelerator cell

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y J; Houck, T L; Reginato, L J; Shang, C C; Yu, S S

    1999-08-19

    The next generation of radiographic machines based on induction accelerators require very high brightness electron beams to realize the desired x-ray spot size and intensity. This high brightness must be maintained throughout the beam transport, from source to x-ray converter target. The accelerator for the second-axis of the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test (DARHT) facility is being designed to accelerate a 4-kA, 2-{micro}s pulse of electrons to 20 MeV. After acceleration, the 2-{micro}s pulse will be chopped into a train of four 50-ns pulses with variable temporal spacing by rapidly deflecting the beam between a beam stop and the final transport section. The short beam pulses will be focused onto an x-ray converter target generating four radiographic pulses within the 2-{micro}s window. Beam instability due to interaction with the accelerator cells can very adversely effect the beam brightness and radiographic pulse quality. This paper describes the various issues considered in the design of the accelerator cell with emphasis on transverse impedance and minimizing beam instabilities.

  13. CW DFB RT diode laser-based sensor for trace-gas detection of ethane using a novel compact multipass gas absorption cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krzempek, Karol; Jahjah, Mohammad; Lewicki, Rafał; Stefański, Przemysław; So, Stephen; Thomazy, David; Tittel, Frank K.

    2013-09-01

    The development of a continuous wave, thermoelectrically cooled (TEC), distributed feedback diode laser-based spectroscopic trace-gas sensor for ultra-sensitive and selective ethane (C2H6) concentration measurements is reported. The sensor platform used tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy as the detection technique. TDLAS was performed using an ultra-compact 57.6 m effective optical path length innovative spherical multipass cell capable of 459 passes between two mirrors separated by 12.5 cm and optimized for the 2.5-4 μm range TEC mercury-cadmium-telluride detector. For an interference-free C2H6 absorption line located at 2,976.8 cm-1, a 1 σ minimum detection limit of 740 pptv with a 1 s lock-in amplifier time constant was achieved.

  14. Stimulus design for model selection and validation in cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Apgar, Joshua F; Toettcher, Jared E; Endy, Drew; White, Forest M; Tidor, Bruce

    2008-02-01

    Mechanism-based chemical kinetic models are increasingly being used to describe biological signaling. Such models serve to encapsulate current understanding of pathways and to enable insight into complex biological processes. One challenge in model development is that, with limited experimental data, multiple models can be consistent with known mechanisms and existing data. Here, we address the problem of model ambiguity by providing a method for designing dynamic stimuli that, in stimulus-response experiments, distinguish among parameterized models with different topologies, i.e., reaction mechanisms, in which only some of the species can be measured. We develop the approach by presenting two formulations of a model-based controller that is used to design the dynamic stimulus. In both formulations, an input signal is designed for each candidate model and parameterization so as to drive the model outputs through a target trajectory. The quality of a model is then assessed by the ability of the corresponding controller, informed by that model, to drive the experimental system. We evaluated our method on models of antibody-ligand binding, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylation and de-phosphorylation, and larger models of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathway. For each of these systems, the controller informed by the correct model is the most successful at designing a stimulus to produce the desired behavior. Using these stimuli we were able to distinguish between models with subtle mechanistic differences or where input and outputs were multiple reactions removed from the model differences. An advantage of this method of model discrimination is that it does not require novel reagents, or altered measurement techniques; the only change to the experiment is the time course of stimulation. Taken together, these results provide a strong basis for using designed input stimuli as a tool for the development of cell signaling models. PMID

  15. Designing and testing lightweight shoulder prostheses with hybrid actuators for movements involved in typical activities of daily living and impact absorption

    PubMed Central

    Sekine, Masashi; Kita, Kahori; Yu, Wenwei

    2015-01-01

    Unlike forearm amputees, transhumeral amputees have residual stumps that are too small to provide a sufficient range of operation for their prosthetic parts to perform usual activities of daily living. Furthermore, it is difficult for small residual stumps to provide sufficient impact absorption for safe manipulation in daily living, as intact arms do. Therefore, substitution of upper limb function in transhumeral amputees requires a sufficient range of motion and sufficient viscoelasticity for shoulder prostheses under critical weight and dimension constraints. We propose the use of two different types of actuators, ie, pneumatic elastic actuators (PEAs) and servo motors. PEAs offer high power-to-weight performance and have intrinsic viscoelasticity in comparison with motors or standard industrial pneumatic cylinder actuators. However, the usefulness of PEAs in large working spaces is limited because of their short strokes. Servo motors, in contrast, can be used to achieve large ranges of motion. In this study, the relationship between the force and stroke of PEAs was investigated. The impact absorption of both types of actuators was measured using a single degree-of-freedom prototype to evaluate actuator compliance for safety purposes. Based on the fundamental properties of the actuators identified, a four degree-of-freedom robotic arm is proposed for prosthetic use. The configuration of the actuators and functional parts was designed to achieve a specified range of motion and torque calculated from the results of a simulation of typical movements performed in usual activities of daily living. Our experimental results showed that the requirements for the shoulder prostheses could be satisfied. PMID:26185472

  16. A new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to evaluate pulmonary drug absorption for metered dose dry powder formulations.

    PubMed

    Hein, Stephanie; Bur, Michael; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Lehr, Claus-Michael

    2011-01-01

    Absorption studies with aerosol formulation delivered by metered dose inhalers across cell- and tissue-based in vitro models of the pulmonary epithelia are not trivial due to the complexity of the processes involved: (i) aerosol generation and deposition, (ii) drug release from the carrier, and (iii) absorption across the epithelial air-blood barrier. In contrast to the intestinal mucosa, pulmonary epithelia are only covered by a thin film of lining fluid. Submersed cell culture systems would not allow to studying the deposition of aerosol particles and their effects on this delicate epithelial tissue. We developed a new Pharmaceutical Aerosol Deposition Device on Cell Cultures (PADDOCC) to mimic the inhalation of a single metered aerosol dose and its subsequent deposition on filter-grown pulmonary epithelial cell monolayers exposed to an air-liquid interface. The reproducibility of deposition of these dry powder aerosols and subsequent drug transport across Calu-3 monolayers with commercially available dry powder inhalers containing salbutamol sulphate or budesonide could be demonstrated. In the context of developing new dry powder aerosol formulations, PADDOCC appears as a useful tool, allowing reducing animal testing and faster translation into clinical trials. PMID:20951200

  17. Determination of nickel in food samples by flame atomic absorption spectroscopy after preconcentration and microextraction based ionic liquids using full factorial and central composite design.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Zohre; Shemirani, Farzaneh

    2012-12-01

    In this research, a microextraction technique based on ionic liquids (ILs) termed in situ solvent formation microextraction (ISFME) was used for determination of nickel in solutions. 1-(2-pyridylazo)-2-naphtol (PAN) was chosen as a complexing agent. After preconcentration, the settled IL-phase was dissolved in 50 μL of ethanol and aspirated into the flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS) using a home-made microsample introduction system. Injection of 50 μL volumes of analyte into an air-acetylene flame provided very sensitive spike-like and reproducible signals. ISFME is based on phase separation phenomenon of ionic liquids in aqueous solutions. This method is simple and rapid for extraction and preconcentration of metal ions from food samples and can be applied for the sample solutions containing very high concentrations of salt. Furthermore, this technique is much safer in comparison with the organic solvent extraction because of using ionic liquid. The effective parameters such as amount of IL, salt effect, concentration of the chelating agent and ion pairing agent were inspected by a full factorial design to identify important parameters and their interactions. Next, a central composite design was applied to obtain optimum point of the important parameters. Under the optimum conditions, the calibration graph was linear over the range of 2 to 80 ng/mL. The limit of detection and relative standard deviation (n= 6) were 0.6 ng/mL and 2%, respectively. PMID:22853633

  18. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  19. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P. L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  20. Modular design of long narrow scintillating cells for ILC detector

    SciTech Connect

    Beznosko, D.; Blazey, G.; Dyshkant, A.; Maloney, J.; Rykalin, V.; Schellpfeffer, J.; /Fermilab

    2005-09-01

    The experimental results for the narrow scintillating elements with effective area about 20 cm{sup 2} are reported. The elements were formed from the single piece of scintillator and were read out via wavelength shifting fibers with the MRS (Metal/Resistor/Semiconductor) photodiodes on both ends of each fiber. The formation of the cells from the piece of scintillator by using grooves is discussed. The cell performance was tested using the radioactive source by measuring the PMT current and a single rate after amplifier and discrimination with threshold at about three photo electrons in each channel and quad coincidences (double coincidences between sensors on each fiber and double coincidences between two neighboring fibers). This result is of high importance for large multi-channel systems, i.e. module may be used as an active element for calorimeter or muon system for the design of the future electron-positron linear collider detector because cell effective area can be smoothly enlarged or reduced (to 4 cm{sup 2} definitely).

  1. Advanced coal gasifier-fuel cell power plant systems design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heller, M. E.

    1983-01-01

    Two advanced, high efficiency coal-fired power plants were designed, one utilizing a phosphoric acid fuel cell and one utilizing a molten carbonate fuel cell. Both incorporate a TRW Catalytic Hydrogen Process gasifier and regenerator. Both plants operate without an oxygen plant and without requiring water feed; they, instead, require makeup dolomite. Neither plant requires a shift converter; neither plant has heat exchangers operating above 1250 F. Both plants have attractive efficiencies and costs. While the molten carbonate version has a higher (52%) efficiency than the phosphoric acid version (48%), it also has a higher ($0.078/kWh versus $0.072/kWh) ten-year levelized cost of electricity. The phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant is probably feasible to build in the near term: questions about the TRW process need to be answered experimentally, such as weather it can operate on caking coals, and how effective the catalyzed carbon-dioxide acceptor will be at pilot scale, both in removing carbon dioxide and in removing sulfur from the gasifier.

  2. Multiple pass gas absorption cell utilizing a spherical mirror opposite one or more pair of obliquely disposed flat mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearson, Richard (Inventor); Lynch, Dana H. (Inventor); Gunter, William D. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method and apparatus for passing light bundles through a multiple pass sampling cell is disclosed. The multiple pass sampling cell includes a sampling chamber having first and second ends positioned along a longitudinal axis of the sampling cell. The sampling cell further includes an entrance opening, located adjacent the first end of the sampling cell at a first azimuthal angular position. The entrance opening permits a light bundle to pass into the sampling cell. The sampling cell also includes an exit opening at a second azimuthal angular position. The light exit permits a light bundle to pass out of the sampling cell after the light bundle has followed a predetermined path.

  3. Molecular origins of optoelectronic properties in coumarin dyes: toward designer solar cell and laser applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaogang; Cole, Jacqueline M; Waddell, Paul G; Lin, Tze-Chia; Radia, Jignesh; Zeidler, Anita

    2012-01-12

    Coumarin derivatives are used in a wide range of applications, such as dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) and dye lasers, and have therefore attracted considerable research interest. In order to understand the molecular origins of their optoelectronic properties, molecular structures for 29 coumarin laser dyes are statistically analyzed. To this end, data for 25 compounds were taken from the Cambridge Structural Database and compared with data for four new crystal structures of coumarin laser dyes [Coumarin 487 (C(19)H(23)NO(2)), Coumarin 498 (C(16)H(17)NO(4)S), Coumarin 510 (C(20)H(18)N(2)O(2)), and Coumarin 525 (C(22)H(18)N(2)O(3))], which are reported herein. The competing contributions of different resonance states to the bond lengths of the 4- and 7-substituted coumarin laser dyes are computed based on the harmonic oscillator stabilization energy model. Consequently, a positive correlation between the contribution of the para-quinoidal resonance state and the UV-vis peak absorption wavelength of these coumarins is revealed. Furthermore, the perturbations of optoelectronic properties, owing to chemical substituents in these coumarin laser dyes, are analyzed: it is found that their UV-vis peak absorption and lasing wavelengths experience a red shift, as the electron-donating strength of the 7-position substituent increases and/or the electron-withdrawing strength of the 3- or 4-position substituent rises; this conclusion is corroborated by quantum-chemical calculations. It is also revealed that the closer the relevant substituents align with the direction of the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT), the larger the spectral shifts and the higher the molar extinction coefficients of coumarin laser dyes. These findings are important for understanding the ICT mechanism in coumarins. Meanwhile, all structure-property correlations revealed herein will enable knowledge-based molecular design of coumarins for dye lasers and DSC applications. PMID:22117623

  4. [THE OPTIMIZATION OF NUTRITION FUNCTION UNDER SYNDROME OF RESISTANCE TO INSULIN, DISORDER OF FATTY ACIDS' METABOLISM AND ABSORPTION OF GLUCOSE BY CELLS (A LECTURE)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic processes continue to proceed in Homo Sapiens. At the very early stages ofphylogenesis, the ancient Archaea that formed mitochondria under symbiotic interaction with later bacterial cells conjointly formed yet another system. In this system, there are no cells' absorption of glucose if it is possible to absorb fatty acids from intercellular medium in the form of unesterfied fatty acids or ketonic bodies--metabolites of fatty acids. This is caused by objectively existed conditions and subsequent availability of substrates at the stages ofphylogenesis: acetate, ketonic bodies, fatty acids and only later glucose. The phylogenetically late insulin used after billions years the same dependencies at formation of regulation ofmetabolism offatty acids and cells' absorption of glucose. In order that syndrome ofresistance ceased to exist as afoundation of metabolic pandemic Homo Sapiens has to understand the following. After successful function ofArchaea+bacterial cells and considered by biology action of insulin for the third time in phylogenesis and using biological function of intelligence the content ofphylogenetically earlier palmitic saturated fatty acid infood can't to exceed possibilities of phylogenetically late lipoproteins to transfer it in intercellular medium and blood and cells to absorb it. It is supposed that at early stages of phylogenesis biological function of intelligence is primarily formed to bring into line "unconformities" of regulation of metabolism against the background of seeming relative biological "perfection". These unconformities were subsequently and separately formed at the level of cells in paracrin regulated cenosises of cells and organs and at the level of organism. The prevention of resistance to insulin basically requires biological function of intelligence, principle of self-restraint, bringing into line multiple desires of Homo Sapiens with much less extensive biological possibilities. The "unconformities" of

  5. Structure-Based, Rational Design of T Cell Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Zoete, V.; Irving, M.; Ferber, M.; Cuendet, M. A.; Michielin, O.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer using engineered T cells is emerging as a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma. Such an approach allows one to introduce T cell receptor (TCR) modifications that, while maintaining the specificity for the targeted antigen, can enhance the binding and kinetic parameters for the interaction with peptides (p) bound to major histocompatibility complexes (MHC). Using the well-characterized 2C TCR/SIYR/H-2K(b) structure as a model system, we demonstrated that a binding free energy decomposition based on the MM-GBSA approach provides a detailed and reliable description of the TCR/pMHC interactions at the structural and thermodynamic levels. Starting from this result, we developed a new structure-based approach, to rationally design new TCR sequences, and applied it to the BC1 TCR targeting the HLA-A2 restricted NY-ESO-1157–165 cancer-testis epitope. Fifty-four percent of the designed sequence replacements exhibited improved pMHC binding as compared to the native TCR, with up to 150-fold increase in affinity, while preserving specificity. Genetically engineered CD8+ T cells expressing these modified TCRs showed an improved functional activity compared to those expressing BC1 TCR. We measured maximum levels of activities for TCRs within the upper limit of natural affinity, KD = ∼1 − 5 μM. Beyond the affinity threshold at KD < 1 μM we observed an attenuation in cellular function, in line with the “half-life” model of T cell activation. Our computer-aided protein-engineering approach requires the 3D-structure of the TCR-pMHC complex of interest, which can be obtained from X-ray crystallography. We have also developed a homology modeling-based approach, TCRep 3D, to obtain accurate structural models of any TCR-pMHC complexes when experimental data is not available. Since the accuracy of the models depends on the prediction of the TCR orientation over pMHC, we have complemented the approach with a simplified rigid method

  6. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  7. Empetrum nigrum var. japonicum Extract Suppresses Ultraviolet B-Induced Cell Damage via Absorption of Radiation and Inhibition of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Cheon; Kim, Daeshin; Kim, Sang Cheol; Jung, Eunsun; Park, Deokhoon; Hyun, Jin Won

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the protective actions of Empetrum nigrum against ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation in human HaCaT keratinocytes. An ethyl acetate extract of E. nigrum (ENE) increased cell viability decreased by exposure to UVB rays. ENE also absorbed UVB radiation and scavenged UVB-induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HaCaT keratinocytes. In addition, ENE shielded HaCaT keratinocytes from damage to cellular components (e.g., peroxidation of lipids, modification of proteins, and breakage of DNA strands) following UVB irradiation. Furthermore, ENE protected against UVB-induced apoptotic cell death, as determined by a reduction in the numbers of apoptotic bodies and sub-G1 hypodiploid cells, as well as by the recovery of mitochondrial membrane potential. The results of the current study therefore suggest that ENE safeguards human keratinocytes against UVB-induced cellular damage via the absorption of UVB ray and scavenging of UVB-generated ROS. PMID:23476710

  8. Chemical state of Ag in Conducting Bridge Random Access Memory cells: a depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy investigation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    d'Acapito, F.; Souchier, E.; Noe, P.; Blaise, P.; Bernard, M.; Jousseaume, V.

    2016-05-01

    Conducting Bridge Random Access Memories (CBRAM) are a promising substitute for FLASH technology but problems with limited retention of the low resistance ON state still hamper their massive deployment. Depth resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy has been used to describe the chemical state of the atoms of the active electrode (in this case Ag) and to reveal the role of Sb as stabilizer of the metallic state.

  9. Binding of navy bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) lectin to the intestinal cells of the rat and its effect on the absorption of glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Donatucci, D.A.; Liener, I.E.; Gross, C.J.

    1987-12-01

    The main objectives of this investigation were to study the binding of a lectin from navy beans with the epithelial cells of the rat intestine and to assess the effect of such binding on the ability of the intestine to absorb glucose. A Scatchard plot, based on the binding of /sup 125/I-labeled lectin to isolated intestinal epithelial cells, was used to calculate an association constant (Ka) of 15 x 10(6)M-1 and the number of binding sites per cell, 12 x 10(6). Metabolic studies were conducted over a period of 5 d on groups of rats fed raw or autoclaved navy bean flour and casein with or without the purified lectin. Growth, protein digestibility, biological value and net protein utilization were significantly lower in animals that had been fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin than in control groups fed diets containing autoclaved navy bean flour or casein alone. Vascular perfusion was used to measure the rate of uptake of glucose by the intestines of rats that had received the various dietary treatments. The rate of absorption of (/sup 14/C)glucose by intestines from rats fed raw navy bean flour or casein plus lectin was approximately one-half that of their counterparts fed the autoclaved flour or casein alone. These results provide evidence that the lectin, by virtue of its interference with intestinal absorption, is responsible, at least in part, for the nutritional inferiority of raw navy beans.

  10. Polymer selection and cell design for electric-vehicle supercapacitors

    SciTech Connect

    Mastragostino, M.; Arbizzani, C.; Paraventi, R.; Zanelli, A.

    2000-02-01

    Supercapacitors are devices for applications requiring high operating power levels, such as secondary power sources in electric vehicles (EVs) to provide peak power for acceleration and hill climbing. While electronically conducting polymers yield different redox supercapacitor configurations, devices with the n-doped polymer as the negative electrode and the p-doped polymer as the positive one are the most promising for EV applications. Indeed, this type of supercapacitor has a high operating potential, is able to deliver all the doping charge and, when charged, has both electrodes in the conducting (p- and n-doped) states. This study reports selection criteria for polymer materials and cell design for high performance EV supercapacitors and experimental results of selected polymer materials.

  11. A Second-Order Achromat Design Based on FODO Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    Two dipole doglegs are widely used to translate the beam axis horizontally or vertically. Quadrupoles are placed between the two consecutive dipoles to match first order dispersion and provide betatron focusing. Similarly a four dipole chicane is usually employed to form a bypass region, where the beam axis is transversely shifted first, then translated back to the original axis. In order to generate an isochronous section, quadrupoles are again needed to tune the first order transfer matrix element R{sub 56} equaling zero. Usually sextupoles are needed to correct second order dispersion in the bending plane, for both the dogleg optics and the chicane (with quad) optics. In this paper, an alternative optics design is introduced, which is based on a simple FODO cell and does not need sextupoles assistance to form a second-order achromat. It may provide a similar function of either a dogleg or a bypass, by using 2 or 4 of such combined supercells.

  12. The impact of cell-specific absorption properties on the correlation of electron transport rates measured by chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthetic oxygen production in planktonic algae.

    PubMed

    Blache, Ulrich; Jakob, Torsten; Su, Wanwen; Wilhelm, Christian

    2011-08-01

    Photosynthesis-irradiance (P-E)-curves describe the photosynthetic performance of autotrophic organisms. From these P-E-curves the photosynthetic parameters α-slope, P(max), and E(k) can be deduced which are often used to characterize and to compare different organisms or organisms in acclimation to different environmental conditions. Particularly, for in situ-measurements of P-E curves of phytoplankton the analysis of variable chlorophyll fluorescence proved its potential as a sensitive and rapid method. By using Chlorella vulgaris (Trebouxiophyceae), Nannochloropsis salina (Eustigmatophyceae), Skeletonema costatum and Cyclotella meneghiniana (Bacillariophyceae), the present study investigated the influence of cellular bio-optical properties on the correlation of the photosynthetic parameters derived from fluorescence-based P-E-curves with photosynthetic parameters obtained from the measurement of oxygen evolution. It is demonstrated that small planktonic algae show a wide range of cellular absorptivity which was subject to species-specifity, growth stage and environmental conditions, e.g. nutrient limitation. This variability in bio-optical properties resulted in a great deviation of relative electron transport rates (rETRs) from oxygen-based photosynthesis rates. Thus, the photosynthetic parameters α-slope and P(max) derived from rETRs strongly depend on the specific cellular absorptivity and cannot be used to compare the photosynthetic performance of cells with different optical properties. However, it was shown that E(k) is independent of cellular absorptivity and could be used to compare samples with unknown optical properties. PMID:21571541

  13. Kinetic (particle-in-cell) simulation of nonlinear laser absorption in a finite-size plasma with a background inhomogeneous magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Mehdian, H. Kargarian, A.; Hajisharifi, K.

    2015-06-15

    In this paper, the effect of an external inhomogeneous magnetic field on the high intensity laser absorption rate in a sub-critical plasma has been investigated by employing a relativistic electromagnetic 1.5 dimensional particle-in-cell code. Relying on the effective nonlinear phenomena such as phase-mixing and scattering, this study shows that in a finite-size plasma the laser absorption increases with inhomogeneity of the magnetic field (i.e., reduction of characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, λ{sub p}) before exiting a considerable amount of laser energy from the plasma due to scattering process. On the other hand, the presence of the external inhomogeneous magnetic field causes the maximum absorption of laser to occur at a shorter time. Moreover, study of the kinetic results associated with the distribution function of plasma particles shows that, in a special range of the plasma density and the characteristic length of inhomogeneous magnetic field, a considerable amount of laser energy is transferred to the particles producing a population of electrons with kinetic energy along the laser direction.

  14. Semitransparent inverted organic solar cell with improved absorption and reasonable transparency perception based on the nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 anode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ximin; Zhang, Ye; Hao, Yuying; Cui, Yanxia; Wang, Wenyan; Shi, Fang; Wang, Hua; Wei, Bin; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an inverted low bandgap semitransparent organic solar cell with improved absorption as well as reasonable transparency perception based on a nanopatterned MoO3/Ag/MoO3 (MAM) multilayer film as the transparent anode under illumination from the MAM side. The integrated absorption efficiency of the active layer at normal hybrid-polarized incidence considering an AM 1.5G solar spectrum is up to 51.69%, increased by 18.53% as compared to that of the equivalent planar device (43.61%) and reaching 77.3% of that of the corresponding opaque nanopatterned device (66.90%). Detailed investigations reveal that the excitation of plasmonic waveguide modes (at transverse magnetic polarization) and photonic modes (at transverse electric polarization) are responsible for the observed enhancement in absorption. Importantly, the proposed device exhibits an average transmittance of up to 28.4% and an average transparency perception of 26.3% for the human eyes under hybrid-polarized light illumination along with a good color rendering property. Additionally, our proposal works very well over a fairly wide angular range.

  15. Design and Installation of a Disposal Cell Cover Field Test

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, C.H.; Waugh, W.J.; Albright, W.H.; Smith, G.M.; Bush, R.P.

    2011-02-27

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Legacy Management (LM) initiated a cover assessment project in September 2007 to evaluate an inexpensive approach to enhancing the hydrological performance of final covers for disposal cells. The objective is to accelerate and enhance natural processes that are transforming existing conventional covers, which rely on low-conductivity earthen barriers, into water balance covers, that store water in soil and release it as soil evaporation and plant transpiration. A low conductivity cover could be modified by deliberately blending the upper layers of the cover profile and planting native shrubs. A test facility was constructed at the Grand Junction, Colorado, Disposal Site to evaluate the proposed methodology. The test cover was constructed in two identical sections, each including a large drainage lysimeter. The test cover was constructed with the same design and using the same materials as the existing disposal cell in order to allow for a direct comparison of performance. One test section will be renovated using the proposed method; the other is a control. LM is using the lysimeters to evaluate the effectiveness of the renovation treatment by monitoring hydrologic conditions within the cover profile as well as all water entering and leaving the system. This paper describes the historical experience of final covers employing earthen barrier layers, the design and operation of the lysimeter test facility, testing conducted to characterize the as-built engineering and edaphic properties of the lysimeter soils, the calibration of instruments installed at the test facility, and monitoring data collected since the lysimeters were constructed.

  16. Design of Radial pin Si Nanowires for High Performance Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, Binh-Minh; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Dayeh, Shadi; Picraux, Samuel Thomas

    2012-09-03

    The quantum efficiency of solar cells, like of any photon detector, is dictated by the ability to absorb photons to create conducting carriers, and the efficiency to drive such carriers to electrodes for collection. Having a medium that enables full photon absorption in a short length, together with a long carrier lifetime that allows photo-generated carriers to reach electrodes before recombining are ideal, but are not always realistic. For example, silicon photovoltaics, despite being a major player in the solar cell market, suffer from the low absorption coefficient, thus requiring a thick absorbing layer which impairs the efficiency with which photogenerated carriers are collected. Radial silicon nanowires have been proposed as a candidate for reducing the optical absorption length and required processing purity in Si based solar cells without compromising their quantum efficiency and yet reducing the overall cell cost. On the one hand, incident light propagates along the axial dimension of the wires, and thus has a greater chance of being absorbed when the wire length extends beyond 10m due to inter-array light scattering effects. On the other hand, the core/shell p-i-n structure leads electrical current flow along sub-micron radii, which enables rapid collection of most photogenerated carriers as the transport length is typically less than the diffusion lengths of minority carriers. In this work, we perform Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD) simulation to investigate the absorption process in arrayed radial nanowires.

  17. GCtool for fuel cell systems design and analysis : user documentation.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.K.; Geyer, H.K.

    1999-01-15

    GCtool is a comprehensive system design and analysis tool for fuel cell and other power systems. A user can analyze any configuration of component modules and flows under steady-state or dynamic conditions. Component models can be arbitrarily complex in modeling sophistication and new models can be added easily by the user. GCtool also treats arbitrary system constraints over part or all of the system, including the specification of nonlinear objective functions to be minimized subject to nonlinear, equality or inequality constraints. This document describes the essential features of the interpreted language and the window-based GCtool environment. The system components incorporated into GCtool include a gas flow mixer, splitier, heater, compressor, gas turbine, heat exchanger, pump, pipe, diffuser, nozzle, steam drum, feed water heater, combustor, chemical reactor, condenser, fuel cells (proton exchange membrane, solid oxide, phosphoric acid, and molten carbonate), shaft, generator, motor, and methanol steam reformer. Several examples of system analysis at various levels of complexity are presented. Also given are instructions for generating two- and three-dimensional plots of data and the details of interfacing new models to GCtool.

  18. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  19. The in vitro permeability coefficient and short-term absorption rates for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in a static diffusion cell model.

    PubMed

    Fasano, William J; Baer, Kevin N

    2006-01-01

    Vinyl toluene is one of several methylstyrene monomers that provide improved performance in resins for specialty paints, hydrocarbon resins for adhesives, specialty polymers, and unsaturated polyester resins. The purpose of this study was to determine a permeability coefficient (Kp) and short-term absorption rate for vinyl toluene using human cadaver skin mounted in an in vitro static diffusion cell model with an exposure area of 0.64 cm2. For the Kp determination, vinyl toluene was applied at a rate of 100 microL/cm2 to 6 skin replicates representing 4 human subjects. Serial receptor fluid samples were collected at 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24, 36, and 48 h postapplication and analyzed for vinyl toluene by HPLC-UV. Based on the slope at steady-state (203.3 microg cm(-2) h(-1) +/- 120.0 microg cm(-2) h(-1)) and the concentration of the applied dose of vinyl toluene, taken as its density (894,600 microg/cm3), the Kp was calculated to be 2.27 x 10(-4) cm/h (+/-1.34 x 10(-4) cm/h). For the short-term absorption experiments, 12 skin replicates representing 3 human subjects were employed. Following 10- and 60-min exposures to a finite dose of vinyl toluene (10 microL/cm2), the respective short-term absorption rates were calculated to be 66.0 (+/-29.9) and 104.2 (+/-63.0) microg cm(-2) h(-1). These data provide industrial hygienists and safety personnel values to estimate the amount of vinyl toluene that may be absorbed via the dermal exposure route, given a variety of exposure scenarios, and the time it takes (skin absorption time) to reach a body burden equal to the Occupational Safety and Health Administrative permissible exposure level (OSHA PEL) or ACGIH TLV. PMID:16455589

  20. Optical Absorption Spectra and Electronic Properties of Symmetric and Asymmetric Squaraine Dyes for Use in DSSC Solar Cells: DFT and TD-DFT Studies.

    PubMed

    El-Shishtawy, Reda M; Elroby, Shaaban A; Asiri, Abdullah M; Müllen, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    The electronic absorption spectra, ground-state geometries and electronic structures of symmetric and asymmetric squaraine dyes (SQD1-SQD4) were investigated using density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent (TD-DFT) density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G** level. The calculated ground-state geometries reveal pronounced conjugation in these dyes. Long-range corrected time dependent density functionals Perdew, Burke and Ernzerhof (PBE, PBE1PBE (PBE0)), and the exchange functional of Tao, Perdew, Staroverov, and Scuseria (TPSSh) with 6-311++G** basis set were employed to examine optical absorption properties. In an extensive comparison between the optical data and DFT benchmark calculations, the BEP functional with 6-311++G** basis set was found to be the most appropriate in describing the electronic absorption spectra. The calculated energy values of lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals (LUMO) were 3.41, 3.19, 3.38 and 3.23 eV for SQD1, SQD2, SQD3, and SQD4, respectively. These values lie above the LUMO energy (-4.26 eV) of the conduction band of TiO₂ nanoparticles indicating possible electron injection from the excited dyes to the conduction band of the TiO₂ in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Also, aromaticity computation for these dyes are in good agreement with the data obtained optically and geometrically with SQD4 as the highest aromatic structure. Based on the optimized molecular geometries, relative positions of the frontier orbitals, and the absorption maxima, we propose that these dyes are suitable components of photovoltaic DSSC devices. PMID:27043556