Science.gov

Sample records for absorption column density

  1. High HI column density lyman limit absorption in z>4 quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrie-Lombardi, L. J.; McMahon, R. G.; Irwin, M. J.; Hazard, C.

    1992-12-01

    The high HI column density Lyman Limit absorption line systems (LLS) are the parent population from which absorbers that are selected on the basis of MgII absorption are drawn. At z=0.5--1.0 the MgII systems have been shown to be associated with the extended halos of bright galaxies (Bergeron & Boisse 1991). Recent work on LLS evolution by Sargent, Steidel & Boksenberg(1989) and Lanzetta(1991) disagree considerably in the form of evolution observed. Whilst SSB claim no evolution in number density up to z=3.5, Lanzetta reports evidence for strong evolution in the number density of LLS for z > 2.5. We shall present results of a low resolution absorption line study of z>4 quasars. The z>4 quasar sample is the ~ 20 brightest non-BAL quasars from the APM z>4 quasar survey. Our observations have been combined with HST observations in low redshift quasars to enable a new determination of the evolution of LLS over the redshift range 0.5 to 4.5. These observations extend absorption line studies to higher redshifts than have been possible before.

  2. An IUE survey of interstellar H I Ly alpha absorption. 1: Column densities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Diplas, Athanassios; Savage, Blair D.

    1994-01-01

    We measure Galactic interstellar neutral hydrogen column densities by analyzing archival interstellar Ly alpha absorption line data toward 554 B2 and hotter stars observed at high resolution with the IUE satellite. This study more than doubles the number of lines of sight with measures of N(H I) based on Ly alpha. We have included the scattered light background correction algorithm of Bianchi and Bohlin in our data reduction. We use the correlation between the Balmer discontinuity (c sub 1) index and the stellar Ly alpha absorption in order to assess the effects of stellar Ly alpha contamination. Approximately 40% of the B stars with measured (c sub 1) index, exhibit serious stellar Ly alpha contamination. One table contains the derived values of the interstellar N(H I) for 393 stars with at most small amounts of stellar contamination. Another lists the observed values of total N(H I) for 161 stars with suspected stellar Ly alpha contamination and/or uncertain stellar parameters.

  3. [The retrieval of ozone column densities by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy during summer at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Han; Liu, Wen-Qing; Bian, Lin-Gen; Lu, Chang-Gui; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Sun, Li-Guang

    2011-02-01

    Daily ozone column densities were monitored by Passive DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) from December 10th, 2008 to Feb 19th, 2009 at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic (69 degrees 22'24" S, 76 degrees 22'14" E). Considering the absorption of O3, OClO, NO2, O4, BrO and the Ring effect, ozone slant column densities were retrieved using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source. The results showed that there was no obvious "ozone hole" during the monitoring period, but ozone VCD (vertical column density) had greatly changed within short time scale, especially in middle December and early February. The analysis of passive DOAS and Brewer measurements of ozone VCD showed good agreement with the correlative coefficient of 0.863, while satellite board OMI measurements with the correlative coefficient of 0.840, which confirmed the validity of the monitoring of Passive DOAS. PMID:21510403

  4. The Keck + Magellan Survey for Lyman Limit Absorption. III. Sample Definition and Column Density Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochaska, J. Xavier; O'Meara, John M.; Fumagalli, Michele; Bernstein, Rebecca A.; Burles, Scott M.

    2015-11-01

    We present an absorption-line survey of optically thick gas clouds—Lyman Limit Systems (LLSs)—observed at high dispersion with spectrometers on the Keck and Magellan telescopes. We measure column densities of neutral hydrogen {N}{{H} {{I}}} and associated metal-line transitions for 157 LLSs at {z}{LLS}=1.76-4.39 restricted to {10}17.3 {{cm}}-2≤slant {N}{{H} {{I}}}\\lt {10}20.3 {{cm}}-2. An empirical analysis of ionic ratios indicates an increasing ionization state of the gas with decreasing {N}{{H} {{I}}} and that the majority of LLSs are highly ionized, confirming previous expectations. The Si+/H0 ratio spans nearly four orders of magnitude, implying a large dispersion in the gas metallicity. Fewer than 5% of these LLSs have no positive detection of a metal transition; by z˜ 3, nearly all gas that is dense enough to exhibit a very high Lyman limit opacity has previously been polluted by heavy elements. We add new measurements to the small subset of LLS (≈5%-10%) that may have super-solar abundances. High Si+/Fe+ ratios suggest an α-enhanced medium, whereas the Si+/C+ ratios do not exhibit the super-solar enhancement inferred previously for the Lyα forest.

  5. The dependence of C IV broad absorption line properties on accompanying Si IV and Al III absorption: relating quasar-wind ionization levels, kinematics, and column densities

    SciTech Connect

    Filiz Ak, N.; Brandt, W. N.; Schneider, D. P.; Trump, J. R.; Hall, P. B.; Anderson, S. F.; Hamann, F.; Myers, Adam D.; Pâris, I.; Petitjean, P.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Shen, Yue; York, Don

    2014-08-20

    We consider how the profile and multi-year variability properties of a large sample of C IV Broad Absorption Line (BAL) troughs change when BALs from Si IV and/or Al III are present at corresponding velocities, indicating that the line of sight intercepts at least some lower ionization gas. We derive a number of observational results for C IV BALs separated according to the presence or absence of accompanying lower ionization transitions, including measurements of composite profile shapes, equivalent width (EW), characteristic velocities, composite variation profiles, and EW variability. We also measure the correlations between EW and fractional-EW variability for C IV, Si IV, and Al III. Our measurements reveal the basic correlated changes between ionization level, kinematics, and column density expected in accretion-disk wind models; e.g., lines of sight including lower ionization material generally show deeper and broader C IV troughs that have smaller minimum velocities and that are less variable. Many C IV BALs with no accompanying Si IV or Al III BALs may have only mild or no saturation.

  6. Simulated Ionian Column Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, Andrew C.; Goldstein, D. B.; Varghese, P. L.; Trafton, L. M.; Moore, C. H.

    2010-10-01

    The sublimation atmosphere of Io is modeled using the direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method. These three-dimensional simulations improve upon previous work by implementing a more accurate two-component surface temperature model. This surface temperature model solves the one-dimensional heat conduction equation with depth for every 1° by 1° surface element. It also includes the following physics: Jovian eclipse, reflected sunlight from Jupiter, latent heat of sublimation/condensation, hot spots, endogenic heating, and independent thermal inertias and albedos for the frost and non-frost surfaces. These simulations model only the dominant dayside atmospheric species, SO2. The non-equilibrium rotational and vibrational energy states of SO2 are treated as well as photo-emission from those states. Plasma heating of the atmosphere by high energy ions and electrons from the Jovian plasma torus is also modeled via a plasma energy flux. Resulting column densities are compared to recent observations in an attempt to constrain the thermal parameters for the frost and non-frost surfaces.

  7. Pulsed airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Kawa, S. Randoph; Biraud, Sebastien

    2010-11-01

    ABSTRACT We report initial measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density using a pulsed airborne lidar operating at 1572 nm. It uses a lidar measurement technique being developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a candidate for the CO2 measurement in the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission. The pulsed multiple-wavelength lidar approach offers several new capabilities with respect to passive spectrometer and other lidar techniques for high-precision CO2 column density measurements. We developed an airborne lidar using a fibre laser transmitter and photon counting detector, and conducted initial measurements of the CO2 column absorption during flights over Oklahoma in December 2008. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals. These follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 1.5 to 7.1 km, and are in good agreement with column number density estimates calculated from nearly coincident airborne in-situ measurements.

  8. How to Calculate Molecular Column Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Shirley, Yancy L.

    2015-03-01

    The calculation of the molecular column density from molecular spectral (rotational or ro-vibrational) transition measurements is one of the most basic quantities derived from molecular spectroscopy. Starting from first principles where we describe the basic physics behind the radiative and collisional excitation of molecules and the radiative transfer of their emission, we derive a general expression for the molecular column density. As the calculation of the molecular column density involves a knowledge of the molecular energy level degeneracies, rotational partition functions, dipole moment matrix elements, and line strengths, we include generalized derivations of these molecule-specific quantities. Given that approximations to the column density equation are often useful, we explore the optically thin, optically thick, and low-frequency limits to our derived general molecular column density relation. We also evaluate the limitations of the common assumption that the molecular excitation temperature is constant and address the distinction between beam-averaged and source-averaged column densities. As non-LTE approaches to the calculation of molecular spectral line column density have become quite common, we summarize non-LTE models that calculate molecular cloud volume densities, kinetic temperatures, and molecular column densities. We conclude our discussion of the molecular column density with worked examples for C18O, C17O, N2H+, NH3, and H2CO. Ancillary information on some subtleties involving line profile functions, conversion between integrated flux and brightness temperature, the calculation of the uncertainty associated with an integrated intensity measurement, the calculation of spectral line optical depth using hyperfine or isotopologue measurements, the calculation of the kinetic temperature from a symmetric molecule excitation temperature measurement, and relative hyperfine intensity calculations for NH3 are presented in appendices. The intent of

  9. Density Gradient Columns for Chemical Displays.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, William B.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures for preparing density gradient columns for chemical displays are presented. They include displays illustrating acid-base reactions, metal ion equilibria, and liquid density. The lifetime of these metastable displays is surprising, some lasting for months in display cabinets. (JN)

  10. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of C02 Column Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William E.; Rodriquez, Michael; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne lidar measurements of atmospheric CO2 column density for an approach being developed as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. It uses a pulsed dual-wavelength lidar measurement based on the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. We demonstrated the approach using the CO2 measurement from aircraft in July and August 2009 over four locations. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and the results show approx.1 ppm random errors for 8-10 km altitudes and approx.30 sec averaging times. Airborne measurements were also made in 2010 with stronger signals and initial analysis shows approx. 0.3 ppm random errors for 80 sec averaging times for measurements at altitudes> 6 km.

  11. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE HIGH COLUMN DENSITY TURNOVER IN THE H I COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Erkal, Denis; Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2012-12-10

    We study the high column density regime of the H I column density distribution function and argue that there are two distinct features: a turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2}, which is present at both z = 0 and z Almost-Equal-To 3, and a lack of systems above N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2} at z = 0. Using observations of the column density distribution, we argue that the H I-H{sub 2} transition does not cause the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 21} cm{sup -2} but can plausibly explain the turnover at N{sub H{sub I}} {approx}> 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. We compute the H I column density distribution of individual galaxies in the THINGS sample and show that the turnover column density depends only weakly on metallicity. Furthermore, we show that the column density distribution of galaxies, corrected for inclination, is insensitive to the resolution of the H I map or to averaging in radial shells. Our results indicate that the similarity of H I column density distributions at z = 3 and 0 is due to the similarity of the maximum H I surface densities of high-z and low-z disks, set presumably by universal processes that shape properties of the gaseous disks of galaxies. Using fully cosmological simulations, we explore other candidate physical mechanisms that could produce a turnover in the column density distribution. We show that while turbulence within giant molecular clouds cannot affect the damped Ly{alpha} column density distribution, stellar feedback can affect it significantly if the feedback is sufficiently effective in removing gas from the central 2-3 kpc of high-redshift galaxies. Finally, we argue that it is meaningful to compare column densities averaged over {approx} kpc scales with those estimated from quasar spectra that probe sub-pc scales due to the steep power spectrum of H I column density fluctuations observed in nearby galaxies.

  12. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    SciTech Connect

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S.; Demoment, J.

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  13. Column density profiles of multiphase gaseous haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Cameron J.; Kravtsov, Andrey V.; Agertz, Oscar

    2016-05-01

    We analyse circumgalactic medium (CGM) in a suite of high-resolution cosmological re-simulations of a Milky Way size galaxy and show that CGM properties are quite sensitive to details of star formation-feedback loop modelling. The simulation that produces a realistic late-type galaxy, fails to reproduce existing observations of the CGM. In contrast, simulation that does not produce a realistic galaxy has the predicted CGM in better agreement with observations. This illustrates that properties of galaxies and properties of their CGM provide strong complementary constraints on the processes governing galaxy formation. Our simulations predict that column density profiles of ions are well described by an exponential function of projected distance d: N ∝ e^{-d/h_s}. Simulations thus indicate that the sharp drop in absorber detections at larger distances in observations does not correspond to a `boundary' of an ion, but reflects the underlying steep exponential column density profile. Furthermore, we find that ionization energy of ions is tightly correlated with the scaleheight hs: h_s ∝ E_ion^{0.74}. At z ≈ 0, warm gas traced by low-ionization species (e.g. Mg II and C IV) has hs ≈ 0.03 - 0.07Rvir, while higher ionization species (O VI and Ne VIII) have hs ≈ 0.32 - 0.45Rvir. Finally, the scaleheights of ions in our simulations evolve slower than the virial radius for z ≤ 2, but similarly to the halo scale radius, rs. Thus, we suggest that the column density profiles of galaxies at different redshifts should be scaled by rs rather than the halo virial radius.

  14. EVIDENCE OF CONTRIBUTION OF INTERVENING CLOUDS TO GAMMA-RAY BURST'S X-RAY COLUMN DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.

    2013-10-20

    The origin of excess of X-ray column density with respect to optical extinction in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still a puzzle. A proposed explanation of the excess is the photoelectric absorption due to the intervening clouds along a GRB's line of sight. Here, we test this scenario by using the intervening Mg II absorption as a tracer of the neutral hydrogen column density of the intervening clouds. We identify a connection between the large X-ray column density (and large column density ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})∼0.5) and large neutral hydrogen column density probed by the Mg II doublet ratio (DR). In addition, GRBs with large X-ray column density (and large ratio of log (N{sub H,X}/N{sub H{sub I}})>0) tend to have multiple saturated intervening absorbers with DR < 1.2. These results therefore indicate an additional contribution from the intervening system to the observed X-ray column density in some GRBs, although the contribution from the host galaxy alone cannot be excluded based on this study.

  15. Estimated global nitrogen deposition using NO2 column density

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Xuehe; Jiang, Hong; Zhang, Xiuying; Liu, Jinxun; Zhang, Zhen; Jin, Jiaxin; Wang, Ying; Xu, Jianhui; Cheng, Miaomiao

    2013-01-01

    Global nitrogen deposition has increased over the past 100 years. Monitoring and simulation studies of nitrogen deposition have evaluated nitrogen deposition at both the global and regional scale. With the development of remote-sensing instruments, tropospheric NO2 column density retrieved from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) and Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY) sensors now provides us with a new opportunity to understand changes in reactive nitrogen in the atmosphere. The concentration of NO2 in the atmosphere has a significant effect on atmospheric nitrogen deposition. According to the general nitrogen deposition calculation method, we use the principal component regression method to evaluate global nitrogen deposition based on global NO2 column density and meteorological data. From the accuracy of the simulation, about 70% of the land area of the Earth passed a significance test of regression. In addition, NO2 column density has a significant influence on regression results over 44% of global land. The simulated results show that global average nitrogen deposition was 0.34 g m−2 yr−1 from 1996 to 2009 and is increasing at about 1% per year. Our simulated results show that China, Europe, and the USA are the three hotspots of nitrogen deposition according to previous research findings. In this study, Southern Asia was found to be another hotspot of nitrogen deposition (about 1.58 g m−2 yr−1 and maintaining a high growth rate). As nitrogen deposition increases, the number of regions threatened by high nitrogen deposits is also increasing. With N emissions continuing to increase in the future, areas whose ecosystem is affected by high level nitrogen deposition will increase.

  16. [Retrieval of NO2 total vertical columns by direct-sun differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pin-hua; Li, Ang; Xu, Jin; Zeng, Yi; Si, Fu-qi; Wu, Feng-cheng

    2012-04-01

    An appropriate reference spectrum is essential for the direct-sun differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DS-DOAS). It depends on the real reference spectrum to retrieve the total vertical column density (VCD). The spectrum detected at the time with minimum sun zenith angle under the relative clear atmospheric condition in the measurement period was conventionally selected as the reference spectrum. Because there is still untracked NO2 absorption structure in the reference spectrum, the VCD retrieved based on the above spectrum is actually relative VCD, which results in larger error. To solve this problem, a new method was investigated. A convolution of extraterrestrial high-precision solar Fraunhofer spectrum and the instrumental function of the spectrometer was computed and chosen as the reference spectrum. The error induced by NO2 absorption structure in the reference spectrum was removed. Then the fitting error of slant column density (SCD) retrieved by this method was analyzed. The correlation between the absolute SCD and the differential slant column density (dSCD) was calculated. The result shows that the error of SCD retrieved by this new method is below 1.6 x 10(16) molecules x cm(-2) on March 7, 2011, while the error generated by the normal method is about 4.25 x 10(16) molecules x cm(-2). The new method decreased more than 62% error. In addition, the results throughout the day were compared to the troposphere VCD from MAX-DOAS and they are in good agreement. It indicates that the new method could effectively reduce the VCD error of the common way. PMID:22715747

  17. The Column Density Variance-{\\cal M}_s Relationship

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkhart, Blakesley; Lazarian, A.

    2012-08-01

    Although there is a wealth of column density tracers for both the molecular and diffuse interstellar medium, there are few observational studies investigating the relationship between the density variance (σ2) and the sonic Mach number ({\\cal M}_s). This is in part due to the fact that the σ2-{\\cal M}_s relationship is derived, via MHD simulations, for the three-dimensional (3D) density variance only, which is not a direct observable. We investigate the utility of a 2D column density \\sigma _{\\Sigma /\\Sigma _0}^2-{\\cal M}_s relationship using solenoidally driven isothermal MHD simulations and find that the best fit follows closely the form of the 3D density \\sigma _{\\rho /\\rho _0}^2-{\\cal M}_s trend but includes a scaling parameter A such that \\sigma _{\\ln (\\Sigma /\\Sigma _0)}^2=A\\times \\ln (1+b^2{\\cal M}_s^2), where A = 0.11 and b = 1/3. This relation is consistent with the observational data reported for the Taurus and IC 5146 molecular clouds with b = 0.5 and A = 0.16, and b = 0.5 and A = 0.12, respectively. These results open up the possibility of using the 2D column density values of σ2 for investigations of the relation between the sonic Mach number and the probability distribution function (PDF) variance in addition to existing PDF sonic Mach number relations.

  18. Evolution of column density distributions within Orion A⋆

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stutz, A. M.; Kainulainen, J.

    2015-05-01

    We compare the structure of star-forming molecular clouds in different regions of Orion A to determine how the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF) varies with environmental conditions such as the fraction of young protostars. A correlation between the N-PDF slope and Class 0 protostar fraction has been previously observed in a low-mass star-formation region (Perseus); here we test whether a similar correlation is observed in a high-mass star-forming region. We used Herschel PACS and SPIRE cold dust emission observations to derive a column density map of Orion A. We used the Herschel Orion Protostar Survey catalog to accurately identify and classify the Orion A young stellar object content, including the cold and relatively short-lived Class 0 protostars (with a lifetime of ~0.14 Myr). We divided Orion A into eight independent regions of 0.25 square degrees (13.5 pc2); in each region we fit the N-PDF distribution with a power law, and we measured the fraction of Class 0 protostars. We used a maximum-likelihood method to measure the N-PDF power-law index without binning the column density data. We find that the Class 0 fraction is higher in regions with flatter column density distributions. We tested the effects of incompleteness, extinction-driven misclassification of Class 0 sources, resolution, and adopted pixel-scales. We show that these effects cannot account for the observed trend. Our observations demonstrate an association between the slope of the power-law N-PDF and the Class 0 fractions within Orion A. Various interpretations are discussed, including timescales based on the Class 0 protostar fraction assuming a constant star-formation rate. The observed relation suggests that the N-PDF can be related to an evolutionary state of the gas. If universal, such a relation permits evaluating the evolutionary state from the N-PDF power-law index at much greater distances than those accessible with protostar counts. Appendices are available in

  19. Analysis of Mexico City urban air pollution using nitrogen dioxide column density measurements from UV/Visible spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Payne, D. G.; Grutter, M.; Melamed, M. L.

    2010-12-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy method (DOAS) was used to get column densities of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) from the analysis of zenith sky UV/visible spectra. Since the optical path length provides critical information in interpreting NO2 column densities, in conjunction with NO2 column densities, the oxygen dimer (O4) column density was retrieved to give insight into the optical path length. We report observations of year round NO2 and O4 column densities (from august 2009 to september 2010) from which the mean seasonal levels and the daily evolution, as well as the occurrence of elevated pollution episodes are examined. Surface nitric oxide (NO) and NO2 from the local monitoring network, as well as wind data and the vertical aerosol density from continuous Lidar measurements are used in the analysis to investigate specific events in the context of local emissions from vehicular traffic, photochemical production and transport from industrial emissions. The NO2 column density measurements will enhance the understanding Mexico City urban air pollution. Recent research has begun to unravel the complexity of the air pollution problem in Mexico City and its effects not only locally but on a regional and global scale as well.

  20. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Column via Space Borne Laser Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, WIlliam S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. In order to uncover the 'missing sink that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy on the order of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of .25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget in order to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong requirements on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an analysis of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics Several systems for meeting these requirements that are under investigation at various institutions in the US as well as Europe will be discussed.

  1. Topology in Synthetic Column Density Maps for Interstellar Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Putko, Joseph; Burkhart, B. K.; Lazarian, A.

    2013-01-01

    We show how the topology tool known as the genus statistic can be utilized to characterize magnetohydrodyanmic (MHD) turbulence in the ISM. The genus is measured with respect to a given density threshold and varying the threshold produces a genus curve, which can suggest an overall ‘‘meatball,’’ neutral, or ‘‘Swiss cheese’’ topology through its integral. We use synthetic column density maps made from three-dimensional 5123 compressible MHD isothermal simulations performed for different sonic and Alfvénic Mach numbers (Ms and MA respectively). We study eight different Ms values each with one sub- and one super-Alfvénic counterpart. We consider sight-lines both parallel (x) and perpendicular (y and z) to the mean magnetic field. We find that the genus integral shows a dependence on both Mach numbers, and this is still the case even after adding beam smoothing and Gaussian noise to the maps to mimic observational data. The genus integral increases with higher Ms values (but saturates after about Ms = 4) for all lines of sight. This is consistent with greater values of Ms resulting in stronger shocks, which results in a clumpier topology. We observe a larger genus integral for the sub-Alfvénic cases along the perpendicular lines of sight due to increased compression from the field lines and enhanced anisotropy. Application of the genus integral to column density maps should allow astronomers to infer the Mach numbers and thus learn about the environments of interstellar turbulence. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation’s REU program through NSF Award AST-1004881.

  2. BAL PHOSPHORUS ABUNDANCE AND EVIDENCE FOR IMMENSE IONIC COLUMN DENSITIES IN QUASAR OUTFLOWS: VLT/X-SHOOTER OBSERVATIONS OF QUASAR SDSS J1512+1119

    SciTech Connect

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Chamberlain, Carter; Benn, Chris

    2012-10-10

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is {approx}1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth.

  3. Radiation Damped Profiles of Extremely High Column Density Neutral Hydrogen : Implications of Cosmic Reionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, Kiehunn

    2016-09-01

    Incorporating the time-dependent second-order perturbation theory for the Lyman scattering cross-section, we investigate the intergalactic absorption profiles of extremely high column density systems near the end of cosmic reionization. Assuming a representative set of the redshift distribution of neutral hydrogen, we quantitatively examined the impact of inhomogeneous density on the intrinsic absorption profiles. The cumulative absorption by neutral patches in the line-of-sight mainly affects the far off-center region of the red damping wing, but the effect is not significant. The shape of the line-center can be modified by the near-zone distribution due to high opacities of the near-resonance scattering. On the other hand, the HWHM (half width at half maximum) as an effective line-width is relatively less sensitive to the local inhomogeneity. Specifically, when the two local damping wings of Lyα and Lyβ are close in spectra of the strongly damped systems, accurate profiles of both lines are required. In the case of N HI ≲ 1021 cm-2, the two-level approximation is marginally applicable for the damping wing fit within 5 - 7% errors. However, as the local column density reaches N HI ˜ 1022.3 cm-2, this classical approximation yields a relative error of a 10% overestimation in the red wing and a 20% underestimation in the blue wing of Lyα. If severe extinction by the Lyα forests is carefully subtracted, the intrinsic absorption profile will provide a better constraint on the local ionized states. For practical applications, an analytic fitting function for the Lyβ scattering is derived.

  4. The dependence of gamma-ray burst X-ray column densities on the model for Galactic hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcodia, R.; Campana, S.; Salvaterra, R.

    2016-05-01

    We study the X-ray absorption of a complete sample of 99 bright Swift gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). In recent years, a strong correlation has been found between the intrinsic X-ray absorbing column density (NH(z)) and the redshift. This absorption excess in high-z GRBs is now thought to be due to the overlooked contribution of the absorption along the intergalactic medium (IGM), by means of both intervening objects and the diffuse warm-hot intergalactic medium along the line of sight. In this work we neglect the absorption along the IGM, because our purpose is to study the eventual effect of a radical change in the Galactic absorption model on the NH(z) distribution. Therefore, we derive the intrinsic absorbing column densities using two different Galactic absorption models: the Leiden Argentine Bonn HI survey and the more recent model that includes molecular hydrogen. We find that if, on the one hand, the new Galactic model considerably affects the single column density values, on the other hand, there is no drastic change in the distribution as a whole. It becomes clear that the contribution of Galactic column densities alone, no matter how improved, is not sufficient to change the observed general trend and it has to be considered as a second order correction. The cosmological increase of NH(z) as a function of redshift persists and, to explain the observed distribution, it is necessary to include the contribution of both the diffuse intergalactic medium and the intervening systems along the line of sight of the GRBs.

  5. Evidence for structure in the H I column density distribution of QSO absorbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petitjean, P.; Webb, J. K.; Rauch, M.; Carswell, R. F.; Lanzetta, K.

    1993-01-01

    The H I column density distribution function of QSO absorption line systems is investigated using recent data with high spectral resolution, and extensive surveys of the Lyman limit systems and damped Ly-alpha systems. The hypothesis that the differential distribution function is fitted by a single power law is rejected at the 99 percent confidence level. A double power law, with a break at N(H I) = 10 exp 16/sq cm, also provides a poor fit over the range in which the sample is complete. While there are no discontinuities in the observed distribution, there is a clear flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm, compared to lower column densities. These observed features can be understood using models of photoionized clouds which are confined by an external pressure with density profiles governed by gravity. In particular, the flattening at N(H I) of about 10 exp 16/sq cm can be explained in terms of a transition between metal-poor and metal-rich systems.

  6. The column density distribution of hard X-ray radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panessa, F.; Bassani, L.; Landi, R.; Bazzano, A.; Dallacasa, D.; La Franca, F.; Malizia, A.; Venturi, T.; Ubertini, P.

    2016-09-01

    In order to investigate the role of absorption in active galactic nuclei (AGN) with jets, we have studied the column density distribution of a hard X-ray selected sample of radio galaxies, derived from the INTEGRAL/Imager on Board the Integral Satellite (IBIS) and Swift/The Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) AGN catalogues (˜7-10 per cent of the total AGN population). The 64 radio galaxies have a typical FR II radio morphology and are characterized by high 20-100 keV luminosities (from 1042 to 1046 erg s-1) and high Eddington ratios (log LBol/LEdd typically larger than ˜0.01). The observed fraction of absorbed AGN (NH > 1022 cm-2) is around 40 per cent among the total sample, and ˜75 per cent among type 2 AGN. The majority of obscured AGN are narrow-line objects, while unobscured AGN are broad-line objects, obeying to the zeroth-order predictions of unified models. A significant anti-correlation between the radio core dominance parameter and the X-ray column density is found. The observed fraction of Compton thick AGN is ˜2-3 per cent, in comparison with the 5-7 per cent found in radio-quiet hard X-ray selected AGN. We have estimated the absorption and Compton thick fractions in a hard X-ray sample containing both radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies and therefore affected by the same selection biases. No statistical significant difference was found in the absorption properties of radio galaxies and non-radio galaxies sample. In particular, the Compton thick objects are likely missing in both samples and the fraction of obscured radio galaxies appears to decrease with luminosity as observed in hard X-ray non-radio galaxies.

  7. NO2 Vertical Column Density at the Marambio Antarctic Station as Retrieved by DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raponi, Marcelo M.; Jiménez, Rodrigo; Tocho, Jorge O.; Quel, Eduardo J.

    2009-03-01

    A number of chemical species present in the stratosphere in very small concentrations (parts per billion and even smaller) contribute significantly to its chemical balance. One of the main stratospheric trace gases is nitrogen dioxide (NO2). This species acts as a restrictive agent for stratospheric ozone destruction (due to the chlorine monoxide), hence the importance of its study. We present a preliminary analysis of passive remote sensing measurements carry out at the Marambio Argentinean Antarctic Base (64.233° S; 56.616° W; 197 m amsl) during the months of January—February of 2008. The spectroscopy system consists of an optical fiber (400 μm core diameter and 6 m of longitude) and a portable spectral analyzer (spectrometer HR4000, Ocean Optics). The device analyzes diffuse solar spectral irradiance in the UV-visible range (290-650 nm), collected and transferred by a zenith-pointing optical fiber. The NO2 vertical column density (VCD) is derived from the radiance spectra using the DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) technique. The system and technique allow for simultaneous measurements of different species of interest on a variety of meteorological conditions. The vertical columns obtained are compared with co-located measurements performed with EVA, a visible absorption spectrometer operated by the Instituto Nacional de Técnica Aeroespacial (INTA), Spain.

  8. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  9. Measurement of plasma temperature and density using laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser radiation absorption technique, suitable for temporal measurement of the electron density, the temperature, or a simultaneous determination of both, in an LTE plasma, is discussed. The theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient for a hydrogen plasma is outlined; some results are presented for visible wavelengths. Measurements of electron density and temperature are presented and shown to be in good agreement with those values obtained by other methods. Finally, the possible use of the argon ion laser for simultaneous electron density and temperature measurement is discussed, and the theoretical curves necessary for its application to hydrogen plasma diagnostics are shown.

  10. The Bane of Column Density Analysis and What Good It Can Do for Us

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    How-Huan Chen, Hope; Goodman, Alyssa A.; Burkhart, Blakesley K.; Myers, Philip C.; Collins, David C.; Meisner, Aaron M.; Lee, Katherine I.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the fact that astronomers are inclined to apply statistical tools, from least-square fitting to machine learning, on the big, high-dimensional data, not enough care is often spent on examining the biases that could be introduced by sample selection and observation. The talk focuses on investigating arguably one of the most often applied statistical analyses in clouds and filaments recently--the probability distribution function (PDF) analysis of column density. We look at the correlation between column density PDF and various physical processes including turbulence and star formation as traced by young stellar objects and star forming cores, in both observation and simulation; as well as potential problems in statistically consistent fitting of column density distribution, validating correlation, biased sample selection, and projection effects. Our results show that 1) even though on large scale, the "width" of the column density PDF seems to correlate with turbulence, no clear correlation is found between column density PDF and turbulence in both simulation and observation, and 2) even previous works show that the index of the "power-law tail" correlates with the star formation activity, there is statistical ambiguity in the sampling of column density structures and associating point sources with any of these structures. We further analyze the hierachical structures of column density in molecular clouds and filaments, using the structure extraction algorithm, the dendrogram.

  11. Isoelectric focusing of red blood cells in a density gradient stabilized column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, A. J. K.; Miller, T. Y.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of Ficoll and cell application pH on red blood cell electrophoretic mobility and focusing pH were investigated by focusing cells in a density gradient stabilized column. Sample loading, cell dispersion, column conductivity, resolution of separation, and the effect of Ampholines were examined.

  12. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Column density maps in 4 IRDCs (Schneider+, 2015)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Tremblin, P.; Ossenkopf, V.; Peretto, N.; Simon, R.; Bontemps, S.; Fedrrath, C.

    2015-04-01

    Dust column density maps obtained from Herschel observations at 160, 250, 350, and 500 micron by a pixel-to-pixel SED fit. The unit is cm^-2 (regardless what is written in the header). (2 data files).

  13. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  14. Performance characteristics and modeling of carbon dioxide absorption by amines in a packed column

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, S.H.; Shyu, C.T. . Dept. of Chemical Engineering)

    1999-01-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO[sub 2]) is widely recognized as a major greenhouse gas contributing to global warming. To mitigate the global warming problem, removal of CO[sub 2] from the industrial flue gases is necessary. Absorption of carbon dioxide by amines in a packed column was experimentally investigated. The amines employed in the present study were the primary mono-ethanolamine (MEA) and tertiary N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA), two very popular amines widely used in the industries for gas purification. The CO[sub 2] absorption characteristics by these two amines were experimentally examined under various operating conditions. A theoretical model was developed for describing the CO[sub 2] absorption behavior. Test data have revealed that the model predictions and the observed CO[sub 2] absorption breakthrough curves agree very well, validating the proposed model. Preliminary regeneration tests of exhausted amine solution were also conducted. The results indicated that the tertiary amine is easier to regenerate with less loss of absorption capacity than the primary one.

  15. Airborne measurements of atmospheric methane column abundance using a pulsed integrated-path differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anand; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B

    2012-12-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon-counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude, and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:23207402

  16. Vertical profiles and column densities of NO2 by the CU Airbone MAX-DOAS: comparison with model simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baidar, S.; Oetjen, H.; Ortega, I.; Cai, C.; Kaduwela, A.; Kim, S.; Volkamer, R.

    2011-12-01

    An airborne motion-stabilized scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument was deployed on board the NOAA Twin Otter research aircraft during the CalNex and CARES field campaigns in summer 2010. A total of 52 flights (up to 4 hours each) were carried out between May 19 and July 19. We describe the CU AMAX-DOAS instrument, column densities and vertical profile retrieval techniques. Comparisons of column densities of NO2 with ground MAX-DOAS at Caltech, Fontana Arrows and CARES T1 sites are also shown as a validation of the aircraft instrument. The obtained vertical profiles and tropospheric column densities of NO2 are compared to CMAQ and WRF-Chem simulation results based on ARB 2008 and EPA NEI 2005 emission inventories respectively. On the basis of case studies we compare NOx pollution over urban pollution hotspots, background conditions as well as above and inside the boundary layer. Comparisons show strong evidence for decreasing NOx emissions to be widespread in California.

  17. The reliability of observational measurements of column density probability distribution functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossenkopf-Okada, V.; Csengeri, T.; Schneider, N.; Federrath, C.; Klessen, R. S.

    2016-05-01

    Context. Probability distribution functions (PDFs) of column densities are an established tool to characterize the evolutionary state of interstellar clouds. Aims: Using simulations, we show to what degree their determination is affected by noise, line-of-sight contamination, field selection, and the incomplete sampling in interferometric measurements. Methods: We solve the integrals that describe the convolution of a cloud PDF with contaminating sources such as noise and line-of-sight emission, and study the impact of missing information on the measured column density PDF. In this way we can quantify the effect of the different processes and propose ways to correct for their impact to recover the intrinsic PDF of the observed cloud. Results: The effect of observational noise can be easily estimated and corrected for if the root mean square (rms) of the noise is known. For σnoise values below 40% of the typical cloud column density, Npeak, this involves almost no degradation in the accuracy of the PDF parameters. For higher noise levels and narrow cloud PDFs the width of the PDF becomes increasingly uncertain. A contamination by turbulent foreground or background clouds can be removed as a constant shield if the peak of the contamination PDF falls at a lower column or is narrower than that of the observed cloud. Uncertainties in cloud boundary definition mainly affect the low-column density part of the PDF and the mean density. As long as more than 50% of a cloud is covered, the impact on the PDF parameters is negligible. In contrast, the incomplete sampling of the uv-plane in interferometric observations leads to uncorrectable PDF distortions in the maps produced. An extension of the capabilities of the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) would allow us to recover the high-column density tail of the PDF, but we found no way to measure the intermediate- and low-column density part of the underlying cloud PDF in interferometric observations.

  18. BAL Phosphorus Abundance and Evidence for Immense Ionic Column Densities in Quasar Outflows: VLT/X-Shooter Observations of Quasar SDSS J1512+1119

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borguet, Benoit C. J.; Edmonds, Doug; Arav, Nahum; Benn, Chris; Chamberlain, Carter

    2012-10-01

    We present spectroscopic analysis of the broad absorption line (BAL) outflow in quasar SDSS J1512+1119. In particular, we focus our attention on a kinematic component in which we identify P V and S IV/S IV* absorption troughs. The shape of the unblended phosphorus doublet troughs and the three S IV/S IV* troughs allow us to obtain reliable column density measurements for these two ions. Photoionization modeling using these column densities and those of He I* constrain the abundance of phosphorus to the range of 0.5-4 times the solar value. The total column density, ionization parameter, and metallicity inferred from the P V and S IV column densities lead to large optical depth values for the common transition observed in BAL outflows. We show that the true C IV optical depth is ~1000 times greater in the core of the absorption profile than the value deduced from its apparent optical depth. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, Chile, PID:87.B-0229.

  19. Improved retrieval of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities by means of MKIV Brewer spectrophotometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diémoz, H.; Siani, A. M.; Redondas, A.; Savastiouk, V.; McElroy, C. T.; Navarro-Comas, M.; Hase, F.

    2014-11-01

    A new algorithm to retrieve nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column densities using MKIV ("Mark IV") Brewer spectrophotometers is described. The method includes several improvements, such as a more recent spectroscopic data set, the reduction of measurement noise, interference by other atmospheric species and instrumental settings, and a better determination of the zenith sky air mass factor. The technique was tested during an ad hoc calibration campaign at the high-altitude site of Izaña (Tenerife, Spain) and the results of the direct sun and zenith sky geometries were compared to those obtained by two reference instruments from the Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC): a Fourier Transform Infrared Radiometer (FTIR) and an advanced visible spectrograph (RASAS-II) based on the differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) technique. To determine the extraterrestrial constant, an easily implementable extension of the standard Langley technique for very clean sites without tropospheric NO2 was developed which takes into account the daytime linear drift of stratospheric nitrogen dioxide due to photochemistry. The measurement uncertainty was thoroughly determined by using a Monte Carlo technique. Poisson noise and wavelength misalignments were found to be the most influential contributors to the overall uncertainty, and possible solutions are proposed for future improvements. The new algorithm is backward-compatible, thus allowing for the reprocessing of historical data sets.

  20. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs altitude. The

  1. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Range During the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar only on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear C02 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs

  2. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption during the ASCENDS 2009-2011 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Weaver, C. J.; Riris, H.; Mao, J.; Sun, X.; Allan, G.; Hasselbrack, W.; Browell, E. V.

    2011-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission and have demonstrated the CO2 and O2 measurements from aircraft. Our technique uses two pulsed lasers allowing simultaneous measurement of a single CO2 absorption line near 1572 nm, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line doublet during the measurement. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 are estimated from the differential optical depths (DOD) of the scanned absorption lines via the IPDA technique. For the 2009 ASCENDS campaign we flew the CO2 lidar on a Lear-25 aircraft, and measured the absorption line shapes of the CO2 line using 20 wavelength samples per scan. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3 to 12.6 km over the Lamont OK, central Illinois, North Carolina, and over the Virginia Eastern Shore. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps with 200-300 seconds of recorded measurements per step. We averaged every 10 seconds of measurements and used a cross-correlation approach to estimate the range to the scattering surface and the echo pulse energy at each wavelength. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the DOD of the fitted CO2 line, and computed its statistics at the various altitude steps. We compared them to CO2 optical depths calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the column number densities calculated from the airborne in-situ readings. The 2009 measurements have been analyzed in detail and they were similar on all flights. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. They showed the expected nearly the linear dependence of DOD vs

  3. Far-infrared Dust Temperatures and Column Densities of the MALT90 Molecular Clump Sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, Andrés E.; Sanhueza, Patricio; Contreras, Yanett; Smith, Howard A.; Jackson, James M.; Hoq, Sadia; Rathborne, Jill M.

    2015-12-01

    We present dust column densities and dust temperatures for ˜3000 young, high-mass molecular clumps from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey, derived from adjusting single-temperature dust emission models to the far-infrared intensity maps measured between 160 and 870 μm from the Herschel/Herschel Infrared Galactic Plane Survey (Hi-Gal) and APEX/APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL) surveys. We discuss the methodology employed in analyzing the data, calculating physical parameters, and estimating their uncertainties. The population average dust temperature of the clumps are 16.8 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that do not exhibit mid-infrared signatures of star formation (quiescent clumps), 18.6 ± 0.2 K for the clumps that display mid-infrared signatures of ongoing star formation but have not yet developed an H ii region (protostellar clumps), and 23.7 ± 0.2 and 28.1 ± 0.3 K for clumps associated with H ii and photo-dissociation regions, respectively. These four groups exhibit large overlaps in their temperature distributions, with dispersions ranging between 4 and 6 K. The median of the peak column densities of the protostellar clump population is 0.20 ± 0.02 g cm-2, which is about 50% higher compared to the median of the peak column densities associated with clumps in the other evolutionary stages. We compare the dust temperatures and column densities measured toward the center of the clumps with the mean values of each clump. We find that in the quiescent clumps, the dust temperature increases toward the outer regions and that these clumps are associated with the shallowest column density profiles. In contrast, molecular clumps in the protostellar or H ii region phase have dust temperature gradients more consistent with internal heating and are associated with steeper column density profiles compared with the quiescent clumps.

  4. Inverse estimation of parameters for multidomain flow models in soil columns with different macropore densities

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Bhavna; Mohanty, Binayak P.; McGuire, Jennifer T.

    2013-01-01

    Soil and crop management practices have been found to modify soil structure and alter macropore densities. An ability to accurately determine soil hydraulic parameters and their variation with changes in macropore density is crucial for assessing potential contamination from agricultural chemicals. This study investigates the consequences of using consistent matrix and macropore parameters in simulating preferential flow and bromide transport in soil columns with different macropore densities (no macropore, single macropore, and multiple macropores). As used herein, the term“macropore density” is intended to refer to the number of macropores per unit area. A comparison between continuum-scale models including single-porosity model (SPM), mobile-immobile model (MIM), and dual-permeability model (DPM) that employed these parameters is also conducted. Domain-specific parameters are obtained from inverse modeling of homogeneous (no macropore) and central macropore columns in a deterministic framework and are validated using forward modeling of both low-density (3 macropores) and high-density (19 macropores) multiple-macropore columns. Results indicate that these inversely modeled parameters are successful in describing preferential flow but not tracer transport in both multiple-macropore columns. We believe that lateral exchange between matrix and macropore domains needs better accounting to efficiently simulate preferential transport in the case of dense, closely spaced macropores. Increasing model complexity from SPM to MIM to DPM also improved predictions of preferential flow in the multiple-macropore columns but not in the single-macropore column. This suggests that the use of a more complex model with resolved domain-specific parameters is recommended with an increase in macropore density to generate forecasts with higher accuracy. PMID:24511165

  5. NGC 1365: A low column density state unveiling a low ionization disk wind

    SciTech Connect

    Braito, V.; Reeves, J. N.; Gofford, J.; Nardini, E.; Porquet, D.; Risaliti, G.

    2014-11-01

    We present the time-resolved spectral analysis of the XMM-Newton data of NGC 1365 collected during one XMM-Newton observation, which caught this 'changing-look' active galactic nucleus in a high flux state characterized also by a low column density (N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}) of the X-ray absorber. During this observation, the low-energy photoelectric cut-off is at about ∼1 keV and the primary continuum can be investigated with the XMM-Newton-RGS data, which show strong spectral variability that can be explained as a variable low N {sub H} that decreased from N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 23} cm{sup –2} to 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2} in a 100 ks timescale. The spectral analysis of the last segment of the observation revealed the presence of several absorption features that can be associated with an ionized (log ξ ∼ 2 erg cm s{sup –1}) outflowing wind (v {sub out} ∼ 2000 km s{sup –1}). We detected for the first time a possible P-Cygni profile of the Mg XII Lyα line associated with this mildly ionized absorber indicative of a wide angle outflowing wind. We suggest that this wind is a low ionization zone of the highly ionized wind present in NGC 1365, which is responsible for the iron K absorption lines and is located within the variable X-ray absorber. At the end of the observation, we detected a strong absorption line at E ∼ 0.76 keV most likely associated with a lower ionization zone of the absorber (log ξ ∼ 0.2 erg cm s{sup –1}, N {sub H} ∼ 10{sup 22} cm{sup –2}), which suggests that the variable absorber in NGC 1365 could be a low ionization zone of the disk wind.

  6. THE COLUMN DENSITY VARIANCE IN TURBULENT INTERSTELLAR MEDIA: A FRACTAL MODEL APPROACH

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il

    2012-12-20

    Fractional Brownian motion structures are used to investigate the dependency of column density variance ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN}) in the turbulent interstellar medium on the variance of three-dimensional density ({sigma}{sup 2}{sub ln{rho}}) and the power-law slope of the density power spectrum. We provide quantitative expressions to infer the three-dimensional density variance, which is not directly observable, from the observable column density variance and spectral slope. We also investigate the relationship between the column density variance and sonic Mach number (M{sub s}) in the hydrodynamic (HD) regime by assuming the spectral slope and density variance to be functions of sonic Mach number, as obtained from the HD turbulence simulations. They are related by the expression {sigma}{sup 2}{sub lnN} = A{sigma}{sub ln{rho}} {sup 2} = Aln (1 + b {sup 2} M{sup 2}{sub s}), suggested by Burkhart and Lazarian for the magnetohydrodynamic case. The proportional constant A varies from Almost-Equal-To 0.2 to Almost-Equal-To 0.4 in the HD regime as the turbulence forcing parameter b increases from 1/3 (purely solenoidal forcing) to 1 (purely compressive forcing). It is also discussed that the parameter A is lowered in the presence of a magnetic field.

  7. Spatial and temporal variations in the column density distribution of comet Halley's CN coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Rita; Schlosser, W.; Meisser, W.; Koczet, P.; Celnik, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Mean radial column density profiles of comet P/Halley's CN coma were derived by combining photographic and photoelectric observations. The shape of the profiles as well as their temporal variations were analyzed in detail and compared with the results of other CN observations of the comet.

  8. Analysis of Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Weaver, Clark J.; Riris, Haris; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William; Browell, Edward V.

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission [1]. It uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1575 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band, surface height and backscatter profile. The lasers are precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver measures the energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with the range profile of scattering in the path. The column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off-line signals via the integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) technique. The time of flight of the laser pulses is used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate an early version of the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar stepped the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 wavelength steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a NIR photomultiplier and is recorded on every other reading by a photon counting system [2]. During August 2009 we made a series of 2.5 hour long flights and measured the atmospheric CO2 absorption and line shapes using the 1572.33 nm CO2 line. Measurements were made at stepped altitudes from 3-13 km over locations in the US, including the SGP ARM site in Oklahoma, central Illinois, north-eastern North Carolina, and over the Chesapeake Bay and the eastern shore of Virginia. Although the received signal energies were weaker than expected for ASCENDS, clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes, and some measurements were made

  9. Retrievals of Column CO2 Densities from Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G.; Hasselbrack, W.; Kawa, S. R.; Mao, J.

    2011-12-01

    We present results from our summer 2010 CO2 measurement campaign using the NASA Goddard CO2 lidar sounder onboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft platform. This instrument is a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS space mission. The airborne instrument steps a pulsed wavelength-tunable laser transmitter across the 1572.33 nm CO2 line in thirty steps at a 300 Hz repetition rate. The line transmission shape, optical depth, and column densities for the CO2 are obtained from a retrieval algorithm that fits the observed scan while accounting for atmospheric temperature, pressure, water vapor and the lidar's wavelength response. We present results from flights over Railroad Valley Nevada, the ARM site in Oklahoma, and a flight over the Pacific Ocean. During our most recent summer 2011 campaign we flew our instrument over solid and broken cloud as well as smoke from forest fires. Preliminary results from these more challenging conditions will be presented. A second part of the presentation asks how many independent pieces of information about the CO2 vertical profile are retrievable for a given CO2 lidar instrument configuration. We explore how changing the instrument signal to noise and changing the number of wavelengths where the absorption is measured impacts the amount of information in the retrieved CO2 vertical profile. For example if we want CO2 concentrations from 2 independent altitude layers how many wavelength samples, at a given signal to noise, are needed? We consider instrument configurations where only two wavelengths are sampled (simple on-line off-line) up to configurations where 30 wavelengths are sampled.

  10. Estimation of high-resolution dust column density maps. Empirical model fits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juvela, M.; Montillaud, J.

    2013-09-01

    Context. Sub-millimetre dust emission is an important tracer of column density N of dense interstellar clouds. One has to combine surface brightness information at different spatial resolutions, and specific methods are needed to derive N at a resolution higher than the lowest resolution of the observations. Some methods have been discussed in the literature, including a method (in the following, method B) that constructs the N estimate in stages, where the smallest spatial scales being derived only use the shortest wavelength maps. Aims: We propose simple model fitting as a flexible way to estimate high-resolution column density maps. Our goal is to evaluate the accuracy of this procedure and to determine whether it is a viable alternative for making these maps. Methods: The new method consists of model maps of column density (or intensity at a reference wavelength) and colour temperature. The model is fitted using Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, comparing model predictions with observations at their native resolution. We analyse simulated surface brightness maps and compare its accuracy with method B and the results that would be obtained using high-resolution observations without noise. Results: The new method is able to produce reliable column density estimates at a resolution significantly higher than the lowest resolution of the input maps. Compared to method B, it is relatively resilient against the effects of noise. The method is computationally more demanding, but is feasible even in the analysis of large Herschel maps. Conclusions: The proposed empirical modelling method E is demonstrated to be a good alternative for calculating high-resolution column density maps, even with considerable super-resolution. Both methods E and B include the potential for further improvements, e.g., in the form of better a priori constraints.

  11. TRACING H{sub 2} COLUMN DENSITY WITH ATOMIC CARBON (C I) AND CO ISOTOPOLOGS

    SciTech Connect

    Lo, N.; Bronfman, L.; Cunningham, M. R.; Jones, P. A.; Lowe, V.; Cortes, P. C.; Simon, R.; Fissel, L.; Novak, G.

    2014-12-20

    We present the first results of neutral carbon ([C I] {sup 3} P {sub 1}-{sup 3} P {sub 0} at 492 GHz) and carbon monoxide ({sup 13}CO, J = 1-0) mapping in the Vela Molecular Ridge cloud C (VMR-C) and the G333 giant molecular cloud complexes with the NANTEN2 and Mopra telescopes. For the four regions mapped in this work, we find that [C I] has very similar spectral emission profiles to {sup 13}CO, with comparable line widths. We find that [C I] has an opacity of 0.1-1.3 across the mapped region while the [C I]/{sup 13}CO peak brightness temperature ratio is between 0.2 and 0.8. The [C I] column density is an order of magnitude lower than that of {sup 13}CO. The H{sub 2} column density derived from [C I] is comparable to values obtained from {sup 12}CO. Our maps show that C I is preferentially detected in gas with low temperatures (below 20 K), which possibly explains the comparable H{sub 2} column density calculated from both tracers (both C I and {sup 12}CO underestimate column density), as a significant amount of the C I in the warmer gas is likely in the higher energy state transition ([C I] {sup 3} P {sub 2}-{sup 3} P {sub 1} at 810 GHz), and thus it is likely that observations of both the above [C I] transitions are needed in order to recover the total H{sub 2} column density.

  12. HIDEEP - an extragalactic blind survey for very low column-density neutral hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minchin, R. F.; Disney, M. J.; Boyce, P. J.; de Blok, W. J. G.; Parker, Q. A.; Banks, G. D.; Freeman, K. C.; Garcia, D. A.; Gibson, B. K.; Grossi, M.; Haynes, R. F.; Knezek, P. M.; Lang, R. H.; Malin, D. F.; Price, R. M.; Stewart, I. M.; Wright, A. E.

    2003-12-01

    We have carried out an extremely long integration time (9000 s beam-1) 21-cm blind survey of 60 deg2 in Centaurus using the Parkes multibeam system. We find that the noise continues to fall as throughout, enabling us to reach an HI column-density limit of 4.2 × 1018 cm-2 for galaxies with a velocity width of 200 km s-1 in the central 32 deg2 region, making this the deepest survey to date in terms of column density sensitivity. The HI data are complemented by very deep optical observations from digital stacking of multi-exposure UK Schmidt Telescope R-band films, which reach an isophotal level of 26.5 R mag arcsec-2 (~=27.5 B mag arcsec-2). 173 HI sources have been found, 96 of which have been uniquely identified with optical counterparts in the overlap area. There is not a single source without an optical counterpart. Although we have not measured the column densities directly, we have inferred them from the optical sizes of their counterparts. All appear to have a column density of NHI= 1020.65+/-0.38. This is at least an order of magnitude above our sensitivity limit, with a scatter only marginally larger than the errors on NHI. This needs explaining. If confirmed it means that HI surveys will only find low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies with high MHI/LB. Gas-rich LSB galaxies with lower HI mass to light ratios do not exist. The paucity of low column-density galaxies also implies that no significant population will be missed by the all-sky HI surveys being carried out at Parkes and Jodrell Bank.

  13. DIFFUSE MOLECULAR CLOUD DENSITIES FROM UV MEASUREMENTS OF CO ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2013-09-10

    We use UV measurements of interstellar CO toward nearby stars to calculate the density in the diffuse molecular clouds containing the molecules responsible for the observed absorption. Chemical models and recent calculations of the excitation rate coefficients indicate that the regions in which CO is found have hydrogen predominantly in molecular form and that collisional excitation is by collisions with H{sub 2} molecules. We carry out statistical equilibrium calculations using CO-H{sub 2} collision rates to solve for the H{sub 2} density in the observed sources without including effects of radiative trapping. We have assumed kinetic temperatures of 50 K and 100 K, finding this choice to make relatively little difference to the lowest transition. For the sources having T{sup ex}{sub 10} only for which we could determine upper and lower density limits, we find (n(H{sub 2})) = 49 cm{sup -3}. While we can find a consistent density range for a good fraction of the sources having either two or three values of the excitation temperature, there is a suggestion that the higher-J transitions are sampling clouds or regions within diffuse molecular cloud material that have higher densities than the material sampled by the J = 1-0 transition. The assumed kinetic temperature and derived H{sub 2} density are anticorrelated when the J = 2-1 transition data, the J = 3-2 transition data, or both are included. For sources with either two or three values of the excitation temperature, we find average values of the midpoint of the density range that is consistent with all of the observations equal to 68 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 100 K and 92 cm{sup -3} for T{sup k} = 50 K. The data for this set of sources imply that diffuse molecular clouds are characterized by an average thermal pressure between 4600 and 6800 K cm{sup -3}.

  14. Modeling the Performance of a Spaceborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, B.; Ismail, S.; Harrison, F. W.; Browell, E. V.; Nehrir, A. R.; Dobler, J. T.; Moore, B.; Refaat, T.; Kooi, S. A.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate global observations of atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) with a laser-based space mission, such as the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission, are crucial to improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. This study focuses on modeling of the performance of a spaceborne laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) system for CO2 column measurements. The model accounts for all of the fundamental physics of the instrument subsystems and components and the influences of measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems and their components are based on existing technologies and the implementation of operational systems. The modeled instrument is specifically assumed to be an Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) LAS system like the Exelis airborne Multifunctional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 um CO2 absorption band. Environmental effects such as gas absorption, solar radiation, scattering of aerosols and thin clouds, atmospheric turbulence, and surface reflection are also considered in the model. The modeled results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles of multiple model runs to accurately represent the random nature of all of the noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. Model simulations demonstrate very good agreement when compared to prior airborne and ground based MFLL measurements. The model predicted lidar return powers for various calibrated surface targets show good agreement with those measured by the MFLL instrument during ground tests at NASA Langley Research Center in the summer of 2012. The difference between modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) of the LAS CO2 column optical depths (Tau_d) for the summer 2011 flight campaign on board the NASA DC-8 over Railroad Valley (RRV), NV is generally within 20%. The simulations for spaceborne Tau_d measurements over RRV indicate

  15. Column densities resulting from shuttle sublimator/evaporator operation. [optical density of nozzle flow containing water vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1973-01-01

    The proposed disposal of H2O from the shuttle fuel cell operation by ejecting it in vapor form through a supersonic nozzle at the rate of 100 lb/day has been investigated from the point of view of the possible interference to astronomical experiments. If the nozzle is located at the tail and directed along the shuttle longitudinal axis, the resulting column density will be less than 10 to th 12th power molecules/sq cm at viewing angles larger than 48 deg above the longitudinal axis. The molecules in the trail will diffuse rapidly. The column density contribution from molecules expelled on the previous orbit is 1.3 x 10 to the 8th power molecules/sq cm. This contribution diminishes by the inverse square root of the number of orbits since the molecules were expelled. The molecular backscatter from atmospheric molecules is also calculated. If the plume is directed into the flight path, the column density along a perpendicular is found to be 1.5 x 10 to the 11th power molecules/sq cm. The return flux is estimated to be of the order of 10 to the 12th power molecules/sq cm/sec at the stagnation point. With reasonable care in design of experiments to protect them from the backscatter flux of water molecules, the expulsion of 100 lb/day does not appear to create an insurmountable difficulty for the shuttle experiments.

  16. OClO slant column densities derived from GOMOS averaged transmittance measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tétard, C.; Fussen, D.; Vanhellemont, F.; Bingen, C.; Dekemper, E.; Mateshvili, N.; Pieroux, D.; Robert, C.; Kyrölä, E.; Tamminen, J.; Sofieva, V.; Hauchecorne, A.; Dalaudier, F.; Bertaux, J.-L.; Fanton d'Andon, O.; Barrot, G.; Blanot, L.; Dehn, A.; Saavedra de Miguel, L.

    2013-11-01

    The Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars (GOMOS) instrument on board the European platform ENVISAT (ENVironment SATellite) was dedicated to the study of the of Earth's atmosphere using the stellar occultation technique. The spectral range of the GOMOS spectrometer extends from the UV (ultra violet) to the near infrared, allowing for the retrieval of species such as O3, NO2, NO3, H2O, O2, air density, aerosol extinction and OClO. Nevertheless, OClO cannot be retrieved using a single GOMOS measurement because of the weak signal-to-noise ratio and the small optical thickness associated with this molecule. We present here the method used to detect this molecule by using several GOMOS measurements. It is based on a two-step approach. First, several co-located measurements are combined in a statistical way to build an averaged measurement with a higher signal-to-noise ratio; then, a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is applied to retrieve OClO slant column densities (SCD). The statistics of the sets of GOMOS measurements used to build the averaged measurement and the spectral window selection are analyzed. The obtained retrievals are compared to results from two balloon-borne instruments. It appears that the inter-comparisons of OClO are generally satisfying (relative differences are about 15-60%). Two nighttime climatologies of OClO based on GOMOS averaged measurements are presented. The first depicts annual global pictures of OClO from 2003 to 2011. From this climatology, the presence of an OClO SCD peak in the equatorial region at about 35 km is confirmed and strong OClO SCD in both polar regions are observed (more than 1016 cm-2 in the Antarctic region and slightly less in the Arctic region), a sign of chlorine activation. The second climatology is a monthly time series. It clearly shows the chlorine activation of the lower stratosphere during winter. Moreover the equatorial OClO SCD peak is observed during all years without any

  17. 13CO Bell Laboratories Survey: 13CO Column Density Distribution of the First Quadrant of the Galactic Plane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Kim, H. G.; Stark, A. A.

    2000-05-01

    We present the distribution of 13CO column density of the first quadrant (l = 8 - 90) of the Galactic Plane using the 13CO Bell Laboratories Survey and UMass-Stony Brook 12CO Survey. We estimate the column density channel by channel (with a velocity step of 1 km/sec) with LTE assumption, generating the coumn density cube data for the first quadrant. Spatial resoultion is smoothed into 6 arcminute for whole direction. The highest column density is estimated to be 9.3x1016 cm-2 per channel, which is one of the densest part of the Galactic Ring region. Good correaltionship is found between 13CO integrated instensity and column density. We discuss some charateristics of the column density distribution. This work is supported by Creative Initiative Research Fund 99-NZ-01-01-A-31 of the Ministry of Science and Techonology, Republic of Korea.

  18. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  19. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Weaver, Clark; Mao, Jianping; Sun, Xiaoli; Hasselbrack, William

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a pulsed lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS space mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are rapidly and precisely stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The direct detection receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. The time of flight of the laser pulses are also used to estimate the height of the scattering surface and to identify cases of mixed cloud and ground scattering. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across the selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, the laser pulse widths are 1 usec, and laser pulse energy is 24 uJ. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during fall 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin clouds. The atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the

  20. Validation of Carbon Monoxide and Methane Vertical Column Densities Retrieved from SCIAMACHY Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hochstaffl, Philipp; Hamidouche, Mourad; Schreier, Franz; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Lichtenberg, Günter

    2016-04-01

    Carbon monoxide and methane are key species of Earth's atmosphere, highly relevant for climate and air quality. Accordingly, a large number of spaceborne sensors are observing these species in the microwave, thermal and near infrared. For the analysis of short wave infrared spectra measured by SCIAMACHY aboard the ENVISAT satellite and similar instrument(s) we had developed the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm: BIRRA is a separable least squares fit of the measured radiance with respect to molecular column densities and auxiliary parameters (optional: surface albedo, baseline, slit function width, and wavenumber shift). BIRRA has been implemented in the operational SCIAMACHY L1 to 2 processor for the retrieval of CO and CH4 from channel 8 (2.3 mue) and 6 (1.6 mue), respectively. Our tests are based on separate comparisons with existing space or ground-based measurements of carbon monoxide and methane column densities. In this poster intercomparisons of CO and CH4 columns estimated from SCIAMACHY with coincident and co-located retrievals provided by ground-based Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy are provided. More specifically, we have used data from several NDACC (Network for the Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change) and TCCON (Total Carbon Column Observing Network) stations. Our strategy for quality check of these products and the selection of specific geographical areas will be discussed.

  1. Ground-based FTIR measurements of vertical column densities of several trace gases above Spitsbergen

    SciTech Connect

    Notholt, J. ); Schrems, O. )

    1994-06-22

    The authors report column density measurements of N[sub 2]O, CH[sub 4], HF, HCl, O[sub 3], NO[sub 2] and HNO[sub 3], made from Ny-Alesund (79[degrees]N), using a ground-based FTIR instrument. The data was collected in March 1992, over a time interval where the site was inside, and then outside the polar vortex.

  2. Obtaining the thermodynamics of harmonically trapped gases from their column density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, Mark; Sommer, Ariel; Cheuk, Lawrence; Ji, Wenjie; Bakr, Waseem; Yefsah, Tarik; Zwierlein, Martin

    2013-05-01

    We present a procedure to obtain the equation of state (EoS) of a harmonically trapped atomic gas directly from its column density. We show that the column density of a harmonically trapped gas is a thermodynamic quantity, and its variation with respect to the external trapping potential encodes the EoS. This procedure also prescribes a powerful tool to perform thermometry for trapped atomic gases. We demonstrate the procedure on the unitary Fermi gas, where the column density is directly related to the trap-averaged heat capacity. This trap-averaged quantity shows evidently only a benign rise above its normal value around the superfluid transition, in contrast to the sharp rise in the homogeneous case. We also report on the progress to measure the temperature dependence of the spin susceptibility in spin-imbalanced Fermi gases at unitarity. This work was supported by the NSF, AFOSR-MURI, ARO-MURI, ONR, DARPA YFA, a grant from the Army Research Office with funding from the DARPA OLE program, an AFOSR PECASE, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, and the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation.

  3. Molecular column densities in selected model atmospheres. [chemical analysis of carbon stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, H. R.; Beebe, R. F.; Sneden, C.

    1974-01-01

    From an examination of predicted column densities, the following conclusions were drawn: (1) The SiO ought to be visible in carbon stars which were generated from triple alpha burning, but absent from carbon stars generated from the CNO bi-cycle. (2) Variation in the observed relative strengths of TiO and ZrO is indicative of real differences in the ratio Ti/Zr. (3) The TiO/ZrO ratio shows a small variation as C/O and effective temperature is changed. (4) Column density of silicon dicarbide (SiC2) is sensitive to abundance, temperature, and gravity; hence all relationships between the strength of SiC2 and other stellar parameters will show appreciable scatter. There is however, a substantial luminosity effect present in the SiC2 column densities. (5) Unexpectedly, SiC2 is anti-correlated with C2. (6) The presence of SiC2 in a carbon star eliminates the possibility of these stars having temperatures greater than or equal to 3000 K, or being produced through the CNO bi-cycle.

  4. Green bank telescope observations of low column density H I around NGC 2997 and NGC 6946

    SciTech Connect

    Pisano, D. J.

    2014-03-01

    Observations of ongoing H I accretion in nearby galaxies have only identified about 10% of the fuel necessary to sustain star formation in these galaxies. Most of these observations have been conducted using interferometers and may have missed lower column density, diffuse, H I gas that may trace the missing 90% of gas. Such gas may represent the so-called cold flows predicted by current theories of galaxy formation to have never been heated above the virial temperature of the dark matter halo. As a first attempt to identify such cold flows around nearby galaxies and complete the census of H I down to N {sub H} {sub I} ∼ 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2}, I used the Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to map the circumgalactic (r ≲ 100-200 kpc) H I environment around NGC 2997 and NGC 6946. The resulting GBT observations cover a 4 deg{sup 2} area around each galaxy with a 5σ detection limit of N{sub H} {sub I} ∼ 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} over a 20 km s{sup –1} line width. This project complements absorption line studies, which are well-suited to the regime of lower N{sub H} {sub I}. Around NGC 2997, the GBT H I data reveal an extended H I disk and all of its surrounding gas-rich satellite galaxies, but no filamentary features. Furthermore, the H I mass as measured with the GBT is only 7% higher than past interferometric measurements. After correcting for resolution differences, the H I extent of the galaxy is 23% larger at the N{sub H} {sub I} = 1.2 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} level as measured by the GBT. On the other hand, the H I observations of NGC 6946 reveal a filamentary feature apparently connecting NGC 6946 with its nearest companions. This H I filament has N{sub H} {sub I} ∼ 5 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup –2} and an FWHM of 55 ± 5 km s{sup –1} and was invisible in past interferometer observations. The properties of this filament are broadly consistent with being a cold flow or debris from a past tidal interaction between NGC 6946 and its satellites.

  5. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham R.; Ramanathan, Anand; Hasselbrack, William E.; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Browell, Edward V.

    2012-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to greater than 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the Iidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected -linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes greater than 6 km the random errors were approximately 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as wen as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly

  6. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Ramanathan, A.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2012-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated an efficient pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. Our team participated in the 2010 ASCENDS airborne campaigns we flew airborne version of the CO2 and O2 lidar on the NASA DC-8. The CO2 lidar measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan and 300 scans per second. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 line shapes were observed at all altitudes. Our post-flight analysis estimated the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solved for the best-fit CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak. We compared these to CO2 DODs calculated from spectroscopy based on HITRAN 2008 and the conditions from airborne in-situ readings. Analysis of the 2010 measurements over the Pacific Ocean and Lamont OK shows the expected ~linear change of the peak DOD with altitude. For measurements at altitudes > 6 km the random errors were ~ 0.3 ppm for 80 sec averaging times. After the 2010 flights we improved the airborne lidar's scan uniformity, calibration and receiver sensitivity. Our team participated in the seven ASCENDS science flights during late July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, snow patches on mountain tops, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity

  7. Pulsed Airborne Lidar measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km altitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Hasselbrack, W. E.; Sun, X.

    2009-12-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA’s planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, O2 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the CO2 line and an O2 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the CO2 and O2 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the CO2 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear-25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser’s wavelength across a selected CO2 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz, laser pulse energy is 25 uJ and laser pulse widths are 1 usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric CO2 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm CO2 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These flights were coordinated with DOE investigators who flew an in-situ CO2 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The

  8. Pulsed Airborne Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption and Line Shapes from 3-13 km Altitudes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C.; Hasselbrack, W.; Sun, X.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric C02 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's planned ASCENDS mission. Our technique uses two pulsed laser transmitters allowing simultaneous measurement of a C02 absorption line in the 1570 nm band, 02 extinction in the Oxygen A-band and surface height and backscatter. The lidar measures the energy and time of flight of the laser echoes reflected from the atmosphere and surface. The lasers are stepped in wavelength across the C02 line and an 02 line region during the measurement. The receiver uses a telescope and photon counting detectors, and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the surface along with scattering from any aerosols in the path. The gas extinction and column densities for the C02 and 02 gases are estimated from the ratio of the on- and off- line signals via the DIAL technique. Time gating is used to isolate the laser echo signals from the surface, and to reject laser photons scattered in the atmosphere. We have developed an airborne lidar to demonstrate the C02 measurement from the NASA Glenn Lear 25 aircraft. The airborne lidar steps the pulsed laser's wavelength across a selected C02 line with 20 steps per scan. The line scan rate is 450 Hz and laser pulse widths are I usec. The time resolved laser backscatter is collected by a 20 cm telescope, detected by a photomultiplier and is recorded by a photon counting system. We made initial airborne measurements on flights during October and December 2008. Laser backscatter and absorption measurements were made over a variety of land and water surfaces and through thin and broken clouds. Atmospheric C02 column measurements using the 1571.4, 1572.02 and 1572.33 nm C02 lines. Two flights were made above the DOE SGP ARM site at altitudes from 3-8 km. These nights were coordinated with DOE investigators who Hew an in-situ C02 sensor on a Cessna aircraft under the path. The increasing C02 line absorptions with

  9. A DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF THE TOTAL GAS COLUMN DENSITY IN ORION KL

    SciTech Connect

    Plume, R.; Bergin, E. A.; Wang, S.; Crockett, N. R.; Phillips, T. G.; Lis, D. C.; Caux, E.; Comito, C.; Schilke, P.; Goldsmith, P. F.

    2012-01-01

    The large number of high-J lines of C{sup 18}O available via the Herschel Space Observatory provide an unprecedented ability to model the total CO column density in hot cores. Using the emission from all the observed lines (up to J = 15-14), we sum the column densities in each individual level to obtain the total column after correcting for the population in the unobserved states. With additional knowledge of source size, V{sub LSR}, and line width, and both local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) and non-LTE modeling, we have determined the total C{sup 18}O column densities in the Extended Ridge, Outflow/Plateau, Compact Ridge, and Hot Core components of Orion KL to be 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, 3.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, 2.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, and 6.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}, respectively. We also find that the C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratio varies from 1.7 in the Outflow/Plateau, 2.3 in the Extended Ridge, 3.0 in the Hot Core, and to 4.1 in the Compact Ridge. This is in agreement with models in which regions with higher ultraviolet radiation fields selectively dissociate C{sup 17}O, although care must be taken when interpreting these numbers due to the size of the uncertainties in the C{sup 18}O/C{sup 17}O abundance ratio.

  10. Column Path Length Measurements Using a Multi-Frequency, Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) Laser Absorption Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, F. W.; Lin, B.; Browell, E. V.; Dobler, J.; McGregor, D.; Kooi, S. A.; Collins, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate understanding of carbon balance in the environment is critical to projections of the future evolution of the Earth's climate. As a result, the NRC Decadal Survey (DS) of Earth Science and Applications from Space identified Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) as a mid-term (Tier II) mission. The active space remote measurement of the column CO2 mixing ratio (XCO2) for the ASCENDS mission requires the simultaneous measurement of the CO2 and O2 number density and the column path length over which they are measured in order to derive the average XCO2 column. This paper presents methods for measuring the path lengths of the CO2 and O2 measurements that are inherent to the Multi-Functional Fiber Laser Lidar (MFLL), a laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) system under development for the ASCENDS mission. The MFLL is a multi-frequency intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) LAS operating near 1.57 and 1.26 μm that uses a range-encoded modulation technique to minimize bias from thin clouds in the CO2 and O2 column measurements while simultaneously measuring the path length to the surface and to intervening cloud layers. This paper discusses the latest MFLL ground and flight test results. During these tests, range-encoded modulation techniques were demonstrated for path length measurements and the MFLL remote CO2 column measurements were evaluated against in situ CO2 measurements. This paper describes the encoding techniques employed, presents an approach for obtaining column path length measurements during CO2 retrievals, and presents the accuracy and precision of the technique. Measurement of path length meeting ASCENDS requirements of approximately 2-m precision were obtained in ground testing and demonstrated during flights over Railroad Valley, NV.

  11. Fractionation analysis of manganese and zinc in beers by means of two sorbent column system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Pawel; Prusisz, Bartlomiej

    2007-03-15

    In the present article, a method of operational fractionation of Mn and Zn in beer using flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The proposed fractionation scheme was based on use of a hydrophobic adsorbing resin Amberlite XAD7 (first column, 2g resin bed) connected in a series with a strong cation exchanger Dowex 50Wx4 (second column, 1g resin bed). After passing the samples of beers through the columns, distinct groupings of Mn and Zn species retained on the sorbents, i.e., hydrophobic fraction of polyphenols bound metal species and cationic metal species fraction, respectively, were determined in respective eluates obtained after complete recovery of Mn and Zn species with 10ml of 2.0moll(-1) HNO(3) (first column) and 10ml of 4.0moll(-1) HCl (second column). In addition, the effluents collected were analyzed prior to the evaluation of the third, residual fraction, presumably attributed to any hydrophilic anionic and inert metal species. The established fractionation patterns for Mn and Zn were discussed in reference to likely associations of metals with endogenous food bioligands and possible availability of the distinguished metal species classes. The quality of the results was proved by the recovery experiments. PMID:19071499

  12. Accounting for surface reflectance in the derivation of vertical column densities of NO2 from airborne imaging DOAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, Andreas Carlos; Schönhardt, Anja; Richter, Andreas; Bösch, Tim; Seyler, André; Constantin, Daniel Eduard; Shaiganfar, Reza; Merlaud, Alexis; Ruhtz, Thomas; Wagner, Thomas; van Roozendael, Michel; Burrows, John. P.

    2016-04-01

    Nitrogen oxides, NOx (NOx = NO + NO2) play a key role in tropospheric chemistry. In addition to their directly harmful effects on the respiratory system of living organisms, they influence the levels of tropospheric ozone and contribute to acid rain and eutrophication of ecosystems. As they are produced in combustion processes, they can serve as an indicator for anthropogenic air pollution. In the late summers of 2014 and 2015, two extensive measurement campaigns were conducted in Romania by several European research institutes, with financial support from ESA. The AROMAT / AROMAT-2 campaigns (Airborne ROmanian Measurements of Aerosols and Trace gases) were dedicated to measurements of air quality parameters utilizing newly developed instrumentation at state-of-the-art. The experiences gained will help to calibrate and validate the measurements taken by the upcoming Sentinel-S5p mission scheduled for launch in 2016. The IUP Bremen contributed to these campaigns with its airborne imaging DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) instrument AirMAP (Airborne imaging DOAS instrument for Measurements of Atmospheric Pollution). AirMAP allows retrieving spatial distributions of trace gas columns densities in a stripe below the aircraft. The measurements have a high spatial resolution of approximately 30 x 80 m2 (along x across track) at a typical flight altitude of 3000 m. Supported by the instrumental setup and the large swath, gapless maps of trace gas distributions above a large city, like Bucharest or Berlin, can be acquired within a time window of approximately two hours. These properties make AirMAP a valuable tool for the validation of trace gas measurements from space. DOAS retrievals yield the density of absorbers integrated along the light path of the measurement. The light path is altered with a changing surface reflectance, leading to enhanced / reduced slant column densities of NO2 depending on surface properties. This effect must be considered in

  13. Column Density Maps of the I-GALFA HI Survey: Evidence for Dark Gas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Steven J.; Koo, B.; Douglas, K. A.; Newton, J. H.; Peek, J. E.; Hughes, J. M.; Spraggs, M.; Park, G.; Kang, J.; Heiles, C. E.; Korpela, E. J.

    2014-01-01

    The gas in galactic disks, including our own, occurs in a wide range of temperatures and densities, most of which are unsuitable for star formation. Somehow, diffuse atomic clouds are collected into colder, denser molecular clouds that can collapse under their own gravity. The molecular condensation process is not directly observable, and the gas itself is often ``dark'' to standard probes like optically thin HI 21cm emission or the CO 2.6mm line. However, the presence of this dark gas can often be inferred from infrared dust emission in excess of what is expected for the observed HI and CO content. We have mapped apparent HI column densities in the Inner-Galaxy Arecibo L-band Feed Array (I-GALFA) survey, which covers a 1600 square degree region at 4-arcminute resolution in the first Galactic quadrant. We compare these ``naive'' HI columns to others derived from Planck first-release CO and dust maps and NE2001 model dispersion measures to identify a number of areas with potentially significant dark gas. We discuss whether optically thick HI or CO-free H2 is more likely to dominate the dark column, and we consider the effects of possible biases on our results. We acknowledge support from the National Science Foundation, the NASA Kentucky Space Grant Consortium, Western Kentucky University, and the Gatton Academy. I-GALFA (www.naic.edu igalfa) is a GALFA-HI survey observed with the 7-beam ALFA receiver on the 305-meter William E. Gordon Telescope. The Arecibo Observatory is a U.S. National Science Foundation facility operated under sequential cooperative agreements with Cornell University and SRI International, the latter in alliance with the Ana G. Mendez-Universidad Metropolitana and the Universities Space Research Association.

  14. Understanding star formation in molecular clouds. I. Effects of line-of-sight contamination on the column density structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, N.; Ossenkopf, V.; Csengeri, T.; Klessen, R. S.; Federrath, C.; Tremblin, P.; Girichidis, P.; Bontemps, S.; André, Ph.

    2015-03-01

    Column-density maps of molecular clouds are one of the most important observables in the context of molecular cloud- and star-formation (SF) studies. With the Herschel satellite it is now possible to precisely determine the column density from dust emission, which is the best tracer of the bulk of material in molecular clouds. However, line-of-sight (LOS) contamination from fore- or background clouds can lead to overestimating the dust emission of molecular clouds, in particular for distant clouds. This implies values that are too high for column density and mass, which can potentially lead to an incorrect physical interpretation of the column density probability distribution function (PDF). In this paper, we use observations and simulations to demonstrate how LOS contamination affects the PDF. We apply a first-order approximation (removing a constant level) to the molecular clouds of Auriga and Maddalena (low-mass star-forming), and Carina and NGC 3603 (both high-mass SF regions). In perfect agreement with the simulations, we find that the PDFs become broader, the peak shifts to lower column densities, and the power-law tail of the PDF for higher column densities flattens after correction. All corrected PDFs have a lognormal part for low column densities with a peak at Av ~ 2 mag, a deviation point (DP) from the lognormal at Av(DP) ~ 4-5 mag, and a power-law tail for higher column densities. Assuming an equivalent spherical density distribution ρ ∝ r- α, the slopes of the power-law tails correspond to αPDF = 1.8, 1.75, and 2.5 for Auriga, Carina, and NGC 3603. These numbers agree within the uncertainties with the values of α ≈ 1.5,1.8, and 2.5 determined from the slope γ (with α = 1-γ) obtained from the radial column density profiles (N ∝ rγ). While α ~ 1.5-2 is consistent with a structure dominated by collapse (local free-fall collapse of individual cores and clumps and global collapse), the higher value of α > 2 for NGC 3603 requires a physical

  15. The structure of galactic HI in directions of low total column density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockman, F. J.; Jahoda, K.; Mccammon, D.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed 21 cm study of areas of that have the smallest known amount of HI in the northern sky was performed. These observations were corrected for stray radiation. The region of main interest, around alpha = 10(h)45(m), delta = 57 deg 20', has a minimium N(HI) of 4.5 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm. Spectra taken at 21' resolution over a field 4 x 3 deg in this direction show up to four HI line components. Two, near 0 and -50 km/s, are ubiquitous. There is also a narrow component at -10 km/s attributable to a diffuse cloud covering half of the field, and scattered patches of HI at v -100 km/s. the low and intermediate velocity components have a broad line width and are so smoothly distributed across the region that it is unlikely that they contain significant unresolved angular structure. Eight other low column density directions were also observed. Their spectra typically have several components, but the total column density is always 7 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm and changes smoothly along a 2 deg strip. Half of the directions show narrow lines arising from weak diffuse HI clouds that contain 0.5 to 3.0 x 10 to the 19th power/sq cm.

  16. Revising the slant column density retrieval of nitrogen dioxide observed by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchenko, S.; Krotkov, N. A.; Lamsal, L. N.; Celarier, E. A.; Swartz, W. H.; Bucsela, E. J.

    2015-06-01

    Nitrogen dioxide retrievals from the Aura/Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) have been used extensively over the past decade, particularly in the study of tropospheric air quality. Recent comparisons of OMI NO2 with independent data sets and models suggested that the OMI values of slant column density (SCD) and stratospheric vertical column density (VCD) in both the NASA OMNO2 and Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute DOMINO products are too large, by around 10-40%. We describe a substantially revised spectral fitting algorithm, optimized for the OMI visible light spectrometer channel. The most important changes comprise a flexible adjustment of the instrumental wavelength shifts combined with iterative removal of the ring spectral features; the multistep removal of instrumental noise; iterative, sequential estimates of SCDs of the trace gases in the 402-465 nm range. These changes reduce OMI SCD(NO2) by 10-35%, bringing them much closer to SCDs retrieved from independent measurements and models. The revised SCDs, submitted to the stratosphere-troposphere separation algorithm, give tropospheric VCDs ˜10-15% smaller in polluted regions, and up to ˜30% smaller in unpolluted areas. Although the revised algorithm has been optimized specifically for the OMI NO2 retrieval, our approach could be more broadly applicable.

  17. DUST SCATTERING IN TURBULENT MEDIA: CORRELATION BETWEEN THE SCATTERED LIGHT AND DUST COLUMN DENSITY

    SciTech Connect

    Seon, Kwang-Il; Witt, Adolf N.

    2013-12-01

    Radiative transfer models in a spherical, turbulent interstellar medium (ISM), in which the photon source is situated at the center, are calculated to investigate the correlation between the scattered light and the dust column density. The medium is modeled using fractional Brownian motion structures that are appropriate for turbulent ISM. The correlation plot between the scattered light and optical depth shows substantial scatter and deviation from simple proportionality. It was also found that the overall density contrast is smoothed out in scattered light. In other words, there is an enhancement of the dust-scattered flux in low-density regions, while the scattered flux is suppressed in high-density regions. The correlation becomes less significant as the scattering becomes closer to being isotropic and the medium becomes more turbulent. Therefore, the scattered light observed in near-infrared wavelengths would show much weaker correlation than the observations in optical and ultraviolet wavelengths. We also find that the correlation plot between scattered lights at two different wavelengths shows a tighter correlation than that of the scattered light versus the optical depth.

  18. The Carina Nebula and Gum 31 molecular complex - I. Molecular gas distribution, column densities, and dust temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebolledo, David; Burton, Michael; Green, Anne; Braiding, Catherine; Molinari, Sergio; Wong, Graeme; Blackwell, Rebecca; Elia, Davide; Schisano, Eugenio

    2016-03-01

    We report high-resolution observations of the 12CO(1-0) and 13CO(1-0) molecular lines in the Carina Nebula and the Gum 31 region obtained with the 22-m Mopra telescope as part of The Mopra Southern Galactic Plane CO Survey. We cover 8 deg2 from l = 285° to 290°, and from b = -1.5° to +0.5°. The molecular gas column density distributions from both tracers have a similar range of values. By fitting a grey-body function to the observed infrared spectral energy distribution from Herschel maps, we derive gas column densities and dust temperatures. The gas column density has values in the range from 6.3 × 1020 to 1.4 × 1023 cm-2, while the dust temperature has values in the range from 17 to 43 K. The gas column density derived from the dust emission is approximately described by a lognormal function for a limited range of column densities. A high-column-density tail is clearly evident for the gas column density distribution, which appears to be a common feature in regions with active star formation. There are regional variations in the fraction of the mass recovered by the CO emission lines with respect to the total mass traced by the dust emission. These variations may be related to changes in the radiation field strength, variation of the atomic to molecular gas fraction across the observed region, differences in the CO molecule abundance with respect to H2, and evolutionary stage differences of the molecular clouds that compose the Carina Nebula-Gum 31 complex.

  19. Experimental studies of selective acid gas removal: Absorption of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide into aqueous methyldiethanolamine using packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Schubert, C.N.

    1988-01-01

    The use of aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) for selective removal of hydrogen sulfide from acid gas streams has been studied in a 2 inch column packed with 1/4 inch ceramic Intalox saddles. The column was operated in a counter-current, steady state fashion. The feed gas composition varied between 1 and 5 mole % hydrogen sulfide and between 0 and 50 mole % carbon dioxide. In order to assist the development of packed column absorption models, the rate at which pure carbon dioxide absorbs into 2 M MDEA was measured as a function of pressure, liquid flow rate and packed bed length. The importance of end effects was carefully evaluated. In addition, draining and tracer methods were used to estimate the amount of static holdup present in the column. Using classical draining methods, as much as 50 % of the total holdup was found to be static. However, according to the step decrease in tracer method, less than 5 % of the total holdup was static. Since the step decrease in tracer method measures the amount of static holdup present in the bed under irrigated conditions, it seems likely that the draining method provides an unrealistic estimate of static holdup. Thus, although the notion of static holdup may be useful as a means of correlating mass transfer coefficients, the data indicate that very little static holdup exists in the column under irrigated conditions. Hence, in the absence of a mechanistically sound model, the choice of whether to use static holdup or dispersion as a means of accounting for deviations from plug flow in the liquid phase should be made on the basis of computational convenience.

  20. Airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer Measurements of CO2 Column Mixing Ratios: Source and Sink Detection in the Atmospheric Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzies, Robert T.; Spiers, Gary D.; Jacob, Joseph C.

    2016-06-01

    The JPL airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer instrument has been flown several times in the 2007-2011 time frame for the purpose of measuring CO2 mixing ratios in the lower atmosphere. The four most recent flight campaigns were on the NASA DC-8 research aircraft, in support of the NASA ASCENDS (Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons) mission formulation studies. This instrument operates in the 2.05-μm spectral region. The Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) method is used to retrieve weighted CO2 column mixing ratios. We present key features of the CO2LAS signal processing, data analysis, and the calibration/validation methodology. Results from flights in various U.S. locations during the past three years include observed mid-day CO2 drawdown in the Midwest, also cases of point-source and regional plume detection that enable the calculation of emission rates.

  1. NO2 Total and Tropospheric Vertical Column Densities from OMI on EOS Aura: Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gleason, J.F.; Bucsela, E.J.; Celarier, E.A.; Veefkind, J.P.; Kim, S.W.; Frost, G.F.

    2009-01-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), which is on the EOS AURA satellite, retrieves vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2, along with those of several other trace gases. The relatively high spatial resolution and daily global coverage of the instrument make it particularly well-suited to monitoring tropospheric pollution at scales on the order of 20 km. The OMI NO2 algorithm distinguishes polluted regions from background stratospheric NO2 using a separation algorithm that relies on the smoothly varying stratospheric NO2 and estimations of both stratospheric and tropospheric air mass factors (AMFs). Version 1 of OMI NO2 data has been released for public use. An overview of OMI NO2 data, some recent results and a description of the improvements for version 2 of the algorithm will be presented.

  2. [MAX-DOAS measurements of NO2 column densities and vertical distribution at Ny-Alesund, Arctic during summer].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Han; Sun, Li-Guang; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhou, Hai-Jin

    2012-09-01

    The multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS), one of the remote sensing techniques for trace gases measurements, is sensitive to the lower atmosphere by eliminating the influence of stratosphere retrieved from zenith-sky spectroscopy. Ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out to observe NO2 at Ny-Alesund, Arctic from 5th Jul to 1st Aug 2011. The differential slant column densities (DSCDs) of NO2 at four off-axis angles showed typical pattern of tropospheric absorbers. Based on the assumption that NO2 was well mixed in 0-1 km of the troposphere, the mean mixing ratio of NO2 during the measurement period was 1.023E11 molec x cm(-3). The fluctuation of NO2 might be related to the fossil fuel combustions and the photochemical reactions. The vertical distribution of NO2 at 0-3 km showed that NO2 was mainly originated from boundary layer of sea surface. PMID:23240391

  3. Kinematics, Kinetic Temperatures, and Column Densities of NH3 in the Orion Hot Core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, T. L.; Gaume, R. A.; Gensheimer, P.; Johnston, K. J.

    2000-08-01

    Using the VLA, we have mapped the Orion Hot Core region (full extent 10") with an angular resolution of ~1" in the (J,K)=(4,4) and (10, 9) inversion transitions of 14NH3 and an angular resolution of 4" in the (J,K)=(2,2) and (3, 3) inversion transitions of 15NH3. All of the single-dish flux density for the (10, 9) transition was recovered by the VLA, but a substantial fraction of the flux density in the (4, 4) and 15NH3 (3, 3) lines was not detected. The missing flux density is from the spatially extended ``spike'' component. Assuming that local thermodynamic equilibrium (LTE) holds, we have calculated the optical depths of the (4, 4) inversion transition for all positions where the main and satellite lines were detected with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio. We combined our (10, 9) data with these (4, 4) line results to produce images of the rotational temperature, Trot, and the column density of ammonia, N(NH3). For the H2 densities in the Hot Core, Trot=Tkin, the kinetic temperature. An additional determination of Tkin and N(NH3) was made by combining our (10, 9) inversion line data with our 15NH3 (3, 3) inversion line results. The 15NH3 inversion transitions have no quadrupole hyperfine structure so that the line shapes are simpler. The moment distribution of the 15NH3 (3, 3) line shows that the largest intensity-weighted line width arises close to the center of the Hot Core region. Thus, we may have discovered a low-luminosity outflow source embedded in the Hot Core. Alternatively, this may be a result of gas motions related to source ``I,'' which is about half a beamwidth from this feature.

  4. Eclipse Egress Growth of the NA I Column Density in the Vicinity of Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. M.; Corliss, J.; Scherb, F.; Potter, A. E.

    1999-09-01

    We report moderate and high resolution, integral field spectroscopic observations of the neutral Sodium D-lines in the vicinity of Io immediately after Io's egress from the shadow of Jupiter. On 1998 November 8, the McMath Solar Telescope echelle spectrograph with a Bowen image slicer was used to obtain a sequence of 14, five minute exposures after egress. The spectra from each of the ten facets of the image slicer can be subdivided into as many as ten separate spectra yielding a 10 X 10 array of integral field spectra covering a 10 arc second square patch of sky around Io. This instrument delivers a resolution R= 140,000. On 1999 February 1, the WIYN Telescope Multi-Object Spectrograph fed by the "Densepak" fiber optic array obtained a complimentary set of spectra covering a larger area, 30 x 40 arc seconds. These spectra have resolution R = 15,000. Twenty two, 60 second exposures were obtained over a period of 31 minutes post egress. The emission from near Io appears on the steep core of the Solar Fraunhofer line. Io's velocity with respect to the Sun changes significantly over the course of the observations so careful account must be taken of the flux available for fluorescence. When this compensation is done, both data sets show the column density of Sodium increasing with time. The McMath data show that the column density begins to approach a steady state value after about 1.5 hours while the WIYN data shows that the time variable component of the emission is confined to the inner 10 to 15 arc seconds of the Sodium cloud. This research was supported by NASA grant NAG5-6787

  5. Impact of Spectroscopic Line Parameters on Carbon Monoxide Column Density Retrievals from Shortwave Infrared Nadir Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Denise; Gimeno Garcia, Sebastian; Schreier, Franz; Lichtenberg, Gunter

    2015-06-01

    Among the various input data required for the retrieval of atmospheric state parameters from infrared remote sensing observations molecular spectroscopy line data have a central role, because their quality is critical for the quality of the final product. Here we discuss the impact of the line parameters on vertical column densities (VCD) estimated from short wave infrared nadir observations. Using BIRRA (the Beer InfraRed Retrieval Algorithm) comprising a line-by-line radiative transfer code (forward model) and a separable nonlinear least squares solver for inversion we retrieve carbon monoxide from observations of SCIAMACHY aboard Envisat. Retrievals using recent versions of HITRAN und GEISA have been performed and the results are compared in terms of residual norms, molecular density scaling factors, their corresponding errors, and the final VCD product. The retrievals turn out to be quite similar for all three databases, so a definite recommendation in favor of one of these databases is difficult for the considered spectral range around 2:3 μm . Nevertheless, HITRAN 2012 appears to be advantageous when evaluating the different quality criteria.

  6. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, G.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, H.; Minomura, M.; Murata, I.; Nagahama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Ibuki, T.

    2010-04-01

    Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the region of 1565-1585 and 1674-1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) to the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570-1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  7. Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities at surface monitoring sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, N.; Inoue, G.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, H.; Minomura, M.; Murata, I.; Nagahama, T.; Matsumi, Y.; Tanaka, T.; Morino, I.; Ibuki, T.

    2010-08-01

    Remotely operable compact instruments for measuring atmospheric CO2 and CH4 column densities were developed in two independent systems: one utilizing a grating-based desktop optical spectrum analyzer (OSA) with a resolution enough to resolve rotational lines of CO2 and CH4 in the regions of 1565-1585 and 1674-1682 nm, respectively; the other is an application of an optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FFPI) to obtain the CO2 column density. Direct sunlight was collimated via a small telescope installed on a portable sun tracker and then transmitted through an optical fiber into the OSA or the FFPI for optical analysis. The near infrared spectra of the OSA were retrieved by a least squares spectral fitting algorithm. The CO2 and CH4 column densities deduced were in excellent agreement with those measured by a Fourier transform spectrometer with high resolution. The rovibronic lines in the wavelength region of 1570-1575 nm were analyzed by the FFPI. The I0 and I values in the Beer-Lambert law equation to obtain CO2 column density were deduced by modulating temperature of the FFPI, which offered column CO2 with the statistical error less than 0.2% for six hours measurement.

  8. 3D printed elastic honeycombs with graded density for tailorable energy absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, Simon R. G.; Farrow, Ian R.; Trask, Richard S.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the development and experimental analysis of hyperelastic honeycombs with graded densities, for the purpose of energy absorption. Hexagonal arrays are manufactured from thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) via fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printing and the density graded by varying cell wall thickness though the structures. Manufactured samples are subject to static compression tests and their energy absorbing potential analysed via the formation of energy absorption diagrams. It is shown that by grading the density through the structure, the energy absorption profile of these structures can be manipulated such that a wide range of compression energies can be efficiently absorbed.

  9. A Broad Bank Lidar for Precise Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption Measurement from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Georgieva, E. M.; Heaps, W. S.; Huang, W.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate global measurement of carbon dioxide column with the aim of discovering and quantifying unknown sources and sinks has been a high priority for the last decade. In order to uncover the "missing sink" that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget the critical precision for a measurement from space needs to be on the order of 1 ppm. To better understand the CO2 budget and to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council (NRC) in its recent decadal survey report (NACP) to NASA recommended a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. That's the goal of Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission - to significantly enhance the understanding of the role of CO2 in the global carbon cycle. Our current goal is to develop an ultra precise, inexpensive new lidar system for column measurements of CO2 changes in the lower atmosphere that uses a Fabry-Perot interferometer based system as the detector portion of the instrument and replaces the narrow band laser commonly used in lidars with a high power broadband source. This approach reduces the number of individual lasers used in the system and considerably reduces the risk of failure. It also tremendously reduces the requirement for wavelength stability in the source putting this responsibility instead on the Fabry- Perot subsystem.

  10. Techniques for reconstructing the column-density of a Bose-Einstein condensate from multiple defocused images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perry, Abigail; Sugawa, Seiji; Salces-Carcoba, Francisco; Spielman, Ian

    2014-05-01

    We report on an experiment reconstructing the column-density of a Bose-Einstein condensate using differently defocused images from multiple cameras. Starting with defocused images taken off-resonance, a transfer function with a ``not-quite invertible'' relationship exists, going from the optical depth observed at the camera to the focused column density [L.D. Turner et al., Opt. Lett., 29(3) 232-234 (2004)]. Adding additional defocused detectors allows us to fully reconstruct the focused image, and more advanced techniques allow us to reconstruct both the amplitude and phase of the electromagnetic wave at the image planes.

  11. The use of NO2 absorption cross section temperature sensitivity to derive NO2 profile temperature and stratospheric/tropospheric column partitioning from visible direct sun DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinei, E.; Cede, A.; Swartz, W. H.; Herman, J.; Mount, G. H.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents a TEmperature SEnsitivity Method (TESEM) to accurately calculate total vertical NO2 column, atmospheric slant NO2 profile-weighted temperature (T), and to separate stratospheric and tropospheric columns from direct-sun (DS) ground-based measurements using the retrieved T. TESEM is based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) fitting of the linear temperature-dependent NO2 absorption cross section, σ (T), regression model (Vandaele et al., 2003). The direct result of the DOAS spectral fitting retrieval is NO2 differential slant column density (Δ SCD) at the actual atmospheric NO2 T. Atmospheric NO2 T is determined from the DOAS fitting results after SCD in the reference spectrum is estimated using the Minimum Langley Extrapolation method (MLE). Since NO2 is mostly distributed between the lower troposphere and middle stratosphere and direct sun measurements have almost equal sensitivity to stratospheric and tropospheric absorption at solar zenith angles < 75° with a well known photon path, we assume that the retrieved total column NO2 T can be represented as a sum of the NO2 stratospheric and tropospheric Ts multiplied by the corresponding stratospheric and tropospheric fractions of the total SCDNO2. We use Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry-transport model (CTM) simulations to evaluate diurnal and seasonal variability of stratospheric and tropospheric NO2 T over two northern middle latitude sites in 2011. GMI simulations reveal that stratospheric NO2 T over northern middle latitudes can be estimated with an error of less than 3 K by the simulated temperature at 27 km from April to October. During November-March months the error can reach as high as 10 K. The tropospheric NO2 T can be approximated by the surface temperature within 3-5 K according to GMI simulations. Traditionally, either σ (NO2) is fitted at a single estimated NO2 T, or two predetermined (stratospheric and tropospheric) temperatures. Use of a single T

  12. On-column double-beam laser absorption detection for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1993-08-01

    Double-beam laser absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been developed. This is based on the direct subtraction of reference and signal photocurrents by an electronic circuit, under feedback control, to reduce background noise. A simple equation for calculating concentrations has been proposed and was confirmed by experimental results. A practical noise-to-signal ratio of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] in intensity is achieved. This is 5 times lower than that of commercial CE systems. For absorbance detection, as low as 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] M malachite green can be detected. This corresponds to a 25-fold improvement of detection limit over commercial systems. This gain in detectability results from both a reduction in intensity fluctuations (noise) and an increase in the effective absorption path length (signal). 22 refs., 6 figs.

  13. Electron density compression and oscillating effects on laser energy absorption in overdense plasma targets.

    PubMed

    Ge, Z Y; Zhuo, H B; Yu, W; Yang, X H; Yu, T P; Li, X H; Zou, D B; Ma, Y Y; Yin, Y; Shao, F Q; Peng, X J

    2014-03-01

    An analytical model for energy absorption during the interaction of an ultrashort, ultraintense laser with an overdense plasma is proposed. Both the compression effect of the electron density profile and the oscillation of the electron plasma surface are self-consistently included, which exhibit significant influences on the laser energy absorption. Based on our model, the general scaling law of the compression effect depending on laser strength and initial density is derived, and the temporal variation of the laser absorption due to the boundary oscillating effect is presented. It is found that due to the oscillation of the electron plasma surface, the laser absorption rate will vibrate periodically at ω or 2ω frequency for the p-polarized and s-polarized laser, respectively. The effect of plasma collision on the laser absorption has also been investigated, which shows a considerable rise in absorption with increasing electron-ion collision frequency for both polarizations. PMID:24730955

  14. Shape dependence of transmission, reflection, and absorption eigenvalue densities in disordered waveguides with dissipation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamilov, A.; Petrenko, S.; Sarma, R.; Cao, H.

    2016-03-01

    The universal bimodal distribution of transmission eigenvalues in lossless diffusive systems underpins such celebrated phenomena as universal conductance fluctuations, quantum shot noise in condensed matter physics, and enhanced transmission in optics and acoustics. Here, we show that in the presence of absorption, the density of the transmission eigenvalues depends on the confinement geometry of the scattering media. Furthermore, in an asymmetric waveguide, the densities of the reflection and absorption eigenvalues also depend on the side from which the waves are incident. With increasing absorption, the density of absorption eigenvalues transforms from a single-peak to a double-peak function. Our findings open an additional avenue for coherent control of wave transmission, reflection, and absorption in random media.

  15. On the errors in measuring the particle density by the light absorption method

    SciTech Connect

    Ochkin, V. N.

    2015-04-15

    The accuracy of absorption measurements of the density of particles in a given quantum state as a function of the light absorption coefficient is analyzed. Errors caused by the finite accuracy in measuring the intensity of the light passing through a medium in the presence of different types of noise in the recorded signal are considered. Optimal values of the absorption coefficient and the factors capable of multiplying errors when deviating from these values are determined.

  16. Analysis of Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 and 2013 Airborne Campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, J. B.; Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Riris, H.; Allan, G. R.; Hasselbrack, W.; Weaver, C. J.; Browell, E. V.

    2013-12-01

    We have developed a pulsed, wavelength-resolved IPDA lidar technique for measuring the tropospheric CO2 concentrations as a candidate for NASA's ASCENDS mission. The CO2 lidar flies on NASA's DC-8 aircraft and measures the atmospheric backscatter profiles and shape of the 1572.33 nm absorption line using 250 mW average laser power, 30 wavelength samples per scan with 300 scans per second. Our post-flight analysis estimates the lidar range and pulse energies at each wavelength every second. We then solve for the optimum CO2 absorption line shape, and calculated the Differential Optical Depth (DOD) at the line peak and the column average CO2 concentrations. We compared these to radiative transfer calculations based on the HITRAN 2008 database, the atmospheric conditions, and the CO2 concentrations sampled by in-situ sensors on the aircraft. Our team participated in the ASCENDS science flights during July and August 2011. These flights were made over a wide variety of surface and cloud conditions near the US, including over the central valley of California, over several mountain ranges, over both broken and solid stratus cloud deck over the Pacific Ocean, over thin and broken clouds above the US Southwest and Iowa, and over forests near the WLEF tower in Wisconsin. Most flights had 5-6 altitude steps to > 12 km, and clear CO2 absorption line shapes were recorded. Analyses show the retrievals of lidar range and CO2 column absorption, as well as estimates of CO2 mixing ratio worked well when measuring over topography with rapidly changing height and reflectivity, through thin clouds and to stratus cloud tops. For regions where the CO2 concentration was relatively constant, the measured CO2 absorption profile (averaged for 50 sec) matched the predicted profile to better than 1% RMS error for all flight altitudes. For 10 second averaging, the scatter in the retrievals was typically 2-3 ppm and was limited by signal shot noise (i.e. the signal photon count). For flight

  17. Modeling of intensity-modulated continuous-wave laser absorption spectrometer systems for atmospheric CO(2) column measurements.

    PubMed

    Lin, Bing; Ismail, Syed; Wallace Harrison, F; Browell, Edward V; Nehrir, Amin R; Dobler, Jeremy; Moore, Berrien; Refaat, Tamer; Kooi, Susan A

    2013-10-10

    The focus of this study is to model and validate the performance of intensity-modulated continuous-wave (IM-CW) CO(2) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) systems and their CO(2) column measurements from airborne and satellite platforms. The model accounts for all fundamental physics of the instruments and their related CO(2) measurement environments, and the modeling results are presented statistically from simulation ensembles that include noise sources and uncertainties related to the LAS instruments and the measurement environments. The characteristics of simulated LAS systems are based on existing technologies and their implementation in existing systems. The modeled instruments are specifically assumed to be IM-CW LAS systems such as the Exelis' airborne multifunctional fiber laser lidar (MFLL) operating in the 1.57 μm CO(2) absorption band. Atmospheric effects due to variations in CO(2), solar radiation, and thin clouds, are also included in the model. Model results are shown to agree well with LAS atmospheric CO(2) measurement performance. For example, the relative bias errors of both MFLL simulated and measured CO(2) differential optical depths were found to agree to within a few tenths of a percent when compared to the in situ observations from the flight of 3 August 2011 over Railroad Valley (RRV), Nevada, during the summer 2011 flight campaign. In addition, the horizontal variations in the model CO(2) differential optical depths were also found to be consistent with those from MFLL measurements. In general, the modeled and measured signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) of the CO(2) column differential optical depths (τd) agreed to within about 30%. Model simulations of a spaceborne IM-CW LAS system in a 390 km dawn/dusk orbit for CO(2) column measurements showed that with a total of 42 W of transmitted power for one offline and two different sideline channels (placed at different locations on the side of the CO(2) absorption line), the accuracy of the

  18. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) vertical column density measurements by Pandora spectrometer over the Canadian oil sands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fioletov, Vitali E.; McLinden, Chris A.; Cede, Alexander; Davies, Jonathan; Mihele, Cristian; Netcheva, Stoyka; Li, Shao-Meng; O'Brien, Jason

    2016-07-01

    Vertical column densities (VCDs) of SO2 retrieved by a Pandora spectral sun photometer at Fort McKay, Alberta, Canada, from 2013 to 2015 were analysed. The Fort McKay site is located in the Canadian oil sands region, approximately 20 km north of two major SO2 sources (upgraders), with total emission of about 45 kt yr-1. Elevated SO2 VCD values were frequently recorded by the instrument, with the highest values of about 9 Dobson Units (DU; DU = 2.69 × 1016 molecules cm-2). Comparisons with co-located in situ measurements demonstrated that there was a very good correlation between VCDs and surface concentrations in some cases, while in other cases, elevated VCDs did not correspond to high surface concentrations, suggesting the plume was above the ground. Elevated VCDs and surface concentrations were observed when the wind direction was from south to southeast, i.e. from the direction of the two local SO2 sources. The precision of the SO2 measurements, estimated from parallel measurements by two Pandora instruments at Toronto, is 0.17 DU. The total uncertainty of Pandora SO2 VCD, estimated using measurements when the wind direction was away from the sources, is less than 0.26 DU (1σ). Comparisons with integrated SO2 profiles from concurrent aircraft measurements support these estimates.

  19. Simulation of gas absorption with chemical reaction: The selective removal of hydrogen sulfide by aqueous methyldiethanolamine in packed columns

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    The design of separation devices, particularly for solvent-based selective removal of H{sub 2}S from CO{sub 2}, requires an accurate mathematical model. Unfortunately, this requirement for high accuracy is often in conflict with the need for efficient computation. The addition of more and more complicated analyses, such as a move from Henry's law to a method incorporating gas and liquid activities for computing vapor liquid equilibria, may give a more accurate solution, but only at the cost of decreased computational efficiency. The efforts in this work have been directed toward two goals. The first was to develop an accurate mathematical model for the aqueous methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) system. The steady-state packed column model developed in this work has been tested with data from Schubert (1988) to verify its accuracy. The second goal was to modify the model to improve its computational efficiency. Areas such as vapor-liquid equilibrium calculations, flow hydrodynamics, and thermal effects were examined to determine what simplifications could be made, and how these simplifications affected both the accuracy and the efficiency of the model. The result of this effort is a mathematical model for multicomponent chemical absorption in a continuous contactor that balances computation efficiency with rigorous physical and chemical treatment. This model is useful not only for the analysis of the MDEA-H{sub 2}S-CO{sub 2} system, but the same framework also could be applied to other chemical absorption systems.

  20. Near UV atmospheric absorption measurements of column abundances during Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition, January-February 1989: 3. BrO observations

    SciTech Connect

    Wahner, A.; Callies, J.; Dorn, H.P.; Platt, U.; Schiller, C. )

    1990-03-01

    Column abundances of BrO were measured during the Airborne Arctic Stratospheric Expedition from January 6 to February 9, 1989 by near UV absorption spectroscopy. BrO was detected during early flights by scattered sunlight observations during twilight and direct moon light observations during the night. The daytime vertical column abundances of BrO varied between 2 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and 13 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}2} and are consistent with observed OClO column abundances and chemical model calculations. The nighttime presence of BrO suggests different vertical profiles of BrO and ClO.

  1. Herschel-Planck dust optical depth and column density maps. II. Perseus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zari, Eleonora; Lombardi, Marco; Alves, João; Lada, Charles J.; Bouy, Hervé

    2016-03-01

    We present optical depth and temperature maps of the Perseus molecular cloud, obtained combining dust emission data from the Herschel and Planck satellites and 2MASS/NIR dust extinction maps. The maps have a resolution of 36 arcsec in the Herschel regions, and of 5 arcmin elsewhere. The dynamic range of the optical depth map ranges from 1 × 10-2 mag up to 20 mag in the equivalent K-band extinction. We also evaluate the ratio between the 2.2 μm extinction coefficient and the 850 μm opacity. The value we obtain is close to the one found in the Orion B molecular cloud. We show that the cumulative and the differential area function of the data (which is proportional to the probability distribution function of the cloud column density) follow power laws with an index of respectively ≃-2, and ≃-3. We use WISE data to improve current YSO catalogs based mostly on Spitzer data and we build an up-to-date selection of Class I/0 objects. Using this selection, we evaluate the local Schmidt law, ΣYSO ∝ Σgasβ, showing that β = 2.4 ± 0.6. Finally, we show that the area-extinction relation is important for determining the star-formation rate in the cloud, which is in agreement with other recent works. The optical depth and temperature maps (FITS files) are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/587/A106

  2. The use of infrared absorption to determine density of liquid hydrogen.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unland, H. D.; Timmerhaus, K. D.; Kropschot, R. H.

    1972-01-01

    Experimental evaluation of the use of infrared absorption for determining the density of liquid hydrogen, and discussion of the feasibility of an airborne densitometer based on this concept. The results indicate that infrared absorption of liquid hydrogen is highly sensitive to the density of hydrogen, and, under the operating limitations of the equipment and experimental techniques used, the determined values proved to be repeatable to an accuracy of 2.7%. The desiderata and limitations of an in-flight density-determining device are outlined, and some of the feasibility problems are defined.

  3. Validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 Vertical Column Densities with Mt.Cimone and Stara Zagora Ground-Based Zenith Sky DOAS Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostadinov, I.; Petritoli, A.; Werner, R.; Valev, D.; Atanasov, At.; Bortoli, D.; Markova, T.; Ravegnani, F.; Palazzi, E.; Giovanelli, G.

    2004-08-01

    Ground-based zenith sky Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements performed by means of GASCOD instruments at Mt. Cimone (44N 11E), Italy and Stara Zagora (42N, 25E), Bulgaria are used for validation of SCIAMACHY NO2 vertical column density (vcd) of ESA SCI_NL product retrieved with 5.01 processor version. The results presented in this work regard satellite data for the JulyDecember 2002 period. On this base it is concluded that during summer-autumn period the overall NO2 vcd above both stations is fairly well reproduced by the SCIAMACHY data, while towards the winter period they deviate from the seasonal behaviour of NO2 vcd derived at both stations

  4. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Judd, L.; Pan, L.; Lefer, B.

    2015-10-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that OMI footprint pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCD using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied Averaging Kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK

  5. OMI NO2 column densities over North American urban cities: the effect of satellite footprint resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Cheol; Lee, Pius; Judd, Laura; Pan, Li; Lefer, Barry

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen dioxide vertical column density (NO2 VCD) measurements via satellite are compared with a fine-scale regional chemistry transport model, using a new approach that considers varying satellite footprint sizes. Space-borne NO2 VCD measurement has been used as a proxy for surface nitrogen oxide (NOx) emission, especially for anthropogenic urban emission, so accurate comparison of satellite and modeled NO2 VCD is important in determining the future direction of NOx emission policy. The NASA Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 VCD measurements, retrieved by the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), are compared with a 12 km Community Multi-scale Air Quality (CMAQ) simulation from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We found that the OMI footprint-pixel sizes are too coarse to resolve urban NO2 plumes, resulting in a possible underestimation in the urban core and overestimation outside. In order to quantify this effect of resolution geometry, we have made two estimates. First, we constructed pseudo-OMI data using fine-scale outputs of the model simulation. Assuming the fine-scale model output is a true measurement, we then collected real OMI footprint coverages and performed conservative spatial regridding to generate a set of fake OMI pixels out of fine-scale model outputs. When compared to the original data, the pseudo-OMI data clearly showed smoothed signals over urban locations, resulting in roughly 20-30 % underestimation over major cities. Second, we further conducted conservative downscaling of OMI NO2 VCDs using spatial information from the fine-scale model to adjust the spatial distribution, and also applied averaging kernel (AK) information to adjust the vertical structure. Four-way comparisons were conducted between OMI with and without downscaling and CMAQ with and without AK information. Results show that OMI and CMAQ NO2 VCDs show the best agreement when both downscaling and AK methods are applied, with the correlation

  6. Observational discrimination between modes of shock propagation in interstellar clouds: Predictions of CH+ and SH+ column densities in diffuse clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flower, D. R.; Desforets, G. P.; Roueff, E.; Hartquist, T. W.

    1986-01-01

    Considerable effort in recent years has been devoted to the study of shocks in the diffuse interstellar medium. This work has been motivated partly by the observations of rotationally excited states of H2, and partly by the realization that species such as CH(+), OH and H2O might be formed preferentially in hot, post-shock gas. The problem of CH(+) and the difficulties encountered when trying to explain the high column densities, observed along lines of sight to certain hot stars, have been reviewed earlier. The importance of a transverse magnetic field on the structure of an interstellar shock was also demonstrated earlier. Transverse magnetic fields above a critical strength give rise to an acceleration zone or precursor, in which the parameters on the flow vary continuously. Chemical reactions, which change the degree of ionization of the gas, also modify the structure of the shock considerably. Recent work has shown that large column densities of CH(+) can be produced in magnetohydrodynamic shock models. Shock speeds U sub s approx. = 10 km/s and initial magnetic field strengths of a few micro G are sufficient to produce ion-neutral drift velocities which can drive the endothermic C(+)(H2,H)CH(+) reaction. It was also shown that single-fluid hydrodynamic models do not generate sufficiently large column densities of CH(+) unless unacceptably high shock velocities (u sub s approx. 20 km/s) are assumed in the models. Thus, the observed column densities of CH(+) provide a constraint on the mode of shock propagation in diffuse clouds. More precisely, they determine a lower limit to the ion-neutral drift velocity.

  7. Optical studies of interstellar material in low density regions of the Galaxy. I - A survey of interstellar Na I and Ca II absorption toward 57 distant stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sembach, K. R.; Danks, A. C.; Savage, B. D.

    1993-01-01

    We present high-resolution spectra of the Na I D and Ca II K lines toward 57 late-O and early-B stars along extended (d greater than 1 kpc) low-density paths through the Milky Way disk and halo. The sight lines preferentially sample diffuse gas in the interstellar medium (ISM) along interarm, Galactic center, and high latitude directions. We measure equivalent widths, apparent column densities, and absorption component structure. The Ca II to Na I ratios presented as a function of velocity for each sight line exhibit variations due to elemental depletion, ionization, and density enhancements. Absorption along high latitude sight lines is kinematically simpler than it is along interarm and Galactic center sight lines. Galactic rotation noticeably broadens the absorption profiles of distant stars located in these latter directions. Along several sight lines, we see Ca II absorption at velocities corresponding to large distances (/z/ about 1 kpc) from the Galactic plane. The effects of differences in the Ca II and Na I scale heights and nonzero velocity dispersions are readily apparent in the data. Brief notes are given for several sight lines with interesting absorption properties.

  8. A Herschel-SPIRE survey of the Mon R2 giant molecular cloud: analysis of the gas column density probability density function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, R.; Gutermuth, R.; Ali, B.; Megeath, T.; Pipher, J.; Myers, P.; Fischer, W. J.; Henning, T.; Wolk, S. J.; Allen, L.; Tobin, J. J.

    2016-09-01

    We present a far-IR survey of the entire Mon R2 giant molecular cloud (GMC) with Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging REceiver cross-calibrated with Planck-High Frequency Instrument data. We fit the spectral energy distributions of each pixel with a greybody function and an optimal beta value of 1.8. We find that mid-range column densities obtained from far-IR dust emission and near-IR extinction are consistent. For the entire GMC, we find that the column density histogram, or column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), is lognormal below ˜1021 cm-2. Above this value, the distribution takes a power law form with an index of -2.15. We analyse the gas geometry, N-PDF shape, and young stellar object (YSO) content of a selection of subregions in the cloud. We find no regions with pure lognormal N-PDFs. The regions with a combination of lognormal and one power-law N-PDF have a YSO cluster and a corresponding centrally concentrated gas clump. The regions with a combination of lognormal and two power-law N-PDF have significant numbers of typically younger YSOs but no prominent YSO cluster. These regions are composed of an aggregate of closely spaced gas filaments with no concentrated dense gas clump. We find that for our fixed scale regions, the YSO count roughly correlates with the N-PDF power-law index. The correlation appears steeper for single power-law regions relative to two power-law regions with a high column density cut-off, as a greater dense gas mass fraction is achieved in the former. A stronger correlation is found between embedded YSO count and the dense gas mass among our regions.

  9. Trend analysis of satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over East Asia for 2005-2014

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muto, T.; Irie, H.; Itahashi, S.

    2015-12-01

    Nitrogen dioxide (NO2) plays a central role in the troposphere as a toxic substance for the respiratory system and a precursor for ozone and aerosols. Furthermore, the OH concentration is dependent on the NO2 concentration. While trend analysis for tropospheric NO2 concentrations in several specific regions all over the world was made in literature for period until 2011, the latest trends after 2011 have not been reported yet. The time period after 2011 is of interest, because it corresponds to the 12th 5-year-plan regulating NOx emissions in China and the period with the power substitution of thermal power generation for the nuclear power generation in Japan. In this study, we first compared satellite-observed tropospheric NO2 VCDs (Vertical Column Densities) with those observed by ground-based Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) instruments installed at Chiba University in order to clarify whether or not there is degradation in OMI and GOME-2 NO2 VCDs data after 2011. We concluded that there is no significant degradation in OMI and GOME-2 data, since the comparison results are similar to those reported by previous validation studies. Based on the results, tropospheric NO2 VCD trends over Central Eastern China (CEC; 30-40°N, 110.0-123.0°E) and Japan (JPN; 33.5-37.0°N, 133.0-141.0°E) regions were estimated using the regression analysis for annual mean values. Although an increase in NO2 VCDs occurred at a rate of 6%(8%) per year in OMI (GOME-2) data from 2005(2007) to 2011 over CEC, we found a decrease at a rate of 10%(11%) per year from 2011 to 2014. This reduction may be a result from the regulation of NOx emissions from coal fired power generation, iron foundry, cement plant, etc., and installation of the denitrification units during the period of 12th 5-year-plan. For JPN, both OMI and GOME-2 data sets showed that the NO2 VCDs decreased at a rate of 4% per year before 2011. The decreasing trends continued until 2014, with a

  10. Microwave resonance lamp absorption technique for measuring temperature and OH number density in combustion environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.

    1988-01-01

    A simple technique for simultaneous determination of temperature and OH number density is described, along with characteristic results obtained from measurements using a premixed, hydrogen air flat flame burner. The instrumentation is based upon absorption of resonant radiation from a flowing microwave discharge lamp, and is rugged, relatively inexpensive, and very simple to operate.

  11. Can formaldehyde column densities be used to estimate near-surface ozone in urban areas?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroeder, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Understanding pollutant exposure for populations in urban areas requires air quality monitoring at a finer scale than can be reasonably provided by surface networks. Satellite measurements of short-lived trace gases could potentially help shape our understanding of the distribution of near-surface ozone throughout entire regions, thus aiding the development of more effective mitigation strategies. In this work, the extensive vertical profiling performed by aircraft in support of NASA's DISCOVER-AQ field campaign is used to examine the relationship between formaldehyde column measurements and near-surface ozone. At large spatial and temporal scales, a fairly strong relationship exists between column formaldehyde and near-surface ozone, but this relationship often weakens at smaller spatial and temporal scales. The cause of these small-scale discrepancies was determined to be an artifact of the difference in lifetimes between ozone and formaldehyde. While ozone has a long lifetime (multiple days) and tends to accumulate throughout the day, formaldehyde has a very short lifetime (a couple hours) and tends to reflect the local hydrocarbon oxidation environment. In Maryland, where biogenic emissions dominate the hydrocarbon mix, a stronger correlation between ozone and formaldehyde was seen than in Texas, where anthropogenic emissions dominated the hydrocarbon mix. This is because in Maryland, while ozone was accumulating throughout the day, formaldehyde was also increasing in conjunction with changes in biogenic emissions. When data are segregated spatially and averaged over the duration of each campaign, a clear trend can be seen between column formaldehyde and surface ozone measurements. While not useful for day-to-day monitoring, this could be useful for long-term exposure estimates and could help facilitate the re-distribution of surface monitoring sites.

  12. Ozone column density determination from direct irradiance measurements in the ultraviolet performed by a four-channel precision filter radiometer.

    PubMed

    Ingold, T; Mätzler, C; Wehrli, C; Heimo, A; Kämpfer, N; Philipona, R

    2001-04-20

    Ultraviolet light was measured at four channels (305, 311, 318, and 332 nm) with a precision filter radiometer (UV-PFR) at Arosa, Switzerland (46.78 degrees , 9.68 degrees , 1850 m above sea level), within the instrument trial phase of a cooperative venture of the Swiss Meteorological Institute (MeteoSwiss) and the Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos/World Radiation Center. We retrieved ozone-column density data from these direct relative irradiance measurements by adapting the Dobson standard method for all possible single-difference wavelength pairs and one double-difference pair (305/311 and 305/318) under conditions of cloud-free sky and of thin clouds (cloud optical depth <2.5 at 500 nm). All UV-PFR retrievals exhibited excellent agreement with those of collocated Dobson and Brewer spectrophotometers for data obtained during two months in 1999. Combining the results of the error analysis and the findings of the validation, we propose to retrieve ozone-column density by using the 305/311 single difference pair and the double-difference pair. Furthermore, combining both retrievals by building the ratio of ozone-column density yields information that is relevant to data quality control. Estimates of the 305/311 pair agree with measurements by the Dobson and Brewer instruments within 1% for both the mean and the standard deviation of the differences. For the double pair these values are in a range up to 1.6%. However, this pair is less sensitive to model errors. The retrieval performance is also consistent with satellite-based data from the Earth Probe Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (EP-TOMS) and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment instrument (GOME). PMID:18357202

  13. In Situ Density Measurement of Basaltic Melts at High Pressure by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, R.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Urakawa, S.; Katayama, Y.

    2004-12-01

    Density of silicate melt at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior. However, because of experimental difficulties, the density of magma at high pressure is poorly known. Katayama et al. (1996) recently developed a new in situ density measurement method for metallic melts, based on the density dependency of X-ray absorption in the sample. In this study, we tried to measure the density of basaltic melt by this absorption method. When X-ray is transmitted to the sample, the intensity of the transmitted X-ray beam (I) is expressed as follows; I=I0exp(-μ ρ t), where I0 is the intensity of incident X-ray beam, μ is the mass absorption coefficient, ρ is the density of the sample, and t is the thickness of the sample. If t and μ are known, we can determine the density of the sample by measuring I and I0. This is the principle of the absorption method for density measurement. In this study, in order to determine t, we used a single crystalline diamond cylinder as a sample capsule, diamond is less compressive and less deformable so that even at high pressure t (thickness of the sample at the point x) is expressed as follows; t = 2*(R02-x2)1/2, R0 is the inner radius of cylinder at the ambient condition, and x is distance from a center of the capsule. And diamond also shows less absorption so that this make it possible to measure the density of silicate melt with smaller absorption coefficient than metallic melts. In order to know the μ of the sample, we measured both densities (ρ ) and absorptions (I/I0) for some glasses and crystals with same composition of the sample at the ambient condition, and calculated as fallows; μ =ln(I/I0)/ρ . Experiments were made at the beamline (BL22XU) of SPring-8. For generation of high pressure and high temperature, we used DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus (SMAP180) there. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromatic X

  14. From slant column densities to trace gas profiles: Post processing data from the new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrich, M. M.; Stremme, W.; Rivera, C. I.; Arellano, E. J.; Grutter, M.

    2014-12-01

    The new MAX-DOAS network in Mexico City provides results of O4, HCHO and NO2 slant column densities (SCD). Here, we present a new numerical code developed to retrieve gas profiles of NO2 and HCHO using radiative transfer simulations. We present first results of such profiles from the MAX-DOAS station located at UNAM campus. The code works in two steps: First, the O4 slant column density information is used to retrieve an aerosol profile. As an a-priori aerosol profile, we use averaged ceilometer data measured at UNAM and scaled to the total optical depth provided by the Aeronet data base. In the second step, the retrieved aerosol profile information is used together with the trace gas (HCHO or NO2) SCDs to retrieve the trace gas profiles. The inversion is based on a gauss-newton iteration scheme and uses constrained least square fitting with either optimal estimation or Tihkonov regularization. For the latter, the regulation matrix is currently constructed from the discrete first derivative operator. The forward model uses the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. The inputs to VLIDORT are calculated using temperature and pressure information from daily radiosounde measurements and aerosol single scattering optical depths and asymmetry factors from the Aeronet data base for Mexico City. For the gas absorption cross sections we use the same values as were used for the SCD calculation from the recorded spectra using QDOAS. Besides demonstrating the functionality of the algorithm showing profile retrievals of simulated SCDs with added random noise, we present HCHO and NO2 profiles retrieved from SCDs calculated from the MAX-DOAS measurements at UNAM campus at selected days.

  15. A Herschel - SPIRE Survey of the Mon R2 Giant Molecular Cloud: Analysis of the Gas Column Density Probability Density Function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokhrel, R.; Gutermuth, R.; Ali, B.; Megeath, T.; Pipher, J.; Myers, P.; Fischer, W. J.; Henning, T.; Wolk, S. J.; Allen, L.; Tobin, J. J.

    2016-06-01

    We present a far-IR survey of the entire Mon R2 GMC with Herschel - SPIRE cross-calibrated with Planck - HFI data. We fit the SEDs of each pixel with a greybody function and an optimal beta value of 1.8. We find that mid-range column densities obtained from far-IR dust emission and near-IR extinction are consistent. For the entire GMC, we find that the column density histogram, or N-PDF, is lognormal below ˜ 1021 cm-2. Above this value, the distribution takes a power law form with an index of -2.15. We analyze the gas geometry, N-PDF shape, and YSO content of a selection of subregions in the cloud. We find no regions with pure lognormal N-PDFs. The regions with a combination of lognormal and one power law N-PDF have a YSO cluster and a corresponding centrally concentrated gas clump. The regions with a combination of lognormal and two power law N-PDF have significant numbers of typically younger YSOs but no prominent YSO cluster. These regions are composed of an aggregate of closely spaced gas filaments with no concentrated dense gas clump. We find that for our fixed scale regions, the YSO count roughly correlates with the N-PDF power law index. The correlation appears steeper for single power law regions relative to two power law regions with a high column density cut-off, as a greater dense gas mass fraction is achieved in the former. A stronger correlation is found between embedded YSO count and the dense gas mass among our regions.

  16. Column CO2 Measurement From an Airborne Solid-State Double-Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, U. N.; Yu, J.; Petros, M.; Refaat, T. F.; Remus, R.; Fay, J.; Reithmaier, K.

    2014-01-01

    NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micrometers IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  17. Utilization of O4 Slant Column Density to Derive Aerosol Layer Height from a Space-Borne UV-Visible Hyperspectral Sensor: Sensitivity and Case Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 10(sup 40) molecules (sup 2) per centimeters(sup -5), to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nanometers, the O4 absorption band at 477 nanometers is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nanometers is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 meters for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 percent of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 kilometer compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  18. Utilization of O4 slant column density to derive aerosol layer height from a space-borne UV-visible hyperspectral sensor: sensitivity and case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Seo; Kim, Jhoon; Lee, Hanlim; Torres, Omar; Lee, Kwang-Mog; Lee, Sang Deok

    2016-02-01

    The sensitivities of oxygen-dimer (O4) slant column densities (SCDs) to changes in aerosol layer height are investigated using the simulated radiances by a radiative transfer model, the linearized pseudo-spherical vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer (VLIDORT), and the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The sensitivities of the O4 index (O4I), which is defined as dividing O4 SCD by 1040 molecules2 cm-5, to aerosol types and optical properties are also evaluated and compared. Among the O4 absorption bands at 340, 360, 380, and 477 nm, the O4 absorption band at 477 nm is found to be the most suitable to retrieve the aerosol effective height. However, the O4I at 477 nm is significantly influenced not only by the aerosol layer effective height but also by aerosol vertical profiles, optical properties including single scattering albedo (SSA), aerosol optical depth (AOD), particle size, and surface albedo. Overall, the error of the retrieved aerosol effective height is estimated to be 1276, 846, and 739 m for dust, non-absorbing, and absorbing aerosol, respectively, assuming knowledge on the aerosol vertical distribution shape. Using radiance data from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), a new algorithm is developed to derive the aerosol effective height over East Asia after the determination of the aerosol type and AOD from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). About 80 % of retrieved aerosol effective heights are within the error range of 1 km compared to those obtained from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) measurements on thick aerosol layer cases.

  19. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Suzuki, A.; Ohtani, E.; Katayama, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the top anvil sizes of 6 mm and 4 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 5 GPa, from 300 to 2000 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  20. Density Measurement for MORB Melts by X-ray Absorption Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamaki, T.; Urakawa, S.; Ohtani, E.; Suzuki, A.; Katayama, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Density of silicate melts at high pressure is one of the most important properties to understand magma migration in the planetary interior and the differentiation of the terrestrial planets. The density measurements of silicate melts have been carried out by several methods (shock compression experiments and sink-float method in static experiments, etc.). However, since these methods have difficulties in acquisition of data at a desired pressure and temperature, the density of the silicate melt have been measured under only a few conditions. Recently a new density measurement was developed by the X-ray absorption method. Advantage of this method is to measure density of liquids at a desired pressure and temperature. In the present study we measured the density of MORB melt by X-ray absorption method. Experiments were carried out at the BL22XU beamline at SPring-8. A DIA-type cubic anvil apparatus was used for generation of high pressure and temperature. We used tungsten carbide anvils with the edge-length of 6 mm. The energy of monochromateized X-ray beam was 23 keV. The intensities of incident and transmitted X-ray were measured by ion chambers. The density of the melt was calculated on the basis of Beer-Lambert law. The starting material was a glass with the MORB composition. Experiments were made from 1 atm to 4 GPa, from 300 to 2200 K. We compared the density of MORB melt with the compression curve of the melt in previous works. The density measured by this study is lower than that expected from the compression curve determined at higher pressures by the sink-float method. Structural change of the MORB melt with increasing pressure might be attributed to this discrepancy.

  1. Impact of ambient O2(a1Δg) on satellite-based laser remote sensing of O2 columns using absorption lines in the 1.27 µm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharp, William E.; Zaccheo, T. Scott; Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Dobler, Jeremy T.; Llewellyn, Edward J.

    2014-06-01

    Determination of CO2 mixing ratio columns from space using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (LAS) requires simultaneous measurements of CO2 number density columns and knowledge of the dry atmospheric surface pressure. One approach to determining the surface pressure is to make an LAS column measurement of O2 number density in the 7857.3-7921.7 cm-1 (1.27 µm) region of the O2(1Δ) state. A complicating factor in the LAS O2 measurement is the presence of a permanent but spatially variable natural source of airglow from the O2(1Δ) state. In addition, the laser radiation can induce stimulated emission from the ambient O2(1Δ) state and also cause stimulated absorption and emission from the ground state O2 molecules as the laser beam passes through the atmosphere. Finally, the upwelling surface-reflected solar radiation is an additional source of background radiation. The effects of these additional radiation sources on the LAS measurement of O2 are examined. The surface-reflected solar radiation produces the largest background at 3 orders of magnitude more intense than the laser backscatter signal, while the airglow is of the same order of magnitude as the laser backscatter. The stimulated emission from ambient O2(a1Δg) is found to be about the same order of magnitude as the laser radiation. These effects are evaluated under noon, twilight, and midnight conditions at midlatitudes, the equator, and the pole. The stimulated emission is in the same direction and in phase with the laser signal, its contamination of the LAS O2 measurement prevents a full sunlight determination of surface pressure.

  2. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M = 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plume's axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 4/3. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path. Keywords: column number density, plume flows, outgassing, free molecule flow.

  3. Effective absorbing column density in the gamma-ray burst afterglow X-ray spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Bernardini, M. G.; Braito, V.; Cusumano, G.; D'Avanzo, P.; D'Elia, V.; Ghirlanda, G.; Ghisellini, G.; Melandri, A.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the scaling relation between the observed amount of absorption in the X-ray spectra of gamma-ray burst afterglows and the absorber redshift. Through dedicated numerical simulations of an ideal instrument, we establish that this dependence has a power-law shape with index 2.4. However, for real instruments, this value depends on their low-energy cut-off, spectral resolution and on the detector spectral response in general. We thus provide appropriate scaling laws for specific instruments. Finally, we discuss the possibility to measure the absorber redshift from X-ray data alone. We find that 105-106 counts in the 0.3-10 keV band are needed to constrain the redshift with 10 per cent accuracy. As a test case, we discuss the XMM-Newton observation of GRB 090618 at z = 0.54. We are able to recover the correct redshift of this burst with the expected accuracy.

  4. Image of Fomalhaut Dust Ring at 350 Microns: The Relative Column Density Map Shows Pericenter-Apocenter Asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, K. A.; Velusamy, T.; Dowell, C. D.; Grogan, K.; Beichman, C. A.

    2005-01-01

    We have imaged the circumstellar disk of Fomalhaut at 350 mm wavelength, using SHARC II (Submillimeter High Angular Resolution Camera II) at the Caltech Submillimeter Observatory. The spatial resolution of the raw images (9") has been enhanced by a factor of 3 using the HiRes deconvolution procedure. We find that at this wavelength and signal-to-noise ratio (approx.12), the observed morphology is that of a simple inclined ring (i approx. 70 deg), with little or no other apparent structure--this is the first observation that shows clearly the ring morphology of the disk. We have combined our 350 mm data with Spitzer Space Telescope images at 24, 70, and 160 mm in order to estimate the two-dimensional spatial variation of relative column density ("tau map") using our DISKFIT procedure. The tau map is based on the following physical assumptions: (1) the wavelength variation of opacity is the same throughout the disk, (2) the radial variation of dust temperature is dictated by the energy balance of individual grains in the stellar radiation field, and (3) the vertical scale height of the disk follows a power-law radial variation. The results confirm the ringlike morphology but also show that the geometric center is displaced from the star by about 8 AU and that the ring has an apocentric enhancement of approximately 14% in integrated column density. If we interpret the displacement in terms of elliptical orbital motion due to gravitational perturbation by an unseen planet, then the implied forced eccentricity is 0.06; dynamical modeling then predicts an apocentric density enhancement consistent with that inferred from the tau map.

  5. Density, ultrasound velocity, acoustic impedance, reflection and absorption coefficient determination of liquids via multiple reflection method.

    PubMed

    Hoche, S; Hussein, M A; Becker, T

    2015-03-01

    The accuracy of density, reflection coefficient, and acoustic impedance determination via multiple reflection method was validated experimentally. The ternary system water-maltose-ethanol was used to execute a systematic, temperature dependent study over a wide range of densities and viscosities aiming an application as inline sensor in beverage industries. The validation results of the presented method and setup show root mean square errors of: 1.201E-3 g cm(-3) (±0.12%) density, 0.515E-3 (0.15%) reflection coefficient and 1.851E+3 kg s(-1) m(-2) (0.12%) specific acoustic impedance. The results of the diffraction corrected absorption showed an average standard deviation of only 0.12%. It was found that the absorption change shows a good correlation to concentration variations and may be useful for laboratory analysis of sufficiently pure liquids. The main part of the observed errors can be explained by the observed noise, temperature variation and the low signal resolution of 50 MHz. In particular, the poor signal-to-noise ratio of the second reflector echo was found to be a main accuracy limitation. Concerning the investigation of liquids the unstable properties of the reference material PMMA, due to hygroscopicity, were identified to be an additional, unpredictable source of uncertainty. While dimensional changes can be considered by adequate methodology, the impact of the time and temperature dependent water absorption on relevant reference properties like the buffer's sound velocity and density could not be considered and may explain part of the observed deviations. PMID:25465962

  6. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Kelly Elizabeth; Kostiuk, T.; Hewagama, T.; Livengood, T. A.; Delgado, J. D.; Annen, J.; Lefèvre, F.

    2008-09-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars’ atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 μm with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne Instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawai'i on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35°, on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60°N 112°W was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  7. Mars Ozone Absorption Line Shapes from Infrared Heterodyne Spectra Applied to GCM-Predicted Ozone Profiles and to MEX/SPICAM Column Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fast, Kelly E.; Kostiuk, T.; Annen, J.; Hewagama, T.; Delgado, J.; Livengood, T. A.; Lefevre, F.

    2008-01-01

    We present the application of infrared heterodyne line shapes of ozone on Mars to those produced by radiative transfer modeling of ozone profiles predicted by general circulation models (GCM), and to contemporaneous column abundances measured by Mars Express SPICAM. Ozone is an important tracer of photochemistry Mars' atmosphere, serving as an observable with which to test predictions of photochemistry-coupled GCMs. Infrared heterodyne spectroscopy at 9.5 microns with spectral resolving power >1,000,000 is the only technique that can directly measure fully-resolved line shapes of Martian ozone features from the surface of the Earth. Measurements were made with Goddard Space Flight Center's Heterodyne instrument for Planetary Wind And Composition (HIPWAC) at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on Mauna Kea, Hawaii on February 21-24 2008 UT at Ls=35deg on or near the MEX orbital path. The HIPWAC observations were used to test GCM predictions. For example, a GCM-generated ozone profile for 60degN 112degW was scaled so that a radiative transfer calculation of its absorption line shape matched an observed HIPWAC absorption feature at the same areographic position, local time, and season. The RMS deviation of the model from the data was slightly smaller for the GCM-generated profile than for a line shape produced by a constant-with-height profile, even though the total column abundances were the same, showing potential for testing and constraining GCM ozone-profiles. The resulting ozone column abundance from matching the model to the HIPWAC line shape was 60% higher than that observed by SPICAM at the same areographic position one day earlier and 2.5 hours earlier in local time. This could be due to day-to-day, diurnal, or north polar region variability, or to measurement sensitivity to the ozone column and its distribution, and these possibilities will be explored. This work was supported by NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program.

  8. Density of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions by X-ray absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seifert, R.; Malfait, W.; Petitgirard, S.; Sanchez-Valle, C.

    2011-12-01

    Silicate melts are essential components of igneous processes and are directly involved in differentiation processes and heat transfer within the Earth. Studies of the physical properties of magmas (e.g., density, viscosity, conductivity, etc) are however challenging and experimental data at geologically relevant pressure and temperature conditions remain scarce. For example, there is virtually no data on the density at high pressure of alkaline magmas (e.g., phonolites) typically found in continental rift zone settings. We present in situ density measurements of alkaline magmas at crustal and upper mantle conditions using synchrotron X-ray absorption. Measurements were conducted on ID27 beamline at ESRF using a panoramic Paris-Edinburgh Press (PE Press). The starting material is a synthetic haplo-phonolite glass similar in composition to the Plateau flood phonolites from the Kenya rift [1]. The glass was synthesized at 1673 K and 2.0 GPa in a piston-cylinder apparatus at ETH Zurich and characterized using EPMA, FTIR and density measurements. The sample contains less than 200 ppm water and is free of CO2. Single-crystal diamond cylinders (Øin = 0.5 mm, height = 1 mm) were used as sample containers and placed in an assembly formed by hBN spacers, a graphite heater and a boron epoxy gasket [2]. The density was determined as a function of pressure (1.0 to 3.1 GPa) and temperature (1630-1860 K) from the X-ray absorption contrast at 20 keV between the sample and the diamond capsule. The molten state of the sample during the data collection was confirmed by X-ray diffraction measurements. Pressure and temperature were determined simultaneously from the equation of state of hBN and platinum using the the double isochor method [3].The results are combined with available density data at room conditions to derive the first experimental equation of state (EOS) of phonolitic liquids at crustal and upper mantle conditions. We will compare our results with recent reports of the

  9. A summary of transition probabilities for atomic absorption lines formed in low-density clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morton, D. C.; Smith, W. H.

    1973-01-01

    A table of wavelengths, statistical weights, and excitation energies is given for 944 atomic spectral lines in 221 multiplets whose lower energy levels lie below 0.275 eV. Oscillator strengths were adopted for 635 lines in 155 multiplets from the available experimental and theoretical determinations. Radiation damping constants also were derived for most of these lines. This table contains the lines most likely to be observed in absorption in interstellar clouds, circumstellar shells, and the clouds in the direction of quasars where neither the particle density nor the radiation density is high enough to populate the higher levels. All ions of all elements from hydrogen to zinc are included which have resonance lines longward of 912 A, although a number of weaker lines of neutrals and first ions have been omitted.

  10. Microplasmas as vacuum ultraviolet source for Cl-atom density measurements by resonance absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Virginie; Bauville, Gérard; Sadeghi, Nader; Puech, Vincent

    2011-11-01

    A micro-hollow cathode discharge was used to generate radiation on the chlorine atom resonance lines. Such radiation could be used to measure, by resonance absorption spectroscopy, the density of chlorine atoms in either ground state (3p5 2P3/2) or in the fine structure metastable state (3p5 2P1/2), which is located at 882.35 cm-1. Among the nine analysed lines in the 132-142 nm spectral region, only those at 137.953 and 139.653 nm, which are strong enough and are not affected by the self-absorption, can be used for the resonance absorption diagnostic of the ground state and the metastable state, respectively. The best operating conditions of the lamp source are 0.5% of Cl2 in argon at 150 mbar and 4 mA discharge current. The measured 800 ± 30 K gas temperature of the microplasma, indicates that under these specific conditions, these two lines are dominantly Doppler broadened. So their profile is Gaussian shaped with full widths at half maximum of (4.7 ± 0.1) × 10-4 nm.

  11. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T.

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide ( 1-), N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide ( 2-) and N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide ( 3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45000 cm -1). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0→ D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  12. The effect of high column density systems on the measurement of the Lyman-α forest correlation function

    SciTech Connect

    Font-Ribera, Andreu; Miralda-Escudé, Jordi E-mail: miralda@icc.ub.edu

    2012-07-01

    We present a study of the effect of High Column Density (HCD) systems on the Lyα forest correlation function on large scales. We study the effect both numerically, by inserting HCD systems on mock spectra for a specific model, and analytically, in the context of two-point correlations and linear theory. We show that the presence of HCDs substantially contributes to the noise of the correlation function measurement, and systematically alters the measured redshift-space correlation function of the Lyα forest, increasing the value of the density bias factor and decreasing the redshift distortion parameter β{sub α} of the Lyα forest. We provide simple formulae for corrections on these derived parameters, as a function of the mean effective optical depth and bias factor of the host halos of the HCDs, and discuss the conditions under which these expressions should be valid. In practice, precise corrections to the measured parameters of the Lyα forest correlation for the HCD effects are more complex than the simple analytical approximations we present, owing to non-linear effects of the damped wings of the HCD systems and the presence of three-point terms. However, we conclude that an accurate correction for these HCD effects can be obtained numerically and calibrated with observations of the HCD-Lyα cross-correlation. We also discuss an analogous formalism to treat and correct for the contaminating effect of metal lines overlapping the Lyα forest spectra.

  13. The Density and Mass of Unshocked Ejecta in Cassiopeia A through Low Frequency Radio Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLaney, Tracey; Kassim, Namir E.; Rudnick, Lawrence; Perley, R. A.

    2014-04-01

    Characterizing the ejecta in young supernova remnants is a requisite step toward a better understanding of stellar evolution. In Cassiopeia A the density and total mass remaining in the unshocked ejecta are important parameters for modeling its explosion and subsequent evolution. Low frequency (<100 MHz) radio observations of sufficient angular resolution offer a unique probe of unshocked ejecta revealed via free-free absorption against the synchrotron emitting shell. We have used the Very Large Array plus Pie Town Link extension to probe this cool, ionized absorber at 9'' and 18.''5 resolution at 74 MHz. Together with higher frequency data we estimate an electron density of 4.2 cm-3 and a total mass of 0.39 M ⊙ with uncertainties of a factor of ~2. This is a significant improvement over the 100 cm-3 upper limit offered by infrared [S III] line ratios from the Spitzer Space Telescope. Our estimates are sensitive to a number of factors including temperature and geometry. However using reasonable values for each, our unshocked mass estimate agrees with predictions from dynamical models. We also consider the presence, or absence, of cold iron- and carbon-rich ejecta and how these affect our calculations. Finally we reconcile the intrinsic absorption from unshocked ejecta with the turnover in Cas A's integrated spectrum documented decades ago at much lower frequencies. These and other recent observations below 100 MHz confirm that spatially resolved thermal absorption, when extended to lower frequencies and higher resolution, will offer a powerful new tool for low frequency astrophysics.

  14. CHARM-F: An airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.; Schöggl, R.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) - in collaboration with Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT) and Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) - is developing CHARM-F, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 columns. Design goal is a compact and rugged instrument optimized for airborne use on board of DLR's long range research aircraft HALO. The main scientific goal of the instrument is to provide precise column measurements of CO2 and CH4 to infer fluxes of these important greenhouse gases by means of inverse modeling. For this purpose, very stringent requirements concerning accuracy and precision have to be met since typical surface sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent. To achieve this, CHARM-F uses laser sources emitting pulse-pairs with nanosecond duration which allows for a precise ranging and a proper separation of atmospheric influences (i.e. aerosol and clouds) from the ground return leading to an unambiguously defined column (no airmass factors involved). Two laser systems - one for each trace gas - are employed using highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump optical parametric oscillators (OPO) which convert the pump radiation to the desired measurement wavelengths in the near infrared. Each laser system emits a pulse pair having different wavelengths. One is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration and the other one to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal pulse separation of 250 μs together with a relatively large spot size of 30 m on ground ensures that nearly the same area is illuminated by both pulses. To achieve single-mode operation, both the pump and the OPO are injection seeded. The seed lasers are locked to a gas cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4 to ensure an absolute wavelength calibration. Furthermore, deviations of the wavelength between outgoing laser pulse and the seed lasers

  15. Pulsed Lidar Measurements of Atmospheric CO2 Column Absorption in the ASCENDS 2011 Airborne Campaign: Measurement Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, A.; Mao, J.; Allan, G. R.; Weaver, C. J.; Hasselbrack, W.; Riris, H.; Sun, X.; Abshire, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Trace gas LIDAR has the potential to actively sense greenhouse gas concentrations in the earth's atmosphere continuously without being affected by day or night. This will enable identifying greenhouse gas sources and sinks, which will help better predict future atmospheric trends of these gases. However, in order to ensure reliable and accurate measurements, it is important to establish metrics to quantify performance. As part of the ASCENDS (Active Sensing of Co2 over Nights, Days and Seasons) program, we conducted an airborne campaign of our CO2 pulsed LIDAR system in August 2011, flying over a variety of terrain and conditions, including snow, ocean, clouds, desert and mountains. Our instrument uses an IPDA (Integrated Path Differential Absorption) approach probing 30 wavelengths across a 1572 nm CO2 absorption line. Our multi-wavelength approach provides redundancy for evaluating the stability of the instrument, and also allows us to perform spectroscopic analysis of the atmosphere. Here, we present our detailed analysis and results. Tracking long-term stability of our instrument by using the Allan deviation formalism for wavelengths away from the absorption line-center, we find that the measured pulse energy (normalized to eliminate ground reflectivity) is stable down to 0.2% across varying terrain, surface reflectivity, flight altitude and LIDAR range. Comparing our measured CO2 absorption line-shape (at regions of constant, known CO2 concentrations) with the predicted line-shape based on the LIDAR range, flight altitude and relevant atmosphere parameters (based on in situ measurements by instruments aboard the aircraft), we find the agreement to be better than 1% (RMS error), once we average 50 s to eliminate shot noise. Our multi-wavelength approach also allows us to track the position of the line-center. The altitude dependence of the atmospheric pressure causes a shift in the CO2 absorption as a function of aircraft altitude. Our measured pressure shift

  16. Tropospheric Nitrogen Dioxide Column Density Trends Seen from the 10-year Record of OMI Measurements over East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irie, H.; Muto, T.; Itahashi, S.; Kurokawa, J. I.

    2015-12-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the Aura satellite recorded the 10-year (2005-2014) of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column density (VCD) data. The data set taken over East Asia was analyzed to estimate linear trends on national and grid bases for two periods of 2005-2011 and 2011-2014. The most striking features are leveling-off or decreasing trends seen in NO2 VCDs over China for 2011-2014 after continuous increases for 2005-2011. In particular, a significant reduction by ~14% occurred from 2013 through 2014, attaining to the level of 2009. The grid-basis trend analysis implies that the turnaround seen in the trends occurred on a province or larger spatial scale and was likely due mainly to the technical improvement such as the widespread use of de-NOx units. Another prominent features are seen in Japan, where NO2 VCDs decreased at a rate of ~4% per year from 2005 to 2011. The rate was almost unchanged between the two periods 2005-2011 and 2011-2014, while the significant power substitution of thermal power generation for the nuclear power generation took place in Japan after 2011, when a massive earthquake occurred off the Pacific coast of northern Japan. This reflects a less contribution of NOx emissions from the power plant sector than that from the transport sector in the Pacific Belt Zone lying over metropolitan areas.

  17. Column Number Density Expressions Through M = 0 and M = 1 Point Source Plumes Along Any Straight Path

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Analytical expressions for column number density (CND) are developed for optical line of sight paths through a variety of steady free molecule point source models including directionally-constrained effusion (Mach number M = 0) and flow from a sonic orifice (M 1). Sonic orifice solutions are approximate, developed using a fair simulacrum fitted to the free molecule solution. Expressions are also developed for a spherically-symmetric thermal expansion (M = 0). CND solutions are found for the most general paths relative to these sources and briefly explored. It is determined that the maximum CND from a distant location through directed effusion and sonic orifice cases occurs along the path parallel to the source plane that intersects the plume axis. For the effusive case this value is exactly twice the CND found along the ray originating from that point of intersection and extending to infinity along the plumes axis. For sonic plumes this ratio is reduced to about 43. For high Mach number cases the maximum CND will be found along the axial centerline path.

  18. Absorption and resonance Raman study of the pyromellitic diahydride anion via density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andruniow, T.; Pawlikowski, M.

    2000-05-01

    The electronic structure of the low-energy states of the pyromellitic diahydride (PMDA) anion is investigated in terms of the VWN (Vosco-Wilk-Nusair) the BP (Becke-Perdew) and the B3LYP density functional (DF) methods employed with 6-31G * basis sets. All the methods are shown to reproduce correctly the absorption and resonance Raman spectra in the region corresponding to the low-energy 1 2Au→1 2B3g transition. The discrepancies between the theory and experiment are attributed to a (weak) Dushinsky effect predominately due to a mixing of the ν3=1593 cm -1 and ν4=1342 cm -1 vibrations in the 1 2B3 g state of the PMDA radical.

  19. Electron bubbles in liquid helium: Density functional calculations of infrared absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Grau, Victor; Barranco, Manuel; Mayol, Ricardo; Pi, Marti

    2006-02-01

    Within density functional theory, we have calculated the energy of the transitions from the ground state to the first two excited states in the electron bubbles in liquid helium at pressures from zero to about the solidification pressure. For {sup 4}He at low temperatures, our results are in very good agreement with infrared absorption experiments. Above a temperature of {approx}2 K, we overestimate the energy of the 1s-1p transition. We attribute this to the break down of the Franck-Condon principle due to the presence of helium vapor inside the bubble. Our results indicate that the 1s-2p transition energies are sensitive not only to the size of the electron bubble, but also to its surface thickness. We also present results for the infrared transitions in the case of liquid {sup 3}He, for which we lack experimental data.

  20. Simulation of X-ray absorption spectra with orthogonality constrained density functional theory†

    PubMed Central

    Derricotte, Wallace D.; Evangelista, Francesco A.

    2015-01-01

    Orthogonality constrained density functional theory (OCDFT) is a variational time-independent approach for the computation of electronic excited states. In this work we extend OCDFT to compute core-excited states and generalize the original formalism to determine multiple excited states. Benchmark computations on a set of 13 small molecules and 40 excited states show that unshifted OCDFT/B3LYP excitation energies have a mean absolute error of 1.0 eV. Contrary to time-dependent DFT, OCDFT excitation energies for first- and second-row elements are computed with near-uniform accuracy. OCDFT core excitation energies are insensitive to the choice of the functional and the amount of Hartree–Fock exchange. We show that OCDFT is a powerful tool for the assignment of X-ray absorption spectra of large molecules by simulating the gas-phase near-edge spectrum of adenine and thymine. PMID:25690350

  1. Density of BCR-2 basalt glass at high pressure by X-ray Absorption Microtomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, A. N.; Lesher, C. E.; Gaudio, S. J.; Yamada, A.; Wang, Y.

    2009-12-01

    Improved understanding of compressibility and thermal expansion and their integral properties, density and volume, of basaltic liquids are important for modeling the thermodynamics of partial melting and crystallization, and melt migration in the Earth’s crust and mantle. We are using X-ray absorption in conjunction with microtomography to determine density of basalt glass/melt at high pressures from the linear attenuation coefficient of voxels calibrated using internal calibration standards at monochromatic energy. Experiments are conducted with the rotating anvil apparatus on the 13-BM-D beamline at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory in an opposing anvil (Drickamer) assembly with 4 mm truncations and 20o taper. The sample and standards are contained within a single crystal diamond sleeve capped with Mo lids inserted into a graphite box-type heater with Mo leads and surrounded by pyrophillite, zirconia and a composite boron epoxy-diamond epoxy--pyrophillite gasket. Pressure is determined by using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction of MgO and Au contained within the capsule. Temperature is controlled to within ±25 oC by regulating power to the heater based on prior calibration. The density of USGS standard BCR-2 (Columbia River Basalt) glass is determined by this technique up to 3 GPa at room temperature giving a compressibility (Ko) for the glass of 70 ±5 GPa, assuming K’= 4. The cell was successfully heated to 900 oC at 1 GPa with tomographic data sets collected at 200 oC temperature intervals. The variation in density with temperature gives a thermal expansion for BCR-2 glass of 3x10-5 K-1. Success in performing microtomography under simultaneous high pressure-temperature conditions will enable this technique to be extended to the melting interval for basalt at elevated pressures in the near future.

  2. MAX-DOAS measurements and satellite validation of tropospheric NO2 and SO2 vertical column densities at a rural site of North China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Junli; Ma, Jianzhong; Lin, Weili; Zhao, Huarong; Shaiganfar, Reza; Beirle, Steffen; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    North China (NC), namely Huabei in Chinese, is one of the most severely polluted regions in China, and the air pollution issues in this region have received a worldwide attention. We performed ground-based Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements at Gucheng, (39°08‧N, 115°40‧E), a rural site of North China about 110 km southwest of Beijing, from September 2008 to September 2010. The tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2 and SO2 were retrieved using the so-called geometric approximation. The results show that the tropospheric NO2 and SO2 VCDs over NC have nearly the same seasonal variation pattern, with the maximum in winter and minimum in summer, while their diurnal variations are different. We also compared the tropospheric NO2 and SO2 VCDs from our MAX-DOAS measurements with several products of corresponding OMI (Ozone Monitoring Instrument) satellite observations. While in summer good agreement is found, the satellite observations systematically underestimate the tropospheric NO2 in winter over the polluted rural area of NC, probably mostly due to the so called aerosol shielding effect. In contrast, for SO2 no such clear conclusion can be drawn, probably owing to the larger uncertainties from MAX-DOAS and in particular satellite retrievals. This indicates that improvements of the retrieval algorithm for MAX-DOAS and off-line corrections of satellite measurements for the tropospheric SO2 VCDs should be given more emphasis in the future.

  3. Satellite-observed NO2, SO2, and HCHO Vertical Column Densities in East Asia: Recent Changes and Comparisons with Regional Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Lee, P.; Kim, S.; Mok, J.; Yoo, H. L.; Bae, C.; Kim, B. U.; Lim, Y. K.; Woo, J. H.; Park, R.

    2015-12-01

    This study reports the recent changes in tropospheric NO2, SO2, and HCHO vertical column densities (VCD) in East Asia observed from multiple satellites, highlighting especially the annual trend changes of NO2 and SO2 over Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei (BTH) region of China since 2010. Tropospheric VCD data from Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME), SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CHartographY (SCIAMACHY), Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) and GOME-2, retrieved from the Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI) and OMI National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) standard products, are utilized to investigate the annual trends of NO2, SO2, and HCHO VCDs from 2001 to 2015. They are also compared with simulations from Community Multi-scale Air Quality Model (CMAQ) based forecast system by the Integrated Multi-scale Air Quality System for Korea (IMAQS-K) of Ajou University. Until 2011, the changes in NO2 VCD over East Asian countries agree well with the findings of previous research, including the impact of the economic downturn during 2008-2009 and the subsequent quick recovery in China. After peaking in 2011, the NO2 VCD observations from active instruments (OMI and GOME-2) over China started to show a slower decreasing trend, mostly led by the rapid changes in the BTH region in northern China. On the other hand, SO2 started to decline earlier, from 2007, but inclined back from 2010 to 2012, and then back to declining trend since 2012. While satellite observations show dramatic recent changes, the model could not reproduce those changes mostly due to its use of fixed emission inventory. We conclude that rapid update of latest emission inventory is necessary for an accurate forecast of regional air quality in east Asia, especially for upcoming international sports events in PyeongChang (Korea), Tokyo (Japan) and Beijing (China) in 2018, 2020 and 2022, respectively.

  4. Spectral Signature of Column Solar Radiation Absorption During the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE). Revision

    SciTech Connect

    O'Hirok, William; Gautier, Catherine; Ricchiazzi, Paul

    1999-11-01

    Spectral and broadband shortwave radiative flux data obtained from the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Enhanced Shortwave Experiment (ARESE) are compared with 3-D radiative transfer computations for the cloud field of October 30, 1995. Because the absorption of broadband solar radiation in the cloudy atmosphere deduced from observations and modeled differ by 135 Wm{sup -2}, we performed a consistency analysis using spectral observations and the model to integrate for wavelengths between the spectral observations. To match spectral measurements, aerosols need a reduction in both single scattering albedo (from 0.938 to 0.82) and asymmetry factor (from 0.67 to 0.61), and cloud droplets require a three-fold increase in co-albedo. Even after modifying the model inputs and microphysics the difference in total broadband absorption is still of the order of 75Wm{sup -2}. Finally, an unexplained absorber centered around 1.06 {micro}m appears in the comparison that is much too large to be explained by dimers.

  5. Analysis of illicit drugs in human urine by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography with on-column fast scanning polychrome absorption detection.

    PubMed

    Wernly, P; Thormann, W

    1991-12-15

    Using micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) with a borate/phosphate buffer containing 75 mM SDS (pH 9.1), common drugs of abuse and/or their metabolites, including opioids, benzoylecgonine, amphetamines, and methaqualone, can easily be analyzed. After solid-phase extraction of 5 mL of urine, drug concentrations down to about 100 ng/mL can be unambiguously monitored with on-column multiwavelength detection. Peak assignment is achieved through comparison of retention times and absorption spectra of eluting peaks with those of computer-stored model runs. The effectiveness of the approach is demonstrated with data obtained from different patient urines which tested positively for one or several drugs using nonisotopic immunoassays. Results suggest that MECC of illicit drugs is a highly specific and sensitive instrumental approach suitable for confirmation testing following a positive response of a toxicological screening procedure. PMID:1789451

  6. Absolute radical densities in etching plasmas determined by broad-band UV absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Booth, Jean-Paul; Cunge, Gilles; Neuilly, François; Sadeghi, Nader

    1998-08-01

    Broad-band UV absorption spectroscopy was used to determine radical densities in reactive gas plasmas generated in a 13.56 MHz capacitively coupled parallel plate reactor. Five radical species were detected: 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1, CF, AlF, 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img3. Absolute (line-integrated) 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1 densities were determined in 0963-0252/7/3/021/img5 and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img6 plasmas, as were the 0963-0252/7/3/021/img1 vibrational and rotational temperatures in the latter case. In 0963-0252/7/3/021/img5 plasmas the CF radical was also detected, along with the etch products AlF (from the Al powered electrode) and 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 (when an Si substrate was present). The fraction that 0963-0252/7/3/021/img2 comprises of the total etch products was estimated. Finally, the 0963-0252/7/3/021/img3 dimer was detected in an 0963-0252/7/3/021/img12 plasma in the presence of an Si substrate. This simple technique allows absolute concentrations of many key reactive species to be determined in reactive plasmas, without the need to analyse the complex rotational spectra of these polyatomic molecules.

  7. Determination of arsenic(III) and arsenic(V) by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry after complexation and sorption on a C-18 bonded silica column.

    PubMed

    Pozebon, D; Dressler, V L; Gomes Neto, J A; Curtius, A J

    1998-04-01

    A flow injection procedure for the separation and pre-concentration of inorganic arsenic based on the complexation with ammonium diethyl dithiophosphate (DDTP) and sorption on a C-18 bonded silica gel minicolumn is proposed. During the sample injection by a time-based fashion, the As(3+)-DDTP complex is stripped from the solution and retained in the column. Arsenic(V) and other ions that do not form complexes are discarded. After reduction to the trivalent state by using potassium iodide plus ascorbic acid, total arsenic is determined by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS). Arsenic(V) concentration can be calculated by difference. After processing 6 ml sample volume, the As(3+)-DDTP complexes were eluted directly into the autosampler cup (120 mul). Ethanol was used for column rinsing. Influence of pH, reagent concentration, pre-concentration and elution time and column size were investigated. When 30 mul of eluate plus 10 mul of 0.1% (w/v) Pd(NO(3))(2) were dispensed into the graphite tube, analytical curve in the 0.3-3 mug As l(-1) range was obtained (r=0.9991). The accuracy was checked for arsenic determination in a certified water, spiked tap water and synthetic mixtures of arsenite and arsenate. Good recoveries (97-108%) of spiked samples were found. Results are precise (RSD 7.5 and 6% for 0.5 and 2.5 mug l(-1), n=10) and in agreement with the certified value of reference material at 95% confidence level. PMID:18967109

  8. Preconcentration and speciation of chromium in a sequential injection system incorporating dual mini-columns coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ai-Mei; Tang, Xiao-Yan; Chen, Ming-Li; Wang, Jian-Hua

    2008-05-01

    A procedure for chromium preconcentration and speciation with a dual mini-column sequential injection system coupled with electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry (ETAAS) was developed. At pH 6, the sample solution was firstly aspirated to flow through a Chlorella vulgaris cell mini-column on which the Cr(III) was retained. The effluent was afterwards directed to flow through a 717 anion exchange resin mini-column accompanied by the retention of Cr(VI). Thereafter, Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were eluted by 0.04 mol L - 1 and 1.0 mol L - 1 nitric acid, respectively, and the eluates were quantified with ETAAS. Chemical and flow variables governing the performance of the system were investigated. By using a sampling volume of 600 µL, sorption efficiencies of 99.7% for Cr(III) and 99% for Cr(VI) were achieved along with enrichment factors of 10.5 for Cr(III) and 11.6 for Cr(VI), within linear ranges of 0.1-2.5 µg L - 1 for Cr(III) and 0.12-2.0 µg L - 1 for Cr(VI). Detection limits of 0.02 µg L - 1 for Cr(III) and 0.03 µg L - 1 for Cr(VI) along with RSD values of 1.9% for Cr(III) and 2.5% for Cr(VI) (1.0 µg L - 1 , n = 11) were obtained. The procedure was validated by analyzing a certified reference material of GBW08608 and further demonstrated by chromium speciation in river and tap water samples.

  9. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  10. Extreme ultraviolet absorption measurements of low Z, low density, low temperature plasmas at the Orion Laser Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbs, Lauren; Brown, Colin; Hoarty, David; Hill, Matthew; James, Steven; Allan, Peter; Orion Laser Team

    2015-11-01

    Experiments have been carried out to demonstrate a platform on the Orion laser to study the equation of state of low Z elements in a low density, low temperature regime (around mg/cc, 10s eV). In this regime equation of state models based on Thomas-Fermi ion cell predict significant departure from ideal-gas + ionization predictions. In these experiments absorption measurements using point-projection backlighting aim to determine the change in ionisation as a function of material density at constant temperature to test model prediction. Initial work reported has shown that absorption data can be taken from X-ray heated samples with sufficient accuracy; short-pulse, high-contrast pulses can be used to explode the sample foil to the required low density, and a new XUV grating spectrometer has been commissioned and used for absorption measurements.

  11. Si IV Column Densities Predicted from Non-equilibrium Ionization Simulations of Turbulent Mixing Layers and High-velocity Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwak, Kyujin; Shelton, Robin L.; Henley, David B.

    2015-10-01

    We present predictions of the Si iv ions in turbulent mixing layers (TMLs) between hot and cool gas and in cool high-velocity clouds (HVCs) that travel through a hot halo, complementing the C iv, N v, and O vi predictions in Kwak & Shelton, Kwak et al., and Henley et al. We find that the Si iv ions are most abundant in regions where the hot and cool gases first begin to mix or where the mixed gas has cooled significantly. The predicted column densities of high velocity Si iv and the predicted ratios of Si iv to C iv and O vi found on individual sightlines in our HVC simulations are in good agreement with observations of high velocity gas. Low velocity Si iv is also seen in the simulations, as a result of decelerated gas in the case of the HVC simulations and when looking along directions that pass perpendicular to the direction of motion in the TML simulations. The ratios of low velocity Si iv to C iv and O vi in the TML simulations are in good agreement with those recorded for Milky Way halo gas, while the ratio of Si iv to O vi from the decelerated gas in the HVC simulations is lower than that observed at normal velocity in the Milky Way halo. We attribute the shortfall of normal velocity Si iv to not having modeled the effects of photoionization and, following Henley et al., consider a composite model that includes decelerated HVC gas, supernova remnants, galactic fountain gas, and the effect of photoionization.

  12. Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities and aerosol optical properties form MAXDOAS measurements in Yangtze River Delta, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Nan; Van. Roozendael, Michel; Ding, Aijun; Zhou, Bin; Hendrick, François; Shen, Yicheng; Wang, Tin; Valks, Pieter

    2014-05-01

    Air pollution is one of the most important environmental problems in developing Asian countries like China. Due to huge consumption of fossil fuels and rapid increase of traffic emissions in the past decades, many regions in China have been experiencing heavy air pollution. The Yangtze River Delta (YRD) region includes the mega-city Shanghai and the well-industrialized and urbanized areas of Zhejiang Province and Jiangsu Province, with over ten large cities, such as Hangzhou, Suzhou and Nanjing. Covering only 2% land area, this region produces over 20% of China's Gross Domestic Product (GDP) which makes it the most densely populated region and one of the most polluted regions in China. For instance, there more than 60% of a year was haze days with poor visibility in Shanghai over the last few years. In the YRD region, knowledge gaps still exist in the understanding of the source and transport of air pollutants because only few measurement studies have been conducted. MAX-DOAS measurements were performed in Shanghai city center and Wujiang (border of Shanghai and Jiangsu Province) from 2010 to 2012 and in Nanjing (capital of Jiangsu Province) from April 2013. A retrieval algorithm, based on an on-line implementation of the radiative transfer code LIDORT and the optimal estimation technique, has been used to provide information on aerosol extinction vertical profiles. The total aerosol optical depths (AODs) calculated from the retrieved profiles were compared to MODIS, AERONET and local PM measurements. The aerosol information was input to LIDORT to calculate NO2 air mass factors. The retrieved tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) were compared to in-situ and satellite NO2 measurements.

  13. Optical measurements of backscatter and absorption for characterizing water column structure and spatial pattern of coastal ocean color

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delwiche, Leon M.; Logsdon, Miles G.

    2005-08-01

    The global significance of the coastal waters off the west coast of Vancouver Island British Columbia was formally recognized by the United Nations' Man and the Biosphere (MAB) program on May, 5, 2000 by the creation of the Clayoquot Sound Biosphere Reserve. The marine coastal ecosystem of this reserve totals approximately 84,242 hectares. The inherent optical properties of these waters were measured during a fifteen day, 21 station cruise in the summer of 2004 and were synchronized with the daily MODIS Aqua satellite over flights. The depth of maximum backscatter were compared to the ratio of absorption of particulate and color dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and related to remotely sensed estimates of Chl-a. The relationships of these parameters are compared between stations within the Clayoquot Sound and off the coast. This investigation highlights the contribution of the functional proportion of particulate and CDOM in over estimates of Chl-a from satellite remote sensing. The spatial correlation of this functional relationship is however linked to observed patterns of coastal ocean color.

  14. Determination of Trace Silver in Water Samples by Online Column Preconcentration Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry Using Termite Digestion Product

    PubMed Central

    Bianchin, Joyce Nunes; Martendal, Edmar; Carasek, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    A new method for Ag determination in water samples using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled to a flow injection system and flame atomic absorption spectrometry was developed. The sorbent used for Ag preconcentration and extraction was the termite digestion product. Flow and chemical variables of the system were optimized through a multivariate procedure. The factors selected were adsorbent mass, buffer type and concentration, sample pH, and sample flow rate. The detection limit and precision were 3.4 μg L−1 and 3.8% (n = 6, 15 μg L−1), respectively. The enrichment factor and the linear working range were, respectively, 21 and 10–50 μg L−1. Results for recovery tests using different water samples were between 96 and 107%. The proposed methodology was applied with success for the determination of Ag in water used to wash clothes impregnated with silver nanoparticles, supplied by a factory located in Santa Catarina, Brazil. PMID:21804766

  15. Highly absorptive curcumin reduces serum atherosclerotic low-density lipoprotein levels in patients with mild COPD

    PubMed Central

    Funamoto, Masafumi; Sunagawa, Yoichi; Katanasaka, Yasufumi; Miyazaki, Yusuke; Imaizumi, Atsushi; Kakeya, Hideaki; Yamakage, Hajime; Satoh-Asahara, Noriko; Komiyama, Maki; Wada, Hiromichi; Hasegawa, Koji; Morimoto, Tatsuya

    2016-01-01

    Purpose COPD is mainly caused by tobacco smoking and is associated with a high frequency of coronary artery disease. There is growing recognition that the inflammation in COPD is not only confined to the lungs but also involves the systemic circulation and can impact nonpulmonary organs, including blood vessels. α1-antitrypsin–low-density lipoprotein (AT-LDL) complex is an oxidatively modified LDL that accelerates atherosclerosis. Curcumin, one of the best-investigated natural products, is a powerful antioxidant. However, the effects of curcumin on AT-LDL remain unknown. We hypothesized that Theracurmin®, a highly absorptive curcumin with improved bioavailability using a drug delivery system, ameliorates the inflammatory status in subjects with mild COPD. Patients and methods This is a randomized, double-blind, parallel-group study. Subjects with stages I–II COPD according to the Japanese Respiratory Society criteria were randomly assigned to receive 90 mg Theracurmin® or placebo twice a day for 24 weeks, and changes in inflammatory parameters were evaluated. Results There were no differences between the Theracurmin® and placebo groups in terms of age, male/female ratio, or body mass index in 39 evaluable subjects. The percent changes in blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c and LDL-cholesterol, triglyceride, or high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels after treatment were similar for the two groups. However, the percent change in the AT-LDL level was significantly (P=0.020) lower in the Theracurmin® group compared with the placebo group. Conclusion Theracurmin® reduced levels of atherosclerotic AT-LDL, which may lead to the prevention of future cardiovascular events in mild COPD subjects. PMID:27616885

  16. Prediction of Iron K-Edge Absorption Spectra Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.DeBeer; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2009-05-14

    Iron K-edge X-ray absorption pre-edge features have been calculated using a time-dependent density functional approach. The influence of functional, solvation, and relativistic effects on the calculated energies and intensities has been examined by correlation of the calculated parameters to experimental data on a series of 10 iron model complexes, which span a range of high-spin and low-spin ferrous and ferric complexes in O{sub h} to T{sub d} geometries. Both quadrupole and dipole contributions to the spectra have been calculated. We find that good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained by using the BP86 functional with the CP(PPP) basis set on the Fe and TZVP one of the remaining atoms. Inclusion of solvation yields a small improvement in the calculated energies. However, the inclusion of scalar relativistic effects did not yield any improved correlation with experiment. The use of these methods to uniquely assign individual spectral transitions and to examine experimental contributions to backbonding is discussed.

  17. THE COLUMN DENSITY DISTRIBUTION AND CONTINUUM OPACITY OF THE INTERGALACTIC AND CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM AT REDSHIFT (z) = 2.4

    SciTech Connect

    Rudie, Gwen C.; Steidel, Charles C.; Shapley, Alice E.; Pettini, Max

    2013-06-01

    We present new high-precision measurements of the opacity of the intergalactic and circumgalactic medium (IGM; CGM) at (z) = 2.4. Using Voigt profile fits to the full Ly{alpha} and Ly{beta} forests in 15 high-resolution high-S/N spectra of hyperluminous QSOs, we make the first statistically robust measurement of the frequency of absorbers with H I column densities 14{approx}< log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2}){approx}<17.2. We also present the first measurements of the frequency distribution of H I absorbers in the volume surrounding high-z galaxies (the CGM, 300 pkpc), finding that the incidence of absorbers in the CGM is much higher than in the IGM. In agreement with Rudie et al., we find that there are fractionally more high-N{sub H{sub I}} absorbers than low-N{sub H{sub I}} absorbers in the CGM compared to the IGM, leading to a shallower power law fit to the CGM frequency distribution. We use these new measurements to calculate the total opacity of the IGM and CGM to hydrogen-ionizing photons, finding significantly higher opacity than most previous studies, especially from absorbers with log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2}) < 17.2. Reproducing the opacity measured in our data as well as the incidence of absorbers with log (N{sub H{sub I}}/cm{sup -2})>17.2 requires a broken power law parameterization of the frequency distribution with a break near N{sub H{sub I}} Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 15} cm{sup -2}. We compute new estimates of the mean free path ({lambda}{sub mfp}) to hydrogen-ionizing photons at z{sub em} = 2.4, finding {lambda}{sub mfp} = 147 {+-} 15 Mpc when considering only IGM opacity. If instead, we consider photons emanating from a high-z star-forming galaxy and account for the local excess opacity due to the surrounding CGM of the galaxy itself, the mean free path is reduced to {lambda}{sub mfp} = 121 {+-} 15 Mpc. These {lambda}{sub mfp} measurements are smaller than recent estimates and should inform future studies of the metagalactic UV background and of

  18. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex. PMID:27007445

  19. Density Transition Based Self-Focusing of cosh-Gaussian Laser Beam in Plasma with Linear Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niti, Kant; Manzoor, Ahmad Wani

    2015-07-01

    Density transition based self-focusing of cosh-Gaussian laser beam in plasma with linear absorption has been studied. The field distribution in the plasma is expressed in terms of beam width parameter, decentered parameter, and linear absorption coefficient. The differential equation for the beam width parameter is solved by following Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin (WKB) and paraxial approximation through parabolic wave equation approach. The behaviour of beam width parameter with dimensionless distance of propagation is studied at optimum values of plasma density, decentered parameter and with different absorption levels in the medium. The results reveal that these parameters can affect the self-focusing significantly. Supported by a Financial Grant from CSIR, New Delhi, India, under Project No. 03(1277)/13/EMR-II

  20. The Circumstellar Shell of the Post-Asymptotic Giant Branch Star HD 56126: 12C12C/12C13C Isotope Ratio and 12C16O Column Density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakker, Eric J.; Lambert, David L.

    1998-11-01

    We have made the first detection of circumstellar absorption lines of the 12C13C A 1Πu-X 1Σ+g (Phillips) system 1-0 band and the 12C16O X 1Σ+ first-overtone 2-0 band in the spectrum of the post-AGB star HD 56126 (IRAS 07134+1005). All current detections of circumstellar molecular absorption lines toward HD 56126 (12C2, 12C13C, 12C14N, 13C14N, and 12C16O) yield the same heliocentric velocity of VCSE = 77.6 +/- 0.4 km s-1. The 12C2, 12C13C, and 12C16O lines give rotational temperatures and integrated column densities of Trot = 328 +/- 37 K, log Nint = 15.34 +/- 0.10 cm-2, Trot = 256 +/- 30 K, log Nint = 13.79 +/- 0.12 cm-2, and Trot = 51 +/- 37 K, log Nint = 18.12 +/- 0.13 cm-2, respectively. The rotational temperatures are lower for molecules with a higher permanent dipole moment. Derived relative column densities ratios are 12C2/12C13C = 36 +/- 13 and 12C16O/(12C2 + 12C13C) = 606 +/- 230. Combined with data from a previous paper, we find relative column densities of 12C16O/(12C14N + 13C14N) = 475 +/- 175 and 12C14N/13C14N = 38 +/- 2. Under chemical equilibrium conditions, 12C13C is formed twice as easily as 12C2. The isotopic exchange reaction for 12C2 is too slow to significantly alter the 12C2/12C13C ratio, and the 12C2 to 12C13C ratio is a good measure of half the carbon isotope ratio: 12C/13C = 2 × 12C2/12C13C = 72 +/- 26. This is in agreement with our prediction that the isotopic exchange reaction for 12C14N is efficient and our observation in Paper III of 12C14N/13C14N = 38 +/- 2. A fit of the C2 excitation model of van Dishoeck & Black to the relative population distribution of C2 yields nc σ/I = 3.3 +/- 1.0 × 10-14. At r ~= 1016 cm, this translates into nc = 1.7 × 107 cm-3 and Ṁ~=2.5×10-4 M⊙ yr-1.

  1. Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over Beijing: results of the first three years of ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements (2008-2011) and satellite validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. Z.; Beirle, S.; Jin, J. L.; Shaiganfar, R.; Yan, P.; Wagner, T.

    2013-02-01

    Ground-based measurements of scattered sunlight by the Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) have been carried out at an urban site (39.95° N, 116.32° E) in Beijing megacity since 6 August 2008. In this study, we retrieved the tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) over Beijing from these MAX-DOAS observations from August 2008 to September 2011. Over this period, the daytime (08:00-17:00 Beijing Time (BJT, which equals UTC + 8)) mean tropospheric NO2 VCDs varied from 0.5 to 13.3 with an average of 3.6 during summertime, and from 0.2 to 16.8 with an average of 5.8 during wintertime, all in units of 1016 molecules cm-2. The average diurnal variation patterns of tropospheric NO2 over Beijing appeared to be rather different from one season to another, indicating differences in the emission strength and atmospheric lifetime. In contrast to previous studies, we find a small weekly cycle of the tropospheric NO2 VCD over Beijing. The NO2 VCD in the late afternoon was the largest on Saturday and the lowest on Sunday, and in the morning it reached a clear maximum on Wednesday. We also find a post-Olympic Games effect, with 39-54% decrease in the tropospheric NO2 VCD over Beijing estimated for August of 2008, compared to the following years. The tropospheric NO2 VCDs derived by our ground MAX-DOAS measurements show a good correlation with SCIAMACHY and OMI satellite data. However, compared with the MAX-DOAS measurements, the satellite observations underestimate the tropospheric NO2 VCDs over Beijing systematically, by 43% for SCIAMACHY and 26-38% for OMI (DOMINO v2.0 and DOMINO v1.02). Based on radiative transfer simulations, we show that the aerosol shielding effect can explain this underestimation, while the gradient smoothing effect caused by the coarse spatial resolution of the satellite observations could play an additional role.

  2. AN EXPLANATION FOR THE DIFFERENT X-RAY TO OPTICAL COLUMN DENSITIES IN THE ENVIRONMENTS OF GAMMA RAY BURSTS: A PROGENITOR EMBEDDED IN A DENSE MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Krongold, Yair; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2013-09-10

    We study the {approx}> 10 ratios in the X-ray to optical column densities inferred from afterglow spectra of gamma ray bursts (GRBs) due to gas surrounding their progenitors. We present time-evolving photoionization calculations for these afterglows and explore different conditions of their environment. We find that homogenous models of the environment (constant density) predict X-ray columns similar to those found in the optical spectra, with the bulk of the opacity being produced by neutral material at large distances from the burst. This result is independent of gas density or metallicity. Only models assuming a progenitor immersed in a dense ({approx}10{sup 2-4} cm{sup -3}) cloud of gas (with radius {approx}10 pc), with a strong, declining gradient of density for the surrounding interstellar medium (ISM) are able to account for the large X-ray to optical column density ratios. However, to avoid an unphysical correlation between the size of this cloud and the size of the ionization front produced by the GRB, the models also require that the circumburst medium is already ionized prior to the burst. The inferred cloud masses are {approx}< 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun }, even if low metallicities in the medium are assumed (Z {approx} 0.1 Z{sub Sun }). These cloud properties are consistent with those found in giant molecular clouds and our results support a scenario in which the progenitors reside within intense star formation regions of galaxies. Finally, we show that modeling over large samples of GRB afterglows may offer strong constraints on the range of properties in these clouds, and the host galaxy ISM.

  3. A fast tree-based method for estimating column densities in adaptive mesh refinement codes. Influence of UV radiation field on the structure of molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia, Valeska; Hennebelle, Patrick

    2014-11-01

    Context. Ultraviolet radiation plays a crucial role in molecular clouds. Radiation and matter are tightly coupled and their interplay influences the physical and chemical properties of gas. In particular, modeling the radiation propagation requires calculating column densities, which can be numerically expensive in high-resolution multidimensional simulations. Aims: Developing fast methods for estimating column densities is mandatory if we are interested in the dynamical influence of the radiative transfer. In particular, we focus on the effect of the UV screening on the dynamics and on the statistical properties of molecular clouds. Methods: We have developed a tree-based method for a fast estimate of column densities, implemented in the adaptive mesh refinement code RAMSES. We performed numerical simulations using this method in order to analyze the influence of the screening on the clump formation. Results: We find that the accuracy for the extinction of the tree-based method is better than 10%, while the relative error for the column density can be much more. We describe the implementation of a method based on precalculating the geometrical terms that noticeably reduces the calculation time. To study the influence of the screening on the statistical properties of molecular clouds we present the probability distribution function of gas and the associated temperature per density bin and the mass spectra for different density thresholds. Conclusions: The tree-based method is fast and accurate enough to be used during numerical simulations since no communication is needed between CPUs when using a fully threaded tree. It is then suitable to parallel computing. We show that the screening for far UV radiation mainly affects the dense gas, thereby favoring low temperatures and affecting the fragmentation. We show that when we include the screening, more structures are formed with higher densities in comparison to the case that does not include this effect. We

  4. The accretion column of AE Aqr

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Claudia; Costa, D. Joaquim; Luna, Gerardo; Lima, Isabel J.; Silva, Karleyne M. G.; De Araujo, Jose Carlos N.; Coelho, Jaziel

    2016-07-01

    AE Aqr is a magnetic cataclysmic variable, whose white dwarf rotates at the very fast rate of 33 s modulating the flux from high-energies to optical wavelengths. There are many studies of the origin of its emission, which consider emission from a rotating magnetic field or from an accretion column. Recently, MAGIC observations have discarded AE Aqr emission in very high energy gamma-rays discarding non-thermal emission. Furthermore, soft and hard X-ray data from Swift and NuSTAR were fitted using thermal models. Here we present the modelling of AE Aqr X-ray spectra and light curve considering the emission of a magnetic accretion column using the Cyclops code. The model takes into consideration the 3D geometry of the system, allowing to properly represent the white-dwarf auto eclipse, the pre-shock column absorption, and the varying density and temperature of a tall accretion column.

  5. The ultraviolet absorption spectrum of the quasar PKS 0405-12 and the local density of Lyman-alpha absorption systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bahcall, John N.; Jannuzi, Buell T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Hartig, George F.

    1993-01-01

    A sample of 32 absorption lines has been identified in the ultraviolet spectrum of the z = 0.57 quasar PKS 0405-12. Data cover the wavelength range 1190-3260 A. There are 10 extragalactic Ly-alpha absorption lines in the complete sample, all with observed equivalent widths greater than or equal to 0.40 A; three of the Ly-alpha lines have Ly-beta counterparts. The number of Ly-alpha lines observed in the spectrum of PKS 0405-12 is within 1 sigma of the number predicted on the basis of previous HST observations of 3C 273 and of H1821 + 643. Combining the HST observations of 3C 273, H1821 + 643, and PKS 0405-12, we estimate the local number density of Ly-alpha systems with rest equivalent widths larger than 0.32 A to be about 15 +/- 4 Ly-alpha lines per unit redshift. Ground-based images reveal a rich field of galaxies in the direction of PKS 0405-12, including many galaxies with the brightnesses and sizes expected if they belong to a cluster associated with the quasar. The quasar spectrum does not show any evidence for absorption at the redshift of the emission lines, indicating a covering factor of less than unity for the halos of galaxies in the cluster around PKS 0405 - 12.

  6. Saturable absorption of an x-ray free-electron-laser heated solid-density aluminum plasma.

    PubMed

    Rackstraw, D S; Ciricosta, O; Vinko, S M; Barbrel, B; Burian, T; Chalupský, J; Cho, B I; Chung, H-K; Dakovski, G L; Engelhorn, K; Hájková, V; Heimann, P; Holmes, M; Juha, L; Krzywinski, J; Lee, R W; Toleikis, S; Turner, J J; Zastrau, U; Wark, J S

    2015-01-01

    High-intensity x-ray pulses from an x-ray free-electron laser are used to heat and probe a solid-density aluminum sample. The photon-energy-dependent transmission of the heating beam is studied through the use of a photodiode. Saturable absorption is observed, with the resulting transmission differing significantly from the cold case, in good agreement with atomic-kinetics simulations. PMID:25615475

  7. Dithiocarbamate functionalized or surface sorbed Merrifield resin beads as column materials for on line flow injection-flame atomic absorption spectrometry determination of lead.

    PubMed

    Praveen, R S; Naidu, G R K; Prasada Rao, T

    2007-09-26

    This article describes the preparation of dithiocarbamate immobilized/functionalized and diethylammonium dithiocarbamate (DDTC) sorbed Merrifield Chloromethylated Resin (MCR) beads and comparison of these materials for on-line flow injection (FI)-flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) determination of lead. The above two materials enrich lead quantitatively over an identical optimal pH range (8.0-9.0), a preconcentration/loading time (up to 4 min) and elution with acidified methanol (a minimum of 0.01 molL(-1) HNO(3) in methanol). However, the detection limit for lead using dithiocarbamate functionalized MCR beads is 1.3 microgL(-1) compared to 3 microgL(-1) for DDTC sorbed MCR beads. Again, the sensitivity enhancement over direct FAAS signal is 48- and 27-fold, respectively. In addition, dithiocarbamate functionalized MCR beads offers better precision compared to DDTC sorbed MCR beads as the corresponding relative standard deviation (R.S.D.) values for five successive determinations of 0.20 microgmL(-1) are 1.44 and 4.36%, respectively. The accuracy of the developed on-line FI-FAAS procedure employing dithiocarbamate functionalized MCR beads as column material was tested by analyzing Certified Reference Material (CRM) of soil (IAEA soil-7) and marine sediment reference material (MESS-3) supplied by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Vienna and National Research Council (NRC), Canada, respectively. Furthermore, the developed procedure has been successfully tested for the analysis of surface, pond, ground and effluent water and soil samples collected from the vicinity of lead acid battery industry in India. PMID:17903486

  8. Dual-role plasma absorption probe to study the effects of sheath thickness on the measurement of electron density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bin; Li, Hong; Chen, Zhipeng; Xie, Jinlin; Liu, Wandong

    2010-08-01

    A sensitive plasma absorption probe (PAP) is reported for measuring electron density in processing plasmas. The sheath formed around the probe tip is important for the resonance of surface waves. For determining the absolute electron density from the absorption frequency of the sensitive PAP, a proper value of sheath thickness relative to the Debye length is required to be assigned in the data processing. In this paper, a dual-role PAP has been proposed to study the effects of sheath thickness on the measurement of electron density. It is used as a Langmuir probe and a sensitive PAP simultaneously. Based on these two functions, the sheath thickness is calibrated before the measurement of electron density. The calibrated value is assigned in the data processing to replace the fitting coefficient used in the previous work. Therefore, the measurement error caused by an inaccurately assigned sheath thickness can be minimized effectively. Because of the bi-functional characteristic, the dual-role PAP is an independent diagnostic tool.

  9. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface. PMID:27355877

  10. [THE BECOMING IN PHYLOGENESIS OF TRANSFER IN INTERCELLULAR MEDIUM AND ACTIVE ABSORPTION OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS BY CELLS SEQUENTIALLY OF HIGH DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS, LOW DENSITY LIPOPROTEINS AND HIGH DENSITY APOE-LIPOPROTEINS].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2015-06-01

    After more than half-century of different conceptions, the theory of general pathology was used to substantiate that all lipoproteins are bi-layer:lipid by their structure. The main function of high density lipoproteins as of all lipoproteins is transfer of fatty acids to cells and only in second turn taking away of spirit cholesterol from cells. At the stages of phylogenesis high density lipoproteins, low density lipoproteins and very low density lipoproteins began to function in a subsequent way. The fatty acids were transferred by low density lipoproteins in polar lipids at passive absorption by cells. Later on, lipoproteins transfer fatty acids in non-polar ethers with spirits glycerin and spirit cholesterol. The cells absorb them by receptor endocytosis. The hepatocytes secret in blood palmitic, oleic, linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins. The palmitic and oleic very low density lipoproteins absorb physiologically insulin-dependent cells apoE/B-100 = endocytosis. The linoleic and linoleic very low density lipoproteins after transition of polyethers cholesterol from high density lipoproteins turn into low density lipoproteins. The cells absorb them by apoB-100 = endocytosis. The formation of chylomicrons occurs in blood and hepatocytes absorb them by the way of apoB/E-48 = endocytosis. The absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by cells with apoB-100 = endocytosis form sensitivity of animals to exogenous hyper spirit cholesterol and absorption of poly-unsaturated fatty acids by apoE/A-I = receptors form corresponding resistance. The ApoE in lipoproteins form cooperative ligands--apoE/B-48 for chylomicrons, apoE/B-100 for very low density lipoproteins and apoE/A-I for high density lipoproteins. The chylomicrons in blood form apoB-48 from complexes of triglycerides secreted by enterocytes. These views change conceptions of pathogenesis and prevention of atherosclerosis, metabolic syndrome and resistance to insulin whose pathogenesis is unified

  11. Test measurements by a BBM of the nadir-looking SWIR FTS aboard GOSAT to monitor CO2 column density from space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Tatsuya; Oguma, Hiroyuki; Morino, Isamu; Higurashi, Akiko; Aoki, Tadao; Inoue, Gen

    2004-12-01

    Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) is a Japanese satellite to monitor column density of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) globally from space. GOSAT will be launched in 2008. The data measured by a GOSAT sensor and ground-based monitoring station data will be used into an atmospheric transport inverse model to identify source/sink amount of CO2 in a sub-continental scale. One of the main GOSAT sensors is a nadir-looking Fourier Transform Spectrometer (FTS), which covers Short Wavelength Infrared (SWIR) region to measure column density of CO2. National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES) is promoting researches on CO2 and CH4 sensitivity analysis, error analysis, data retrieval algorithm study, ground-based/air-borne validation strategy, and a plan of inverse model study for the SWIR FTS. A Bread-board model (BBM) of the SWIR FTS was built and tested by ground-based and airborne measurements. Several sets of the CO2 and CH4 radiance spectra over rice fields were obtained by the test measurements, and it was confirmed that the airborne measurements with a vibration insulator are effective for onboard measurements. Moreover, several improvement items of BBM have become clear.

  12. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  13. Absorption and diffusion of hydrogen in palladium-silver alloys by density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Xuezhi; Kramer, Gert Jan

    2002-11-01

    The vibrational states, absorption energies, and diffusions of H in Pd and Pd1-xAgx(0<~x<~1) have been studied by first-principle calculations. All results compare favorably to experiment. The zero-point motion of H is important in the determination of the H site occupation, in the estimation of the diffusion barrier, and in the explanation of the reversed isotope effect. The interesting anomalous isotope effect is explored, and a diffusion mechanism is proposed for tritium. The preferred diffusion paths of H in Pd and Pd1-xAgx are “indirect” paths. According to the absorption energies and diffusion barriers, H diffusion in Pd-Ag alloys should avoid the Ag-rich areas.

  14. Studies of the differential absorption rocket experiment. [to measure atmospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginther, J. C.; Smith, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of the ionosphere, in the rocket program of the Aeronomy Laboratory, include a propagation experiment, the data from which may be analyzed in several modes. This report considers in detail the differential absorption experiment. The sources of error and limitations of sensitivity are discussed. Methods of enhancing the performance of the experiment are described. Some changes have been made in the system and the improvement demonstrated. Suggestions are made for further development of the experiment.

  15. Resonance lamp absorption measurement of OH number density and temperature in expansion tube scramjet engine tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Trucco, Richard E.; Bittner, Robert D.

    1992-01-01

    In this paper, we report results of hydroxyl radical and static temperature measurements performed in the General Applied Science Laboratories-NASA HYPULSE expansion tube facility using the microwave resonance lamp absorption technique. Data were obtained as part of a series of hydrogen/air and hydrogen/oxygen combustion tests at stagnation enthalpies corresponding to Mach 17 flight speeds. Data from a representative injector configuration is compared to a full Navier-Stokes CFD solution.

  16. A passive measurement of dissociated atom densities in atmospheric pressure air discharge plasmas using vacuum ultraviolet self-absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Laity, George; Fierro, Andrew; Dickens, James; Neuber, Andreas; Frank, Klaus

    2014-03-28

    We demonstrate a method for determining the dissociation degree of atmospheric pressure air discharges by measuring the self-absorption characteristics of vacuum ultraviolet radiation from O and N atoms in the plasma. The atom densities are determined by modeling the amount of radiation trapping present in the discharge, without the use of typical optical absorption diagnostic techniques which require external sources of probing radiation into the experiment. For an 8.0 mm spark discharge between needle electrodes at atmospheric pressure, typical peak O atom densities of 8.5 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} and peak N atom densities of 9.9 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup −3} are observed within the first ∼1.0 mm of plasma near the anode tip by analyzing the OI and NI transitions in the 130.0–132.0 nm band of the vacuum ultraviolet spectrum.

  17. The observed relationship between the south pole 225-GHz atmospheric opacity and the water vapor column density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamberlin, Richard A.; Bally, John

    1995-05-01

    We compare our previously reported measurements of South Pole 225 GHz atmospheric opacity, τ, to the column of precipitable water vapor ( PWV) which was derived from concurrent upper air soundings. From this comparison we found that τ=(2.8±0.1)×10-2+(6.9±0.2)×10-2× PWV with τ in units of nepers/airmass and PWV in units of mm of precipitable H2O. We compared our results to predictions from Grossman's AT atmospheric transparency model which is widely used in the radio astronomy community. The coefficient of the second term of the above relation, 0.069, was consistent with the predictions from the model; however, the first term, 0.028, which represents the dry air opacity, was about five to ten times larger than expected. Most of this discrepancy between the observed and the predicted dry air opacity can be accounted for by including contributions from continuum emission from N2 and O2 as is done in Liebe's MPM atmospheric model.

  18. Atomistic modeling of CO 2 capture in primary and tertiary amines - Heat of absorption and density changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiti, A.; Bourcier, W. L.; Aines, R. D.

    2011-06-01

    With the aim of exploring new amine-based chemistry for CO 2 capture at large industrial scales we performed atomistic modeling of CO 2 chemisorption in aqueous solutions of primary and tertiary amines. DFT-based quantum chemical solvation calculations are shown to yield a number of important results, including the relative stability of ion species (carbamate vs. bicarbonate), heat of absorption, and density and volume changes as a function of CO 2 loading. Good agreement of simulation results with available experimental data provides confidence in the accuracy of such computational methods in predicting properties of new solvent systems and capture designs.

  19. Balloon-Borne Submillimeter Polarimetry of the Vela C Molecular Cloud: Systematic Dependence of Polarization Fraction on Column Density and Local Polarization-Angle Dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fissel, Laura M.; Ade, Peter A. R.; Angilè, Francesco E.; Ashton, Peter; Benton, Steven J.; Devlin, Mark J.; Dober, Bradley; Fukui, Yasuo; Galitzki, Nicholas; Gandilo, Natalie N.; Klein, Jeffrey; Korotkov, Andrei L.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Martin, Peter G.; Matthews, Tristan G.; Moncelsi, Lorenzo; Nakamura, Fumitaka; Netterfield, Calvin B.; Novak, Giles; Pascale, Enzo; Poidevin, Frédérick; Santos, Fabio P.; Savini, Giorgio; Scott, Douglas; Shariff, Jamil A.; Diego Soler, Juan; Thomas, Nicholas E.; Tucker, Carole E.; Tucker, Gregory S.; Ward-Thompson, Derek

    2016-06-01

    We present results for Vela C obtained during the 2012 flight of the Balloon-borne Large Aperture Submillimeter Telescope for Polarimetry. We mapped polarized intensity across almost the entire extent of this giant molecular cloud, in bands centered at 250, 350, and 500 μm. In this initial paper, we show our 500 μm data smoothed to a resolution of 2.‧5 (approximately 0.5 pc). We show that the mean level of the fractional polarization p and most of its spatial variations can be accounted for using an empirical three-parameter power-law fit, p \\propto {{\\boldsymbol{N}}}-0.45 {{\\boldsymbol{S}}}-0.60, where N is the hydrogen column density and S is the polarization-angle dispersion on 0.5 pc scales. The decrease of p with increasing S is expected because changes in the magnetic field direction within the cloud volume sampled by each measurement will lead to cancellation of polarization signals. The decrease of p with increasing N might be caused by the same effect, if magnetic field disorder increases for high column density sightlines. Alternatively, the intrinsic polarization efficiency of the dust grain population might be lower for material along higher density sightlines. We find no significant correlation between N and S. Comparison of observed submillimeter polarization maps with synthetic polarization maps derived from numerical simulations provides a promising method for testing star formation theories. Realistic simulations should allow for the possibility of variable intrinsic polarization efficiency. The measured levels of correlation among p, N, and S provide points of comparison between observations and simulations.

  20. Interaction of Isophorone with Pd(111): A Combination of Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy, Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic level understanding of interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity toward C=C or C=O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of this class of compounds with transition metals was investigated on α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone on Pd(111) as a prototypical system. In this study, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments, and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT+vdW) were combined to obtain detailed information on the binding of isophorone to palladium at different coverages and on the effect of preadsorbed hydrogen on the binding and adsorption geometry. According to these experimental observations and the results of theoretical calculations, isophorone adsorbs on Pd(111) in a flat-lying geometry at low coverages. With increasing coverage, both C=C and C=O bonds of isophorone tilt with respect to the surface plane. The tilting is considerably more pronounced for the C=C bond on the pristine Pd(111) surface, indicating a prominent perturbation and structural distortion of the conjugated π system upon interaction with Pd. Preadsorbed hydrogen leads to higher tilting angles of both π bonds, which points to much weaker interaction of isophorone with hydrogen-precovered Pd and suggests the conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system. The results of the DFT+vdW calculations provide further insights into the perturbation of the molecular structure of isophorone on Pd(111). PMID:26089998

  1. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: A density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)4-n(Cys)n sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  2. Tailored pump-probe transient spectroscopy with time-dependent density-functional theory: controlling absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkenhorst, Jessica; De Giovannini, Umberto; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology allow us to follow electronic motion at its natural time-scale with ultra-fast time resolution, leading the way towards attosecond physics experiments of extreme precision. In this work, we assess the use of tailored pumps in order to enhance (or reduce) some given features of the probe absorption (for example, absorption in the visible range of otherwise transparent samples). This type of manipulation of the system response could be helpful for its full characterization, since it would allow us to visualize transitions that are dark when using unshaped pulses. In order to investigate these possibilities, we perform first a theoretical analysis of the non-equilibrium response function in this context, aided by one simple numerical model of the hydrogen atom. Then, we proceed to investigate the feasibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory as a means to implement, theoretically, this absorption-optimization idea, for more complex atoms or molecules. We conclude that the proposed idea could in principle be brought to the laboratory: tailored pump pulses can excite systems into light-absorbing states. However, we also highlight the severe numerical and theoretical difficulties posed by the problem: large-scale non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are cumbersome, even with TDDFT, and the shortcomings of state-of-the-art TDDFT functionals may still be serious for these out-of-equilibrium situations.

  3. VizieR Online Data Catalog: CIV column densities in z<2.5 QSOs (D'odorico+, 2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Calura, F.; Cristiani, S.; Viel, M.

    2010-06-01

    The core of our sample is formed by the high-resolution, high S/N QSO spectra already described in Saitta et al. (2008MNRAS.385..519S) and D'Odorico et al. (2008MNRAS.389.1727D). Most of them were obtained with the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectrograph at the Kueyen unit of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) VLT (Cerro Paranal, Chile) in the framework of the ESO Large Programme (LP): 'The Cosmic Evolution of the IGM' (Bergeron et al., 2004Msngr.118...40B). In this work, three more QSOs were added to that sample, mainly to increase the redshift extension above z~3. UVES spectra of the QSOs, Q0055-269, PKS 2000-330 and PKS 1937-101, were downloaded from the ESO Archive and reduced with the UVES pipeline following the standard procedure. The continuum level was determined by interpolating with a cubic spline of the region of the spectrum free from evident absorption features. (2 data files).

  4. Derivation of water vapour absorption cross-sections in the red region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lal, M.; Chakrabarty, D. K.

    1994-01-01

    Absorption spectrum in 436 to 448 nm wavelength region gives NO2 and O3 column densities. This spectrum can also give H2O column density. The spectrum in the range of 655 to 667 nm contains absorption due to NO3 and H2O. Combining the absorption spectra in the wavelength ranges of 436 to 448 and 655 to 667 nm, water vapor absorption cross-sections in this range comes out to be of the order of 2.0 x 10(exp -24) cm(exp -2).

  5. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-15

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the ''{mu}10'' microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p{sup 5}({sup 2}P{sup 0}{sub 3/2})6s[{sup 3}/{sub 2}]{sup 0}{sub 2} which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10{sup 18} m{sup -3} order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the {mu}10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes.

  6. Measurement of axial neutral density profiles in a microwave discharge ion thruster by laser absorption spectroscopy with optical fiber probes.

    PubMed

    Tsukizaki, Ryudo; Koizumi, Hiroyuki; Nishiyama, Kazutaka; Kuninaka, Hitoshi

    2011-12-01

    In order to reveal the physical processes taking place within the "μ10" microwave discharge ion thruster, internal plasma diagnosis is indispensable. However, the ability of metallic probes to access microwave plasmas biased at a high voltage is limited from the standpoints of the disturbance created in the electric field and electrical isolation. In this study, the axial density profiles of excited neutral xenon were successfully measured under ion beam acceleration by using a novel laser absorption spectroscopy system. The target of the measurement was metastable Xe I 5p(5)((2)P(0) (3/2))6s[3/2](0) (2) which absorbed a wavelength of 823.16 nm. Signals from laser absorption spectroscopy that swept a single-mode optical fiber probe along the line of sight were differentiated and converted into axial number densities of the metastable neutral particles in the plasma source. These measurements revealed a 10(18) m(-3) order of metastable neutral particles situated in the waveguide, which caused two different modes during the operation of the μ10 thruster. This paper reports a novel spectroscopic measurement system with axial resolution for microwave plasma sources utilizing optical fiber probes. PMID:22225195

  7. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  8. Energy transmission transformer for a wireless capsule endoscope: analysis of specific absorption rate and current density in biological tissue.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nagato, Tomohiro; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-07-01

    This paper reports on the electromagnetic influences on the analysis of biological tissue surrounding a prototype energy transmission system for a wireless capsule endoscope. Specific absorption rate (SAR) and current density were analyzed by electromagnetic simulator in a model consisting of primary coil and a human trunk including the skin, fat, muscle, small intestine, backbone, and blood. First, electric and magnetic strength in the same conditions as the analytical model were measured and compared to the analytical values to confirm the validity of the analysis. Then, SAR and current density as a function of frequency and output power were analyzed. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by comparing the analytical values with the measured ones. The SAR was below the basic restrictions of the International Commission on Nonionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). At the same time, the results for current density show that the influence on biological tissue was lowest in the 300-400 kHz range, indicating that it was possible to transmit energy safely up to 160 mW. In addition, we confirmed that the current density has decreased by reducing the primary coil's current. PMID:18595805

  9. Analysis of current density and specific absorption rate in biological tissue surrounding transcutaneous transformer for an artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Shiba, Kenji; Nukaya, Masayuki; Tsuji, Toshio; Koshiji, Kohji

    2008-01-01

    This paper reports on the current density and specific absorption rate (SAR) analysis of biological tissue surrounding an air-core transcutaneous transformer for an artificial heart. The electromagnetic field in the biological tissue is analyzed by the transmission line modeling method, and the current density and SAR as a function of frequency, output voltage, output power, and coil dimension are calculated. The biological tissue of the model has three layers including the skin, fat, and muscle. The results of simulation analysis show SARs to be very small at any given transmission conditions, about 2-14 mW/kg, compared to the basic restrictions of the International Commission on nonionizing radiation protection (ICNIRP; 2 W/kg), while the current density divided by the ICNIRP's basic restrictions gets smaller as the frequency rises and the output voltage falls. It is possible to transfer energy below the ICNIRP's basic restrictions when the frequency is over 250 kHz and the output voltage is under 24 V. Also, the parts of the biological tissue that maximized the current density differ by frequencies; in the low frequency is muscle and in the high frequency is skin. The boundary is in the vicinity of the frequency 600-1000 kHz. PMID:18232363

  10. Mini-Column Ion-Exchange Separation and Atomic Absorption Quantitation of Nickel, Cobalt, and Iron: An Undergraduate Quantitative Analysis Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, James L.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Presents an undergraduate quantitative analysis experiment, describing an atomic absorption quantitation scheme that is fast, sensitive and comparatively simple relative to other titration experiments. (CS)

  11. Synthetic observations of molecular clouds in a galactic centre environment - I. Studying maps of column density and integrated intensity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertram, Erik; Glover, Simon C. O.; Clark, Paul C.; Ragan, Sarah E.; Klessen, Ralf S.

    2016-02-01

    We run numerical simulations of molecular clouds, adopting properties similar to those found in the central molecular zone (CMZ) of the Milky Way. For this, we employ the moving mesh code AREPO and perform simulations which account for a simplified treatment of time-dependent chemistry and the non-isothermal nature of gas and dust. We perform simulations using an initial density of n0 = 103 cm-3 and a mass of 1.3 × 105 M⊙. Furthermore, we vary the virial parameter, defined as the ratio of kinetic and potential energy, α = Ekin/|Epot|, by adjusting the velocity dispersion. We set it to α = 0.5, 2.0 and 8.0, in order to analyse the impact of the kinetic energy on our results. We account for the extreme conditions in the CMZ and increase both the interstellar radiation field (ISRF) and the cosmic ray flux (CRF) by a factor of 1000 compared to the values found in the solar neighbourhood. We use the radiative transfer code RADMC-3D to compute synthetic images in various diagnostic lines. These are [C II] at 158 μm, [O I] (145 μm), [O I] (63 μm), 12CO (J = 1 → 0) and 13CO (J = 1 → 0) at 2600 and 2720 μm, respectively. When α is large, the turbulence disperses much of the gas in the cloud, reducing its mean density and allowing the ISRF to penetrate more deeply into the cloud's interior. This significantly alters the chemical composition of the cloud, leading to the dissociation of a significant amount of the molecular gas. On the other hand, when α is small, the cloud remains compact, allowing more of the molecular gas to survive. We show that in each case the atomic tracers accurately reflect most of the physical properties of both the H2 and the total gas of the cloud and that they provide a useful alternative to molecular lines when studying the interstellar medium in the CMZ.

  12. Time-Dependent Density Functional Calculations of Ligand K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    DeBeer George, S.; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2007-07-10

    X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) at the Cl and S K edge and Mo L edge have been calculated at the TDDFT level for a series of dioxomolybdenum complexes LMoO{sub 2}X (L = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate, X = Cl, SCH{sub 2}Ph, OPh), which play an important role in modeling the catalytic cycle of the sulfite oxidase enzyme. Also, the XAS spectra of model molecules of the Mo complexes have been simulated and interpreted in terms of the Mo 4d orbital splitting, in order to find possible correlations with the spectral pattern of the complexes. Comparison with the available experimental data allows us to assess the performances of the present computational scheme to describe the core excitations in large bioinorganic systems. The theoretical interpretation of the spectral features of both the metal and ligand core excitations in terms of the oscillator strength distribution provides important insight into the covalency of the metal-ligand bond.

  13. Hydrogeologic implications of increased septic-tank-soil-absorption system density, Ogden Valley, Weber County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lowe, Mike; Miner, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Ground water in Ogden Valley occurs in perched, confined, and unconfined aquifers in the valley fill to depths of 600 feet and more. The confined aquifer, which underlies only the western portion of the valley, is overlain by cleyey silt lacustrine sediments probably deposited during the Bonneville Basin's Little Valley lake cycle sometime between 90,000 and 150,000 years ago. The top of this cleyey silt confining layer is generally 25 to 60 feet below the ground surface. Unconfined conditions occur above and beyond the outer margin of the confining layer. The sediments overlying the confining layer are primarily Lake Bonneville deposits. Water samples from springs, streams, and wells around Pineview Reservoir, and from the reservoir itself, were collected and analyzed. These samples indicate that water quality in Ogden Valley is presently good. Average nitrate concentrations in the shallow unconfined aquifer increase toward the center of Ogden Valley. This trend was not observed in the confined aquifer. There is no evidence, however, of significant water-quality deterioration, even in the vicinity of Huntsville, a town that has been densely developed using septic-tank-soil-absorption systems for much of the time since it was founded in 1860.

  14. Tropospheric NO2 column densities over oases of the Taklamakan desert (NW-China): satellite DOAS observations and ground based Multi Axis DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Y.; Meixner, F.; Wu, Z.; Beirle, S.; Wagner, T.; Andreae, M.; Mamtimin, B.

    2012-04-01

    We report about a study on the potential role of biogenic nitric oxide (NO) emissions from soil for the tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) column density over typical, intensively used agro-ecosystems of NW-China. For that, we used (a) tropospheric NO2 column data measured from both, satellite (SCIAMACHY) and ground based (MAX-DOAS) platforms, and (b) statistical data of agricultural management as well as observed meteorological data to estimate biogenic NO soil emissions, fast near-surface conversion of NO to NO2, and the vertical dispersion of NO2. We have chosen three very remote oases (Milan, Ruoqiang, Waxxari) on the southern fringe of the Taklamakan desert in the extremely arid region of northwest China (Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region). These target oases are isolated from each other as well as from other potential NO2 sources (100-150 km). Therefore, the oases can be considered as typical areal sources of predominantly soil biogenic NO. Moreover, their areal extension is pretty comparable to the typical pixel size of satellite retrievals. For the period 2003-2010, we used monthly mean tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs, in molecules cm-2) based on data of the SCIAMACHY satellite. With regard to the satellite observations, the three selected oases can truly be considered as tropospheric NO2 hotspots in the "middle of nothing" (desert). VCDs of NO2 were always higher during growing seasons. In the growing seasons of the last 5 years, tropospheric VCDs of NO2 increased with the annual enlargement of sown and irrigated areas and obligatory strong application of fertilizers. Furthermore, we performed ground-based MAXDOAS measurements in and around Milan oasis (39.26°N, 88.91°E) in May and June 2011. On a few occasions, we measured VCDs of NO2 simultaneously upwind and downwind of Milan oasis applying two MAXDOAS instruments. VCDs of NO2 were generally observed to be significantly higher at the downwind site. This again proved that the oasis

  15. Quantification of mid and late evoked sinks in laminar current source density profiles of columns in the primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Markus K.; Hechavarría, Julio C.; Kössl, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Current source density (CSD) analysis assesses spatiotemporal synaptic activations at somatic and/or dendritic levels in the form of depolarizing current sinks. Whereas many studies have focused on the short (<50 ms) latency sinks, associated with thalamocortical projections, sinks with longer latencies have received less attention. Here, we analyzed laminar CSD patterns for the first 600 ms after stimulus onset in the primary auditory cortex of Mongolian gerbils. By applying an algorithm for contour calculation, three distinct mid and four late evoked sinks were identified in layers I, III, Va, VIa, and VIb. Our results further showed that the patterns of intracortical information-flow remained qualitatively similar for low and for high sound pressure level stimuli at the characteristic frequency (CF) as well as for stimuli ± 1 octave from CF. There were, however, differences associated with the strength, vertical extent, onset latency, and duration of the sinks for the four stimulation paradigms used. Stimuli one octave above the most sensitive frequency evoked a new, and quite reliable, sink in layer Va whereas low level stimulation led to the disappearance of the layer VIb sink. These data indicate the presence of input sources specifically activated in response to level and/or frequency parameters. Furthermore, spectral integration above vs. below the CF of neurons is asymmetric as illustrated by CSD profiles. These results are important because synaptic feedback associated with mid and late sinks—beginning at 50 ms post stimulus latency—is likely crucial for response modulation resulting from higher order processes like memory, learning or cognitive control. PMID:26557058

  16. Enhanced X-ray absorption for micro-CT analysis of low density polymers.

    PubMed

    Crica, Livia Elena; Wengenroth, Jonas; Tiainen, Hanna; Ionita, Mariana; Haugen, Håvard Jostein

    2016-06-01

    X-ray microtomography (micro-CT), one of the most resourceful instruments for high resolution 3D analysis, can provide qualitative and quantitative accurate structural and compositional information for a broad range of materials. Yet its contribution to the field of biopolymeric materials science is often limited by low imaging contrast due to scarce X-ray attenuation features, particularly for sponges and foam-like structures. This limitation can be overcome to some extent by adjusting the working parameters of micro-CT equipment. However, such approach also facilitates noise and artefacts, and solving the signal-to-noise trade-off has been always problematic. Searching for alternatives turns one's attention towards the improvement of X-ray attenuation features. While several studies report the use of contrast agents for biological materials, studies to integrate multiple micro-CT approaches for biopolymers were not conducted so far. This method paper is thus aimed to serve as a platform for micro-CT analysis of low X-ray absorptive polymers. Here, several contrast enhancing artifices were developed and trialled on gelatin and poly(vinyl alcohol) biopolymer composites (GP). Accordingly, GP were modified with iodine, barium, silver-based chemicals and hexa(methyl disilazane) by two different methods, i.e. addition of high atomic number chemicals during materials synthesis and post-synthesis staining, respectively. Consequently, cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy emerged as complementary characterization, aimed to confirm the reproducibility of samples morphological features. The most versatile methods were barium chloride additive incorporation and iodine staining coupled with hexa(methyl disilazane) chemical drying. Both methods significantly improved the X-ray absorbance of our polymeric samples, providing better contrast of micro-CT tomograms. PMID:26863157

  17. The use of NO2 absorption cross section temperature sensitivity to derive NO2 profile temperature and stratospheric-tropospheric column partitioning from visible direct-sun DOAS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spinei, E.; Cede, A.; Swartz, W. H.; Herman, J.; Mount, G. H.

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents a temperature sensitivity method (TESEM) to accurately calculate total vertical NO2 column, atmospheric slant NO2 profile-weighted temperature (T), and to separate stratospheric and tropospheric columns from direct-sun (DS), ground-based measurements using the retrieved T. TESEM is based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) fitting of the linear temperature-dependent NO2 absorption cross section, σ (T), regression model (Vandaele et al., 2003). Separation between stratospheric and tropospheric columns is based on the primarily bimodal vertical distribution of NO2 and an assumption that stratospheric effective temperature can be represented by temperature at 27 km ± 3 K, and tropospheric effective temperature is equal to surface temperature within 3-5 K. These assumptions were derived from the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) chemistry-transport model (CTM) simulations over two northern midlatitude sites in 2011. TESEM was applied to the Washington State University Multi-Function DOAS instrument (MFDOAS) measurements at four midlatitude locations with low and moderate NO2 anthropogenic emissions: (1) the Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Table Mountain Facility (JPL-TMF), CA, USA (34.38° N/117.68° W); (2) Pullman, WA, USA (46.73° N/117.17° W); (3) Greenbelt, MD, USA (38.99° N/76.84° W); and (4) Cabauw, the Netherlands (51.97° N/4.93° E) during July 2007, June-July 2009, July-August and October 2011, November 2012-May 2013, respectively. NO2 T and total, stratospheric, and tropospheric NO2 vertical columns were determined over each site.

  18. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-07-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground-based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~ 35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatiotemporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs). are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to

  19. Kinetics of Moisture Absorption for Alkali Extracted Steam-Exploded Fiber Filled High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Taib, R. M.; Ramarad, S.; Ishak, Z. A. M.; Rozman, H. D.

    2010-03-11

    Acacia mangium wood fiber derived from steam-explosion and fiber fractionation treatment was used as fillers for high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The alkali extracted steam-exploded fibers (AEF) obtained were acetylated to produce acetylated fibers (AAEF) having three different weight percent gain (WPG). Composites of AEF or AAEF and HDPE were prepared via 2-roll mill, compression molded and cut into dumbbell specimens. All samples were immersed in water at room temperature for 30 days. The process of absorption of water by all composites followed the kinetics and mechanisms described by the Fick's theory. Diffusion coefficient (D) values increased with filler loading but decreased with increasing WPG of the AAEF fiber. Further decrease was observed when maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was added to the composite system. This was due to improved fiber-matrix adhesion that restricts movement of water molecules from further penetrate inside the composite structures.

  20. Kinetics of Moisture Absorption for Alkali Extracted Steam-Exploded Fiber Filled High-Density Polyethylene Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taib, R. M.; Ramarad, S.; Ishak, Z. A. M.; Rozman, H. D.

    2010-03-01

    Acacia mangium wood fiber derived from steam-explosion and fiber fractionation treatment was used as fillers for high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The alkali extracted steam-exploded fibers (AEF) obtained were acetylated to produce acetylated fibers (AAEF) having three different weight percent gain (WPG). Composites of AEF or AAEF and HDPE were prepared via 2-roll mill, compression molded and cut into dumbbell specimens. All samples were immersed in water at room temperature for 30 days. The process of absorption of water by all composites followed the kinetics and mechanisms described by the Fick's theory. Diffusion coefficient (D) values increased with filler loading but decreased with increasing WPG of the AAEF fiber. Further decrease was observed when maleated polyethylene (MAPE) was added to the composite system. This was due to improved fiber-matrix adhesion that restricts movement of water molecules from further penetrate inside the composite structures.

  1. Broadband antireflection and absorption enhancement of ultrathin silicon solar microcells enabled with density-graded surface nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, Lesley; Kang, Dongseok; Lee, Sung-Min; Li, Weigu; Hunter, Hajirah; Yoon, Jongseung

    2014-06-02

    Density-graded surface nanostructures are implemented on ultrathin silicon solar microcells by silver-nanoparticle-catalyzed wet chemical etching to enable near-zero surface reflection over a broad wavelength range of incident solar spectrum as well as non-zeroth order diffraction and light trapping for longer wavelength photons, thereby achieving augmented photon absorption for ultrathin silicon microcells in a simple, cost-effective manner. The increase of absorbed photon flux through the “black silicon (b-Si)” surface translates directly into the corresponding enhancement of photovoltaic performance, where 5.7-μm b-Si microcells with the rational design of device configuration exhibit improved energy conversion efficiency by 148% and 50% with and without a diffuse backside reflector, respectively, compared to devices from the bare silicon without b-Si implementation. Systematic studies on nanostructured morphology, optical and electrical properties of b-Si microcells, together with semi-empirical numerical modeling of photon absorption, provide key aspects of underlying materials science and physics.

  2. Weight in infancy and adult calcium absorption as determinants of bone mineral density in adult men: the Hertfordshire cohort study.

    PubMed

    Patel, M B R; Makepeace, A E; Jameson, K A; Masterson, L M; Holt, R I G; Swaminathan, R; Javaid, M K; Cooper, C; Arden, N K

    2012-12-01

    Adult bone mass is modified by early life environmental influences, but the mechanism of this association is uncertain. Data support an inverse relationship between intestinal calcium absorption (αCa) and birth weight in women. However, little is known regarding determinants in men. This study examines the association between weight in infancy and adult αCa in healthy men and whether this could be a mechanism by which the early life environment may influence bone mass. Men were recruited from the MRC Hertfordshire Cohort Study, for whom detailed early life records were available. Areal bone mineral density (aBMD) was measured using a Hologic QDR 4500 at the femoral neck (FN) and lumbar spine. We randomly selected 123 men stratified by birth weight and assessed αCa using the stable strontium absorption test. The mean age was 63.6 (SD 2.5) years. αCa was not associated with birth weight or weight at 1 year. FN aBMD was associated with both weight at 1 year (r = 0.20, p = 0.03) and αCa (r = 0.20, p = 0.03). Both of these associations remained statistically significant in a mutually adjusted, multivariable model but would account for only ~4 % variance in BMD. We demonstrated a positive association between weight at 1 year and aBMD and between αCa and FN BMD, but no association was found between birth weight and αCa. This suggests that in men, although αCa is a contributing factor in FN bone density, it is not the main mechanism whereby the early environment modifies adult BMD. PMID:23010962

  3. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    SciTech Connect

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-15

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  4. Development of vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for wide measurement range of number density using a dual-tube inductively coupled plasma light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwahara, Akira; Matsui, Makoto; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki

    2012-12-01

    A vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy system for a wide measurement range of atomic number densities is developed. Dual-tube inductively coupled plasma was used as a light source. The probe beam profile was optimized for the target number density range by changing the mass flow rate of the inner and outer tubes. This system was verified using cold xenon gas. As a result, the measurement number density range was extended from the conventional two orders to five orders of magnitude.

  5. Determination of Ba-emitter densities along electrodes in high pressure sodium lamps by optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westermeier, Michael; Reinelt, Jens; Awakowicz, Peter; Mentel, Juergen

    2008-10-01

    Nowadays, high pressure sodium lamps gain more importance in various fields of lighting e.g. for horticulture lighting. To achieve a long lifetime, a detailed understanding of the density of the barium emitter around the lamp electrodes and its interaction with them is needed. The lamp under investigation has a special research design. It is downscaled to a 140 W lamp and equipped with a sapphire discharge tube to allow optical observations. Ba is stored in a tungsten coil around the rod shaped tungsten electrodes and transported to the tip during operation. By measuring the absorption of the 553 nm Ba resonance line the spatially resolved Ba density around the electrodes during lamp operation is determined. As backlight a filtered UHP-lamp is installed. The measuring results show a decrease of Ba along the electrode axis representing a diffusion process. Further results will be shown for different lamp operating parameters (e.g. current, frequency) and combined with the measured electrode temperature profiles.

  6. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanoparticles for the on-line determination of gold, palladium, and platinum in mine samples based on flow injection micro-column preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ye, Juanjuan; Liu, Shuxia; Tian, Miaomiao; Li, Wanjun; Hu, Bin; Zhou, Weihong; Jia, Qiong

    2014-01-01

    A simple and highly selective procedure for on-line determination of trace levels of Au, Pd, and Pt in mine samples has been developed using flow injection-column adsorption preconcentration coupled with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometry (FI-column-GFAAS). The precious metals were adsorbed on the as-synthesized magnetic nanoparticles functionalized with 4'-aminobenzo-15-crown-5-ether packed into a micro-column and then eluted with 2% thiourea + 0.1 mol L(-1) HCl solution prior to the determination by GFAAS. The properties of the magnetic adsorbents were investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). Various experimental parameters affecting the preconcentration of Au, Pd, and Pt were investigated and optimized. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the detection limits of the developed technique were 0.16 ng mL(-1) for Au, 0.28 ng mL(-1) for Pd, and 1.01 ng mL(-1) for Pt, with enrichment factors of 24.3, 13.9, and 17.8, respectively. Precisions, evaluated as repeatability of results, were 1.1%, 3.9%, and 4.4% respectively for Au, Pd, and Pt. The developed method was validated by the analysis of Au, Pd, and Pt in certified reference materials and mine samples with satisfactory results. PMID:24274293

  7. On lunar exospheric column densities and solar wind access beyond the terminator from ROSAT soft X-ray observations of solar wind charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmström, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-07-01

    We analyze the Röntgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19° wedges (one north and one south) 13-32° off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38° wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38° wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  8. On Lunar Exospheric Column Densities and Solar Wind Access Beyond the Terminator from ROSAT Soft X-Ray Observations of Solar Wind Charge Exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Michael R.; Snowden, S. L.; Sarantos, M.; Benna, M.; Carter, J. A.; Cravens, T. E.; Farrell, W. M.; Fatemi, S.; Hills, H. Kent; Hodges, R. R.; Holmstrom, M.; Kuntz, K. D.; Porter, F. Scott; Read, A.; Robertson, I. P.; Sembay, S. F.; Sibeck, D. G.; Stubbs, T. J.; Travnicek, P.; Walsh, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    We analyze the Rontgen satellite (ROSAT) position sensitive proportional counter soft X-ray image of the Moon taken on 29 June 1990 by examining the radial profile of the surface brightness in three wedges: two 19 deg wedges (one north and one south) 13-32 deg off the terminator toward the dark side and one wedge 38 deg wide centered on the antisolar direction. The radial profiles of both the north and the south wedges show significant limb brightening that is absent in the 38 deg wide antisolar wedge. An analysis of the soft X-ray intensity increase associated with the limb brightening shows that its magnitude is consistent with that expected due to solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) with the tenuous lunar atmosphere based on lunar exospheric models and hybrid simulation results of solar wind access beyond the terminator. Soft X-ray imaging thus can independently infer the total lunar limb column density including all species, a property that before now has not been measured, and provide a large-scale picture of the solar wind-lunar interaction. Because the SWCX signal appears to be dominated by exospheric species arising from solar wind implantation, this technique can also determine how the exosphere varies with solar wind conditions. Now, along with Mars, Venus, and Earth, the Moon represents another solar system body at which SWCX has been observed.

  9. Complexation of Neptunium(V) with Glutaroimide Dioxime: A Study by Absorption Spectroscopy, Microcalorimetry, and Density Functional Theory Calculations.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Seraj A; Bhattacharyya, Arunasis; Zhang, Zhicheng; Rao, Linfeng

    2015-09-01

    Complexation of NpO2(+) ions with glutaroimide dioxime (H2L), a cyclic imide dioxime ligand that has been shown to form strong complexes with UO2(2+) in aqueous solutions, was studied by absorption spectroscopy and microcalorimetry in 1.0 M NaClO4 aqueous solutions. NpO2(+) forms two successive complexes, NpO2(HL)(aq) and NpO2(HL)2(-) (where HL(-) stands for the partially deprotonated glutaroimide dioxime ligand), with stability constants of log β111 = 17.8 ± 0.1 and log β122 = 33.0 ± 0.2, respectively. The complexation is both enthalpy- and entropy-driven, with negative enthalpies (ΔH111 = -52.3 ± 1.0 kJ/mol and ΔH122 = -96.1 ± 1.4 kJ/mol) and positive entropies (ΔS111 = 164 ± 3 J/mol/K and ΔS122 = 310 ± 4 J/mol/K). The thermodynamic parameters suggest that, similar to complexation of UO2(2+), the ligand coordinates with NpO2(+) in a tridentate mode, via the two oxygen atoms of the oxime groups and the nitrogen atom of the imide group. Density functional theory calculations have helped to interpret the optical absorption properties of the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex, by showing that the cis and trans configurations of the complex have very similar energies so that both configurations could be present in the aqueous solutions. It is the noncentrosymmetric cis configuration that makes the 5f → 5f transition allowable so that the NpO2(HL)2(-) complex absorbs in the near-IR region. PMID:26263050

  10. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C.; Silva, A. M.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-03-01

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical anisotropy for the

  11. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C.; Silva, A. M.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  12. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems. PMID:24197060

  13. [THE EFFECT OF SATINS: ACTIVATION OF LIPOLYSIS AND ABSORPTION BY INSULIN-DEPENDED CELLS LIPOPROTEINS OF VERY LOW DENSITY, INCREASING OF BIO-AVAILABILITY OF POLYENOIC FATTY ACIDS AND DECREASING OF CHOLESTEROL OF LIPOPROTEINS OF LOW DENSITY].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N; Malyshev, P P; Amelyushkina, V A; Aripovsky, A V; Smirnov, G P; Polevaya, T Yu; Kabo, S I; Kukhartchuk, V V

    2015-10-01

    The Russian cardiologic R&D production complex of Minzdrav of Russia, 121552 Moscow, Russia The statins are synthetic xenobiotics alien to animal cells. They are unlikely capable to manifest pleiotropic effect. It is feasible to evaluate effect of statins by stages: a) initially a specific inhibition of synthesis of cholesterol alcohol; b) further indirect activation of hydrolysis of triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density; c) nonspecific activation of cells' receptor absorption of palmitic and oleic lipoproteins of very low density and then d) linoleic and linolenic lipoproteins of low density with all polyenoic fatty acids. On balance, statins activate absorption ofpolyenoic fatty acids by cells. Just they manifest physiological, specific pleiotropic effect. The statins inhibit synthesis of pool of cholesterol alcohol-lipoproteins of very low density condensed between phosphatidylcholines in polar mono-layer phosphatidylcholines+cholesterol alcohol on surface oftriglycerides. The low permeability of mono-layer separates substrate-triglycerides in lipoproteins of very low density and post-heparin lipoprotein lipase in hydrophilic blood plasma. The higher is ratio cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines in mono-layer of lipoproteins of very low density the slower is lipolysis, formation of ligand lipoproteins of very low density and their absorption by cells under apoB-100-endocytosis. The statins normalize hyperlipemia by force of a) activation of absorption oflipoproteins of very low density by insulin-depended cells and b) activation of absorption of lipoproteins of low density by all cells, increasing of bio-availability of polyenoic fatty acids, activation of apoB-100-endocytosis. The limitation in food of content of palmitic saturated fatty acid and increasing of content of ω-3 polyenoic fatty acids improve "bio-availability" of polyenoic fatty acids and their absorption by cells and also decreases cholesterol alcohol/phosphatidylcholines and

  14. Picosecond-TALIF and VUV absorption measurements of absolute atomic nitrogen densities from an RF atmospheric pressure plasma jet with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, Andrew; Niemi, Kari; Schröter, Sandra; Bredin, Jerome; Gans, Timo; Wagenaars, Erik

    2015-09-01

    Reactive Oxygen and Nitrogen species (RONS) from RF atmospheric pressure plasma jets (APPJs) are important in biomedical applications as well as industrial plasma processing such as surface modification. Atomic oxygen has been well studied, whereas, despite its importance in the plasma chemistry, atomic nitrogen has been somewhat neglected due to its difficulty of measurement. We present absolute densities of atomic nitrogen in APPJs operating with He/O2/N2 gas mixtures in open air, using picosecond Two-photon Absorption Laser Induced Fluorescence (ps-TALIF) and vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. In order to apply the TALIF technique in complex, He/O2/N2 mixtures, we needed to directly measure the collisional quenching effects using picosecond pulse widths (32ps). Traditional calculated quenching corrections, used in nanosecond TALIF, are inadequate due to a lack of quenching data for complex mixtures. Absolute values for the densities were found by calibrating against a known density of Krypton. The VUV absorption experiments were conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Atomic nitrogen densities were on the order of 1020 m-3 with good agreement between TALIF and VUV absorption. UK EPSRC grant EP/K018388/1.

  15. Telescoping columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J. T.

    1980-12-01

    An extendable column is described which consists of several axially elongated rigid structural sections nested within one another. Each section includes a number of rotatably attached screws running along its length. The next inner section includes threaded lugs oriented to threadingly engage the screws. The column is extended or retracted upon rotation of the screws. The screws of each section are selectively rotated by a motor and an engagement mechanism.

  16. Inter-Comparison of Nitrogen Dioxide Column Densities Retrieved by Ground-Based Max-Doas Under Different Instrumental Conditions Over Mainz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruchkouski, I.; Dziomin, V.; Ortega, I.; Volkamer, R.; Krasouski, A.

    2013-12-01

    This study is dedicated to the instrumental differences between ground-based MAX-DOAS measurement devices. Our MAX-DOAS instrument, which has been developed at the National Ozone Monitoring Research & Education Center of the Belarusian State University for the purpose of nitrogen dioxide and other atmospheric trace gases monitoring over Belarus, features a rotating mirror and a telescope directly connected to the spectrometer with a two-dimensional CCD detector. Using a mirror instead of an optical fibre makes it possible to change the field of view of the telescope, and the whole instrument is rather compact and all its components are placed outdoors in the open air. However, this makes it quite difficult to ensure a top-quality thermostabilization. In the course of the MAX-DOAS campaign, which took place in the Max Planck Institute for Chemistry in Mainz, Germany in summer of 2013, we had a great opportunity to compare our instrument with other devices of different types. In the present study we make a comparison of nitrogen dioxide slant column densities (SCDs) during several days obtained by our instrument with that measured by the device from the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado (Boulder), which has a thermostabilization level of about 0.01 degrees Celsius. We investigate the influence of the spectrometer parts thermostabilization on nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval. Furthermore, it was possible to modify the telescope field of view for our instrument from 0.005 to 1.3 degrees, so we performed nitrogen dioxide SCDs retrieval for different fields of view at the same angle of elevation. We analyze these measurement results and obtain an optimal field of view with the aim to achieve the highest possible signal to noise ratio.

  17. Absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonant line from a lead hollow cathode lamp. An absolute number density calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W. ); Oldenborg, R.C.; Baughcum, S.L. )

    1989-10-19

    An accurate absolute number density calibration curve for absorption by gaseous lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonant line from a typical lead hollow cathode lamp is reported. This calibration shows the usual curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot for atomic absorption at moderate to high absorbances that is commonly attributed to self-absorption leading to line reversal in the source and/or preferential absorption at the line center when the absorber temperature is not much greater than the source Doppler temperature. A theoretical calculation utilizing a Doppler-limited Fourier transform spectrum of the 283.3-nm emission from the lamp and a tabulated value of the absorption cross section and accounting for the isotopic and nuclear hyperfine components in both the emission and absorption due to naturally occurring lead quantitatively reproduces the experimental calibration curve without any parameter adjustments. It is found that the curvature in the Beer-Lambert plot has more to do with the fact that the absorbing and emitting atoms are a mixture of isotopes giving several isotopic and nuclear hyperfine transitions at slightly different frequencies than it does with preferential absorption at line centers.

  18. Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balachandra Swamy, A. C.

    EXTENDED ABSTRACT Pulsed HF radiowave absorption measurements at 2.1 MHZ. over Delhi under quiet and solar flare conditions and related electron density height profiles A.C.Balachandra swmay & Late C.S.G.K. Setty Absorption of radio waves in the ionosphere is of great practical importance for radio communication and navigation systems. The first attempt to measure the absolute magnitude of the radiowave absorption were made by appletion and Ratcliffe (1930) using the frequency change method for medium frequency waves reflected from the E-region. They concluded from their experiment that the main part of the attenuation occurred below the reflection level and named the absorption region, D-region of the ionosphere. One of the basic properties of the ionosphere is the absorption of high Frequency Radiowaves. HF radiowave absorption results mainly from collisions between electrons (which are set into forced oscillations by the electric field of the wave) and neutral air particles, the RF energy abstracted from the wave being converted into thermal energy. The radiowave absorption in the ionosphere depends on electron density and collision frequency. The most important absorbing regions are the D-region and the lower E-region (50-100 Km.) The regular diurnal variation of the electron density in this height range is caused mainly by the changes in the depth of penetration of solar XUV radiations with solar zenith angle under quiet solar conditions. In 1937 Dellinger J.H.identified fade outs in high frequency radio circuits as due to abnormal ionospheric absorption associated with solar flares. The onset of the fade out was usually rapid and the duration was typically tens of minutes like that of the visible flare, because of the sudden onset, the immediate effects of solar flares are known collectively as sudden Ionospheric Disturbances (STD). The phenomenon discovered by Dellinger is usually called a short Wave Fadeout(SWF). Since the SWF is due to abnormal absorption

  19. Relationship Between Column-Density and Surface Mixing Ratio: Statistical Analysis of O3 and NO2 Data from the July 2011 Maryland DISCOVER-AQ Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, Clare; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Crawford, James H.; Lamsol, Lok; Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Chen, Gao; Liu, Xiong; Szykman, James; Tsay, Si-Chee; Loughner, Christipher

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the ability of column (or partial column) information to represent surface air quality, results of linear regression analyses between surface mixing ratio data and column abundances for O3 and NO2 are presented for the July 2011 Maryland deployment of the DISCOVER-AQ mission. Data collected by the P-3B aircraft, ground-based Pandora spectrometers, Aura/OMI satellite instrument, and simulations for July 2011 from the CMAQ air quality model during this deployment provide a large and varied data set, allowing this problem to be approached from multiple perspectives. O3 columns typically exhibited a statistically significant and high degree of correlation with surface data (R(sup 2) > 0.64) in the P- 3B data set, a moderate degree of correlation (0.16 < R(sup 2) < 0.64) in the CMAQ data set, and a low degree of correlation (R(sup 2) < 0.16) in the Pandora and OMI data sets. NO2 columns typically exhibited a low to moderate degree of correlation with surface data in each data set. The results of linear regression analyses for O3 exhibited smaller errors relative to the observations than NO2 regressions. These results suggest that O3 partial column observations from future satellite instruments with sufficient sensitivity to the lower troposphere can be meaningful for surface air quality analysis.

  20. Relationship between column-density and surface mixing ratio: Statistical analysis of O3 and NO2 data from the July 2011 Maryland DISCOVER-AQ mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, Clare M.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Crawford, James H.; Lamsal, Lok; Krotkov, Nickolay; Herman, Jay; Weinheimer, Andrew; Chen, Gao; Liu, Xiong; Szykman, James; Tsay, Si-Chee; Loughner, Christopher; Hains, Jennifer; Lee, Pius; Dickerson, Russell R.; Stehr, Jeffrey W.; Brent, Lacey

    2014-08-01

    To investigate the ability of column (or partial column) information to represent surface air quality, results of linear regression analyses between surface mixing ratio data and column abundances for O3 and NO2 are presented for the July 2011 Maryland deployment of the DISCOVER-AQ mission. Data collected by the P-3B aircraft, ground-based Pandora spectrometers, Aura/OMI satellite instrument, and simulations for July 2011 from the CMAQ air quality model during this deployment provide a large and varied data set, allowing this problem to be approached from multiple perspectives. O3 columns typically exhibited a statistically significant and high degree of correlation with surface data (R2 > 0.64) in the P-3B data set, a moderate degree of correlation (0.16 < R2 < 0.64) in the CMAQ data set, and a low degree of correlation (R2 < 0.16) in the Pandora and OMI data sets. NO2 columns typically exhibited a low to moderate degree of correlation with surface data in each data set. The results of linear regression analyses for O3 exhibited smaller errors relative to the observations than NO2 regressions. These results suggest that O3 partial column observations from future satellite instruments with sufficient sensitivity to the lower troposphere can be meaningful for surface air quality analysis.

  1. Calibration of scalar relativistic density functional theory for the calculation of sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectra.

    PubMed

    Debeer George, Serena; Neese, Frank

    2010-02-15

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been proven to be a powerful tool for investigating the electronic structures of sulfur-containing coordination complexes. The full information content of the spectra can be developed through a combination of experiment and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). In this work, the necessary calibration is carried out for a range of contemporary functionals (BP86, PBE, OLYP, OPBE, B3LYP, PBE0, TPSSh) in a scalar relativistic (0(th) order regular approximation, ZORA) DFT framework. It is shown that with recently developed segmented all-electron scalar relativistic (SARC) basis sets one obtains results that are as good as with large, uncontracted basis sets. The errors in the calibrated transition energies are on the order of 0.1 eV. The error in calibrated intensities is slightly larger, but the calculations are still in excellent agreement with experiment. The behavior of full TD-DFT linear response versus the Tamm-Dancoff approximation has been evaluated with the result that two methods are almost indistinguishable. The inclusion of relativistic effects barely changes the results for first row transition metal complexes, however, the contributions become visible for second-row transition metals and reach a maximum (of an approximately 10% change in the calibration parameters) for third row transition metal species. The protocol developed here is approximately 10 times more efficient than the previously employed protocol, which was based on large, uncontracted basis sets. The calibration strategy followed here may be readily extended to other edges. PMID:20092349

  2. Nickel Sorption to Bacteriogenic Manganese Oxides: Insights from X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pena, J.; Kwon, K.; Refson, K.; Bargar, J. R.; Sposito, G.

    2008-12-01

    Bacteriogenic Mn oxides are ubiquitous, highly reactive minerals with a remarkable capacity to scavenge metals due to their nanoparticulate dimensions and abundant structural defects. These minerals are commonly deposited in a matrix of bacterial cells and extracellular polymeric substances, forming geosymbiotic systems whose reactivity with contaminant metals is not fully characterized. In the current study, a synergistic experimental-computational approach was used to study the mechanism of Ni adsorption at varying loadings and at pH 6-8 using the Mn oxide produced by Pseudomonas putida GB-1. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra showed two dominant coordination environments: Ni bound as a triple corner sharing (TCS) complex at octahedral vacancy sites and Ni incorporated into the octahedral sheet. The proportion of adsorbed and incorporated Ni varied as a function of surface coverage and pH, with the latter form of Ni being favored at higher loadings and decreased proton activity. These two coordination environments, although consistent with data published for Ni sorbed by synthetic MnO2(s), did not describe fully all of our EXAFS spectra, leading us to consider the binding of Ni at particle edges or via a non-specific sorption mechanism. In parallel to the spectral analysis, density functional theory (DFT) calculations were performed to test different adsorbate-adsorbent configurations and the pH dependence of the adsorption mechanism. Geometry optimized structures for Ni sorbed above vacancies (i.e., TCS) or incorporated into the Mn oxide structure were in excellent agreement with corresponding structural parameters obtained from EXAFS analysis. The calculated energy barriers for the transition from adsorbed TCS to incorporated Ni were consistent with the hypothesis that the TCS complex is a precursor for Ni incorporation and that incorporation is favored by decreased proton activity. The combined perspectives obtained from these two

  3. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory of arsenic dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Courtney M; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2014-06-28

    S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on a series of As[S2CNR2]3 complexes, where R2 = Et2, (CH2)5 and Ph2, to determine how dithiocarbamate substituents attached to N affect As[S2CNR2]3 electronic structure. Complimentary [PPh4][S2CNR2] salts were also studied to compare dithiocarbamate bonding in the absence of As. The XAS results indicate that changing the orientation of the alkyl substituents from trans to cis (R2 = Et2vs. (CH2)5) yields subtle variations whereas differences associated with a change from alkyl to aryl are much more pronounced. For example, despite the differences in As 4p mixing, the first features in the S K-edge XAS spectra of [PPh4][S2CNPh2] and As[S2CNPh2]3 were both shifted by 0.3 eV compared to their alkyl-substituted derivatives. DFT calculations revealed that the unique shift observed for [PPh4][S2CNPh2] is due to phenyl-induced splitting of the π* orbitals delocalized over N, C and S. A similar phenomenon accounts for the shift observed for As[S2CNPh2]3, but the presence of two unique S environments (As-S and As···S) prevented reliable analysis of As-S covalency from the XAS data. In the absence of experimental values, DFT calculations revealed a decrease in As-S orbital mixing in As[S2CNPh2]3 that stems from a redistribution of electron density to S atoms participating in weaker As···S interactions. Simulated spectra obtained from TDDFT calculations reproduce the experimental differences in the S K-edge XAS data, which suggests that the theory is accurately modeling the experimental differences in As-S orbital mixing. The results highlight how S K-edge XAS and DFT can be used cooperatively to understand the electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes containing S atoms in different chemical environments. PMID:24811926

  4. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  5. Absolute CF{sub 2} density and gas temperature measurements by absorption spectroscopy in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wen-Yao; Xu, Yong Peng, Fei; Gong, Fa-Ping; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhu, Ai-Min; Liu, Yong-Xin; Wang, You-Nian

    2014-10-15

    Broadband ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy has been used to determine the CF{sub 2} radical density in dual-frequency capacitively coupled CF{sub 4}/Ar plasmas, using the CF{sub 2} A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system of absorption spectrum. The rotational temperature of ground state CF{sub 2} and excited state CF was also estimated by using A{sup ~1}B{sub 1}←X{sup ~1}A{sub 1} system and B{sup 2}Δ−X{sup 2}Π system, respectively. The translational gas temperature was deduced from the Doppler width of the Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 2}) and Ar{sup *}({sup 3}P{sub 0}) metastable atoms absorption line by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The rotational temperatures of the excited state CF are about 100 K higher than those of ground state CF{sub 2}, and about 200 K higher than the translational gas temperatures. The dependences of the radical CF{sub 2} density, electron density, electron temperature, rotational temperature, and gas temperature on the high frequency power and pressure have been analyzed. Furthermore, the production and loss mechanisms of CF{sub 2} radical and the gas heating mechanisms have also been discussed.

  6. X-ray absorption resonances near L2,3-edges from real-time propagation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix.

    PubMed

    Kadek, Marius; Konecny, Lukas; Gao, Bin; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-09-21

    The solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the relativistic Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix formalism is presented and used to calculate X-ray absorption cross sections. Both dynamical relaxation effects and spin-orbit corrections are included, as demonstrated by calculations of the X-ray absorption of SF6 near the sulfur L2,3-edges. We also propose an analysis facilitating the interpretation of spectral transitions from real-time simulations, and a selective perturbation that eliminates nonphysical excitations that are artifacts of the finite basis representation. PMID:26268195

  7. PULSE COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Grimmett, E.S.

    1964-01-01

    This patent covers a continuous countercurrent liquidsolids contactor column having a number of contactor states each comprising a perforated plate, a layer of balls, and a downcomer tube; a liquid-pulsing piston; and a solids discharger formed of a conical section at the bottom of the column, and a tubular extension on the lowest downcomer terminating in the conical section. Between the conical section and the downcomer extension is formed a small annular opening, through which solids fall coming through the perforated plate of the lowest contactor stage. This annular opening is small enough that the pressure drop thereacross is greater than the pressure drop upward through the lowest contactor stage. (AEC)

  8. Gallium trace on-line preconcentration/separation and determination using a polyurethane foam mini-column and flame atomic absorption spectrometry. Application in aluminum alloys, natural waters and urine.

    PubMed

    Anthemidis, Aristidis N; Zachariadis, George A; Stratis, John A

    2003-07-27

    A sensitive and selective flow injection time-based method for on-line preconcentration/separation and determination of gallium by flame atomic absorption spectrometry at trace levels was developed. The on-line formed gallium chloride complex is sorbed onto a polyether-type polyurethane foam mini-column, followed by on-line quantitative elution with isobutyl methyl ketone and direct introduction into the flame pneumatic nebulizer of the atomic absorption spectrometer. All chemical and flow variables of the system as well as the possible interferences were studied. The manner of strong HCl solutions propulsion was investigated and established using a combination of two displacement bottles. For 90 s preconcentration time, a sample frequency of 28 h(-1), an enhancement factor of 40, a detection limit of 6 microg l(-1) and a precision expressed as relative standard deviation (s(r)) of 3.3% (at 1.00 mg l(-1)) were achieved. The calibration curve is linear over the concentration range 0.02-3.00 mg l(-1). The accuracy of the developed method was sufficient and evaluated by the analysis of a silicon-aluminum alloy standard reference material. Finally, it was successfully applied to gallium determination in commercial aluminum alloys, natural waters and urine. PMID:18969117

  9. Correlation Analysis of Column-Density Data with Surface Mixing Ratios for o3 and NO2 during Discover-Aq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flynn, C.; Pickering, K. E.; Lamsal, L. N.; Krotkov, N. A.; Herman, J. R.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Chen, G.; Liu, X.; Tsay, S.; Loughner, C. P.; Szykman, J.

    2012-12-01

    The first deployment of the Earth Venture -1 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) project was conducted during July 2011 in the Baltimore-Washington region. In-situ sampling of trace gases was performed by the P-3B aircraft over fourteen flight days, allowing profiles of O3 and NO2 to be obtained over surface air quality monitoring sites. Surface-level volume mixing ratio data were made available for these monitoring sites by the Maryland Department of the Environment (MDE) and Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These sites were also equipped with the ground-based Pandora UV/Vis spectrometers, observing O3 and NO2 column amounts. Satellite observations for tropospheric O3 and NO2 from Aura/OMI were also provided for the deployment period. A correlation analysis was performed between the available tropospheric column amounts of O3 and NO2 (from integration of in-situ P-3B data, from Pandora spectrometers, and from Aura/OMI) and the surface mixing ratio data for each site. A simulation of O3 and NO2 during July 2011 was performed after the end of the deployment with CMAQ v5.0 for a range of horizontal resolutions. A correlation analysis was also performed between model column amounts and model surface-level mixing ratio values. The values of the correlation coefficients obtained for the model are generally larger than those obtained for the observations, indicating that the model surface is more connected to the overlying column than was seen in the observations. However, both the model columns and the P-3B columns demonstrate larger correlation with surface mixing ratios for O3 than NO2, yielding a high degree of correlation between the O3 columns and surface values. These results suggest that ozone observations from future satellite instruments with sufficient sensitivity to the lower troposphere can be meaningful for surface air quality analysis.

  10. [Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 by multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-hua; Si, Fu-qi; Dou, Ke; Li, Ang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-qing

    2010-09-01

    A method of retrieving NO2 in troposphere based on multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was introduced. The differential slant column density (dSCD) of NO2 was evaluated by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), removing the Fraunhofer structure and Ring effect. Combining the results of different observing directions, the tropospheric NO2 differential slant column density (deltaSCD) was evaluated, and the air mass factor (AMF) was calculated with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) was retrieved. To ensure the accuracy of the results, it was compared with the results of long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS), a good accordance was shown with the correlation coefficients of 0.94027 and 0.96924. PMID:21105419

  11. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  12. New concepts for the comparison of tropospheric NO2 column densities derived from car-MAX-DOAS observations, OMI satellite observations and the regional model CHIMERE during two MEGAPOLI campaigns in Paris 2009/10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaiganfar, R.; Beirle, S.; Petetin, H.; Zhang, Q.; Beekmann, M.; Wagner, T.

    2015-03-01

    We compare tropospheric column densities (vertically integrated concentrations) of NO2 from three data sets for the metropolitan area of Paris during two extensive measurement campaigns (25 days in summer 2009 and 29 days in winter 2010) within the European research project MEGAPOLI. The selected data sets comprise a regional chemical transport model (CHIMERE) as well as two observational data sets: ground based mobile Multi-AXis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (car-MAX-DOAS) measurements and satellite measurements from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). On most days, car-MAX-DOAS measurements were carried out along large circles (diameter ~35 km) around Paris. The car-MAX-DOAS results are compared to coincident data from CHIMERE and OMI. All three data sets have their specific strengths and weaknesses, especially with respect to their spatio-temporal resolution and coverage as well as their uncertainties. Thus we compare them in two different ways: first, we simply consider the original data sets. Second, we compare modified versions making synergistic use of the complementary information from different data sets. For example, profile information from the regional model is used to improve the satellite data, observations of the horizontal trace gas distribution are used to adjust the respective spatial patterns of the model simulations, or the model is used as a transfer tool to bridge the spatial scales between car-MAX-DOAS and satellite observations. Using the modified versions of the data sets, the comparison results substantially improve compared to the original versions. In general, good agreement between the data sets is found outside the emission plume, but inside the emission plumes the tropospheric NO2 VCDs are systematically underestimated by the CHIMERE model and the satellite observations (compared to the car-MAX-DOAS observations). One major result from our study is that for satellite validation close to strong emission sources (like

  13. Tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities over Beijing: results of the first three-years of ground-based MAX-DOAS measurements (2008-2011) and satellite validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, J. Z.; Beirle, S.; Jin, J. L.; Shaiganfar, R.; Yan, P.; Wagner, T.

    2012-10-01

    Ground-based measurements of scattered sunlight by the Multi Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) have been carried out at an urban site (39.95° N, 116.32° E) in Beijing megacity since 6 August 2008. In this study, we retrieved the tropospheric NO2 vertical column densities (VCDs) over Beijing from these MAX-DOAS observations from August 2008 to September 2011. Over such period, the daytime (08:00-17:00 h Beijing Time) mean tropospheric NO2 VCDs varied from 0.5 to 13.3 with an average of 3.6 during summertime, and from 0.2 to 16.8 with an average of 5.8 during wintertime, all in units of 1016 molecules cm-2. The average diurnal variation patterns of tropospheric NO2 over Beijing appeared to be rather different from one season to another, indicating differences in the mixing layer height, the atmospheric lifetime and the emission patterns. In contrast to previous studies, we find a small weekly cycle of the tropospheric NO2 VCD over Beijing. The NO2 VCD in the late afternoon was the largest on Saturday and the lowest on Sunday, and in the morning it reached a clear maximum on Wednesday. We also find a post Olympic Games effect, with 39-54% decrease in the tropospheric NO2 VCD over Beijing estimated for August of 2008, compared to the following years. The tropospheric NO2 VCDs derived by our ground MAX-DOAS measurements show a good correlation with SCIAMACHY and OMI satellite data. However, compared with the MAX-DOAS measurements, the satellite observations underestimate the tropospheric NO2 VCDs over Beijing systematically, by 43% for SCIAMACHY and 26-38% for OMI (DOMINO v2.0 and DOMINO v1.02). Based on radiative transfer simulations, we show that the aerosol shielding effect can explain this underestimation, while the gradient smoothing effect caused by the coarse spatial resolution of the satellite observations could play an additional role.

  14. A study of electron density profiles in relation to ionization sources and ground-based radio wave absorption measurements, part 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.; Kane, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    The D-region ion production functions are used to calculate the relationship between radio wave absorption and the flux level of X-rays in the 1-8A wavelength band. In order to bring this calculation into agreement with the empirically established relationship, it was found necessary to reduce by, a factor of about 5, the Meira nitric oxide densities below 90 km.

  15. Absorption spectroscopy measurements of argon metastable and resonant atom density in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas using a low pressure lamp

    SciTech Connect

    Munoz, J.; Margot, J.; Calzada, M. D.

    2012-01-15

    The densities of metastable and resonant atom were measured in atmospheric pressure Ar-He surface-wave plasmas. Measurements were performed using an absorption spectroscopy method taking into account the Voigt profiles of the plasma lines. The density values of the argon {sup 3}P{sub 2}, {sup 3}P{sub 0} (metastable atoms) and {sup 3}P{sub 1} (resonant atoms) levels measured in pure argon discharges are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. A drastic decrease of metastable and resonant densities is observed when introducing helium in amounts as low as 2%. The influence of electron density and gas temperature on the population mechanisms (direct electron excitation from the ground state and dissociative recombination) of metastable and resonant atoms is discussed using a simplified theoretical model.

  16. Absolute number densities of helium metastable atoms determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy in helium plasma-based discharges used as ambient desorption/ionization sources for mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reininger, Charlotte; Woodfield, Kellie; Keelor, Joel D.; Kaylor, Adam; Fernández, Facundo M.; Farnsworth, Paul B.

    2014-10-01

    The absolute number densities of helium atoms in the 2s 3S1 metastable state were determined in four plasma-based ambient desorption/ionization sources by atomic absorption spectroscopy. The plasmas included a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge (HF-DBD), a low temperature plasma (LTP), and two atmospheric-pressure glow discharges, one with AC excitation and the other with DC excitation. Peak densities in the luminous plumes downstream from the discharge capillaries of the HF-DBD and the LTP were 1.39 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.011 × 1012 cm- 3, respectively. Neither glow discharge produced a visible afterglow, and no metastable atoms were detected downstream from the capillary exits. However, densities of 0.58 × 1012 cm- 3 and 0.97 × 1012 cm- 3 were measured in the interelectrode regions of the AC and DC glow discharges, respectively. Time-resolved measurements of metastable atom densities revealed significant random variations in the timing of pulsed absorption signals with respect to the voltage waveforms applied to the discharges.

  17. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  18. Self-consistent particle-in-cell modelling of short pulse absorption and transport for high energy density physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramsay, M. G.; Arber, T. D.; Sircombe, N. J.

    2016-03-01

    In order for detailed, solid density particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations to run within a reasonable time frame, novel approaches to modelling high density material must be employed. For the purposes of modelling high intensity, short pulse laser-plasma interactions, however, these approaches must be consistent with retaining a full PIC model in the low-density laser interaction region. By replacing the standard Maxwell field solver with an electric field update based on a simplified Ohm's law in regions of high electron density, it is possible to access densities at and above solid without being subject to the standard grid and time step constraints. Such a model has recently been implemented in the PIC code EPOCH. We present the initial results of a detailed two-dimensional simulation performed to compare the adapted version of the code with recent experimental results from the Orion laser facility.

  19. Optical Absorption Measurements of Sputtered Ti Ion Density and Discussion of Ionization Mechanisms in Inductively Coupled Plasma-Assisted DC Sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okimura, Kunio; Nakamura, Tadashi; Mori, Hisashi

    This study discusses the ionization mechanisms of sputtered titanium (Ti) in inductively coupled plasma (ICP)-assisted dc magnetron sputtering based on measurements and model analyses. Ionic and atomic densities of sputtered titanium were measured using an optical absorption method under an Ar pressure of 3.5 Pa against rf(13.56MHz) power applied to the inserted coil. A Langmuir probe provided measurements of electron densities against coil rf power, giving input parameters for model analyses. We adopted a model analysis method presented by J. Hopwood and F. Qian [J. Appl. Phys. 78, 758 (1995)]. Variations of ionic and atomic densities and ionization fractions against electron density from model calculation agreed with those obtained by measurements. The results showed clearly that electron impact ionization dominates ionization of sputtered titanium in high er electron density regions compared to Penning ionization through Ar metastable atoms. Penning ionization played an important role at the lower electron density region because of the longer time for radiative decay of Ar metastable atoms.

  20. Evolution of solitary density waves in stellar winds of early-type stars: A simple explanation of discrete absorption component behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldron, Wayne L.; Klein, Larry; Altner, Bruce

    1994-01-01

    We model the evolution of a density shell propagating through the stellar wind of an early-type star, in order to investigate the effects of such shells on UV P Cygni line profiles. Unlike previous treatments, we solve the mass, momentum, and energy conservation equations, using an explicit time-differencing scheme, and present a parametric study of the density, velocity, and temperature response. Under the assumed conditions, relatively large spatial scale, large-amplitude density shells propagate as stable waves through the supersonic portion of the wind. Their dynamical behavior appears to mimic propagating 'solitary waves,' and they are found to accelerate at the same rate as the underlying steady state stellar wind (i.e., the shell rides the wind). These hydrodynamically stable structures quantitatively reproduce the anomalous 'discrete absorption component' (DAC) behavior observed in the winds of luminous early-type stars, as illustrated by comparisons of model predictions to an extensive International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) time series of spectra of zeta Puppis (O4f). From these comparisons, we find no conclusive evidence indicative of DACs accelerating at a significantly slower rate than the underlying stellar wind, contrary to earlier reports. In addition, these density shells are found to be consistent within the constraints set by the IR observations. We conclude that the concept of propagating density shells should be seriously reconsidered as a possible explanation of the DAC phenomenon in early-type stars.

  1. Measuring the morphology and density of internally mixed black carbon with SP2 and VTDMA: new insight into the absorption enhancement of black carbon in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuxuan; Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Yafang; Su, Hang; Kecorius, Simonas; Wang, Zhibin; Wu, Zhijun; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong; Wiedensohler, Alfred; He, Kebin

    2016-04-01

    The morphology and density of black carbon (BC) cores in internally mixed BC (In-BC) particles affect their mixing state and absorption enhancement. In this work, we developed a new method to measure the morphology and effective density of the BC cores of ambient In-BC particles using a single-particle soot photometer (SP2) and a volatility tandem differential mobility analyzer (VTDMA) during the CAREBeijing-2013 campaign from 8 to 27 July 2013 at Xianghe Observatory. This new measurement system can select size-resolved ambient In-BC particles and measure the mobility diameter and mass of the In-BC cores. The morphology and effective density of the ambient In-BC cores are then calculated. For the In-BC cores in the atmosphere, changes in their dynamic shape factor (χ) and effective density (ρeff) can be characterized as a function of the aging process (Dp/Dc) measured by SP2 and VTDMA. During an intensive field study, the ambient In-BC cores had an average shape factor χ of ˜ 1.2 and an average density of ˜ 1.2 g cm-3, indicating that ambient In-BC cores have a near-spherical shape with an internal void of ˜ 30 %. From the measured morphology and density, the average shell / core ratio and absorption enhancement (Eab) of ambient BC were estimated to be 2.1-2.7 and 1.6-1.9, respectively, for In-BC particles with sizes of 200-350 nm. When the In-BC cores were assumed to have a void-free BC sphere with a density of 1.8 g cm-3, the shell / core ratio and Eab were overestimated by ˜ 13 and ˜ 17 %, respectively. The new approach developed in this work improves the calculations of the mixing state and optical properties of ambient In-BC particles by quantifying the changes in the morphology and density of ambient In-BC cores during aging.

  2. High density H2 associative absorption on Titanium alpha-borozene (Ti2B6H6): An ab-initio case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbarzadeh, Alireza; Tymzcak, C. J.

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen is considered as a clean energy carrier that could be a future replacement for our addiction to fossil fuels. However, in order to have hydrogen economy at its highest efficiently we need to store hydrogen at high volumetric and gravimetric density. Using the all electron hybrid density functional theory, we have designed a benzene-like-molecule, Ti2B6H6, which has the promise of achieving this goal. Our results show that the molecule can associatively absorb the hydrogen up to ten percent by weight of hydrogen, which exceeds the 2015 US department of energy target. In this presentation we will discuss the mechanisms of H2 absorption and possible applications of this novel molecule. This research is funded by the Welch Foundation under Grant J. 1675 and the Texas Southern University High Performance Computing Center.

  3. In Situ X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies on the Effect of pH on Pt Electronic Density during Aqueous Phase Reforming of Glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Ayman M.; Howard, Christopher J.; Roberts, Benjamin Q.; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Liang; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2012-10-30

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results on correlating the Pt local coordination and electronic structure with the Pt/C catalyst activity and selectivity during aqueous reforming of glycerol at different pH are reported. The results show that both low and high pH favor C-O cleavage over that of C-C. However, the selectivity towards C-O bond cleavage was higher under the acidic conditions. XANES measurements under reaction conditions showed that low pH increased the Pt electron density while the effect of basic conditions was minimal. ΔXANES was used to estimate the coverage of adsorbates under reaction conditions and the results suggest a change in the adsorbates coverage by the acidic conditions, resulting in higher electron density on Pt

  4. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of 1(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden 1(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed.

  5. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Study of Low-Lying Absorption and Fluorescence Band Shapes for Phenylene-Containing Oligoacenes.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ye

    2015-12-24

    Low-lying band shapes of absorption and fluorescence spectra for a member of a newly synthesized family of phenylene-containing oligoacenes (POA 6) reported in J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 , 15351 are studied theoretically with two different approaches with TIPS-anthracene as a comparison. Underlying photophysics and exciton-phonon interactions in both molecules are investigated in details with the aid of the time-dependent density functional theory and multimode Brownian oscillator model. The first two low-lying excited-states of POA 6 were found to exhibit excitation characteristics spanning entire conjugated backbone despite the presence of antiaromatic phenylene section. Absorption and fluorescence spectra calculated from both time-dependent density functional theory and multimode Brownian oscillator model are shown to reach good agreement with experimental ones. The coupling between phonon modes and optical transitions is generally weak as suggested by the multimode Brownian oscillator model. Broader peaks of POA 6 spectra are found to relate to stronger coupling between low frequency phonon modes such as backbone twisting (with frequency <300 cm(-1)) and optical transitions. Furthermore, POA 6 exhibits weaker exciton-phonon coupling for the phonon modes above 1000 cm(-1) compared to TIPS-anthracene owing to extended conjugated backbone. A significant coupling between an in-plane breathing mode localized around the antiaromatic phenylene segment with frequency at 1687 cm(-1) and optical transitions for the first two excited-states of POA 6 is also observed. PMID:26611665

  6. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin.

    PubMed

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of (1)(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden (1)(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed. PMID:25005288

  7. Clustering properties of high matter density peaks from UVES observations of QSO pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.

    2003-06-01

    The association of high H 0 column density absorption systems in QSO spectra with galactic objects has been widely verified at redshifts up to z ~ 1, by direct imaging of QSO fields and follow-up spectroscopy (Guillemin & Bergeron 1997; Le Brun et al. 1997). We study the transverse clustering properties of these tracers of high matter density peaks, by looking for coincident absorption systems in adjacent lines of sight toward QSO pairs and groups (D'Odorico et al. 2002).

  8. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  9. Determination of the interface δ-hole density in a blue-emitting organic semiconductor diode by electromodulated absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Mi; Png, Rui-Qi; Sivaramakrishnan, Sankaran; Chia, Perq-Jon; Yong, Chaw-Keong; Chua, Lay-Lay; Ho, Peter K. H.

    2010-09-01

    The hole density at the interface of a poly(fluorene-alt-triarylamine) (TFB) with p-doped poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDT) anodes has been determined from electromodulation of the TFB subgap polaron band. At 295 K, this δ-hole density σOSC is approximately 1×1012 cm-2, for which the current-voltage characteristics indicate an Ohmic contact. However at 30 K, σOSC falls to 2×1011 cm-2, and the contact characteristics approach the injecting-blocking boundary. The PEDT/TFB vacuum offset inside the device is inferred to be 0.1 eV, and so the Fermi level is not as deeply pinned in the TFB gap as suggested by ultraviolet photoemission measurements.

  10. Consistent interpretation of ground based and GOME BrO slant column data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, R. W.; Bovensmann, H.; Kaiser, J. W.; Richter, A.; Rozanov, A.; Wittrock, F.; Burrows, J. P.

    Model computations of slant column densities (SCD) enable the comparison between ground based and satellite based absorption measurements of scattered light and are therefore a good basis to investigate the presence of tropospheric BrO amounts. In this study ground based zenith sky and GOME nadir measurements of BrO SCD are compared with simulations for the 19-21 March 1997 at Ny-Ålesund. The vertical columns of tropospheric BrO amounts are estimated to be in the range 4 ±0.8 ∗ 10 13 [molecules/cm 2] for the investigated period and location.

  11. Solid-state optical absorption from optimally tuned time-dependent range-separated hybrid density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Jain, Manish; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Kronik, Leeor

    We present a framework for obtaining solid-state charge and optical excitations and spectra from optimally tuned range-separated hybrid density functional theory, which allows for the accurate prediction of exciton binding energies. We demonstrate our approach through calculations of one- and two-particle excitations in pentacene, a molecular semiconducting crystal, where we find excellent agreement with experiments and prior computations. We show that with one adjustable parameter, our method accurately predicts band structures and optical spectra of Si and LiF, prototypical covalent and ionic solids. For a range of extended bulk systems, this method may provide a computationally inexpensive alternative to many-body perturbation theory, opening the door to studies of materials of increasing size and complexity [Phys. Rev. B 92, 081204(R), 2015]. This work was supported by DOE.

  12. Solid-state optical absorption from optimally tuned time-dependent range-separated hybrid density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaely-Abramson, Sivan; Jain, Manish; Sharifzadeh, Sahar; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Kronik, Leeor

    2015-08-01

    We present a framework for obtaining reliable solid-state charge and optical excitations and spectra from optimally tuned range-separated hybrid density functional theory. The approach, which is fully couched within the formal framework of generalized Kohn-Sham theory, allows for the accurate prediction of exciton binding energies. We demonstrate our approach through first principles calculations of one- and two-particle excitations in pentacene, a molecular semiconducting crystal, where our work is in excellent agreement with experiments and prior computations. We further show that with one adjustable parameter, set to produce the known band gap, this method accurately predicts band structures and optical spectra of silicon and lithium fluoride, prototypical covalent and ionic solids. Our findings indicate that for a broad range of extended bulk systems, this method may provide a computationally inexpensive alternative to many-body perturbation theory, opening the door to studies of materials of increasing size and complexity.

  13. Fructus ligustri lucidi ethanol extract improves bone mineral density and properties through modulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum of growing rats.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xin; Lyu, Ying; Wu, Zhenghao; Fang, Yuehui; Xu, Hao; Zhao, Pengling; Xu, Yajun; Feng, Haotian

    2014-04-01

    Optimizing peak bone mass in early life is one of key preventive strategies against osteoporosis. Fructus ligustri lucidi (FLL), the fruit of Ligustrum lucidum Ait., is a commonly prescribed herb in many kidney-tonifying traditional Chinese medicinal formulas to alleviate osteoporosis. Previously, FLL extracts have been shown to have osteoprotective effect in aged or ovariectomized rats. In the present study, we investigated the effects of FLL ethanol extract on bone mineral density (BMD) and mechanical properties in growing male rats and explored the underlying mechanisms. Male weaning Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized into four groups and orally administrated for 4 months an AIN-93G formula-based diet supplementing with different doses of FLL ethanol extract (0.40, 0.65, and 0.90 %) or vehicle control, respectively. Then calcium balance, serum level of Ca, P, 25(OH)2D3, 1,25(OH)2D3, osteocalcin (OCN), C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), and parathyroid hormone, bone microarchitecture, and calcium absorption-related genes expression in duodenum and kidney were analyzed. The results demonstrated that FLL ethanol extract increased BMD of growing rats and improved their bone microarchitecture and mechanical properties. FLL ethanol extract altered bone turnover, as evidenced by increasing a bone formation maker, OCN, and decreasing a bone resorption maker, CTX-I. Intriguingly, both Ca absorption and Ca retention rate were elevated by FLL ethanol extract treatment, possibly through the mechanisms of up-regulating the transcriptions of calcitropic genes in kidney (1α-hydroxylase) and duodenum (vitamin D receptor, calcium transporter calbindin-D9k, and transient receptor potential vanilloid 6). In conclusion, FLL ethanol extract increased bone mass gain and improved bone properties via modulating bone turnover and up-regulating calcium absorption-related gene expression in kidney and duodenum, which could then activate 1,25(OH)2D3-dependent calcium

  14. Thiazide-sensitive Na+ -Cl- cotransporter (NCC) gene inactivation results in increased duodenal Ca2+ absorption, enhanced osteoblast differentiation and elevated bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chau, Tom; Chu, Pauling; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) due to genetic mutations in Gitelman's syndrome (GS) or pharmacological inhibition with thiazide diuretics causes hypocalciuria and increased bone mineral density (BMD) with unclear extrarenal calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulation. We investigated intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and bone Ca(2+) metabolism in nonsense Ncc Ser707X (S707X) homozygous knockin mice (Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice). Compared to wild-type and heterozygous knockin littermates, Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had increased intestinal absorption of (45) Ca(2+) and expression of the active Ca(2+) transport machinery (transient receptor potential vanilloid 6, calbindin-D9K , and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 1b). Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had also significantly increased Ca(2+) content accompanied by greater mineral apposition rate (MAR) in their femurs and higher trabecular bone volume, cortical bone thickness, and BMD determined by μCT. Their osteoblast differentiation markers, such as bone alkaline phosphatase, procollagen I, osteocalcin, and osterix, were also significantly increased while osteoclast activity was unaffected. Analysis of marrow-derived bone cells, either treated with thiazide or directly cultured from Ncc S707X knockin mice, showed that the differentiation of osteoblasts was associated with increased phosphorylation of mechanical stress-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In conclusion, NCC inhibition stimulates duodenal Ca(2+) absorption as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone Ca(2+) storage, possibly through a FAK/ERK dependent mechanism. PMID:24984877

  15. HCl absorption toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zmuidzinas, J.; Blake, G. A.; Carlstrom, J.; Keene, J.; Miller, D.

    1995-01-01

    We have detected the 626 GHz J = 1 approaches 0 transition of hydrogen chloride (H(sup 35)Cl) in absorption against the blending of the three hyperfine components of this transition by the velocity profile of Sgr B2 observed in other species. The apparent optical depth of the line is tau approximately equal to 1, and the minimum HCl column density is 1.6 x 10(exp 14)/sq cm. A detailed radiative transfer model was constructed which includes collisional and radiative excitation, absorption and emission by dust, and the radial variation of temperature and density. Good agreement between the model and the data is obtained for HCl/H2 approximately 1.1 x 10(exp -9). Comparison of this result to chemical models indicates that the depletion factor of gas-phase chlorine is between 50-180 in the molecular envelope surrounding the SgrB2(N) and (M) dust cores.

  16. The O(3P) and N(4S) density measurement at 225 km by ultraviolet absorption and fluorescence in the Apollo-Soyuz test project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.; Rawling, W. T.; Donahue, T. M.; Anderson, J. G.; Hudson, R. D.

    1976-01-01

    The densities of O(3P) and N(4S) at 225 km were determined during the Apollo Soyuz Test Project by a resonance absorption/fluorescence technique in which OI and NI line radiation produced and collimated on board the Apollo was reflected from the Soyuz back to the Apollo for spectral analysis. The two spacecraft maneuvered so that a range of observation angles of plus or minus 15 deg with respect to the normal to the orbital velocity vector was scanned. The measurements were made at night on two consecutive orbits at spacecraft separations of 150 and 500 m. The resulting relative counting rates as function of observation angle were compared to calculated values to determine the oxygen value. This value agrees with mass spectrometric measurements made under similar conditions. The nitrogen value is in good agreement with other measurements and suggests a smaller diurnal variation than is predicted by present models.

  17. Absolute atomic oxygen and nitrogen densities in radio-frequency driven atmospheric pressure cold plasmas: Synchrotron vacuum ultra-violet high-resolution Fourier-transform absorption measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Niemi, K.; O'Connell, D.; Gans, T.; Oliveira, N. de; Joyeux, D.; Nahon, L.; Booth, J. P.

    2013-07-15

    Reactive atomic species play a key role in emerging cold atmospheric pressure plasma applications, in particular, in plasma medicine. Absolute densities of atomic oxygen and atomic nitrogen were measured in a radio-frequency driven non-equilibrium plasma operated at atmospheric pressure using vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) absorption spectroscopy. The experiment was conducted on the DESIRS synchrotron beamline using a unique VUV Fourier-transform spectrometer. Measurements were carried out in plasmas operated in helium with air-like N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} (4:1) admixtures. A maximum in the O-atom concentration of (9.1 {+-} 0.7) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} m{sup -3} was found at admixtures of 0.35 vol. %, while the N-atom concentration exhibits a maximum of (5.7 {+-} 0.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} m{sup -3} at 0.1 vol. %.

  18. Simulating Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy in MCl62- (M= U, Np, Pu) complexes and UOCl5- using time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Govind, Niranjan; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2014-02-21

    We report simulations of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Cl K-edge of actinide hexahalides MCl62- (M = U, Np, Pu) and the UOCl5- complex using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) extended for core excitations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first calculations of the Cl K-edge spectra of NpCl62- and PuCl62-. In addition, the spectra are simulated with and without the environmental effects of the host crystal as well as ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to capture the dynamical effects due to atomic motion. The calculated spectra are compared with experimental results, where available and the observed trends are discussed.

  19. Coherent potential approximation for the absorption spectra and the densities of states of cubic Frenkel exciton systems with Gaussian diagonal disorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avgin, I.; Boukahil, A.; Huber, D. L.

    2015-11-01

    Using the coherent potential approximation, we investigate the optical absorption and the density of states of Frenkel exciton systems on simple, body centered, and face centered cubic lattices with nearest-neighbor interactions and a Gaussian distribution of transition frequencies (i.e. Gaussian diagonal disorder). The analysis is based on an elliptic integral approach with a variety of variances. The results for the simple cubic lattice are in good agreement with the finite array calculations of Schreiber and Toyozawa. Our findings suggest that the coherent potential approximation can be useful in interpreting the optical properties of cubic crystals where the optically excited states are Frenkel excitons with the dominant interactions limited to nearest-neighbors.

  20. Studies on effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption and electron density of some narcotic drugs in the energy range 1 keV-20 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounhalli, Shivraj G.; Shantappa, Anil; Hanagodimath, S. M.

    2013-04-01

    Effective atomic numbers for photon energy absorption ZPEA,eff, photon interaction ZPI,eff and for electron density Nel, have been calculated by a direct method in the photon-energy region from 1 keV to 20 MeV for narcotic drugs, such as Heroin (H), Cocaine (CO), Caffeine (CA), Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), Cannabinol (CBD), Tetrahydrocannabivarin (THCV). The ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel values have been found to change with energy and composition of the narcotic drugs. The energy dependence ZPEA,eff, ZPI,eff and Nel is shown graphically. The maximum difference between the values of ZPEA,eff, and ZPI,eff occurs at 30 keV and the significant difference of 2 to 33% for the energy region 5-100 keV for all drugs. The reason for these differences is discussed.

  1. Tuning superior solar cell performance of carrier mobility and absorption in perovskite CH3NH3GeCl3: A density functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yu-Qing; Wu, Li-Juan; Liu, Biao; Wang, Ling-Zhi; He, Peng-Bin; Cai, Meng-Qiu

    2016-05-01

    The solar cell based on hybrid organic-inorganic halide perovskite has received considerable attention. One of the most important issues in the pursuit of further developments in this area is to obtain both a high carrier mobility and an excellent ability of light adsorption. In this paper, we investigate the electronic structure and electronic effective masses of the new non-toxic material CH3NH3GeCl3 by first-principle calculations. The results show that the absorption efficiency of CH3NH3GeCl3 is more superior to that of CH3NH3PbI3 in short wavelength region. We trace this result to the ferroelectricity caused by the more serious octahedral GeCl6- distortion. We also discover a new relationship between the carrier effective masses anisotropy and the anisotropy of electronic density of states along three principal directions. Moreover, while applied the isotropic compressive pressure, the absorption efficiency and carrier mobility of CH3NH3GeCl3 in orthorhombic phase are improved greatly due to changes of electronic structure. We speculate that these are general results of tuning of the carrier mobility by controlling the band gap and the electronic occupation along different directions, to obtain both a high carrier mobility and an excellent ability of light adsorption.

  2. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory derived NO emission from soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2014-07-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW-China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis center, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis' (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol-Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three dimensional NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modeled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  3. Tropospheric vertical column densities of NO2 over managed dryland ecosystems (Xinjiang, China): MAX-DOAS measurements vs. 3-D dispersion model simulations based on laboratory-derived NO emission from soil samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamtimin, B.; Behrendt, T.; Badawy, M. M.; Wagner, T.; Qi, Y.; Wu, Z.; Meixner, F. X.

    2015-01-01

    We report on MAX-DOAS observations of NO2 over an oasis-ecotone-desert ecosystem in NW China. There, local ambient NO2 concentrations originate from enhanced biogenic NO emission of intensively managed soils. Our target oasis "Milan" is located at the southern edge of the Taklimakan desert, very remote and well isolated from other potential anthropogenic and biogenic NOx sources. Four observation sites for MAX-DOAS measurements were selected, at the oasis centre, downwind and upwind of the oasis, and in the desert. Biogenic NO emissions in terms of (i) soil moisture and (ii) soil temperature of Milan oasis (iii) different land-cover type sub-units (cotton, Jujube trees, cotton/Jujube mixture, desert) were quantified by laboratory incubation of corresponding soil samples. Net potential NO fluxes were up-scaled to oasis scale by areal distribution and classification of land-cover types derived from satellite images using GIS techniques. A Lagrangian dispersion model (LASAT, Lagrangian Simulation of Aerosol Transport) was used to calculate the dispersion of soil emitted NO into the atmospheric boundary layer over Milan oasis. Three-dimensional (3-D) NO concentrations (30 m horizontal resolution) have been converted to 3-D NO2 concentrations, assuming photostationary state conditions. NO2 column densities were simulated by suitable vertical integration of modelled 3-D NO2 concentrations at those downwind and upwind locations, where the MAX-DOAS measurements were performed. Downwind-upwind differences (a direct measure of Milan oasis' contribution to the areal increase of ambient NO2 concentration) of measured and simulated slant (as well as vertical) NO2 column densities show excellent agreement. This agreement is considered as the first successful attempt to prove the validity of the chosen approach to up-scale laboratory-derived biogenic NO fluxes to ecosystem field conditions, i.e. from the spatial scale of a soil sample (cm2) to the size of an entire agricultural

  4. Lyman-α Absorption from Heliotail ENAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Brian E.; Izmodenov, Vladislav V.

    2010-12-01

    The energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) that the Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is currently studying are messengers from the termination shock and beyond. Ultraviolet spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) provide another way to study these ENAs, which are capable of producing detectable absorption signatures in HST Lyman-α spectra of nearby stars. This broad, shallow absorption is only observed within 20° of the downwind direction. Only the lengthy downwind lines of sight through the long heliotail build up enough column density of ENAs to yield detectable absorption. The absorption therefore represents the first real observational detection of the heliotail. We try to connect ENA fluxes observed by IBEX with the Lyman-α absorption observed by HST. In the downwind direction, IBEX observes ENA fluxes that increase towards lower energies, at least to 0.2 keV, but consistency with the HST measurements seems to require that the ENA fluxes at least flatten if not decrease below 0.2 keV. The ``ribbon'' of ENAs detected by IBEX is not detected in Lyman-α absorption, which may be a problem for any explanation of the ribbon that proposes a source beyond our heliosphere.

  5. Flow in a metal hydride chromatographic column

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, G.S.

    1990-01-01

    The flow of hydrogen isotopes in a metal hydride chromatographic column is calculated by a one-dimensional finite difference method. The Ergun equation is used to define the gas flow; and equilibrium pressure isotherms are used to define the column holdup. Solid phase loadings are shown to move as a wave front on absorption, but remain more uniform on desorption. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  6. Adsorption of formic acid on rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) revisited: An infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory study

    SciTech Connect

    Mattsson, A.; Österlund, L.; Hu, Shuanglin Hermansson, K.

    2014-01-21

    Formic acid (HCOOH) adsorption on rutile TiO{sub 2} (110) has been studied by s- and p-polarized infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRRAS) and spin-polarized density functional theory together with Hubbard U contributions (DFT+U) calculations. To compare with IRRAS spectra, the results from the DFT+U calculations were used to simulate IR spectra by employing a three-layer model, where the adsorbate layer was modelled using Lorentz oscillators with calculated dielectric constants. To account for the experimental observations, four possible formate adsorption geometries were calculated, describing both the perfect (110) surface, and surfaces with defects; either O vacancies or hydroxyls. The majority species seen in IRRAS was confirmed to be the bridging bidentate formate species with associated symmetric and asymmetric frequencies of the ν(OCO) modes measured to be at 1359 cm{sup −1} and 1534 cm{sup −1}, respectively. The in-plane δ(C–H) wagging mode of this species couples to both the tangential and the normal component of the incident p-polarized light, which results in absorption and emission bands at 1374 cm{sup −1} and 1388 cm{sup −1}. IRRAS spectra measured on surfaces prepared to be either reduced, stoichiometric, or to contain surplus O adatoms, were found to be very similar. By comparisons with computed spectra, it is proposed that in our experiments, formate binds as a minority species to an in-plane Ti{sub 5c} atom and a hydroxyl, rather than to O vacancy sites, the latter to a large extent being healed even at our UHV conditions. Excellent agreement between calculated and experimental IRRAS spectra is obtained. The results emphasize the importance of protonation and reactive surface hydroxyls – even under UHV conditions – as reactive sites in e.g., catalytic applications.

  7. Carbon X-ray absorption spectra of fluoroethenes and acetone: a study at the coupled cluster, density functional, and static-exchange levels of theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Coriani, Sonia; Christiansen, Ove; Norman, Patrick

    2013-03-28

    Near carbon K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of a series of fluorine-substituted ethenes and acetone have been studied using coupled cluster and density functional theory (DFT) polarization propagator methods, as well as the static-exchange (STEX) approach. With the complex polarization propagator (CPP) implemented in coupled cluster theory, relaxation effects following the excitation of core electrons are accounted for in terms of electron correlation, enabling a systematic convergence of these effects with respect to electron excitations in the cluster operator. Coupled cluster results have been used as benchmarks for the assessment of propagator methods in DFT as well as the state-specific static-exchange approach. Calculations on ethene and 1,1-difluoroethene illustrate the possibility of using nonrelativistic coupled cluster singles and doubles (CCSD) with additional effects of electron correlation and relativity added as scalar shifts in energetics. It has been demonstrated that CPP spectra obtained with coupled cluster singles and approximate doubles (CC2), CCSD, and DFT (with a Coulomb attenuated exchange-correlation functional) yield excellent predictions of chemical shifts for vinylfluoride, 1,1-difluoroethene, trifluoroethene, as well as good spectral features for acetone in the case of CCSD and DFT. Following this, CPP-DFT is considered to be a viable option for the calculation of X-ray absorption spectra of larger π-conjugated systems, and CC2 is deemed applicable for chemical shifts but not for studies of fine structure features. The CCSD method as well as the more approximate CC2 method are shown to yield spectral features relating to π∗-resonances in good agreement with experiment, not only for the aforementioned molecules but also for ethene, cis-1,2-difluoroethene, and tetrafluoroethene. The STEX approach is shown to underestimate π∗-peak separations due to spectral compressions, a characteristic which is inherent to this

  8. A Survey of Metal Lines at High Redshift. II. SDSS Absorption Line Studies—O VI Line Density, Space Density, and Gas Metallicity at z abs ~ 3.0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, S.; Mathur, S.; Pieri, M.; York, D. G.

    2010-09-01

    We have analyzed a large data set of O VI absorber candidates found in the spectra of 3702 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) quasars, focusing on a subsample of 387 active galactic nuclei sight lines with an average S/N >=5.0, allowing for the detection of absorbers above a rest-frame equivalent width limit of W r >= 0.19 Å for the O VI 1032 Å component. Accounting for random interlopers mimicking an O VI doublet, we derive for the first time a secure lower limit for the redshift number density ΔN/Δz for redshifts z abs >= 2.8. With extensive Monte Carlo simulations, we quantify the losses of absorbers due to blending with the ubiquitous Lyα forest lines and estimate the success rate of retrieving each individual candidate as a function of its redshift, the emission redshift of the quasar, the strength of the absorber, and the measured signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of the spectrum by modeling typical Lyman forest spectra. These correction factors allow us to derive the "incompleteness and S/N-corrected" redshift number densities of O VI absorbers: ΔN O VI,c /Δzc (2.8 < z < 3.2) = 4.6 ± 0.3, ΔN O VI,c /Δzc (3.2 < z < 3.6) = 6.7 ± 0.8, and ΔN O VI,c /Δzc (3.6 < z < 4.0) = 8.4 ± 2.9. We can place a secure lower limit for the contribution of O VI to the closure mass density at the redshifts probed here: ΩO VI (2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 1.9 × 10-8 h -1. We show that the strong lines we probe account for over 65% of the mass in the O VI absorbers; the weak absorbers, while dominant in line number density, do not contribute significantly to the mass density. Making a conservative assumption about the ionization fraction, {O VI}/{O}, and adopting the Anders & Grevesse solar abundance values, we derive the mean metallicity of the gas probed in our search: ζ(2.8 < z < 3.2) >= 3.6 × 10-4 h, in good agreement with other studies. These results demonstrate that large spectroscopic data sets such as SDSS can play an important role in QSO absorption line studies, in spite of

  9. Formaldehyde absorption toward W51

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Petuchowski, S. J.

    1989-01-01

    Formaldehyde (H2CO) absorption toward the H II region complex W51A (G49.5 - 0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions has been measured with angular resolution of about 0.15 pc. The continuum H II region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping throughout the map than previous maps at lower resolution; in particular, two narrow regions of enhanced opacity are observed. The absorption in the velocity range 64-67 km/s LSR extends over most of the region, with an observed velocity gradient of 5.2 km/s pc. The opacity structure largely parallels the velocity structure, with a ridge of enhanced opacity to the north of the highest velocity feature. The S/N of the maps allows accurate modeling of the spectral profiles. Nine distinct clumps in the foreground clouds have been identified and parametrized, and column densities for the 1(11) and 2(12) rotational levels of orthoformaldehyde have been derived.

  10. Modeling of column apparatuses: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Doichinova, M. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com; Popova-Krumova, P. E-mail: petyabs@yahoo.com

    2013-12-18

    This paper presents a review of the modeling method on the base of the physical approximations of the mechanics of continua, which have been developed for processes in column apparatuses. This method includes diffusion type of model for modeling of mass transfer with chemical reaction in column apparatuses with and without circulation zones. The diffusion type of model is used for modeling of scale effect in column apparatuses too. The study concluded that the proposal method is possibility for investigation the influence of radial non uniformity of the velocity distribution on the process efficiency, influence of zones breadths on the mass transfer efficiency in the column. The method of the column apparatuses modeling can be used for modeling of physical and chemical absorption, chemical adsorption, homogeneous and heterogeneous (catalytic) chemical reactions, airlift reactors for chemical and photochemical reactions.

  11. Modeling of column apparatuses: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doichinova, M.; Popova-Krumova, P.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a review of the modeling method on the base of the physical approximations of the mechanics of continua, which have been developed for processes in column apparatuses. This method includes diffusion type of model for modeling of mass transfer with chemical reaction in column apparatuses with and without circulation zones. The diffusion type of model is used for modeling of scale effect in column apparatuses too. The study concluded that the proposal method is possibility for investigation the influence of radial non uniformity of the velocity distribution on the process efficiency, influence of zones breadths on the mass transfer efficiency in the column. The method of the column apparatuses modeling can be used for modeling of physical and chemical absorption, chemical adsorption, homogeneous and heterogeneous (catalytic) chemical reactions, airlift reactors for chemical and photochemical reactions.

  12. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules. PMID:20707545

  13. Assignment of near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra of metalloporphyrins by means of time-dependent density-functional calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Norman; Fink, Rainer; Hieringer, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    The C 1s and N 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of three prototype tetraphenyl porphyrin (TPP) molecules are discussed in the framework of a combined experimental and theoretical study. We employ time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) to compute the NEXAFS spectra of the open- and closed-shell metalloporphyrins CoTPP and ZnTPP as well as the free-base 2HTPP in realistic nonplanar conformations. Using Becke's well-known half-and-half hybrid functional, the computed core excitation spectra are mostly in good agreement with the experimental data in the low-energy region below the appropriate ionization threshold. To make these calculations feasible, we apply a new, simple scheme based on TDDFT using a modified single-particle input spectrum. This scheme is very easy to implement in standard codes and allows one to compute core excitation spectra at a similar cost as ordinary UV/vis spectra even for larger molecules. We employ these calculations for a detailed assignment of the NEXAFS spectra including subtle shifts in certain peaks of the N 1s spectra, which depend on the central coordination of the TPP ligand. We furthermore assign the observed NEXAFS resonances to the individual molecular subunits of the investigated TPP molecules.

  14. X-ray absorption spectra of graphene and graphene oxide by full-potential multiple scattering calculations with self-consistent charge density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Junqing; Krüger, Peter; Natoli, Calogero R.; Hayakawa, Kuniko; Wu, Ziyu; Hatada, Keisuke

    2015-09-01

    The x-ray absorption near-edge structure of graphene, graphene oxide, and diamond is studied by the recently developed real-space full potential multiple scattering (FPMS) theory with space-filling cells. It is shown how accurate potentials for FPMS can be generated from self-consistent charge densities obtained with other schemes, especially the projector augmented wave method. Compared to standard multiple scattering calculations in the muffin-tin approximation, FPMS gives much better agreement with experiment. The effects of various structural modifications on the graphene spectra are well reproduced. (1) Stacking of graphene layers increases the peak intensity in the higher energy region. (2) The spectrum of the C atom located at the edge of a graphene sheet shows a prominent pre-edge structure. (3) Adsorption of oxygen gives rise to the so-called interlayer-state peak. Moreover, O K-edge spectra of graphene oxide are calculated for three types of bonding, C-OH, C-O-C, and C-O, and the proportions of these bondings at 800 ∘C are deduced by fitting them to the experimental spectrum.

  15. Predicting Near Edge X-ray Absorption Spectra with the Spin-Free Exact-Two-Component Hamiltonian and Orthogonality Constrained Density Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Derricotte, Wallace D; Evangelista, Francesco A

    2016-01-12

    Orthogonality constrained density functional theory (OCDFT) provides near-edge X-ray absorption (NEXAS) spectra of first-row elements within one electronvolt from experimental values. However, with increasing atomic number, scalar relativistic effects become the dominant source of error in a nonrelativistic OCDFT treatment of core-valence excitations. In this work we report a novel implementation of the spin-free exact-two-component (X2C) one-electron treatment of scalar relativistic effects and its combination with a recently developed OCDFT approach to compute a manifold of core-valence excited states. The inclusion of scalar relativistic effects in OCDFT reduces the mean absolute error of second-row elements core-valence excitations from 10.3 to 2.3 eV. For all the excitations considered, the results from X2C calculations are also found to be in excellent agreement with those from low-order spin-free Douglas-Kroll-Hess relativistic Hamiltonians. The X2C-OCDFT NEXAS spectra of three organotitanium complexes (TiCl4, TiCpCl3, TiCp2Cl2) are in very good agreement with unshifted experimental results and show a maximum absolute error of 5-6 eV. In addition, a decomposition of the total transition dipole moment into partial atomic contributions is proposed and applied to analyze the nature of the Ti pre-edge transitions in the three organotitanium complexes. PMID:26584082

  16. Four-Component Damped Density Functional Response Theory Study of UV/Vis Absorption Spectra and Phosphorescence Parameters of Group 12 Metal-Substituted Porphyrins.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Saue, Trond; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-10

    The influences of group 12 (Zn, Cd, Hg) metal-substitution on the valence spectra and phosphorescence parameters of porphyrins (P) have been investigated in a relativistic setting. In order to obtain valence spectra, this study reports the first application of the damped linear response function, or complex polarization propagator, in the four-component density functional theory framework [as formulated in Villaume et al. J. Chem. Phys. 2010 , 133 , 064105 ]. It is shown that the steep increase in the density of states as due to the inclusion of spin-orbit coupling yields only minor changes in overall computational costs involved with the solution of the set of linear response equations. Comparing single-frequency to multifrequency spectral calculations, it is noted that the number of iterations in the iterative linear equation solver per frequency grid-point decreases monotonously from 30 to 0.74 as the number of frequency points goes from one to 19. The main heavy-atom effect on the UV/vis-absorption spectra is indirect and attributed to the change of point group symmetry due to metal-substitution, and it is noted that substitutions using heavier atoms yield small red-shifts of the intense Soret-band. Concerning phosphorescence parameters, the adoption of a four-component relativistic setting enables the calculation of such properties at a linear order of response theory, and any higher-order response functions do not need to be considered-a real, conventional, form of linear response theory has been used for the calculation of these parameters. For the substituted porphyrins, electronic coupling between the lowest triplet states is strong and results in theoretical estimates of lifetimes that are sensitive to the wave function and electron density parametrization. With this in mind, we report our best estimates of the phosphorescence lifetimes to be 460, 13.8, 11.2, and 0.00155 s for H2P, ZnP, CdP, and HgP, respectively, with the corresponding transition

  17. A comparison of neutral hydrogen 21 cm observations with UV and optical absorption-line measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovanelli, R.; York, D. G.; Shull, J. M.; Haynes, M. P.

    1978-01-01

    Several absorption components detected in visible or UV lines have been identified with emission features in new high-resolution, high signal-to-noise 21 cm observations. Stars for which direct overlap is obtained are HD 28497, lambda Ori, mu Col, HD 50896, rho Leo, HD 93521, and HD 219881. With the use of the inferred H I column densities from 21 cm profiles, rather than the integrated column densities obtained from L-alpha, more reliable densities can be derived from the existence of molecular hydrogen. Hence the cloud thicknesses are better determined; and 21 cm emission maps near these stars can be used to obtain dimensions on the plane of the sky. It is now feasible to derive detailed geometries for isolated clumps of gas which produce visual absorption features.

  18. Herschel/HIFI-HRS observation of CH absorption in IRAS16293-2422

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bottinelli, S.; Caux, C.; Wakelam, V.; Ceccarelli, C.; Kahane, C.

    2011-05-01

    We present high spectral resolution observations of CH absorption towards the low-mass protostar IRAS16293-2422. The data were obtained with the High Resolution Spectrometer (HRS) module of the Heterodyne Instrument for the Far-Infrared (HIFI) on-board Herschel, as part of the CHESS (Chemical HErschel Surveys of Star-forming regions) guaranteed time key program. CH is well known for having column densities correlated with those of H_2 and for its role as a product in the ion-molecule gas-phase chemistry. We derive CH column densities in the envelope of IRAS16293-2422, and investigate the implications when comparing with column densities of H_2 and of other carbon species such as CN or CCH. We also discuss the non-detections of CD and CH^+.

  19. A survey with Copernicus of interstellar O VI absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, E. B.; Meloy, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The presence of broad, shallow absorptions caused by O VI ions were revealed from UV spectra observations recorded by the Copernicus satellite for thirty-two stars. A table lists survey data on the stars observed for which values of the O VI column densities or their upper limits are extracted. Interstellar rather than circumstellar origin is evident from observation of the lack of correspondence between radical velocities of the stars and those of the O VI profiles. The presence of a low-density high-temperature phase of interstellar gas produced by supernova explosions is suggested.

  20. Detection of hydrogen fluoride absorption in diffuse molecular clouds with Herschel/HIFI: an ubiquitous tracer of molecular gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonnentrucker, P.; Neufeld, D. A.; Phillips, T. G.; Gerin, M.; Lis, D. C.; de Luca, M.; Goicoechea, J. R.; Black, J. H.; Bell, T. A.; Boulanger, F.; Cernicharo, J.; Coutens, A.; Dartois, E.; Kaźmierczak, M.; Encrenaz, P.; Falgarone, E.; Geballe, T. R.; Giesen, T.; Godard, B.; Goldsmith, P. F.; Gry, C.; Gupta, H.; Hennebelle, P.; Herbst, E.; Hily-Blant, P.; Joblin, C.; Kołos, R.; Krełowski, J.; Martín-Pintado, J.; Menten, K. M.; Monje, R.; Mookerjea, B.; Pearson, J.; Perault, M.; Persson, C. M.; Plume, R.; Salez, M.; Schlemmer, S.; Schmidt, M.; Stutzki, J.; Teyssier, D.; Vastel, C.; Yu, S.; Caux, E.; Güsten, R.; Hatch, W. A.; Klein, T.; Mehdi, I.; Morris, P.; Ward, J. S.

    2010-10-01

    We discuss the detection of absorption by interstellar hydrogen fluoride (HF) along the sight line to the submillimeter continuum sources W49N and W51. We have used Herschel's HIFI instrument in dual beam switch mode to observe the 1232.4762 GHz J = 1-0 HF transition in the upper sideband of the band 5a receiver. We detected foreground absorption by HF toward both sources over a wide range of velocities. Optically thin absorption components were detected on both sight lines, allowing us to measure - as opposed to obtain a lower limit on - the column density of HF for the first time. As in previous observations of HF toward the source G10.6-0.4, the derived HF column density is typically comparable to that of water vapor, even though the elemental abundance of oxygen is greater than that of fluorine by four orders of magnitude. We used the rather uncertain N(CH)-N(H2) relationship derived previously toward diffuse molecular clouds to infer the molecular hydrogen column density in the clouds exhibiting HF absorption. Within the uncertainties, we find that the abundance of HF with respect to H2 is consistent with the theoretical prediction that HF is the main reservoir of gas-phase fluorine for these clouds. Thus, hydrogen fluoride has the potential to become an excellent tracer of molecular hydrogen, and provides a sensitive probe of clouds of small H2 column density. Indeed, the observations of hydrogen fluoride reported here reveal the presence of a low column density diffuse molecular cloud along the W51 sight line, at an LSR velocity of ~24 km s-1, that had not been identified in molecular absorption line studies prior to the launch of Herschel. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  1. Adsorption of isophorone and trimethyl-cyclohexanone on Pd(111): A combination of infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dostert, Karl-Heinz; O'Brien, Casey P.; Liu, Wei; Riedel, Wiebke; Savara, Aditya; Tkatchenko, Alexandre; Schauermann, Swetlana; Freund, Hans-Joachim

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalysts with desired selectivity towards C = C or C = O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of the α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone and the saturated ketone TMCH (3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone) with Pd(111) was investigated in this study as a prototypical system. Infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS) and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT + vdWsurf) were combined to form detailed assignments of IR vibrational modes in the range from 3000 cm- 1 to 1000 cm- 1 in order to obtain information on the binding of isophorone and TMCH to Pd(111) as well as to study the effect of co-adsorbed hydrogen. IRAS measurements were performed with deuterium-labeled (d5-) isophorone, in addition to unlabeled isophorone and unlabeled TMCH. Experimentally observed IR absorption features and calculated vibrational frequencies indicate that isophorone and TMCH molecules in multilayers have a mostly unperturbed structure with random orientation. At sub-monolayer coverages, strong perturbation and preferred orientations of the adsorbates were found. At low coverage, isophorone interacts strongly with Pd(111) and adsorbs in a flat-lying geometry with the C = C and C = O bonds parallel, and a CH3 group perpendicular, to the surface. At intermediate sub-monolayer coverage, the C = C bond is strongly tilted, while the C = O bond remains flat-lying, which indicates a prominent perturbation of the conjugated π system. Pre-adsorbed hydrogen leads to significant changes in the adsorption geometry of isophorone, which suggests a weakening of its binding to Pd(111). At low coverage, the structure of the CH3 groups seems to be mostly unperturbed on the hydrogen pre-covered surface. With increasing coverage, a conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system was observed in the

  2. Column Liquid Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majors, Ronald E.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Reviews literature covering developments of column liquid chromatography during 1982-83. Areas considered include: books and reviews; general theory; columns; instrumentation; detectors; automation and data handling; multidimensional chromatographic and column switching techniques; liquid-solid chromatography; normal bonded-phase, reversed-phase,…

  3. Simulating Ru L3-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, N.; Schoenlein, R. W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-05-01

    Ruthenium L2,3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes transitions from core 2p orbitals to the 4d levels of the atom and is a powerful tool for interrogating the local electronic and molecular structure around the metal atom. However, a molecular-level interpretation of the Ru L2,3-edge spectral lineshapes is often complicated by spin–orbit coupling (SOC) and multiplet effects. In this study, we develop spin-free time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) as a viable and predictive tool to simulate the Ru L3-edge spectra. We successfully simulate and analyze the ground state Ru L3-edge XA spectra of a series of RuII and RuIII complexes: [Ru(NH3)6]2+/3+, [Ru(CN)6]4-/3-, [RuCl6]4-/3-, and the ground (1A1) and photoexcited (3MLCT) transient states of [Ru(bpy)3]2+ and Ru(dcbpy)2(NCS)2 (termed N3). The TDDFT simulations reproduce all the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. The advantage of using TDDFT to assign complicated Ru L3-edge spectra is illustrated by its ability to identify ligand specific charge transfer features in complex molecules. We conclude that the B3LYP functional is the most reliable functional for accurately predicting the location of charge transfer features in these spectra. Experimental and simulated Ru L3-edge XA spectra are presented for the transition metal mixed-valence dimers [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5]- (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. We explore the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy and our simulations reveal that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is crucial for reproducing the experimentally determined valencies, highlighting the importance of the role of the solvent in transition metal charge transfer chemistry.

  4. Simulating Ru L3-Edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Model Complexes and Electron Localization in Mixed-Valence Metal Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuiken, Benjamin E. Van; Valiev, Marat; Daifuku, Stephanie L.; Bannan, Caitlin; Strader, Matthew L.; Cho, Hana; Huse, Nils; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Govind, Niranjan; Khalil, Munira

    2013-04-26

    Ruthenium L3-edge X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy probes unoccupied 4d orbitals of the metal atom and is increasingly being used to investigate the local electronic structure in ground and excited electronic states of Ru complexes. The simultaneous development of computational tools for simulating Ru L3-edge spectra is crucial for interpreting the spectral features at a molecular level. This study demonstrates that time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) is a viable and predictive tool for simulating ruthenium L3-edge XA spectroscopy. We systematically investigate the effects of exchange correlation functional and implicit and explicit solvent interactions on a series of RuII and RuIII complexes in their ground and electronic excited states. The TDDFT simulations reproduce all of the experimentally observed features in Ru L3-edge XA spectra within the experimental resolution (0.4 eV). Our simulations identify ligand-specific charge transfer features in complicated Ru L3-edge spectra of [Ru(CN)6]4- and RuII polypyridyl complexes illustrating the advantage of using TDDFT in complex systems. We conclude that the B3LYP functional most accurately predicts the transition energies of charge transfer features in these systems. We use our TDDFT approach to simulate experimental Ru L3-edge XA spectra of transition metal mixed-valence dimers of the form [(NC)5MII-CN-RuIII(NH3)5] (where M = Fe or Ru) dissolved in water. Our study determines the spectral signatures of electron delocalization in Ru L3-edge XA spectra. We find that the inclusion of explicit solvent molecules is necessary for reproducing the spectral features and the experimentally determined valencies in these mixed-valence complexes. This study validates the use of TDDFT for simulating Ru 2p excitations using popular quantum chemistry codes and providing a powerful interpretive tool for equilibrium and ultrafast Ru L3-edge XA spectroscopy.

  5. Characterization of the X-ray absorption in the Galactic ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, E.; García, J.; Kallman, T.; Mendoza, C.

    2016-06-01

    The physical conditions of the Galactic interstellar medium (ISM) can be studied in detail through the high-resolution X-ray spectroscopy provided by the grating instruments in both Chandra and XMM-Newton. Using an X-ray source, which acts as a lamp, one can analyze the absorption features that are imprinted in the spectra by the gas located between the observer and the X-ray source, which offers the opportunity to study physical properties of the ISM such as ionization degree, column densities, and elemental abundances. We present a detailed analysis of the H, O, Ne, and Fe absorption in the X-ray spectra of 24 bright galactic sources obtained with the Chandra and XMM-Newton observatories. Implementing our new absorption model ISMabs, we have measured column densities, ionization fractions, and abundances for H, O, Ne, and Fe in the direction of each source. We find that the column densities tend to increase with source distance and decrease with galactic latitude, while the ionization fractions and abundances are mostly constant along every line of sight. Finally, we found that molecules and grains are not a major contributor to the absorption features in the O K-edge wavelength region.

  6. Absolute number density calibration of the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283. 3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp and the calculated effect of argon pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, J.W.; McClean, R.E. ); Oldenborg, R.C. )

    1991-03-21

    The absolute number density calibration for the absorption by ground-state lead atoms of the 283.3-nm resonance line from a high-intensity lead hollow cathode lamp (Photron superlamp) is determined and found to be the same as that of a standard hollow cathode lamp. Comparisons of the calibrations to theoretical calculations are found to be quite satisfactory. The effects of argon pressures in the absorption cell on the calibration are examined theoretically by using a simple Lorentzian broadening and shifting model. These calculations show the expected reduction in sensitivity and increasing linearity of Beer-Lambert plots with increasing argon pressure.

  7. On the sizes of neutral hydrogen regions giving rise to damped Lyα absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier, E. M.; Turnshek, D. A.; Rao, S.

    2009-08-01

    Using quasi-stellar object (QSO) absorption-line spectra obtained along closely spaced sightlines, we examine the transverse sizes of regions containing large columns of neutral hydrogen gas at redshifts z ~ 1.5. The observations are primarily of intervening damped Lyα (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption-line systems in gravitationally lensed QSOs. In particular, Hubble Space Telescope spectroscopy of the four-component Cloverleaf QSO (H1413+1143) reveals three new DLA/sub-DLA systems at z ~ 1.44, 1.49 and 1.66. A neutral hydrogen column density of NHI >= 2 × 1020atomscm-2 is required for a system to be classified as a DLA, but none of the three systems has an HI column density above the DLA threshold in all four components. Over component separations <1.4 arcsec in the Cloverleaf, corresponding to transverse sizes of ~5-12h-170kpc, the HI column densities typically change by factors of ~2-40. Similar observations of other QSOs containing absorption systems in the DLA regime are summarized from the literature. In addition to establishing approximate sizes for DLA regions, the results have implications for their volume-averaged HI gas number densities and neutral gas masses. By combining our results on DLA absorber sizes with published results on the sizes of lower column density QSO absorbers, which however arise in very ionized regions, we infer the useful relation that the typical transverse size of an absorber in the redshift interval z ~ [1, 2] is Sabs ~ 11h-170[NHI/1020]-1/4kpc. Based on observations made with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope. E-mail: emonier@brockport.edu

  8. Damped Lyman-alpha absorption by disk galaxies with large redshifts. III. Intermediate-resolution spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Turnshek, D.A.; Wolfe, A.M.; Lanzetta, K.M.; Briggs, F.H.; Cohen, R.D.; Multiple Mirror Telescope Observatory, Tucson, AZ; Pittsburgh Univ., PA; California Univ., La Jolla )

    1989-09-01

    New intermediate-resolution spectroscopy for six members of a sample of 68 moderate- to high-redshift QSOs is presented. Evidence is reported which indicates that seven strong absorption features in the QSO spectra are due to damped Ly-alpha absorption. A standard curve-of-growth analysis on five of the damped systems is performed, and relevant properties are tabulated and discussed. Six of the seven damped Ly-alpha systems have H I column densities of 2 x 10 to the 20th/sq cm or larger, while the remaining system has an H I column density of about 10 to the 20th/sq cm. It is suggested that damped Ly-alpha systems arise when a sight line intercepts a high-redshift protogalaxy disk containing a quiescent cloud component characterized by high column density and low effective velocity dispersion. At the same time, the sight line usually intercepts a broader turbulent component, which is identified as the halo, characterized by much lower column density and higher effective velocity dispersion. 42 refs.

  9. Inelastic column behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duberg, John E; Wilder, Thomas W , III

    1952-01-01

    The significant findings of a theoretical study of column behavior in the plastic stress range are presented. When the behavior of a straight column is regarded as the limiting behavior of an imperfect column as the initial imperfection (lack of straightness) approaches zero, the departure from the straight configuration occurs at the tangent-modulus load. Without such a concept of the behavior of a straight column, one is led to the unrealistic conclusion that lateral deflection of the column can begin at any load between the tangent-modulus value and the Euler load, based on the original elastic modulus. A family of curves showing load against lateral deflection is presented for idealized h-section columns of various lengths and of various materials that have a systematic variation of their stress-strain curves.

  10. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  11. Formaldehyde Absorption toward W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Bennett, C.L.; Petuchowski, S.J.

    1988-04-01

    We have measured formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) absorption toward the HII region complex W51A (G49.5-0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions with angular resolution of approximately 4 inch. The continuum HII region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. We observe no H{sub 2}CO emission in regions of low continuum intensity. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping than previous maps at lower resolution. The good S/N of the maps allows accurate estimation of the complicated line profiles, showing some of the absorbing clouds to be quite patchy. We list the properties of the opacity spectra for a number of positions both in the clumps and in the more diffuse regions of the absorbing clouds, and derive column densities for the 1{sub 11} and 2{sub 12} rotational levels of ortho-formaldehyde.

  12. New detections of Galactic molecular absorption systems toward ALMA calibrator sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, Ryo; Kohno, Kotaro; Tamura, Yoichi; Izumi, Takuma; Umehata, Hideki; Nagai, Hiroshi

    2016-02-01

    We report on Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) detections of molecular absorption lines in Bands 3, 6, and 7 toward four radio-loud quasars, which were observed as the bandpass and complex gain calibrators. The absorption systems, three of which are newly detected, are found to be Galactic origin. Moreover, HCO absorption lines toward two objects are detected, which almost doubles the number of HCO absorption samples in the Galactic diffuse medium. In addition, high HCO-to-H13CO+ column density ratios are found, suggesting that the interstellar media (ISM) observed toward the two calibrators are in photodissociation regions, which observationally illustrates the chemistry of diffuse ISM driven by ultraviolet (UV) radiation. These results demonstrate that calibrators in the ALMA Archive are potential sources for the quest for new absorption systems and for detailed investigation of the nature of the ISM.

  13. Search for correlated UV and x ray absorption of NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Halpern, Jules P.; Kolman, Michiel

    1991-01-01

    NGC 3516, a low-luminosity Seyfert galaxy, is one of a small fraction of Seyfert galaxies that exhibit broad absorption in a resonance line. In order to determine whether the UV and x ray absorption in NGC 3516 are related, 5 IUE observations were obtained, quasi-simultaneously with 4 Ginga observations. The results are presented and discussed. The following subject areas are covered: short-term UV variability; emission lines; galactic absorption lines; the C IV, N V, and Si IV absorption features; lower limit on the carbon column density; estimate of the distance from the absorber to the continuum source; variability in the continuum and absorption; a comparison with BAL QSO's; and the x ray-UV connection.

  14. Distillation Column Modeling Tools

    SciTech Connect

    2001-09-01

    Advanced Computational and Experimental Techniques will Optimize Distillation Column Operation. Distillation is a low thermal efficiency unit operation that currently consumes 4.8 quadrillion BTUs of energy...

  15. Microwaves Scattering by Underdense Inhomogeneous Plasma Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lin; Ouyang, Jiting

    2016-03-01

    The scattering characteristics of microwaves (MWs) by an underdense inhomogeneous plasma column have been investigated. The plasma column is generated by hollow cathode discharge (HCD) in a glass tube filled with low pressure argon. The plasma density in the column can be varied by adjusting the discharge current. The scattering power of X-band MWs by the column is measured at different discharge currents and receiving angles. The results show that the column can affect the properties of scattering wave significantly regardless of its plasma frequency much lower than the incident wave frequency. The power peak of the scattering wave shifts away from 0° to about ±15° direction. The finite-different time-domain (FDTD) method is employed to analyze the wave scattering by plasma column with different electron density distributions. The reflected MW power from a metal plate located behind the column is also measured to investigate the scattering effect on reducing MW reflectivity of a metal target. This study is expected to deepen the understanding of plasma-electromagnetic wave interaction and expand the applications concerning plasma antenna and plasma stealth.

  16. Nebular UV Absorption Lines in Planetary Nebulae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dinerstein, Harriet

    We propose to continue our Cycle 1 program of studying the Lyman and Werner bands of H_2, seen in absorption against the UV continua of planetary nebula central stars, which arise within neutral-molecular envelopes surrounding the ionized gas. These are the pump lines for a fluorescent cascade of near-infrared emission lines which are observed in many planetary nebulae. By observing the UV lines we can probe the chemical and thermal structure of the envelopes, as well as measure molecular column densities and clarify the excitation processes for the infrared lines. In Cycle 1 we were granted time for three targets, one of which was successfully observed shortly before submission of this proposal. Although the data were not yet available for examination, similar target observed by the project team revealed a rich set of H_2 circumstellar absorption features, demonstrating the feasibility of our program. FUSE spectra also include absorption features from atomic species such as O I and C II, which give rise to important far-infrared fine-structure cooling lines that likewise have been observed from planetary nebulae. In Cycle 2, we add as a secondary goal a search for nebular components of the O VI 032, 1038 AA absorption lines, which trace the presence of hot shocked gas, in nebulae with anomalously strong optical recombination lines of ions of oxygen and nitrogen. This will test a plausible hypothesis for the origin of this anomaly.

  17. Inflatable Column Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hedgepeth, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    Lightweight structural member easy to store. Billowing between circumferential loops of fiber inflated column becomes series of cells. Each fiber subjected to same tension along entire length (though tension is different in different fibers). Member is called "isotensoid" column. Serves as jack for automobiles or structures during repairs. Also used as support for temporary bleachers or swimming pools.

  18. Glass-silicon column

    DOEpatents

    Yu, Conrad M.

    2003-12-30

    A glass-silicon column that can operate in temperature variations between room temperature and about 450.degree. C. The glass-silicon column includes large area glass, such as a thin Corning 7740 boron-silicate glass bonded to a silicon wafer, with an electrode embedded in or mounted on glass of the column, and with a self alignment silicon post/glass hole structure. The glass/silicon components are bonded, for example be anodic bonding. In one embodiment, the column includes two outer layers of silicon each bonded to an inner layer of glass, with an electrode imbedded between the layers of glass, and with at least one self alignment hole and post arrangement. The electrode functions as a column heater, and one glass/silicon component is provided with a number of flow channels adjacent the bonded surfaces.

  19. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  20. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    ) detections, which are associated with gas-rich mergers, we find three new cases of profiles with blueshifted broad wings (with FW20 ≳ 500 km s-1) in high radio power AGN. These detections are good candidates for being HI outflows. Together with the known cases of outflows already included in the sample (3C 293 and 3C 305), the detection rate of H I outflows is 5% in the total radio AGN sample. Because of the effects of spin temperature and covering factor of the outflowing gas, this fraction could represent a lower limit. However, if the relatively low detection rate is confirmed by more detailed observations, it would suggest that, if outflows are a characteristic phenomenon of all radio AGN, they would have a short depletion timescale compared to the lifetime of the radio source. This would be consistent with results found for some of the outflows traced by molecular gas. Using stacking techniques, in our previous paper we showed that compact radio sources have higher τ, FWHM, and column density than extended sources. In addition, here we find that blueshifted and broad/asymmetric lines are more often present among compact sources. In good agreement with the results of stacking, this suggests that unsettled gas is responsible for the larger stacked FWHM detected in compact sources. Therefore in such sources the H I is more likely to be unsettled. This may arise as a result of jet-cloud interactions, as young radio sources clear their way through the rich ambient gaseous medium. Appendices are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  1. Broad Balmer-Line Absorption in SDSS J172341.10+555340.5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Kentaro

    2010-10-01

    We present the discovery of Balmer-line absorption from Hα to H9 in an iron low-ionizaton broad absorption line (FeLoBAL) quasar, SDSS J172341.10+555340.5, by near-infrared spectroscopy with the Cooled Infrared Spectrograph and Camera for OHS (CISCO) attached to the Subaru Telescope. The redshift of the Balmer-line absorption troughs is 2.0530±0.0003, and it is blueshifted by 5370 km s-1 from the Balmer emission lines. It is more than 4000 km s-1 blueshifted from the previously known UV absorption lines. We detected relatively strong (EWrest = 20 Å) [OIII] emission lines that are similar to those found in other broad absorption line quasars with Balmer-line absorption. We also derived the column density of neutral hydrogen of 5.2 × 1017 cm-2 by using the curve of growth and taking account of Lyα trapping. We searched for UV absorption lines that had the same redshift with Balmer-line absorption, and found Ali III and Fe III absorption lines at z = 2.053 that correspond to previously unidentified absorption lines, and the presence of other blended troughs that were difficult to identify.

  2. Damped Lyman-alpha absorption by disk galaxies with large redshifts. IV - More intermediate-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Arthur M.; Turnshek, David A.; Lanzetta, Kenneth M.; Lu, Limin

    1993-01-01

    Intermediate-resolution spectra of six QSOs exhibiting seven Ly-alpha absorption troughs that are candidates for damped Ly-alpha absorption lines are presented. The metal content of the confirmed damped systems is investigated by examining the metal-line velocity profiles, and by performing curve-of-growth analyses for four of the six confirmed damped systems. The low-ionization lines associated with the z(metals) = 2.0399 damped system toward Q0458-020 have velocity widths up to 10 times wider than the width of the 21-cm absorption feature found at the same redshift. Since the 21-cm absorption arises in a low velocity dispersion layer of H I that extends more than 8/h kpc transverse to the line of sight, the H I absorption cannot arise from the same clouds responsible for the bulk of the metal-line absorption. This is strong evidence for a two-component model consisting of high column density 'quiescent' gas which gives rise to damped Ly-alpha and 21-cm absorption, and low column density 'turbulent' gas which dominates equivalent widths of saturated metal lines.

  3. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    George E. Dzyacky

    2010-11-23

    The Flooding Predictor™ is a patented advanced control technology proven in research at the Separations Research Program, University of Texas at Austin, to increase distillation column throughput by over 6%, while also increasing energy efficiency by 10%. The research was conducted under a U. S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement awarded to George Dzyacky of 2ndpoint, LLC. The Flooding Predictor™ works by detecting the incipient flood point and controlling the column closer to its actual hydraulic limit than historical practices have allowed. Further, the technology uses existing column instrumentation, meaning no additional refining infrastructure is required. Refiners often push distillation columns to maximize throughput, improve separation, or simply to achieve day-to-day optimization. Attempting to achieve such operating objectives is a tricky undertaking that can result in flooding. Operators and advanced control strategies alike rely on the conventional use of delta-pressure instrumentation to approximate the column’s approach to flood. But column delta-pressure is more an inference of the column’s approach to flood than it is an actual measurement of it. As a consequence, delta pressure limits are established conservatively in order to operate in a regime where the column is never expected to flood. As a result, there is much “left on the table” when operating in such a regime, i.e. the capacity difference between controlling the column to an upper delta-pressure limit and controlling it to the actual hydraulic limit. The Flooding Predictor™, an innovative pattern recognition technology, controls columns at their actual hydraulic limit, which research shows leads to a throughput increase of over 6%. Controlling closer to the hydraulic limit also permits operation in a sweet spot of increased energy-efficiency. In this region of increased column loading, the Flooding Predictor is able to exploit the benefits of higher liquid

  4. Development of an Airborne Triple-Pulse 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong; Antill, Charles W.; Remus, Ruben

    2016-01-01

    This presentation will provide status and details of an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar being developed at NASA Langley Research Center with support from NASA ESTO Instrument Incubator Program. The development of this active optical remote sensing IPDA instrument is targeted for measuring both atmospheric carbon dioxide and water vapor in the atmosphere from an airborne platform. This presentation will focus on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of seed laser locking, wavelength control, receiver and detector upgrades, laser packaging and lidar integration. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will also be presented.

  5. Nuclear reactor control column

    SciTech Connect

    Bachovchin, D.M.

    1982-08-10

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest crosssectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  6. Nuclear reactor control column

    DOEpatents

    Bachovchin, Dennis M.

    1982-01-01

    The nuclear reactor control column comprises a column disposed within the nuclear reactor core having a variable cross-section hollow channel and containing balls whose vertical location is determined by the flow of the reactor coolant through the column. The control column is divided into three basic sections wherein each of the sections has a different cross-sectional area. The uppermost section of the control column has the greatest cross-sectional area, the intermediate section of the control column has the smallest cross-sectional area, and the lowermost section of the control column has the intermediate cross-sectional area. In this manner, the area of the uppermost section can be established such that when the reactor coolant is flowing under normal conditions therethrough, the absorber balls will be lifted and suspended in a fluidized bed manner in the upper section. However, when the reactor coolant flow falls below a predetermined value, the absorber balls will fall through the intermediate section and into the lowermost section, thereby reducing the reactivity of the reactor core and shutting down the reactor.

  7. Velocity resolved [C ii], [C i], and CO observations of the N159 star-forming region in the Large Magellanic Cloud: a complex velocity structure and variation of the column densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Yoko; Requena-Torres, Miguel Angel; Güsten, Rolf; Stutzki, Jürgen; Wiesemeyer, Helmut; Pütz, Patrick; Ricken, Oliver

    2015-08-01

    particular between the different species. At most positions the [C ii] emission line profile is substantially wider than that of CO and [C i]. We estimated the fraction of the [C ii] integrated line emission that cannot be fitted by the CO line profile to be 20% around the CO cores, and up to 50% at the area between the cores, indicating a gas component that has a much larger velocity dispersion than the ones probed by the CO and [C i] emission. We derived the relative contribution from C+, C, and CO to the column density in each velocity bin. The result clearly shows that the contribution from C+ dominates the velocity range far from the velocities traced by the dense molecular gas. Spatially, the region located between the CO cores of N159 W and E has a higher fraction of C+ over the whole velocity range. We estimate the contribution of the ionized gas to the [C ii] emission using the ratio to the [N ii] emission, and find that the ionized gas contributes ≤19% to the [C ii] emission at its peak position, and ≤15% over the whole observed region. Using the integrated line intensities, we present the spatial distribution of I[CII]/IFIR. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that the [C ii] emission in the LMC N159 region shows significantly different velocity profiles from that of CO and [C i] emissions, emphasizing the importance of velocity resolved observations in order to distinguish different cloud components.

  8. Infrared measurements of column abundances of several trace gases in the Antarctic atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murcray, F. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1988-01-01

    Atmospheric emission measurements were made in 1978 from an LC 130 aircraft from Point Mugu, CA, to McMurdo Station, Antarctica, and from McMurdo over the Antarctic continent on several different flights. These included a number of flights over the South Pole. In December 1980, infrared solar spectra were obtained from the ground at South Pole Station. Infrared solar spectra were also obtained from South Pole during late November and early December of 1986. These latter measurements were extended to cover additional spectral regions to obtain column densities of a number of additional constituents. The results obtained from these measurement series are reviewed and, where measurements were made during both periods, compared. Spectral absorption or emission features due to HNO3, NO, NO2, HCl, (H-16)2O, (H-18)2O, HDO, CH4, and N2O were used to obtain data on the total column abundances for these compounds.

  9. X-ray Emission and Absorption Lines During the SSS Phase of RS Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönrich, R. A.; Ness, J.-U.

    2008-12-01

    The high-resolution X-ray spectra of the sixth outburst of RS Ophiuchi revealed P Cygni-like line profiles. We use the column densities of selected isolated absorption lines to derive the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio. We next discuss the origin of the emission lines, which may originate from the shock, and the absorption and emission lines may thus have a different formation history. Finally, we discuss the correlation of high-amplitude variability detected during the early SSS phase with variability in the hardness ratio that follows the same pattern but is shifted by 1000~sec.

  10. A survey of local interstellar hydrogen from OAO-2 observations of Lyman alpha absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, B. D.; Jenkins, E. B.

    1972-01-01

    The Wisconsin far ultraviolet spectrometer aboard OAO-2 observed the wavelength region near 1216 A for 69 stars of spectral type B2 or earlier. From the strength of the observed interstellar L sub alpha absorption, atomic hydrogen column densities were derived over distances averaging 300 pc away from the sun. The OAO data were compared to synthetic ultraviolet spectra, originally derived from earlier higher resolution rocket observations, which were computer processed to simulate the effects of absorption by different amounts of hydrogen followed by the instrumental blending.

  11. Microminiature gas chromatographic column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donaldson, R. W., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    Techniques commonly used for fabrication of integrated circuits are utilized to produce long capillary tubes for microminiature chromatographs. Method involves bonding of flat silicon plate to top of spirally grooved silicon chip to close groove and form capillary column.

  12. Distillation Column Flooding Predictor

    SciTech Connect

    2002-02-01

    This factsheet describes a research project whose goal is to develop the flooding predictor, an advanced process control strategy, into a universally useable tool that will maximize the separation yield of a distillation column.

  13. Evolution of high-redshift Lyman-limit absorption systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lanzetta, K.M. )

    1991-07-01

    Results are presented of a new spectroscopic survey of high-redshift Lyman-limit absorption systems. Based on this data set, the rate of incidence of the Lyman-limit systems with z greater than about 2.5 is found to evolve strongly with redshift in the sense that the product of the number density per unit comoving volume and the absorption cross section increases with increasing redshift. If the observed evolution indicates intrinsic evolution of the absorbers, this result suggests that the evolution detected previously for the C IV-selected absorbers over a similar redshift range is not naturally interpreted as evolution of the ionization level of the absorbers rather than as a chemical enrichment effect. The data are also used to investigate the H I column density distribution and to examine the multiple-component structure of the absorbing complexes. The H I column density distribution is found to be well fitted by a power-law form. 35 refs.

  14. Evaluation of Air Pollution Applications of AERONET and MODIS Aerosol Column Optical Depth by Comparison with In Situ Measurements of Aerosol Light Scattering and Absorption for Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loria Salazar, S.; Arnott, W. P.; Moosmuller, H.; Colucci, D.

    2012-12-01

    Reno, Nevada, USA is subject to typical urban aerosol, wind-blown dust, and occasional biomass burning smoke from anthropogenic and natural fires. Reno has complex air flow at levels relevant for aerosol transport. At times recirculating mountain and urban flow arrives from the Sierra Nevada, San Francisco, CA and Sacramento, CA. The urban plumes are further modified by biogenic forest emissions and secondary aerosol formation during transport over the Sierra Nevada Mountains to Reno. This complicates the use of MODIS aerosol optical depth (AOD) for air quality measurements in Reno. Our laboratory at the University of Nevada Reno has collocated multispectral photoacoustic instruments and reciprocal nephelometers to measure light absorption and light scattering coefficients as well as an AERONET operated CIMEL CE-318 ground-based sunphotometer. Preliminary measurements from August 2011 indicate substantially larger Cimel AOD than could be accounted for by use of the in situ aerosol extinction measurements combined with mixing height estimate. This poster presents new results comparing AERONET AOD and single scattering albedo and MODIS AOD with in situ measurements for summer and fall 2012, along with extensive back trajectory analysis, to evaluate conditions when satellite measurement may be useful for air pollution applications in Reno.

  15. Towards Atomic Column-by-Column Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Pennycook, S.J.; Rafferty, B.

    1998-09-06

    The optical arrangement of the scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) is ideally suited for performing analysis of individual atomic columns in materials. Using the incoherent Z-contrast image as a reference, and arranging incoherent conditions also for the spectroscopy, a precise correspondence is ensured between features in the inelastic image and elastic signals. In this way the exact probe position needed to maximise the inelastic signal from a selected column can be located and monitored during the analysis using the much higher intensity elastic signal. Although object functions for EELS are typically less than 1 {Angstrom} full width at half maximum, this is still an order of magnitude larger than the corresponding object functions for elastic (or diffuse) scattering used to form the Z-contrast image. Therefore the analysis is performed with an effective probe that is significantly broader than that used for the reference Z-contrast image. For a 2.2 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is of the order of 2.5 {Angstrom}, while for a 1.3 {Angstrom} probe the effective probe is 1.6 {Angstrom}. Such increases in effective probe size can significantly reduce or even eliminate contrast between atomic columns that are visible in the image. However, this is only true if we consider circular collector apertures. Calculations based upon the theory of Maslen and Rossouw (Maslen and Rossouw 1984; Rossouw and Maslen 1984) show that employing an annular aperture can reduce the FWHM of the inelastic object function down to values close 0.1 {Angstrom}. With practical aperture sizes it should be possible to achieve this increased spatial resolution without loosing too much signal.

  16. A combined strategy of mass fragmentation, post-column cobalt complexation and shift in ultraviolet absorption spectra to determine the uridine 5'-diphospho-glucuronosyltransferase metabolism profiling of flavones after oral administration of a flavone mixture in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Wang, Liping; Dai, Peimin; Zeng, Xuejun; Qi, Xiaoxiao; Zhu, Lijun; Yan, Tongmeng; Wang, Ying; Lu, Linlin; Hu, Ming; Wang, Xinchun; Liu, Zhongqiu

    2015-05-22

    The use of dietary flavones is becoming increasingly popular for their prevention of cancers, cardiovascular diseases, and other diseases. Despite many pharmacokinetic studies on flavone mixtures, the position(s) of glucuronidation sites on the flavone skeleton in vivo remain(s) uncertain because of the lack of a convenient method to differentiate the isomers in biological samples. Accordingly, this study aimed to develop a new strategy to identify the position of the mono-O-glucuronide of flavones in vivo and to simultaneously determine the parent agent and its major metabolites responsible for complex pharmacokinetic characteristics. The novel strategy involves accurate mass measurements of flavone glucuronides, their [Co(II) (flavone glucuronide-H) (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline)2](+) complexes generated via the post-column addition of CoBr2 and 4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline, and their mass spectrometric fragmentation by UPLC-DAD-Q-TOF and the comparison of retention times with biosynthesized standards of different isomers that were identified by analyzing the shift in UV spectra compared with the spectra of their respective aglycones. We successfully generated a metabolite profiling of flavones in rat plasma after oral administration of a flavone mixture from Dracocephalum moldavica L., which was used here as the model to demonstrate the strategy. Twelve flavone glucuronides, which were glucuronidated derivatives of acacetin, apigenin, luteolin, diosmetin, chrysoeriol and cirsimaritin, were detected and identified. Glucuronidation of the flavone skeleton at the 3'-/7-position was more prevalent, however, luteolin 4'-glucuronide levels exceeded luteolin 7-glucuronide levels. Based on the UDP-glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) metabolism profiling of flavones in rat plasma, six main compounds (tilianin, acacetin 7-glucuronide, apigenin 7-glucuronide, luteolin 3'-glucuronide, acacetin, and apigenin) were selected as pharmacokinetic markers. Pharmacokinetic

  17. Optimally focused cold atom systems obtained using density-density correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Putra, Andika; Campbell, Daniel L.; Price, Ryan M.; Spielman, I. B.; De, Subhadeep

    2014-01-15

    Resonant absorption imaging is a common technique for detecting the two-dimensional column density of ultracold atom systems. In many cases, the system's thickness along the imaging direction greatly exceeds the imaging system's depth of field, making the identification of the optimally focused configuration difficult. Here we describe a systematic technique for bringing Bose-Einstein condensates (BEC) and other cold-atom systems into an optimal focus even when the ratio of the thickness to the depth of field is large: a factor of 8 in this demonstration with a BEC. This technique relies on defocus-induced artifacts in the Fourier-transformed density-density correlation function (the power spectral density, PSD). The spatial frequency at which these artifacts first appear in the PSD is maximized on focus; the focusing process therefore both identifies and maximizes the range of spatial frequencies over which the PSD is uncontaminated by finite-thickness effects.

  18. A Blind Green Bank Telescope Millimeter-wave Survey for Redshifted Molecular Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-01

    We present the methodology for "blind" millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO+ rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z >~ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is "blind," i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H2 column densities >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2 in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H2 and HCO+-to-H2 conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H2) >~ 3 × 1021 cm-2.

  19. A blind green bank telescope millimeter-wave survey for redshifted molecular absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Kanekar, N.; Gupta, A.; Carilli, C. L.; Stocke, J. T.; Willett, K. W.

    2014-02-10

    We present the methodology for 'blind' millimeter-wave surveys for redshifted molecular absorption in the CO/HCO{sup +} rotational lines. The frequency range 30-50 GHz appears optimal for such surveys, providing sensitivity to absorbers at z ≳ 0.85. It is critical that the survey is 'blind', i.e., based on a radio-selected sample, including sources without known redshifts. We also report results from the first large survey of this kind, using the Q-band receiver on the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) to search for molecular absorption toward 36 sources, 3 without known redshifts, over the frequency range 39.6-49.5 GHz. The GBT survey has a total redshift path of Δz ≈ 24, mostly at 0.81 < z < 1.91, and a sensitivity sufficient to detect equivalent H{sub 2} column densities ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} in absorption at 5σ significance (using CO-to-H{sub 2} and HCO{sup +}-to-H{sub 2} conversion factors of the Milky Way). The survey yielded no confirmed detections of molecular absorption, yielding the 2σ upper limit n(z = 1.2) < 0.15 on the redshift number density of molecular gas at column densities N(H{sub 2}) ≳ 3 × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2}.

  20. Impact of energy-related pollutants on chromosome structure. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1980. IQUID COLUMN CHROMATOGRAPHY; ABSORPTION SPECTRA; COMPUTER CODES; DICHROISM; EQUIPMENT INTERFACES; MICROPROCESSORS; SPECTROPHOTOMETERS; ; CARBON 13; COMPLEXES; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Methods for rapidly analyzing methylated and ethylated nucleosides and bases by high pressure liquid chromatography were investigated. Deoxyribonucleotides were alkylated with alkyl iodides and dialkyl sulfates. Several unreported products of the reactions of methyl and ethyl iodide in dimethylsulfoxide were found and are being characterized. The Cary 219 UV-Vis spectrophotometer was interfaced to a microcomputer and several utility programs were written. Preliminary absorption and circular dichroism studies of the binding of ethidium to DNA and nucleosome cores showed binding to cores to be quite different from binding to DNA. Free radical and additional reactions of bisulfite with DNA in chromatin were examined. Free radical attack was minimal. Some conversion of cytosine to uracil was noted, but protein crosslinking to DNA was not detected. The first valid natural abundance /sup 13/C nmr spectra of double-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA complexed with ethidium were obtained. These spectra suggested that DNA undergoes considerable internal motion. The data show that 13-C nmr studies of the conformational and motional properties of native DNA and of complexes of native DNA with small molecules are practical and promising. Studies of subnucleosomes derived from nucleosomes were completed. Based on these studies, a model of the linear arrangement of histone C-terminal and N-terminal chain regions along nucleosome DNA was proposed. The use of staphylococcal protease to probe histone conformations in nucleosomes was explored. Preliminary data indicate that H3 is much more susceptible to protease than other core histones, and is cleaved in its hydrophobic domain. A procedure for fractionating chromatin was alos developed. (ERB)

  1. Advanced IMCW Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS CO2 Column Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel; lin, bing; nehrir, amin; harrison, fenton; obland, michael

    2015-04-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation.

  2. Electronic Absorption Spectra of Neutral Perylene (C20H12), Terrylene (C30H16), and Quaterrylene (C40H20) and their Positive and Negative Ions: Ne Matrix-Isolation Spectroscopy and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halasinski, Thomas M.; Weisman, Jennifer L.; Lee, Timothy J.; Salama, Farid; Head-Gordon, Martin; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a full experimental and theoretical study of an interesting series of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, the oligorylenes. The absorption spectra of perylene, terrylene and quaterrylene in neutral, cationic and anionic charge states are obtained by matrix-isolation spectroscopy in Ne. The experimental spectra are dominated by a bright state that red shifts with growing molecular size. Excitation energies and state symmetry assignments are supported by calculations using time dependent density functional theory methods. These calculations also provide new insight into the observed trends in oscillator strength and excitation energy for the bright states: the oscillator strength per unit mass of carbon increases along the series.

  3. Eruption column physics

    SciTech Connect

    Valentine, G.A.

    1997-03-01

    In this paper the author focuses on the fluid dynamics of large-scale eruption columns. The dynamics of these columns are rooted in multiphase flow phenomena, so a major part of the paper sets up a foundation on that topic that allows one to quickly assess the inherent assumptions made in various theoretical and experimental approaches. The first part is centered on a set of complex differential equations that describe eruption columns, but the focus is on a general understanding of important physical processes rather than on the mathematics. The author discusses briefly the relative merits and weaknesses of different approaches, emphasizing that the largest advances in understanding are made by combining them. He then focuses on dynamics of steady eruption columns and then on transient phenomena. Finally he briefly reviews the effects of varying behavior of the ambient medium through which an eruption column moves. These final sections will emphasize concepts and a qualitative understanding of eruption dynamics. This paper relies on principles of continuum mechanics and transport processes but does not go into detail on the development of those principles. 36 refs., 36 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Improving the accuracy of S02 column densities and emission rates obtained from upward-looking UV-spectroscopic measurements of volcanic plumes by taking realistic radiative transfer into account

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kern, Christoph; Deutschmann, Tim; Werner, Cynthia; Sutton, A. Jeff; Elias, Tamar; Kelly, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is monitored using ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy at numerous volcanoes around the world due to its importance as a measure of volcanic activity and a tracer for other gaseous species. Recent studies have shown that failure to take realistic radiative transfer into account during the spectral retrieval of the collected data often leads to large errors in the calculated emission rates. Here, the framework for a new evaluation method which couples a radiative transfer model to the spectral retrieval is described. In it, absorption spectra are simulated, and atmospheric parameters are iteratively updated in the model until a best match to the measurement data is achieved. The evaluation algorithm is applied to two example Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) measurements conducted at Kilauea volcano (Hawaii). The resulting emission rates were 20 and 90% higher than those obtained with a conventional DOAS retrieval performed between 305 and 315 nm, respectively, depending on the different SO2 and aerosol loads present in the volcanic plume. The internal consistency of the method was validated by measuring and modeling SO2 absorption features in a separate wavelength region around 375 nm and comparing the results. Although additional information about the measurement geometry and atmospheric conditions is needed in addition to the acquired spectral data, this method for the first time provides a means of taking realistic three-dimensional radiative transfer into account when analyzing UV-spectral absorption measurements of volcanic SO2 plumes.

  5. Probing the Absorption Structures in Seyfert Galaxies with X-ray Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelbord, J.

    2001-12-01

    The paradigm of the unified model for Seyfert galaxies has had many successes in explaining the range of phenomena observed in active galaxies. However, the structures invoked in this scenario have been difficult to observe due to their limited sizes and due to contaminating flux from other regions. As a result, some of these structures, notably the putative obscuring torus, are poorly constrained. The difficulty in isolating the emission from the central regions can be mitigated (but not eliminated!) by focusing upon high-energy radiation, which is dominated by direct and reprocessed radiation from the nuclear region. We have drawn upon the large number of X-ray spectra available in the ASCA archive in order to study the distribution of properties in a large sample of high-energy observations. Furthermore, by uniformly processing the data ourselves, we minimize systematic effects. One asset of X-rays is that they provide a sensitive probe of absorbers in the line of sight toward the central region, because photoelectric absorption cuts off the continuum at low energies. In the ASCA bandpass column densities of ~1021-23 cm-2 can be measured. This is an interesting range of densities because it allows us to distinguish between absorption in a torus or possibly a warped accretion disk (where column densities are expected to be high) and absorption taking place at larger scales in the host galaxy (where column densities are expected to be closer to Galactic values of 1020-21 cm-2). This data is then compared to data from other wavebands. Published radio studies (e.g.: Nagar & Wilson 1999, Kinney et al. 2000) have put constraints on the orientations of the accretion systems in Seyfert galaxies. We combine these and the X-ray measurements for the ~50 sources in these studies which have ASCA data in order to constrain the various possible absorption structures and test the unification scenario.

  6. Abundances in 8 QSO Absorption Line Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauroesch, James Thomas

    1995-01-01

    An analysis is given of high resolution observations of metal-absorption line systems in the spectra of 4 QSOs made with the echelle spectrograph on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory. High spectral -resolution (9 to 18 km cdot s^{ -1}) observations were obtained for the QSOs S5 0014 + 813, H 0913 + 072, B2 1225 + 317, and HS 1946 + 7658; column densities were derived for the heavy element line systems. Abundances and/or abundance ratios have been determined for 8 systems and a variety of H I column densities in the redshift range 1-3.4 are probed. The systems studies are generally relatively poor in heavy elements, and appear to be similar in heavy element abundances to the gas out of which the Galactic halo stars of similar metallicity formed. Indications of the halo star-abundance sample include the observed ratios of (N/Si), (Al/Si), and (Mn/Fe). The existence of associated H II regions is inferred for a number of damped systems, and it is suggested that the possibly significant amount of gas in H II regions in damped Lyman-alpha systems can be constrained by the comparison of the column densities of O I, N I, N II, Si II, and S II in these systems. The ratio of N(Al II)/N(Al III) is shown to be a poor indicator of the amount of ionized gas in some cases. The abundances of Si as determined from N(Si II)/N(H I) suggest that there is a relatively rapid decrease in abundances in these systems at z _sp{ ~}> 2. Such a decrease in abundances is what would be expected if the galactic (thin) disks did not form before redshifts of z {~} 2. The use of Si II is important, since the weakness of the Zn II lines at low abundances (due to the low relative abundance of Zn compared to elements such as Si) will result in few detections, and in upper limits that are difficult to interpret. The observed drop in abundances is consistent with the decrease in number of heavy-element absorption systems at high redshifts, a result that is found in

  7. Intercomparison of NO column measurements during MAP/GLOBUS 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Matthews, W. A.; Kondo, Y.; Zander, R.; Demoulin, PH.; Fabian, P.; Murcray, D. G.; Murcray, F. J.; Lado-Bordowsky, O.; Mcpeters, D.

    1988-01-01

    Simultaneous NO column measurements made in France in September, 1985, using several techniques, are compared with one another. The observed NO distributions vary significantly from day to day. It is shown that NO measurements using IR or UV absorption are self-consistent and show good agreement with predictions from a one-dimensional photochemical model. In situ chemiluminescent measurements produced NO columns which were systematically higher than those predicted.

  8. TCAP HYDROGEN ISOTOPE SEPARATION USING PALLADIUM AND INVERSE COLUMNS

    SciTech Connect

    Heung, L.; Sessions, H.; Xiao, S.

    2010-08-31

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) was further studied with a new configuration. Previous configuration used a palladium packed column and a plug flow reverser (PFR). This new configuration uses an inverse column to replace the PFR. The goal was to further improve performance. Both configurations were experimentally tested. The results showed that the new configuration increased the throughput by a factor of more than 2.

  9. Vitamin D receptor gene BsmI-polymorphism in Finnish premenopausal and postmenopausal women: its association with bone mineral density, markers of bone turnover, and intestinal calcium absorption, with adjustment for lifestyle factors.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Marika; Kärkkäinen, Merja; Outila, Terhi; Vanninen, Tarja; Ray, Carola; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel

    2002-01-01

    Bone mineral density (BMD) is regulated by genetic and environmental factors. Sixty percent to 80% of bone mass is suggested to be under polygenetic control, but the role of individual genes seems to be modest. Several studies have indicated that the vitamin D receptor ( VDR) gene has a role in the regulation of BMD and bone metabolism, but the results are very controversial. We studied the associations between BsmI-polymorphism of the VDR gene and BMD and bone metabolism in 24 premenopausal (aged 22-45 years) and 69 postmenopausal (aged 48-65 years) Finnish women. The BMD of the lumbar spine and femoral neck and bone turnover markers were measured, and the intestinal calcium absorption was investigated, using a method based on the absorption of non-radioactive strontium. The genotype distribution was 16%, BB; 34.5%, Bb; and 49.5%, bb, which differs from the genotype distribution found in other Caucasian populations, but is similar to earlier Finnish reports. The winter value of 25-hydroxyvitamin-D (25-OH-D) was highest for the BB genotype in both age groups (analysis of covariance [ANCOVA]; premenopausal women P = 0.5, postmenopausal women P = 0.03, and for the groups combined P = 0.02). Lumbar spine BMD and intestinal strontium absorption were highest for the BB genotype in both age groups, but these results were nonsignificant. The markers of bone metabolism did not differ significantly between the VDR genotypes. The BB genotype had the best vitamin D status, which could explain the differences in calcium absorption between the genotypes. However, the conclusions of our study are limited because of the small number of subjects. PMID:12434167

  10. A Column Dispersion Experiment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corapcioglu, M. Y.; Koroglu, F.

    1982-01-01

    Crushed glass and a Rhodamine B solution are used in a one-dimensional optically scanned column experiment to study the dispersion phenomenon in porous media. Results indicate that the described model gave satisfactory results and that the dispersion process in this experiment is basically convective. (DC)

  11. Columns in Clay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leenhouts, Robin

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a clay project for students studying Greece and Rome. It provides a wonderful way to learn slab construction techniques by making small clay column capitols. With this lesson, students learn architectural vocabulary and history, understand the importance of classical architectural forms and their influence on today's…

  12. Quasar Outflow Constraints using Broad Absorption Line Variability Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGraw, Sean; Shields, Joseph C.; Hamann, Fred; Capellupo, Daniel M.; Gallagher, Sarah; Brandt, W. Niel; Herbst, Hanna

    2016-01-01

    Quasar outflows are plausible candidates for AGN feedback processes influencing the host galaxy and may explain the established correlations between the supermassive black hole (SMBH) and the surrounding bulge. In order to better understand feedback and the physical conditions of the outflowing gas, observational constraints on absorber kinematics and energetics are needed. We are utilizing multiple epoch, rest frame UV quasar spectra to establish limits on outflow locations and total column densities for the purpose of estimating wind kinetic energies and momenta. We are also investigating the variability patterns of broad absorption lines (BALs) and mini-BALs across a range of ionization states to probe underlying connections between the various classes of absorbers. This work employs observations from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, Hobby Eberly Telescope, and MDM observatory. We detect BAL variability in 3 out of 12 FeLoBAL quasars over multiple year timescales and conclude that the variable absorbers lie within tens of parsecs of the SMBH based on interpretations of the Fe II and Mg II BALS. We also measure significant BAL changes across daily to yearly timescales in a sample of 71 quasars with plausible detections of the P V 1117,1128 BAL. Detecting phosphorus in absorption is notable because it traces high column density outflows and is therefore relevant for studying AGN feedback. Constraints on outflow energetics and other selected results will be presented.

  13. COMPARING SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE MASS DERIVED FROM CORONAL ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Kucera, Therese; Alexander, David

    2011-01-20

    In a previous study, Gilbert et al. derived the column density and total mass of solar prominences using a new technique, which measures how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (195 A) spectral band is absorbed by prominence material, while considering the effects of both foreground and background radiation. In the present work, we apply this method to a sample of prominence observations in three different wavelength regimes: one in which only H{sup 0} is ionized (504 A < {lambda} < 911 A), a second where both H{sup 0} and He{sup 0} are ionized (228 A < {lambda} < 504 A), and finally at wavelengths where H{sup 0}, He{sup 0}, and He{sup +} are all ionized ({lambda} < 228 A). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al., permits the separation of the contributions of neutral hydrogen and helium to the total column density in prominences. Additionally, an enhancement of the technique allowed the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the column density from the continuum absorption in each extreme-ultraviolet observation. We find the total prominence mass is consistently lower in the 625 A observations compared to lines in the other wavelength regimes. There is a significant difference in total mass between the 625 A and 195 A lines, indicating the much higher opacity at 625 A is causing a saturation of the continuum absorption and thus, a potentially large underestimation of mass.

  14. Comparing Spatial Distributions of Solar Prominence Mass Derived from Coronal Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2011-01-01

    In a previous study, Gilbert et al. derived the column density and total mass of solar prominences using a new technique, which measures how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (195 Å) spectral band is absorbed by prominence material, while considering the effects of both foreground and background radiation. In the present work, we apply this method to a sample of prominence observations in three different wavelength regimes: one in which only H0 is ionized (504 Å < λ < 911 Å), a second where both H0 and He0 are ionized (228 Å < λ < 504 Å), and finally at wavelengths where H0, He0, and He+ are all ionized (λ < 228 Å). This approach, first suggested by Kucera et al., permits the separation of the contributions of neutral hydrogen and helium to the total column density in prominences. Additionally, an enhancement of the technique allowed the calculation of the two-dimensional (2D) spatial distribution of the column density from the continuum absorption in each extreme-ultraviolet observation. We find the total prominence mass is consistently lower in the 625 Å observations compared to lines in the other wavelength regimes. There is a significant difference in total mass between the 625 Å and 195 Å lines, indicating the much higher opacity at 625 Å is causing a saturation of the continuum absorption and thus, a potentially large underestimation of mass.

  15. Direct measurement of interstellar extinction toward young stars using atomic hydrogen Lyα absorption

    SciTech Connect

    McJunkin, Matthew; France, Kevin; Brown, Alexander; Schneider, P. C.; Herczeg, Gregory J.; Hillenbrand, Lynne; Schindhelm, Eric; Edwards, Suzan

    2014-01-10

    Interstellar reddening corrections are necessary to reconstruct the intrinsic spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of accreting protostellar systems. The stellar SED determines the heating and chemical processes that can occur in circumstellar disks. Measurement of neutral hydrogen absorption against broad Lyα emission profiles in young stars can be used to obtain the total H I column density (N(H I)) along the line of sight. We measure N(H I) with new and archival ultraviolet observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) of 31 classical T Tauri and Herbig Ae/Be stars. The H I column densities range from log{sub 10}(N(H I)) ≈19.6-21.1, with corresponding visual extinctions of A{sub V} =0.02-0.72 mag, assuming an R{sub V} of 3.1. We find that the majority of the H I absorption along the line of sight likely comes from interstellar rather than circumstellar material. Extinctions derived from new HST blue-optical spectral analyses, previous IR and optical measurements, and new X-ray column densities on average overestimate the interstellar extinction toward young stars compared to the N(H I) values by ∼0.6 mag. We discuss possible explanations for this discrepancy in the context of a protoplanetary disk geometry.

  16. Mini-columns for Conducting Breakthrough Experiments. Design and Construction

    SciTech Connect

    Dittrich, Timothy M.; Reimus, Paul William; Ware, Stuart Douglas

    2015-06-11

    Experiments with moderately and strongly sorbing radionuclides (i.e., U, Cs, Am) have shown that sorption between experimental solutions and traditional column materials must be accounted for to accurately determine stationary phase or porous media sorption properties (i.e., sorption site density, sorption site reaction rate coefficients, and partition coefficients or Kd values). This report details the materials and construction of mini-columns for use in breakthrough columns to allow for accurate measurement and modeling of sorption parameters. Material selection, construction techniques, wet packing of columns, tubing connections, and lessons learned are addressed.

  17. Column solid phase extraction and flame atomic absorption spectrometric determination of manganese(II) and iron(III) ions in water, food and biological samples using 3-(1-methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid on synthesized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza; Sehat, Ali Akbari; Arabieh, Masoud; Yousefi, Seyed Reza; Hosseini, Majid Haji; Rezaee, Mohammad

    2014-02-01

    A modified, selective, highly sensitive and accurate procedure for the determination of trace amounts of manganese and iron ions is established in the presented work. 3-(1-Methyl-1H-pyrrol-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole-5-carboxylic acid (MPPC) and graphene oxide (GO) were used in a glass column as chelating reagent and as adsorbent respectively prior to their determination by flame atomic absorption spectrometry. The adsorption mechanism of titled metals complexes on GO was investigated by using computational chemistry approach based on PM6 semi-empirical potential energy surface (PES). The effect of some parameters including pH, flow rate and volume of sample and type, volume and concentration of eluent, as well as the adsorption capacity of matrix ions on the recovery of Mn(II) and Fe(III) was investigated. The limit of detection was 145 and 162 ng L(-1) for Mn(II) and Fe(III), respectively. Calibration was linear over the range of 0.31-355 μg L(-1) for Mn(II) and 0.34-380 μg L(-1) for Fe(III) ions. The method was successfully applied for the determination of understudied ions in water, food and biological samples. PMID:24411390

  18. 11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. TIMBER COLUMN AND CAST IRON COLUMN CAP IN FIFTH FLOOR WAREHOUSE SPACE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Commercial & Industrial Buildings, Becker-Hazelton Company Warehouse, 280 Iowa Street, Dubuque, Dubuque County, IA

  19. The nature of chemical bonding in actinide and lanthanide ferrocyanides determined by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Dumas, Thomas; Guillaumont, Dominique; Fillaux, Clara; Scheinost, Andreas; Moisy, Philippe; Petit, Sébastien; Shuh, David K; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Den Auwer, Christophe

    2016-01-28

    The electronic properties of actinide cations are of fundamental interest to describe intramolecular interactions and chemical bonding in the context of nuclear waste reprocessing or direct storage. The 5f and 6d orbitals are the first partially or totally vacant states in these elements, and the nature of the actinide ligand bonds is related to their ability to overlap with ligand orbitals. Because of its chemical and orbital selectivities, X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is an effective probe of actinide species frontier orbitals and for understanding actinide cation reactivity toward chelating ligands. The soft X-ray probes of the light elements provide better resolution than actinide L3-edges to obtain electronic information from the ligand. Thus coupling simulations to experimental soft X-ray spectral measurements and complementary quantum chemical calculations yields quantitative information on chemical bonding. In this study, soft X-ray XAS at the K-edges of C and N, and the L2,3-edges of Fe was used to investigate the electronic structures of the well-known ferrocyanide complexes K4Fe(II)(CN)6, thorium hexacyanoferrate Th(IV)Fe(II)(CN)6, and neodymium hexacyanoferrate KNd(III)Fe(II)(CN)6. The soft X-ray spectra were simulated based on quantum chemical calculations. Our results highlight the orbital overlapping effects and atomic effective charges in the Fe(II)(CN)6 building block. In addition to providing a detailed description of the electronic structure of the ferrocyanide complex (K4Fe(II)(CN)6), the results strongly contribute to confirming the actinide 5f and 6d orbital oddity in comparison to lanthanide 4f and 5d. PMID:26733312

  20. Slurry bubble column hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rados, Novica

    Slurry bubble column reactors are presently used for a wide range of reactions in both chemical and biochemical industry. The successful design and scale up of slurry bubble column reactors require a complete understanding of multiphase fluid dynamics, i.e. phase mixing, heat and mass transport characteristics. The primary objective of this thesis is to improve presently limited understanding of the gas-liquid-solid slurry bubble column hydrodynamics. The effect of superficial gas velocity (8 to 45 cm/s), pressure (0.1 to 1.0 MPa) and solids loading (20 and 35 wt.%) on the time-averaged solids velocity and turbulent parameter profiles has been studied using Computer Automated Radioactive Particle Tracking (CARPT). To accomplish this, CARPT technique has been significantly improved for the measurements in highly attenuating systems, such as high pressure, high solids loading stainless steel slurry bubble column. At a similar set of operational conditions time-averaged gas and solids holdup profiles have been evaluated using the developed Computed Tomography (CT)/Overall gas holdup procedure. This procedure is based on the combination of the CT scans and the overall gas holdup measurements. The procedure assumes constant solids loading in the radial direction and axially invariant cross-sectionally averaged gas holdup. The obtained experimental holdup, velocity and turbulent parameters data are correlated and compared with the existing low superficial gas velocities and atmospheric pressure CARPT/CT gas-liquid and gas-liquid-solid slurry data. The obtained solids axial velocity radial profiles are compared with the predictions of the one dimensional (1-D) liquid/slurry recirculation phenomenological model. The obtained solids loading axial profiles are compared with the predictions of the Sedimentation and Dispersion Model (SDM). The overall gas holdup values, gas holdup radial profiles, solids loading axial profiles, solids axial velocity radial profiles and solids

  1. THE COS-HALOS SURVEY: AN EMPIRICAL DESCRIPTION OF METAL-LINE ABSORPTION IN THE LOW-REDSHIFT CIRCUMGALACTIC MEDIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tripp, Todd M.; O'Meara, John M.; Peeples, Molly S.

    2013-02-15

    We present the equivalent width and column density measurements for low and intermediate ionization states of the circumgalactic medium (CGM) surrounding 44 low-z, L Almost-Equal-To L* galaxies drawn from the COS-Halos survey. These measurements are derived from far-UV transitions observed in HST/COS and Keck/HIRES spectra of background quasars within an impact parameter R < 160 kpc to the targeted galaxies. The data show significant metal-line absorption for 33 of the 44 galaxies, including quiescent systems, revealing the common occurrence of a cool (T Almost-Equal-To 10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} K), metal-enriched CGM. The detection rates and column densities derived for these metal lines decrease with increasing impact parameter, a trend we interpret as a declining metal surface density profile for the CGM. A comparison of the relative column densities of adjacent ionization states indicates that the gas is predominantly ionized. The large surface density in metals demands a large reservoir of metals and gas in the cool CGM (very conservatively, M {sup cool} {sub CGM} > 10{sup 9} M {sub Sun }), which likely traces a distinct density and/or temperature regime from the highly ionized CGM traced by O{sup +5} absorption. The large dispersion in absorption strengths (including non-detections) suggests that the cool CGM traces a wide range of densities or a mix of local ionizing conditions. Lastly, the kinematics inferred from the metal-line profiles are consistent with the cool CGM being bound to the dark matter halos hosting the galaxies; this gas may serve as fuel for future star formation. Future work will leverage this data set to provide estimates on the mass, metallicity, dynamics, and origin of the cool CGM in low-z, L* galaxies.

  2. Global Properties of the Ejecta Absorptions in the Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G. L.; Danks, A. C.

    2002-12-01

    Between 2400A to 3160A, we have identified approximately 500 absorption line complexes, each with up to 20 velocity components. Lines of Fe I, Fe II, Ti II, V II, Ni II, Co II, Mn II, Mg I, Mg II and Na I have been identified. Surprisingly, most of the lines originate from energy levels significantly above the ground level. This is indicative of optical pumping from the Central Source. Line widths and population of various levels are non-thermal. The relative column densities change with velocity. For example, Fe II column densities for one transition arising from 0.1eV increase with ejecta velocity while Fe II column densities for another transition decreases with velocity. This may be due to softening of the ultraviolet radiation that pumps the various ions (neutrals) with velocity. If we assume that the distance of each system scales with distance from the Central Source, only a thirty percent change in distance is noted; yet the ratio of column densities for the Fe II examples given above changes by nearly thirty-fold. If the ejecta distance scales with distance from Eta Carinae, then it is likely that this ejecta originated at nearly the same time. The geometry of the Homunculus has been determined to be a double-lobed structure tilted out of the plane of the sky. We interpret the ejecta as being in the wall of the Southwest lobe, and that this wall just happens to be in line of sight from Eta Carinae to the observer. As Eta Carinae enters into the upcoming minimum, we are already seeing some evidence for changes in column densities due to changes in ultraviolet fluxes. This is reinforced by IUE observations that we have recently re-analyzed with respect to the 5.52 year (2020+/-10 days) spectroscopic period. Observations were done through STScI and funding was through the STIS GTO resources.

  3. Global Properties of the Ejecta Absorptions in the Spectrum of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.; Danks, A.

    2003-01-01

    Between 2400A to 3160A, we have identified approximately 500 absorption line complexes, each with up to 20 velocity components. Lines of Fe I, Fe II, Ti II, V II, Ni II, Co II, Mn II, Mg I, Mg II and Na I have been identified. Surprisingly, most of the lines originate from energy levels significantly above the ground level. This is indcative of optical pumping from the Central Source. Line widths and population of various levels are non-thermal. The relative column densities change with velocity. For example, Fe 11 column densities for one transition arising from approx. 0.l ev increase with ejecta velocity while Fe 11 column densities for another transition decreases with velocity. This may be due to softening of the ultraviolet radiation that pumps the various ions (neutrals) with velocity. If we assume that the distance of each system scales with distance from the Central Source, only a thirty percent change in distance is noted; yet the ratio of column densities for the Fe I1 examples given above changes by nearly thirty-fold. If the ejecta distance scales with distance from Eta Carinae, then it is likely that this ejecta originated at nearly the same time. The geometry of the Homunculus has been determined to be a double-lobed structure tilted out of the plane of the sky. We interpret the ejecta as being in the wall of the Southwest lobe, and that this wall just happens to be in line of sight from Eta Carinae to the observer. As Eta Carinae enters into the upcoming minimum, we are already seeing some evidence for changes in column densities due to changes in ultraviolet fluxes. This is reinforced by IUE observations that we have recently re-analyzed with respect to the 5.52 year (2020 +/- 10 days) spectroscopic period. Observations were done through STScI and funding was through the STIS GTO resources.

  4. Sulfur K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations on Superoxide Reductase: Role of the Axial Thiolate in Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A.; Jenney, F.E.; Jr.; Adams, M.W.W.; Johnson, M.K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.

    2009-06-02

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron enzyme that reduces superoxide to peroxide at a diffusion-controlled rate. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to investigate the ground-state electronic structure of the resting high-spin and CN- bound low-spin FeIII forms of the 1Fe SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus. A computational model with constrained imidazole rings (necessary for reproducing spin states), H-bonding interaction to the thiolate (necessary for reproducing Fe-S bond covalency of the high-spin and low-spin forms), and H-bonding to the exchangeable axial ligand (necessary to reproduce the ground state of the low-spin form) was developed and then used to investigate the enzymatic reaction mechanism. Reaction of the resting ferrous site with superoxide and protonation leading to a high-spin FeIII-OOH species and its subsequent protonation resulting in H2O2 release is calculated to be the most energetically favorable reaction pathway. Our results suggest that the thiolate acts as a covalent anionic ligand. Replacing the thiolate with a neutral noncovalent ligand makes protonation very endothermic and greatly raises the reduction potential. The covalent nature of the thiolate weakens the FeIII bond to the proximal oxygen of this hydroperoxo species, which raises its pKa by an additional 5 log units relative to the pKa of a primarily anionic ligand, facilitating its protonation. A comparison with cytochrome P450 indicates that the stronger equatorial ligand field from the porphyrin results in a low-spin FeIII-OOH species that would not be capable of efficient H2O2 release due to a spin-crossing barrier associated with formation of a high-spin 5C FeIII product. Additionally, the presence of the dianionic porphyrin pi ring in cytochrome P450 allows O-O heterolysis, forming an FeIV-oxo porphyrin radical species, which is calculated to be extremely unfavorable for the non-heme SOR ligand environment. Finally, the 5C FeIII site that results

  5. The hard X-ray emission spectra from accretion columns in intermediate polars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yi, Insu; Vishniac, Ethan T.

    1994-01-01

    We consider the hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray emission from accretion columns in an intermediate polar system, GK Per, using a simple settling solution. The rate of photon emission per logarithmic energy interval can be fitted with a power law, E(exp -gamma), with gamma approximately 2.0, in agreement with observations. This index is only weakly dependent on the mass accretion rate, dot-M, for dot-M in the range of a few times 10(exp 16-18) g/s. The peak energy of the photon spectra (after photoelectric absorption) is expected to be E(sub p) approximately (5 keV) gamma(exp -1/3) (N(sub H)/10(exp 23)/sq cm)(exp 1/3) where N(sub H) is the hydrogen column density along the line of sight. The observed spectra of GK Per and possibly of V1223 Sgr suggest N(sub H) approximately 10(exp 23)/sq cm. This large N(sub H) may be due to partially ionized preshock column material. Alternatively, we also consider absorption by the cool outer parts of an accretion disk. In this case the photoelectric absorption depth in the disk is a sensitive function of inclination. For GK Per the required inclination is approximately 83 deg. For mass accretion rates larger than a critical rate of approximately 10(exp 18) g/s, X-ray emission from the column accretion is significantly affected by radiation drag. Although the mass accretion rate increases dramatically during outbursts, the observed hard (greater than 2 keV) X-ray luminosity will not rise proportionately. The slope and peak energy of the outburst spectra are only weakly affected. We conclude that the observed X-ray spectra can be explained by this simple analytic solution and that the production of hard X-rays from the accretion shock at the magnetic poles in the intermediate polars is in general agreement with the observations. However, since the X-ray emission and absorption depend on the mass accretion rate in a complicated manner, observed hard X-ray luminosities (greater than 2 keV) are not a good indicator of the mass

  6. A variable P v broad absorption line and quasar outflow energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capellupo, D. M.; Hamann, F.; Barlow, T. A.

    2014-10-01

    Broad absorption lines (BALs) in quasar spectra identify high-velocity outflows that might exist in all quasars and could play a major role in feedback to galaxy evolution. The viability of BAL outflows as a feedback mechanism depends on their kinetic energies, as derived from the outflow velocities, column densities, and distances from the central quasar. We estimate these quantities for the quasar, Q1413+1143 (redshift ze = 2.56), aided by the first detection of P V λλ1118, 1128 BAL variability in a quasar. In particular, P V absorption at velocities where the C IV trough does not reach zero intensity implies that the C IV BAL is saturated and the absorber only partially covers the background continuum source (with characteristic size <0.01 pc). With the assumption of solar abundances, we estimate that the total column density in the BAL outflow is log NH ≳ 22.3 cm-2. Variability in the P V and saturated C IV BALs strongly disfavours changes in the ionization as the cause of the BAL variability, but supports models with high column density BAL clouds moving across our lines of sight. The observed variability time of 1.6 yr in the quasar rest frame indicates crossing speeds >750 km s-1 and a radial distance from the central black hole of ≲ 3.5 pc, if the crossing speeds are Keplerian. The total outflow mass is ˜4100 M⊙, the kinetic energy ˜4 × 1054 erg, and the ratio of the outflow kinetic energy luminosity to the quasar bolometric luminosity is ˜0.02 (at the minimum column density and maximum distance), which might be sufficient for important feedback to the quasar's host galaxy.

  7. Density Gradients in Chemistry Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines experiments in which a density gradient might be used to advantage. A density gradient consists of a column of liquid, the composition and density of which varies along its length. The procedure can be used in analysis of solutions and mixtures and in density measures of solids. (Author/TS)

  8. Novel absorption detection techniques for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.

    1994-07-27

    Capillary electrophoresis (CE) has emerged as one of the most versatile separation methods. However, efficient separation is not sufficient unless coupled to adequate detection. The narrow inner diameter (I.D.) of the capillary column raises a big challenge to detection methods. For UV-vis absorption detection, the concentration sensitivity is only at the {mu}M level. Most commercial CE instruments are equipped with incoherent UV-vis lamps. Low-brightness, instability and inefficient coupling of the light source with the capillary limit the further improvement of UV-vis absorption detection in CE. The goals of this research have been to show the utility of laser-based absorption detection. The approaches involve: on-column double-beam laser absorption detection and its application to the detection of small ions and proteins, and absorption detection with the bubble-shaped flow cell.

  9. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J.

    2016-07-01

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis.

  10. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. V. X-ray absorption spectra with ionization potential corrected exchange and correlation potentials.

    PubMed

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J

    2016-07-21

    Core excitation energies are computed with time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) using the ionization energy corrected exchange and correlation potential QTP(0,0). QTP(0,0) provides C, N, and O K-edge spectra to about an electron volt. A mean absolute error (MAE) of 0.77 and a maximum error of 2.6 eV is observed for QTP(0,0) for many small molecules. TD-DFT based on QTP (0,0) is then used to describe the core-excitation spectra of the 22 amino acids. TD-DFT with conventional functionals greatly underestimates core excitation energies, largely due to the significant error in the Kohn-Sham occupied eigenvalues. To the contrary, the ionization energy corrected potential, QTP(0,0), provides excellent approximations (MAE of 0.53 eV) for core ionization energies as eigenvalues of the Kohn-Sham equations. As a consequence, core excitation energies are accurately described with QTP(0,0), as are the core ionization energies important in X-ray photoionization spectra or electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis. PMID:27448875

  11. Microfabricated packed gas chromatographic column

    DOEpatents

    Kottenstette, Richard; Matzke, Carolyn M.; Frye-Mason, Gregory C.

    2003-12-16

    A new class of miniaturized gas chromatographic columns has been invented. These chromatographic columns are formed using conventional micromachining techniques, and allow packed columns having lengths on the order of a meter to be fabricated with a footprint on the order of a square centimeter.

  12. Absorption-line measurements of AGN outflows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Dale L.

    Investigations into the elemental abundances in two nearby active galaxies, the narrow-line Seyfert 1 Markarian 1044 and the Seyfert 1 Markarian 279, are reported. Spectra from three space-based observatories HST, FUSE, and CHANDRA, are used to measure absorption lines in material outflowing from the nucleus. I make multi-wavelength comparisons to better convert the ionic column densities into elemental column densities which can then be used to determine abundances (metallicities). Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies are known to have extreme values of a number of properties compared to active galactic nuclei (AGNs) as a class. In particular, emission-line studies have suggested that NLS1s are unusually metal-rich compared to broad-line AGNs of comparable luminosity. To test these suggestions I perform absorption-line studies on the NLS1 Markarian 1044, a nearby and bright AGN. I use lines of H I, C IV, N V, and O VI to properly make the photoionization correction through the software Cloudy and determine abundances of Carbon, Nitrogen and Oxygen. I find two results. The first is that Markarian 1044 has a bulk metallicity greater than five times solar. The second is that the N/C ratio in Markarian 1044 is consistent with a solar mixture. This is in direct contradiction of extrapolations from local H II regions which state N/ C should scale with bulk metallicity. This implies a different enrichment history in Markarian 1044 than in the Galactic disk. I also report discovery of three new low-redshift Lya forest lines with log N HI >= 12:77 in the spectrum of Markarian 1044. This number is consistent with the 2.6 expected Lya forest lines in the path length to Markarian 1044. I also investigate the CHANDRA X-ray spectrum of Markarian 279, a broad-line Seyfert 1. I use a new code, PHASE, to self-consistently model the entire absorption spectrum simultaneously. Using solely the X-ray spectrum I am able to determine the physical parameters of this absorber to a degree only

  13. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    SciTech Connect

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao Zuoqiang; Lin Jingquan

    2012-12-15

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  14. Analysis of microwave leaky modes propagating through laser plasma filaments column waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alshershby, Mostafa; Hao, Zuoqiang; Lin, Jingquan

    2012-12-01

    A plasma column waveguide formed by a bundle of closely spaced plasma filaments induced by the propagation of ultrafast laser pulses in air and revived by a longer infrared laser pulse is shown to support microwave radiation. We consider values of both the plasma electron density and microwave frequency for which the refractive index of plasma is lower than the refractive index of air; therefore, a leaky plasma waveguide can be realized in extremely high frequency band. The guiding mechanism does not require high conductance of the plasma and can be easily excited by using commercial femtosecond laser sources. A theoretical study of leaky mode characteristics of isotropic and homogeneous plasma column waveguides is investigated with several values of plasma and waveguide structure parameters. The microwave transmission loss was found to be mainly caused by the microwave leakage through the air-plasma interface and is weakly dependent on the plasma absorption. In spite of losses of microwaves caused by leakage and plasma absorption, it is shown to be much lower than both that accompanying to surface waves attaching to single conducting plasma wire and the free space propagation over distances in the order of the filament length, which opens exciting perspectives for short distance point to point wireless transmission of pulsed-modulated microwaves.

  15. Sulfur K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations on Superoxide Reduc Tase: Role of the Axial Thiolate in Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, A.; Jenney, F.E., Jr.; Adams, M.W.; Johnson, M.K.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.; Solomon, E.I.; /Stanford U., Chem. Dept. /Athens U. /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-10-26

    Superoxide reductase (SOR) is a non-heme iron enzyme that reduces superoxide to peroxide at a diffusion-controlled rate. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is used to investigate the ground-state electronic structure of the resting high-spin and CN{sup -} bound low-spin Fe{sup III} forms of the 1Fe SOR from Pyrococcus furiosus. A computational model with constrained imidazole rings (necessary for reproducing spin states), H-bonding interaction to the thiolate (necessary for reproducing Fe-S bond covalency of the high-spin and low-spin forms), and H-bonding to the exchangeable axial ligand (necessary to reproduce the ground state of the low-spin form) was developed and then used to investigate the enzymatic reaction mechanism. Reaction of the resting ferrous site with superoxide and protonation leading to a high-spin Fe{sup III}-OOH species and its subsequent protonation resulting in H2O2 release is calculated to be the most energetically favorable reaction pathway. Our results suggest that the thiolate acts as a covalent anionic ligand. Replacing the thiolate with a neutral noncovalent ligand makes protonation very endothermic and greatly raises the reduction potential. The covalent nature of the thiolate weakens the Fe{sup III} bond to the proximal oxygen of this hydroperoxo species, which raises its pKa by an additional 5 log units relative to the pK{sub a} of a primarily anionic ligand, facilitating its protonation. A comparison with cytochrome P450 indicates that the stronger equatorial ligand field from the porphyrin results in a low-spin Fe{sup III}-OOH species that would not be capable of efficient H2O2 release due to a spin-crossing barrier associated with formation of a high-spin 5C Fe{sup III} product. Additionally, the presence of the dianionic porphyrin {pi} ring in cytochrome P450 allows O-O heterolysis, forming an Fe{sup IV}-oxo porphyrin radical species, which is calculated to be extremely unfavorable for the non-heme SOR ligand

  16. Clear evidence for the presence of O VI absorption in QSO metal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Limin; Savage, Blair D.

    1993-01-01

    We have detected O VI 1031.93 A, 1037.62 A doublet absorption in a composite QSO spectrum formed from a large number of intervening C IV absorption systems. The detections constitute the first firm evidence for the presence of O VI in intervening QSO metal absorption systems. The equivalent width of the detected O VI absorption implies an O VI column density N(O VI) not less than 2.8 x 10 exp 14/sq cm. This value, together with the nondetection of the N V 1238.82 A, 1242.80 A doublet absorption, suggests that N(O VI)/N(N V) not less than 4.4. For collisionally ionized gas with a solar O to N abundance ratio in thermal equilibrium the above ratio requires a temperature T not less than 2.5 x 10 exp 5 K. It is found that C IV systems which show low-ionization species and those which do not both have associated O VI absorption, suggesting that O VI is probably present in all C IV systems. We also find that C IV systems which show low-ionization species on average have stronger high-ionization absorption lines than those which do not. A simple interpretation was given to explain this trend.

  17. HST Observations of Heliospheric and Astrospheric Lyα Absorption Toward the α Cen System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, B. E.; Linsky, J. L.; Valenti, J. A.

    Charge exchange processes create a population of heated neutral hydrogen gas throughout the heliosphere. This material produces a detectable absorption signature in the Lyα lines of nearby stars with low interstellar column densities. Such spectra have therefore been used to study the properties of neutral hydrogen in the outer heliosphere, and also to detect analogous astrospheric hydrogen surrounding other stars. The first detection of heliospheric Lyα absorption was from observations of α Cen A and B made in 1995 with the GHRS instrument on board the Hubble Space Telescope. The heliospheric material produces excess absorption on the red side of the interstellar absorption. Excess absorption also exists on the blue side, which is believed to be due to astrospheric material around the two stars. On 1999 February 12, α Cen A was observed again by the STIS instrument, which replaced GHRS in 1997; and on 2000 May 8, α Cen's distant companion star Proxima Cen was also observed by STIS. We compare the GHRS and STIS data in order to search for variations in the heliospheric absorption that would indicate structural changes in the heliosphere, possibly induced by solar wind variability associated with the Sun's activity cycle. We also search for analogous changes in α Cen's astrosphere, and we compare the astrospheric absorption of α Cen with that of Proxima Cen as a way of comparing the stellar wind properties of these very different stars.

  18. Upper limits for absorption by water vapor in the near-UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Eoin M.; Wenger, John C.; Venables, Dean S.

    2016-02-01

    There are few experimental measurements of absorption by water vapor in the near-UV. Here we report the results of spectral measurements of water vapor absorption at ambient temperature and pressure from 325 nm to 420 nm, covering most tropospherically relevant short wavelengths. Spectra were recorded using a broadband optical cavity in the chemically controlled environment of an atmospheric simulation chamber. No absorption attributable to the water monomer (or the dimer) was observed at the 0.5 nm resolution of our system. Our results are consistent with calculated spectra and recent DOAS field observations, but contradict a report of significant water absorption in the near-UV. Based on the detection limit of our instrument, we report upper limits for the water absorption cross section of less than 5×10-26 cm2 molecule-1 at our instrument resolution. For a typical, indicative slant column density of 4×1023 cm2, we calculate a maximum optical depth of 0.02 arising from absorption of water vapor in the atmosphere at wavelengths between 340 nm and 420 nm, with slightly higher maximum optical depths below 340 nm. The results of this work, together with recent atmospheric observations and computational results, suggest that water vapor absorption across most of the near-UV is small compared to visible and infrared wavelengths.

  19. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  20. K- and L-edge X-ray absorption spectrum calculations of closed-shell carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds using damped four-component density functional response theory.

    PubMed

    Fransson, Thomas; Burdakova, Daria; Norman, Patrick

    2016-05-21

    X-ray absorption spectra of carbon, silicon, germanium, and sulfur compounds have been investigated by means of damped four-component density functional response theory. It is demonstrated that a reliable description of relativistic effects is obtained at both K- and L-edges. Notably, an excellent agreement with experimental results is obtained for L2,3-spectra-with spin-orbit effects well accounted for-also in cases when the experimental intensity ratio deviates from the statistical one of 2 : 1. The theoretical results are consistent with calculations using standard response theory as well as recently reported real-time propagation methods in time-dependent density functional theory, and the virtues of different approaches are discussed. As compared to silane and silicon tetrachloride, an anomalous error in the absolute energy is reported for the L2,3-spectrum of silicon tetrafluoride, amounting to an additional spectral shift of ∼1 eV. This anomaly is also observed for other exchange-correlation functionals, but it is seen neither at other silicon edges nor at the carbon K-edge of fluorine derivatives of ethene. Considering the series of molecules SiH4-XFX with X = 1, 2, 3, 4, a gradual divergence from interpolated experimental ionization potentials is observed at the level of Kohn-Sham density functional theory (DFT), and to a smaller extent with the use of Hartree-Fock. This anomalous error is thus attributed partly to difficulties in correctly emulating the electronic structure effects imposed by the very electronegative fluorines, and partly due to inconsistencies in the spurious electron self-repulsion in DFT. Substitution with one, or possibly two, fluorine atoms is estimated to yield small enough errors to allow for reliable interpretations and predictions of L2,3-spectra of more complex and extended silicon-based systems. PMID:27136720

  1. A novel approach in dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction based on the use of an auxiliary solvent for adjustment of density UV-VIS spectrophotometric and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric determination of gold based on ion pair formation.

    PubMed

    Kocúrová, Lívia; Balogh, Ioseph S; Skrlíková, Jana; Posta, József; Andruch, Vasil

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents a novel approach to dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (DLLME), based on the use of an auxiliary solvent for the adjustment of density. The procedure utilises a solvent system consisting of a dispersive solvent, an extraction solvent and an auxiliary solvent, which allows for the use of solvents having a density lower than that of water as an extraction solvent while preserving simple phase separation by centrifugation. The suggested approach could be an alternative to procedures described in the literature in recent months and which have been devoted to solving the same problem. The efficiency of the suggested approach is demonstrated through the determination of gold based on the formation of the ion pair [Au(CN)(2)](-) anion with Astra Phloxine (R) reagent and its extraction using the DLLME procedure with subsequent UV-VIS spectrophotometric and graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometric detection. The optimum conditions were found to be: pH 3; 0.8 mmol L(-1) K(4)[Fe(CN)(6)]; 0.12 mmol L(-1) R; dispersive solvent, methanol; extraction solvent, toluene; auxiliary solvent, tetrachloromethane. The calibration plots were linear in the ranges 0.39-4.7 mg L(-1) and 0.5-39.4 μg L(-1) for UV-VIS and GFAAS detection, respectively; thus enables the application of the developed method in two ranges differing from one from another by three orders of magnitude. The presented approach can be applied to the development of DLLME procedures for the determination of other compounds extractable by organic solvents with a density lower than that of water. PMID:20875602

  2. Mt. Pinatubo SO2 Column Measurements From Mauna Loa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Rinsland, C. P.; Blatherwick, R. D.; David, S. J.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    Absorption features of the nu(sub 1) band of SO2 have been identified in high resolution infrared solar absorption spectra recorded from Mauna Loa, Hawaii, on July 9 and 12, 1991, shortly after the arrival of the first eruption plume from the Mt. Pinatubo volcano in the Phillipines. A total SO2 vertical column amount of (5.1 +/- 0.5) x 10(exp 16) molecules/sq cm on July 9 has been retrieved based on nonlinear least- squares spectral fittings of 9 selected SO2 absorption features with an updated set of SO2 spectral parameters. A SO2 total column upper limit of 0.9 x 10(esp 16) molecules/sq cm deduced from measurements on September 20-24, 1991, is consistent with the dispersion of the SO2 cloud and the rapid conversion of the SO2 vapor into volcanic aerosol particles.

  3. GAS AND DUST ABSORPTION IN THE DoAr 24E SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, Andrew J.; Richter, Matthew J.; Seifahrt, Andreas; Carr, John S.; Najita, Joan R.; Moerchen, Margaret M.; Doppmann, Greg W.

    2012-11-20

    We present findings for DoAr 24E, a binary system that includes a classical infrared companion. We observed the DoAr 24E system with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS), with high-resolution, near-infrared spectroscopy of CO vibrational transitions, and with mid-infrared imaging. The source of high extinction toward infrared companions has been an item of continuing interest. Here we investigate the disk structure of DoAr 24E using the column densities, temperature, and velocity profiles of two CO absorption features seen toward DoAr 24Eb. We model the spectral energy distributions found using T-ReCS imaging and investigate the likely sources of extinction toward DoAr 24Eb. We find the lack of silicate absorption and small CO column density toward DoAr 24Eb suggest that the mid-infrared continuum is not as extinguished as the near-infrared, possibly due to the mid-infrared originating from an extended region. This, along with the velocity profile of the CO absorption, suggests that the source of high extinction is likely due to a disk or disk wind associated with DoAr 24Eb.

  4. ON NEUTRAL ABSORPTION AND SPECTRAL EVOLUTION IN X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J. M.; Cackett, E. M.; Reis, R. C.

    2009-12-10

    Current X-ray observatories make it possible to follow the evolution of transient and variable X-ray binaries across a broad range in luminosity and source behavior. In such studies, it can be unclear whether evolution in the low-energy portion of the spectrum should be attributed to evolution in the source, or instead to evolution in neutral photoelectric absorption. Dispersive spectrometers make it possible to address this problem. We have analyzed a small but diverse set of X-ray binaries observed with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer across a range in luminosity and different spectral states. The column density in individual photoelectric absorption edges remains constant with luminosity, both within and across source spectral states. This finding suggests that absorption in the interstellar medium strongly dominates the neutral column density observed in spectra of X-ray binaries. Consequently, evolution in the low-energy spectrum of X-ray binaries should properly be attributed to evolution in the source spectrum. We discuss our results in the context of X-ray binary spectroscopy with current and future X-ray missions.

  5. Why Hexagonal Basalt Columns?

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Martin; Anderssohn, Robert; Bahr, Hans-Achim; Weiß, Hans-Jürgen; Nellesen, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Basalt columns with their preferably hexagonal cross sections are a fascinating example of pattern formation by crack propagation. Junctions of three propagating crack faces rearrange such that the initial right angles between them tend to approach 120°, which enables the cracks to form a pattern of regular hexagons. To promote understanding of the path on which the ideal configuration can be reached, two periodically repeatable models are presented here involving linear elastic fracture mechanics and applying the principle of maximum energy release rate. They describe the evolution of the crack pattern as a transition from rectangular start configuration to the hexagonal pattern. This is done analytically and by means of three-dimensional finite element simulation. The latter technique reproduces the curved crack path involved in this transition. PMID:26550724

  6. Physical properties of the interstellar medium using high-resolution Chandra spectra: O K-edge absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Gatuzz, E.; Mendoza, C.; García, J.; Kallman, T. R.; Bautista, M. A.; Gorczyca, T. W. E-mail: claudio@ivic.gob.ve E-mail: manuel.bautista@wmich.edu E-mail: timothy.r.kallman@nasa.gov

    2014-08-01

    Chandra high-resolution spectra toward eight low-mass Galactic binaries have been analyzed with a photoionization model that is capable of determining the physical state of the interstellar medium. Particular attention is given to the accuracy of the atomic data. Hydrogen column densities are derived with a broadband fit that takes into account pileup effects, and in general are in good agreement with previous results. The dominant features in the oxygen-edge region are O I and O II Kα absorption lines whose simultaneous fits lead to average values of the ionization parameter of log ξ = –2.90 and oxygen abundance of A{sub O} = 0.70. The latter is given relative to the standard by Grevesse and Sauval, but rescaling with the revision by Asplund et al. would lead to an average abundance value fairly close to solar. The low average oxygen column density (N{sub O} = 9.2 × 10{sup 17} cm{sup –2}) suggests a correlation with the low ionization parameters, the latter also being in evidence in the column density ratios N(O II)/N(O I) and N(O III)/N(O I) that are estimated to be less than 0.1. We do not find conclusive evidence for absorption by any other compound but atomic oxygen in our oxygen-edge region analysis.

  7. SPIRAL CONTACTOR FOR SOLVENT EXTRACTION COLUMN

    DOEpatents

    Cooley, C.R.

    1961-06-13

    The patented extraction apparatus includes a column, perforated plates extending across the column, liquid pulse means connected to the column, and an imperforate spiral ribbon along the length of the column.

  8. Sources of Variability in the Stratospheric Column of Nitrogen Dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglass, Anne; Gleason, James; Chin, Mian; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Instruments such as the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME, on the European Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-2), launched 1995), the Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY, on ENVISAT, to be launched July 2001) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI on EOS Aura, to be launched 2003) make measurements of the total column of NO2. There is interest in separating the stratospheric and tropospheric contributions to the column, as the tropospheric column provides a measure of pollution. We are using a 3D chemistry and transport model driven by winds from the Goddard Space Flight Center Data Assimilation System to examine variability in the stratospheric NO2 column. Model results for NOx = NO + NO2 + 2N2O5 will be shown to compare well with sunset observations from the Halogen Occultation Experiment on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite, and to exhibit similar temporal and spatial dependence. Partitioning between NO, NO2, and N2O5 is also shown to compare well with observations. This good agreement supports the use of simulated fields in the stratosphere to derive the tropospheric column from the total column. Preliminary comparisons of the tropospheric column with model simulations for the troposphere will also be shown.

  9. Moving-mesh cosmology: properties of neutral hydrogen in absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bird, Simeon; Vogelsberger, Mark; Sijacki, Debora; Zaldarriaga, Matias; Springel, Volker; Hernquist, Lars

    2013-03-01

    We examine the distribution of neutral hydrogen in cosmological simulations carried out with the new moving-mesh code AREPO and compare it with the corresponding GADGET simulations based on the smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) technique. The two codes use identical gravity solvers and baryonic physics implementations, but very different methods for solving the Euler equations, allowing us to assess how numerical effects associated with the hydro solver impact the results of simulations. Here we focus on an analysis of the neutral gas, as detected in quasar absorption lines. We find that the high column density regime probed by damped Lyα (DLA) and Lyman limit systems (LLS) exhibits significant differences between the codes. GADGET produces spurious artefacts in large haloes in the form of gaseous clumps, boosting the LLS cross-section. Furthermore, it forms haloes with denser central baryonic cores than AREPO, which leads to a substantially greater DLA cross-section from smaller haloes. AREPO thus produces a significantly lower cumulative abundance of DLAs, which is intriguingly in much closer agreement with observations. The column density function, however, is not altered enough to significantly reduce the discrepancy with the observed value. For the low column density gas probed by the Lyα forest, the codes differ only at the level of a few per cent, suggesting that this regime is quite well described by both methods, a fact that is reassuring for the many Lyα studies carried out with SPH thus far. While the residual differences are smaller than the errors on current Lyα forest data, we note that this will likely change for future precision experiments.

  10. Buckling of a holey column.

    PubMed

    Pihler-Puzović, D; Hazel, A L; Mullin, T

    2016-09-14

    We report the results from a combined experimental and numerical investigation of buckling in a novel variant of an elastic column under axial load. We find that including a regular line of centred holes in the column can prevent conventional, global, lateral buckling. Instead, the local microstructure introduced by the holes allows the column to buckle in an entirely different, internal, mode in which the holes are compressed in alternate directions, but the column maintains the lateral reflection symmetry about its centreline. The internal buckling mode can be accommodated within a smaller external space than the global one; and it is the preferred buckling mode over an intermediate range of column lengths for sufficiently large holes. For very short or sufficiently long columns a modification of the classical, global, lateral buckling is dominant. PMID:27501288

  11. Ca II and Na I absorption in the QSO S4 0248 + 430 due to an intervening galaxy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womble, Donna S.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Cohen, Ross D.; Burbidge, E. Margaret

    1990-01-01

    Observations of the QSO S4 0248 + 430 and a nearby anonymous galaxy are presented. Two absorption components are found in both Ca II H and K and Na I D1 and D2 at z(a) = 0.0515, 0.0523. Column densities of log N(Ca II) = 13.29, 13.50, and log N(Na I) = 13.79, 14.18 are found for z(a) = 0.0515, 0.0523 absorption systems, respectively. The column density ratios imply considerable calcium depletion and disk-type absorbing gas. At least one and possibly both absorption components are produced by high-velocity gas. A broadband image of the field shows an asymmetrical armlike feature or possible tidal tail covering and extending past the position of the QSO. The presence of this extended feature and the apparent difference between the absorption velocities and galaxy rotation velocity suggest that the absorbing gas is not ordinary disk gas, but rather is a result of tidal disruption.

  12. REMOTE SENSING OF OZONE USING AN INFRARED DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype airborne downlooking infrared differential absorption system using CO2 TEA (transverse excited atmospheric) lasers is described. The system uses two wavelengths and topographic reflection to measure the integrated column concentration of ozone between the laser source...

  13. Mitigation of Liquefaction in Sandy Soils Using Stone Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selcuk, Levent; Kayabalı, Kamil

    2010-05-01

    Soil liquefaction is one of the leading causes of earthquake-induced damage to structures. Soil improvement methods provide effective solutions to reduce the risk of soil liquefaction. Thus, soil ground treatments are applied using various techniques. However, except for a few ground treatment methods, they generally require a high cost and a lot of time. Especially in order to prevent the risk of soil liquefaction, stone columns conctructed by vibro-systems (vibro-compaction, vibro-replacement) are one of the traditional geotechnical methods. The construction of stone columns not only enhances the ability of clean sand to drain excess pore water during an earthquake, but also increases the relative density of the soil. Thus, this application prevents the development of the excess pore water pressure in sand during earthquakes and keeps the pore pressure ratio below a certain value. This paper presents the stone column methods used against soil liquefaction in detail. At this stage, (a) the performances of the stone columns were investigated in different spacing and diameters of columns during past earthquakes, (b) recent studies about design and field applications of stone columns were presented, and (c) a new design method considering the relative density of soil and the capacity of drenage of columns were explained in sandy soil. Furthermore, with this new method, earthquake performances of the stone columns constructed at different areas were investigated before the 1989 Loma Prieta and the 1994 Northbridge earthquakes, as case histories of field applications, and design charts were compiled for suitable spacing and diameters of stone columns with consideration to the different sandy soil parameters and earhquake conditions. Key Words: Soil improvement, stone column, excess pore water pressure

  14. HCO{sup +} AND HCN J = 3-2 ABSORPTION TOWARD THE CENTER OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Sebastien; Dinh-V-Trung

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated the presence of dense gas toward the radio source Cen A by looking at the absorption of the HCO{sup +} and HCN (3-2) lines in front of the bright continuum source with the Submillimeter Array. We detect narrow HCO{sup +} (3-2) absorption, and tentatively HCN (3-2), close to the systemic velocity. For both molecules, the J = 3 - 2 absorption is much weaker than for the J = 1 - 0 line. From simple excitation analysis, we conclude that the gas density is of the order of a few 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} for a column density N(HCO{sup +})/{delta}V of 3 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s and a kinetic temperature of 10 K. In particular, we find no evidence for molecular gas density higher than a few 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} on the line of sight to the continuum source. We discuss the implications of our finding on the nature of the molecular gas responsible for the absorption toward Cen A.

  15. Dual dorsal columns: a review.

    PubMed

    Beck, C H

    1976-02-01

    Recent evidence indicates that Wall (1970) may have been premature in concluding that dorsal column lesions produce no discernable sensory defects. Much of the negative evidence Wall presented to support this view is inconclusive. In addition several studies have reported significant sensory deficits in animals with severed dorsal columns. On the other hand, the literature strongly supports Wall's view that dorsal column lesions cause motor disturbances. A review of the anatomical and electrophysiological literature reveals growing evidence for the dissociation of two major subsystems relaying in the dorsal column nuclei. The possible functions of these two systems are discussed. PMID:814988

  16. Accounting for aerosol scattering in the CLARS retrieval of column averaged CO2 mixing ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qiong; Natraj, Vijay; Li, King-Fai; Shia, Run-Lie; Fu, Dejian; Pongetti, Thomas J.; Sander, Stanley P.; Roehl, Coleen M.; Yung, Yuk L.

    2015-07-01

    The California Laboratory for Atmospheric Remote Sensing Fourier transform spectrometer (CLARS-FTS) deployed at Mount Wilson, California, has been measuring column abundances of greenhouse gases in the Los Angeles (LA) basin in the near-infrared spectral region since August 2011. CLARS-FTS measures reflected sunlight and has high sensitivity to absorption and scattering in the boundary layer. In this study, we estimate the retrieval biases caused by aerosol scattering and present a fast and accurate approach to correct for the bias in the CLARS column averaged CO2 mixing ratio product, XCO2. The high spectral resolution of 0.06 cm-1 is exploited to reveal the physical mechanism for the bias. We employ a numerical radiative transfer model to simulate the impact of neglecting aerosol scattering on the CO2 and O2 slant column densities operationally retrieved from CLARS-FTS measurements. These simulations show that the CLARS-FTS operational retrieval algorithm likely underestimates CO2 and O2 abundances over the LA basin in scenes with moderate aerosol loading. The bias in the CO2 and O2 abundances due to neglecting aerosol scattering cannot be canceled by ratioing each other in the derivation of the operational product of XCO2. We propose a new method for approximately correcting the aerosol-induced bias. Results for CLARS XCO2 are compared to direct-Sun XCO2 retrievals from a nearby Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) station. The bias-correction approach significantly improves the correlation between the XCO2 retrieved from CLARS and TCCON, demonstrating that this approach can increase the yield of useful data from CLARS-FTS in the presence of moderate aerosol loading.

  17. Gas Phase Absorption Spectroscopy of C+60 and C+70 in a Cryogenic Ion Trap: Comparison with Astronomical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Holz, M.; Maier, J. P.; Gerlich, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Bohlender, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recent low-temperature laboratory measurements and astronomical observations have proved that the fullerene cation {{{C}}}60+ is responsible for four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). These absorptions correspond to the strongest bands of the lowest electronic transition. The gas phase spectrum below 10 {{K}} is reported here for the full wavelength range encompassed by the electronic transition. The absorption spectrum of {{{C}}}70+, with its origin band at 7959.2 {{\\mathringA }}, has been obtained under similar laboratory conditions. Observations made toward the reddened star {HD} 183143 were used in a specific search for the absorption of these fullerene cations in diffuse clouds. In the case of {{{C}}}60+, one further band in the astronomical spectrum at 9348.5 \\mathringA is identified, increasing the total number of assigned DIBs to five. Numerous other {{{C}}}60+ absorptions in the laboratory spectrum are found to lie below the astronomical detection limit. Special emphasis is placed on the laboratory determination of absolute absorption cross-sections. For {{{C}}}60+ this directly yields a column density, N({{{C}}}60+), of 2× {10}13 {{{cm}}}-2 in diffuse clouds, without the need to rely on theoretical oscillator strengths. The intensity of the {{{C}}}70+ electronic transition in the range 7000–8000 Å is spread over many features of similar strength. Absorption cross-section measurements indicate that even for a similar column density, the individual absorption bands of {{{C}}}70+ will be too weak to be detected in the astronomical spectra, which is confirmed giving an upper limit of 2 {{m\\mathringA }} to the equivalent width. Based on observations obtained at the Canada‑France‑Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  18. 45. MAIN MEETING ROOM COLUMNS. Ends of gallery columns identified ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. MAIN MEETING ROOM COLUMNS. Ends of gallery columns identified at the time of removal for transfer to the George School for re-erection. The stamp reads, 'REMOVED FROM 12th ST. MTG HSE PHILA 1972'. - Twelfth Street Meeting House, 20 South Twelfth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  19. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Studies of [(H3buea)FeIII-X]n1 (X= S2-, O2-,OH-): Comparison of Bonding and Hydrogen Bonding in Oxo and Sulfido Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Dey, Abhishek; Hocking, Rosalie K.; Larsen, Peter; Borovik, Andrew S.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2006-09-27

    Iron L-edge, iron K-edge, and sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy was performed on a series of compounds [Fe{sup III}H{sub 3}buea(X)]{sup n-} (X = S{sup 2-}, O{sup 2-}, OH{sup -}). The experimentally determined electronic structures were used to correlate to density functional theory calculations. Calculations supported by the data were then used to compare the metal-ligand bonding and to evaluate the effects of H-bonding in Fe{sup III}-O vs Fe{sup III-}S complexes. It was found that the Fe{sup III-}O bond, while less covalent, is stronger than the FeIII-S bond. This dominantly reflects the larger ionic contribution to the Fe{sup III-}O bond. The H-bonding energy (for three H-bonds) was estimated to be -25 kcal/mol for the oxo as compared to -12 kcal/mol for the sulfide ligand. This difference is attributed to the larger charge density on the oxo ligand resulting from the lower covalency of the Fe-O bond. These results were extended to consider an Fe{sup IV-}O complex with the same ligand environment. It was found that hydrogen bonding to Fe{sup IV-}O is less energetically favorable than that to Fe{sup III-}O, which reflects the highly covalent nature of the Fe{sup IV-}O bond.

  20. Dorsal column stimulator applications

    PubMed Central

    Yampolsky, Claudio; Hem, Santiago; Bendersky, Damián

    2012-01-01

    Background: Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) has been used to treat neuropathic pain since 1967. Following that, technological progress, among other advances, helped SCS become an effective tool to reduce pain. Methods: This article is a non-systematic review of the mechanism of action, indications, results, programming parameters, complications, and cost-effectiveness of SCS. Results: In spite of the existence of several studies that try to prove the mechanism of action of SCS, it still remains unknown. The mechanism of action of SCS would be based on the antidromic activation of the dorsal column fibers, which activate the inhibitory interneurons within the dorsal horn. At present, the indications of SCS are being revised constantly, while new applications are being proposed and researched worldwide. Failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS) is the most common indication for SCS, whereas, the complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is the second one. Also, this technique is useful in patients with refractory angina and critical limb ischemia, in whom surgical or endovascular treatment cannot be performed. Further indications may be phantom limb pain, chronic intractable pain located in the head, face, neck, or upper extremities, spinal lumbar stenosis in patients who are not surgical candidates, and others. Conclusion: Spinal cord stimulation is a useful tool for neuromodulation, if an accurate patient selection is carried out prior, which should include a trial period. Undoubtedly, this proper selection and a better knowledge of its underlying mechanisms of action, will allow this cutting edge technique to be more acceptable among pain physicians. PMID:23230533

  1. Sulfur K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Density Functional Calculations on Mo(IV) and Mo(VI)=O Bis-dithiolenes: Insights into the Mechanism of Oxo Transfer in DMSO Reductase and Related Functional Analogues

    PubMed Central

    Tenderholt, Adam L.; Wang, Jun-Jieh; Szilagyi, Robert K.; Holm, Richard H.; Hodgson, Keith O.; Hedman, Britt; Solomon, Edward I.

    2010-01-01

    Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and density functional theory (DFT) calculations have been used to determine the electronic structures of two Mo bis-dithiolene complexes, [Mo(OSi)(bdt)2]1− and [MoO(OSi)(bdt)2]1− where OSi = [OSiPh2tBu]1− and bdt = benzene-1,2-dithiolate(2−), that model the Mo(IV) and Mo(VI)=O states of the DMSO reductase family of molybdenum enzymes. These results show that the Mo(IV) complex undergoes metal-based oxidation unlike the Mo(IV) tris-dithiolene complexes, indicating that the dithiolene ligands are behaving innocently. Experimentally-validated calculations have been extended to model the oxo-transfer reaction coordinate using dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) as a substrate. The reaction proceeds through a transition state (TS1) to an intermediate with DMSO weakly bound, followed by a subsequent transition state (TS2) which is the largest barrier of the reaction. The factors that control the energies of these transition states, the nature of the oxo transfer process, and the role of the dithiolene ligand are discussed. PMID:20499905

  2. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Density Functional Theory Calculations

    PubMed Central

    Younker, Jarod M.; Krest, Courtney M.; Jiang, Wei; Krebs, Carsten; Bollinger, J. Martin; Green, Michael T.

    2009-01-01

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) uses a stable Mn(IV)/Fe(III) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of ~2.92 Å. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 Å Mn—O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(III/III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OHX ligands as well as the location of the Mn(IV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a µ-1,3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H2O/OH) to site 1, one µ-O bridge, and one µ-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data. PMID:18937466

  3. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  4. Buckling testing of composite columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbero, Ever; Tomblin, John

    1992-11-01

    Euler buckling test results are presented for large composite columns relevant to the mass production of composite structural members by pultrusion. The experimental procedure employed yields highly reproducible and accurate results. All percentage differences between theory and experiment are below 6.2 percent; the theoretically predicted long-column buckling load is accurate even in the case of the most complex composite materials.

  5. Column abundance measurements of atmospheric hydroxyl at 45 deg S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. W.; Keep, D. J.; Burnett, C. R.; Burnett, E. B.

    1994-01-01

    The first Southern Hemisphere measurements of the vertical column abundance of atmospheric hydroxyl (OH) have been obtained at Lauder, New Zealand (45 deg S) with a PEPSIOS instrument measuring the absorption of sunlight at 308 nm. The variation of column OH with solar zenith angle is similar to that measured at other sites. However average annual abundances of OH are about 20% higher than those found by similar measurements at 40 deg N. Minimum OH abundances about 10% less than average levels at 40 deg N, are observed during austral spring. The OH abundance abruptly increases by 30% in early summer and remains at the elevated level until late the following winter.

  6. X-RAY ABSORPTION OF HIGH-REDSHIFT QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Eitan, Assaf; Behar, Ehud E-mail: behar@physics.technion.ac.il

    2013-09-01

    The soft X-ray photoelectric absorption of high-z quasars has been known for two decades, but has no unambiguous astrophysical context. We construct the largest sample to date of 58 high-redshift quasars (z > 0.45) selected from the XMM-Newton archive based on a high photon count criterion (>1800). We measure the optical depth {tau} at 0.5 keV and find that 43% of the quasars show significant absorption. We aim to find which physical parameters of the quasars, e.g., redshift, radio luminosity, radio loudness, or X-ray luminosity, drive their observed absorption. We compare the absorption behavior with redshift with the pattern expected if the diffuse intergalactic medium (IGM) is responsible for the observed absorption. We also compare the absorption with a comparison sample of gamma-ray burst (GRB) X-ray afterglows. Although the z > 2 quasar opacity is consistent with diffuse IGM absorption, many intermediate-z (0.45 < z < 2) quasars are not sufficiently absorbed for this scenario, and are appreciably less absorbed than GRBs. Only 10/37 quasars at z < 2 are absorbed, and only 5/30 radio-quiet quasars are absorbed. We find a weak correlation between {tau} and z, and an even weaker correlation between {tau} and radio luminosity. These findings lead to the conclusion that although a diffuse IGM origin for the quasar absorption is unlikely, the optical depth does seem to increase with redshift, roughly as (1 + z){sup 2.2{+-}0.6}, tending to {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.4 at high redshifts, similar to the high-z GRBs. This result can be explained by an ionized and clumpy IGM at z < 2, and a cold, diffuse IGM at higher redshift. If, conversely, the absorption occurs at the quasar, and owing to the steep L{sub x} {proportional_to}(1 + z){sup 7.1{+-}0.5} correlation in the present sample, the host column density scales as N{sub H}{proportional_to}L{sub x}{sup 0.7{+-}0.1}.

  7. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  8. Soil column leaching of pesticides.

    PubMed

    Katagi, Toshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    In this review, I address the practical and theoretical aspects of pesticide soil mobility.I also address the methods used to measure mobility, and the factors that influence it, and I summarize the data that have been published on the column leaching of pesticides.Pesticides that enter the unsaturated soil profile are transported downwards by the water flux, and are adsorbed, desorbed, and/or degraded as they pass through the soil. The rate of passage of a pesticide through the soil depends on the properties of the pesticide, the properties of the soil and the prevailing environmental conditions.Because large amounts of many different pesticides are used around the world, they and their degradates may sometimes contaminate groundwater at unacceptable levels.It is for this reason that assessing the transport behavior and soil mobility of pesticides before they are sold into commerce is important and is one indispensable element that regulators use to assess probable pesticide safety. Both elementary soil column leaching and sophisticated outdoor lysimeter studies are performed to measure the leaching potential for pesticides; the latter approach more reliably reflects probable field behavior, but the former is useful to initially profile a pesticide for soil mobility potential.Soil is physically heterogeneous. The structure of soil varies both vertically and laterally, and this variability affects the complex flow of water through the soil profile, making it difficult to predict with accuracy. In addition, macropores exist in soils and further add to the complexity of how water flow occurs. The degree to which soil is tilled, the density of vegetation on the surface, and the type and amounts of organic soil amendments that are added to soil further affect the movement rate of water through soil, the character of soil adsorption sites and the microbial populations that exist in the soil. Parameters that most influence the rate of pesticide mobility in soil are

  9. Interstellar Mg II and C IV absorption by 1 1/2 galaxies along the sightline to MrK 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, David V.; Blades, J. Chris

    1993-01-01

    The first results of our HST survey designed to search for Mg 2 and C 4 absorption lines from the disks and halos of low-redshift galaxies using background QSO's and supernovae as probes are presented. Our survey utilizes the high resolution of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph enabling us to calculate the column densities and doppler parameters of individual components within an absorption complex, and hence determine the physical conditions of the absorbing gas. Observing the complexity of the absorption line profiles i.e., the velocity distribution and total velocity extent of the constituent components, offers an important description of the kinematics of the absorbing gas, and hence an understanding of its origin. Focus is on one sight line in particular, that towards Mrk 205, which passes 3-5 kpc from the intervening galaxy NGC 4319. Mg 2 and C 4 absorption from both local Milky Way halo gas and from NGC 4319 is detected.

  10. Ultraviolet observations of interstellar absorption lines toward SN 1987A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Blair D.; Jenkins, Edward B.; Joseph, Charles L.; De Boer, Klass S.

    1989-01-01

    High-dispersion IUE echelle spectra of SN 1987A were averaged in order to obtain UV absorption-line profiles of the highest possible quality in the direction of SN 1987A. The profiles for Si IV and C IV are quite similar and have much less structure than the Al III profile. On relating column densities, while the C IV and Si IV ratio is relatively constant over the 0-100 km/s velocity range, the C IV to Al III and Si IV to Al III ratios vary by nearly a factor of 10. This suggests that the C IV and Si IV along this sight line in the Galaxy and its halo may have a common origin which differs from that for Al III.

  11. PROMINENCE PLASMA DIAGNOSTICS THROUGH EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Landi, E.; Reale, F.

    2013-07-20

    In this paper, we introduce a new diagnostic technique that uses EUV and UV absorption to determine the electron temperature and column emission measure, as well as the He/H relative abundance of the absorbing plasma. If a realistic assumption on the geometry of the latter can be made and a spectral code such as CHIANTI is used, then this technique can also yield the absorbing plasma hydrogen and electron density. This technique capitalizes on the absorption properties of hydrogen and helium at different wavelength ranges and temperature regimes. Several cases where this technique can be successfully applied are described. This technique works best when the absorbing plasma is hotter than 15,000 K. We demonstrate this technique on AIA observations of plasma absorption during a coronal mass ejection eruption. This technique can be easily applied to existing observations of prominences and cold plasmas in the Sun from almost all space missions devoted to the study of the solar atmosphere, which we list.

  12. Absorption driven focus shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.

    2016-03-01

    Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the absorption level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative absorption level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between absorption levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the absorption level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.

  13. UNSHIFTED METASTABLE He I* MINI-BROAD ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEM IN THE NARROW-LINE TYPE 1 QUASAR SDSS J080248.18+551328.9

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Tuo; Zhou, Hongyan; Jiang, Peng; Wang, Tinggui; Wang, Huiyuan; Liu, Wenjuan; Yang, Chenwei; Ge, Jian; Hamann, Fred; Komossa, S.; Yuan, Weimin; Zuther, Jens; Lu, Honglin; Zuo, Wenwen

    2015-02-10

    We report the identification of an unusual absorption-line system in the quasar SDSS J080248.18+551328.9 and present a detailed study of the system, incorporating follow-up optical and near-IR spectroscopy. A few tens of absorption lines are detected, including He I*, Fe II*, and Ni II*, which arise from metastable or excited levels, as well as resonant lines in Mg I, Mg II, Fe II, Mn II, and Ca II. All of the isolated absorption lines show the same profile of width Δv ∼ 1500 km s{sup –1} centered at a common redshift as that of the quasar emission lines, such as [O II], [S II], and hydrogen Paschen and Balmer series. With narrow Balmer lines, strong optical Fe II multiplets, and weak [O III] doublets, its emission-line spectrum is typical for that of a narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLS1). We have derived reliable measurements of the gas-phase column densities of the absorbing ions/levels. Photoionization modeling indicates that the absorber has a density of n {sub H} ∼ (1.0-2.5) × 10{sup 5} cm{sup –3} and a column density of N {sub H} ∼ (1.0-3.2) × 10{sup 21} cm{sup –2} and is located at R ∼100-250 pc from the central supermassive black hole. The location of the absorber, the symmetric profile of the absorption lines, and the coincidence of the absorption- and emission-line centroid jointly suggest that the absorption gas originates from the host galaxy and is plausibly accelerated by stellar processes, such as stellar winds and/or supernova explosions. The implications for the detection of such a peculiar absorption-line system in an NLS1 are discussed in the context of coevolution between supermassive black hole growth and host galaxy buildup.

  14. Resonant Absorption of Bessel Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.

    1999-11-01

    We report the first observation of enhanced laser-plasma optical absorption in a subcritical density plasma resulting from spatial resonances, here in the laser breakdown of a gas with a Bessel beam. The enhancement in absorption is directly correlated to enhancements both in confinement of laser radiation to the plasma and in its heating. Under certain conditions, azimuthal asymmetry in the laser beam is essential for efficient gas breakdown. Simulations of this absorption consistently explain the experimental observations. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9515509) and the US Department of Energy (DEF G0297 ER 41039).

  15. Post column derivatisation analyses review. Is post-column derivatisation incompatible with modern HPLC columns?

    PubMed

    Jones, Andrew; Pravadali-Cekic, Sercan; Dennis, Gary R; Shalliker, R Andrew

    2015-08-19

    Post Column derivatisation (PCD) coupled with high performance liquid chromatography or ultra-high performance liquid chromatography is a powerful tool in the modern analytical laboratory, or at least it should be. One drawback with PCD techniques is the extra post-column dead volume due to reaction coils used to enable adequate reaction time and the mixing of reagents which causes peak broadening, hence a loss of separation power. This loss of efficiency is counter-productive to modern HPLC technologies, -such as UHPLC. We reviewed 87 PCD methods published from 2009 to 2014. We restricted our review to methods published between 2009 and 2014, because we were interested in the uptake of PCD methods in UHPLC environments. Our review focused on a range of system parameters including: column dimensions, stationary phase and particle size, as well as the geometry of the reaction loop. The most commonly used column in the methods investigated was not in fact a modern UHPLC version with sub-2-micron, (or even sub-3-micron) particles, but rather, work-house columns, such as, 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. columns packed with 5 μm C18 particles. Reaction loops were varied, even within the same type of analysis, but the majority of methods employed loop systems with volumes greater than 500 μL. A second part of this review illustrated briefly the effect of dead volume on column performance. The experiment evaluated the change in resolution and separation efficiency of some weak to moderately retained solutes on a 250 × 4.6 mm i.d. column packed with 5 μm particles. The data showed that reaction loops beyond 100 μL resulted in a very serious loss of performance. Our study concluded that practitioners of PCD methods largely avoid the use of UHPLC-type column formats, so yes, very much, PCD is incompatible with the modern HPLC column. PMID:26343427

  16. Evidence for Active Galactic Nucleus Feedback in the Broad Absorption Lines and Reddening of Mrk 231

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leighly, Karen M.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Baron, Eddie; Lucy, Adrian B.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-06-01

    We present the first J-band spectrum of Mrk 231, which reveals a large He I* λ10830 broad absorption line with a profile similar to that of the well-known Na I broad absorption line. Combining this spectrum with optical and UV spectra from the literature, we show that the unusual reddening noted by Veilleux et al. is explained by a reddening curve like those previously used to explain low values of total-to-selective extinction in Type Ia supernovae. The nuclear starburst may be the origin and location of the dust. Spatially resolved emission in the broad absorption line trough suggests nearly full coverage of the continuum emission region. The broad absorption lines reveal higher velocities in the He I* lines (produced in the quasar-photoionized H II region) compared with the Na I and Ca II lines (produced in the corresponding partially ionized zone). Cloudy simulations show that a density increase is required between the H II and partially ionized zones to produce ionic column densities consistent with the optical and IR absorption line measurements and limits, and that the absorber lies ~100 pc from the central engine. These results suggest that the He I* lines are produced in an ordinary quasar BAL wind that impacts upon, compresses, and accelerates the nuclear starburst's dusty effluent (feedback in action), and the Ca II and Na I lines are produced in this dusty accelerated gas. This unusual circumstance explains the rarity of Na I absorption lines; without the compression along our line of sight, Mrk 231 would appear as an ordinary iron low-ionization, broad absorption line quasar.

  17. Dynamics of a Tapped Granular Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosato, Anthony; Blackmore, Denis; Zuo, Luo; Hao, Wu; Horntrop, David

    2015-11-01

    We consider the behavior of a column of spheres subjected to a time-dependent vertical taps. Of interest are various dynamical properties, such as the motion of its mass center, its response to taps of different intensities and forms, and the effect of system size and material properties. The interplay between diverse time and length scales are the key contributors to the column's evolving dynamics. Soft sphere discrete element simulations were conducted over a very wide parameter space to obtain a portrait of column behavior as embodied by the collective dynamics of the mass center motion. Results compared favorably with a derived reduced-order paradigm of the mass center motion (surprisingly analogous to that for a single bouncing ball on an oscillating plate) with respect to dynamical regimes and their transitions. A continuum model obtained from a system of Newtonian equations, as a locally averaged limit in the transport mode along trajectories is described, and a numerical solution protocol for a one-dimensional system is outlined. Typical trajectories and density evolution profiles are shown. We conclude with a discussion of our investigations to relate predictions of the continuum and reduced dynamical systems models with discrete simulations.

  18. Employing anatomical knowledge in vertebral column labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2009-02-01

    The spinal column constitutes the central axis of human torso and is often used by radiologists to reference the location of organs in the chest and abdomen. However, visually identifying and labeling vertebrae is not trivial and can be timeconsuming. This paper presents an approach to automatically label vertebrae based on two pieces of anatomical knowledge: one vertebra has at most two attached ribs, and ribs are attached only to thoracic vertebrae. The spinal column is first extracted by a hybrid method using the watershed algorithm, directed acyclic graph search and a four-part vertebra model. Then curved reformations in sagittal and coronal directions are computed and aggregated intensity profiles along the spinal cord are analyzed to partition the spinal column into vertebrae. After that, candidates for rib bones are detected using features such as location, orientation, shape, size and density. Then a correspondence matrix is established to match ribs and vertebrae. The last vertebra (from thoracic to lumbar) with attached ribs is identified and labeled as T12. The rest of vertebrae are labeled accordingly. The method was tested on 50 CT scans and successfully labeled 48 of them. The two failed cases were mainly due to rudimentary ribs.

  19. Development of a Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Ultra-Precise Measurements of Column CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Emily L.; Georgieva, Elena M.; Heaps, William S.

    2005-01-01

    A passive Fabry-Perot based instrument is described for detecting column CO2 through absorption measurements at 1.58 microns . In this design, solar flux reaches the instrument platform and is directed through two channels. In the first channel, transmittance fi5nges from a Fabry-Perot interferometer are aligned with CO2 absorption lines so that absorption due to CO2 is primarily detected. The second channel encompasses the same frequency region as the first, but is comparatively more sensitive to changes in the solar flux than absorption due to CO2. The ratio of these channels is sensitive to changes in the total CO2 column, but not to changes in solar flux. This inexpensive instrument will offer high precision measurements (error 4%) in a compact package. Design of this instrument and preliminary ground-based measurements of column CO2 are presented here as well as strategies for deployment on aircraft and satellite platforms.

  20. Damped Lyα absorption systems in semi-analytic models with multiphase gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Michael; Somerville, Rachel S.; Haas, Marcel R.; Gawiser, Eric; Maller, Ariyeh; Popping, Gergö; Trager, Scott C.

    2014-06-01

    We investigate the properties of damped Lyman α absorption systems (DLAs) in semi-analytic models of galaxy formation, including new modelling of the partitioning of cold gas into atomic, molecular, and ionized phases, and a star formation recipe based on the density of molecular gas. We use three approaches for partitioning gas into atomic and molecular constituents: a pressure-based recipe and metallicity-based recipes with fixed and varying ultraviolet (UV) radiation fields. We identify DLAs by adopting an assumed gas density profile for galactic discs and passing lines of sight through our simulations to compute H I column densities. We find that models with `standard' gas radial profiles - computed assuming that the average specific angular momentum of the gas disc is equal to that of the host dark matter halo - fail to reproduce the observed column density distribution of DLAs, regardless of the assumed gas partitioning. These models also fail to reproduce the distribution of velocity widths Δv of low-ionization state metal systems, overproducing low-Δv relative to high-Δv systems. Models with `extended' radial gas profiles - corresponding to gas discs with higher specific angular momentum, or gas in an alternate extended configuration - are able to reproduce quite well the column density distribution of absorbers over the column density range 19 < log NH I < 22.5 in the redshift range 2 < z < 3.5. The model with pressure-based gas partitioning and the metallicity-based recipe with a varying UV radiation field also reproduce the observed line density of DLAs, H I gas density, and Δv distribution at z < 3 well. However all of the models investigated here underproduce DLAs and the H I gas density at z > 3. This may indicate that DLAs at high redshift arise from a different physical phenomenon, such as outflows or filaments. If this is the case, the flatness in the number of DLAs and H I gas density over the redshift interval 0 < z < 5 may be due to a

  1. Field Results from Three Campaigns to Validate the Performance of the Miniaturized Laser Heterodyne Radiometer (Mini-LHR) for Measuring Carbon Dioxide and Methane in the Atmospheric Column

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. Houston; Clarke, Greg B.; Melroy, Hilary; Ott, Lesley; Steel, Emily Wilson

    2014-01-01

    In a collaboration between NASA GSFC and GWU, a low-cost, surface instrument is being developed that can continuously monitor key carbon cycle gases in the atmospheric column: carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4). The instrument is based on a miniaturized, laser heterodyne radiometer (LHR) using near infrared (NIR) telecom lasers. Despite relatively weak absorption line strengths in this spectral region, spectrallyresolved atmospheric column absorptions for these two molecules fall in the range of 60-80% and thus sensitive and precise measurements of column concentrations are possible. In the last year, the instrument was deployed for field measurements at Park Falls, Wisconsin; Castle Airport near Atwater, California; and at the NOAA Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii. For each subsequent campaign, improvement in the figures of merit for the instrument has been observed. In the latest work the absorbance noise is approaching 0.002 optical density (OD) noise on a 1.8 OD signal. An overview of the measurement campaigns and the data retrieval algorithm for the calculation of column concentrations will be presented. For light transmission through the atmosphere, it is necessary to account for variation of pressure, temperature, composition, and refractive index through the atmosphere that are all functions of latitude, longitude, time of day, altitude, etc. For temperature, pressure, and humidity profiles with altitude we use the Modern-Era Retrospective Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) data. Spectral simulation is accomplished by integrating short-path segments along the trajectory using the SpecSyn spectral simulation suite developed at GW. Column concentrations are extracted by minimizing residuals between observed and modeled spectrum using the Nelder-Mead simplex algorithm. We will also present an assessment of uncertainty in the reported concentrations from assumptions made in the meteorological data, LHR instrument and tracker noise, and radio

  2. SIMULATION OF CONTINUOUS-CONTACT SEPARATION PROCESSES: MULTICOMPONENT, ADIABATIC ABSORPTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new algorithm has been developed for the steady-state simulation of multicomponent, adiabatic absorption in packed columns. The system of differential model equations that describe the physical absorption process is reduced to algebraic equations by using a finite difference me...

  3. Self-Consistent Monte Carlo Simulations of Positive Column Discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; Kortshagen, U.

    1998-10-01

    In recent years it has become widely recognized that electron distribution functions in atomic gas positive column discharges are best described as non local over most of the range of R× N (column radius × gas density) where positive columns are stable. The use of an efficient Monte Carlo code with a radial potential expansion in powers of r^2 and with judiciously chosen constraints on the potential near the axis and wall now provides fully self-consistent kinetic solutions using only small computers. A set of solutions at smaller R× N and lower currents are presented which exhibit the classic negative dynamic resistance of the positive column at low currents. The negative dynamic resistance is due to a non-negligible Debye length and is sometimes described as a transition from free to ambipolar diffusion. This phenomenon is sensitive to radial variations of key parameters in the positive column and thus kinetic theory simulations are likely to provide a more realistic description than classic isothermal fluid models of the positive column. Comparisons of kinetic theory simulations to various fluid models of the positive column continue to provide new insight on this `corner stone' problem of Gaseous Electronics.

  4. Efficiency of supercritical fluid chromatography columns in different thermal environments.

    PubMed

    Kaczmarski, Krzysztof; Poe, Donald P; Tarafder, Abhijit; Guiochon, Georges

    2013-05-24

    The efficiency of a packed column eluted with supercritical carbon dioxide at 323K and outlet pressures from 90 to 150bar was studied with the column in two different thermal environments. The 150mm×2.0mm ID stainless steel column was packed with spherical 5-μm porous silica particles with a covalently bonded nonpolar stationary phase, and the test solutes were normal alkanes. When operated in a convective air bath the column exhibited severe efficiency losses when its outlet pressure was below 120bar. The efficiency of the same column enclosed in a shell made of foam insulation was restored at low outlet pressures down to 100bar. The van Deemter plots showed an abnormal dependence of the plate height (HETP) on the flow rate at low outlet pressures, exhibiting a maximum in the HETP at flow rates around 1mL/min and a 20-bar pressure drop. The large efficiency losses at low outlet pressures are due to radial temperature gradients associated with enthalpic expansion and cooling of the mobile phase. The separations were simulated by a numerical model that accounts for axial and radial gradients in the temperature and density along the column. The abnormal van Deemter plots arise from competing processes affecting the radial distribution of the solute migration velocity along the column. The negative impact on efficiency is greatest when the density profile of the mobile phase along the column is close to the critical isopycnic line. The efficiency improves at increased flow rates because of increased cooling at larger pressure drops and increased density along the entire length of the column. The model predicts the unusual trends in the van Deemter plots, but the calculated results at low outlet pressures are strongly influenced by small variations in the porosity distribution in the column, limiting the accuracy of the predicted HETP values. In spite of these difficulties, the model has enabled a detailed analysis of the effects of temperature, pressure and flow

  5. Using Solution- and Solid-State S K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy with Density Functional Theory to Evaluate M–S Bonding for MS42- (M = Cr, Mo, W) Dianions

    PubMed Central

    Olson, Angela C.; Keith, Jason M.; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Daly, Scott R.; Kozimor, Stosh A.; MacInnes, Molly M.; Martin, Richard L.; Scott, Brian L.

    2014-01-01

    Herein, we have evaluated relative changes in M–S electronic structure and orbital mixing in Group 6 MS42- dianions using solid- and solution-phase S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS; M = Mo, W), as well as density functional theory (DFT; M = Cr, Mo, W) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. To facilitate comparison with solution measurements (conducted in acetonitrile), theoretical models included gas-phase calculations as well as those that incorporated an acetonitrile dielectric, the latter of which provided better agreement with experiment. Two pre-edge features arising from S 1s → e* and t2* electron excitations were observed in the S K-edge XAS spectra and were reasonably assigned as 1A1 → 1T2 transitions. For MoS42-, both solution-phase pre-edge peak intensities were consistent with results from the solid-state spectra. For WS42-, solution- and solid-state pre-edge peak intensities for transitions involving e* were equivalent, while transitions involving the t2* orbitals were less intense in solution. Experimental and computational results have been presented in comparison to recent analyses of MO42- dianions, which allowed M–S and M–O orbital mixing to be evaluated as the principle quantum number (n) for the metal valence d orbitals increased (3d, 4d, 5d). Overall, the M–E (E = O, S) analyses revealed distinct trends in orbital mixing. For example, as the Group 6 triad was descended, e* (π*) orbital mixing remained constant in the M–S bonds, but increased appreciably for M–O interactions. For the t2* orbitals (σ* + π*), mixing decreased slightly for M–S bonding and increased only slightly for the M–O interactions. These results suggested that the metal and ligand valence orbital energies and radial extensions delicately influenced the orbital compositions for isoelectronic ME42- (E = O, S) dianions. PMID:25311904

  6. Using solution- and solid-state S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with density functional theory to evaluate M-S bonding for MS4(2-) (M = Cr, Mo, W) dianions.

    PubMed

    Olson, Angela C; Keith, Jason M; Batista, Enrique R; Boland, Kevin S; Daly, Scott R; Kozimor, Stosh A; MacInnes, Molly M; Martin, Richard L; Scott, Brian L

    2014-12-14

    Herein, we have evaluated relative changes in M-S electronic structure and orbital mixing in Group 6 MS4(2-) dianions using solid- and solution-phase S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS; M = Mo, W), as well as density functional theory (DFT; M = Cr, Mo, W) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations. To facilitate comparison with solution measurements (conducted in acetonitrile), theoretical models included gas-phase calculations as well as those that incorporated an acetonitrile dielectric, the latter of which provided better agreement with experiment. Two pre-edge features arising from S 1s → e* and t electron excitations were observed in the S K-edge XAS spectra and were reasonably assigned as (1)A1 → (1)T2 transitions. For MoS4(2-), both solution-phase pre-edge peak intensities were consistent with results from the solid-state spectra. For WS4(2-), solution- and solid-state pre-edge peak intensities for transitions involving e* were equivalent, while transitions involving the t orbitals were less intense in solution. Experimental and computational results have been presented in comparison to recent analyses of MO4(2-) dianions, which allowed M-S and M-O orbital mixing to be evaluated as the principle quantum number (n) for the metal valence d orbitals increased (3d, 4d, 5d). Overall, the M-E (E = O, S) analyses revealed distinct trends in orbital mixing. For example, as the Group 6 triad was descended, e* (π*) orbital mixing remained constant in the M-S bonds, but increased appreciably for M-O interactions. For the t orbitals (σ* + π*), mixing decreased slightly for M-S bonding and increased only slightly for the M-O interactions. These results suggested that the metal and ligand valence orbital energies and radial extensions delicately influenced the orbital compositions for isoelectronic ME4(2-) (E = O, S) dianions. PMID:25311904

  7. Periodic explosions by positive feedback in a rising foam column

    PubMed Central

    Zener, Clarence; Noriega, Jaime

    1982-01-01

    An aqueous foam rising adiabatically in a column suffers a drop in temperature. Under appropriate conditions, such a column periodically explodes. We here trace this explosion to the tight thermal coupling between the foam and its enclosing glass column. When the surface surfactant concentration is unbuffered by micelles, a positive feedback exists between the flow of heat from the walls into the foam and the thermal conductivity of the foam itself. In our highly expanded foam, heat is conducted through the foam cells' interior primarily by the heat-pipe effect. Such an effect is retarded by a dense layer of surfactant molecules. Heat absorption causes cell expansion, which, in a foam unbuffered by micelles, causes a reduction in surface concentration of surfactant molecules and, hence, in an increase in thermal conductivity. This interpretation of our observed periodic explosions is in agreement with all of our observations. PMID:16593192

  8. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Woo K.

    1994-12-31

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternation ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multifunction column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multifunction ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins. Applications are to separation of nitrogen and sulfur isotopes.

  9. Self-regenerating column chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Park, W.K.

    1995-05-30

    The present invention provides a process for treating both cations and anions by using a self-regenerating, multi-ionic exchange resin column system which requires no separate regeneration steps. The process involves alternating ion-exchange chromatography for cations and anions in a multi-ionic exchange column packed with a mixture of cation and anion exchange resins. The multi-ionic mixed-charge resin column works as a multi-function column, capable of independently processing either cationic or anionic exchange, or simultaneously processing both cationic and anionic exchanges. The major advantage offered by the alternating multi-function ion exchange process is the self-regeneration of the resins.

  10. Observationally determined Fe II oscillator strengths. [interstellar and quasar absorption spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Steenberg, M.; Shull, J. M.; Seab, C. G.

    1983-01-01

    Absorption oscillator strengths for 21 Fe II resonance lines, have been determined using a curve-of-growth analysis of interstellar data from the Copernicus and International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) satellites. In addition to slight changes in strengths of the far-UV lines, new f-values are reported for wavelength 1608.45, a prominent line in interstellar and quasar absorption spectra, and for wavelength 2260.08, a weak, newly identified linen in IUE interstellar spectra. An upper limit on the strength of the undetected line at 2366.867 A (UV multiplet 2) is set. Using revised oscillator strengths, Fe II column densities toward 13 OB stars are derived. The interstellar depletions, (Fe/H), relative to solar values range between factors of 10 and 120.

  11. Oxygen, neon, and iron X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, Efraín; García, Javier A.; Kallman, Timothy R.; Mendoza, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    Aims: We present a detailed study of X-ray absorption in the local interstellar medium by analyzing the X-ray spectra of 24 galactic sources obtained with the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer and the XMM-Newton Reflection Grating Spectrometer. Methods: By modeling the continuum with a simple broken power-law and by implementing the new ISMabs X-ray absorption model, we have estimated the total H, O, Ne, and Fe column densities towards the observed sources. Results: We have determined the absorbing material distribution as a function of source distance and galactic latitude-longitude. Conclusions: Direct estimates of the fractions of neutrally, singly, and doubly ionized species of O, Ne, and Fe reveal the dominance of the cold component, thus indicating an overall low degree of ionization. Our results are expected to be sensitive to the model used to describe the continuum in all sources.

  12. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-01-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS dataset acquired with a Multi-AXis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from the 10 June to the 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to

  13. Tropospheric nitrogen dioxide column retrieval from ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tack, F.; Hendrick, F.; Goutail, F.; Fayt, C.; Merlaud, A.; Pinardi, G.; Hermans, C.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Van Roozendael, M.

    2015-06-01

    We present an algorithm for retrieving tropospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) vertical column densities (VCDs) from ground-based zenith-sky (ZS) measurements of scattered sunlight. The method is based on a four-step approach consisting of (1) the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) analysis of ZS radiance spectra using a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to low NO2 absorption, (2) the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum using a Langley-plot-type method, (3) the removal of the stratospheric content from the daytime total measured slant column based on stratospheric VCDs measured at sunrise and sunset, and simulation of the rapid NO2 diurnal variation, (4) the retrieval of tropospheric VCDs by dividing the resulting tropospheric slant columns by appropriate air mass factors (AMFs). These steps are fully characterized and recommendations are given for each of them. The retrieval algorithm is applied on a ZS data set acquired with a multi-axis (MAX-) DOAS instrument during the Cabauw (51.97° N, 4.93° E, sea level) Intercomparison campaign for Nitrogen Dioxide measuring Instruments (CINDI) held from 10 June to 21 July 2009 in the Netherlands. A median value of 7.9 × 1015 molec cm-2 is found for the retrieved tropospheric NO2 VCDs, with maxima up to 6.0 × 1016 molec cm-2. The error budget assessment indicates that the overall error σTVCD on the column values is less than 28%. In the case of low tropospheric contribution, σTVCD is estimated to be around 39% and is dominated by uncertainties in the determination of the residual amount in the reference spectrum. For strong tropospheric pollution events, σTVCD drops to approximately 22% with the largest uncertainties on the determination of the stratospheric NO2 abundance and tropospheric AMFs. The tropospheric VCD amounts derived from ZS observations are compared to VCDs retrieved from off-axis and direct-sun measurements of the same MAX-DOAS instrument as well as to data

  14. A correlation between the H I 21-cm absorption strength and impact parameter in external galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Reeves, S. N.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2016-04-01

    By combining the data from surveys for H I 21-cm absorption at various impact parameters in near-by galaxies, we report an anti-correlation between the 21-cm absorption strength (velocity integrated optical depth) and the impact parameter. Also, by combining the 21-cm absorption strength with that of the emission, giving the neutral hydrogen column density, N_{H I}, we find no evidence that the spin temperature of the gas (degenerate with the covering factor) varies significantly across the disk. This is consistent with the uniformity of spin temperature measured across the Galactic disk. Furthermore, comparison with the Galactic N_{H I} distribution suggests that intervening 21-cm absorption preferentially arises in disks of high inclinations (near face-on). We also investigate the hypothesis that 21-cm absorption is favourably detected towards compact radio sources. Although there is insufficient data to determine whether there is a higher detection rate towards quasar, rather than radio galaxy, sight-lines, the 21-cm detections intervene objects with a mean turnover frequency of <ν _{_TO}>≈ 5× 108 Hz, compared to <ν _{_TO}>≈ 1× 108 Hz for the non-detections. Since the turnover frequency is anti-correlated with radio source size, this does indicate a preferential bias for detection towards compact background radio sources.

  15. A correlation between the H I 21-cm absorption strength and impact parameter in external galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curran, S. J.; Reeves, S. N.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.

    2016-07-01

    By combining the data from surveys for H I 21-cm absorption at various impact parameters in near-by galaxies, we report an anti-correlation between the 21-cm absorption strength (velocity integrated optical depth) and the impact parameter. Also, by combining the 21-cm absorption strength with that of the emission, giving the neutral hydrogen column density, N_{H I}, we find no evidence that the spin temperature of the gas (degenerate with the covering factor) varies significantly across the disc. This is consistent with the uniformity of spin temperature measured across the Galactic disc. Furthermore, comparison with the Galactic N_{H I} distribution suggests that intervening 21-cm absorption preferentially arises in discs of high inclinations (near face-on). We also investigate the hypothesis that 21-cm absorption is favourably detected towards compact radio sources. Although there is insufficient data to determine whether there is a higher detection rate towards quasar, rather than radio galaxy, sight-lines, the 21-cm detections intervene objects with a mean turnover frequency of < ν _{_TO}rangle ≈ 5× 108 Hz, compared to < ν _{_TO}rangle ≈ 1× 108 Hz for the non-detections. Since the turnover frequency is anti-correlated with radio source size, this does indicate a preferential bias for detection towards compact background radio sources.

  16. HI Absorption Lines Detected from the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong-zu, Wu; Martha P, Haynes; Riccardo, Giovanelli; Ming, Zhu; Ru-rong, Chen

    2015-10-01

    We present some preliminary results of an on-going study of HI 21-cm absorption lines based on the 40% survey data released by the Arecibo Legacy Fast Arecibo L-band Feed Array (ALFALFA). (1) Ten HI candidate absorbers have been detected. Five of them are previously published in the literature, and the rest of them are new detections that need further confirmation. (2) For those sources with no detected absorptions, we have calculated the upper limit of their foreground HI column density NHI. The statistical result of the NHI distribution indicates that the ratio Ts/f between the averaged spin temperature and coverage factor for DLAs (the damped Lyα systems) might be larger than 500 K. The radio frequency interference (RFI) and standing wave are the main factors affecting the detection of HI absorption lines, which have been analyzed and discussed as well in order to find a method of solution. Our study can serve as a pathfinder for the future large-scale search of HI 21-cm absorption lines using the Five-Hundred-Meter Aperture Spherical Radio Telescope (FAST), which is an Arecibo-type radio telescope currently under construction in China with greatly increased sensitivity, bandwidth, and observational sky area. As prospects, we have discussed two types of observational studies of HI absorption lines toward extragalactic sources using the FAST telescope.

  17. LIQUID-LIQUID EXTRACTION COLUMNS

    DOEpatents

    Thornton, J.D.

    1957-12-31

    This patent relates to liquid-liquid extraction columns having a means for pulsing the liquid in the column to give it an oscillatory up and down movement, and consists of a packed column, an inlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase located in the direct communication with the liquid in the lower part of said column, an inlet pipe for the continuous liquid phase and an outlet pipe for the dispersed liquid phase located in direct communication with the liquid in the upper part of said column, a tube having one end communicating with liquid in the lower part of said column and having its upper end located above the level of said outlet pipe for the dispersed phase, and a piston and cylinder connected to the upper end of said tube for applying a pulsating pneumatic pressure to the surface of the liquid in said tube so that said surface rises and falls in said tube.

  18. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  19. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  20. Save by absorption heat pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.F.; Campagne, W.V.L.

    1987-12-01

    The author compares absorption heat pumping (AHP) to mechanical vapor compressor (MVC) heat pumping. The moving part of the AHP is a pump easy to maintain and inexpensive to spare. The mechanical component of the MVC is a vapor compressor which requires more maintenance and is cost-prohibitive to spare. Also, in the MVC system, a purified product stream is heat pumped in an open compressor, thus risking product contamination. In the AHP system, the cold and hot utilities are heat pumped. Therefore, product integrity with an AHP system is well protected as in a conventional fractionation column.

  1. Widespread galactic CF+ absorption: detection toward W49 with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liszt, H. S.; Guzmán, V. V.; Pety, J.; Gerin, M.; Neufeld, D. A.; Gratier, P.

    2015-07-01

    Aims: We study the usefulness of CF+ as a tracer of the regions where C+ and H2 coexist in the interstellar medium. Methods: We used the Plateau de Bure Interferometer to synthesize CF+J = 1-0 absorption at 102.6 GHz toward the core of the distant HII region W49N at l = 43.2°, b = 0.0°, and we modeled the fluorine chemistry in diffuse/translucent molecular gas. Results: We detected CF+ absorption over a broad range of velocity showing that CF+ is widespread in the H2-bearing Galactic disk gas. Conclusions: Originally detected in dense gas in the Orion Bar and Horsehead PDR (Photon-Dominated Region) CF+ was subsequently detected in absorption from diffuse and translucent clouds seen toward BL Lac and 3C 111. Here we showed that CF+ is distributed throughout the diffuse and translucent molecular disk gas with N(CF+)/N(H2) = 1.5-2.0 × 10-10, increasing to N(CF+)/N(H2) = 3.5 × 10-10 in one cloud at 39 km s-1 having higher N(H2) ≈ 3 × 1021 cm-2. Models of the fluorine chemistry reproduce the observed column densities and relative abundance of HF, from which CF+ forms, but generally overpredict the column density of CF+ by factors of 1.4-4. We show that a free space photodissociation rate Γ ≳ 10-9 s-1, comparable to that of CH, might account for much of the discrepancy but a recent calculation finds a value about ten times smaller. In the heavily blended and kinematically complex spectra seen toward W49, CF+ absorption primarily traces the peaks of the H2 distribution.

  2. X-ray absorption toward the red quasar 3C 212

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elvis, Martin; Fiore, Fabrizio; Mathur, Smita; Wilkes, Belinda J.

    1994-01-01

    A Roentgen Satellite (ROSAT) X-ray spectrum of the z = 1.049 'red quasar' 3C 212 has a strong low-energy cutoff. The spectrum can be fitted with a power law (of energy index 1.4(+0.8, -0.6) with low-energy photoelectric absorption in excess of the Galactic value that, if at the redhsift of the quasar, would have a column density of (0.9(+0.8, -0.6)) x 10(exp 22) atoms/sq cm. Possible sites for the absorption are a nuclear torus, an intervening damped Lyman-alpha system, or intracluster material (e.g., a cooling flow) around the quasar. The implied absorbing column density is sufficient to redden a normal quasar spectrum to the observed steep optical slope. The observed continuum, if dereddened by this amount, can produce the observed emission line fluxes and ratios. The absence of the graphite lambda-2175 feature in 3C 212 however, requires dust different from the local Milky Way composition, or an intervening absorber with z less than 0.4. Alternative acceptable fits to the X-ray spectrum are (1) a blackbody with a temperature of 0.7 keV (in the quasar frame) modified only by Galactic absorption, and (2) an optically thin thermal plasma with excess absorption. Although a blackbody spectrum would be unprecedented, the model is consistent with all the available X-ray and optical data and cannot be ruled out. We discuss possible observations that can discriminate among the above models.

  3. Errarum: Detection of Absorption-Line Features in the X-Ray Spectra of the Galactic Superluminal Source GRO J1655-40

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Y.; Inoue, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Ebisawa, K.; Nagase, F.; Kotani, T.; Gehrels, N.

    1998-06-01

    In the paper ``Detection of Absorption-Line Features in the X-Ray Spectra of the Galactic Superluminal Source GRO J1655-40'' by Y. Ueda, H. Inoue, Y. Tanaka, K. Ebisawa, F. Nagase, T. Kotani, and N. Gehrels (ApJ, 492, 782 [1998]), there is an error in the curve of growth for the Kα absorption line (Fig. 4). The revised version of Figure 4 given here replaces Figure 4 in the paper. Several numbers derived from the figure should be corrected accordingly, but the conclusion of the paper is not affected. In the third paragraph of the discussion section (page 786), the iron column density of the plasma should be 1019-1020 cm-2, which corresponds to a hydrogen column density of 3 × 1023-3 × 1024 cm-2. The final limit on the hydrogen column density of the line-absorbing plasma should be changed to 3 × 1023 cm-2 < NH < 1024 cm-2.

  4. Radiotracer Imaging of Sediment Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, W. W.; O'Neil, J. P.; Boutchko, R.; Nico, P. S.; Druhan, J. L.; Vandehey, N. T.

    2010-12-01

    Nuclear medical PET and SPECT cameras routinely image radioactivity concentration of gamma ray emitting isotopes (PET - 511 keV; SPECT - 75-300 keV). We have used nuclear medical imaging technology to study contaminant transport in sediment columns. Specifically, we use Tc-99m (T1/2 = 6 h, Eγ = 140 keV) and a SPECT camera to image the bacteria mediated reduction of pertechnetate, [Tc(VII)O4]- + Fe(II) → Tc(IV)O2 + Fe(III). A 45 mL bolus of Tc-99m (32 mCi) labeled sodium pertechnetate was infused into a column (35cm x 10cm Ø) containing uranium-contaminated subsurface sediment from the Rifle, CO site. A flow rate of 1.25 ml/min of artificial groundwater was maintained in the column. Using a GE Millennium VG camera, we imaged the column for 12 hours, acquiring 44 frames. As the microbes in the sediment were inactive, we expected most of the iron to be Fe(III). The images were consistent with this hypothesis, and the Tc-99m pertechnetate acted like a conservative tracer. Virtually no binding of the Tc-99m was observed, and while the bolus of activity propagated fairly uniformly through the column, some inhomogeneity attributed to sediment packing was observed. We expect that after augmentation by acetate, the bacteria will metabolically reduce Fe(III) to Fe(II), leading to significant Tc-99m binding. Imaging sediment columns using nuclear medicine techniques has many attractive features. Trace quantities of the radiolabeled compounds are used (micro- to nano- molar) and the half-lives of many of these tracers are short (<1 day). This allows multiple measurements to be made on the same column and thus the sediment biology to be monitored non-invasively over time (i.e. after an augmentation has been introduced) and minimizes long-lived radioactive waste. Different parameters can be measured, depending on the tracer type and delivery. A constant infusion of a conservative tracer, such as the positron emitter Br-76 (T1/2= 16.2 hr), measures the exclusion fraction (as

  5. Development of Ultraviolet Absorption Photometer for Atmospheric Ozone Measurements and Results from Mid - Investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Bhaswar

    This presentation consists of two parts. First we describe the design and construction of a dual-beam ultraviolet-absorption photometer, as a balloon payload, for ozone measurements. We then describe the construction of a rocket-borne version of the instrument and results of tests performed in the laboratory. Results of balloon flights using this instrument and a NASA-JSC/UH ultraviolet photometer are finally presented. Measurement of ozone in the atmosphere can be made using the strong photometric absorption feature of the gas at 253.7 nanometers. An ultraviolet lamp produces identical optical paths through two absorption columns. Two photodetectors measure the intensity of light through the two columns and a third detector just adjacent to the lamp provides a monitor of integrated light intensity, thus allowing detection of (and on board corrections to) changes in lamp output. A four-port valve in series with an ozone scrubber periodically reverses the two columns between ozone measurement and reference cycles. In this way, instrumental drifts and differences in the two optical paths can be monitored, and corrections, both scientific and engineering, can be deduced. Fast ozone measurements can be made along with other meteorological parameters, allowing good determination of the vertical profile of ozone. Ozone profiles computed from standard photochemical models are usually lower than those determined from satellite measurements; the discrepancies are typically forty percent of measured values at 50 km, and fifty percent at 80 km. Ozone column density measurements with ground based instruments and rocket-borne detectors agree with satellite data, but with a wide variation in accuracy and precision. In situ measurement of ozone with high accuracy, precision, and good spatial resolution would allow testing of (i) current and future photochemical models and (ii) predicted diurnal and seasonal variation in the mesosphere. Details are presented of our ultraviolet

  6. Intergalactic Helium Absorption toward High-Redshift Quasars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giroux, Mark L.; Fardal, Mark A.; Shull, J. Michael

    1995-01-01

    The recent Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of the z(q) = 3.286 quasar Q0302-003 (Jakobsen et at. 1994) and the z(q) = 3.185 quasar Q1935-67 by Tytler (1995) show absorption edges at the redshifted wavelength of He II 304 A. A key goal is to distinguish between contributions from discrete Ly-alpha forest clouds and a smoothly distributed intergalactic medium (IGM). We model the contributions from each of these sources of He II absorption, including the distribution of line Doppler widths and column densities, the 'He II proximity effect' from the quasar, and a self-consistent derivation of the He II opacity of the universe as a function of the spectrum of ionizing sources, with the assumption that both the clouds and the IGM are photoionized. The He II edge can be fully accounted for by He II line blanketing for reasonable distributions of line widths and column densities in the Ly-alpha forest, provided that the ionizing sources have spectral index alpha(s) greater than 1.5, and any He II proximity effect is neglected. Even with some contribution from a diffuse IGM, it is difficult to account for the edge observed by Jakobsen et al. (1994) with a 'hard' source spectrum (alpha(s) less than 1.3). The proximity effect modifies the relative contributions of the clouds and IGM to tau(He II) near the quasar (z approx. less than z(q)) and markedly increases the amount of He II absorption required. This implies, for example, that to account for the He II edge with line blanketing alone, the minimum spectral index alpha(s) must be increased from 1.5 to 1.9. We demonstrate the need for higher resolution observations that characterize the change in transmission as z approaches z(q) and resolve line-free gaps in the continuum. We set limits on the density of the diffuse IGM and suggest that the IGM and Ly-alpha clouds are likely to be a significant repository for dark baryons.

  7. High Dust Depletion in two Intervening Quasar Absorption Line Systems with the 2175 Å Extinction Bump at z ~ 1.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Peng; Ge, Jian; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Wang, Junfeng; Zhou, Hongyan; Wang, Tinggui

    2010-12-01

    We present the column densities of heavy elements and dust depletion studies in two strong Mg II absorption systems at z ~ 1.4 displaying the 2175 Å dust extinction feature. Column densities are measured from low-ionization absorption lines using an Apparent Optical Depth Method on the Keck/ESI spectra. We find that the dust depletion patterns resemble that of cold diffuse clouds in the Milky Way (MW). The values, [Fe/Zn] ≈-1.5 and [Si/Zn]<-0.67, are among the highest dust depletion measured for quasar absorption line systems. In another 2175 Å absorber at z = 1.64 toward the quasar SDSS J160457.50+220300.5, Noterdaeme et al. reported a similar dust depletion measurement ([Fe/Zn] = -1.47 and [Si/Zn] = -1.07) and detected C I and CO absorption lines on its VLT/UVES spectrum. We conclude that heavy dust depletion (i.e., a characteristic of cold dense clouds in MW) is required to produce a pronounced 2175 Å extinction bump. The data presented herein were obtained at the W. M. Keck Observatory, which is operated as a scientific partnership among the California Institute of Technology, the University of California, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. The Observatory was made possible by the generous financial support of the W. M. Keck Foundation.

  8. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for Column CO2 Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. F.; Lin, B.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; Liu, Z.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, S.; Kooi, S. A.; Fan, T. F.

    2015-12-01

    Global and regional atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission and Atmospheric Carbon and Transport (ACT) - America airborne investigation are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity-Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are being investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space and airborne platforms to meet the mission science measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud returns. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of intervening optically thin clouds, thereby minimizing bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the Earth's surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques and provides very high (at sub-meter level) range resolution. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These techniques are used in a new data processing architecture to support the ASCENDS CarbonHawk Experiment Simulator (ACES) and ACT-America programs.

  9. Advanced intensity-modulation continuous-wave lidar techniques for ASCENDS CO2 column measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. W.; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-10-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  10. Advanced Intensity-Modulation Continuous-Wave Lidar Techniques for ASCENDS O2 Column Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.; Harrison, F. Wallace; Obland, Michael D.; Meadows, Byron

    2015-01-01

    Global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements for the NASA Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission are critical for improving our understanding of global CO2 sources and sinks. Advanced Intensity- Modulated Continuous-Wave (IM-CW) lidar techniques are investigated as a means of facilitating CO2 measurements from space to meet the ASCENDS measurement requirements. In recent numerical, laboratory and flight experiments we have successfully used the Binary Phase Shift Keying (BPSK) modulation technique to uniquely discriminate surface lidar returns from intermediate aerosol and cloud contamination. We demonstrate the utility of BPSK to eliminate sidelobes in the range profile as a means of making Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) column CO2 measurements in the presence of optically thin clouds, thereby eliminating the need to correct for sidelobe bias errors caused by the clouds. Furthermore, high accuracy and precision ranging to the surface as well as to the top of intermediate cloud layers, which is a requirement for the inversion of column CO2 number density measurements to column CO2 mixing ratios, has been demonstrated using new hyperfine interpolation techniques that takes advantage of the periodicity of the modulation waveforms. This approach works well for both BPSK and linear swept-frequency modulation techniques. The BPSK technique under investigation has excellent auto-correlation properties while possessing a finite bandwidth. A comparison of BPSK and linear swept-frequency is also discussed in this paper. These results are extended to include Richardson-Lucy deconvolution techniques to extend the resolution of the lidar beyond that implied by limit of the bandwidth of the modulation, where it is shown useful for making tree canopy measurements.

  11. Electronic and molecular structures of the members of the electron transfer series [Cr(tbpy)3]n (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0): an X-ray absorption spectroscopic and density functional theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Scarborough, Christopher C; Sproules, Stephen; Weyhermüller, Thomas; DeBeer, Serena; Wieghardt, Karl

    2011-12-19

    The electron transfer series of complexes [Cr((t)bpy)(3)](n)(PF(6))(n) (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0 (1-4)) has been synthesized and the molecular structures of 1, 2, and 3 have been determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography; the structure of 4 has been investigated using extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. Magnetic susceptibility measurements (4-300 K) established an S = 3/2 ground state for 1, an S = 1 ground state for 2, an S = 1/2 ground state for 3, and an S = 0 ground state for 4. The electrochemistry of this series in CH(3)CN solution exhibits three reversible one-electron transfer waves. UV-vis/NIR spectra and Cr K-edge X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) are reported. The same experimental techniques have been applied for [Cr(III)(tacn)(2)]Br(3)·5H(2)O (5) and [Cr(II)(tacn)(2)]Cl(2) (6), which possess an S = 3/2 and an S = 2 ground state, respectively (tacn = 1,4,7-triazacyclononane, a tridentate, pure σ-donor ligand). The Cr K-edge XAS spectra of the corresponding complexes K(4)[Cr(II)(CN)(6)]·10H(2)O (S = 1) (7) and K(3)[Cr(III)(CN)(6)] (S = 3/2) (8) have also been recorded. All complexes have been studied computationally with density functional theory (DFT) using the B3LYP functional. The molecular and electronic structures of the anionic members of the series [Cr(bpy)(3)](1-,2-,3-) have also been calculated. It is unequivocally shown that all members of the electron transfer series 1-4 and [Cr(bpy)(3)](n) (n = 3+, 2+, 1+, 0, 1-, 2, 3-) possess a central Cr(III) ion ((t(2g))(3), S = 3/2). The three N,N'-coordinated neutral (bpy(0)) ligands in the trication 1 and [Cr(III)(bpy)(3)](3+) are one-electron reduced in a stepwise fashion to localized one, two, and three π-radical anions (bpy(•))(1-) in the dicationic, monocationic, and neutral species, respectively. Complexes 2 and [Cr(bpy)(3)](2+) cannot be described as low-spin Cr(II) species; they are in fact best described as [Cr(III)((t)bpy(•))((t)bpy(0))(2)](2+) and [Cr

  12. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  13. Density and viscosity of some partially carbonated aqueous alkanolamine solutions and their blends

    SciTech Connect

    Weiland, R.H.; Dingman, J.C.; Cronin, D.B.; Browning, G.J.

    1998-05-01

    Very little information is available concerning the effect of acid gas loading on the physical properties of amine-treating solutions flowing through the absorption and regeneration columns used in gas processing. The densities and viscosities of partially carbonated monoethanolamine (MEA), diethanolamine (DEA), and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA) solutions were measured at 298 K. With increasing carbon dioxide loadings, significant increases in both density and viscosity were observed. These results were combined with literature data to produce correlations for alkanolamine solution density and viscosity as a function of amine concentration, carbon dioxide loading, and temperature. The resulting single-amine correlations were used to predict the densities and viscosities of DEA + MDEA and MEA + MDEA blends. Predictions are compared with data measured for these blends.

  14. The neutral hydrogen cosmological mass density at z = 5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crighton, Neil H. M.; Murphy, Michael T.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Worseck, Gábor; Rafelski, Marc; Becker, George D.; Ellison, Sara L.; Fumagalli, Michele; Lopez, Sebastian; Meiksin, Avery; O'Meara, John M.

    2015-09-01

    We present the largest homogeneous survey of z > 4.4 damped Lyα systems (DLAs) using the spectra of 163 QSOs that comprise the Giant Gemini GMOS (GGG) survey. With this survey we make the most precise high-redshift measurement of the cosmological mass density of neutral hydrogen, Ω_{H I}. At such high redshift, important systematic uncertainties in the identification of DLAs are produced by strong intergalactic medium absorption and QSO continuum placement. These can cause spurious DLA detections, result in real DLAs being missed or bias the inferred DLA column density distribution. We correct for these effects using a combination of mock and higher resolution spectra, and show that for the GGG DLA sample the uncertainties introduced are smaller than the statistical errors on Ω_{H I}. We find Ω _{H I}=0.98^{+0.20}_{-0.18}× 10^{-3} at = 4.9, assuming a 20 per cent contribution from lower column density systems below the DLA threshold. By comparing to literature measurements at lower redshifts, we show that Ω_{H I} can be described by the functional form Ω _{H I}(z)∝ (1+z)^{0.4}. This gradual decrease from z = 5 to 0 is consistent with the bulk of H I gas being a transitory phase fuelling star formation, which is continually replenished by more highly ionized gas from the intergalactic medium and from recycled galactic winds.

  15. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  16. FRACTIONATING COLUMN PRODUCT COLLECTOR CONTROL

    DOEpatents

    Paxson, G.D. Jr.

    1964-03-10

    Means for detecting minute fluid products from a chemical separation column and for advancing a collector tube rack in order to automatically separate and collect successive fractionated products are described. A charge is imposed on the forming drops at the column orifice to create an electric field as the drop falls in the vicinity of a sensing plate. The field is detected by an electrometer tube coupled to the plate causing an output signal to actuate rotation of a collector turntable rack, thereby positioning new collectors under the orifice. The invention provides reliable automatic collection independent of drop size, rate of fall, or chemical composition. (AEC)

  17. Complex X-ray Absorption and the Fe K(alpha) Profile in NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, T. J.; Kraemer, S. B.; George, I. M.; Reeves, J. N.; Botorff, M. C.

    2004-01-01

    We present data from simultaneous Chandra, XMM-Newton and BeppoSAX observations of the Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 3516, taken during 2001 April and November. We have investigated the nature of the very flat observed X-ray spectrum. Chandra grating data show the presence of X-ray absorption lines, revealing two distinct components of the absorbing gas, one which is consistent with our previous model of the UV/X-ray absorber while the other, which is outflowing at a velocity of approximately 1100 kilometers per second, has a larger column density and is much more highly ionized. The broad-band spectral characteristics of the X-ray continuum observed with XMM during 2001 April, reveal the presence of a third layer of absorption consisting of a very large column (approximately 2.5 x 10(exp 23) per square centimeter) of highly ionized gas with a covering fraction approximately 50%. This low covering fraction suggests that the absorber lies within a few 1t-days of the X-ray source and/or is filamentary in structure. Interestingly, these absorbers are not in thermal equilibrium with one another. The two new components are too highly ionized to be radiatively accelerated, which we suggest is evidence for a hydromagnetic origin for the outflow. Applying our model to the November dataset, we can account for the spectral variability primarily by a drop in the ionization states of the absorbers, as expected by the change in the continuum flux. When this complex absorption is accounted for we find the underlying continuum to be typical of Seyfert 1 galaxies. The spectral curvature attributed to the high column absorber, in turn, reduces estimates of the flux and extent of any broad Fe emission line from the accretion disk.

  18. Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Zhou, C. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 ; Peng, X. J.

    2013-07-15

    An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

  19. Broad Balmer Absorption Line Variability: Evidence of Gas Transverse Motion in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xiheng; Zhou, Hongyan; Shu, Xinwen; Zhang, Shaohua; Ji, Tuo; Pan, Xiang; Sun, Luming; Zhao, Wen; Hao, Lei

    2016-03-01

    We report on the discovery of broad Balmer absorption lines variability in the QSO SDSS J125942.80+121312.6, based on the optical and near-infrared spectra taken from the SDSS-I, SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS), and TripleSpec observations over a timescale of 5.8 years in the QSO's rest-frame. The blueshifted absorption profile of Hβ shows a variation of more than 5σ at a high velocity portion (\\gt 3000 {km} {{{s}}}-1) of the trough. We perform a detailed analysis for the physical conditions of the absorber using Balmer lines as well as metastable He i and optical Fe ii absorptions (λ4233 from b4P5/2 level and λ5169 from a6S5/2) at the same velocity. These Fe ii lines are identified in the QSO spectra for the first time. According to the photoionization simulations, we estimate a gas density of n({{H}})≈ {10}9.1 {{cm}}-3 and a column density of {N}{col}({{H}})≈ {10}23 {{cm}}-2 for the BOSS data, but the model fails to predict the variations of ionic column densities between the SDSS and BOSS observations if changes in ionizing flux are assumed. We thus propose transverse motion of the absorbing gas being the cause of the observed broad Balmer absorption line variability. In fact, we find that the changes in covering factors of the absorber can well-reproduce all of the observed variations. The absorber is estimated ∼0.94 pc away from the central engine, which is where the outflow likely experiences deceleration due to the collision with the surrounding medium. This scheme is consistent with the argument that LoBAL QSOs may represent the transition from obscured star-forming galaxies to classic QSOs.

  20. Is it possible to deduce the ground state OH density from relative optical emission intensities of the OH(A 2Σ+-X 2Πi) transition in atmospheric pressure non-equilibrium plasmas?—An analysis of self-absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Yanjun; Peng, Zhimin; Ding, Yanjun; Sadeghi, Nader; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2016-08-01

    The measurement of absolute densities of reactive species and radicals such as OH is of growing interest for many plasma applications. In this paper, we extend the use of a self-absorption model for atomic emission spectroscopy to molecular emission spectroscopy. The proposed analysis of self-absorbed molecular emission spectra is a simple and inexpensive method to determine OH(X) densities and rotational temperatures compared to laser induced fluorescence. We compare the recorded absolute OH density in a non-equilibrium diffuse atmospheric-pressure RF glow discharge by this method with broadband UV absorption considering a number of rotational lines with J‧  ⩽  6.5, the detection limit of the line integrated OH(X) density with this method is of the order of 2  ×  1019 m‑2. The accuracy of the density is sensitive to the rotational temperature of the OH(A) state and the non-equilibrium rotational population distribution.

  1. Triangular Helical Column for Centrifugal Countercurrent Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoichiro; Yu, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Effective column space and stationary phase retention have been improved by changing the configuration of the helical column originally used for toroidal coil countercurrent chromatography. The use of an equilateral triangular core for the helix column doubles effective column space and retains the stationary phase over 40% of the total column capacity without increasing the column pressure. The present results suggest that the stationary phase retention and the peak resolution will be further improved using new column designs fabricated by a new technology called "laser sintering for rapid prototyping." PMID:20046940

  2. Soft X-Ray Absorption by High-Redshift Intergalactic Helium.

    PubMed

    Miralda-Escudé

    2000-01-01

    The Lyalpha absorption from intergalactic, once-ionized helium (He ii) has been measured with the Hubble Space Telescope in four quasars over the last few years in the redshift range 2.4absorption can be observed becomes increasingly difficult at higher redshift owing to the large abundance of hydrogen Lyman limit systems. It is pointed out here that He ii in the IGM should also cause detectable continuum absorption in the soft X-rays. The spectrum of a high-redshift source seen behind the IGM when most of the helium was He ii should recover from the He ii Lyman continuum absorption at an observed energy of approximately 0.1 keV. Galactic absorption will generally be stronger, but not by a large factor; the intergalactic He ii absorption can be detected as an excess over the expected Galactic absorption from the 21 cm H i column density. In principle, this method allows a direct determination of the fraction of helium that was singly ionized as a function of redshift if the measurement is done on a large sample of high-redshift sources over a range of redshifts. PMID:10587481

  3. Interstellar MG II Absorption Lines from Low-Redshift Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowen, David V.; Blades, J. Chris; Pettini, Max

    1995-08-01

    population as the higher redshift absorbers, although the sample is too small to permit a definitive analysis. There is some evidence for a sharp cutoff in equivalent width as p' increases, suggesting that low-redshift galaxies may be sharply bounded beyond ˜30 h-1 kpc. The luminosities of most of the absorbers in our program are such that the source sight lines pass through the predicted (Holmberg) optical radii of the galaxies. Hence the region between the optical radius and the gas radius of the z > 0.2 Mg II absorbers, ≍10 kpc to 30 h-1 kpc, remains unexplored at low redshift. Although our data do not enable us to determine whether the outer regions of galaxy disks are responsible for Mg II absorption systems, we note that 21 cm measurements currently available show that H I disks of the brightest spiral galaxies are already close to the sizes of higher redshift Mg II absorbers. We have found a correlation between the absolute blue magnitude of spiral galaxies and their H I radii measured at the N(H I) = 1019 and 1020 cm-2 level, and there is evidence that the correlation tends to that of the intermediate-redshift Mg II absorbing galaxies at lower N(H I) limits. Hence the outer regions of galaxy disks may well have sufficient column densities to produce Mg II absorption lines.

  4. Revised Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column

    SciTech Connect

    Laurinat, J

    2006-04-11

    following an interruption of flow to the column were calculated. The transient calculations were terminated after the maximum resin bed temperature reached the Technical Standard of 60 C, which was set to prevent significant resin degradation. The LANL column differs from the FWR column in that it has a significantly smaller radius, 3.73 cm nominal versus approximately 28 cm. It follows that natural convection removes heat much more effectively from the LANL column, so that the column may reach thermal equilibrium. Consequently, the calculations for a flow interruption were extended until an approach to thermal equilibrium was observed. The LANL ion exchange process also uses a different resin than was used in the FWR column. The LANL column uses Reillex HPQ{trademark} resin, which is more resistant to attack by nitric acid than the Ionac 641{trademark} resin used in the FWR column. Heat generation from the resin oxidation reaction with nitric acid is neglected in this analysis since LANL will be treating the resin to remove the LTE prior to loading the resin in the columns. Calculations were performed using a finite difference computer code, which incorporates models for absorption and elution of plutonium and for forced and natural convection within the resin bed. Calculations for normal column operation during loading were performed using an initial temperature and a feed temperature equal to the ambient air temperature. The model for the normal flow calculations did not include natural convection within the resin bed. The no flow calculations were started with the temperature and concentration profiles at the end of the loading stage, when there would be a maximum amount of plutonium either adsorbed on the resin or in the feed solution in the column.

  5. The absorption spectrum of the QSO PKS 2126-158 (z_em =3.27) at high resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Odorico, V.; Cristiani, S.; D'Odorico, S.; Fontana, A.; Giallongo, E.

    1998-01-01

    Spectra of the z_em = 3.268 quasar PKS 2126-158 have been obtained in the range lambda lambda 4300-6620 Angstroms with a resolution Rsmallimeq27000 and an average signal-to-noise ratio s/nsmallimeq 25 per resolution element. The list of the identified absorption lines is given together with their fitted column densities and Doppler widths. The modal value of the Doppler parameter distribution for the Lyalpha lines is smallimeq 25 km s(-1) . The column density distribution can be described by a power-law dn / dN ~ N(-beta ) with beta smallimeq 1.5. 12 metal systems have been identified, two of which were previously unknown. In order to make the column densities of the intervening systems compatible with realistic assumptions about the cloud sizes and the silicon to carbon overabundance, it is necessary to assume a jump beyond the He II edge in the spectrum of the UV ionizing background at z smallim 3 a factor 10 larger than the standard predictions for the integrated quasar contribution. An enlarged sample of C IV absorptions (71 doublets) has been used to analyze the statistical properties of this class of absorbers strictly related to galaxies. The column density distribution is well described by a single power-law, with beta =1.64 and the Doppler parameter distribution shows a modal value b_CIV smallimeq 14 km s(-1) . The two point correlation function has been computed in the velocity space for the individual components of C IV features. A significant signal is obtained for scales smaller than 200- 300 km s(-1) , xi (30< Delta v < 90 km\\ s(-1) ) = 33 +/- 3. A trend of decreasing clustering amplitude with decreasing column density is apparent, analogously to what has been observed for Lyalpha lines. Based on observations collected at the European Southern Observatory, La Silla, Chile (ESO No. 2-013-49K). Table 2 is only available in electronic from via anonymous ftp 130.79.128.5 or http://cdsweb.u-strasbg.fr/Abstract.html

  6. Effect of Clouds on the Calculated Vertical Distribution of Shortwave Absorption in the Tropics

    SciTech Connect

    McFarlane, Sally A.; Mather, James H.; Ackerman, Thomas P.; Liu, Zheng

    2008-09-23

    High vertical resolution profiles of cloud properties were obtained from cloud radars operated by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program on the islands of Nauru and Manus in the Tropical Western Pacific (TWP). Broadband flux calculations using a correlated k-distribution model were performed to estimate the effect of clouds on the total column and vertical distribution of shortwave absorption at these tropical sites. Sensitivity studies were performed to examine the role of precipitable water vapor, cloud vertical location, optical depth, and particle size on the SW column absorption. On average, observed clouds had little impact on the calculated total SW column absorption at the two sites, but a significant impact on the vertical distribution of SW absorption. Differences in the column amount, vertical profiles, and diurnal cycle of SW absorption at the two sites were due primarily to differences in cirrus cloud frequency.

  7. Relevance of an organic solvent for absorption of siloxanes.

    PubMed

    Ghorbel, Leila; Tatin, Romuald; Couvert, Annabelle

    2014-01-01

    A wide range of siloxanes exist but the most abundant in biogas are Hexamethyldisiloxane (L2) and Octamethyltrisiloxane (L3) as linear siloxanes and Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) as a cyclic siloxane. In order to remove volatile organic compound from biogas, different processes can be used. A promising process for siloxane removal is their absorption in an organic solvent. In this work, three oils were tested to absorb the selected siloxanes: silicone oil 47V20, Seriola 1510 and Polyalphaolefin. Initially, the characterization of these oils was realized by measuring their viscosities and densities, depending on temperature. The second time, the absorption capacity of the siloxanes by selected oils was characterized through the determination of their Henry's constants, but also owing to the implementation of a wet-wall column. Both Henry's constants and removal efficiencies in continuous regime revealed that silicone oil (47V20) can be considered as the most efficient oil among the three selected siloxanes. Moreover, the cyclic siloxane (D4) showed more affinity with oils than linear siloxanes. Silicone oil 47V20 appeared to be the best oil (intermediate price 14 euro/L, low viscosity, low volatility, chemical inertness (no corrosion) and resistance to high and low temperatures). PMID:24600877

  8. Ultraviolet gas absorption and dust extinction toward M8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boggs, Don; Bohm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Interstellar absorption lines are analyzed using high-resolution IUE spectra of 11 stars in the young cluster NGC 6530 located in the M8 region. High-velocity clouds at -35 km/s and -60 km/s are seen toward all cluster stars. The components arise in gases that are part of large interstellar bubbles centered on the cluster and driven by stellar winds of the most luminous members. Absorption lines of species of different ionization states are separated in velocity. The velocity stratification is best explained as a 'champagne' flow of ionized gas away from the cluster. The C IV/Si IV ratios toward the hotter cluster members are consistent with simple photoionization models if the gas-phase C/Si ratio is increased by preferential accretion onto dust grains. High ion column densities in the central cluster decline with distance from W93, suggesting that radiation from a hot source near W93 has photoionized gas in the central cluster.

  9. First Detection of HCO+ Absorption in the Magellanic System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Claire E.; Stanimir´, Snežana; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Putman, M. E.; Liszt, H. S.; Wong, Tony; Richter, P.; Dawson, J. R.; Dickey, John M.; Lindner, Robert R.; Babler, Brian L.; Allison, J. R.

    2015-07-01

    We present the first detection of HCO+ absorption in the Magellanic System. Using the ATCA, we observed nine extragalactic radio continuum sources behind the Magellanic System and detected HCO+ absorption toward one source located behind the leading edge of the Magellanic Bridge. The detection is located at an LSR velocity of v=214.0+/- 0.4 {km} {{{s}}}-1, with an FWHM of {{Δ }}v=4.5+/- 1.0 {km} {{{s}}}-1, and an optical depth of τ ({{HCO}}+)=0.10+/- 0.02. Although there is abundant neutral hydrogen (H i) surrounding the sight line in position-velocity space, at the exact location of the absorber the H i column density is low, \\lt {10}20 {{cm}}-2, and there is little evidence for dust or CO emission from Planck observations. While the origin and survival of molecules in such a diffuse environment remain unclear, dynamical events such as H i flows and cloud collisions in this interacting system likely play an important role.

  10. Atomic Oxygen Abundance in Molecular Clouds: Absorption Toward Sagittarius B2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lis, D. C.; Keene, Jocelyn; Phillips, T. G.; Schilke, P.; Werner, M. W.; Zmuidzinas, J.

    2001-01-01

    We have obtained high-resolution (approximately 35 km/s) spectra toward the molecular cloud Sgr B2 at 63 micrometers, the wavelength of the ground-state fine-structure line of atomic oxygen (O(I)), using the ISO-LWS instrument. Four separate velocity components are seen in the deconvolved spectrum, in absorption against the dust continuum emission of Sgr B2. Three of these components, corresponding to foreground clouds, are used to study the O(I) content of the cool molecular gas along the line of sight. In principle, the atomic oxygen that produces a particular velocity component could exist in any, or all, of three physically distinct regions: inside a dense molecular cloud, in the UV illuminated surface layer (PDR) of a cloud, and in an atomic (H(I)) gas halo. For each of the three foreground clouds, we estimate, and subtract from the observed O(I) column density, the oxygen content of the H(I) halo gas, by scaling from a published high-resolution 21 cm spectrum. We find that the remaining O(I) column density is correlated with the observed (13)CO column density. From the slope of this correlation, an average [O(I)]/[(13)CO] ratio of 270 +/- 120 (3-sigma) is derived, which corresponds to [O(I)]/[(13)CO] = 9 for a CO to (13)CO abundance ratio of 30. Assuming a (13)CO abundance of 1x10(exp -6) with respect to H nuclei, we derive an atomic oxygen abundance of 2.7x10(exp -4) in the dense gas phase, corresponding to a 15% oxygen depletion compared to the diffuse ISM in our Galactic neighborhood. The presence of multiple, spectrally resolved velocity components in the Sgr B2 absorption spectrum allows, for the first time, a direct determination of the PDR contribution to the O(I) column density. The PDR regions should contain O(I) but not (13)CO, and would thus be expected to produce an offset in the O(I)-(13)CO correlation. Our data do not show such an offset, suggesting that within our beam O(I) is spatially coexistent with the molecular gas, as traced by (13)CO

  11. Critical Density Interaction Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Young, P; Baldis, H A; Cheung, P; Rozmus, W; Kruer, W; Wilks, S; Crowley, S; Mori, W; Hansen, C

    2001-02-14

    Experiments have been performed to study the propagation of intense laser pulses to high plasma densities. The issue of self-focusing and filamentation of the laser pulse as well as developing predictive capability of absorption processes and x-ray conversion efficiencies is important for numerous programs at the Laboratory, particularly Laser Program (Fast Ignitor and direct-drive ICF) and D&NT (radiography, high energy backlighters and laser cutting). Processes such as resonance absorption, profile modification, linear mode conversion, filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering can occur near the critical density and can have important effects on the coupling of laser light to solid targets. A combination of experiments have been used to study the propagation of laser light to high plasma densities and the interaction physics of intense laser pulses with solid targets. Nonparaxial fluid codes to study nonstationary behavior of filamentation and stimulated Brillouin scattering at high densities have also been developed as part of this project.

  12. Suspension of Drops of a Liquid in a Column of Water.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Jamil

    1995-01-01

    Describes a demonstration which creates the illusion of violating Archimedes Principle. The procedure involves two liquids with identical densities and produces drops of one liquid suspended in the middle of a column of the second liquid. (DDR)

  13. The Milky Way's Hot Gas Kinematics: Signatures in Current and Future OVII Absorption Line Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Matthew J.; Hodges-Kluck, Edmund J.; Bregman, Joel N.

    2016-02-01

    Detections of z ≈ 0 oxygen absorption and emission lines indicate the Milky Way hosts a hot (˜ {10}6 K), low-density plasma extending ≳ 50 {{kpc}} into the Mily Way’s halo. Current X-ray telescopes cannot resolve the line profiles, but the variation of their strengths on the sky constrains the radial gas distribution. Interpreting the O vii Kα absorption line strengths has several complications, including optical depth and line of sight velocity effects. Here, we present model absorption line profiles accounting for both of these effects to show the lines can exhibit asymmetric structures and be broader than the intrinsic Doppler width. The line profiles encode the hot gas rotation curve, the net inflow or outflow of hot gas, and the hot gas angular momentum profile. We show how line of sight velocity effects impact the conversion between equivalent width and the column density, and provide modified curves of growth accounting for these effects. As an example, we analyze the LMC sight line pulsar dispersion measure and O vii equivalent width to show the average gas metallicity is ≳ 0.6{Z}⊙ and b ≳ 100 km s-1. Determining these properties offers valuable insights into the dynamical state of the Milky Way’s hot gas, and improves the line strength interpretation. We discuss future strategies to observe these effects with an instrument that has a spectral resolution of about 3000, a goal that is technically possible today.

  14. Cyclic performance of concrete-filled steel batten built-up columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaghi, M. S.; Khalkhaliha, M.; Aziminejad, A.

    2016-03-01

    Steel built-up batten columns are common types of columns in Iran and some other parts of the world. They are economic and have acceptable performance due to gravity loads. Although several researches have been conducted on the behavior of the batten columns under axial loads, there are few available articles about their seismic performance. Experience of the past earthquakes, particularly the 2003 Bam earthquake in Iran, revealed that these structural members are seismically vulnerable. Thus, investigation on seismic performance of steel batten columns due to seismic loads and providing a method for retrofitting them are important task in seismic-prone areas. This study aims to investigate the behavior of concrete-filled batten columns due to combined axial and lateral loads. To this end, nonlinear static analyses were performed using ANSYS software. Herein, the behaviors of the steel batten columns with and without concrete core were compared. The results of this study showed that concrete-filled steel batten columns, particularly those filled with high-strength concrete, may cause significant increases in energy absorption and capacity of the columns. Furthermore, concrete core may improve post-buckling behavior of steel batten columns.

  15. A new X-ray Absorption Model for the Interstellar Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatuzz, E.; Kallman, T.; García, J.; Gorczyca, T.; Mendoza, C.

    2014-07-01

    Absorption from the interstellar medium (ISM) affects every X-ray observation. Its effects are usually removed or studied using models which assume that the gas is neutral. However, spectra show that ions are present in most or many lines of sight. We present a model for interstellar X-ray absorption, which we call ismabs, that includes both ions and neutral elements and which uses the most accurate atomic data available for abundant elements. We have benchmarked ismabs using high-resolution spectra from X-ray binary sources obtained with the High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer (HETGS) on the Chandra X-ray observatory. The oxygen and neon K edge absorption regions as well as the iron L edge absorption region have been studied in detail. Although the neutral component is dominant in these spectra, the inclusion of ions leads to better fits to observed data, compared with previous work which only included neutral elements. The use of ismabs allows the determination of column densities of abundant elements, and their mean ionization states. Ismabs is fast and has relatively few free parameters. It has been developed for use with common X-ray spectral fitting packages such as XSPEC or ISIS.

  16. Multiple Velocity Components in the C IV Absorption Line of NGC 5548

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Elvis, Martin; Wilkes, Belinda

    1999-01-01

    We have observed the much-studied Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548 with the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). Our 14 ks observation covers the C IV emission line at a resolution of greater than 20,000. Our purpose was to study the absorption line found at lower resolution by IUE and the HST Faint Object Spectrograph. We found that the C IV absorption line resolves into six separate doublets with equivalent widths of 0.07-0.38 Angstrom. The absorption lines have blueshifts relative to the systemic velocity of the galaxy of 380-1250 km s(exp -1), except for one, which has a redshift of 250 km s(exp -1), suggesting both inflow and outflow. The inflowing component may be related to the accretion flow into the nuclear black hole. All the doublet lines are resolved by the GHRS. Three doublets are narrow, with FWHM greater than or approximately 100 km s(exp -1), and three are broad, FWHM approximately 160-290 km s(exp -1). We find evidence of partial covering by the narrow absorption lines. Either (but not both) of the two strongest broad doublets could be from the same material that produces the X-ray ionized absorber seen in soft X-rays. The remaining five systems must be at least 10 times less ionized (and so of lower total column density) to remain consistent with the X-ray spectra.

  17. Evidence for active galactic nucleus feedback in the broad absorption lines and reddening of MRK 231 {sup ,}

    SciTech Connect

    Leighly, Karen M.; Baron, Eddie; Lucy, Adrian B.; Terndrup, Donald M.; Dietrich, Matthias; Gallagher, Sarah C.

    2014-06-20

    We present the first J-band spectrum of Mrk 231, which reveals a large He I* λ10830 broad absorption line with a profile similar to that of the well-known Na I broad absorption line. Combining this spectrum with optical and UV spectra from the literature, we show that the unusual reddening noted by Veilleux et al. is explained by a reddening curve like those previously used to explain low values of total-to-selective extinction in Type Ia supernovae. The nuclear starburst may be the origin and location of the dust. Spatially resolved emission in the broad absorption line trough suggests nearly full coverage of the continuum emission region. The broad absorption lines reveal higher velocities in the He I* lines (produced in the quasar-photoionized H II region) compared with the Na I and Ca II lines (produced in the corresponding partially ionized zone). Cloudy simulations show that a density increase is required between the H II and partially ionized zones to produce ionic column densities consistent with the optical and IR absorption line measurements and limits, and that the absorber lies ∼100 pc from the central engine. These results suggest that the He I* lines are produced in an ordinary quasar BAL wind that impacts upon, compresses, and accelerates the nuclear starburst's dusty effluent (feedback in action), and the Ca II and Na I lines are produced in this dusty accelerated gas. This unusual circumstance explains the rarity of Na I absorption lines; without the compression along our line of sight, Mrk 231 would appear as an ordinary iron low-ionization, broad absorption line quasar.

  18. Trends in Covalency for d- and f-Element Metallocene Dichlorides Identified Using Chlorine K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Time Dependent-Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kozimor, Stosh A.; Yang, Ping; Batista, Enrique R.; Boland, Kevin S.; Burns, Carol J.; Clark, David L.; Conradson, Steven D.; Martin, Richard L.; Wikerson, Marianne P.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.

    2009-09-02

    We describe the use of Cl K-edge X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and both ground state and time-dependent hybrid density functional theory (DFT) to probe electronic structure and determine the degree of orbital mixing in M-Cl bonds for (C5Me5)2MCl2 (M = Ti, 1; Zr, 2; Hf, 3; Th, 4; and U, 5), where we can directly compare a class of structurally similar compounds for d- and f-elements. We report direct experimental evidence for covalency in M-Cl bonding, including actinides, and offer insight into the relative roles of the valence f- and dorbitals in these systems. The Cl K-edge XAS data for the group IV transition metals, 1 – 3, show slight decreases in covalency in M-Cl bonding with increasing principal quantum number, in the order Ti > Zr > Hf. The percent Cl 3p character per M-Cl bond was experimentally determined to be 25, 23, and 22% per M-Cl bond for 1-3, respectively. For actinides, we find a shoulder on the white line for (C5Me5)2ThCl2, 4, and distinct, but weak pre-edge features for 2 (C5Me5)2UCl2, 5. The percent Cl 3p character in Th-Cl bonds in 4 was determined to be 14 %, with high uncertainty, while the U-Cl bonds in 5 contains 9 % Cl 3p character. The magnitudes of both values are approximately half what was observed for the transition metal complexes in this class of bent metallocene dichlorides. Using the hybrid DFT calculations as a guide to interpret the experimental Cl K-edge XAS, these experiments suggest that when evaluating An- Cl bonding, both 5f- and 6d-orbitals should be considered. For (C5Me5)2ThCl2, the calculations and XAS indicate that the 5f- and 6d-orbitals are nearly degenerate and heavily mixed. In contrast, the 5f- and 6d-orbitals in (C5Me5)2UCl2 are no longer degenerate, and fall in two distinct energy groupings. The 5f-orbitals are lowest in energy and split into a 5-over-2 pattern with the high lying U 6d-orbitals split in a 4-over-1 pattern, the latter of which is similar to the dorbital splitting in group IV transition

  19. Glycolipid class profiling by packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Frantz S; Lesellier, Eric; Bleton, Jean; Baillet, Arlette; Tchapla, Alain; Chaminade, Pierre

    2004-06-18

    The potential of packed-column subcritical fluid chromatography (SubFC) for the separation of lipid classes has been assessed in this study. Three polar stationary phases were checked: silica, diol, and poly(vinyl alcohol). Carbon dioxide (CO2) with methanol as modifier was used as mobile phase and detection performed by evaporative light scattering detection. The influence of methanol content, temperature, and pressure on the chromatographic behavior of sphingolipids and glycolipids were investigated. A complete separation of lipid classes from a crude wheat lipid extract was achieved using a modifier gradient from 10 to 40% methanol in carbon dioxide. Solute selectivity was improved using coupled silica and diol columns in series. Because the variation of eluotropic strength depending on the fluid density changes, a normalized separation factor product (NSP) was used to select the nature, the number and the order of the columns to reach the optimum glycolipid separation. PMID:15248431

  20. Surface wave propagation characteristics in atmospheric pressure plasma column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2007-04-01

    In the typical experiments of surface wave sustained plasma columns at atmospheric pressure the ratio of collision to wave frequency (ν/ω) is much greater than unity. Therefore, one might expect that the usual analysis of the wave dispersion relation, performed under the assumption ν/ω = 0, cannot give adequate description of the wave propagation characteristics. In order to study these characteristics we have analyzed the wave dispersion relationship for arbitrary ν/ω. Our analysis includes phase and wave dispersion curves, attenuation coefficient, and wave phase and group velocities. The numerical results show that a turning back point appears in the phase diagram, after which a region of backward wave propagation exists. The experimentally observed plasma column is only in a region where wave propagation coefficient is higher than the attenuation coefficient. At the plasma column end the electron density is much higher than that corresponding to the turning back point and the resonance.

  1. A Flexible Moisture Content Probe for Unsaturated Soil Column Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    E. D. Mattson; K. E. Baker; C. D. Palmer; J. M Svoboda

    2006-05-01

    A commercially available soil moisture capacitance probe was modified by replacing rigid electrode traces with non-intrusive, flexible circuit board trace electrodes that can be attached to the interior of soil column walls. This new design minimizes soil packing difficulties and potential bias in flow pathways commonly associated with rigid probe installations in column experiments. Testing showed that the modified probe design provides reproducible output independent of sample bulk density. The electrical conductivity of the pore-water solution, however, affects the probe response. For cases where the specific conductance of the pore-water solution is constant, the probe can be calibrated. The flexible electrodes offer a simple means of minimizing sensor intrusion into laboratory soil columns while providing reproducible voltage output that is a function of moisture content.

  2. Calcium H&K and sodium D absorption induced by the interstellar and circumgalactic media of the Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murga, Maria; Zhu, Guangtun; Ménard, Brice; Lan, Ting-Wen

    2015-09-01

    We map out calcium II and sodium I absorption (Fraunhofer H, K & D lines) induced by both the interstellar medium and the circumgalactic medium of the Milky Way. Our measurements cover more than 9000 deg2 and make use of about 300 000 extragalactic spectra from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We present absorption maps for these two species and then compare their distributions to those of neutral hydrogen and dust. We show that the abundance of Na I with respect to neutral hydrogen stays roughly constant in different environments, while that of Ca II decreases with hydrogen column density. Studying how these tracers vary as a function of velocity, we show that, on average, the NNaI/NCaII ratio decreases at higher velocity with respect to the local standard of rest, similar to the local Routly-Spitzer effect but seen on Galactic scale. We show that it is likely caused by higher gas/dust density at lower velocity. Finally, we show that Galactic Ca II and Na I absorption needs to be taken into account for precision photometry and, more importantly, for photometric redshift estimation with star-forming galaxies. Our maps of Ca II and Na I absorption are publicly available.

  3. Searching for narrow absorption and emission lines in XMM-Newton spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campana, S.; Braito, V.; D'Avanzo, P.; Ghirlanda, G.; Melandri, A.; Pescalli, A.; Salafia, O. S.; Salvaterra, R.; Tagliaferri, G.; Vergani, S. D.

    2016-08-01

    We present the results of a spectroscopic search for narrow emission and absorption features in the X-ray spectra of long gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglows. Using XMM-Newton data, both EPIC and RGS spectra, of six bright (fluence > 10-7 erg cm-2) and relatively nearby (z = 0.54-1.41) GRBs, we performed a blind search for emission or absorption lines that could be related to a high cloud density or metal-rich gas in the environ close to the GRBs. We detected five emission features in four of the six GRBs with an overall statistical significance, assessed through Monte Carlo simulations, of ≲ 3.0σ. Most of the lines are detected around the observed energy of the oxygen edge at ~ 0.5 keV, suggesting that they are not related to the GRB environment but are most likely of Galactic origin. No significant absorption features were detected. A spectral fitting with a free Galactic column density (NH) testing different models for the Galactic absorption confirms this origin because we found an indication of an excess of Galactic NH in these four GRBs with respect to the tabulated values.

  4. AKARI observations of ice absorption bands towards edge-on young stellar objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Y.; Kamuro, D.; Sakon, I.; Itoh, Y.; Terada, H.; Noble, J. A.; Pontoppidan, K. M.; Fraser, H. J.; Tamura, M.; Kandori, R.; Kawamura, A.; Ueno, M.

    2012-02-01

    Context. Circumstellar disks and envelopes of low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs) contain significant amounts of ice. Such icy material will evolve to become volatile components of planetary systems, such as comets in our solar system. Aims: To investigate the composition and evolution of circumstellar ice around low-mass young stellar objects (YSOs), we observed ice absorption bands in the near infrared (NIR) towards eight YSOs ranging from class 0 to class II, among which seven are associated with edge-on disks. Methods: We performed slit-less spectroscopic observations using the grism mode of the InfraRed Camera (IRC) on board AKARI, which enables us to obtain full NIR spectra from 2.5 μm to 5 μm, including the CO2 band and the blue wing of the H2O band, which are inaccessible from the ground. We developed procedures to carefully process the spectra of targets with nebulosity. The spectra were fitted with polynomial baselines to derive the absorption spectra. The molecular absorption bands were then fitted with the laboratory database of ice absorption bands, considering the instrumental line profile and the spectral resolution of the grism dispersion element. Results: Towards the class 0-I sources (L1527, IRC-L1041-2, and IRAS 04302), absorption bands of H2O, CO2, CO, and XCN are clearly detected. Column density ratios of CO2 ice and CO ice relative to H2O ice are 21-28% and 13-46%, respectively. If XCN is OCN-, its column density is as high as 2-6% relative to H2O ice. The HDO ice feature at 4.1 μm is tentatively detected towards the class 0-I sources and HV Tau. Non-detections of the CH-stretching mode features around 3.5 μm provide upper limits to the CH3OH abundance of 26% (L1527) and 42% (IRAS 04302) relative to H2O. We tentatively detect OCS ice absorption towards IRC-L1041-2. Towards class 0-I sources, the detected features should mostly originate in the cold envelope, while CO gas and OCN- could originate in the region close to the protostar

  5. Axial development and radial non-uniformity of flow in packed columns.

    PubMed

    Park, Jaekeun C; Raghavan, Karthik; Gibbs, Stephen J

    2002-02-01

    Flow inhomogeneity and axial development in low-pressure chromatographic columns have been studied by magnetic resonance imaging velocimetry. The columns studied included (a) an 11.7-mm I.D. column packed with either 50 microm diameter porous polyacrylamide, or 99 or 780 microm diameter impermeable polystyrene beads, and (b) a 5-mm I.D. column commercially packed with 10 microm polymeric beads. The packing methods included gravity settling, slurry packing, ultrasonication, and dry packing with vibration. The magnetic resonance method used averaged apparent fluid velocity over both column cross-sections and fluid displacements greater than one particle diameter and hence permits assessment of macroscopic flow non-uniformities. The results confirm that now non-uniformities induced by the conical distributor of the 11.7-mm I.D. column or the presence of voids at the column entrance relax on a length scale of the column radius. All of the 11.7-mm I.D. columns examined exhibit near wall channeling within a few particle diameters of the wall. The origins of this behavior are demonstrated by imaging of the radial dependence of the local porosity for a column packed with 780 microm beads. Columns packed with the 99-microm beads exhibit reduced flow in a region extending from ten to three-to-five particle diameters from the wall. This velocity reduction is consistent with a reduced porosity of 0.35 in this region as compared to approximately 0.43 in the bulk of the column. Ultrasonicated and dry-packed columns exhibit enhanced flow in a region located between approximately eight and 20 particle diameters from the wall. This enhancement maybe caused by packing density inhomogeneity and/or particle size segregation caused by vibration during the packing process. No significant non-uniformities on length scales of 20 microm or greater were observed in the commercially packed column packed with 10 microm particles. PMID:11860146

  6. Eruption column modeling of supervolcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, F.

    2010-12-01

    Eruption columns consists of multiphase mixtures of gases and particulate matter in thermodynamic non-equilibrium, and tracking the multitude of interfaces associated with the liquid, solid, and plastic bodies of a wide spectrum of sizes is not practical. The current modeling practice is to use different averaging procedures by employing single-phase continuum models or those from the kinetic theory, together with various conditions that specify the microphysical processes of mixtures. But these models are inadequate to model the eruption columns of supervolcanoes, where the plumes reach the stratosphere and phase change processes contribute to the columns’ dispersion properties on the regional and global scales. A more effective multiphase flow modeling procedure is presented and its computer implementation is discussed.

  7. Self-absorption theory applied to rocket measurements of the nitric oxide (1, 0) gamma band in the daytime thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eparvier, F. G.; Barth, C. A.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the UV fluorescent emissions of the NO (1, 0) and (0, 1) gamma bands in the lower-thermospheric dayglow, made with a sounding rocket launched on March 7, 1989 from Poker Flat, Alaska, were analyzed. The resonant (1, 0) gamma band was found to be attenuated below an altitude of about 120 km. A self-absorption model based on Holstein transmission functions was developed for the resonant (1, 0) gamma band under varying conditions of slant column density and temperature and was applied for the conditions of the rocket flight. The results of the model agreed with the measured attenuation of the band, indicating the necessity of including self-absorption theory in the analysis of satellite and rocket limb data of NO.

  8. Absorption from a multi-layer circumnuclear medium and reflection from the accretion disc in NGC 1365

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Risaliti, G.

    2016-05-01

    NGC 1365 hosts an X-ray obscured AGN known for both its variable absorption and its relativistic features in the reflection component. Recent simultaneous observations performed by XMM-Newton and NuSTAR caught the source in a rare, nearly unobscured state, revealing the presence of a warm absorber and a neutral, but low column density (∼ 1022 cm-2) absorber, usually not observable due to thicker layers along the line of sight. Here I propose a multi-layer structure of the circumnuclear medium which can explain all the observed absorption states of this source, and their variability properties. Remarkably, despite the spectral complexity due to this multi-component absorber, the relativistic reflection component (and hence the black hole spin) can be unambiguously measured through a time resolved spectroscopic analysis.

  9. Hubble Space Telescope Faint Object Spectrograph and ground-based observations of the broad absorption line quasar 0226-1024

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korista, Kirk T.; Weymann, Ray J.; Morris, Simon L.; Kopko, Michael, Jr.; Turnshek, David A.; Hartig, George F.; Foltz, Craig B.; Burbidge, E. M.; Junkkarinen, Vesa T.

    1992-01-01

    Faint Object Spectrograph data from the Hubble Space Telescope of the broad absorption line quasar 0226-1024 have revealed the presence of 8-10 absorbing ions between 680 and 1000 A (restframe): C III, N III, N IV, O III, O IV, O VI, S V, S VI, possibly Ne VIII, and possibly O V* arising from a metastable excited state. We also present ground-based optical observations of the broad line troughs for the following ions: H I, C IV, N V, Si IV, and possibly Fe III, S IV, P V, and C III* (also arising from a metastable excited state). The results of this fit are used to estimate the absorbing ionic column densities. There is evidence that the broad absorption line clouds are optically thick and either do not completely cover the continuum source or narrow unresolved lines are present.

  10. Stability of elastically supported columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, Alfred S; Viscovich, Steven J

    1942-01-01

    A criterion is developed for the stiffness required of elastic lateral supports at the ends of a compression member to provide stability. A method based on this criterion is then developed for checking the stability of a continuous beam-column. A related method is also developed for checking the stability of a member of a pin-jointed truss against rotation in the plane of the truss.

  11. Beam Studies with Electron Columns

    SciTech Connect

    Shiltsev, V.; Valishev, A.; Kuznetsov, G.; Kamerdzhiev, V.; Romanov, A.; /Novosibirsk, IYF

    2009-04-01

    We report preliminary results of experimental studies of 'electron columns' in the Tevatron and in a specialized test setup. In the Tevatron, a beam of 150 GeV protons ionizes residual gas and ionization electrons are stored in an electrostatic trap immersed into strong longitudinal magnetic field. Shifts of proton betatron frequencies are observed. In the test setup, we observe effects pointing to accumulation and escape of ionization electrons.

  12. Water Column Methylation in Estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schartup, A. T.; Calder, R.; Soerensen, A. L.; Mason, R. P.; Balcom, P. H.; Sunderland, E. M.

    2014-12-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a neurotoxin that bioaccumulates in aquatic food webs and affects humans and wildlife through fish consumption. Many studies have measured active methylation/demethylation in ocean margin sediments but few have reported similar rates for the marine water column. This presentation will review available evidence for water column methylation in estuaries, including new experimental measurements of methylation/demethylation rates from a deep subarctic fjord in Labrador Canada collected in Spring and Fall of 2012-2013. We used these and other data to construct a mass budget for MeHg in the estuary and show that water column methylation (with rates ranging from 1.5 to 2.8 % day-1), is the largest contributor, followed by inputs from rivers (4.9 mol year-1), to the in situ pool of MeHg available for uptake by biota. By contrast, the sediment in this system is a net sink for MeHg (-1.5 mol year-1). We discuss the relationship between observed MeHg and other ancillary environmental factors (organic carbon, sulfur and nutrients) as well as implications for the response time of fish to future changes in mercury inputs.

  13. Constraining the ortho-to-para ratio of H2 with anomalous H_2CO absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troscompt, N.; Faure, A.; Maret, S.; Ceccarelli, C.; Hily-Blant, P.; Wiesenfeld, L.

    2009-11-01

    Context: The ortho-to-para ratio (OPR) of molecular hydrogen is a fundamental parameter in understanding the physics and chemistry of molecular clouds. In dark and cold regions, however, H2 is not directly observable and the OPR of H2 in these sources has so far remained elusive. Aims: We show that the 6 cm absorption line of ortho-formaldehyde (H2CO) can be employed to constrain both the density and the OPR of H2 in dark clouds. Methods: Green Bank Telescope (GBT) observations of ortho-H2CO toward the molecular cloud Barnard 68 (B68) are reported. Non-LTE radiative transfer calculations combined with the well-constrained structure of B68 are then employed to derive the physical conditions in the absorption region. Results: We provide the first firm confirmation of the Townes & Cheung mechanism: propensity rules for the collisions of H2CO with H2 molecules are responsible for the sub-2.7 K cooling of the 6 cm doublet. Non-LTE calculations show that in the absorption region of B68, the kinetic temperature is ˜ 10 K, the ortho-H2CO column density amounts to ˜ 2.2× 1013 cm-2, the H2 density is in the range 1.4{-}2.4× 10 4 cm-3, and the OPR of H2 is close to zero. Our observations thus provide fresh evidence that H2 is mostly in its para form in the cold gas, as expected from theoretical considerations. Our results also suggest that formaldehyde absorption originates in the edge of B68, at visual extinctions A_V⪉ 0.5 mag. This work has been inspired by our colleague and friend Pierre Valiron, who passed away in August 2008. This paper is dedicated to his memory.

  14. Convective stability of multicomponent fluids in the thermogravitational column.

    PubMed

    Ryzhkov, Ilya I; Shevtsova, Valentina M

    2009-02-01

    A comprehensive linear stability analysis of convection in the thermogravitational column is first performed for multicomponent fluids. Two types of perturbations are investigated: Longitudinal waves propagating in vertical direction of the column and transversal waves propagating perpendicular to the vertical axis and temperature gradient. The stability problems are reduced to those without cross-diffusion effect by a special transformation. The calculations are performed for binary and ternary mixtures by the Galerkin method. It is found that in binary fluids, the onset of longitudinal instability can be monotonic or oscillatory depending on the separation ratio, which characterizes the Soret effect. The difference between stability characteristics of binary and ternary fluids is associated with different diffusion times of components in a ternary system. It is shown that the mechanism of transversal instability is related to the unstable density stratification in the column (in total or due to individual components). The unstable stratification can only be realized in fluids with negative Soret effect. The analogue of exchange of stabilities principle for a plane column with a multicomponent fluid is proved. The obtained results indicate that the thermogravitational column can be used for measuring diffusion and thermal diffusion coefficients in ternary and higher mixtures with one or several components having negative Soret effect. PMID:19391841

  15. On the source of the dust extinction in type Ia supernovae and the discovery of anomalously strong Na I absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M. M.; Morrell, Nidia; Hsiao, E. Y.; Campillay, Abdo; Contreras, Carlos; Simon, Joshua D.; Burns, Christopher R.; Persson, Sven E.; Thompson, I. B.; Freedman, Wendy L.; Cox, Nick L. J.; Foley, Ryan J.; Karakas, Amanda I.; Patat, F.; Sternberg, A.; Williams, R. E.; Gal-Yam, A.; Leonard, D. C.; Stritzinger, Maximilian; Folatelli, Gastón; and others

    2013-12-10

    High-dispersion observations of the Na I D λλ5890, 5896 and K I λλ7665, 7699 interstellar lines, and the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å in the spectra of 32 Type Ia supernovae are used as an independent means of probing dust extinction. We show that the dust extinction of the objects where the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å is detected is consistent with the visual extinction derived from the supernova colors. This strongly suggests that the dust producing the extinction is predominantly located in the interstellar medium of the host galaxies and not in circumstellar material associated with the progenitor system. One quarter of the supernovae display anomalously large Na I column densities in comparison to the amount of dust extinction derived from their colors. Remarkably, all of the cases of unusually strong Na I D absorption correspond to 'Blueshifted' profiles in the classification scheme of Sternberg et al. This coincidence suggests that outflowing circumstellar gas is responsible for at least some of the cases of anomalously large Na I column densities. Two supernovae with unusually strong Na I D absorption showed essentially normal K I column densities for the dust extinction implied by their colors, but this does not appear to be a universal characteristic. Overall, we find the most accurate predictor of individual supernova extinction to be the equivalent width of the diffuse interstellar band at 5780 Å, and provide an empirical relation for its use. Finally, we identify ways of producing significant enhancements of the Na abundance of circumstellar material in both the single-degenerate and double-degenerate scenarios for the progenitor system.

  16. A search for ultraviolet circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha Piscis Austrinus (Fomalhaut), a possible Beta Pictoris-like system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K.-P.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Kondo, Yoji

    1994-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra have been used to search for circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha PsA (A3 V), a nearby (6.7 pc) proto-planetary system candidate. Recent sub-millimeter mapping observations around the region of alpha PsA indicate a spatially resolved dust disk like the one seen around Beta Pic. To determine how closely this putative disk resembles that of Beta Pic, we have searched for signatures of circumstellar gaseous absorption in all the available IUE high-dispersion data of alpha PsA. Examination of co-added IUE spectra shows weak circumstellar absorptions from excited levels in the resonance multiplet of Fe II near 2600 A. We also conclude that the sharp C I feature near 1657 A, previously identified as interstellar absorption toward alpha PsA, likely has a circumstellar origin. However, because the weakness of these absorption features, we will consider the presence of circumstellar gas as tentative and should be verified by using the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. No corresponding circumstellar absorption is detected in higher ionization Fe III and Al III. Since the collisionally ionized nonphotospheric Al III resonance absorption seen in Beta Pic is likely formed close to the stellar surface, its absence in the UV spectra of alpha PsA could imply that, in contrast with Beta Pic, there is no active gaseous disk infall onto the central star. In the alpha PsA gaseous disk, if we assume a solar abundance for iron and all the iron is in the form of Fe II, plus a disk temperature of 5000 K, the Fe II UV1 absorption at 2611.8743 A infers a total hydrogen column density along the line of sight through the circumstellar disk of N(H) approximately equals 3.8 x 10(exp 17)/cm.

  17. Probing X-Ray Absorption and Optical Extinction in the Interstellar Medium Using Chandra Observations of Supernova Remnants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foight, Dillon R.; Güver, Tolga; Özel, Feryal; Slane, Patrick O.

    2016-07-01

    We present a comprehensive study of interstellar X-ray extinction using the extensive Chandra supernova remnant (SNR) archive and use our results to refine the empirical relation between the hydrogen column density and optical extinction. In our analysis, we make use of the large, uniform data sample to assess various systematic uncertainties in the measurement of the interstellar X-ray absorption. Specifically, we address systematic uncertainties that originate from (i) the emission models used to fit SNR spectra; (ii) the spatial variations within individual remnants; (iii) the physical conditions of the remnant such as composition, temperature, and non-equilibrium regions; and (iv) the model used for the absorption of X-rays in the interstellar medium. Using a Bayesian framework to quantify these systematic uncertainties, and combining the resulting hydrogen column density measurements with the measurements of optical extinction toward the same remnants, we find the empirical relation N H = (2.87 ± 0.12) × 1021 A V cm‑2, which is significantly higher than the previous measurements.

  18. Simultaneous soft and hard X-ray spectroscopy of AM Herculis with EXOSAT: Discovery of photospheric absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerels, Frits; Heise, John; Teeseling, Andre Van

    1994-01-01

    We present 0.1-10 keV spectroscopic observations of AM Herculis obtained with the Transmission Grating Spectrometers and Medium Energy experiments on EXOSAT, taken when the object was in its 'reversed X-ray mode.' The observation covers over six binary orbits without interruption, enabling us to analyze the phase and intensity dependence of both the hard and the soft spectrum simultaneously. We resolve the optically thick soft X-ray spectrum, and find definite evidence for time- and phase-dependent photospheric absorption structure arising in the white dwarf atmosphere. We present a simple empirical analysis of the combined soft and hard X-ray spectra, to examine whether the effect of a better determination of the column density of neutral absorbing material, afforded by our data, would solve the problem of the large relative soft X-ray overluminosity previously observed in AM Her. We find that a single absorbing column fits the entire spectrum, and that the column densities implied are indeed substantially lower than previously estimated. However, during half the binary orbit we still determine a strong lower limit to the soft-to-hard luminosity ratio of L(sub soft)/L(sub hard) is greater than or approximately equal to 10, in conflict with the simple radiative shock models for the accretion region. We argue that this indicates the need to reexamine the luminosity problem using explicit models for the emission spectrum based on a full solution of the atmospheric radiative transfer problem.

  19. Lightweight structural columns. [space erectable trusses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, H. G. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    Lightweight half-lengths of columns for truss structures are described. The columns are adapted for nestable storage and transport to facilitate fabrication of large area truss structures at a remote site and particularly adaptable for space applications.

  20. Method for packed column separations and purifications

    DOEpatents

    Holman, David A.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2006-08-15

    The invention encompasses a method of packing and unpacking a column chamber. A mixture of a fluid and a matrix material are introduced through a column chamber inlet so that the matrix material is packed within a column chamber to form a packed column. The column chamber having the column chamber inlet or first port for receiving the mixture further has an outlet port and an actuator port. The outlet port is partially closed for capturing the matrix material and permitting the fluid to flow therepast by rotating relative one to the other of a rod placed in the actuator port. Further rotation relative one to the other of the rod and the column chamber opens the outlet and permits the matrix material and the fluid to flow therethrough thereby unpacking the matrix material from the column chamber.