Science.gov

Sample records for absorption cooling cycle

  1. Optimal Cooling Load and COP Relationship of a Four-Heat-Reservoir Endoreversible Absorption Refrigeration Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lingen; Zheng, Tong; Sun, Fengrui; Wu, Chih

    2004-06-01

    On the basis of a four-heat-reservoir endoreversible absorption refrigeration cycle model, another linear heat transfer law [i.e., the heat-flux] is adopted, the fundamental optimal relation between the coefficient of performance (COP) and the cooling load, as well as the maximum cooling load and the corresponding COP of the cycle coupled to constant-temperature heat reservoirs are derived by using finite-time thermodynamics or thermodynamic optimization. The optimal distribution of the heat-transfer surface areas is also obtained. Moreover, the effects of the cycle parameters on the COP and the cooling load of the cycle are studied by detailed numerical examples. The results obtained herein are of importance to the optimal design and performance improvement of an absorption refrigeration cycle.

  2. Thermodynamic equation of state approach for the choice of working fluids of absorption cooling cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, A. L.; Mansoori, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    A methodology is developed for the application of thermodynamic equations of state of fluids and fluid mixtures in evaluating working fluid combinations of absorption cooling cycles. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium formulation of this methodology is presented. In the application of this approach for the comparative study and choice of working fluids, the Redlich-Kwong equation of state is used for a number of possible working fluid combinations for solar absorption cooling cycles. It is demonstrated that when limited experimental data are at hand this approach could be a useful screening technique for potential working fluid combinations.

  3. A Novel Absorption Cycle for Combined Water Heating, Dehumidification, and Evaporative Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    CHUGH, Devesh; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Abdelaziz, Omar; Moghaddam, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    In this study, development of a novel system for combined water heating, dehumidification, and space evaporative cooling is discussed. Ambient water vapor is used as a working fluid in an open system. First, water vapor is absorbed from an air stream into an absorbent solution. The latent heat of absorption is transferred into the process water that cools the absorber. The solution is then regenerated in the desorber, where it is heated by a heating fluid. The water vapor generated in the desorber is condensed and its heat of phase change is transferred to the process water in the condenser. The condensed water can then be used in an evaporative cooling process to cool the dehumidified air exiting the absorber, or it can be drained if primarily dehumidification is desired. Essentially, this open absorption cycle collects space heat and transfers it to process water. This technology is enabled by a membrane-based absorption/desorption process in which the absorbent is constrained by hydrophobic vapor-permeable membranes. Constraining the absorbent film has enabled fabrication of the absorber and desorber in a plate-and-frame configuration. An air stream can flow against the membrane at high speed without entraining the absorbent, which is a challenge in conventional dehumidifiers. Furthermore, the absorption and desorption rates of an absorbent constrained by a membrane are greatly enhanced. Isfahani and Moghaddam (Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 2013) demonstrated absorption rates of up to 0.008 kg/m2s in a membrane-based absorber and Isfahani et al. (Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 2013) have reported a desorption rate of 0.01 kg/m2s in a membrane-based desorber. The membrane-based architecture also enables economical small-scale systems, novel cycle configurations, and high efficiencies. The absorber, solution heat exchanger, and desorber are fabricated on a single metal sheet. In addition to the open arrangement and membrane-based architecture, another novel feature of the

  4. Performance evaluation of single-glazed and double glazed collectors/regenerators for an open cycle absorption solar cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, R.; Wang, P.L.

    1998-07-01

    Feasibility for an open-cycle absorption solar cooling system operated in Kaohsiung, Taiwan is studied via a computer simulation program using previous obtained experimental correlations for the collector/regenerator (C/R) performance and the TMY data of Kaohsiung, Taiwan. Three C/R models are considered in this study. They are the natural and the forced convection single-glazed Cs/Rs and the forced convection double-glazed C/R. The effects of the C/R area, the C/R solution flow rate, the solution storage, the chilled water temperature and the daily cooling demand on the system performance in terms of seasonal solar fraction are studied and discussed. The results show that the solar C/R is the key component of the cooling system and the open-cycle absorption system is a sound solar cooling system. It is shown that the double glazed forced convection C/R gives a better system performance. The simulation study is to evaluate the seasonal solar fraction, which is defined as F=(solar cooling load)/(total cooling load) Firstly, all three C/R models are simulated under the base case conditions. The seasonal averaged solar fraction for three models are found to be 0.7, 0.75 and 0.79, respectively, while the corresponding seasonal averaged C/R efficiencies are 15.7%, 18.4% and 20.6%. The double-glazed forced convection system performs better than the other two systems. This is consistent with the results of previous experimental studies for the C/R. A nearly linear relationship between the C/R efficiency and the solar fraction is shown. The solar fraction increases slightly with the solution storage volume for the natural convection case, but it is much more sensitive to the solution storage for the forced convection system. The solar fraction is relatively insensitive to the C/R area after a critical value is reached. A similar dependence is also found in other solar absorption air conditioning system alternatives.

  5. Design, evaluation and recommedation effort relating to the modification of a residential 3-ton absorption cycle cooling unit for operation with solar energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrick, R. H.; Anderson, P. P.

    1973-01-01

    The possible use of solar energy powered absorption units to provide cooling and heating of residential buildings is studied. Both, the ammonia-water and the water-lithium bromide cycles, are considered. It is shown that the air cooled ammonia water unit does not meet the criteria for COP and pump power on the cooling cycle and the heat obtained from it acting as a heat pump is at too low a temperature. If the ammonia machine is water cooled it will meet the design criteria for cooling but can not supply the heating needs. The water cooled lithium bromide unit meets the specified performance for cooling with appreciably lower generator temperatures and without a mechanical solution pump. It is recommeded that in the demonstration project a direct expansion lithium bromide unit be used for cooling and an auxiliary duct coil using the solar heated water be employed for heating.

  6. The economics of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    Analytic procedure evaluates cost of combining absorption-cycle chiller with solar-energy system in residential or commercial application. Procedure assumes that solar-energy system already exists to heat building and that cooling system must be added. Decision is whether to cool building with conventional vapor-compression-cycle chiller or to use solar-energy system to provide heat input to absorption chiller.

  7. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  8. Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows.

    PubMed

    Buote

    2000-04-01

    The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC, we have detected strong absorption over energies approximately 0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central approximately 1&arcmin; of the galaxy NGC 1399, the group NGC 5044, and the cluster A1795. These systems have among the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below approximately 0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=105-106 K in which ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from H i and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass dropout in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission.

  9. Evaluation of an Absorption Heat Pump to Mitigate Plant Capacity Reduction Due to Ambient Temperature Rise for an Air-Cooled Ammonia and Water Cycle: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.; Nix, G.

    2001-08-06

    Air-cooled geothermal plants suffer substantial decreases in generating capacity at increased ambient temperatures. As the ambient temperature rises by 50 F above a design value of 50 F, at low brine-resource temperatures, the decrease in generating capacity can be more than 50%. This decrease is caused primarily by increased condenser pressure. Using mixed-working fluids has recently drawn considerable attention for use in power cycles. Such cycles are more readily amenable to use of absorption ''heat pumps.'' For a system that uses ammonia and water as the mixed-working fluid, this paper evaluates using an absorption heat pump to reduce condenser backpressure. At high ambient temperatures, part of the turbine exhaust vapor is absorbed into a circulating mixed stream in an absorber in series with the main condenser. This steam is pumped up to a higher pressure and heated to strip the excess vapor, which is recondensed using an additional air-cooled condenser. The operating conditions are chosen to reconstitute this condensate back to the same concentration as drawn from the original system. We analyzed two power plants of nominal 1-megawatt capacity. The design resource temperatures were 250 F and 300 F. Ambient temperature was allowed to rise from a design value of 50 F to 100 F. The analyses indicate that using an absorption heat pump is feasible. For the 300 F resource, an increased brine flow of 30% resulted in a net power increase of 21%. For the 250 F resource, the increase was smaller. However, these results are highly plant- and equipment-specific because evaluations must be carried out at off-design conditions for the condenser. Such studies should be carried out for specific power plants that suffer most from increased ambient temperatures.

  10. Closed-Cycle He-Cooled Absorption Cells Designed for a Bruker IFS-125HR: First Results Between 79 K and 297K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantz, Arlan W.; Sung, Keeyoon; Brown, Linda R.; Crawford, Timothy J.; Smith, Mary Ann H.; Devi, V. Malathy; Benner, D. Chris

    2010-06-01

    Gas absorption cells specifically designed to achieve stable temperatures down to ˜70 K to fit inside the sample compartment of an evacuated Bruker (IFS-125HR) Fourier Transform spectrometer (FTS) have been developed at Connecticut College, and tested at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). In operation, the temperature-controlled cooling by a closed-cycle helium refrigerator achieved a temperature stability of ±0.01 K. The unwanted absorption features initially observed from cryo-deposits formed on the outside cell windows were eliminated by adding an internal vacuum shroud box around the coolable cell to isolate it from residual gases in the evacuated FTS chambers. The effects of vibrations arising from the closed-cycle helium refrigerator upon the FTS spectra were characterized. Using this set up, high resolution spectra of several methane isotopologues (such as 12CH_4, 13CH_4 and 12CH_3D) broadened by N_2, were recorded in the 1230 to 1850 cm-1 spectral region. Such data are needed to characterize the temperature dependence of line shapes at very low temperatures for remote sensing of outer planets and their moons. Results from the initial analysis of the R(2) manifold of the ν_4 fundamental band of 13CH_4 are discussed to examine whether the N_2-broadened half width coefficients follow a simple exponential temperature-dependence over the entire 80 - 296 K temperature range. This initial test was very successful, proving that a high precision Fourier transform spectrometer can be easily configured for spectroscopic studies at very low temperatures relevant to planetary atmospheres. Research described in this paper was performed at Connecticut College, the College of William and Mary, NASA Langley Research Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, under contracts and cooperative agreements with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  11. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  12. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  13. Solar absorption cooling plant in Seville

    SciTech Connect

    Bermejo, Pablo; Pino, Francisco Javier; Rosa, Felipe

    2010-08-15

    A solar/gas cooling plant at the Engineering School of Seville (Spain) was tested during the period 2008-2009. The system is composed of a double-effect LiBr + water absorption chiller of 174 kW nominal cooling capacity, powered by: (1) a pressurized hot water flow delivered by mean of a 352 m{sup 2} solar field of a linear concentrating Fresnel collector and (2) a direct-fired natural gas burner. The objective of the project is to indentify design improvements for future plants and to serve as a guideline. We focused our attention on the solar collector size and dirtiness, climatology, piping heat losses, operation control and coupling between solar collector and chiller. The daily average Fresnel collector efficiency was 0.35 with a maximum of 0.4. The absorption chiller operated with a daily average coefficient of performance of 1.1-1.25, where the solar energy represented the 75% of generator's total heat input, and the solar cooling ratio (quotient between useful cooling and insolation incident on the solar field) was 0.44. (author)

  14. Open cycle lithium chloride cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lenz, T. G.; Loef, G. O. G.; Iyer, R.; Wenger, J.

    1983-05-01

    A lithium chloride open cycle absorption chiller has been designed, built and tested. Solution reconcentration takes place in a small counter current packed column supplied with solar heated air. Removal of noncondensable gases that enter the chiller dissolved in the strong solution and the make-up refrigerant streams is accomplished by a liquid-jet ejector and a small vacuum pump. Cooling capacities approaching 1.4 tons and COP levels of 0.58 have been achieved at non-optimum operating conditions. Test results from preliminary system operation suggest that mass transfer processes in both the packed column reconcentrator and the absorber are controlled by concentration gradients in the lithium chloride solution. Liquid phase controlled mass transfer dictates an operating strategy different from the previously assumed gas phase controlled process to obtain maximum rates of evaporation in the packed column. Determination of optimal operating conditions leading to decreased electrical power consumption and improved cooling capacity and coefficient of performance will require further analysis and testing.

  15. Fundamental Study of Absorption Cycle without Electric Solution Pump

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimori, Atsushi; Sato, Kazuo; Nakao, Kazushige; Ohgushi, Tetsuro; Katsuta, Masafumi

    The absorption refrigerant cycle has been used in Japan, as energy shortage problem is more and more serious and environmental protection is of increasing importance. This type of air conditioner and chiller consume less electric power input than the electric one. However, the absorption refrigerator of large cooling capacity consumes some electric power with the required facility. Then in this research, the absorption cycle without the electric solution pump is proposed using a capillary pump and the possibility of making this cycle running using LiBr solution as a working fluid is investigated. As a result, it was found that the absorption cycle could be reached using a capillary wick in the generator to circulate the refrigerant and kept the strong and weak solution low pressure.

  16. Preformance Analysis of NH3-H2O Absorption Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujimori, Atsushi; Ozaki, Eiichi

    Different from H2O-LiBr absorption cycle, it is necessary to have rectifier between generator and condenser in NH3-H2O absorption cycle, because there mixes some steam in refrigerant vapor in the process of regenerating refrigerant from the ammonia strong aqueous solution. And in some case ex. partial load or heating, the efficiency of rectifier might decrease, if the flow rate of refrigerant vapor and ammonia aqueous solution decrease. As a result, steam flow into condenser with ammonia refrigerant vapor, which reduces cycle COPs of cooling and heating. Accordingly in order to evaluate the effect of ammonia concentration in refrigerant for the performance of NH3-H2O absorption heat pump, the simple design approach of modeling condenser and evaporator is introduced in this paper. In the model, the calculation of heat rate in condenser and evaporator was simplified considering the characteristic of NH3-H2O liquid-vapor equilibrium. Then the simulation for cycle perforance based on GAX absorption cycle was made using the efficiency of rectifier that established the ammonia concentration in refrigerant and it was derived that 3 [%] decrease of ammonia concentration in refrigerant induced 15 [%] decrcase of cooling COP and 7 [%] decrease of heating COP and that there existed the most suitable circulation ratio for each ammonia concentration in refrigerant.

  17. Cycle Simulation of HotWater Fired Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esaki, Shuji; Iramina, Kazuyasu; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Ohnou, Masayuki; Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Soga, Takashi

    The design limits were examined to determine the lowest temperature for hot water that can be used as a heat source to drive a hot water fired absorption chiller. Advantage was taken of the fact that the cycle calculation method using the minimum temperature difference is quite effective. This minimum temperature difference was the lower of the two temperature differences used to get the logarithmic mean temperature difference that need to design the evaporator, absorber, condenser and generator in an absorption refrigerator. This report proposes a new solution algorithm employing this minimum temperature difference to make a cycle simulation of the hot water fired absorption chiller. It shows the lowest usable temperature for hot water and makes clear the chilled water and cooling water temperature conditions that can provide the lowest temperature.

  18. Overview of Resources for Geothermal Absorption Cooling for Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaobing; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R; Mehdizadeh Momen, Ayyoub

    2015-06-01

    This report summarizes the results of a literature review in three areas: available low-temperature/coproduced geothermal resources in the United States, energy use for space conditioning in commercial buildings, and state of the art of geothermal absorption cooling.

  19. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperatures boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorptions systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system`s components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H{sub 2}O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H{sub 2}O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the User`s Manual.

  20. Site dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A procedure was developed to evaluate the cost effectiveness of combining an absorption cycle chiller with a solar energy system. A basic assumption of the procedure is that a solar energy system exists for meeting the heating load of the building, and that the building must be cooled. The decision to be made is to either cool the building with a conventional vapor compression cycle chiller or to use the existing solar energy system to provide a heat input to the absorption chiller. Two methods of meeting the cooling load not supplied by solar energy were considered. In the first method, heat is supplied to the absorption chiller by a boiler using fossil fuel. In the second method, the load not met by solar energy is net by a conventional vapor compression chiller. In addition, the procedure can consider waste heat as another form of auxiliary energy. Commercial applications of solar cooling with an absorption chiller were found to be more cost effective than the residential applications. In general, it was found that the larger the chiller, the more economically feasible it would be. Also, it was found that a conventional vapor compression chiller is a viable alternative for the auxiliary cooling source, especially for the larger chillers. The results of the analysis gives a relative rating of the sites considered as to their economic feasibility of solar cooling.

  1. Cycle Analysis using Exhaust Heat of SOFC and Turbine Combined Cycle by Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takezawa, Shinya; Wakahara, Kenji; Araki, Takuto; Onda, Kazuo; Nagata, Susumu

    A power generating efficiency of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and gas turbine combined cycle is fairly high. However, the exhaust gas temperature of the combined cycle is still high, about 300°C. So it should be recovered for energy saving, for example, by absorption chiller. The energy demand for refrigeration cooling is recently increasing year by year in Japan. Then, we propose here a cogeneration system by series connection of SOFC, gas turbine and LiBr absorption chiller to convert the exhaust heat to the cooling heat. As a result of cycle analysis of the combined system with 500kW class SOFC, the bottoming single-effect absorption chiller can produce the refrigerating capacity of about 120kW, and the double-effect absorption chiller can produce a little higher refrigerating capacity of about 130kW without any additional fuel. But the double-effect absorption chiller became more expensive and complex than the single-effect chiller.

  2. Simulation and performance analysis of triple-effect absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.; DeVault, R.C.

    1993-08-01

    Performance simulation has been carried out for several triple-effect cycles, designed to improve utilization of high temperature heat sources for absorption systems and capable of substantial performance improvement over equivalent double-effect cycles. The systems investigated include the three-condenser-three-desorber (3C3D) cycle, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect one; the recently proposed Double Condenser Coupled (DCC) cycle which recovers heat from the hot condensate leaving the high temperature condensers and adds it to the lower temperature desorbers; and the dual loop cycle comprising two complete single-effect loops, recovering heat from the condenser and absorber of one loop to the desorber of the other loop and generating a cooling effect in the evaporators of both loops. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems was used to investigate the performances of the cycles and compare them on an equivalent basis, by selecting a common reference design and operating condition. Performance simulation was carried out over a range of operating conditions, including some investigation of the influence of the design parameters. Coefficients of performance ranging from 1.27 for the series-flow 3C3D to 1.73 for the parallel-flow DCC have been calculated at the design point. The relative merits and shortcomings of the different cycle configurations has been studied.

  3. Quasar Absorption Line Survey - Cycle 4 High

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahcall, John

    1994-01-01

    The Absorption Line Survey of bright quasars provides a homogeneous data base for studying fundamental questions about the origin and evolution of gaseous systems in the universe. The initial results determine at small redshifts the number densities of Ly-ALPHA systems, of metal-lines and extragalactic halos, of Lyman-limit systems, of associated absorption systems, and the shapes and intensities of quasar emission lines and spectral energy distributions. The survey reveals that much of the sky is covered by high or very high velocity metal-line clouds present in the Galactic halo. A larger sample, which includes the requested Cycle 3 observations, is required to answer many important questions. For example, what is the correlation function of Ly-ALPHA systems at small redshifts? What fraction of the metal, the Ly-ALPHA, and the Ly-limit systems are associated with galaxies and what are the characteristic sizes of the outer gaseous regions of different types of galaxies? Do absorbing systems show evidence of the large-scale structure seen with galaxies and clusters of galaxies? The observations requested in Cycle 3 will extend the region of coverage of the Key Project sample from the redshift range of z = 0.0 to 1.0 (Cycles 1& 2) to z = 0.0 to 1.6 (Cycles 1-3). THIS FILE CONTAINS THE HIGH PRIORITY OBSERVATIONS FROM CYCLES 2 and 3 WHICH WERE NOT COMPLETED IN THOSE CYCLES.

  4. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Lawson, M. B.; Lithgow, R. A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and was used to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The variables considered include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicates that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  5. H I absorption toward cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bregman, Joel N.

    1990-01-01

    An H I survey of 14 cooling flow clusters and two noncooling flow clusters was conducted, and H I absorption features were detected against the nuclear radio continuum sources of two cooling flow dominant (CFD) galaxies, 2A 0335 + 096 and MKW3s. The absorption features are broad and redshifted with respect to the stellar absorption-line velocity of the CFDs by 90-225 km/s. This indicates that the H I is falling onto, and is probably gravitationally bound to, the CFDs. The kinematics of the H I clouds suggest a possible kinematic link between the warm and cold phases of the intracluster medium. The clouds are orders of magnitude smaller in radius and mass and larger in density than Galactic H I clouds. The detected CFDs have mass-accretion rates that are about 2.5 times larger than the CFDs that were not detected.

  6. Cascade Reverse Osmosis Air Conditioning System: Cascade Reverse Osmosis and the Absorption Osmosis Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Battelle is developing a new air conditioning system that uses a cascade reverse osmosis (RO)-based absorption cycle. Analyses show that this new cycle can be as much as 60% more efficient than vapor compression, which is used in 90% of air conditioners. Traditional vapor-compression systems use polluting liquids for a cooling effect. Absorption cycles use benign refrigerants such as water, which is absorbed in a salt solution and pumped as liquid—replacing compression of vapor. The refrigerant is subsequently separated from absorbing salt using heat for re-use in the cooling cycle. Battelle is replacing thermal separation of refrigerant with a more efficient reverse osmosis process. Research has shown that the cycle is possible, but further investment will be needed to reduce the number of cascade reverse osmosis stages and therefore cost.

  7. Some heat pump concepts for residual heat utilization. [Absorption-cycle and open-cycle systems

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Blanco, H.; Chen, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Large quantities of low temperature heat in the industrial sector are rejected in the cooling water, condensate, and process water streams. While the energy rejected in these streams at temperatures between 40 and 80/sup 0/C amounts to 2.95 x 10/sup 9/ GJ/y, 2.42 x 10/sup 9/ GJ/y of process energy in the form of hot water and steam are needed in the United States. Industrial heat pumps, that recover the low temperature heat energy and upgrade it to a more usable temperature level, may improve the energy supply and demand situation. Two heat activated heat pump concepts - an absorption cycle system and an open cycle system are analyzed from the conceptual systems design and energy savings point of view. The results of the analysis and further research needs are presented.

  8. Performance Characteristics of Absorption Hybrid Cycle Introduced Compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyoki, Shigeki; Kotani, Yuji; Uemura, Tadashi

    In this paper, four kinds of absorption hybrid cycle which introduced the compressor in the absorption cycle were proposed. As basic cycle of absorption refrigerating machine, the following were chosen: two kinds of single-stage absorption refrigerating machine and two kinds of double effect absorption refrigerating machine. As a working medium-absorbent system, NH3-H2O system, C2H5NH2-H2O system and C2H5NH2-H2O-LiBr system were adopted. Using these three kinds of working medium-absorbent system, the performance characteristics of four kinds of absorption hybrid cycle were simulated. And the performance characteristics of these cycles were compared.

  9. Dilution cycle control for an absorption refrigeration system

    DOEpatents

    Reimann, Robert C.

    1984-01-01

    A dilution cycle control system for an absorption refrigeration system is disclosed. The control system includes a time delay relay for sensing shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system and for generating a control signal only after expiration of a preselected time period measured from the sensed shutdown of the absorption refrigeration system, during which the absorption refrigeration system is not restarted. A dilution cycle for the absorption refrigeration system is initiated in response to generation of a control signal by the time delay relay. This control system is particularly suitable for use with an absorption refrigeration system which is frequently cycled on and off since the time delay provided by the control system prevents needless dilution of the absorption refrigeration system when the system is turned off for only a short period of time and then is turned back on.

  10. Modeling of a Von Platen-Munters diffusion absorption refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agostini, Bruno; Agostini, Francesco; Habert, Mathieu

    2016-09-01

    This article presents a thermodynamical model of a Von-Platen diffusion absorption refrigeration cycle for power electronics applications. It is first validated by comparison with data available in the literature for the classical water-ammonia-helium cycle for commercial absorption fridges. Then new operating conditions corresponding to specific ABB applications, namely high ambient temperature and new organic fluids combinations compatible with aluminium are simulated and discussed. The target application is to cool power electronics converters in harsh environments with high ambient temperature by providing refrigeration without compressor, for passive components losses of about 500 W, with a compact and low cost solution.

  11. Optimum hot water temperature for absorption solar cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lecuona, A.; Ventas, R.; Venegas, M.; Salgado, R.; Zacarias, A.

    2009-10-15

    The hot water temperature that maximizes the overall instantaneous efficiency of a solar cooling facility is determined. A modified characteristic equation model is used and applied to single-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chillers. This model is based on the characteristic temperature difference and serves to empirically calculate the performance of real chillers. This paper provides an explicit equation for the optimum temperature of vapor generation, in terms of only the external temperatures of the chiller. The additional data required are the four performance parameters of the chiller and essentially a modified stagnation temperature from the detailed model of the thermal collector operation. This paper presents and discusses the results for small capacity machines for air conditioning of homes and small buildings. The discussion highlights the influence of the relevant parameters. (author)

  12. Analysis of the Solar Radiation Impact on Cooling Performance of the Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorčák, Pavol; Košičanová, Danica; Nagy, Richard; Mlynár, Peter

    2014-11-01

    Absorption cooling at low power is a new technology which has not yet been applied to current conditioning elements. This paper analyzes the various elements of solar absorption cooling. Individual states were simulated in which working conditions were set for the capability of solar absorption cooling to balance heat loads in the room. The research is based on an experimental device (absorption units with a performance of 10kW) developed at the STU in Bratislava (currently inputs and outputs of cold sources are being measured). Outputs in this paper are processed so that they connect the entire scheme of the solar absorption cooling system (i.e. the relationship between the solar systems hot and cold storage and the absorption unit). To determine the size of the storage required, calculated cooling for summer months is considered by the ramp rate of the absorption unit and required flow rate of the collectors.

  13. Site-dependent factors affecting the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartlett, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    A procedure has been developed which can be used to determine the economic feasibility of solar powered absorption cooling systems. This procedure has been used in a study to investigate the influence of the site-dependent parameters on the economic feasibility of solar absorption cooling. The purpose of this study was to make preliminary site selections for solar powered absorption cooling systems. This paper summarizes the results of that study.

  14. Comparative first- and second-law analysis of an absorption cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Blanco, H.; Pan, L.

    1985-07-01

    Generally, the basis of efficiency calculations and optimization studies of absorption cycles is the first law of thermodynamics. It is often argued that a first-law analysis does not produce all the information needed to optimize the absorption system. According to this line of thought, only an analysis based on the second law of thermodynamics gives the needed information. Assessment of the usefulness of second-law analysis as applied to absorption cycles seems adequate to determine the potential benefits of gathering the additional data for the absorbent-refrigerant combinations currently under consideration. To this end, a comparative first- and second-law analysis of a single-effect, lithium bromide-water absorption cycle is carried out here. An existing computer program and entropy values from the literature are used to analyze the cycle. The effects of temperature approaches in each heat exchanger and external heating/cooling fluid flow rates on the cycle performance are determined. A comparison of the results obtained via first- and second-law analyses reveals that the usefulness of the information depends on the boundaries of the system under consideration. Optimization of the absorption cycle itself, without considering the effect of external heating/cooling fluid flow rates at all, can be accomplished by first-law analysis. However, optimization of not only the cycle but also the external flow rates (i.e., the overall thermal system) is better accomplished by second-law analysis. Another interesting result of this study is that a critical temperature approach for cycle optimization can be found for the generator. In practical terms, this means that improving the heat exchanger in the generator will not always enhance the thermal performance of the cycle.

  15. Emissions-critical charge cooling using an organic rankine cycle

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Nelson, Christopher R.

    2014-07-15

    The disclosure provides a system including a Rankine power cycle cooling subsystem providing emissions-critical charge cooling of an input charge flow. The system includes a boiler fluidly coupled to the input charge flow, an energy conversion device fluidly coupled to the boiler, a condenser fluidly coupled to the energy conversion device, a pump fluidly coupled to the condenser and the boiler, an adjuster that adjusts at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle subsystem to change a temperature of the input charge exiting the boiler, and a sensor adapted to sense a temperature characteristic of the vaporized input charge. The system includes a controller that can determine a target temperature of the input charge sufficient to meet or exceed predetermined target emissions and cause the adjuster to adjust at least one parameter of the Rankine power cycle to achieve the predetermined target emissions.

  16. Integrated vacuum absorption steam cycle gas separation

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Shiaguo [Champaign, IL; Lu, Yonggi [Urbana, IL; Rostam-Abadi, Massoud [Champaign, IL

    2011-11-22

    Methods and systems for separating a targeted gas from a gas stream emitted from a power plant. The gas stream is brought into contact with an absorption solution to preferentially absorb the targeted gas to be separated from the gas stream so that an absorbed gas is present within the absorption solution. This provides a gas-rich solution, which is introduced into a stripper. Low pressure exhaust steam from a low pressure steam turbine of the power plant is injected into the stripper with the gas-rich solution. The absorbed gas from the gas-rich solution is stripped in the stripper using the injected low pressure steam to provide a gas stream containing the targeted gas. The stripper is at or near vacuum. Water vapor in a gas stream from the stripper is condensed in a condenser operating at a pressure lower than the stripper to concentrate the targeted gas. Condensed water is separated from the concentrated targeted gas.

  17. Available solar exergy in an absorption cooling process

    SciTech Connect

    Millan, M.I.; Martin, E.; Hernandez, F.

    1996-06-01

    Using the global solar radiation on a flat plate converter of selective surface, the process temperature, the ambient temperature and the characteristics of the collector as initial data; the maximum available exergy for feeding a lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and its daily distribution in Madrid is determined. The conversion of solar radiation into exergy is calculated through the Mueser endoreversible engine. The model, which takes into account the relative Sun-Earth movements, the presence of the atmosphere, the transitory regime, the losses to the surroundings and the losses caused by the heat capacities effect, allows a maximum hourly exergy efficiency of the available heat between 11 and 14.6% and a daily exergy efficiency in the order of 3% to be obtained. The maximum available daily exergy varies from 800 kJ/(m{sup 2} day) for a very hot clear day to 950 kJ/(m{sup 2} day) for a warm clear day. 11 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Performance Estimation of Absorption/Compression Cycle Using Working Pair Dimethyle Ether/Methanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, Naok; Maeda, Tetsuhiko; Hasegawa, Yasuo

    This paper presents the performance estimation of hybrid absorption/compression heat pump cycle, which use dimethyl ether (DME) and methanol pair as a working fluid. The disadvantage of the DME as a refrigerant is that it is flammable. But it has several advantages from the environmental aspects; toxicity is very low, and GWP is small. The first purpose of this study is to estimate the reduction of the loss of the heat exchangers, by use of absorption/compression cycle. And the second purpose is to lower the working pressure to reduce the possibility of the leakage of the working fluids. Two hybrid systems are supposed as models; one is absorption/compression system with single stage solution circuit, and another is an absorption/compression system with generator/absorber heat exchange cycle. The former cycle exceeds the cooling and heating COPs of pure DME cycle, reducing the maximum pressure about 130 kPa. And the latter system increases the heating COP by 6 to 36% with the working pressure range about 150-260 kPa.

  19. Optimal design of solid oxide fuel cell, ammonia-water single effect absorption cycle and Rankine steam cycle hybrid system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrpooya, Mehdi; Dehghani, Hossein; Ali Moosavian, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    A combined system containing solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine power plant, Rankine steam cycle and ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system is introduced and analyzed. In this process, power, heat and cooling are produced. Energy and exergy analyses along with the economic factors are used to distinguish optimum operating point of the system. The developed electrochemical model of the fuel cell is validated with experimental results. Thermodynamic package and main parameters of the absorption refrigeration system are validated. The power output of the system is 500 kW. An optimization problem is defined in order to finding the optimal operating point. Decision variables are current density, temperature of the exhaust gases from the boiler, steam turbine pressure (high and medium), generator temperature and consumed cooling water. Results indicate that electrical efficiency of the combined system is 62.4% (LHV). Produced refrigeration (at -10 °C) and heat recovery are 101 kW and 22.1 kW respectively. Investment cost for the combined system (without absorption cycle) is about 2917 kW-1.

  20. Performance Characteristics of Hybrid Cycle Combined Absorption Heat Transformer and Absorption Refrigerating Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyoki, Shigeki; Otsuka, Shin-Ichi; Uemura, Tadashi

    In this paper, four kinds of hybrid cycles which combined the single-stage absorption refrigerating machine and four kinds of absorption heat transformers were proposed. It is possible that each of these hybrid cycles gets high temperature and low temperature from one cycle, simultaneously. As basic cycle of absorption heat transformer, the following were chosen: two kinds of single-stage absorption heat transformer and two kinds of two-stage absorption heat transformer. As a working medium-absorbent system, H2O-LiBr system, H2O-LiBr-LiNO3 system, H2O-LiBr-LiNO3-LiCl system, H2O-LiBr-C2H6O2 system and H2O-LiNO3-LiCl system were adopted. Using these five kinds of working medium-absorbent system, the performance characteristics of four kinds of hybrid cycle were simulated. And the performance characteristics of these cycles were compared.

  1. ABSORPTIONS IN THE VISIBLE OF PROTONATED PYRENE COLLISIONALLY COOLED TO 15 K

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, F.-X.; Gause, O.; Rice, C. A.; Maier, J. P.

    2013-12-01

    Protonated polycyclic hydrocarbons have been added to the list of suggested carriers of diffuse interstellar absorptions. To test this proposition requires laboratory spectra measured under interstellar conditions, in particular with the rotational and vibrational degrees of freedom equilibrated to low temperatures. This has been achieved for protonated pyrene with absorption bands in the visible, using an ion trap and collisional cooling to ≈15 K. A two-photon excitation-dissociation scheme was employed to record the (1) {sup 1} A' ← X {sup 1} A' electronic spectrum on around 10{sup 5} ions per duty cycle. The origin band of the absorption spectrum of this relatively large polycyclic aromatic species with 27 atoms is located at 4858.86 Å. Two further comparably intense spectral features are present at 4834.48 and 4809.32 Å. This is one of the largest protonated aromatics studied in the gas phase and compared to astronomical observations; however, it is not a carrier of known diffuse interstellar bands.

  2. Integrated energy, economic, and environmental assessment for the optimal solar absorption cooling and heating system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hang, Yin

    Buildings in the United States are responsible for 41% of the primary energy use and 30% of carbon dioxide emissions. Due to mounting concerns about climate change and resource depletion, meeting building heating and cooling demand with renewable energy has attracted increasing attention in the energy system design of green buildings. One of these approaches, the solar absorption cooling and heating (SACH) technology can be a key solution to addressing the energy and environmental challenges. SACH system is an integration of solar thermal heating system and solar thermal driven absorption cooling system. So far, SACH systems still remain at the demonstration and testing stage due to not only its high cost but also complicated system characteristics. This research aims to develop a methodology to evaluate the life cycle energy, economic and environmental performance of SACH systems by high-fidelity simulations validated by experimental data. The developed methodology can be used to assist the system design. In order to achieve this goal, the study includes four objectives as follows: * Objective 1: Develop the evaluation model for the SACH system. The model includes three aspects: energy, economy, and environment from a life cycle point of view. * Objective 2: Validate the energy system model by solar experiments performance data. * Objective 3: Develop a fast and effective multi-objective optimization methodology to find the optimal system configuration which achieves the maximum system benefits on energy, economy and environment. Statistic techniques are explored to reveal the relations between the system key parameters and the three evaluation targets. The Pareto front is generated by solving this multi-objective optimization problem. * Objective 4: Apply the developed assessment methodology to different building types and locations. Furthermore, this study considered the influence of the input uncertainties on the overall system performance. The sensitivity

  3. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  4. Operating data on a novel absorption refrigeration cycle. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    McCluskey, R.J.

    1993-12-23

    This report describes the modifications and repairs made to the 200 ton absorption refrigeration pilot plant since April 1992, when Clarkson University assumed responsibility for it. Current operating problems and the performance of the plant, achieved to date, are detailed. Performance has been limited by small air leaks into the absorption section of the plant and by plugging in a heat exchanger which has limited the flow of purified glycol to the absorber. Nonetheless, the plant has been operated for periods of over eight hours with sustained cooling loads of 40 tons. Chilled water has been produced at a temperature as low as 38 degrees Fahrenheit. The principal leak sources have been pinpointed. Plans are described for achieving plant operation at designed levels.

  5. Recent Advances in SRS on Hydrogen Isotope Separation Using Thermal Cycling Absorption Process

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Xin; Sessions, Henry T.; Heung, L. Kit

    2015-02-01

    The recent Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10th of the current production system’s footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects and medical isotope production.

  6. Combined vapor compression/absorption heat pump cycles for engine-driven heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radermacher, Reinhard; Herold, Keith E.; Howe, Lawrence A.

    1988-12-01

    The performance of three combined absorption/vapor compression cycles for gas-fired internal combustion engine driven heat pumps was theoretically assessed. Two cycles were selected for the preliminary design of breadboard systems using only off-the-shelf components. The first cycle, based on the working pair ammonia/water, is termed the simple-cycle. The second cycle, based on the working pair lithium-bromide/water, is termed the compressor enhanced double-effect chiller. Both cycles are found to be technically feasible. The coefficient of performance and the capacity are increased by up to 21 percent for cooling in the first case (compressor efficiency of 0.7) and by up to 14 percent in the second (compressor efficiency of 0.5). Both were compared against the engine drive R22 vapor compression heat pump. The performance of actual machinery for both cycles is, in the current design, hampered by the fact that the desired oil-free compressors have poor isentropic efficiencies. Oil lubricated compressors together with very effective oil separators would improve the performance of the combined LiBr/water cycle to 23 percent.

  7. Near-UV absorption in very cool DA white dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Saumon, D.; Holberg, J. B.; Kowalski, P. M. E-mail: holberg@argus.lpl.arizona.edu

    2014-07-20

    The atmospheres of very cool, hydrogen-rich white dwarfs (WDs) (T{sub eff} < 6000 K) are challenging to model because of the increased complexity of the equation of state, chemical equilibrium, and opacity sources in a low-temperature, weakly ionized dense gas. In particular, many models that assume relatively simple models for the broadening of atomic levels and mostly ideal gas physics overestimate the flux in the blue part of their spectra. A solution to this problem that has met with some success is that additional opacity at short wavelengths comes for the extreme broadening of the Lyman α line of atomic H by collisions primarily with H{sub 2}. For the purpose of validating this model more rigorously, we acquired Hubble Space Telescope STIS spectra of eight very cool WDs (five DA and three DC stars). Combined with their known parallaxes, BVRIJHK, and Spitzer IRAC photometry, we analyze their entire spectral energy distribution (from 0.24 to 9.3 μm) with a large grid of model atmospheres and synthetic spectra. We find that the red wing of the Lyman α line reproduces the rapidly decreasing near-UV flux of these very cool stars very well. We determine better constrained values of T{sub eff} and gravity as well as upper limits to the helium abundance in their atmospheres.

  8. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vliet, G.C.; Lawson, M.B.; Lithgow, R.A.

    1980-12-01

    This investigation involved the development of a numerical model for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine, and the use of the model to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The sensitivity analysis was performed by selecting a nominal condition and determining performance sensitivity for each variable with others held constant. The variables considered in the study include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicated in particular that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy. The dynamic model should be valuable as a design tool for developing new absorption machines or modifying current machines to make them optimal based on current and future energy costs.

  9. Improvement of the COP of the LiBr-Water Double-Effect Absorption Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shitara, Atsushi

    Prevention of the global warming has called for a great necessity for energy saving. This applies to the improvement of the COP of absorption chiller-heaters. We started the development of the high efficiency gas-fired double-effect absorption chiller-heater using LiBr-H2O to achieve target performance in short or middle term. To maintain marketability, the volume of the high efficiency machine has been set below the equal to the conventional machine. The absorption cycle technology for improving the COP and the element technology for downsizing the machine is necessary in this development. In this study, the former is investigated. In this report, first of all the target performance has been set at cooling COP of 1.35(on HHV), which is 0.35 higher than the COP of 1.0 for conventional machines in the market. This COP of 1.35 is practically close to the maximum limit achievable by double-effect absorption chiller-heater. Next, the design condition of each element to achieve the target performance and the effect of each mean to improve the COP are investigated. Moreover, as a result of comparing the various flows(series, parallel, reverse)to which the each mean is applied, it has been found the optimum cycle is the parallel flow.

  10. Characteristic Simulation of the Waste-Heat Utilization Absorption Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jung-In; Oh, Hoo-Kyu; Kashiwagi, Takao

    In the recent years double effect cycles have gathered a lot of attention because of their good efficiency particularly fitting with preoccupation of energy saving and with recent environmental problems. Simulation studies on double effect absorption cycles for refrigeration purposes have been performed for H2O/LiBr fair. The purpose of this study is the objective for evaluating the possibilities of effectively utilizing waste-heat as a secondary heat source for the low temperature generator. The efficiency of the different cycles have been studied and the simulation results show that higher coefficient of performance could be obtained for standard parallel cycle (TYPE PA). The optimum designs and operating conditions were determined based on the operating conditions and the coefficient of performance. The effectiveness of introducing a waste-heat source of about the same temperature level as the low temperature generator is demonstrated. If the cycles are assisted by fuel cell waste-heat, the input of waste-heat to low temperature generation parallel cycle (TYPE PB) yields highest COP.

  11. Parallel LC circuit model for multi-band absorption and preliminary design of radiative cooling.

    PubMed

    Feng, Rui; Qiu, Jun; Liu, Linhua; Ding, Weiqiang; Chen, Lixue

    2014-12-15

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of multi-band absorption by exciting magnetic polaritons in the infrared region. According to the independent properties of the magnetic polaritons, we propose a parallel inductance and capacitance(PLC) circuit model to explain and predict the multi-band resonant absorption peaks, which is fully validated by using the multi-sized structure with identical dielectric spacing layer and the multilayer structure with the same strip width. More importantly, we present the application of the PLC circuit model to preliminarily design a radiative cooling structure realized by merging several close peaks together. This omnidirectional and polarization insensitive structure is a good candidate for radiative cooling application.

  12. Thermal design of lithium bromide-water solution vapor absorption cooling system for indirect evaporative cooling for IT pod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, Digvijay Ramkrishna

    Nowadays with increase use of internet, mobile there is increase in heat which ultimately increases the efficient cooling system of server room or IT POD. Use of traditional ways of cooling system has ultimately increased CO2 emission and depletion of CFC's are serious environmental issues which led scientific people to improve cooling techniques and eliminate use of CFC's. To reduce dependency on fossil fuels and 4environmental friendly system needed to be design. For being utilizing low grade energy source such as solar collector and reducing dependency on fossil fuel vapour absorption cooling system has shown a great driving force in today's refrigeration systems. This LiBr-water aabsorption cooling consists of five heat exchanger namely: Evaporator, Absorber, Solution Heat Exchanger, Generator, Condenser. The thermal design was done for a load of 23 kW and the procedure was described in the thesis. There are 120 servers in the IT POD emitting 196 W of heat each on full load and some of the heat was generated by the computer placed inside the IT POD. A detailed procedure has been discussed. A excel spreadsheet was to prepared with varying tube sizes to see the effect on flows and ultimately overall heat transfer coefficient.

  13. Analysis of combined heat and mass transfer in closed-cycle adsorption cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hajji, A.

    1987-01-01

    A relationship for the solid-vapor adsorption equilibrium is proposed and proved to represent accurately the experimental data and to be convenient for numerical calculations. Formulas describing the process involved in closed-cycle cooling and heating systems are also derived. These formulas are first applied in a dynamic analysis of a closed-cycle solar adsorption refrigerator. A computer program was written to study the effect of the design parameters and operating conditions on the system performance. A second application concerns the simulation of the regenerative adsorption cooling systems which were recently introduced to increase the performance of adsorption machines. A computer program was developed to analyze the dynamic behavior of such systems. An analytical investigation of the vapor-liquid absorption is presented. Closed-form solution were obtained where the depth of the absorbing solution is taken into account. The effect of interfacial instability on heat and mass transfer is also modeled by introducing constant heat and mass transfer coefficients. An analysis of the fully developed natural convection heat and mass transfer between two inclined parallel plates is presented. Solvability conditions are determined and closed-form expressions for the temperature and concentration obtained.

  14. Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C. . Applied Unitary/Refrigeration Systems Div.)

    1992-03-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

  15. Development of a stabilized low temperature infrared absorption cell for use in low temperature and collisional cooling experiments.

    PubMed

    Valentin, A; Henry, A; Claveau, C; Camy-Peyret, C; Hurtmans, D; Mantz, A W

    2004-12-01

    We have constructed a stabilized low temperature infrared absorption cell cooled by an open cycle refrigerator, which can run with liquid nitrogen from 250 to 80K or with liquid helium from 80K to a few kelvin. Several CO infrared spectra were recorded at low temperature using a tunable diode laser spectrometer. These spectra were analyzed taking into account the detailed effects of collisions on the line profile when the pressure increases. We also recorded spectra at very low pressure to accurately model the diode laser emission. Spectra of the R(2) line in the fundamental band of 13CO cooled by collisions with helium buffer gas at 10.5K and at pressures near 1 Torr have been recorded. The He-pressure broadening parameter (gamma(0) = 0.3 cm(-1) atm(-1)) has been derived from the simultaneous analysis of four spectra at different pressures.

  16. Investigation of Absorption Cooling Application Powered by Solar Energy in the South Coast Region of Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babayigit, O.; Aksoy, M. H.; Ozgoren, M.; Solmaz, O.

    2013-04-01

    In this study, an absorption system using ammonia-water (NH3-H2O) solution has been theoretically examined in order to meet the cooling need of a detached building having 150 m2 floor area for Antalya, Mersin and Mugla provinces in Turkey. Hourly dynamic cooling load capacities of the building were determined by using Radiant Time Series (RTS) method in the chosen cities. For the analysis, hourly average meteorological data such as atmospheric air temperature and solar radiation belonging to the years 1998-2008 are used for performance prediction of the proposed system. Thermodynamic relations for each component of absorption cooling system is explained and coefficients of performance of the system are calculated. The maximum daily total radiation data were calculated as 7173 W/m2day on July 15, 7277 W/m2 day on July 19 and 7231 W/m2day on July 19 for Mersin, Antalya and Mugla, respectively on the 23° toward to south oriented panels from horizontal surface. The generator operating temperatures are considered between 90-130°C and the best result for 110°C is found the optimum degree for maximum coefficient of performance (COP) values at the highest solar radiation occurred time during the considered days for each province. The COP values varies between 0.521 and 0.530 for the provinces. In addition, absorber and condenser capacities and thermal efficiency for the absorption cooling system were calculated. The necessary evacuated tube collector area for the different provinces were found in the range of 45 m2 to 47 m2. It is shown that although the initial investment cost is higher for the proposed absorption cooling system, it is economically feasible because of its lower annual operation costs and can successfully be operated for the considered provinces.

  17. Evaluation of absorption cycle for space station environmental control system application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, W. H.; Oneill, M. J.; Reid, H. C.; Bisenius, P. M.

    1972-01-01

    The study to evaluate an absorption cycle refrigeration system to provide environmental control for the space stations is reported. A zero-gravity liquid/vapor separator was designed and tested. The results were used to design a light-weight, efficient generator for the absorption refrigeration system. It is concluded that absorption cycle refrigeration is feasible for providing space station environmental control.

  18. Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

  19. Exergy analysis of an integrated solid oxide fuel cell and organic Rankine cycle for cooling, heating and power production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sulaiman, Fahad A.; Dincer, Ibrahim; Hamdullahpur, Feridun

    The study examines a novel system that combined a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and an organic Rankine cycle (ORC) for cooling, heating and power production (trigeneration) through exergy analysis. The system consists of an SOFC, an ORC, a heat exchanger and a single-effect absorption chiller. The system is modeled to produce a net electricity of around 500 kW. The study reveals that there is 3-25% gain on exergy efficiency when trigeneration is used compared with the power cycle only. Also, the study shows that as the current density of the SOFC increases, the exergy efficiencies of power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration decreases. In addition, it was shown that the effect of changing the turbine inlet pressure and ORC pump inlet temperature are insignificant on the exergy efficiencies of the power cycle, cooling cogeneration, heating cogeneration and trigeneration. Also, the study reveals that the significant sources of exergy destruction are the ORC evaporator, air heat exchanger at the SOFC inlet and heating process heat exchanger.

  20. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T.

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  1. Simulation and performance comparison of LiBr/H{sub 2}O triple-effect absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    DeVault, R.C.; Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1994-01-01

    Performance simulation has been carried out for several LiBr/H2O triple-effect cycles using the Absorption Simulation Model (ABSIM) . The systems investigated include the three-condenser-three-desorber (3C3D) cycle, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; and two cycles which additionally recover heat from the hot condensate leaving the highest temperature condenser by adding the heat to the lowest temperature desorber. These latter two cycles are called Double Condenser Coupled (DCC) cycles since each uses heat recovered from the highest temperature refrigerant to heat both the middle temperature desorber (heat of condensation) and the lowest temperature desorber (by further subcooling the condensed refrigerant), hence the ``double-coupling``. ABSIM, a modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems, was used to investigate the performances of each of the cycles and compare them on an equivalent basis. The performance simulation was carried out over a range of operating conditions, including some investigation into the influence of varying particular design parameters. Cooling coefficients of performance ranging from 1.27 for the series-flow 3C3D to 1.73 for the parallel-flow DCC have been calculated at the design point. Relative merits of these LiBr/H20 triple-effect cycle configurations are discussed.

  2. Absorption line profiles in a companion spectrum of a mass losing cool supergiant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Liliya L.; Boehm-Vitense, Erika

    1990-01-01

    Cool star winds can best be observed in resonance absorption lines seen in the spectrum of a hot companion, due to the wind passing in front of the blue star. We calculated absorption line profiles that would be seen in the ultraviolet part of the blue companion spectrum. Line profiles are derived for different radial dependences of the cool star wind and for different orbital phases of the binary. Bowen and Wilson find theoretically that stellar pulsations drive mass loss. We therefore apply our calculations to the Cepheid binary S Muscae which has a B5V companion. We find an upper limit for the Cepheid mass loss of M less than or equal to 7 x 10(exp -10) solar mass per year provided that the stellar wind of the companion does not influence the Cepheid wind at large distances.

  3. System and method for regulating EGR cooling using a rankine cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Ernst, Timothy C.; Morris, Dave

    2015-12-22

    This disclosure relates to a waste heat recovery (WHR) system and method for regulating exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooling, and more particularly, to a Rankine cycle WHR system and method, including a recuperator bypass arrangement to regulate EGR exhaust gas cooling for engine efficiency improvement and thermal management. This disclosure describes other unique bypass arrangements for increased flexibility in the ability to regulate EGR exhaust gas cooling.

  4. Optical and ultraviolet absorption studies of cool gas in the Milky Way halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danly, L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper focuses on the contributions from absorption techniques to the knowledge of halo gas with temperatures below 10 to the 5th K. The results from observations of the neutral and singly ionized species on the nature of cool gas in the halo, its structure and its kinematics are presented. An overview of past and optical and ultraviolet observational studies of halo gas is included.

  5. A closed cycle cascade Joule Thomson refrigerator for cooling Josephson junction magnetometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tward, E.; Sarwinski, R.

    1985-01-01

    A closed cycle cascade Joule Thomson refrigerator designed to cool Josephson Junction magnetometers to liquid helium temperature is being developed. The refrigerator incorporates 4 stages of cooling using the working fluids CF4 and He. The high pressure gases are provided by a small compressor designed for this purpose. The upper stages have been operated and performance will be described.

  6. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  7. A combined gas cooled nuclear reactor and fuel cell cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, David J.

    Rising oil costs, global warming, national security concerns, economic concerns and escalating energy demands are forcing the engineering communities to explore methods to address these concerns. It is the intention of this thesis to offer a proposal for a novel design of a combined cycle, an advanced nuclear helium reactor/solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) plant that will help to mitigate some of the above concerns. Moreover, the adoption of this proposal may help to reinvigorate the Nuclear Power industry while providing a practical method to foster the development of a hydrogen economy. Specifically, this thesis concentrates on the importance of the U.S. Nuclear Navy adopting this novel design for its nuclear electric vessels of the future with discussion on efficiency and thermodynamic performance characteristics related to the combined cycle. Thus, the goals and objectives are to develop an innovative combined cycle that provides a solution to the stated concerns and show that it provides superior performance. In order to show performance, it is necessary to develop a rigorous thermodynamic model and computer program to analyze the SOFC in relation with the overall cycle. A large increase in efficiency over the conventional pressurized water reactor cycle is realized. Both sides of the cycle achieve higher efficiencies at partial loads which is extremely important as most naval vessels operate at partial loads as well as the fact that traditional gas turbines operating alone have poor performance at reduced speeds. Furthermore, each side of the cycle provides important benefits to the other side. The high temperature exhaust from the overall exothermic reaction of the fuel cell provides heat for the reheater allowing for an overall increase in power on the nuclear side of the cycle. Likewise, the high temperature helium exiting the nuclear reactor provides a controllable method to stabilize the fuel cell at an optimal temperature band even during transients helping

  8. Measured performance of a 3-ton LiBr absorption water chiller and its effect on cooling system operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A 3-ton lithium bromide absorption water chiller was tested for a number of conditions involving hot-water input, chilled water, and the cooling water. The primary influences on chiller capacity were the hot water inlet temperature and the cooling water inlet temperature. One combination of these two parameters extended the output to as much as 125% of design capacity, but no combination could lower the capacity to below 60% of design. A cooling system was conceptually designed so that it could provide several modes of operation. Such flexibility is needed for any solar cooling system to be able to accommodate the varying solar energy collection and the varying building demand. It is concluded that a 3-ton absorption water chiller with the kind of performance that was measured can be incorporated into a cooling system such as that proposed, to provide efficient cooling over the specified ranges of operating conditions.

  9. Measured performance of a 3 ton LiBr absorption water chiller and its effect on cooling system operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Namkoong, D.

    1976-01-01

    A three ton lithium bromide absorption water chiller was tested for a number of conditions involving hot water input, chilled water, and the cooling water. The primary influences on chiller capacity were the hot water inlet temperature and the cooling water inlet temperature. One combination of these two parameters extended the output to as much as 125% of design capacity, but no combination could lower the capacity to below 60% of design. A cooling system was conceptually designed so that it could provide several modes of operation. Such flexibility is needed for any solar cooling system to be able to accommodate the varying solar energy collection and the varying building demand. It was concluded that a three-ton absorption water chiller with the kind of performance that was measured can be incorporated into a cooling system such as that proposed, to provide efficient cooling over the specified ranges of operating conditions.

  10. Jet-cooled infrared absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of HCOOH and HCOOD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Wei; Zhang, Yulan; Li, Wenguang; Duan, Chuanxi

    2017-04-01

    The jet-cooled absorption spectrum of the v4 fundamental band of normal formic acid (HCOOH) and deuterated formic acid (HCOOD) was recorded in the frequency range of 1370-1392 cm-1 with distributed-feedback quantum cascade lasers (DFB-QCLs) as the tunable infrared radiations. A segmented rapid-scan data acquisition scheme was developed for pulsed supersonic jet infrared laser absorption spectroscopy based on DFB-QCLs with a moderate vacuum pumping capacity. The unperturbed band-origin and rotational constants in the excited vibrational state were determined for both HCOOH and HCOOD. The unperturbed band-origin locates at 1379.05447(11) cm-1 for HCOOH, and 1366.48430(39) cm-1 for HCOOD, respectively.

  11. Search for CO absorption bands in IUE far-ultraviolet spectra of cool stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gessner, Susan E.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Robinson, Richard D.

    1994-01-01

    Observations of the red supergiant (M2 Iab) alpha Ori with the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have provided an unambiguous detection of a far-ultraviolet (far-UV) chromospheric continuum on which are superposed strong molecular absorption bands. The absorption bands have been identified by Carpenter et al. (1994) with the fourth-positive A-X system of CO and are likely formed in the circumstellar shell. Comparison of these GHRS data with archival International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra of alpha Ori indicates that both the continuum and the CO absorption features can be seen with IUE, especially if multiple IUE spectra, reduced with the post-1981 IUESIPS extraction procedure (i.e., with an oversampling slit), are carefully coadded to increase the signal to noise over that obtainable with a single spectrum. We therefore initiated a program, utilizing both new and archival IUE Short Wavelength Prime (SWP) spectra, to survey 15 cool, low-gravity stars, including alpha Ori, for the presence of these two new chromospheric and circumstellar shell diagnostics. We establish positive detections of far-UV stellar continua, well above estimated IUE in-order scattered light levels, in spectra of all of the program stars. However, well-defined CO absorption features are seen only in the alpha Ori spectra, even though spectra of most of the program stars have sufficient signal to noise to allow the dectection of features of comparable magnitude to the absorptions seen in alpha Ori. Clearly if CO is present in the circumstellar environments of any of these stars, it is at much lower column densities.

  12. Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts. Report on Phases 1 and 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C.

    1992-03-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

  13. The performance of a solar-regenerated open-cycle desiccant bed grain cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Ismail, M.Z.; Angus, D.E. ); Thorpe, G.R. )

    1991-01-01

    The cooling of stored food grains suppresses the growth of populations of insect pests, inhibits spoilage by fungi and helps to preserve grain quality. In temperate and subtropical climates, grains may be effectively cooled by ventilating them with ambient air. In tropical climates, the enthalpy of the air must be reduced before it can be used for cooling grain. One method of achieving this is to isothermally reduce the humidity of the air. This paper describes experiments carried out on a simple-to-build solar-regenerated open-cycle grain cooling system. The device consists of a 5.85 m{sup 2} collector coupled with two beds of silica gel. Results from a series of experiments suggest that the device may be used to cool up to 200 tons of grain. The electrical power consumption of the device is of the order of 0.3 watt per ton of grain cooled, and the total electrical energy consumption is of the order of 0.7 kWh per ton of grain stored for a six-month period. The effectiveness of the device is a function of air flow rate and the enthalpy of ambient air, and results presented in this paper suggest that the solar cooling device is particularly effective in tropical climates.

  14. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, Anthony A.

    1985-01-01

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs.

  15. Oxygen production by molten alkali metal salts using multiple absorption-desorption cycles

    DOEpatents

    Cassano, A.A.

    1985-07-02

    A continuous chemical air separation is performed wherein oxygen is recovered with a molten alkali metal salt oxygen acceptor in a series of absorption zones which are connected to a plurality of desorption zones operated in separate parallel cycles with the absorption zones. A greater recovery of high pressure oxygen is achieved at reduced power requirements and capital costs. 3 figs.

  16. Open cycle He-3 cooling to 0.18 K for space operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, D.; Nast, T. C.

    It is pointed out that many space instruments will require very low cryogenic temperatures to perform satisfactorily. Thus, instruments for telescopes such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility (SIRTF) will require a cooler to provide approximately 50 microwatts total cooling power at temperatures in the range from 0.1 to 0.3 K. The present paper is concerned with a long life open-cycle He-3 cooler which provides low cooling (50 microwatts) to a temperature as low as 0.18 K on the basis of a process involving the continuous evaporation of liquid He-3 and the loss of vapor through a vent tube. Attention is given to an open cycle He-3 cooler used in conjunction with a telescope which utilizes superfluid He-4, the venting characteristics, on-orbit liquid retention, and closed-cycle refrigeration below 1 K.

  17. A small helium liquifier which provides continuous cooling based on cycled isentropic expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, C.; Gygax, S.; Myrtle, K.; Barton, R.

    1985-01-01

    This simple cryocooler provides a small reservoir of liquid helium at a stable temperature of 4.2K. It uses a novel adaptation of the Simon expansion cryocooler to provide continuous cooling. Operation is in a four stage cycle: (1) A closed vessel of helium under high pressure is cooled to 12K using a conventional Gifford-McMahon closed-cycle cryocooler. (2) The pressure is released adiabatically providing cooling to 4.2K. (3) Liquid helium is collected in a second, well insulated, vessel. (4) The first vessel is repressurized. The cycle time is 15-30 minutes. In this manner, a pool of liquid helium is continuously maintained in the second vessel, with a temperature stability of 0.03 degrees. The continuous cooling power available is 3mW. This design provides simplicity and reliability through the absence of any orifices or moving parts at cryogenic temperatures except for the conventional Gifford-McMahon cryocooler.

  18. Development of a Water Based, Critical Flow, Non-Vapor Compression cooling Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Hosni, Mohammad H.

    2014-03-30

    Expansion of a high-pressure liquid refrigerant through the use of a thermostatic expansion valve or other device is commonplace in vapor-compression cycles to regulate the quality and flow rate of the refrigerant entering the evaporator. In vapor-compression systems, as the condensed refrigerant undergoes this expansion, its pressure and temperature drop, and part of the liquid evaporates. We (researchers at Kansas State University) are developing a cooling cycle that instead pumps a high-pressure refrigerant through a supersonic converging-diverging nozzle. As the liquid refrigerant passes through the nozzle, its velocity reaches supersonic (or critical-flow) conditions, substantially decreasing the refrigerant’s pressure. This sharp pressure change vaporizes some of the refrigerant and absorbs heat from the surrounding conditions during this phase change. Due to the design of the nozzle, a shockwave trips the supersonic two-phase refrigerant back to the starting conditions, condensing the remaining vapor. The critical-flow refrigeration cycle would provide space cooling, similar to a chiller, by running a secondary fluid such as water or glycol over one or more nozzles. Rather than utilizing a compressor to raise the pressure of the refrigerant, as in a vapor-cycle system, the critical-flow cycle utilizes a high-pressure pump to drive refrigerant liquid through the cooling cycle. Additionally, the design of the nozzle can be tailored for a given refrigerant, such that environmentally benign substances can act as the working fluid. This refrigeration cycle is still in early-stage development with prototype development several years away. The complex multi-phase flow at supersonic conditions presents numerous challenges to fully understanding and modeling the cycle. With the support of DOE and venture-capital investors, initial research was conducted at PAX Streamline, and later, at Caitin. We (researchers at Kansas State University) have continued development

  19. Personal, closed-cycle cooling and protective apparatus and thermal battery therefor

    DOEpatents

    Klett, James W.; Klett, Lynn B.

    2004-07-20

    A closed-cycle apparatus for cooling a living body includes a heat pickup body or garment which permits evaporation of an evaporating fluid, transmission of the vapor to a condenser, and return of the condensate to the heat pickup body. A thermal battery cooling source is provided for removing heat from the condenser. The apparatus requires no external power and provides a cooling system for soldiers, race car drivers, police officers, firefighters, bomb squad technicians, and other personnel who may utilize protective clothing to work in hostile environments. An additional shield layer may simultaneously provide protection from discomfort, illness or injury due to harmful atmospheres, projectiles, edged weapons, impacts, explosions, heat, poisons, microbes, corrosive agents, or radiation, while simultaneously removing body heat from the wearer.

  20. Low-cycle fatigue analysis of a cooled copper combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elastoplastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of regeneratively cooled rocket engine combustion chamber. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the engine operating cycle. The strain range was used in conjunction with OFHC copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict engine low-cycle fatigue life. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen chamber which was fatigue tested to failure at the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  1. A Preliminary Study on Designing and Testing of an Absorption Refrigeration Cycle Powered by Exhaust Gas of Combustion Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napitupulu, F. H.; Daulay, F. A.; Dedy, P. M.; Denis; Jecson

    2017-03-01

    In order to recover the waste heat from the exhaust gas of a combustion engine, an adsorption refrigeration cycle is proposed. This is a preliminary study on design and testing of a prototype of absorption refrigeration cycle powered by an internal combustion engine. The heat source of the cycle is a compression ignition engine which generates 122.36 W of heat in generator of the cycle. The pairs of absorbent and refrigerant are water and ammonia. Here the generator is made of a shell and tube heat exchanger with number of tube and its length are 20 and 0.69 m, respectively. In the experiments the exhaust gas, with a mass flow rate of 0.00016 kg/s, enters the generator at 110°C and leaves it at 72°C. Here, the solution is heated from 30°C to 90°C. In the evaporator, the lowest temperature can be reached is 17.9°C and COP of the system is 0.45. The main conclusion can be drawn here is that the proposed system can be used to recycle the waste heat and produced cooling. However, the COP is still low.

  2. A Gas-Cooled-Reactor Closed-Brayton-Cycle Demonstration with Nuclear Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Dorsey, Daniel J.; Peters, Curtis D.; Brown, Nicholas; Williamson, Joshua; Jablonski, Jennifer

    2005-02-01

    A gas-cooled reactor may be coupled directly to turbomachinery to form a closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) system in which the CBC working fluid serves as the reactor coolant. Such a system has the potential to be a very simple and robust space-reactor power system. Gas-cooled reactors have been built and operated in the past, but very few have been coupled directly to the turbomachinery in this fashion. In this paper we describe the option for testing such a system with a small reactor and turbomachinery at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia currently operates the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at steady-state powers up to 4 MW and has an adjacent facility with heavy shielding in which another reactor recently operated. Sandia also has a closed-Brayton-Cycle test bed with a converted commercial turbomachinery unit that is rated for up to 30 kWe of power. It is proposed to construct a small experimental gas-cooled reactor core and attach this via ducting to the CBC turbomachinery for cooling and electricity production. Calculations suggest that such a unit could produce about 20 kWe, which would be a good power level for initial surface power units on the Moon or Mars. The intent of this experiment is to demonstrate the stable start-up and operation of such a system. Of particular interest is the effect of a negative temperature power coefficient as the initially cold Brayton gas passes through the core during startup or power changes. Sandia's dynamic model for such a system would be compared with the performance data. This paper describes the neutronics, heat transfer, and cycle dynamics of this proposed system. Safety and radiation issues are presented. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.

  3. A Gas-Cooled-Reactor Closed-Brayton-Cycle Demonstration with Nuclear Heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, Ronald J.; Wright, Steven A.; Dorsey, Daniel J.; Williamson, Joshua; Peters, Curtis D.; Brown, Nicholas; Jablonski, Jennifer

    2005-02-06

    A gas-cooled reactor may be coupled directly to turbomachinery to form a closed-Brayton-cycle (CBC) system in which the CBC working fluid serves as the reactor coolant. Such a system has the potential to be a very simple and robust space-reactor power system. Gas-cooled reactors have been built and operated in the past, but very few have been coupled directly to the turbomachinery in this fashion. In this paper we describe the option for testing such a system with a small reactor and turbomachinery at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia currently operates the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at steady-state powers up to 4 MW and has an adjacent facility with heavy shielding in which another reactor recently operated. Sandia also has a closed-Brayton-Cycle test bed with a converted commercial turbomachinery unit that is rated for up to 30 kWe of power. It is proposed to construct a small experimental gas-cooled reactor core and attach this via ducting to the CBC turbomachinery for cooling and electricity production. Calculations suggest that such a unit could produce about 20 kWe, which would be a good power level for initial surface power units on the Moon or Mars. The intent of this experiment is to demonstrate the stable start-up and operation of such a system. Of particular interest is the effect of a negative temperature power coefficient as the initially cold Brayton gas passes through the core during startup or power changes. Sandia's dynamic model for such a system would be compared with the performance data. This paper describes the neutronics, heat transfer, and cycle dynamics of this proposed system. Safety and radiation issues are presented. The views expressed in this document are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect agreement by the government.

  4. Conformal cooling and rapid thermal cycling in injection molding with 3D printed tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xiaorong

    Solid Freeform Fabrication processes such as 3D Printing have demonstrated the potential to produce tools with complex internal geometry. This work explores the application of this capability to improved thermal management for injection molding tooling through: (i)cooling lines which are conformal to the mold surface which provide improved uniformity and stability of mold temperature and (ii)tools with low thermal inertia which, in combination with conformal fluid channels allow for rapid heating and cooling of tooling, thereby facilitating isothermal filling of the mold cavity. This work presents a systematic, modular, approach to the design of conformal cooling channels. Recognizing that the cooling is local to the surface of the tool, the tool is divided up into geometric regions and a channel system is designed for each region. Each channel system is itself modeled as composed of cooling elements, typically the region spanned by two channels. Six criteria are applied including; a transient heat transfer condition which dictates a maximum distance from mold surface to cooling channel, considerations of pressure and temperature drop along the flow channel and considerations of strength of the mold. These criteria are treated as constraints and successful designs are sought which define windows bounded by these constraints. The methodology is demonstrated in application to a complex core and cavity for injection molding. In the area of rapid thermal cycling, this work utilizes the design methods for conformal channels for the heating phases and adds analysis of the packing and cooling phases. A design is created which provides thermal isolation and accommodation of cyclic thermal stresses though an array of bendable support columns which support the molding portion of the tool where the heating/cooling channels are contained. Designed elasticity of the tool is used to aid in packing of the polymer during the cooling phase. Methodology for the design of this

  5. Analysis of the solar powered/fuel assisted Rankine cycle cooling system. Phase 1: Revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lior, N.; Koai, K.; Yeh, H.

    1985-04-01

    The subject of this analysis is a solar cooling system which consists of a conventional open-compressor chiller, driven by a novel hybrid steam Rankine cycle. Steam is generated by the use of solar energy collected at about 100C, and it is then superheated to about 600C in a fossil-fuel fired superheater. The steam drives a novel counter-rotating turbine, some of the heat from it is regenerated, and it is then condensed. Thermal storage is implemented as an integral part of the cycle, by means of hot-water which is flashed to steam when needed for driving the turbine. For the solar energy input, both evacuated and double-glazed flat-plate collectors were considered. A comprehensive computer program was developed to analyze the operation and performance of the entire power/cooling system. Each component was described by a separate subroutine to compute its performance from basic principles, and special attention was given to the parasitic losses, including pumps, fans and pressure drops in the piping and heat exchangers, and to describe the off-design performance of the components. The thermophysical properties of the fluids used are also described in separate subroutines. Transient simulation of the entire system was performed on an hourly basis over a cooling season in two representative climatic regions (Washington, DC, and Phoenix, AZ) for a number of system configurations.

  6. A closed-cycle refrigerator for cooling maser amplifiers below 4 Kelvin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, M.

    1989-01-01

    A helium refrigerator utilizing the Gifford-McMahon/Joule-Thomson (GM/JT) cycle was designed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of using small closed-cycle refrigerators as an alternative to batch-filled cryostats for operating temperatures below 4 K. The systems could be used to cool low-noise microwave maser amplifiers located in large parabolic antennas. These antennas tilt vertically, making conventional liquid-filled dewars difficult to use. The system could also be used for a non-tilting beam waveguide antenna to reduce the helium consumption of a liquid helium cryostat. The prototype system is adjustable to provide 700 mW of cooling at 2.5 K to 3 W at 4.3 K. Performance of the unit is not significantly affected by physical orientation. The volume occupied by the refrigerator is less than 0.1 cu m. Two JT expansion stages are used to maximize cooling capacity per unit mass flow. The heat exchangers were designed to produce minimum pressure drop in the return gas stream. Pressure drop for the entire JT return circuit is less than 5 kpa at a mass flow of 0.06 g/sec when operating at 2.5 K.

  7. Thermodynamic modelling of a double-effect LiBr-H2O absorption refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iranmanesh, A.; Mehrabian, M. A.

    2012-12-01

    The goal of this paper is to estimate the conductance of components required to achieve the approach temperatures, and gain insights into a double-effect absorption chiller using LiBr-H2O solution as the working fluid. An in-house computer program is developed to simulate the cycle. Conductance of all components is evaluated based on the approach temperatures assumed as input parameters. The effect of input data on the cycle performance and the exergetic efficiency are investigated.

  8. Electronics and Sensor Cooling with a Stirling Cycle for Venus Surface Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellott, Ken

    2004-01-01

    The inhospitable ambient surface conditions of Venus, with a 450 C temperature and 92 bar pressure, may likely require any extended-duration surface exploratory mission to incorporate some type of cooling for probe electronics and sensor devices. A multiple-region Venus mission study was completed at NASA GRC in December of 2003 that resulted in the preliminary design of a kinematically-driven, helium charged, Stirling cooling cycle with an estimated over-all COP of 0.376 to lift 100 watts of heat from a 200 C cold sink temperature and reject it at a hot sink temperature of 500 C. This paper briefly describes the design process and also describes and summarizes key features of the kinematic, Stirling cooler preliminary design concept.

  9. Sensitivity Analysis of Reprocessing Cooling Times on Light Water Reactor and Sodium Fast Reactor Fuel Cycles

    SciTech Connect

    R. M. Ferrer; S. Bays; M. Pope

    2008-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to quantify the effects of variations of the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) and fast reactor reprocessing cooling time on a Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) assuming a single-tier fuel cycle scenario. The results from this study show the effects of different cooling times on the SFR’s transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR) and transuranic fuel enrichment. Also, the decay heat, gamma heat and neutron emission of the SFR’s fresh fuel charge were evaluated. A 1000 MWth commercial-scale SFR design was selected as the baseline in this study. Both metal and oxide CR=0.50 SFR designs are investigated.

  10. Coupling a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle to a Helium-Cooled Reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, Bobby; Pasch, James Jay; Kruizenga, Alan Michael; Walker, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This report outlines the thermodynamics of a supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) recompression closed Brayton cycle (RCBC) coupled to a Helium-cooled nuclear reactor. The baseline reactor design for the study is the AREVA High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). Using the AREVA HTGR nominal operating parameters, an initial thermodynamic study was performed using Sandia's deterministic RCBC analysis program. Utilizing the output of the RCBC thermodynamic analysis, preliminary values of reactor power and of Helium flow rate through the reactor were calculated in Sandia's HelCO2 code. Some research regarding materials requirements was then conducted to determine aspects of corrosion related to both Helium and to sCO2 , as well as some mechanical considerations for pressures and temperatures that will be seen by the piping and other components. This analysis resulted in a list of materials-related research items that need to be conducted in the future. A short assessment of dry heat rejection advantages of sCO2> Brayton cycles was also included. This assessment lists some items that should be investigated in the future to better understand how sCO2 Brayton cycles and nuclear can maximally contribute to optimizing the water efficiency of carbon free power generation

  11. System design and analysis of hydrocarbon scramjet with regeneration cooling and expansion cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xianyu; Yang, Jun; Zhang, Hua; Shen, Chibing

    2015-06-01

    A new expansion cycle scheme of the scramjet engine system including a hydrocarbon-fuel-based (kerosene) regenerativecooling system and supercritical/cracking kerosene-based turbo-pump was proposed in this paper. In this cycle scheme, the supercritical/cracking kerosene with high pressure and high temperature is formed through the cooling channel. And then, in order to make better use of the high energy of the supercritical/cracking fuel, the supercritical/cracking kerosene fuel was used to drive the turbo-pump to obtain a high pressure of the cold kerosenefuel at the entrance of the cooling channel. In the end, the supercritical/cracking kerosene from the turbine exit is injected into the scramjet combustor. Such supercritical/cracking kerosene fuel can decrease the fuel-air mixing length and increase the combustion efficiency, due to the gas state and low molecular weight of the cracking fuel. In order to ignite the cold kerosene in the start-up stage, the ethylene-assisted ignition subsystem was applied. In the present paper, operating modes and characteristics of the expansion cycle system are first described.And then, the overall design of the system and the characterisitics of the start-up process are analyzed numerically to investigate effects of the system parameters on the scramjet start-up performance. The results show that the expansion cycle system proposed in this paper can work well under typical conditions. The research work in this paper can help to make a solid foundation for the research on the coupling characteristics between the dynamicsand thermodynamics of the scramjet expansion cycle system

  12. Effect of Gas/Steam Turbine Inlet Temperatures on Combined Cycle Having Air Transpiration Cooled Gas Turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, O.

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide efforts are being made for further improving the gas/steam combined cycle performance by having better blade cooling technology in topping cycle and enhanced heat recovery in bottoming cycle. The scope of improvement is possible through turbines having higher turbine inlet temperatures (TITs) of both gas turbine and steam turbine. Literature review shows that a combined cycle with transpiration cooled gas turbine has not been analyzed with varying gas/steam TITs. In view of above the present study has been undertaken for thermodynamic study of gas/steam combined cycle with respect to variation in TIT in both topping and bottoming cycles, for air transpiration cooled gas turbine. The performance of combined cycle with dual pressure heat recovery steam generator has been evaluated for different cycle pressure ratios (CPRs) varying from 11 to 23 and the selection diagrams presented for TIT varying from 1,600 to 1,900 K. Both the cycle efficiency and specific work increase with TIT for each pressure ratio. For each TIT there exists an optimum pressure ratio for cycle efficiency and specific work. For the CPR of 23 the best cycle performance is seen at a TIT of 1,900 K for maximum steam temperature of 570 °C, which gives the cycle efficiency of 60.9 % with net specific work of 909 kJ/kg.

  13. Concept Design for a High Temperature Helium Brayton Cycle with Interstage Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.; Vernon, Milton E.; Pickard, Paul S.

    2013-12-01

    The primary metric for the viability of these next generation nuclear power plants will be the cost of generated electricity. One important component in achieving these objectives is the development of power conversion technologies that maximize the electrical power output of these advanced reactors for a given thermal power. More efficient power conversion systems can directly reduce the cost of nuclear generated electricity and therefore advanced power conversion cycle research is an important area of investigation for the Generation IV Program. Brayton cycles using inert or other gas working fluids, have the potential to take advantage of the higher outlet temperature range of Generation IV systems and allow substantial increases in nuclear power conversion efficiency, and potentially reductions in power conversion system capital costs compared to the steam Rankine cycle used in current light water reactors. For the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), Helium Brayton cycles which can operate in the 900 to 950 C range have been the focus of power conversion research. Previous Generation IV studies examined several options for He Brayton cycles that could increase efficiency with acceptable capital cost implications. At these high outlet temperatures, Interstage Heating and Cooling (IHC) was shown to provide significant efficiency improvement (a few to 12%) but required increased system complexity and therefore had potential for increased costs. These scoping studies identified the potential for increased efficiency, but a more detailed analysis of the turbomachinery and heat exchanger sizes and costs was needed to determine whether this approach could be cost effective. The purpose of this study is to examine the turbomachinery and heat exchanger implications of interstage heating and cooling configurations. In general, this analysis illustrates that these engineering considerations introduce new constraints to the design of IHC systems that may require

  14. Soy-Based, Water-Cooled, TC W-III Two Cycle Engine Oil

    SciTech Connect

    Scharf, Curtis R.; Miller, Mark E.

    2003-08-30

    The objective of this project was to achieve technical approval and commercial launch for a biodegradable soy oil-based, environmentally safe, TC W-III performance, water-cooled, two cycle engine oil. To do so would: (1) develop a new use for RBD soybean oil; (2) increase soybean utilization in North America in the range of 500 K-3.0 MM bushels; and (3) open up supply opportunities of 1.5-5.0 MM bushels worldwide. These goals have been successfully obtained.

  15. Water chemistry of a combined-cycle power plant's auxiliary equipment cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, B. M.; Korotkov, A. N.; Oparin, M. Yu.; Larin, A. B.

    2013-04-01

    Results from an analysis of methods aimed at reducing the corrosion rate of structural metal used in heat-transfer systems with water coolant are presented. Data from examination of the closed-circuit system for cooling the auxiliary mechanisms of a combined-cycle plant-based power unit and the results from adjustment of its water chemistry are given. A conclusion is drawn about the possibility of using a reagent prepared on the basis of sodium sulfite for reducing the corrosion rate when the loss of coolant is replenished with nondeaerated water.

  16. Study on High Efficient Absorption Refrigerator Using Multi-effect Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Irie, Tomoyoshi; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    Double effect chillers are commonly used as cooling machines for air condition. Great efforts have been making to improve the efficiency for a long time, and now the COP is very near to the limitation of double effect cycles. Triple effect cycles are expected for the next step beyond double effect cycles, but have some problems of high temperature and high pressure in the high stage generator. High temperature of absorbent causes corrosion problem and high vapor pressure over atmospheric pressure causes the restriction of legal regulation. This paper deals with many types of triple effect cycles. The temperature and dew point of the high stage generator are analyzed, several types are selected for low dew point, and one of them is more analyzed in detail.

  17. Evidence for Solar Cycle Influence on the Infrared Energy Budget and Radiative Cooling of the Thermosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Martin-Torres, F. Javier; Marshall, B. Thomas; Thompson, R. Earl; Williams, Joshua; Turpin, TImothy; Kratz, D. P.; Russell, James M.; Woods, Tom; Gordley, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    We present direct observational evidence for solar cycle influence on the infrared energy budget and radiative cooling of the thermosphere. By analyzing nearly five years of data from the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument, we show that the annual mean infrared power radiated by the nitric oxide (NO) molecule at 5.3 m has decreased by a factor of 2.9. This decrease is correlated (r = 0.96) with the decrease in the annual mean F10.7 solar index. Despite the sharp decrease in radiated power (which is equivalent to a decrease in the vertical integrated radiative cooling rate), the variability of the power as given in the standard deviation of the annual means remains approximately constant. A simple relationship is shown to exist between the infrared power radiated by NO and the F10.7 index, thus providing a fundamental relationship between solar activity and the thermospheric cooling rate for use in thermospheric models. The change in NO radiated power is also consistent with changes in absorbed ultraviolet radiation over the same time period.

  18. Study on Cooling Performance of Stirling Cycle Machine wiht New Regenerator Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagawa, Noboru; Kitahama, Dai; Takeuchi, Takuro; Matsuguchi, Atsushi; Tsuruno, Seizo

    In order to develop Stirling cycle machines with high efficiency, suitable regenerator for each machine must be designed. To realize the flexibility of design and to improve the performance of regenerator, a new matrix, mesh sheet was proposed. It is a plate type with electrically etched holes. Each small hole is connected with neighboring holes by grooves on the plate. The performance test of cooling mode was carried out with a 3-kW Stirling engine in order to measure its cooling performance. Three types of the mesh sheet were developed and two of them were respectively stacked to install in the machine. Also, the pressure and regenerator losses were compared with conventional stacked wire gauzes and the mesh sheets. From the results, it was clarified that the performance of the cooling mode was improved about 5 to 40 % by the mesh sheet. In this paper, the relation between the dimensions of the mesh sheet, the pressure and regenerator losses were also clarified.

  19. Advancement of Double Effect Absorption Cycle by Input of Low Temperture Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroshi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Energy conservation is becoming important for global environmental protection. New simple techniques of more efficiently using the waste heat of gas co-generation systems for refrigeration are required. This paper proposes a new method of using low temperature waste heat below 100°C for refrigeration. In the new method, the low temperature waste heat is fed into the weak solution line of the double effect absorption cycle directly via an auxiliary heat exchanger. In this paper, first, the location of the auxiliary waste heat recovery heat exchanger on the solution line was studied for each solution flow type of double effect absorption cycle. Then six promising methods of recovering waste heat were selected, and moreover, the basic model was constructed and the effect of input of the low temperature waste heat was investigated for each selected method.

  20. Organic Fluids and Passive Cooling in a Supercritical Rankine Cycle for Power Generation from Low Grade Heat Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidhi, Rachana

    Low grade heat sources have a large amount of thermal energy content. Due to low temperature, the conventional power generation technologies result in lower efficiency and hence cannot be used. In order to efficiently generate power, alternate methods need to be used. In this study, a supercritical organic Rankine cycle was used for heat source temperatures varying from 125°C to 200°C. Organic refrigerants with zero ozone depletion potential and their mixtures were selected as working fluid for this study while the cooling water temperature was changed from 10-25°C. Operating pressure of the cycle has been optimized for each fluid at every heat source temperature to obtain the highest thermal efficiency. Energy and exergy efficiencies of the thermodynamic cycle have been obtained as a function of heat source temperature. Efficiency of a thermodynamic cycle depends significantly on the sink temperature. At areas where water cooling is not available and ambient air temperature is high, efficient power generation from low grade heat sources may be a challenge. Use of passive cooling systems coupled with the condenser was studied, so that lower sink temperatures could be obtained. Underground tunnels, buried at a depth of few meters, were used as earth-air-heat-exchanger (EAHE) through which hot ambient air was passed. It was observed that the air temperature could be lowered by 5-10°C in the EAHE. Vertical pipes were used to lower the temperature of water by 5°C by passing it underground. Nocturnal cooling of stored water has been studied that can be used to cool the working fluid in the thermodynamic cycle. It was observed that the water temperature can be lowered by 10-20°C during the night when it is allowed to cool. The amount of water lost was calculated and was found to be approximately 0.1% over 10 days. The different passive cooling systems were studied separately and their effects on the efficiency of the thermodynamic cycle were investigated. They were

  1. Strong neutrino cooling by cycles of electron capture and decay in neutron star crusts

    SciTech Connect

    Schatz, Hendrik; Gupta, Sanjib; Moeller, Peter; Beard, Mary; Brown, Edward; Deibel, A. T.; Gasques, Leandro; Hix, William Raphael; Keek, Laurens; Lau, Rita; Steiner, Andrew M; Wiescher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The temperature in the crust of an accreting neutron star, which comprises its outermost kilometre, is set by heating from nuclear reactions at large densities, neutrino cooling and heat transport from the interior. The heated crust has been thought to affect observable phenomena at shallower depths, such as thermonuclear bursts in the accreted envelope. Here we report that cycles of electron capture and its inverse, decay, involving neutron-rich nuclei at a typical depth of about 150 metres, cool the outer neutron star crust by emitting neutrinos while also thermally decoupling the surface layers from the deeper crust. This Urca mechanism has been studied in the context of white dwarfs13 and type Ia supernovae, but hitherto was not considered in neutron stars, because previous models1, 2 computed the crust reactions using a zero-temperature approximation and assumed that only a single nuclear species was present at any given depth. The thermal decoupling means that X-ray bursts and other surface phenomena are largely independent of the strength of deep crustal heating. The unexpectedly short recurrence times, of the order of years, observed for very energetic thermonuclear superbursts are therefore not an indicator of a hot crust, but may point instead to an unknown local heating mechanism near the neutron star surface.

  2. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day–night cycle

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-01-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8–13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day–night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance. PMID:27959339

  3. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-01

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  4. Radiative cooling to deep sub-freezing temperatures through a 24-h day-night cycle.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen; Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2016-12-13

    Radiative cooling technology utilizes the atmospheric transparency window (8-13 μm) to passively dissipate heat from Earth into outer space (3 K). This technology has attracted broad interests from both fundamental sciences and real world applications, ranging from passive building cooling, renewable energy harvesting and passive refrigeration in arid regions. However, the temperature reduction experimentally demonstrated, thus far, has been relatively modest. Here we theoretically show that ultra-large temperature reduction for as much as 60 °C from ambient is achievable by using a selective thermal emitter and by eliminating parasitic thermal load, and experimentally demonstrate a temperature reduction that far exceeds previous works. In a populous area at sea level, we have achieved an average temperature reduction of 37 °C from the ambient air temperature through a 24-h day-night cycle, with a maximal reduction of 42 °C that occurs when the experimental set-up enclosing the emitter is exposed to peak solar irradiance.

  5. A high-efficiency power cycle in which hydrogen is compressed by absorption in metal hydrides.

    PubMed

    Powell, J R; Salzano, F J; Yu, W S; Milau, J S

    1976-07-23

    A high-efficiency power cycle is proposed in which molecular hydrogen gas is used as a working fluid in a regenerative closed Brayton cycle. The hydrogen gas is compressed by an absorption-desorption cycle on metal hydride (FeTiH(x)) beds. Low-temperature solar or geothermal heat (temperature about 100 degrees C) is used for the compression process, and high-temperature fossil fuel or nuclear heat (temperature about 700 degrees C) supplies the expansion work in the turbine. Typically, about 90 percent of the high-temperature heat input is converted to electricity, while about 3 kilowatts of low-temperature heat is required per kilowatt of electrical output.

  6. Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

    2010-09-01

    As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ‘Air-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systems’. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of

  7. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  8. The absorption and emission spectrum of radiative cooling galactic fountain gas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Robert A.; Shapiro, Paul R.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the time-dependent, nonequilibrium thermal and ionization history of gas cooling radiatively from 10(exp 6) K in a one-dimensional, planar, steady-state flow model of the galactic fountain, including the effects of radiative transfer. Our previous optically thin calculations explored the effects of photoionization on such a flow and demonstrated that self-ionization was sufficient to cause the flow to match the observed galactic halo column densities of C 4, Si 4, and N 5 and UV emission from C 4 and O 3 in the constant density (isochoric) limit, which corresponded to cooling regions homogeneous on scales D less than or approximately equal to 1 kpc. Our new calculations which take full account of radiative transfer confirm the importance of self-ionization in enabling such a flow to match the data but allow a much larger range for cooling region sizes, i.e. D(sub 0) greater than or approximately equal to 15 pc. For an initial flow velocity v(sub 0) approximately equal to 100 km/s, comparable to the sound speed of a 10(exp 6) K gas, the initial density is found to be n(sub h,0) is approximately 2 x 10(exp -2) cm(exp -3), in reasonable agreement with other observation estimates, and D(sub 0) is approximately equal to 40 pc. We also compare predicted H(alpha) fluxes, UV line emission, and broadband x-ray fluxes with observed values. One dimensional numerical hydrodynamical calculations including the effects of radiative cooling are also presented.

  9. Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP): Instrument and Simulation Development Status at Los Alamos National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Arias, Angela A.; Schmierer, Eric N.; Gettemy, Donald; Howard, David W.; Wermer, Joseph R.; Tuggle, Dale G.

    2005-07-15

    The Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) Project at Los Alamos National Laboratory has been a collaborative effort with Savannah River Site to demonstrate the Tube-in-Tube (TnT) column design and to improve TCAP science. TnT TCAP is an alternative design which uses a liquid to thermally cycle the metal hydride packed column. Inert gas displacement tests and deuterium pulse tests have been performed on the TnT TCAP column. The inert gas displacement tests are designed to measure plug flow in the column while the deuterium pulse tests determine the separation ability of the column. A residual gas analyzer measures the gases in the exit stream and the experimental results are compared with pulse test model results.

  10. Paleoecology of cool-water, subtidal cycles in mid-cenozoic limestones, Eucla Platform, Southern Australia

    SciTech Connect

    James, N.P.; Bone, Y.

    1994-10-01

    The open-shelf, subtidal, bryozoan-rich Abrakurrie Limestone beneath the Nullarbor Plain (Eucla Platform) is cyclic at the meter-scale. Best developed cycles are asymmetric and comprise three distinct parts with a capping hardground. The basal part (A) is a thin, coarse, grainstone or rudstone that is rich in robust bryosoan and epifaunal echinoid fragments and pecten bivalves, reflecting growth and accumulation in generally high energy, hard bottom environments. The middle part (B), intepreted as a low-energy, sub-swellbase accumulation, is a burrowed to planar cross-laminated fine grainstone or packstone with a low diversity, delicate-branching bryozoan assemblage and little else except scattered infaunal echinoids and pectens. The upper part (C) is a burrowed, abundantly fossilferous (bryozoan, bivalve, echinoid) rudstone or floatstone. Upward increases in the numbers and diversity of Mg-calcite and aragonitic cheilostome bryozoans (especially erect rigid, flat robust branching and nodular/arborescent types), gastropods, infaunal bivalves, and infaunal echinoids points to a high-energy environment. Sediments at the top of C are variably cemented by inclusion-rich marine cement (now calcite) that formed a hardground which was subsequently physically and biologically eroded and stained by iron oxides during a period of non-deposition. Sediments from the next overlying cycle succeed cements in uppermost intergranular pores and fill open crustacean burrows. Variably developed cyclicity is interpreted, on the basis of comparable Holocene cool-water shelf sediments, to reflect deposition in generally sub-photic environments that ranged from just below swell base (B) upwards towards the zone of wave abrasion (A and C). Hardgrounds (H) formed when the seafloor was within the zone of wave abrasion. Shallowing and deepening of these critical interfaces was controlled by fluctuating sea level and/or climatic change. 55 refs., 12 figs.

  11. HYBRID SULFUR CYCLE FLOWSHEETS FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION USING HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS

    SciTech Connect

    Gorensek, M.

    2011-07-06

    Two hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process flowsheets intended for use with high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) are presented. The flowsheets were developed for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program, and couple a proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolyzer for the SO2-depolarized electrolysis step with a silicon carbide bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step. One presumes an HTGR reactor outlet temperature (ROT) of 950 C, the other 750 C. Performance was improved (over earlier flowsheets) by assuming that use of a more acid-tolerant PEM, like acid-doped poly[2,2'-(m-phenylene)-5,5'-bibenzimidazole] (PBI), instead of Nafion{reg_sign}, would allow higher anolyte acid concentrations. Lower ROT was accommodated by adding a direct contact exchange/quench column upstream from the bayonet reactor and dropping the decomposition pressure. Aspen Plus was used to develop material and energy balances. A net thermal efficiency of 44.0% to 47.6%, higher heating value basis is projected for the 950 C case, dropping to 39.9% for the 750 C case.

  12. Impact of Cooling Rate-Induced Recrystallization on High G Mechanical Shock and Thermal Cycling in Sn-Ag-Cu Solder Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tae-Kyu; Bieler, Thomas R.; Kim, Choong-Un

    2016-01-01

    The mechanical stability and thermo-mechanical fatigue performance of solder joints with low silver content Sn-1.0Ag-0.5Cu (wt.%) (SAC105) alloy based on different cooling rates are investigated in high G level shock environment and thermal cycling conditions. The cooling rate-controlled samples ranging from 1°C/min to 75°C/min cooling rate, not only show differences in microstructure, where a fine poly-granular microstructure develops in the case of fast cooling versus normal cooling, but also show various shock performances based on the microstructure changes. The fast cooling rate improves the high G shock performance by over 90% compared to the normal cooled SAC105 alloy air-cooling environment commonly used after assembly reflow. The microstructure effect on thermal cycling performance is also discussed, which is analyzed based on the Sn grain orientation, interconnect stability, and solder joint bulk microstructure.

  13. Supercontinuum based absorption spectrometer for cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements in a rapid compression machine.

    PubMed

    Werblinski, Thomas; Kleindienst, Stefan; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Zigan, Lars; Will, Stefan

    2016-06-10

    A broadband supercontinuum (SC) based absorption spectrometer capable of cycle-resolved multiparameter measurements at internal combustion (IC) engine conditions is presented. Three parameters, temperature, pressure and water mole fraction, were extracted from broadband near-infrared H2O absorption spectra, spanning the wavelength-range from 1340 to 1405.5 nm, which exhibits a large number of specific H2O transitions. The spectrometer is based on spatial domain detection and features a near-infrared line scan camera as a detector. Measurements were performed during a compression cycle of a rapid compression machine comprising a pressure and temperature range from 2.5 to 65 bar and 300 to 900 K, respectively. With the new spectrometer, we are for the first time, based on the authors' knowledge, able to perform measurements based on SC radiation over a complete compression and expansion stroke at measurement rates up to 50 kHz. A detailed overview is provided about the best match algorithm between theory and experiments, including parameters from two different spectral databases, namely the Barber-Tennyson database (BT2) and HITRAN2012. The results indicate that spectral broadening effects are not properly described by theory, especially at pressure levels exceeding 20 bar, which culminates in a clear underestimation of the derived pressure data by SC absorption spectroscopy. Nevertheless, temperature can be determined accurately by performing a three-parameter fit based on water mole fraction, temperature, and pressure. In contrast, making use of pressure transducer data as look-up values and varying only temperature and H2O mole fraction to find the best match leads to a clear overestimation of temperature at elevated pressures.

  14. Simulation model of a single-stage lithium bromide-water absorption cooling unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miao, D.

    1978-01-01

    A computer model of a LiBr-H2O single-stage absorption machine was developed. The model, utilizing a given set of design data such as water-flow rates and inlet or outlet temperatures of these flow rates but without knowing the interior characteristics of the machine (heat transfer rates and surface areas), can be used to predict or simulate off-design performance. Results from 130 off-design cases for a given commercial machine agree with the published data within 2 percent.

  15. Optimization of absorption air-conditioning for solar energy applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, E. H.

    1976-01-01

    Improved performance of solar cooling systems using the lithium bromide water absorption cycle is investigated. Included are computer simulations of a solar-cooled house, analyses and measurements of heat transfer rates in absorption system components, and design and fabrication of various system components. A survey of solar collector convection suppression methods is presented.

  16. Radiative cooling of a solidifying droplet layer including absorption and scattering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siegel, Robert

    1987-01-01

    A simple solution for the transient cooling of a solidifying layer filled with drops that can emit and scatter radiation is discussed, with application to a liquid drop radiator proposed for the Space Station (Mattick and Hertzberg, 1981). The layer remains at uniform temperature during solidification, and the outer portions rapidly lose heat, producing a variation along the length of the layer in the distribution of liquid concentration across the layer. The analysis is used to obtain both the amount of energy dissipated by the two-phase system at uniform temperature and the velocity distribution necessary to maintain a uniform liquid fraction across the entire layer at all locations along the layer length.

  17. Cycle Design of Reverse Brayton Cryocooler for HTS Cable Cooling Using Exergy Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Sudeep Kumar; Ghosh, Parthasarathi

    2017-02-01

    The reliability and price of cryogenic refrigeration play an important role in the successful commercialization of High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cables. For cooling HTS cable, sub-cooled liquid nitrogen (LN2) circulation system is used. One of the options to maintain LN2 in its sub-cooled state is by providing refrigeration with the help of Reverse Brayton Cryo-cooler (RBC). The refrigeration requirement is 10 kW for continuously sub-cooling LN2 from 72 K to 65 K for cooling 1 km length of HTS cable [1]. In this paper, a parametric evaluation of RBC for sub-cooling LN2 has been performed using helium as a process fluid. Exergy approach has been adopted for this analysis. A commercial process simulator, Aspen HYSYS® V8.6 has been used for this purpose. The critical components have been identified and their exergy destruction and exergy efficiency have been obtained for a given heat load condition.

  18. Reverse Brayton Cycle with Bladeless Turbo Compressor for Automotive Environmental Cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepeda-Rizo, Juan (Inventor); Ganapathi, Gani B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An automotive cabin cooling system uses a bladeless turbocompressor driven by automobile engine exhaust to compress incoming ambient air. The compressed air is directed to an intercooler where it is cooled and then to another bladeless turbine used as an expander where the air cools as it expands and is directed to the cabin interior. Excess energy may be captured by an alternator couple to the expander turbine. The system employs no chemical refrigerant and may be further modified to include another intercooler on the output of the expander turbine to isolate the cooled cabin environment.

  19. Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigeration for lesser developed countries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, Donald C.

    1990-02-01

    The Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigerator is a solar thermal technology which provides low cost, efficient, reliable ice-making to areas without ready access to electricity. An ISAAC refrigeration system consists of a compound parabolic solar collector, two pressure vessels, a condenser, a cold box or refrigerated space, and simple connective piping -- no moving parts or electrical components. Most parts are simple construction or plumbing grade materials, locally available in many remote areas. This technology has numerous potential benefits in lesser developed countries both by providing a cheap, reliable source of ice, and, since manufacture requires only semi-skilled labor, a source of employment to the local economy. Applications include vaccine storage for health care clinics; fish, meat, and dairy product storage; and personal consumption. Importantly, this technology increases the quality of life for people in lesser developed countries without depleting fossil fuel resources or increasing the release of greenhouse gases such as CO2 and chlorofluorocarbons.

  20. Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigeration for lesser developed countries

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.

    1990-02-06

    The Intermittent Solar Ammonia Absorption Cycle (ISAAC) refrigerator is a solar thermal technology which provides low cost, efficient, reliable ice-making to areas without ready access to electricity. An ISAAC refrigeration system consists of a compound parabolic solar collector, two pressure vessels, a condenser, a cold box or refrigerated space, and simple connective piping -- no moving parts or electrical components. Most parts are simple construction or plumbing grade materials, locally available in many remote areas. This technology has numerous potential benefits in lesser developed countries both by providing a cheap, reliable source of ice, and, since manufacture requires only semi-skilled labor, a source of employment to the local economy. Applications include vaccine storage for health care clinics; fish, meat, and dairy product storage; and personal consumption. Importantly, this technology increases the quality of life for people in lesser developed countries without depleting fossil fuel resources or increasing the release of greenhouse gases such as CO{sub 2} and chlorofluorocarbons.

  1. Modelling the absorption refrigeration cycle using partially miscible working fluids by group contribution methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larkeche, O.; Meniai, A.-H.; Cachot, T.

    2012-06-01

    The present study concerns the cycle performance modelling of a particular configuration of an absorption refrigeration machine based on phase separation as well as development of a strategy for computer aided design of absorbents. The model uses predictive methods based on the group contribution concept for the computation of the thermodynamic phase equilibria involved such as liquid-liquid and vapour-liquid as well as enthalpy-concentration diagrams. The proposed absorbents computer-aided design strategy is based on the exploration of a number of structural group combinations obtained from a selected set of functional groups, according to the chemistry laws. The model was tested on four different absorbent-refrigerant pairs reported in the literature, namely (benzyl ethyl amine-glycerol), (water-hexanoic acid), (water-2-hexanone) and (water-ethyl propionate) as well as on pairs where the absorbent compound is generated by the proposed absorbent design strategy and the refrigerant is water. The results show that quite good values of the coefficient of performance (COP) can be obtained, indicating that this cycle configuration is promising and energetically efficient, mainly due to hardware savings, i.e. absence of condenser. However, other working fluid combinations have to be tested using the proposed model.

  2. Design and Economic Analysis of a Heating/Absorption Cooling System Operating with Municipal Solid Waste Digester: A Case Study of Gazi University

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coşar, Gökhan; Pooyanfar, Mirparham; Amirabedin, Ehsan; Topal, Hüseyin

    2013-12-01

    Recovering energy from municipal solid waste (MSW) is one of the most important issues of energy management in developed countries. This raises even more interest as world fossil fuel reserves diminish and fuel prices rise. Being one of main processes of waste disposal, anaerobic digestion can be used as a means to reduce fossil fuel and electricity consumption as well as reducing emissions. With growing demand for cooling in Turkey, especially during warm seasons and considering the energy costs, utilizing heat-driven absorption cooling systems coupled with an anaerobic digester for local cooling purposes is a potentially interesting alternative for electricity driven compression cooling. The aim of this article is to study the viability of utilizing biogas obtained from MSW anaerobic digestion as the main fuel for heating facilities of Gazi University, Turkey and also the energy source for an absorption cooling system designed for the central library of the aforementioned campus. The results prove that the suggested system is sustainably and financially appealing and has the potential to replace the conventional electricity driven cooling systems with a reasonable net present worth; moreover, it can notably reduce carbon dioxide emissions.

  3. Preliminary Design Study of Medium Sized Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with Natural Uranium as Fuel Cycle Input

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meriyanti, Su'ud, Zaki; Rijal, K.; Zuhair, Ferhat, A.; Sekimoto, H.

    2010-06-01

    In this study a fesibility design study of medium sized (1000 MWt) gas cooled fast reactors which can utilize natural uranium as fuel cycle input has been conducted. Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GFR) is among six types of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants. GFR with its hard neuron spectrum is superior for closed fuel cycle, and its ability to be operated in high temperature (850° C) makes various options of utilizations become possible. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input, modified CANDLE burn-up scheme[1-6] is adopted this GFR system by dividing the core into 10 parts of equal volume axially. Due to the limitation of thermal hydraulic aspects, the average power density of the proposed design is selected about 70 W/cc. As an optimization results, a design of 1000 MWt reactors which can be operated 10 years without refueling and fuel shuffling and just need natural uranium as fuel cycle input is discussed. The average discharge burn-up is about 280 GWd/ton HM. Enough margin for criticallity was obtained for this reactor.

  4. Static Characteristics of Absorption Chiller-Heater Supplying Cold and Hot Water Simultaneously

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Irie, Tomoyoshi

    Absorption chiller-heaters which can supply both chilled water and hot water at the same time, are used for cooling and heating air conditioning systems. In this paper, we classified absorption cold and hot water generating cycles and control methods, studied these absorption cycles by cycle simulation. In economizer cycle, condensed refrigerant which heats hot water is transported to cooling cycle and used effectively for cooling chilled water, Concerning with transported condensed refrigerant, there are two methods, all condensed refrigerant or required refrigerant for cooling are transported to cooling cycle, and required refrigerant method is better for energy saving. Adding improvement of solution control to this economizer cycle, simultaneous cold and hot water supplying chiller-heaters have good characteristics of energy saving in the all region.

  5. Thermal and economic assessment of hot side sensible heat and cold side phase change storage combination fo absorption solar cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, M. K.; Morehouse, J. H.

    An analysis of a solar assisted absorption cooling system which employs a combination of phase change on the cold side and sensible heat storage on the hot side of the cooling machine for small commercial buildings is given. The year-round thermal performance of this system for space cooling were determined by simulation and compared against conventional cooling systems in three geographic locations: Phoenix, Arizona; Miami, Florida and Washington, D.C. The results indicate that the hot-cold storage combination has a considerable amount of energy and economical savings over hot side sensible heat storage. Using the hot-cold storage combination, the optimum collector areas for Washington, D.C., Phoenix and Miami are 355 m squared, 250 m squared and 495 m squared, respectively. Compared against conventional vapor compression chiller, the net solar fractions are 61, 67 and 69 percent, respectively.

  6. Developments in absorptive glass mat separators for cycling applications and 36 V lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toniazzo, V.; Lambert, U.

    The major markets for valve-regulated lead-acid (VRLA) batteries are undergoing a radical upheaval. In particular, the telecommunications industry requires more reliable power supplies, and the familiar 12 V electrical system in cars will probably be soon replaced by a 36/42 V system, or by other electrical systems if part of the automotive market is taken over by hybrid electrical vehicles (HEVs). In order to meet these new challenges and enable VRLA batteries to provide a satisfactory life in float and cycling applications in the telecommunication field, or in the high-rate-partial-state-of-charge service required by both 36/42 V automobiles and HEVs, the lead-acid battery industry has to improve substantially the quality of present VRLA batteries based on absorptive glass mat (AGM) technology. Therefore, manufacturing steps and cell components have to be optimized, especially AGM separators as these are key components for better production yields and battery performance. This paper shows how the optimal segregation of the coarse and fine fibres in an AGM separator structure can improve greatly the properties of the material. The superior capillarity, springiness and mechanical properties of the 100% glass Amerglass multilayer separator compared with commercial monolayer counterparts with the same specific surface-area is highlighted.

  7. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  8. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters II: Self-regulation cycle and non-thermal emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, Svenja; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Self-regulated feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centres of galaxy clusters and in regulating star formation in central galaxies. In a companion paper, we found steady state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the CR energy equation for a large cluster sample. In those solutions, radiative cooling in the central region is balanced by streaming CRs through the generation and dissipation of resonantly generated Alfvén waves and by thermal conduction at large radii. Here we demonstrate that the predicted non-thermal emission resulting from hadronic CR interactions in the intra-cluster medium exceeds observational radio (and gamma-ray) data in a subsample of clusters that host radio mini halos (RMHs). In contrast, the predicted non-thermal emission is well below observational data in cooling galaxy clusters without RMHs. These are characterised by exceptionally large AGN radio fluxes, indicating high CR yields and associated CR heating rates. We suggest a self-regulation cycle of AGN feedback in which non-RMH clusters are heated by streaming CRs homogeneously throughout the central cooling region. We predict radio micro halos surrounding the AGNs of these CR-heated clusters in which the primary emission may predominate the hadronically generated emission. Once the CR population has streamed sufficiently far and lost enough energy, the cooling rate increases, which explains the increased star formation rates in clusters hosting RMHs. Those could be powered hadronically by CRs that have previously heated the cluster core.

  9. Study of a Vuilleumier cycle cryogenic refrigerator for detector cooling on the limb scanning infrared radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russo, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    A program to detect and monitor the presence of trace constituents in the earth's atmosphere by using the Limb Scanning Infrared Radiometer (LSIR) is reported. The LSIR, which makes radiometric measurements of the earth's limb radiance profile from a space platform, contains a detector assembly that must be cooled to a temperature of 65 + or - 2 K. The feasibility of cooling the NASA-type detector package with Vuilleumier (VM) cryogenic refrigerator was investigated to develop a preliminary conceptual design of a VM refrigerator that is compatible with a flight-type LSIR instrument. The scope of the LSIR program consists of analytical and design work to establish the size, weight, power consumption, interface requirements, and other important characteristics of a cryogenic cooler that would meet the requirements of the LSIR. The cryogenic cooling requirements under the conditions that NASA specified were defined. Following this, a parametric performance analysis was performed to define the interrelationships between refrigeration characteristics and mission requirements. This effort led to the selection of an optimum refrigerator design for the LSIR mission.

  10. Hybrid sulfur cycle operation for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors

    DOEpatents

    Gorensek, Maximilian B

    2015-02-17

    A hybrid sulfur (HyS) cycle process for the production of hydrogen is provided. The process uses a proton exchange membrane (PEM) SO.sub.2-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) for the low-temperature, electrochemical reaction step and a bayonet reactor for the high-temperature decomposition step The process can be operated at lower temperature and pressure ranges while still providing an overall energy efficient cycle process.

  11. Probing the Sub-cycle AC Stark Shift by means of Attosecond Pulses: An ab initio Study of Transient Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Di; Telnov, Dmitry A.; Chu, Shih-I.

    2012-06-01

    We report a first fully ab initio theoretical exploration of the sub-cycle dynamical AC Stark shift and broadening of He atoms driven by an attosecond pulse and IR pulse. Since the duration of the UV pulse is much shorter than that of the optical cycle of the IR dressing laser field, the sub-cycle dynamics of the dressed atoms can be unfolded by applying the attosecond pulse at different time delay. A nonperturbative method is developed to calculate the transient absorption spectrum without weak-field limitation. By solving the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation accurately by means of the time-dependent generalized pseudospectral method, we predict novel sub-cycle laser-induced time-dependent AC Stark shift and power broadening of He atoms whose dynamical features are in good agreement with the latest ongoing experiments at UCF. Detailed results will be presented. This work is partially supported by DOE and NSF.

  12. Experiences in solar cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ward, D. S.

    The results of performance evaluations for nine solar cooling systems are presented, and reasons fow low or high net energy balances are discussed. Six of the nine systems are noted to have performed unfavorably compared to standard cooling systems due to thermal storage losses, excessive system electrical demands, inappropriate control strategies, poor system-to-load matching, and poor chiller performance. A reduction in heat losses in one residential unit increased the total system efficiency by 2.5%, while eliminating heat losses to the building interior increased the efficiency by 3.3%. The best system incorporated a lithium bromide absorption chiller and a Rankine cycle compression unit for a commercial application. Improvements in the cooling tower and fan configurations to increase the solar cooling system efficiency are indicated. Best performances are expected to occur in climates inducing high annual cooling loads.

  13. Review of the absorption spectra of solid O2 and N2 as they relate to contamination of a cooled infrared telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, S. M.

    1977-01-01

    During contamination studies for the liquid helium cooled shuttle infrared telescope facility, a literature search was conducted to determine the absorption spectra of the solid state of homonuclear molecules of O2 and N2, and ascertain what laboratory measurements of the solid have been made in the infrared. With the inclusion of one unpublished spectrum, the absorption spectrum of the solid oxygen molecule has been thoroughly studied from visible to millimeter wavelengths. Only two lines appear in the solid that do not also appear in the gas or liquid. A similar result is implied for the solid nitrogen molecule because it also is homonuclear. The observed infrared absorption lines result from lattice modes of the alpha phase of the solid, and disappear at the warmer temperatures of the beta, gamma, and liquid phases. They are not observed from polycrystalline forms of O2, while strong scattering is. Scattering, rather than absorption, is considered to be the principal natural contamination problem for cooled infrared telescopes in low earth orbit.

  14. Solar powered absorption cycle heat pump using phase change materials for energy storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Solar powered heating and cooling system with possible application to residential homes is described. Operating principles of system are defined and illustration of typical energy storage and exchange system is provided.

  15. Fuel Cycle System Analysis Implications of Sodium-Cooled Metal-Fueled Fast Reactor Transuranic Conversion Ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Piet; Edward A. Hoffman; Samuel E. Bays; Gretchen E. Matthern; Jacob J. Jacobson; Ryan Clement; David W. Gerts

    2013-03-01

    If advanced fuel cycles are to include a large number of fast reactors (FRs), what should be the transuranic (TRU) conversion ratio (CR)? The nuclear energy era started with the assumption that they should be breeder reactors (CR > 1), but the full range of possible CRs eventually received attention. For example, during the recent U.S. Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, the proposal was burner reactors (CR < 1). Yet, more recently, Massachusetts Institute of Technology's "Future of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle" proposed CR [approximately] 1. Meanwhile, the French company EDF remains focused on breeders. At least one of the reasons for the differences of approach is different fuel cycle objectives. To clarify matters, this paper analyzes the impact of TRU CR on many parameters relevant to fuel cycle systems and therefore spans a broad range of topic areas. The analyses are based on a FR physics parameter scan of TRU CR from 0 to [approximately]1.8 in a sodium-cooled metal-fueled FR (SMFR), in which the fuel from uranium-oxide-fueled light water reactors (LWRs) is recycled directly to FRs and FRs displace LWRs in the fleet. In this instance, the FRs are sodium cooled and metal fueled. Generally, it is assumed that all TRU elements are recycled, which maximizes uranium ore utilization for a given TRU CR and waste radiotoxicity reduction and is consistent with the assumption of used metal fuel separated by electrochemical means. In these analyses, the fuel burnup was constrained by imposing a neutron fluence limit to fuel cladding to the same constant value. This paper first presents static, time-independent measures of performance for the LWR [right arrow] FR fuel cycle, including mass, heat, gamma emission, radiotoxicity, and the two figures of merit for materials for weapon attractiveness developed by C. Bathke et al. No new fuel cycle will achieve a static equilibrium in the foreseeable future. Therefore, additional analyses are shown with dynamic, time

  16. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    DOEpatents

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar; Smith, Raub Warfield

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  17. Numerical Hydraulic Study on Seawater Cooling System of Combined Cycle Power Plant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. Y.; Park, S. M.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, S. W.

    2010-06-01

    As the rated flow and pressure increase in pumping facilities, a proper design against surges and severe cavitations in the pipeline system is required. Pressure surge due to start-up, shut-down process and operation failure causes the water hammer in upstream of the closing valve and the cavitational hammer in downstream of the valve. Typical cause of water hammer is the urgent closure of valves by breakdown of power supply and unexpected failure of pumps. The abrupt changes in the flow rate of the liquid results in high pressure surges in upstream of the valves, thus kinetic energy is transformed into potential energy which leads to the sudden increase of the pressure that is called as water hammer. Also, by the inertia, the liquid continues to flow downstream of the valve with initial speed. Accordingly, the pressure decreases and an expanding vapor bubble known as column separation are formed near the valve. In this research, the hydraulic study on the closed cooling water heat exchanger line, which is the one part of the power plant, is introduced. The whole power plant consists of 1,200 MW combined power plant and 220,000 m3/day desalination facility. Cooling water for the plant is supplied by sea water circulating system with a capacity of 29 m3/s. The primary focus is to verify the steady state hydraulic capacity of the system. The secondary is to quantify transient issues and solutions in the system. The circuit was modeled using a commercial software. The stable piping network was designed through the hydraulic studies using the simulation for the various scenarios.

  18. Performance evaluation of a solar ejector-vapour compression cycle for cooling application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Megdouli, K.; Elakhdar, M.; Nahdi, E.; Kairouani, L.; Mhimid, A.

    2015-04-01

    This study deals with the performance of the ejector-vapour compression cycle assisted by solar. The effect of operating conditions on the combined cycle performance is examined. Also, a comparison of the system performance with environment friendly refrigerants (R134a, R600, R123, R141b, R142b, R152a, R290, and R245fa) is made. This performance is calculated using an empirical correlation. Thermodynamic properties of functioning fluids are obtained with package REFPROP 8. Using the typical meteorological year file containing the weather data of the city of Tunis, the system performance is computed for three collector types. The theoretical results show that the R290 offers the highest coefficient of performance, COP=3.75, for generator temperature TB = 78°C, condenser temperature Tc = 30°C and the intercooler temperature Te = 15°C.

  19. Stirling cycle heat pump for heating and/or cooling systems

    SciTech Connect

    Meijer, R.J.; Khalili, K.; Meijer, E.; Godett, T.M.

    1991-03-05

    This patent describes a duplex Stirling cycle machine acting as a heat pump. It comprises: a Stirling engine having pistons axially displaceable within parallel cylinders, the engine further having a swashplate rotatable about an axis of, rotation parallel to the cylinders and defining a plane inclined from the axis of rotation. The pistons connected to the swashplate via crossheads whereby axial displacement of the pistons is converted to rotation of the swashplate, and a Stirling cycle heat pump having a compression heat exchanger, an expansion heat exchanger and a regenerator with pistons equal in number to the engine pistons and axially displaceable within cylinders which are oriented co-axially with the engine cylinders. The crossheads further connected to the heat pump pistons whereby the heat pump pistons move simultaneously with the engine pistons over an equal stroke distance.

  20. Equatorial ionospheric absorption during half a solar cycle (1964-1970)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnanalingam, S.

    1972-01-01

    An extensive series of vertical incidence absorption measurements made at an equatorial station is analyzed in detail for a better understanding of the lower ionosphere. A quantitive empirical relationship is derived between absorption and 1 to 8 A solar flux for moderate levels of solar activity. It is shown that the threshold flux for D region modification, at a solar zenith angle of 10 deg, is approximately 0.0005 erg/sq/cm/sec. Attention is drawn to the incidence of days of high absorption even in the absence of solar X-ray activity. Available evidence points to variability of the order of 10 to 40% in the intensity of the solar Lyman alpha radiation as the most likely cause of these unusual, though infrequent, enhancements in absorption.

  1. High Temperature Fusion Reactor Cooling Using Brayton Cycle Based Partial Energy Conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juhasz, Albert J.; Sawicki, Jerzy T.

    2003-01-01

    For some future space power systems using high temperature nuclear heat sources most of the output energy will be used in other than electrical form, and only a fraction of the total thermal energy generated will need to be converted to electrical work. The paper describes the conceptual design of such a partial energy conversion system, consisting of a high temperature fusion reactor operating in series with a high temperature radiator and in parallel with dual closed cycle gas turbine (CCGT) power systems, also referred to as closed Brayton cycle (CBC) systems, which are supplied with a fraction of the reactor thermal energy for conversion to electric power. Most of the fusion reactor's output is in the form of charged plasma which is expanded through a magnetic nozzle of the interplanetary propulsion system. Reactor heat energy is ducted to the high temperature series radiator utilizing the electric power generated to drive a helium gas circulation fan. In addition to discussing the thermodynamic aspects of the system design the authors include a brief overview of the gas turbine and fan rotor-dynamics and proposed bearing support technology along with performance characteristics of the three phase AC electric power generator and fan drive motor.

  2. Development of solar driven absorption air conditioners and heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dao, K.; Wahlig, M.; Wali, E.; Rasson, J.; Molishever, E.

    1980-03-01

    The development of absorption refrigeration systems for solar active heating and cooling applications is discussed. The approaches investigated are those using air-cooled condenser-absorber and those leading to coefficient of performances (COP) that increase continuously with heat source temperature. This is primarily an experimental project, with the emphasis on designing, fabricating and testing absorption chillers in operating regimes that are particularly suited for solar energy applications. Its demonstrated that the conventional single-effect ammonia-water absorption cycle can be used (with minor modifications) for solar cooling.

  3. Advancement of Double Effect Absorption Cycle by Input of Low Temperature Waste Heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroshi; Edera, Masaru; Nakamura, Makoto; Oka, Masahiro; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Energy conservation is becoming important for global environmental protection. New simple techniques of more efficient1y using the waste heat of gas co-generation systems for refrigerationare required. In first report, a new method of using the low temperature waste heat for refrigeration was proposed, and the basic characteristics of the promising methods of recovering waste heat were c1arified. In this report, the more detailed simulation model of the series flow type double effect absorption refrigerator with auxiliary heat exchanger was constructed and the static characteristics were investigated. Then experiments on this advanced absorption refrigerator were carried out, and the results of the calculation and experiments were compared and discussed. Moreover, the betterment of the simulation model of this advanced absorption refrigerator was carried out.

  4. Performance Evaluation of a 4.5 kW (1.3 Refrigeration Tons) Air-Cooled Lithium Bromide/Water Solar Powered (Hot-Water-Fired) Absorption Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Zaltash, Abdolreza; Petrov, Andrei Y; Linkous, Randall Lee; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2007-01-01

    During the summer months, air-conditioning (cooling) is the single largest use of electricity in both residential and commercial buildings with the major impact on peak electric demand. Improved air-conditioning technology has by far the greatest potential impact on the electric industry compared to any other technology that uses electricity. Thermally activated absorption air-conditioning (absorption chillers) can provide overall peak load reduction and electric grid relief for summer peak demand. This innovative absorption technology is based on integrated rotating heat exchangers to enhance heat and mass transfer resulting in a potential reduction of size, cost, and weight of the "next generation" absorption units. Rotartica Absorption Chiller (RAC) is a 4.5 kW (1.3 refrigeration tons or RT) air-cooled lithium bromide (LiBr)/water unit powered by hot water generated using the solar energy and/or waste heat. Typically LiBr/water absorption chillers are water-cooled units which use a cooling tower to reject heat. Cooling towers require a large amount of space, increase start-up and maintenance costs. However, RAC is an air-cooled absorption chiller (no cooling tower). The purpose of this evaluation is to verify RAC performance by comparing the Coefficient of Performance (COP or ratio of cooling capacity to energy input) and the cooling capacity results with those of the manufacturer. The performance of the RAC was tested at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in a controlled environment at various hot and chilled water flow rates, air handler flow rates, and ambient temperatures. Temperature probes, mass flow meters, rotational speed measuring device, pressure transducers, and a web camera mounted inside the unit were used to monitor the RAC via a web control-based data acquisition system using Automated Logic Controller (ALC). Results showed a COP and cooling capacity of approximately 0.58 and 3.7 kW respectively at 35 C (95 F) design condition for ambient

  5. What Dominates the Coronal Emission Spectrum During the Cycle of Impulsive Heating and Cooling?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen J.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2011-01-01

    The smoking gun of small-scale, impulsive events heating the solar corona is expected to be the presence of a hot ( > 5 MK) plasma component. Evidence for this has been scarce, but has gradually begun to accumulate due to recent studies designed to constrain the high temperature part of the emission measure distribution. However, the detected hot component is often weaker than models predict and this is due in part to the common modeling assumption that the ionization balance remains in equilibrium. The launch of the latest generation of space-based observing instrumentation aboard Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) has brought the matter of the ionization state of the plasma firmly to the forefront. It is timely to consider exactly what emission current instruments would detect when observing a corona heated impulsively on small-scales by nanoflares. Only after we understand the full effects of nonequilibrium ionization can we draw meaningful conclusions about the plasma that is (or is not) present. We have therefore performed a series of hydrodynamic simulations for a variety of different nanoflare properties and initial conditions. Our study has led to several key conclusions. 1. Deviations from equilibrium are greatest for short-duration nanoflares at low initial coronal densities. 2. Hot emission lines are the most affected and are suppressed sometimes to the point of being invisible. 3. The emission detected in all of the SDO-AIA channels is generally dominated by warm, over-dense, cooling plasma. 4. It is difficult not to create coronal loops that emit strongly at 1.5 MK and in the range 2 to 5 MK, which are the most commonly observed kind, for a broad range of nanoflare scenarios. 5. The Fe XV (284.16 ) emission in most of our models is about 10 times brighter than the Ca XVII (192.82 ) emission, consistent with observations. Our overarching conclusion is that small-scale, impulsive heating inducing a nonequilibrium ionization state leads to

  6. Doubling the electrocaloric cooling of poled ferroelectric materials by bipolar cycling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basso, Vittorio; Gerard, Jean-François; Pruvost, Sébastien

    2014-08-01

    We have investigated the entropy change in the ferroelectric phase of poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) 70/30 films by direct heat flux calorimetry using Peltier cell heat flux sensors. We find that by applying a negative electric field to a positively poled state, the entropy can be further increased without any significantly change of the remanent polarization or the domain structure. By cycling between positive and negative values of the electric field, the electrocaloric effect (ECE) can be then improved by a factor of 2. As an example, we measured, around the positive remanence Pr = 60 × 10-3 C m-2, a fully reversible entropy change |Δs| = 1 J kg-1K-1 for a field change from 40 × 106 to -40 × 106 V m-1 and a maximum of |Δs| = 3.2 J kg-1K-1 for an asymmetric field change from 200 × 106 to -40 × 106 V m-1. This effect can be exploited to significantly increase the range of operating temperature for ECE materials below their Curie temperature.

  7. High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Steam Cycle/Cogeneration Lead Project strategy plan

    SciTech Connect

    1982-03-01

    The strategy for developing the HTGR system and introducing it into the energy marketplace is based on using the most developed technology path to establish a HTGR-Steam Cycle/Cogeneration (SC/C) Lead Project. Given the status of the HTGR-SC/C technology, a Lead Plant could be completed and operational by the mid 1990s. While there is remaining design and technology development that must be accomplished to fulfill technical and licensing requirements for a Lead Project commitment, the major barriers to the realization a HTGR-SC/C Lead Project are institutional in nature, e.g. Project organization and management, vendor/supplier development, cost/risk sharing between the public and private sector, and Project financing. These problems are further exacerbated by the overall pervading issues of economic and regulatory instability that presently confront the utility and nuclear industries. This document addresses the major institutional issues associated with the HTGR-SC/C Lead Project and provides a starting point for discussions between prospective Lead Project participants toward the realization of such a Project.

  8. An Active Broad Area Cooling Model of a Cryogenic Propellant Tank with a Single Stage Reverse Turbo-Brayton Cycle Cryocooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guzik, Monica C.; Tomsik, Thomas M.

    2011-01-01

    As focus shifts towards long-duration space exploration missions, an increased interest in active thermal control of cryogenic propellants to achieve zero boil-off of cryogens has emerged. An active thermal control concept of considerable merit is the integration of a broad area cooling system for a cryogenic propellant tank with a combined cryocooler and circulator system that can be used to reduce or even eliminate liquid cryogen boil-off. One prospective cryocooler and circulator combination is the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler. This system is unique in that it has the ability to both cool and circulate the coolant gas efficiently in the same loop as the broad area cooling lines, allowing for a single cooling gas loop, with the primary heat rejection occurring by way of a radiator and/or aftercooler. Currently few modeling tools exist that can size and characterize an integrated reverse turbo-Brayton cycle cryocooler in combination with a broad area cooling design. This paper addresses efforts to create such a tool to assist in gaining a broader understanding of these systems, and investigate their performance in potential space missions. The model uses conventional engineering and thermodynamic relationships to predict the preliminary design parameters, including input power requirements, pressure drops, flow rate, cycle performance, cooling lift, broad area cooler line sizing, and component operating temperatures and pressures given the cooling load operating temperature, heat rejection temperature, compressor inlet pressure, compressor rotational speed, and cryogenic tank geometry. In addition, the model allows for the preliminary design analysis of the broad area cooling tubing, to determine the effect of tube sizing on the reverse turbo-Brayton cycle system performance. At the time this paper was written, the model was verified to match existing theoretical documentation within a reasonable margin. While further experimental data is needed for full

  9. Investigation of the Performance of D2O-Cooled High-Conversion Reactors for Fuel Cycle Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Hikaru Hiruta; Gilles Youinou

    2013-09-01

    This report presents FY13 activities for the analysis of D2O cooled tight-pitch High-Conversion PWRs (HCPWRs) with U-Pu and Th-U fueled cores aiming at break-even or near breeder conditions while retaining the negative void reactivity. The analyses are carried out from several aspects which could not be covered in FY12 activities. SCALE 6.1 code system is utilized, and a series of simple 3D fuel pin-cell models are developed in order to perform Monte Carlo based criticality and burnup calculations. The performance of U-Pu fueled cores with axial and internal blankets is analyzed in terms of their impact on the relative fissile Pu mass balance, initial Pu enrichment, and void coefficient. In FY12, Pu conversion performances of D2O-cooled HCPWRs fueled with MOX were evaluated with small sized axial/internal DU blankets (approximately 4cm of axial length) in order to ensure the negative void reactivity, which evidently limits the conversion performance of HCPWRs. In this fiscal year report, the axial sizes of DU blankets are extended up to 30 cm in order to evaluate the amount of DU necessary to reach break-even and/or breeding conditions. Several attempts are made in order to attain the milestone of the HCPWR designs (i.e., break-even condition and negative void reactivity) by modeling of HCPWRs under different conditions such as boiling of D2O coolant, MOX with different 235U enrichment, and different target burnups. A similar set of analyses are performed for Th-U fueled cores. Several promising characteristics of 233U over other fissile like 239Pu and 235U, most notably its higher fission neutrons per absorption in thermal and epithermal ranges combined with lower ___ in the fast range than 239Pu allows Th-U cores to be taller than MOX ones. Such an advantage results in 4% higher relative fissile mass balance than that of U-Pu fueled cores while retaining the negative void reactivity until the target burnup of 51 GWd/t. Several other distinctions between U-Pu and

  10. Helium heater design for the helium direct cycle component test facility. [for gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, V. R.; Gunn, S. V.; Lee, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes a helium heater to be used to conduct non-nuclear demonstration tests of the complete power conversion loop for a direct-cycle gas-cooled nuclear reactor power plant. Requirements for the heater include: heating the helium to a 1500 F temperature, operating at a 1000 psia helium pressure, providing a thermal response capability and helium volume similar to that of the nuclear reactor, and a total heater system helium pressure drop of not more than 15 psi. The unique compact heater system design proposed consists of 18 heater modules; air preheaters, compressors, and compressor drive systems; an integral control system; piping; and auxiliary equipment. The heater modules incorporate the dual-concentric-tube 'Variflux' heat exchanger design which provides a controlled heat flux along the entire length of the tube element. The heater design as proposed will meet all system requirements. The heater uses pressurized combustion (50 psia) to provide intensive heat transfer, and to minimize furnace volume and heat storage mass.

  11. FR-II Broad Absorption Line Quasars and the Life Cycle of Quasars

    SciTech Connect

    Gregg, M D; Becker, R H; de Vries, W

    2006-01-05

    By combining the Sloan Digitized Sky Survey Third Data Release quasar list with the VLA FIRST survey, we have identified five objects having both broad absorption lines in their optical spectra and FR-II radio morphologies. We identify an additional example of this class from the FIRST Bright Quasar Survey, J1408+3054. Including the original FR-II-BAL object, J1016+5209, brings the number of such objects to eight. These quasars are relatively rare; finding this small handful has required the 45,000-large quasar sample of SDSS. The FR-II-BAL quasars exhibit a significant anti-correlation between radio-loudness and the strength of the BAL features. This is easily accounted for by the evolutionary picture in which quasars emerge from cocoons of BAL-producing material which stifle the development of radio jets and lobes. There is no such simple explanation for the observed properties of FR-II-BALs in the unification-by-orientation model of quasars. The rarity of the FR-II-BAL class implies that the two phases do not coexist for very long in a single quasar, perhaps less than 10{sup 5} years, with the combined FR-II, high ionization broad absorption phase being even shorter by another factor of 10 or more.

  12. Design and Economic Potential of an Integrated High-Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Combined Cooling, Heat, and Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosford, Kyle S.

    Clean distributed generation power plants can provide a much needed balance to our energy infrastructure in the future. A high-temperature fuel cell and an absorption chiller can be integrated to create an ideal combined cooling, heat, and power system that is efficient, quiet, fuel flexible, scalable, and environmentally friendly. With few real-world installations of this type, research remains to identify the best integration and operating strategy and to evaluate the economic viability and market potential of this system. This thesis informs and documents the design of a high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller demonstration system at a generic office building on the University of California, Irvine (UCI) campus. This work details the extension of prior theoretical work to a financially-viable power purchase agreement (PPA) with regard to system design, equipment sizing, and operating strategy. This work also addresses the metering and monitoring for the system showcase and research and details the development of a MATLAB code to evaluate the economics associated with different equipment selections, building loads, and economic parameters. The series configuration of a high-temperature fuel cell, heat recovery unit, and absorption chiller with chiller exhaust recirculation was identified as the optimal system design for the installation in terms of efficiency, controls, ducting, and cost. The initial economic results show that high-temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller systems are already economically competitive with utility-purchased generation, and a brief case study of a southern California hospital shows that the systems are scalable and viable for larger stationary power applications.

  13. Energy Absorption in a Load-Unload Cycle of Knee Implant Using Fractal Model of Rough Surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodaei, Mohammad; Farhang, Kambiz

    2016-05-01

    Roughness measurement of knee implant surfaces is investigated. The study of roughness measurement show that the topography of knee implant surface is multi-scale and surface spectra follows a power law behavior. A magnification of rough surface topography implies that there is no difference between original and magnified profile of implant surface. For implant surface, statistical parameters such as variance of height, curvature, and slope are found to be scale-dependent. Fractal representation of implant surface shows that the size-distribution of the multi-scale contacts spots follows a power law and is characterized by the fractal dimension of implant surface. Fractal surface description of the rough surfaces of knee implant is used to obtain force-displacement relationship of the contact force. Using an approximate function through the fusion of two piecewise functions, energy absorption of a knee implant in a single cycle of load-unload is obtained.

  14. CHaracteristics of Two-Stage Absorption Heat Pump Cycler Driven by Waste Heat From Gas Engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kojima, Hiroshi; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Recently the energy conservation is expected from the global environment protection view point. In this study, a new concept of a compound gas cooling system using treated sewage water combining a gas engine heat pump and an absorption heat pump is proposed. In this system, the absorption heat pump is driven by the waste heat from the gas engine. In this paper, first, the best absorption cycle for this absorption heat pump is selected for the cooling and heating mode. And finally the simulation model of the two-stage absorption heat pumps for heating mode is demonstrated and the static characteristics are clarified.

  15. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.

  16. Laser cooling without spontaneous emission.

    PubMed

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-01-30

    This Letter reports the demonstration of laser cooling without spontaneous emission, and thereby addresses a significant controversy. It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by natural decay. It is achieved by using the bichromatic force on an atomic transition with a relatively long excited state lifetime and a relatively short cooling time so that spontaneous emission effects are minimized. The observed width of the one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the "temperature" by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is limited. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited.

  17. Preliminary investigations on therapy thresholds for laser dosimetry, cryogen spray cooling duration, and treatment cycles for laser cartilage reshaping in the New Zealand white rabbit auricle.

    PubMed

    Chlebicki, Cara A; Protsenko, Dmitry E; Wong, Brian J

    2014-05-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of laser irradiation (λ = 1.45 μm) in tandem with cryogen spray cooling (CSC) to reshape rabbit auricular cartilage using a total energy density of 14 J/cm(2). The aim of this study was to further explore and identify the dosimetry parameter space for laser output energy, CSC duration, and treatment cycles required to achieve shape change while limiting skin and cartilage injury. Ten New Zealand white rabbits were treated with the 1.45 μm diode laser combined with cryogen spray cooling (Candela Smoothbeam™, Candela Co., Wayland, MA, USA). The ear's central portion was bent around a cylindrical jig and irradiated in consecutive spots of 6 mm diameter (13 or 14 J/cm(2) per spot) along three rows encompassing the bend. CSC was delivered during irradiation in cycles consisting of 25-35 ms. At thin and thick portions of the ear, 4-7 and 6-10 treatment cycles were delivered, respectively. After surgery, ears were examined and splinted for 6 weeks. Treatment parameters resulting in acceptable (grades 1 and 2) and unacceptable (grade 3) skin injuries for thick and thin regions were identified, and shape change was observed. Confocal and histological analysis of cartilage tissue revealed several outcomes correlating to laser dosimetry, CSC duration, and treatment cycles. These outcomes included expansion of cartilage layers (thickening), partial cartilage injuries, and full-thickness cartilage injuries. We determined therapy thresholds for laser output energy, cryogen spray cooling duration, and treatment cycles in the rabbit auricular model. These parameters are a starting point for future clinical procedures aimed at correcting external ear deformities.

  18. Preliminary Investigations on Therapy Thresholds for Laser Dosimetry, Cryogen Spray Cooling Duration, and Treatment Cycles for Laser Cartilage Reshaping in the New Zealand White Rabbit Auricle

    PubMed Central

    Chlebicki, Cara A.; Protsenko, Dmitry E.; Wong, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the feasibility of laser irradiation (λ=1.45 μm) in tandem with cryogen spray cooling (CSC) to reshape rabbit auricular cartilage using total energy density of 14 J/cm2. The aim of this study was to further explore and identify the dosimetry parameter space for laser output energy, CSC duration, and treatment cycles required to achieve shape change while limiting skin and cartilage injury. Ten New Zealand white rabbits were treated with the 1.45 μm diode laser combined with cryogen spray cooling (Candela Smoothbeam™, Candela Co., Wayland, MA). The ear's central portion was bent around a cylindrical jig and irradiated in consecutive spots of 6 mm diameter (13 J/cm2 or 14 J/cm2 per spot) along 3 rows encompassing the bend. CSC was delivered during irradiation in cycles consisting of 25-35 ms. At thin and thick portions of the ear, 4-7 and 6-10 treatment cycles were delivered, respectively. After surgery, ears were examined and splinted for 6 weeks. Treatment parameters resulting in acceptable (Grades 1 & 2) and unacceptable (Grade 3) skin injuries for thick and thin regions were identified and shape change was observed. Confocal and histological analysis of cartilage tissue revealed several outcomes correlating to laser dosimetry, CSC duration, and treatment cycles. These outcomes included expansion of cartilage layers (thickening), partial cartilage injuries, and full thickness cartilage injuries. We determined therapy thresholds for laser output energy, cryogen spray cooling duration, and treatment cycles in the rabbit auricular model. These parameters are a starting point for future clinical procedures aimed at correcting external ear deformities. PMID:24202858

  19. Development of Exhaust Gas Driven Absorption Chiller-Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Endou, Tetsuya; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    Waste heat from co-generation systems are usually recovered by hot water or steam, those are used to drive absorption refrigerators at cooling time, and those are used for heating via heat exchangers at heating time. However waste heat from micro gas turbines are discharged in the form of exhaust gas, it is simple that exhaust gas is directly supplied to absorption chiller-heaters. In the first report we studied cooling cycle, and this second paper, we evaluated various absorption heating cycles for exhaust gas driven absorption chiller-heaters, and adopted one of these cycles for the prototype machine. Also, we experimented with the prototype for wide range condition and got the heating characteristics. Based on the experimental data, we developed a simulation model of the static characteristics, and then studied how to increase the output by limited exhaust gas.

  20. Hydraulic design of a re-circulating water cooling system of a combined cycle power plant in Thailand

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, C.K.; Pandit, D.R.; Kwon, S.G.

    1998-12-31

    The paper describes the hydraulic design and hydraulic transient analysis of the re-circulating water cooling system of the combined cyclo Sipco power cogeneration plant in Thailand. The power plant of 450 MW total capacity is proposed to be built in two stages. Stage one will produce 300 MW of power and will consist of two gas turbine generators (GTG) and one steam turbine generator (STG). Stage two will produce 150 MW of power and will consist of one GTG and one STG. The cooling system will consist of one GTG and one STG. The cooling system will consist of cooling towers, a combined collecting basin and pump intake sump, pumps and motors, and separate conveyance systems and condensers for the generator units in the two stages. In a re-circulating water cooling system, cold water is pumped from the pump intake sump to the condensers through the conveyance system and hot water from the condensers is carried through the returning pipeline system to the cooling towers, whence the water after cooling is drained into the sump at the base of the towers. Total cooling water requirement for the system in stage one is estimated to be 112,000 gallons per minute (GPM), and that in stage two, 56,000 GPM. The sump is designed using the computer program HEC-2, developed by the US Army Corps of Engineers (COE) and the pump intake basin, following the recommendations of the Hydraulic Institute. The pumps were sized by computing the head loss in the system, and, the steady state and transient performances (during pump start-up and shut-down procedures and due to possible power or mechanical failure of one or all pumps) of the system were analyzed by mathematically modeling the system using the computer program WHAMO (Water Hammer nd Mass Oscillations), also developed by the COE.

  1. Non-equilibrium effects evidenced by vibrational spectra during the coil-to-globule transition in poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) subjected to an ultrafast heating-cooling cycle.

    PubMed

    Deshmukh, Sanket A; Kamath, Ganesh; Suthar, Kamlesh J; Mancini, Derrick C; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2014-03-14

    Molecular dynamics simulations in conjunction with finite element calculations are used to explore the conformational dynamics of a thermo-sensitive oligomer, namely poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM), subjected to an ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle. Finite element (FE) calculations were used to predict the temperature profile resulting from laser-induced heating of the polymer-aqueous system. The heating rate (∼0.6 K ps(-1)) deduced from FE calculations was used to heat an aqueous solution of PNIPAM consisting of 30 monomeric units (30-mer) from 285 K to 315 K. Non-equilibrium effects arising from the ultra-fast heating-cooling cycle results in a hysteresis during the coil-to-globule transition. The corresponding atomic scale conformations were characterized by monitoring the changes in the vibrational spectra, which provided a reliable metric to study the coil-to-globule transition in PNIPAM and vice-versa across the LCST. The vibrational spectra of bonds involving atoms from the oligomer backbone and the various side-groups (amide I, amide II, and the isopropyl group of PNIPAM) of the oligomers were analyzed to study the conformational changes in the oligomer corresponding to the observed hysteresis. The differences in the vibrational spectra calculated at various temperatures during heating and cooling cycles were used to understand the coil-to-globule and globule-to-coil transitions in the PNIPAM oligomer and identify the changes in the relative interactions between various atoms in the backbone and in the side groups of the oligomer with water. The shifts in the computed vibrational spectral peaks and the changes in the intensity of peaks for the different regions of PNIPAM, seen across the LCST during the heating cycle, are in good agreement with previous experimental studies. The changes in the radius of gyration (Rg) and vibrational spectra for amide I and amide II regions of PNIPAM suggest a clear coil-to-globule transition at ∼301 K during the

  2. Thermodynamic study of air-cycle and mercury-vapor-cycle systems for refrigerating cooling air for turbines or other components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nachtigall, Alfred J; Freche, John C; Esgar, Jack B

    1956-01-01

    An analysis of air refrigeration systems indicated that air cycles are generally less satisfactory than simple heat exchangers unless high component efficiencies and high values of heat-exchanger effectiveness can be obtained. A system employing a mercury-vapor cycle appears to be feasible for refrigerating air that must enter the system at temperature levels of approximately 1500 degrees R, and this cycle is more efficient than the air cycle. Weight of the systems was not considered. The analysis of the systems is presented in a generalized dimensionless form.

  3. Rapid freeze-drying cycle optimization using computer programs developed based on heat and mass transfer models and facilitated by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS).

    PubMed

    Kuu, Wei Y; Nail, Steven L

    2009-09-01

    Computer programs in FORTRAN were developed to rapidly determine the optimal shelf temperature, T(f), and chamber pressure, P(c), to achieve the shortest primary drying time. The constraint for the optimization is to ensure that the product temperature profile, T(b), is below the target temperature, T(target). Five percent mannitol was chosen as the model formulation. After obtaining the optimal sets of T(f) and P(c), each cycle was assigned with a cycle rank number in terms of the length of drying time. Further optimization was achieved by dividing the drying time into a series of ramping steps for T(f), in a cascading manner (termed the cascading T(f) cycle), to further shorten the cycle time. For the purpose of demonstrating the validity of the optimized T(f) and P(c), four cycles with different predicted lengths of drying time, along with the cascading T(f) cycle, were chosen for experimental cycle runs. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was used to continuously measure the sublimation rate. As predicted, maximum product temperatures were controlled slightly below the target temperature of -25 degrees C, and the cascading T(f)-ramping cycle is the most efficient cycle design. In addition, the experimental cycle rank order closely matches with that determined by modeling.

  4. High Resolution Jet-Cooled Infrared Absorption Spectra of Formic Acid Dimer: a Reinvestigation of the Fermi-Triad System in the C-O Stretching Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Chuanxi

    2014-06-01

    High resolution jet-cooled absorption spectra of the formic acid dimer (HCOOH)2 have been measured in the C-O stretching region at 1215-1240 wn using a rapid-scan tunable diode laser spectrometer. Three vibrational bands of (HCOOH)2 have been assigned unambiguously. They were interpreted as the Fermi-triad system consisting of the νb{22} fundamental band and two combination bands in a previous low-resolution study [F. Ito, Chem. Phys. Lett. 447, 202(2007)]. The spectral coverage in the high-resolution study of the middle band [M. Ortlieb and M. Havenith, J. Phys. Chem. A. 111, 7355(2007)] were extended. These three vibrational bands were analyzed together using a standard rigid rotor Watson A-reduced Hamiltonian without explicit consideration of the perturbation among three vibrationally excited states. The perturbed energies for three vibrationally excited states are 1219.71637(20), 1225.34666(15), and 1233.95863(17) wn, respectively.

  5. Numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating disk related to development of a spacecraft absorption cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faghri, Amir; Swanson, Theodore D.

    1989-01-01

    The numerical and experimental analysis of a thin liquid film on a rotating and a stationary disk related to the development of an absorber unit for a high capacity spacecraft absorption cooling system, is described. The creation of artificial gravity by the use of a centrifugal field was focused upon in this report. Areas covered include: (1) One-dimensional computation of thin liquid film flows; (2) Experimental measurement of film height and visualization of flow; (3) Two-dimensional computation of the free surface flow of a thin liquid film using a pressure optimization method; (4) Computation of heat transfer in two-dimensional thin film flow; (5) Development of a new computational methodology for the free surface flows using a permeable wall; (6) Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a thin film in the presence and absence of gravity; and (7) Comparison of theoretical prediction and experimental data. The basic phenomena related to fluid flow and heat transfer on rotating systems reported here can also be applied to other areas of space systems.

  6. Rovibrational cooling of molecules by optical pumping.

    PubMed

    Manai, I; Horchani, R; Lignier, H; Pillet, P; Comparat, D; Fioretti, A; Allegrini, M

    2012-11-02

    We demonstrate rotational and vibrational cooling of cesium dimers by optical pumping techniques. We use two laser sources exciting all the populated rovibrational states, except a target state that thus behaves like a dark state where molecules pile up thanks to absorption-spontaneous emission cycles. We are able to accumulate photoassociated cold Cs(2) molecules in their absolute ground state (v = 0, J = 0) with up to 40% efficiency. Given its simplicity, the method could be extended to other molecules and molecular beams. It also opens up general perspectives in laser cooling the external degrees of freedom of molecules.

  7. Intermediates of Krebs cycle correct the depression of the whole body oxygen consumption and lethal cooling in barbiturate poisoning in rat.

    PubMed

    Ivnitsky, Jury Ju; Schäfer, Timur V; Malakhovsky, Vladimir N; Rejniuk, Vladimir L

    2004-10-01

    Rats poisoned with one LD50 of thiopental or amytal are shown to increase oxygen consumption when intraperitoneally given sucinate, malate, citrate, alpha-ketoglutarate, dimethylsuccinate or glutamate (the Krebs cycle intermediates or their precursors) but not when given glucose, pyruvate, acetate, benzoate or nicotinate (energy substrates of other metabolic stages etc). Survival was increased with succinate or malate from control groups, which ranged from 30-83% to 87-100%. These effects were unrelated to respiratory depression or hypoxia as judged by little or no effect of succinate on ventilation indices and by the lack of effect of oxygen administration. Body cooling of comatose rats at ambient temperature approximately 19 degrees C became slower with succinate, the rate of cooling correlated well with oxygen consumption decrease. Succinate had no potency to modify oxygen consumption and body temperature in intact rats. A condition for antidote effect of the Krebs intermediate was sufficiently high dosage (5 mmol/kg), further dose increase made no odds. Repeated dosing of succinate had more marked protective effect, than a single one, to oxygen consumption and tended to promote the attenuation of lethal effect of barbiturates. These data suggest that suppression of whole body oxygen consumption with barbiturate overdose could be an important contributor to both body cooling and mortality. Intermediates of Krebs cycle, not only succinate, may have a pronounced therapeutic effect under the proper treatment regimen. Availability of Krebs cycle intermediates may be a limiting factor for the whole body oxygen consumption in barbiturate coma, its role in brain needs further elucidation.

  8. Coordinated optimization of the parameters of the cooled gas-turbine flow path and the parameters of gas-turbine cycles and combined-cycle power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kler, A. M.; Zakharov, Yu. B.; Potanina, Yu. M.

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, we evaluate the effectiveness of the coordinated solution to the optimization problem for the parameters of cycles in gas turbine and combined cycle power plants and to the optimization problem for the gas-turbine flow path parameters within an integral complex problem. We report comparative data for optimizations of the combined cycle power plant at coordinated and separate optimizations, when, first, the gas turbine and, then, the steam part of a combined cycle plant is optimized. The comparative data are presented in terms of economic indicators, energy-effectiveness characteristics, and specific costs. Models that were used in the present study for calculating the flow path enable taking into account, as a factor influencing the economic and energy effectiveness of the power plant, the heat stability of alloys from which the nozzle and rotor blades of gas-turbine stages are made.

  9. Feasibility study on ultralong-cycle operation and material performance for compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactors: a review work

    SciTech Connect

    Tak, Taewoo; Choe, Jiwon; Jeong, Yongjin; Lee, Deokjung; Kim, T. K.; Hong, Ser Gi

    2015-11-01

    This paper reviews the feasibility of ultralong-cycle operation on a compact liquid metal-cooled fast reactor (LMR) firstly by assessing the operation of a long-life fast reactor core and secondly by evaluating material performance in respect to both long-cycle operation and compact-size fast reactor. Many kinds of reactor concepts have been proposed, and LMR and small modular reactor (SMR) are the issued leading technologies for generation four (Gen-IV) reactor system development. The breed-and-burn strategy was proposed as a core burning strategy to operate a long cycle, and it has been evaluated in this paper with two reactor concepts: constant axial shape of neutron flux, nuclide densities, and power shape during life of energy and ultralong cycle fast reactor. In addition, Super-Safe, Small, and Simple and small modular fast reactor, compact LMR concepts, have been simulated to evaluate their long-life operation strategies. For the other practical issues, the materials for fuel, coolant, and structure have been identified and some of them are selected to have their performance optimized specifically for compact LMR with a long-cycle operation. It is believed that this comprehensive review will propose a proper direction for future reactor development and will be followed by the next step research for a complete reactor model with the other reactor components.

  10. Heat acclimatization does not improve VO2max or cycling performance in a cool climate in trained cyclists.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, A; Racinais, S; Jensen, M V; Nørgaard, S J; Bonne, T; Nybo, L

    2015-06-01

    This study investigated if well-trained cyclists improve V ˙ O 2 m a x and performance in cool conditions following heat acclimatization through natural outdoor training in hot conditions. Eighteen trained male cyclists were tested for physiological adaptations, V ˙ O 2 m a x , peak aerobic power output, exercise efficiency, and outdoor time trial (TT) performance (43.4 km in cool environment, ∼5-13 °C) before and after 2 weeks of training in a cool (CON, n = 9) or hot (∼35 °C, HA, n = 9) environment. After heat acclimatization, TT performance in the heat was improved by 16%; however, there was no change in the HA group in V ˙ O 2 m a x (4.79 ± 0.21 L/min vs 4.82 ± 0.35 L/min), peak aerobic power output (417 ± 16 W vs 422 ± 17 W), and outdoor TT performance in cool conditions (300 ± 14 W/69 ± 3 min vs 302 ± 9 W/69 ± 4 min). The present study shows that 2 weeks of heat acclimatization was associated with marked improvements in TT performance in the heat. However, for the well-trained endurance athletes, this did not transfer to an improved aerobic exercise capacity or outdoor TT performance in cool conditions.

  11. A 200-year delay in the response of the hydrological cycle in Western Europe to Northern hemispheric cooling during the Younger Dryas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rach, O.; Brauer, A.; Wilkes, H.; Sachse, D.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of temperature changes on the hydrological cycle constitutes a significant unknown in predictions of regional effects of future climate change. A better understanding of temporal and spatial patterns of past hydrological changes in relation to temperature changes is essential for the identification of the underlying mechanisms. The scarcity of direct paleohydrological proxies and difficulties comparing marine, ice-core and terrestrial records on absolute timescales has precluded an analysis of leads and lags between temperature and the hydrological cycle. We present a high-resolution record of paleohydrological changes in Western Europe during the Younger Dryas (YD) cold period (12.68 - 11.60 ka BP) from a sediment core of Lake Meerfelder Maar (MFM) in Western Germany. Our record is based on stable hydrogen isotope compositions (δD values) of terrestrial and aquatic lipid biomarkers (n-alkanes), which record changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation, a direct measure of fluxes in the hydrological cycle. The sediment core's age model is based on annually laminated sediments and well-dated tephra layers. This precise and independent chronology allows for insights into the response of the lake ecosystem to temperature changes in the Northern Hemisphere (NH). Terrestrial and aquatic n-alkane δD values indicate changes in the isotopic composition of precipitation, especially at the onset and the end of the YD of up to 40‰. We observed a two-phased response of the hydrological cycle to NH cooling: (1) a 15‰ decrease in the isotopic composition of precipitation occurred synchronous to the onset of cooling in the NH and the commencement of Greenland Stadial 1 (GS1) in the NGRIP ice-core after 12.88 ka BP and was mainly the result of cooling. (2) a decrease in the isotopic composition of precipitation of another 15‰ occurred at 12.68 ka BP, when temperatures in Greenland had already reached their lowest point. This was accompanied by increasing

  12. Conceptual design study on very small long-life gas cooled fast reactor using metallic natural Uranium-Zr as fuel cycle input

    SciTech Connect

    Monado, Fiber; Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Basar, Khairul; Permana, Sidik; Aziz, Ferhat; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2014-02-12

    A conceptual design study of very small 350 MWth Gas-cooled Fast Reactors with Helium coolant has been performed. In this study Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was implemented to create small and long life fast reactors with natural Uranium as fuel cycle input. Such system can utilize natural Uranium resources efficiently without the necessity of enrichment plant or reprocessing plant. The core with metallic fuel based was subdivided into 10 regions with the same volume. The fresh Natural Uranium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh Natural Uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all axial regions. The reactor discharge burn-up is 31.8% HM. From the neutronic point of view, this design is in compliance with good performance.

  13. Thermal design and verification of an instrument cooling system for infrared detectors utilizing the Oxford Stirling cycle refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werrett, Stephen; Seivold, Alfred L.

    1990-01-01

    A detailed nodal computer model was developed to thermally represent the hardware, and sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate design parameters and orbital environmental effects of an instrument cooling system for IR detectors. Thermal-vacuum testing showed excellent performance of the system and a correspondence with math model predictions to within 3 K. Results show cold stage temperature sensitivity to cold patch backload, outer stage external surface emittance degradation, and cold stage emittance degradation, respectively. The increase in backload on the cold patch over the mission lifetime is anticipated to be less than 3.0 watts, which translates to less than a 3-degree increase in detector temperatures.

  14. High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor steam-cycle/cogeneration lead plant reactor vessel: system design description

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    The Reactor Vessel System contains the primary coolant inventory within a gas-tight pressure boundary, and provides the necessary flow paths and overpressure protection for this pressure boundary. The Reactor Vessel System also houses the components of the Reactor System, the Heat Transport System, and the Auxiliary Heat Removal System. The scope of the Reactor Vessel System includes the prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV) structure with its reinforcing steel and prestressing components; liners, penetrations, closures, and cooling water tubes attached to the concrete side of the liner; the thermal barrier (insulation) on the primary coolant side of the liner; instrumentation for structural monitoring; and a pressure relief system. Specifications are presented.

  15. The feasibility study of small long-life gas cooled fast reactor with mixed natural Uranium/Thorium as fuel cycle input

    SciTech Connect

    Ariani, Menik; Su'ud, Zaki; Waris, Abdul; Khairurrijal,; Monado, Fiber; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2012-06-06

    A conceptual design study of Gas Cooled Fast Reactors with Modified CANDLE burn-up scheme has been performed. In this study, design GCFR with Helium coolant which can be continuously operated by supplying mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium without fuel enrichment plant or fuel reprocessing plant. The active reactor cores are divided into two region, Thorium fuel region and Uranium fuel region. Each fuel core regions are subdivided into ten parts (region-1 until region-10) with the same volume in the axial direction. The fresh Natural Uranium and Thorium is initially put in region-1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region-2 and the each region-1 is filled by fresh natural Uranium/Thorium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions in both cores area, i.e. shifted the core of i{sup th} region into i+1 region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. For the next cycles, we will add only Natural Uranium and Thorium on each region-1. The calculation results show the reactivity reached by mixed Natural Uranium/Thorium with volume ratio is 4.7:1. This reactor can results power thermal 550 MWth. After reactor start-up the operation, furthermore reactor only needs Natural Uranium/Thorium supply for continue operation along 100 years.

  16. LaNi5 Hydrogen-Absorption Cryogenic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrogen-absorption refrigerating system provides about 650 mW of cooling at 20 to 29 K in continuous, closed-cycle operation. Three thermally cycled absorbers/desorbers act as compressors. System successfully tested below 29 K for over 1,000 h, while separate room-temperature hydride compressor operated continuously for 6,000 h. Due to lack of moving parts, lifetimes of 10 years or more eventually expected.

  17. Design and experimental analysis of counter-flow heat and mass exchanger incorporating (M-cycle) for evaporative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalid, Omar; Butt, Zubair; Tanveer, Waqas; Rao, Hasan Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, the functioning of dew-point cooler is improved in terms of its thermal effectiveness. For this reason, a heat and mass exchanger has been designed by using a counter-flow pattern incorporating Maisotsenko cycle (M-cycle) having effective absorbing material called Kraft paper on wet channel side and improved width to height ratio. Experimentation has been performed under various inlet air working parameters such as humidity, velocity and temperature in addition with changing feed water temperature. The results from the experiments specify that the dew-point and the wet-bulb effectiveness is achieved between 67-87 % and 104-120 % respectively. Analysis is performed with temperature variation between 25 and 45 °C at different absolute humidity levels ranging from 14.4 to 18 g/kg, while the inlet air velocity is varied between 0.88 and 1.50 m/s. Thus, the working ability of the improved design has been found 5 % more effective in terms of wet bulb effectiveness as compared to previous counter-flow designs.

  18. District cooling gets hot

    SciTech Connect

    Seeley, R.S.

    1996-07-01

    Utilities across the country are adopting cool storage methods, such as ice-storage and chilled-water tanks, as an economical and environmentally safe way to provide cooling for cities and towns. The use of district cooling, in which cold water or steam is pumped to absorption chillers and then to buildings via a central community chiller plant, is growing strongly in the US. In Chicago, San Diego, Pittsburgh, Baltimore, and elsewhere, independent district-energy companies and utilities are refurbishing neglected district-heating systems and adding district cooling, a technology first developed approximately 35 years ago.

  19. Performance Analysis of Solution Transportation Absorption Chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Behdad; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Thermally activated advanced absorption cycles are considered promising candidates to replace CFCs, HCFCs and HFCs for residential and commercial applications. In such absorption systems, it is desirable to utilize the waste heat from industries for heating and cooling applications in commercial and residential sectors. For this purpose, it is necessary to transport energy over some distance because the waste heat source and demand are generally located apart from each other. Transportation of steam, hot water or chilled water requires high construction costs for insulation. There is an efficient method of energy transportation using absorption system called “ Solution Transportation Absorption System (STA)”. The solution is transported at an ambient temperature so that tube-insulations not required. This paper shows the simulation of the abovementioned system and the optimal result, using mathematical optimization. The optimum system with industry‧s waste heat utilization is obtained. At the end, the effect on the pollution emission and energy conservation is obtained.

  20. The study of capability natural uranium as fuel cycle input for long life gas cooled fast reactors with helium as coolant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariani, Menik; Satya, Octavianus Cakra; Monado, Fiber; Su'ud, Zaki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    The objective of the present research is to assess the feasibility design of small long-life Gas Cooled Fast Reactor with helium as coolant. GCFR included in the Generation-IV reactor systems are being developed to provide sustainable energy resources that meet future energy demand in a reliable, safe, and proliferation-resistant manner. This reactor can be operated without enrichment and reprocessing forever, once it starts. To obtain the capability of consuming natural uranium as fuel cycle input modified CANDLE burn-up scheme was adopted in this system with different core design. This study has compared the core with three designs of core reactors with the same thermal power 600 MWth. The fuel composition each design was arranged by divided core into several parts of equal volume axially i.e. 6, 8 and 10 parts related to material burn-up history. The fresh natural uranium is initially put in region 1, after one cycle of 10 years of burn-up it is shifted to region 2 and the region 1 is filled by fresh natural uranium fuel. This concept is basically applied to all regions, i.e. shifted the core of the region (i) into region (i+1) region after the end of 10 years burn-up cycle. The calculation results shows that for the burn-up strategy on "Region-8" and "Region-10" core designs, after the reactors start-up the operation furthermore they only needs natural uranium supply to the next life operation until one period of refueling (10 years).

  1. Neon helium mixtures as a refrigerant for the FCC beam screen cooling: comparison of cycle design options

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kloeppel, S.; Quack, H.; Haberstroh, C.; Holdener, F.

    2015-12-01

    In the course of the studies for the next generation particle accelerators, in this case the Future Circular Collider for hadron-hadron interaction (FCC-hh), different aspects are being investigated. One of these is the heat load on the beam screen, which results mainly from the synchrotron radiation. In case of the FCC-hh, a heat load of 6 MW is expected. The heat has to be absorbed at 40 to 60 K due to vacuum restrictions. In this range, refrigeration is possible with both helium and neon. Our investigations are focused on a mixed refrigerant of these two components, which combines the advantages of both. Especially promising is the possible substitution of the oil flooded screw compressors by more efficient turbo compressors. This paper investigates different flow schemes and mixture compositions with respect to complexity and efficiency. Furthermore, thermodynamic aspects, e.g. whether to use cold or warm secondary cycle compressors are discussed. Additionally, parameters of the main compressor are established.

  2. Storage and cooling by solar energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Exell, R. H. B.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques for converting solar energy into mechanical energy for use in small-to-large scale refrigeration systems are examined. The systems considered included a Rankine cycle, 106 kW system coupled to 58 sq m of flat plate collectors, photovoltaic panels with storage in the form of ice, a positive ventilation and ice bank cooling system, ammonia-water absorption refrigeration, intermittent refrigeration, and solid adsorption refrigeration. All the equipment will be required to produce storage temperatures in the range 0-10 C and, consequently, the use of solar energy for deep freeze applications is considered unlikely. Small units which feature storage spaces of around one cubic meter can be satisfied by solar cells or intermittent absorption units. Larger-sized storage will employ the ammonia absorption process. Flat-plate collectors are foreseen to supply the power in rural areas.

  3. Stability of IRA-45 solid amine resin as a function of carbon dioxide absorption and steam desorption cycling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Peter C.; Wydeven, Theodore

    1987-01-01

    The removal of CO2 from the NASA Space Station's cabin atmosphere, which may be undertaken by a solid-amine water (steam)-desorbed system, is presently evaluated with a view to long-term amine resin stability and adsorption/desorption cycling by means of an automated laboratory flow-testing facility. While the CO2-adsorption capacity of the IRA-45 amine resin used gradually decreased over time, the rate of degradation significantly decreased after the first 10 cycles. Attention is given to the presence (and possible need for removal) of trimethylamine in the process air downstream of the resin bed.

  4. Development of a plant dynamics computer code for analysis of a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle energy converter coupled to a natural circulation lead-cooled fast reactor.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.

    2007-03-08

    STAR-LM is a lead-cooled pool-type fast reactor concept operating under natural circulation of the coolant. The reactor core power is 400 MWt. The open-lattice core consists of fuel pins attached to the core support plate, (the does not consist of removable fuel assemblies). The coolant flows outside of the fuel pins. The fuel is transuranic nitride, fabricated from reprocessed LWR spent fuel. The cladding material is HT-9 stainless steel; the steady-state peak cladding temperature is 650 C. The coolant is single-phase liquid lead under atmospheric pressure; the core inlet and outlet temperatures are 438 C and 578 C, respectively. (The Pb coolant freezing and boiling temperatures are 327 C and 1749 C, respectively). The coolant is contained inside of a reactor vessel. The vessel material is Type 316 stainless steel. The reactor is autonomous meaning that the reactor power is self-regulated based on inherent reactivity feedbacks and no external power control (through control rods) is utilized. The shutdown (scram) control rods are used for startup and shutdown and to stop the fission reaction in case of an emergency. The heat from the reactor is transferred to the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle in in-reactor heat exchangers (IRHX) located inside the reactor vessel. The IRHXs are shell-and-tube type heat exchangers with lead flowing downwards on the shell side and CO{sub 2} flowing upwards on the tube side. No intermediate circuit is utilized. The guard vessel surrounds the reactor vessel to contain the coolant, in the very unlikely event of reactor vessel failure. The Reactor Vessel Auxiliary Cooling System (RVACS) implementing the natural circulation of air flowing upwards over the guard vessel is used to cool the reactor, in the case of loss of normal heat removal through the IRHXs. The RVACS is always in operation. The gap between the vessels is filled with liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) to enhance the heat removal by air by significantly reducing the thermal

  5. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings on an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) simulated film-cooled turbine vane pressure surface due to particulate fly ash deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Kevin

    Coal synthesis gas (syngas) can introduce contaminants into the flow of an Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) industrial gas turbine which can form molten deposits onto components of the first stage of a turbine. Research is being conducted at West Virginia University (WVU) to study the effects of particulate deposition on thermal barrier coatings (TBC) employed on the airfoils of an IGCC turbine hot section. WVU had been working with U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) to simulate deposition on the pressure side of an IGCC turbine first stage vane to study the effects on film cooling. To simulate the particulate deposition, TBC coated, angled film-cooled test articles were subjected to accelerated deposition injected into the flow of a combustor facility with a pressure of approximately 4 atm and a gas temperature of 1560 K. The particle characteristics between engine conditions and laboratory are matched using the Stokes number and particulate loading. To investigate the degradation on the TBC from the particulate deposition, non-destructive evaluations were performed using a load-based multiple-partial unloading micro-indentation technique and were followed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) evaluation and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) examinations. The micro-indentation technique used in the study was developed by Kang et al. and can quantitatively evaluate the mechanical properties of materials. The indentation results found that the Young's Modulus of the ceramic top coat is higher in areas with deposition formation due to the penetration of the fly ash. The increase in the modulus of elasticity has been shown to result in a reduction of strain tolerance of the 7% yttria-stabilized zirconia (7YSZ) TBC coatings. The increase in the Young's modulus of the ceramic top coat is due to the stiffening of the YSZ columnar microstructure from the cooled particulate fly ash. SEM evaluation was used to

  6. Parametric study of a silica gel-water adsorption refrigeration cycle -- The influence of thermal capacitance and heat exchanger UA-values on cooling capacity, power density, and COP

    SciTech Connect

    Boelman, E.C.; Saha, B.B.; Kashiwagi, Takao

    1997-12-31

    The influence of heat exchanger UA-values (adsorber/desorber, evaporator, and condenser) is investigated for an adsorption chiller, with consideration given to the thermal capacitance of the adsorber/desorber by means of a lumped-parameter cycle simulation model developed by the authors and co-workers for the single-stage silica gel-water adsorption chiller. The closed-cycle-type chiller, for use in air conditioning, is driven by low-grade waste heat (85 C [185 F]) and cooled by water at 31 C (88 F) and operates on relatively short cycle times (420 seconds adsorption/desorption; 30 second adsorber/desorber sensible cooling and heating). The results showed cycle performance to be considerably affected by the thermal capacitance and UA-value of the adsorber/desorber, which is attributed to the severe sensible cooling/heating requirements resulting from batched cycle operation. The model is also sensitive to the evaporator UA-value--but to a lesser extent. The condenser UA-value is the least sensitive parameter due to the working pair adsorption behavior in the temperature range defined for desorption and condensation.

  7. Investigation of plant control strategies for the supercritical C0{sub 2}Brayton cycle for a sodium-cooled fast reactor using the plant dynamics code.

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J.

    2011-04-12

    The development of a control strategy for the supercritical CO{sub 2} (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the investigation of alternate control strategies for a Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) nuclear power plant incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle power converter. The SFR assumed is the 400 MWe (1000 MWt) ABR-1000 preconceptual design incorporating metallic fuel. Three alternative idealized schemes for controlling the reactor side of the plant in combination with the existing automatic control strategy for the S-CO{sub 2} Brayton cycle are explored using the ANL Plant Dynamics Code together with the SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Liquid Metal Reactor (LMR) Analysis Code System coupled together using the iterative coupling formulation previously developed and implemented into the Plant Dynamics Code. The first option assumes that the reactor side can be ideally controlled through movement of control rods and changing the speeds of both the primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pumps such that the intermediate sodium flow rate and inlet temperature to the sodium-to-CO{sub 2} heat exchanger (RHX) remain unvarying while the intermediate sodium outlet temperature changes as the load demand from the electric grid changes and the S-CO{sub 2} cycle conditions adjust according to the S-CO{sub 2} cycle control strategy. For this option, the reactor plant follows an assumed change in load demand from 100 to 0 % nominal at 5 % reduction per minute in a suitable fashion. The second option allows the reactor core power and primary and intermediate coolant system sodium pump flow rates to change autonomously in response to the strong reactivity feedbacks of the metallic fueled core and assumed constant pump torques representing unchanging output from the pump electric motors. The plant behavior to the assumed load demand reduction is surprising close to that calculated for the first option. The only negative result observed is a slight increase in the intermediate

  8. Power electronics cooling apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Sanger, Philip Albert; Lindberg, Frank A.; Garcen, Walter

    2000-01-01

    A semiconductor cooling arrangement wherein a semiconductor is affixed to a thermally and electrically conducting carrier such as by brazing. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the semiconductor and carrier are closely matched to one another so that during operation they will not be overstressed mechanically due to thermal cycling. Electrical connection is made to the semiconductor and carrier, and a porous metal heat exchanger is thermally connected to the carrier. The heat exchanger is positioned within an electrically insulating cooling assembly having cooling oil flowing therethrough. The arrangement is particularly well adapted for the cooling of high power switching elements in a power bridge.

  9. State-of-the-Art Review on Crystallization Control Technologies for water/LiBr Absorption Heat Pumps

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Kai; Abdelaziz, Omar; Kisari, Padmaja; Vineyard, Edward Allan

    2011-01-01

    The key technical barrier to using water/lithium bromide (LiBr) as the working fluid in aircooled absorption chillers and absorption heat-pump systems is the risk of crystallization when the absorber temperature rises at fixed evaporating pressure. This article reviews various crystallization control technologies available to resolve this problem: chemical inhibitors, heat and mass transfer enhancement methods, thermodynamic cycle modifications, and absorption system-control strategies. Other approaches, such as boosting absorber pressure and J-tube technology, are reviewed as well. This review can help guide future efforts to develop water/LiBr air-cooled absorption chillers and absorption heatpump systems.

  10. Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Fast CO2 Absorption by MgO-Based Absorbents with High Cycling Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Weizhen; Rohatgi, Aashish; Duan, Yuhua; Singh, Prabhakar; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 capture from pre-combustion syngas in the temperature range of 250-400°C is highly desirable from an energy efficiency perspective. Thermodynamically, MgO is a promising material for CO2 capture, but the gas-solid reaction to produce MgCO3 is kinetically slow due to high lattice energy. We report here fast CO2 absorption over a solid MgO-molten nitrate/nitrite aggregate through phase transfer catalysis, in which the molten phase serves as both a catalyst and reaction medium. Reaction with CO2 at the gas-solid-liquid triple phase boundary results in formation of MgCO3 with significant reaction rate and a high conversion of MgO. This methodology is also applicable to other alkaline earth oxides, inspiring the design of absorbents which require activation of the bulk material.

  11. Development of Exhaust Gas Driven Absorption Chiller-Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Endou, Tetsuya; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    Micro gas turbines are expected as engines for the distributed co-generation systems, performing power generation and heat recovery. Waste heat from micro gas turbines are discharged in the form of exhaust gas, and it is simple that exhaust gas is directly supplied to an absorption refrigerator. In this paper, we evaluated various single-double effect absorption cycles for exhaust gas driven absorption refrigerators, and clarified that the difference of performance among these cycles are little. We adopted one of these cycles for the prototype machine, and experimented with it to get the partial load characteristics and the effect of cooling water temperature on the performance. Based on the experimental data, we developed as imulation model of the static characteristics, and studied the direction of improvement.

  12. The development of a solar-powered residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Efforts to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar power for residential heating and cooling are described. These efforts were concentrated on the analysis, design, and test of a full-scale demonstration system which is currently under construction at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama. The basic solar heating and cooling system under development utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating and water heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling.

  13. Absorption and adsorption chillers applied to air conditioning systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuczyńska, Agnieszka; Szaflik, Władysław

    2010-07-01

    This work presents an application possibility of sorption refrigerators driven by low temperature fluid for air conditioning of buildings. Thermodynamic models were formulated and absorption LiBr-water chiller with 10 kW cooling power as well as adsorption chiller with silica gel bed were investigated. Both of them are using water for desorption process with temperature Tdes = 80 °C. Coefficient of performance (COP) for both cooling cycles was analyzed in the same conditions of the driving heat source, cooling water Tc = 25 °C and temperature in evaporator Tevap = 5 °C. In this study, the computer software EES was used to investigate the performance of absorption heat pump system and its behaviour in configuration with geothermal heat source.

  14. Controlling successive ionic layer absorption and reaction cycles to optimize silver nanoparticle-induced localized surface plasmon resonance effects on the paper strip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Wansun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2017-03-01

    This study investigates why a silver nanoparticle (SNP)-induced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) paper chip fabricated at low successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles leads to a high SERS enhancement factor (7 × 108) with an inferior nanostructure and without generating a hot spot effect. The multi-layered structure of SNPs on cellulose fibers, verified by magnified scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed by a computational simulation method, was hypothesized as the reason. The pattern of simulated local electric field distribution with respect to the number of SILAR cycles showed good agreement with the experimental Raman intensity, regardless of the wavelength of the excitation laser sources. The simulated enhancement factor at the 785-nm excitation laser source (2.8 × 109) was 2.5 times greater than the experimental enhancement factor (1.1 × 109). A 532-nm excitation laser source exhibited the highest maximum local electric field intensity (1.9 × 1011), particularly at the interparticle gap called a hot spot. The short wavelength led to a strong electric field intensity caused by strong electromagnetic coupling arising from the SNP-induced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects through high excitation energy. These findings suggest that our paper-based SILAR-fabricated SNP-induced LSPR model is valid for understanding SNP-induced LSPR effects.

  15. Controlling successive ionic layer absorption and reaction cycles to optimize silver nanoparticle-induced localized surface plasmon resonance effects on the paper strip.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Chul; Kim, Wansun; Park, Hun-Kuk; Choi, Samjin

    2017-03-05

    This study investigates why a silver nanoparticle (SNP)-induced surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) paper chip fabricated at low successive ionic layer absorption and reaction (SILAR) cycles leads to a high SERS enhancement factor (7×10(8)) with an inferior nanostructure and without generating a hot spot effect. The multi-layered structure of SNPs on cellulose fibers, verified by magnified scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analyzed by a computational simulation method, was hypothesized as the reason. The pattern of simulated local electric field distribution with respect to the number of SILAR cycles showed good agreement with the experimental Raman intensity, regardless of the wavelength of the excitation laser sources. The simulated enhancement factor at the 785-nm excitation laser source (2.8×10(9)) was 2.5 times greater than the experimental enhancement factor (1.1×10(9)). A 532-nm excitation laser source exhibited the highest maximum local electric field intensity (1.9×10(11)), particularly at the interparticle gap called a hot spot. The short wavelength led to a strong electric field intensity caused by strong electromagnetic coupling arising from the SNP-induced local surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) effects through high excitation energy. These findings suggest that our paper-based SILAR-fabricated SNP-induced LSPR model is valid for understanding SNP-induced LSPR effects.

  16. Stochastic Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic Cooling was invented by Simon van der Meer and was demonstrated at the CERN ISR and ICE (Initial Cooling Experiment). Operational systems were developed at Fermilab and CERN. A complete theory of cooling of unbunched beams was developed, and was applied at CERN and Fermilab. Several new and existing rings employ coasting beam cooling. Bunched beam cooling was demonstrated in ICE and has been observed in several rings designed for coasting beam cooling. High energy bunched beams have proven more difficult. Signal suppression was achieved in the Tevatron, though operational cooling was not pursued at Fermilab. Longitudinal cooling was achieved in the RHIC collider. More recently a vertical cooling system in RHIC cooled both transverse dimensions via betatron coupling.

  17. High-efficiency gas heat pump air-conditioner equipped with absorption refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, Yosuke; Ohashi, Toshinori; Okamoto, Hiroaki; Hihara, Eiji; Kawakami, Ryuichiro

    On conventional gas heat pump(GHP), waste heat from gas engine that uses as driving source is emitted into outside. So from the standpoint of efficient use of waste heat, it is assumed that waste heat from gas engine is used as driving source of absorption chiller, and high temperature condensate refrigerant in GHP is subcooled to middle temperature by cold source from absorption cycle, and as a result, GHP makes more efficiency. However, in equipping GHP with absorption cycle, downsizing and high-efficiency of absorption cycle is required. In this study, air-cooled subcooled adiabatic absorber is focused and physical phenomenon in it is analyzed, and finally one perception of the optimized designing is shown.

  18. Simulation of Bichromatic Force Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hua, Xiang; Corder, Christopher; Metcalf, Harold

    2016-05-01

    Laser cooling without spontaneous emission as implemented by the bichromatic force (BF) remains a controversial topic. We have done a numerical simulation of the BF on He using the 23 S <--> 33 P transition at λ = 389 nm in order to support the interpretation of previously reported measurements. Our experiments and the simulation reported here use a time scale comparable to the excited state lifetime so that spontaneous emission cannot contribute significantly. The average velocity change is 30 - 40 times larger than the recoil velocity but the measurements of both phase space and velocity space compression are limited by the longitudinal velocity spread of the atomic beam to ~ 2. The simulation clearly shows this spreading. The code passed several preliminary tests using single-frequency traveling and standing waves, and then it was run with the appropriate bichromatic light fields. Its output agrees very well with the measurements and, most importantly, shows that significant laser cooling is indeed possible on a time scale comparable to that of a single absorption-spontaneous cycle. Supported by ONR.

  19. Nutrient-cycling mechanisms other than the direct absorption from soil may control forest structure and dynamics in poor Amazonian soils.

    PubMed

    Grau, Oriol; Peñuelas, Josep; Ferry, Bruno; Freycon, Vincent; Blanc, Lilian; Desprez, Mathilde; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jérôme; Descroix, Laurent; Dourdain, Aurélie; Guitet, Stéphane; Janssens, Ivan A; Sardans, Jordi; Hérault, Bruno

    2017-03-23

    Tropical forests store large amounts of biomass despite they generally grow in nutrient-poor soils, suggesting that the role of soil characteristics in the structure and dynamics of tropical forests is complex. We used data for >34 000 trees from several permanent plots in French Guiana to investigate if soil characteristics could predict the structure (tree diameter, density and aboveground biomass), and dynamics (growth, mortality, aboveground wood productivity) of nutrient-poor tropical forests. Most variables did not covary with site-level changes in soil nutrient content, indicating that nutrient-cycling mechanisms other than the direct absorption from soil (e.g. the nutrient uptake from litter, the resorption, or the storage of nutrients in the biomass), may strongly control forest structure and dynamics. Ecosystem-level adaptations to low soil nutrient availability and long-term low levels of disturbance may help to account for the lower productivity and higher accumulation of biomass in nutrient-poor forests compared to nutrient-richer forests.

  20. Nutrient-cycling mechanisms other than the direct absorption from soil may control forest structure and dynamics in poor Amazonian soils

    PubMed Central

    Grau, Oriol; Peñuelas, Josep; Ferry, Bruno; Freycon, Vincent; Blanc, Lilian; Desprez, Mathilde; Baraloto, Christopher; Chave, Jérôme; Descroix, Laurent; Dourdain, Aurélie; Guitet, Stéphane; Janssens, Ivan A.; Sardans, Jordi; Hérault, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Tropical forests store large amounts of biomass despite they generally grow in nutrient-poor soils, suggesting that the role of soil characteristics in the structure and dynamics of tropical forests is complex. We used data for >34 000 trees from several permanent plots in French Guiana to investigate if soil characteristics could predict the structure (tree diameter, density and aboveground biomass), and dynamics (growth, mortality, aboveground wood productivity) of nutrient-poor tropical forests. Most variables did not covary with site-level changes in soil nutrient content, indicating that nutrient-cycling mechanisms other than the direct absorption from soil (e.g. the nutrient uptake from litter, the resorption, or the storage of nutrients in the biomass), may strongly control forest structure and dynamics. Ecosystem-level adaptations to low soil nutrient availability and long-term low levels of disturbance may help to account for the lower productivity and higher accumulation of biomass in nutrient-poor forests compared to nutrient-richer forests. PMID:28332608

  1. High resolution jet-cooled infrared absorption spectra of the formic acid dimer: A reinvestigation of the C-O stretch region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goroya, Kusse G.; Zhu, Yu; Sun, Ping; Duan, Chuanxi

    2014-04-01

    The vibration-rotation-tunneling absorption spectra of the formic acid dimer (HCOOH)2 have been measured in the C-O stretch region at 1215-1240 cm-1 using a rapid-scan tunable diode laser spectrometer in conjunction with a slit supersonic expansion. The ν5 fundamental band of the HCOOH monomer is identified and the perturbed band-center is 1220.83329(10) cm-1. Three vibrational bands centered at 1219.71, 1225.35, and 1233.95 cm-1 are assigned to the two combination bands and the ν22 fundamental band of (HCOOH)2 unambiguously. The transition frequencies of these three vibrational bands are fitted together using a standard Watson A-reduced Hamiltonian, yielding precise rotational and centrifugal distortion constants for each tunneling level in the ground and excited vibrational states. The fitting results of the vibrational band centered at 1225.35 cm-1 are in good agreement with a previous high resolution study [M. Ortlieb and M. Havenith, J. Phys. Chem. A. 111, 7355 (2007)]. The tunneling splittings in the vibrationally excited states are -0.00304(16), -0.01023(11), and -0.00318(12) cm-1, respectively, where the minus indicates that the upper tunneling component lies energetically below the lower tunneling component. A three-state deperturbation analysis using the Fermi coupling constants obtained from a previous vibrational analysis [F. Ito, Chem. Phys. Lett. 447, 202 (2007)] fails to get the normal order of the tunneling levels for all the three excited vibrational states simultaneously.

  2. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  3. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  4. Sorption Refrigeration / Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Bidyut Baran; Alam, K. C. Amanul; Hamamoto, Yoshinori; Akisawa, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Over the past few decades there have been considerable efforts to use adsorption (solid/vapor) for cooling and heat pump applications, but intensified efforts were initiated only since the imposition of international restrictions on the production and use of CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons) and HCFCs (hydrochlorofluorocarbons). Up to now, only the desiccant evaporative cooling system of the open type has achieved commercial use, predominantly in the United States. Closed-type adsorption refrigeration and heat pump systems are rarely seen in the market, or are still in the laboratory testing stage. Promising recent development have been made in Japan for the use of porous metal hydrides and composite adsorbents. In this paper, a short description of adsorption theories along with an overview of present status and future development trends of thermally powered adsorption refrigeration cycles are outlined putting emphasis on experimental achievements. This paper also addressed some advanced absorption cycles having relatively higher COP, and also summarizes fundamental concepts of GAX cycles and various GAX cycles developed for heat pump applications.

  5. 40 CFR 86.1335-90 - Cool-down procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1335-90 Cool-down procedure. (a) This cool-down procedure applies to Otto-cycle and diesel engines... cold cycle exhaust emission test may begin after a cool-down only when the engine oil and...

  6. 40 CFR 86.1335-90 - Cool-down procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Regulations for New Otto-Cycle and Diesel Heavy-Duty Engines; Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1335-90 Cool-down procedure. (a) This cool-down procedure applies to Otto-cycle and diesel engines... cold cycle exhaust emission test may begin after a cool-down only when the engine oil and...

  7. Feasibility and operating costs of an air cycle for CCHP in a fast food restaurant

    DOE PAGES

    Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Vineyard, Edward

    2016-05-06

    This work considers the possibilities of an air-based Brayton cycle to provide the power, heating and cooling needs of fast-food restaurants. A model of the cycle based on conventional turbomachinery loss coefficients is formulated. The heating, cooling and power capabilities of the cycle are extracted from simulation results. Power and thermal loads for restaurants in Knoxville, TN and in International Falls, MN, are considered. It is found that the cycle can meet the loads by setting speed and mass flow-rate apportionment between the power and cooling functional sections. The associated energy costs appear elevated when compared to the cost ofmore » operating individual components or a more conventional, absorption-based CHP system. Lastly, a first-order estimate of capital investments is provided. Suggestions for future work whereby the operational costs could be reduced are given in the conclusions.« less

  8. Feasibility and operating costs of an air cycle for CCHP in a fast food restaurant

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Blanco, Horacio; Vineyard, Edward

    2016-05-06

    This work considers the possibilities of an air-based Brayton cycle to provide the power, heating and cooling needs of fast-food restaurants. A model of the cycle based on conventional turbomachinery loss coefficients is formulated. The heating, cooling and power capabilities of the cycle are extracted from simulation results. Power and thermal loads for restaurants in Knoxville, TN and in International Falls, MN, are considered. It is found that the cycle can meet the loads by setting speed and mass flow-rate apportionment between the power and cooling functional sections. The associated energy costs appear elevated when compared to the cost of operating individual components or a more conventional, absorption-based CHP system. Lastly, a first-order estimate of capital investments is provided. Suggestions for future work whereby the operational costs could be reduced are given in the conclusions.

  9. Internal dissipation and heat leaks in quantum thermodynamic cycles.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A; Palao, José P; Alonso, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The direction of the steady-state heat currents across a generic quantum system connected to multiple baths may be engineered to realize virtually any thermodynamic cycle. In spite of their versatility, such continuous energy-conversion systems are generally unable to operate at maximum efficiency due to non-negligible sources of irreversible entropy production. In this paper we introduce a minimal model of irreversible absorption chiller. We identify and characterize the different mechanisms responsible for its irreversibility, namely heat leaks and internal dissipation, and gauge their relative impact in the overall cooling performance. We also propose reservoir engineering techniques to minimize these detrimental effects. Finally, by looking into a known three-qubit embodiment of the absorption cooling cycle, we illustrate how our simple model may help to pinpoint the different sources of irreversibility naturally arising in more complex practical heat devices.

  10. Internal dissipation and heat leaks in quantum thermodynamic cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel

    2015-09-01

    The direction of the steady-state heat currents across a generic quantum system connected to multiple baths may be engineered to realize virtually any thermodynamic cycle. In spite of their versatility, such continuous energy-conversion systems are generally unable to operate at maximum efficiency due to non-negligible sources of irreversible entropy production. In this paper we introduce a minimal model of irreversible absorption chiller. We identify and characterize the different mechanisms responsible for its irreversibility, namely heat leaks and internal dissipation, and gauge their relative impact in the overall cooling performance. We also propose reservoir engineering techniques to minimize these detrimental effects. Finally, by looking into a known three-qubit embodiment of the absorption cooling cycle, we illustrate how our simple model may help to pinpoint the different sources of irreversibility naturally arising in more complex practical heat devices.

  11. Cool & Connected

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Cool & Connected planning assistance program helps communities develop strategies and an action plan for using broadband to promote environmentally and economically sustainable community development.

  12. Cooling wall

    SciTech Connect

    Nosenko, V.I.

    1995-07-01

    Protecting the shells of blast furnaces is being resolved by installing cast iron cooling plates. The cooling plates become non-operational in three to five years. The problem is that defects occur in manufacturing the cooling plates. With increased volume and intensity of work placed on blast furnaces, heat on the cast iron cooling plates reduces their reliability that limits the interim repair period of blast furnaces. Scientists and engineers from the Ukraine studied this problem for several years, developing a new method of cooling the blast furnace shaft called the cooling wall. Traditional cast iron plates were replaced by a screen of steel tubes, with the area between the tubes filled with fireproof concrete. Before placing the newly developed furnace shaft into operation, considerable work was completed such as theoretical calculations, design, research of temperature fields and tension. Continual testing over many years confirms the value of this research in operating blast furnaces. The cooling wall works with water cooling as well as vapor cooling and is operating in 14 blast furnaces in the Ukraine and two in Russia, and has operated for as long as 14 years.

  13. Design and operation of a solar heating and cooling system for a residential size building

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Littles, J. W.; Humphries, W. R.; Cody, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    The first year of operation of solar house is discussed. Selected design information, together with a brief system description is included. The house was equipped with an integrated solar heating and cooling system which uses fully automated state-of-the art. Evaluation of the data indicate that the solar house heating and cooling system is capable of supplying nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating and approximately 50 percent of the thermal energy required to operate the absorption cycle air conditioner.

  14. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  15. Radiative cooling for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Wang, Ken X.; Anoma, Marc A.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-03-01

    Standard solar cells heat up under sunlight, and the resulting increased temperature of the solar cell has adverse consequences on both its efficiency and its reliability. We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the operating temperature of a solar cell through sky access, while maintaining its sunlight absorption. We present first an ideal scheme for the radiative cooling of solar cells. For an example case of a bare crystalline silicon solar cell, we show that the ideal scheme can passively lower the operating temperature by 18.3 K. We then show a microphotonic design based on realistic material properties, that approaches the performance of the ideal scheme. We also show that the radiative cooling effect is substantial, even in the presence of significant non-radiative heat change, and parasitic solar absorption in the cooling layer, provided that we design the cooling layer to be sufficiently thin.

  16. Cool Shelter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2005-01-01

    Amid climbing energy costs and tightening budgets, administrators at school districts, colleges and universities are looking for all avenues of potential savings while promoting sustainable communities. Cool metal roofing can save schools money and promote sustainable design at the same time. Cool metal roofing keeps the sun's heat from collecting…

  17. Weld electrode cooling study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Robert C.; Simon, Daniel L.

    1999-03-01

    The U.S. auto/truck industry has been mandated by the Federal government to continuously improve their fleet average gas mileage, measured in miles per gallon. Several techniques are typically used to meet these mandates, one of which is to reduce the overall mass of cars and trucks. To help accomplish this goal, lighter weight sheet metal parts, with smaller weld flanges, have been designed and fabricated. This paper will examine the cooling characteristics of various water cooled weld electrodes and shanks used in resistance spot welding applications. The smaller weld flanges utilized in modern vehicle sheet metal fabrications have increased industry's interest in using one size of weld electrode (1/2 inch diameter) for certain spot welding operations. The welding community wants more data about the cooling characteristics of these 1/2 inch weld electrodes. To hep define the cooling characteristics, an infrared radiometer thermal vision system (TVS) was used to capture images (thermograms) of the heating and cooling cycles of several size combinations of weld electrodes under typical production conditions. Tests results will show why the open ended shanks are more suitable for cooling the weld electrode assembly then closed ended shanks.

  18. Laser Cooling Without Spontaneous Emission Using the Bichromatic Force

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, Christopher; Arnold, Brian; Hua, Xiang; Metcalf, Harold

    2015-05-01

    We have demonstrated laser cooling without spontaneous emission using the bichromatic force (BF). It works by restricting the atom-light interaction to a time short compared to a cycle of absorption followed by spontaneous emission. The BF exploits multiple absorption-stimulated emission cycles to cause many rapid momentum exchanges, with these cycles redistributing both energy and entropy between the atoms and light fields in the total atoms+light system. This momentum exchange is restricted to a well-defined velocity range, resulting from nonadiabatic transitions at a velocity that can be understood from simple energy conservation. The observed width of our one-dimensional velocity distribution is reduced by ×2 thereby reducing the ``temperature'' by ×4. Moreover, our results comprise a compression in phase space because the spatial expansion of the atomic sample is negligible. We have also done various simulations of the motion of atoms under the BF and they compare well with our data. This accomplishment is of interest to direct laser cooling of molecules or in experiments where working space or time is limited. Supported by ONR and Dept. of Education GAANN.

  19. Preliminary studies on the heat exchanger option for S-CO{sub 2} power conversion cycle coupled to water cooled SMR

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Y.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. I.

    2012-07-01

    For more than a half century, the steam Rankine cycle had been the major power conversion cycle for a nuclear power plant. However, as the interest on the next generation reactors grows, a variety of alternative power conversion systems have been studied. Among them, the S-CO{sub 2} cycle (Supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle) is considered as a promising candidate due to several benefits such as 1) Relatively high thermal efficiency at relatively low turbine inlet temperature, 2) High efficiency with simple lay-out 3) Compactness of turbo-machineries. 4) Compactness of total cycle combined with PCHE (Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger). According to the conventional classification of heat exchangers (HE), there are three kind of HE, 1) Tubular HEs, 2) Plate-type HEs, 3) Extended surface HEs. So far, the researcher has mostly assumed PCHE type HE for the S-CO{sub 2} cycle due to its compactness with reasonably low pressure drop. However, PCHE is currently one of the most expensive components in the cycle, which can have a negative effect on the economics of the cycle. Therefore, an alternative for the HE should be seriously investigated. By comparing the operating condition (pressure and temperature) there are three kind of HE in the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, 1) IHX (Intermediate Heat exchanger) 2) Recuperator and 3) Pre-cooler. In each heat exchanger, hot side and cold side coolants are different, i.e. reactor coolant to S-CO{sub 2} (IHX), S-CO{sub 2} to S-CO{sub 2}(Recuperator), S-CO{sub 2} to water (Pre-cooler). By considering all the attributes mentioned above, all existing types of heat exchangers are compared to find a possible alternative to PCHE. The comparing factors are 1) Size(volume), 2) Cost. Plate fin type HEs are considered to be the most competitive heat exchanger regarding the size and the cost after some improvements on the design limit are made. (authors)

  20. Development of an Ionic-Liquid Absorption Heat Pump

    SciTech Connect

    Holcomb, Don

    2011-03-29

    Solar Fueled Products (SFP) is developing an innovative ionic-liquid absorption heat pump (ILAHP). The development of an ILAHP is extremely significant, as it could result in annual savings of more than 190 billion kW h of electrical energy and $19 billion. This absorption cooler uses about 75 percent less electricity than conventional cooling and heating units. The ILAHP also has significant environmental sustainability benefits, due to reduced CO2 emissions. Phase I established the feasibility and showed the economic viability of an ILAHP with these key accomplishments: • Used the breakthrough capabilities provided by ionic liquids which overcome the key difficulties of the common absorption coolers. • Showed that the theoretical thermodynamic performance of an ILAHP is similar to existing absorption-cooling systems. • Established that the half-effect absorption cycle reduces the peak generator temperature, improving collector efficiency and reducing collector area. • Component testing demonstrated that the most critical components, absorber and generator, operate well with conventional heat exchangers. • Showed the economic viability of an ILAHP. The significant energy savings, sustainability benefits, and economic viability are compelling reasons to continue the ILAHP development.

  1. Advanced MOX Core Design Study of Sodium Cooled Reactors in Current Feasibility Study on Commercialized Fast Reactor Cycle Systems in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Niwa, H.

    2002-07-01

    The Sodium cooled MOX core design studies are performed with the target burnup of 150 GWd/t and measures against the recriticality issues in core disruptive accidents (CDAs). Four types of core are comparatively studied in viewpoints of core performance and reliability. Result shows that all the types of core satisfy the target and that the homogeneous core with axial blanket partial elimination subassembly is the most superior concept in case the effectiveness of measures against recriticality issues by the axial blanket partial elimination is assured. (authors)

  2. Electron Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, Timothy J. P.

    1991-08-01

    Electron cooling is a method of reducing the 6 -dimensional phase space volume of a stored ion beam. The technique was invented by Budker and first developed by him and his colleagues at the Institute for Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk. Further studies of electron cooling were subsequently performed at CERN and Fermilab. At the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility (IUCF) an electron cooling system was designed, built, and commissioned in 1988. This was the highest energy system built to date (270 keV for cooling 500 MeV protons) and the first such system to be used as an instrument for performing nuclear and atomic physics experiments. This dissertation summarizes the design principles; measurements of the longitudinal drag rate (cooling force), equilibrium cooled beam properties and effective longitudinal electron beam temperature. These measurements are compared with theory and with the measured performance of other cooling systems. In addition the feasibility of extending this technology to energies an order of magnitude higher are discussed.

  3. Life Cycle Assessment of Residential Heating and Cooling Systems in Minnesota A comprehensive analysis on life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and cost-effectiveness of ground source heat pump (GSHP) systems compared to the conventional gas furnace and air conditioner system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mo

    Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) technologies for residential heating and cooling are often suggested as an effective means to curb energy consumption, reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and lower homeowners' heating and cooling costs. As such, numerous federal, state and utility-based incentives, most often in the forms of financial incentives, installation rebates, and loan programs, have been made available for these technologies. While GSHP technology for space heating and cooling is well understood, with widespread implementation across the U.S., research specific to the environmental and economic performance of these systems in cold climates, such as Minnesota, is limited. In this study, a comparative environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) is conducted of typical residential HVAC (Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning) systems in Minnesota to investigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for delivering 20 years of residential heating and cooling—maintaining indoor temperatures of 68°F (20°C) and 75°F (24°C) in Minnesota-specific heating and cooling seasons, respectively. Eight residential GSHP design scenarios (i.e. horizontal loop field, vertical loop field, high coefficient of performance, low coefficient of performance, hybrid natural gas heat back-up) and one conventional natural gas furnace and air conditioner system are assessed for GHG and life cycle economic costs. Life cycle GHG emissions were found to range between 1.09 × 105 kg CO2 eq. and 1.86 × 10 5 kg CO2 eq. Six of the eight GSHP technology scenarios had fewer carbon impacts than the conventional system. Only in cases of horizontal low-efficiency GSHP and hybrid, do results suggest increased GHGs. Life cycle costs and present value analyses suggest GSHP technologies can be cost competitive over their 20-year life, but that policy incentives may be required to reduce the high up-front capital costs of GSHPs and relatively long payback periods of more than 20 years. In addition

  4. Study on the Partial Load Characteristics of Double-Effect Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawakami, Ryuichiro; Fukuchi, Toru; Kaita, Yoshio

    Simulation analysis was carried out to study the partial load characteristics of three different types of double-effect LiBr-water absorption cycle, namely series flow, parallel flow and reverse flow. A computer program was developed for this study to simulate the behavior of the absorption cycles equipped with flow rate control of absorbent, cooling water and chilling water on partial load. The effects of the flow rate control on the coefficient of performance (COP), the maximum temperature and maximum pressure were studied. The results show that not only flow rate control of absorbent is essential for high COP on the partial load, but also flow rate control of cooling water and chilling water is recommendable to save the power of pumping.

  5. Thermodynamic Analysis of the Use a Chemical Heat Pump to Link a Supercritical Water-Cooled Nuclear Reactor and a Thermochemical Water-Splitting Cycle for Hydrogen Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granovskii, Mikhail; Dincer, Ibrahim; Rosen, Marc A.; Pioro, Igor

    Increases in the power generation efficiency of nuclear power plants (NPPs) are mainly limited by the permissible temperatures in nuclear reactors and the corresponding temperatures and pressures of the coolants in reactors. Coolant parameters are limited by the corrosion rates of materials and nuclear-reactor safety constraints. The advanced construction materials for the next generation of CANDU reactors, which employ supercritical water (SCW) as a coolant and heat carrier, permit improved “steam” parameters (outlet temperatures up to 625°C and pressures of about 25 MPa). An increase in the temperature of steam allows it to be utilized in thermochemical water splitting cycles to produce hydrogen. These methods are considered by many to be among the most efficient ways to produce hydrogen from water and to have advantages over traditional low-temperature water electrolysis. However, even lower temperature water splitting cycles (Cu-Cl, UT-3, etc.) require an intensive heat supply at temperatures higher than 550-600°C. A sufficient increase in the heat transfer from the nuclear reactor to a thermochemical water splitting cycle, without jeopardizing nuclear reactor safety, might be effectively achieved by application of a heat pump, which increases the temperature of the heat supplied by virtue of a cyclic process driven by mechanical or electrical work. Here, a high-temperature chemical heat pump, which employs the reversible catalytic methane conversion reaction, is proposed. The reaction shift from exothermic to endothermic and back is achieved by a change of the steam concentration in the reaction mixture. This heat pump, coupled with the second steam cycle of a SCW nuclear power generation plant on one side and a thermochemical water splitting cycle on the other, increases the temperature of the “nuclear” heat and, consequently, the intensity of heat transfer into the water splitting cycle. A comparative preliminary thermodynamic analysis is conducted

  6. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, William F.

    1996-01-01

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers.

  7. Cool School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stephens, Suzanne

    1980-01-01

    The design for Floyd Elementary School in Miami (Florida) seeks to harness solar energy to provide at least 70 percent of the annual energy for cooling needs and 90 percent for hot water. (Author/MLF)

  8. Cool Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    ILC, Dover Division's lightweight cooling garment, called Cool Vest was designed to eliminate the harmful effects of heat stress; increases tolerance time in hot environments by almost 300 percent. Made of urethane-coated nylon used in Apollo, it works to keep the body cool, circulating chilled water throughout the lining by means of a small battery-powered pump. A pocket houses the pump, battery and the coolant which can be ice or a frozen gel, a valve control allows temperature regulation. One version is self-contained and portable for unrestrained movement, another has an umbilical line attached to an external source of coolant, such as standard tap water, when extended mobility is not required. It is reported from customers that the Cool Vest pays for itself in increased productivity in very high temperatures.

  9. BaH molecular spectroscopy with relevance to laser cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarallo, M. G.; Iwata, G. Z.; Zelevinsky, T.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a simple experimental apparatus for laser ablation of barium monohydride (BaH) molecules and the study of their rovibrational spectra relevant to direct laser cooling. BaH is a promising candidate for laser cooling and ultracold fragmentation, both of which are precursors to novel experiments in many-body physics and precision measurement. We present a detailed analysis of the properties of ablation plumes that can improve the understanding of surface ablation and deposition technologies. A range of absorption spectroscopy and collisional thermalization regimes has been studied. We directly measured the Franck-Condon factor of the B 2Σ+(v'=0 ) ←X 2Σ+(v''=1 ) cycling transition. Prospects for production of a high luminosity cryogenic BaH beam are outlined.

  10. An Exergy Analysis of LiBr-Water Absorption Refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asano, Hitoshi; Fujii, Terushige; Wang, Xiao; Origane, Takafumi; Katayama, Masatoshi; Inoue, Umeo

    Absorption refrigerators are very efficient as a heat recovery unit in a co-generation system.In order to design an absorption refrigerator for an arbitrary heat source properly, it is important to consider not only quantity but also quality of heat flow. The evaluation of exergy loss in each component is also effective for the improvement of system. This paper deals with the exergy analysis on a LiBr-water absorption refrigerator consisted of a single-and a double-effect cycle driven by the exhaust gas of the micro gas turbine with the output power of about 30 kW. Moreover, exergy loss in absorption process was eva1uated. As a result, it was shown that 80% of the exergy loss in an absorber was caused in absorption process, and the exergy loss decreased with decreasing the change in solution concentration in absorber. In these calculated results,the maximum cooling load of 77.8 kW was obtained from the exhaust gas with the temperature of 2900°C by utilizing both a single-and a double-effect cycles in combination. The energy and exergy efficiency of the system was 88.0% and 25.6%, respectively.

  11. Radiative cooling for thermophotovoltaic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiguang; Sun, Xingshu; Bermel, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Radiative cooling has recently garnered a great deal of attention for its potential as an alternative method for photovoltaic thermal management. Here, we will consider the limits of radiative cooling for thermal management of electronics broadly, as well as a specific application to thermal power generation. We show that radiative cooling power can increase rapidly with temperature, and is particularly beneficial in systems lacking standard convective cooling. This finding indicates that systems previously operating at elevated temperatures (e.g., 80°C) can be passively cooled close to ambient under appropriate conditions with a reasonable cooling area. To examine these general principles for a previously unexplored application, we consider the problem of thermophotovoltaic (TPV) conversion of heat to electricity via thermal radiation illuminating a photovoltaic diode. Since TPV systems generally operate in vacuum, convective cooling is sharply limited, but radiative cooling can be implemented with proper choice of materials and structures. In this work, realistic simulations of system performance are performed using the rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) techniques to capture thermal emitter radiation, PV diode absorption, and radiative cooling. We subsequently optimize the structural geometry within realistic design constraints to find the best configurations to minimize operating temperature. It is found that low-iron soda-lime glass can potentially cool the PV diode by a substantial amount, even to below ambient temperatures. The cooling effect can be further improved by adding 2D-periodic photonic crystal structures. We find that the improvement of efficiency can be as much as an 18% relative increase, relative to the non-radiatively cooled baseline, as well as a potentially significant improvement in PV diode lifetime.

  12. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-01

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  13. Color-preserving daytime radiative cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Linxiao; Raman, Aaswath; Fan, Shanhui

    2013-11-25

    We introduce a general approach to radiatively lower the temperature of a structure, while preserving its color under sunlight. The cooling effect persists in the presence of considerable convective and conductive heat exchange and for different solar absorptances.

  14. Annual Developmental Cycle of Gonads of European Perch Females (Perca fluviatilis L.) from Natural Sites and a Canal Carrying Post-cooling Water from the Dolna Odra Power Plant (NW Poland).

    PubMed

    Kirczuk, Lucyna; Domagała, Józef; Pilecka-Rapacz, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    The European perch is a species endowed with high adaptation capabilities as regards different environmental conditions. The aim of the study was to analyse the annual developmental cycle of ovaries of the European perch from the Oder river, Lake Dąbie and a drainage canal (Warm Canal) carrying post-cooling water from the Dolna Odra power plant (annual average water temperature in the canal is higher by 6-8°C than the water of the other sampling sites). Most of the female perch caught in the canal carrying post-cooling water had immature stage 2 gonads (delayed development of the gonads) and were smaller than the fish from the other sites. No traces of spawning in the form of deposed egg strings were found in the drainage canal. Adult individuals avoid high temperatures found in the Warm Canal. In April, in perch from all sites, ovaries with post-spawning oocytes were observed. The spawning season of the females lasted from the beginning of April until May. Stage 4 of gonad development, with oocytes in advanced vitellogenesis, was the longest and ranged from September through February.

  15. Sorption cooling: a valid extension to passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, Jan; Burger, Johannes; ter Brake, Marcel

    2007-10-01

    Passive cooling has shown to be a very dependable cryogenic cooling method for space missions. Several missions employ passive radiators to cool down their delicate sensor systems for many years, without consuming power, without exporting vibrations or producing electromagnetic interference. So for a number of applications, passive cooling is a good choice. At lower temperatures, the passive coolers run into limitations that prohibit accommodation on a spacecraft. The approach to this issue has been to find a technology able to supplement passive cooling for lower temperatures, which maintains as much as possible of the advantages of passive coolers. Sorption cooling employs a closed cycle Joule-Thomson expansion process to achieve the cooling effect. Sorption cells perform the compression phase in this cycle. At a low temperature and pressure, these cells adsorb the working fluid. At a higher temperature they desorb the fluid and thus produce a high-pressure flow to the restriction in the cold stage. The sorption process selected for this application is of the physical type, which is completely reversible. It does not suffer from degradation as is the case with chemical sorption of e.g. hydrogen in metal hydrides. Sorption coolers include no moving parts except for some check valves, they export neither mechanical vibrations nor electromagnetic interference, and are potentially very dependable due to their simplicity. The required cooling temperature determines the type of working fluid to be applied. Sorption coolers can be used in conjunction with passive cooling for heat rejection at different levels. This paper starts with a brief discussion on applications of passive coolers in different types of orbits and the limitations on passive cooling at low cooling temperatures. Next, the working principle of sorption cooling is summarized. The DARWIN mission is chosen as an example application of sorption and passive cooling and special attention is paid to the

  16. Sorption cooling: A valid extension to passive cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doornink, D. J.; Burger, J. F.; ter Brake, H. J. M.

    2008-05-01

    Passive cooling has shown to be a very dependable cryogenic cooling method for space missions. Several missions employ passive radiators to cool down their delicate sensor systems for many years, without consuming power, without exporting vibrations or producing electromagnetic interference. So for a number of applications, passive cooling is a good choice. At lower temperatures, the passive coolers run into limitations that prohibit accommodation on a spacecraft. The approach to this issue has been to find a technology able to supplement passive cooling for lower temperatures, which maintains as much as possible of the advantages of passive coolers. Sorption cooling employs a closed cycle Joule-Thomson expansion process to achieve the cooling effect. Sorption cells perform the compression phase in this cycle. At a low temperature and pressure, these cells adsorb the working fluid. At a higher temperature they desorb the fluid and thus produce a high-pressure flow to the expander in the cold stage. The sorption process selected for this application is of the physical type, which is completely reversible. It does not suffer from degradation as is the case with chemical sorption of, e.g., hydrogen in metal hydrides. Sorption coolers include no moving parts except for some check valves, they export neither mechanical vibrations nor electromagnetic interference, and are potentially very dependable due to their simplicity. The required cooling temperature determines the type of working fluid to be applied. Sorption coolers can be used in conjunction with passive cooling for heat rejection at different levels. This paper starts with a brief discussion on applications of passive coolers in different types of orbits and on the limitations of passive cooling for lower cooling temperatures. Next, the working principle of sorption cooling is summarized. The DARWIN mission is chosen as an example application of sorption and passive cooling and special attention is paid to the

  17. Cooling Vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1983-01-01

    Because quadriplegics are unable to perspire below the level of spinal injury, they cannot tolerate heat stress. A cooling vest developed by Ames Research Center and Upjohn Company allows them to participate in outdoor activities. The vest is an adaptation of Ames technology for thermal control garments used to remove excess body heat of astronauts. The vest consists of a series of corrugated channels through which cooled water circulates. Its two outer layers are urethane coated nylon, and there is an inner layer which incorporates the corrugated channels. It can be worn as a backpack or affixed to a wheelchair. The unit includes a rechargeable battery, mini-pump, two quart reservoir and heat sink to cool the water.

  18. Cooled railplug

    DOEpatents

    Weldon, W.F.

    1996-05-07

    The railplug is a plasma ignitor capable of injecting a high energy plasma jet into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine or continuous combustion system. An improved railplug is provided which has dual coaxial chambers (either internal or external to the center electrode) that provide for forced convective cooling of the electrodes using the normal pressure changes occurring in an internal combustion engine. This convective cooling reduces the temperature of the hot spot associated with the plasma initiation point, particularly in coaxial railplug configurations, and extends the useful life of the railplug. The convective cooling technique may also be employed in a railplug having parallel dual rails using dual, coaxial chambers. 10 figs.

  19. Closed loop steam cooled airfoil

    DOEpatents

    Widrig, Scott M.; Rudolph, Ronald J.; Wagner, Gregg P.

    2006-04-18

    An airfoil, a method of manufacturing an airfoil, and a system for cooling an airfoil is provided. The cooling system can be used with an airfoil located in the first stages of a combustion turbine within a combined cycle power generation plant and involves flowing closed loop steam through a pin array set within an airfoil. The airfoil can comprise a cavity having a cooling chamber bounded by an interior wall and an exterior wall so that steam can enter the cavity, pass through the pin array, and then return to the cavity to thereby cool the airfoil. The method of manufacturing an airfoil can include a type of lost wax investment casting process in which a pin array is cast into an airfoil to form a cooling chamber.

  20. 40 CFR 86.1335-90 - Cool-down procedure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cool-down procedure. 86.1335-90... § 86.1335-90 Cool-down procedure. (a) This cool-down procedure applies to Otto-cycle and diesel engines... at any desired flow rate. The thermostat may be removed or blocked open during the cool-down but...

  1. Cooling vest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosmo, J.; Kane, J.; Coverdale, J.

    1977-01-01

    Inexpensive vest of heat-sealable urethane material, when strapped to person's body, presents significant uncomplicated cooling system for environments where heavy accumulation of metabolic heat exists. Garment is applicable to occupations where physical exertion is required under heavy protective clothing.

  2. The development of a solar residential heating and cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The MSFC solar heating and cooling facility was assembled to demonstrate the engineering feasibility of utilizing solar energy for heating and cooling buildings, to provide an engineering evaluation of the total system and the key subsystems, and to investigate areas of possible improvement in design and efficiency. The basic solar heating and cooling system utilizes a flat plate solar energy collector, a large water tank for thermal energy storage, heat exchangers for space heating, and an absorption cycle air conditioner for space cooling. A complete description of all systems is given. Development activities for this test system included assembly, checkout, operation, modification, and data analysis, all of which are discussed. Selected data analyses for the first 15 weeks of testing are included, findings associated with energy storage and the energy storage system are outlined, and conclusions resulting from test findings are provided. An evaluation of the data for summer operation indicates that the current system is capable of supplying an average of 50 percent of the thermal energy required to drive the air conditioner. Preliminary evaluation of data collected for operation in the heating mode during the winter indicates that nearly 100 percent of the thermal energy required for heating can be supplied by the system.

  3. Cooled, Laminated Radial Turbine Demonstration Program.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-02-01

    growth, and burst tests, a stresscoat test, and a 6000-cycle test at overspeed conditions (119- percent design speed) to establish the low -cycle...and a low -cycle-fatigue life of 6000 cycles versus a predicted life of 7600 cycles. Also, the maximum metal temperature at the blade tip was held at... low manu- facturing cost was considered by AiResearch to be well below that of any cast or machined configuration with comparably high cooling and

  4. Laser cooling, slowing and trapping of a diatomic molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, John

    2015-05-01

    Roughly three decades ago, laser cooling and trapping succeeded in producing ultracold ions and atoms, sparking a revolution in atomic physics and subsequently becoming workhorse techniques within the field. These techniques require a ``cycling transition,'' where the particle of interest is repeatedly driven by a photon into an excited electronic state and quickly decays back to the initial ground state, allowing the process to repeat. Because photon absorption transfers momentum to the particle, application of force is possible. Adjusting the geometry and frequency of the applied photons allows creation of a damping (cooling) force. Further addition of a quadrupole magnetic field allows for a restoring (trapping) force. Prior to this thesis, straightforward extension of these methods to molecules was considered a practical impossibility; electronic decays in molecules tend to populate multiple rotational and vibrational states, preventing creation of a cycling transition. While a variety of ultracold molecular species is desirable to satisfy a range of applications, the only other production method is limited to species where the constituent atoms are themselves amenable to laser cooling. For other species, a different technique is required. Here we outline the methods and experiments in which laser cooling and trapping were first applied to molecules. By careful molecule choice, by using a cooling transition that exploits selection rules, and by counteracting dark states with a magnetic field, we create a cycling transition for the diatomic molecule strontium monofluoride (SrF). We show the power of this technique by demonstrating Doppler and sub-Doppler cooling in 1-D, radiation pressure slowing and stopping of a molecular beam, and finally a 3-D magneto-optical trap (MOT). Our MOT produces the coldest trapped sample of directly-cooled molecules to date, with a temperature of T ~ 2.5 mK. This method is viable for several classes of diatomic molecules with a

  5. [Ecological and radio-ecological effects from long-term use of the lake Kyzyl-Tash as a cooling reservoir by the nuclear fuel cycle facility].

    PubMed

    Smagin, A I

    2010-01-01

    This review introduces long-term study findings on ecological and radiation induced regime of the water reservoir - lake Kyzyl-Tash (R-2) - used as a heat sink of nuclear-power reactors in the Southern Urals from 1948 through 2008. It was exhibited that water reservoir exploitation by the nuclear fuel cycle facility "Mayak" PA resulted in hydrological, thermal, hydrochemical and radiological ecosystem regimes changes. The central radioactive substances depot in the water reservoir was determined to be the upper 20-30 cm bed silt layers, contamination density of which in 1980-1990s amounted on average approximately 0.2 PBq/km2 (about 5 kKu/km2). Some regularities of radionuclide distribution in bed sediments and biota were ascertained. Dose estimates from ionizing exposure to fish inhabited the water reservoir were experimentally made. Dose contribution was mainly due to incorporated beta-emitters amounted up to 2-3 Gy/y in 1980s. The leading role in the reservoir life belonged to phytoplankton with its algal nuisance periodicity constituting 5-6 years for blue-green and diatomic algae, and 2-3 years for green algae. During periods of the highest development pressure phytoplankton productive capacity in the reservoir was by an order of magnitude greater compared to control water reservoirs of the region. Combined long-term impact of radiological and chemical factors did not cause irreversible changes either in fish populations or ecological system in general. It can be proved by the fact that during 1970-1980s the water reservoir R-2 was inhabited by such cleanness indicators as crawfish (Astacus leptodactylus) and shellfish (Anodonta cygnea L.). On reducing of thermal and chemical pressure in the end of 1980s some processes observed gave evidence of ecosystem restoration in the lake Kyzyl-Tash. At the present moment the situation of the water reservoir exploiting as a heat sink is stabilized with preserved self-cleaning capacity.

  6. Methods of beam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1996-02-01

    Diverse methods which are available for particle beam cooling are reviewed. They consist of some highly developed techniques such as radiation damping, electron cooling, stochastic cooling and the more recently developed, laser cooling. Methods which have been theoretically developed, but not yet achieved experimentally, are also reviewed. They consist of ionization cooling, laser cooling in three dimensions and stimulated radiation cooling.

  7. Radial turbine cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roelke, Richard J.

    1992-01-01

    Radial turbines have been used extensively in many applications including small ground based electrical power generators, automotive engine turbochargers and aircraft auxiliary power units. In all of these applications the turbine inlet temperature is limited to a value commensurate with the material strength limitations and life requirements of uncooled metal rotors. To take advantage of all the benefits that higher temperatures offer, such as increased turbine specific power output or higher cycle thermal efficiency, requires improved high temperature materials and/or blade cooling. Extensive research is on-going to advance the material properties of high temperature superalloys as well as composite materials including ceramics. The use of ceramics with their high temperature potential and low cost is particularly appealing for radial turbines. However until these programs reach fruition the only way to make significant step increases beyond the present material temperature barriers is to cool the radial blading.

  8. Development of New Air-Cooled Heat Pump Chiller 'Compact Cube'

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ookoshi, Yasushi; Ito, Takuya; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Kato, Yohei; Ochiai, Yasutaka; Tanaka, Kosuke; Uji, Yoshihiro; Nakayama, Hiroshi

    Further improvement of the performance is requested to air-cooled heat pump chiller from the viewpoint of the global warming prevention. Smaller unit is needed to facilitate the renewal from absorption chiller to air-cooled heat pump chiller. To meet such needs, we developed compact new air-cooled heat pump chiller with high efficiency, 'Compact cube'. The developed machine is side-flow type with U-shaped fin and tube heat exchangers. With this structure, the uniform air velocity, high packed density of the heat exchangers, and the unit miniaturization have been implemented. The refrigeration cycle with two-evaporating temperature has also been implemented. The cooling COP of this cycle is 2% higher compared with conventional one-evaporating temperature cycle because of the rise of average evaporating temperature. In a new model, a new control system, which controls both capacity of compressors and air flow rate corresponding to heat load, has been implemented. As a result, the developed machine achieved IPLV(Integrated Part load Value) to 6.2(MCHV-P1800AE) which is 29% better than the conventional unit.

  9. Cool Sportswear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    New athletic wear design based on the circulating liquid cooling system used in the astronaut's space suits, allows athletes to perform more strenuous activity without becoming overheated. Techni-Clothes gear incorporates packets containing a heat-absorbing gel that slips into an insulated pocket of the athletic garment and is positioned near parts of the body where heat transfer is most efficient. A gel packet is good for about one hour. Easily replaced from a supply of spares in an insulated container worn on the belt. The products, targeted primarily for runners and joggers and any other athlete whose performance may be affected by hot weather, include cooling headbands, wrist bands and running shorts with gel-pack pockets.

  10. Cooling technique

    DOEpatents

    Salamon, Todd R; Vyas, Brijesh; Kota, Krishna; Simon, Elina

    2017-01-31

    An apparatus and a method are provided. Use is made of a wick structure configured to receive a liquid and generate vapor in when such wick structure is heated by heat transferred from heat sources to be cooled off. A vapor channel is provided configured to receive the vapor generated and direct said vapor away from the wick structure. In some embodiments, heat conductors are used to transfer the heat from the heat sources to the liquid in the wick structure.

  11. The effect of pre-cooling intensity on cooling efficiency and exercise performance.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Nina; Perret, Claudio; Bogerd, Cornelis P; Rossi, René M; Daanen, Hein A M

    2010-05-01

    Although pre-cooling is known to enhance exercise performance, the optimal cooling intensity is unknown. We hypothesized that mild cooling opposed to strong cooling circumvents skin vasoconstriction and thermogenesis, and thus improves cooling efficiency reflected in improved time to exhaustion. Eight males undertook three randomized trials, consisting of a pre-cooling and an exercise session. During the pre-cooling, performed in a room of 24.6 +/- 0.4 degrees C and 24 +/- 6% relative humidity, participants received either 45 min of mild cooling using an evaporative cooling shirt or strong cooling using an ice-vest. A no-cooling condition was added as a control. Subsequent cycling exercise was performed at 65%[Vdot]O(2peak) in a climatic chamber of 29.3 +/- 0.2 degrees C and 80 +/- 3% relative humidity. During the pre-cooling session, mild and strong cooling decreased the skin blood flow compared with the control. However, no differences were observed between mild and strong cooling. No thermogenesis was observed in any conditions investigated. The reduction of body heat content after pre-cooling was two times larger with strong cooling (39.5 +/- 8.4 W . m(-2)) than mild cooling (21.2 +/- 5.1 W . m(-2)). This resulted in the greatest improvement in time to exhaustion with strong cooling. We conclude that the cooling intensities investigated had a similar effect on cooling efficiency (vasoconstriction and thermogenesis) and that the improved performance after strong cooling is attributable to the greater decrease in body heat content.

  12. Performance Analysis of XCPC Powered Solar Cooling Demonstration Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widyolar, Bennett K.

    A solar thermal cooling system using novel non-tracking External Compound Parabolic Concentrators (XCPC) has been built at the University of California, Merced and operated for two cooling seasons. Its performance in providing power for space cooling has been analyzed. This solar cooling system is comprised of 53.3 m2 of XCPC trough collectors which are used to power a 23 kW double effect (LiBr) absorption chiller. This is the first system that combines both XCPC and absorption chilling technologies. Performance of the system was measured in both sunny and cloudy conditions, with both clean and dirty collectors. It was found that these collectors are well suited at providing thermal power to drive absorption cooling systems and that both the coinciding of available thermal power with cooling demand and the simplicity of the XCPC collectors compared to other solar thermal collectors makes them a highly attractive candidate for cooling projects.

  13. Solar Absorption Refrigeration System for Air-Conditioning of a Classroom Building in Northern India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Tanmay; Varun; Kumar, Anoop

    2015-10-01

    Air-conditioning is a basic tool to provide human thermal comfort in a building space. The primary aim of the present work is to design an air-conditioning system based on vapour absorption cycle that utilizes a renewable energy source for its operation. The building under consideration is a classroom of dimensions 18.5 m × 13 m × 4.5 m located in Hamirpur district of Himachal Pradesh in India. For this purpose, cooling load of the building was calculated first by using cooling load temperature difference method to estimate cooling capacity of the air-conditioning system. Coefficient of performance of the refrigeration system was computed for various values of strong and weak solution concentration. In this work, a solar collector is also designed to provide required amount of heat energy by the absorption system. This heat energy is taken from solar energy which makes this system eco-friendly and sustainable. A computer program was written in MATLAB to calculate the design parameters. Results were obtained for various values of solution concentrations throughout the year. Cost analysis has also been carried out to compare absorption refrigeration system with conventional vapour compression cycle based air-conditioners.

  14. Study on Absorption Heat Pump Using Untapped Energy Resource

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okamoto, Hiroaki; Hihara, Eiji; Bando, Shigeru; Oka, Masahiro; Ichikawa, Toru; Kojima, Hiroshi

    The spread of absorption heat pump is considered an effective strategy to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases andthe heat island impact. However, its large volume and low efficiency as compare to vapor-compression system haverestricted its application area. In order to develop a compact and high-efficiency absorption heat pump, we propose a newtype of system which adopting triple effect cycle at cooling, while double effect at heating. In addition, unused energy,such as sewage water, is used in this system to improve the COP furthermore. System performances were evaluated by discussing the COP, highest pressure, highest temperature, strongest solutionconcentration, and energy consumption at part-load operation. By using sewage water as heat source, COP increaseswhile the highest pressure, highest temperature and strongest solution concentration decrease. From a standpointofperformance at heating and energy consumption, it is found that the proposed system works well and more effective thanthe existing system.

  15. Interstage cooling in compressors

    SciTech Connect

    Bisio, G.; Devia, F.

    1997-12-31

    Interstage cooling in air compressors presents pros and cons according to the purposes for which air is compressed and the systems up to now applied are very different among them. In this paper, cases in which intercooling is made by usual exchangers are considered first. In these cases, either the final pressure only is useful, or both final pressure and temperature are useful. Subsequently, injection of alcohols in open-cycle gas turbines during the compression process is considered, putting in evidence theoretical and actually possible advantages, as higher efficiency and specific work. In the various cases examined, several thermodynamic parameters should be suitably chosen in order to examine the most convenient solution.

  16. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows.

  17. Debuncher Cooling Limitations to Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1991-08-13

    During the January studies period we performed studies to determine the effect that debuncher cooling has on the stacking rate. Two different sets of measurements were made separated by about a week. Most measurements reported here are in PBAR log 16, page 243-247. These measurements were made by changing the accelerator timeline to give about 6 seconds between 29's, and then gating the cooling systems to simulate reduced cycle times. For the measurement of the momentum cooling effectiveness the gating switches could not be made to work, so the timeline was changed for each measurement. The cooling power of all three systems was about 800 watts for the tests reported here. We now regularly run at 1200 watts per system.

  18. Cooling device

    SciTech Connect

    Teske, L.

    1984-02-21

    A cooling device is claimed for coal dust comprising a housing, a motor-driven conveyor system therein to transport the coal dust over coolable trays in the housing and conveyor-wheel arms of spiral curvature for moving the coal dust from one or more inlets to one or more outlets via a series of communicating passages in the trays over which the conveyor-wheel arms pass under actuation of a hydraulic motor mounted above the housing and driving a vertical shaft, to which the conveyor-wheel arms are attached, extending centrally downwardly through the housing.

  19. REACTOR COOLING

    DOEpatents

    Quackenbush, C.F.

    1959-09-29

    A nuclear reactor with provisions for selectively cooling the fuel elements is described. The reactor has a plurality of tubes extending throughout. Cylindrical fuel elements are disposed within the tubes and the coolant flows through the tubes and around the fuel elements. The fuel elements within the central portion of the reactor are provided with roughened surfaces of material. The fuel elements in the end portions of the tubes within the reactor are provlded with low conduction jackets and the fuel elements in the region between the central portion and the end portions are provided with smooth surfaces of high heat conduction material.

  20. Annual DOE Active Solar Heating and Cooling Contractors Review meeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-09-01

    Ninety three project summaries dicussing the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling are presented: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology.

  1. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  2. X-Ray spectroscopy of cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestwich, Andrea

    1996-01-01

    Cooling flows in clusters of galaxies occur when the cooling time of the gas is shorter than the age of the cluster; material cools and falls to the center of the cluster potential. Evidence for short X-ray cooling times comes from imaging studies of clusters and X-ray spectroscopy of a few bright clusters. Because the mass accretion rate can be high (a few 100 solar mass units/year) the mass of material accumulated over the lifetime of a cluster can be as high as 10(exp 12) solar mass units. However, there is little evidence for this material at other wavelengths, and the final fate of the accretion material is unknown. X-ray spectra obtained with the Einstein SSS show evidence for absorption; if confirmed this result would imply that the accretion material is in the form of cool dense clouds. However ice on the SSS make these data difficult to interpret. We obtained ASCA spectra of the cooling flow cluster Abell 85. Our primary goals were to search for multi-temperature components that may be indicative of cool gas; search for temperature gradients across the cluster; and look for excess absorption in the cooling region.

  3. Spatially-selective optical pumping cooling and Two-Isotope Collision-Assisted Zeeman cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rebekah Ferrier

    In this thesis I describe two non-evaporative cooling schemes for cooling Rb atoms. The first is a Sisyphus-like ultracold gas cooling scheme called Spatially-selecTive Optical Pumping (STOP) cooling. In principle, STOP cooling has wide applicability to both atoms and molecules. STOP cooling works by exploiting the fact that atoms or molecules in a confining potential can be optically pumped out of an otherwise dark state in a spatially-selective way. Selecting atoms or molecules for optical pumping out of a dark state in a region of high potential energy and then waiting a fixed time after the optical pumping allows for the creation of a group of high kinetic energy atoms or molecules moving in a known direction. These can then be slowed using external fields (such as the scattering force from a resonant laser beam) and optically pumped back into the dark state, cooling the gas and closing the cooling cycle. I present theoretical modeling of the STOP cooling technique, including predictions of achievable cooling rates. I have conducted an experimental study of the cooling technique for a single cooling cycle, observing one dimensional cooling rates in excess of 100 micro-K per second in an ultracold gas of 87 Rb atoms. I will also comment on the prospects for improving the cooling performance beyond that presented in this work. The second cooling scheme I investigated is called Two-Isotope Collision Assisted Zeeman (2-CAZ) cooling. Through a combination of spin-exchange collisions in a magnetic field and optical pumping, it is possible to cool a gas of atoms without requiring the loss of atoms from the gas. I investigated 2-CAZ cooling using 85Rb and 87Rb. I was able to experimentally confirm that the measured 2-CAZ cooling rate agreed with a cooling rate predicted though a simple analytic model. As part of the measured cooling rate, I quantitatively characterized the heating rates associated with our actual implementation of this cooling technique and found

  4. Energy Absorption Behaviors of Nanoporous Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    energy absorption isotherms : (a) the first loading-unloading cycle; (b) the second, the third, and the fourth loading-unloading cycles without thermal...change, AV (cm- /g) Fig.7 The energy absorption isotherms under a cyclic loading in a 23. lwt% aqueous solution of NaC1. 80

  5. Parametric analysis of a double-effect steam absorption chiller

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed Salih Ahmed, Mojahid Sid Ahmed; Gilani, Syed Ihtsham Ul-Haq

    2012-06-01

    The development in the field of refrigeration and cooling systems based on absorption cycles has attained its own internal dynamic in the last decade. A major obstacle for developing model is the lack of available component specifications. These specifications are commonly proprietary of the chiller's manufacturers and normally the available information is not sufficient. This work presented a double-effect parallel-flow-type steam absorption chiller model based on thermodynamic and energy equations. The chiller studied is 1250 RT (Refrigeration Tons) using lithium bromide -water as working pair. The mathematical equations that govern the operation of the steam absorption chiller are developed, and from the available design data the values of the overall heat transfer coefficient multiplied by the heat exchanger surface area and the characteristics of each component of the absorption chiller at the design point are calculated. For thermo physical and thermodynamic properties for lithium bromide-water solution, set of computationally efficient formulations are used. The model gives the required information about temperature, concentration, and flow rate at each state point of the system. The model calculates the heat load at each component as well as the performance of the system.

  6. Renewable Heating and Cooling

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Renewable heating and cooling is a set of alternative resources and technologies that can be used in place of conventional heating and cooling technologies for common applications such as water heating, space heating, space cooling and process heat.

  7. Restaurant food cooling practices.

    PubMed

    Brown, Laura Green; Ripley, Danny; Blade, Henry; Reimann, Dave; Everstine, Karen; Nicholas, Dave; Egan, Jessica; Koktavy, Nicole; Quilliam, Daniela N

    2012-12-01

    Improper food cooling practices are a significant cause of foodborne illness, yet little is known about restaurant food cooling practices. This study was conducted to examine food cooling practices in restaurants. Specifically, the study assesses the frequency with which restaurants meet U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recommendations aimed at reducing pathogen proliferation during food cooling. Members of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Environmental Health Specialists Network collected data on food cooling practices in 420 restaurants. The data collected indicate that many restaurants are not meeting FDA recommendations concerning cooling. Although most restaurant kitchen managers report that they have formal cooling processes (86%) and provide training to food workers on proper cooling (91%), many managers said that they do not have tested and verified cooling processes (39%), do not monitor time or temperature during cooling processes (41%), or do not calibrate thermometers used for monitoring temperatures (15%). Indeed, 86% of managers reported cooling processes that did not incorporate all FDA-recommended components. Additionally, restaurants do not always follow recommendations concerning specific cooling methods, such as refrigerating cooling food at shallow depths, ventilating cooling food, providing open-air space around the tops and sides of cooling food containers, and refraining from stacking cooling food containers on top of each other. Data from this study could be used by food safety programs and the restaurant industry to target training and intervention efforts concerning cooling practices. These efforts should focus on the most frequent poor cooling practices, as identified by this study.

  8. Laser cooling by collisional redistribution of radiation.

    PubMed

    Vogl, Ulrich; Weitz, Martin

    2009-09-03

    The general idea that optical radiation may cool matter was put forward 80 years ago. Doppler cooling of dilute atomic gases is an extremely successful application of this concept. More recently, anti-Stokes cooling in multilevel systems has been explored, culminating in the optical refrigeration of solids. Collisional redistribution of radiation has been proposed as a different cooling mechanism for atomic two-level systems, although experimental investigations using moderate-density gases have not reached the cooling regime. Here we experimentally demonstrate laser cooling of an atomic gas based on collisional redistribution of radiation, using rubidium atoms in argon buffer gas at a pressure of 230 bar. The frequent collisions in the ultradense gas transiently shift a highly red-detuned laser beam (that is, one detuned to a much lower frequency) into resonance, whereas spontaneous decay occurs close to the unperturbed atomic resonance frequency. During each excitation cycle, kinetic energy of order k(B)T-that is, the thermal energy (k(B), Boltzmann's constant; T, temperature)-is extracted from the dense atomic sample. In a proof-of-principle experiment with a thermally non-isolated sample, we demonstrate relative cooling by 66 K. The cooled gas has a density more than ten orders of magnitude greater than the typical values used in Doppler-cooling experiments, and the cooling power reaches 87 mW. Future applications of the technique may include supercooling beyond the homogeneous nucleation temperature and optical chillers.

  9. Preliminary concepts for high-temperature mold heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, J.P.

    1990-12-01

    The feasibility and limitations of various methods for mold heating and cooling were investigated. Two methods were chosen for evaluation: electrical heating and water cooling, and electrical heating and heat pipe conduction cooling. A model mold of each method was built. Test results indicated that the electrical heating and circulated water cooling was the better method. An injection mold utilizing this method was fabricated and temperature-cycled between 300 and 770{degree}F. 1 ref., 2 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Gas hydrate cool storage system

    DOEpatents

    Ternes, M.P.; Kedl, R.J.

    1984-09-12

    The invention presented relates to the development of a process utilizing a gas hydrate as a cool storage medium for alleviating electric load demands during peak usage periods. Several objectives of the invention are mentioned concerning the formation of the gas hydrate as storage material in a thermal energy storage system within a heat pump cycle system. The gas hydrate was formed using a refrigerant in water and an example with R-12 refrigerant is included. (BCS)

  11. Improvement in Ge Detector Cooling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    lifetime and integrity, improve performance, and resolve the need to procure and handle liquid nitrogen (LN2). Both cryocoolers offer advantages over...place, the 22-liter reservoir of LN2 provides up to 7 days of cooling to the detector with no risk of a partial thermal cycle or warm -up. The detector... warmed for repairs. Moreover, the interchangeability of dipsticks and Cryo-Cycle™ coolers allows independent replacement of either of the two most

  12. Terrestrial cooling and solar variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agee, E. M.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence from surface temperature records is presented and discussed which suggests a significant cooling trend over the Northern Hemisphere from 1940 to the present. This cooling trend is associated with an increase of the latitudinal gradient of temperature and the lapse rate, as predicted by climate models with decreased solar input and feedback mechanisms. Evidence suggests that four of these 80- to 100-year cycles of global surface temperature fluctuation may have occurred, and in succession, from 1600 to the present. Interpretation of sunspot activity were used to infer a direct thermal response of terrestrial temperature to solar variability on the time scale of the Gleissberg cycle (90 years, an amplitude of the 11-year cycles). A physical link between the sunspot activity and the solar parameter is hypothesized. Observations of sensible heat flux by stationary planetary waves and transient eddies, as well as general circulation modeling results of these processes, were examined from the viewpoint of the hypothesis of cooling due to reduced insolation.

  13. Multi-phase galaxy formation and quasar absorption systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maller, Ariyeh H.

    2005-03-01

    The central problem of galaxy formation is understanding the cooling and condensation of gas in dark matter halos. It is now clear that to match observations this requires further physics than the simple assumptions of single phase gas cooling. A model of multi-phase cooling (maller & bullock 2004) can successfully account for the upper cutoff in the masses of galaxies and provides a natural explanation of many types of absorption systems (mo & miralda-escude 1996). Absorption systems are our best probes of the gaseous content of galaxy halos and therefore provide important constraints on models for gas cooling into galaxies. All physical processes that effect gas cooling redistribute gas and therefore are detectable in absorption systems. Detailed studies of the nature of gas in galaxy halos using absorption systems are crucial for building a correct theory of galaxy formation.

  14. Heavy Elements and Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wahlgren, Glenn M.; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Norris, Ryan P.

    2008-01-01

    We report on progress in the analysis of high-resolution near-IR spectra of alpha Orionis (M2 Iab) and other cool, luminous stars. Using synthetic spectrum techniques, we search for atomic absorption lines in the stellar spectra and evaluate the available line parameter data for use in our abundance analyses. Our study concentrates on the post iron-group elements copper through zirconium as a means of investigating the slow neutron-capture process of nucleosynthesis in massive stars and the mechanisms that transport recently processed material up into the photospheric region. We discuss problems with the atomic data and model atmospheres that need to be addressed before theoretically derived elemental abundances from pre-supernova nucleosynthesis calculations can be tested by comparison with abundances determined from observations of cool, massive stars.

  15. Radiative Cooling: Principles, Progress, and Potentials.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Muntasir; Gu, Min

    2016-07-01

    The recent progress on radiative cooling reveals its potential for applications in highly efficient passive cooling. This approach utilizes the maximized emission of infrared thermal radiation through the atmospheric window for releasing heat and minimized absorption of incoming atmospheric radiation. These simultaneous processes can lead to a device temperature substantially below the ambient temperature. Although the application of radiative cooling for nighttime cooling was demonstrated a few decades ago, significant cooling under direct sunlight has been achieved only recently, indicating its potential as a practical passive cooler during the day. In this article, the basic principles of radiative cooling and its performance characteristics for nonradiative contributions, solar radiation, and atmospheric conditions are discussed. The recent advancements over the traditional approaches and their material and structural characteristics are outlined. The key characteristics of the thermal radiators and solar reflectors of the current state-of-the-art radiative coolers are evaluated and their benchmarks are remarked for the peak cooling ability. The scopes for further improvements on radiative cooling efficiency for optimized device characteristics are also theoretically estimated.

  16. Radiative Cooling: Principles, Progress, and Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Md. Muntasir

    2016-01-01

    The recent progress on radiative cooling reveals its potential for applications in highly efficient passive cooling. This approach utilizes the maximized emission of infrared thermal radiation through the atmospheric window for releasing heat and minimized absorption of incoming atmospheric radiation. These simultaneous processes can lead to a device temperature substantially below the ambient temperature. Although the application of radiative cooling for nighttime cooling was demonstrated a few decades ago, significant cooling under direct sunlight has been achieved only recently, indicating its potential as a practical passive cooler during the day. In this article, the basic principles of radiative cooling and its performance characteristics for nonradiative contributions, solar radiation, and atmospheric conditions are discussed. The recent advancements over the traditional approaches and their material and structural characteristics are outlined. The key characteristics of the thermal radiators and solar reflectors of the current state‐of‐the‐art radiative coolers are evaluated and their benchmarks are remarked for the peak cooling ability. The scopes for further improvements on radiative cooling efficiency for optimized device characteristics are also theoretically estimated. PMID:27812478

  17. Alternatives to compressor cooling in California climates

    SciTech Connect

    Feustel, H. ); de Almeida, A. . Dept. of Electrical Engineering); Blumstein, C. . Universitywide Energy Research Group)

    1991-01-01

    This review and discussion has been prepared for the California Institute for Energy Efficiency (CIEE) to examine research on alternatives to compressor cooling. The report focuses on strategies for eliminating compressors in California's transition climates -- moderately warm areas located between the cool coastal regions and the hot central regions. Many of these strategies could also help reduce compressor use in hotter climates. Compressor-driven cooling of residences in California's transition climate regions is an undesirable load for California's electric utilities because load factor is poor and usage is typically high during periods of system peak demand. We review a number of alternatives to compressors, including low-energy strategies: evaporative cooling, natural and induced ventilation, reflective coatings, shading with vegetation and improved glazing, thermal storage, and radiative cooling. Also included are two energy-intensive strategies: absorption cooling and desiccant cooling. Our literature survey leads us to conclude that many of these strategies, used either singly or in combination, are technically and economically feasible alternatives to compressor-driven cooling. 78 refs., 8 figs.

  18. Hybrid radiator cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    France, David M.; Smith, David S.; Yu, Wenhua; Routbort, Jules L.

    2016-03-15

    A method and hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus for implementing enhanced radiator-cooling are provided. The hybrid radiator-cooling apparatus includes an air-side finned surface for air cooling; an elongated vertically extending surface extending outwardly from the air-side finned surface on a downstream air-side of the hybrid radiator; and a water supply for selectively providing evaporative cooling with water flow by gravity on the elongated vertically extending surface.

  19. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  20. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  1. Stirling Air Conditioner for Compact Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    2010-09-01

    BEETIT Project: Infinia is developing a compact air conditioner that uses an unconventional high efficient Stirling cycle system (vs. conventional vapor compression systems) to produce cool air that is energy efficient and does not rely on polluting refrigerants. The Stirling cycle system is a type of air conditioning system that uses a motor with a piston to remove heat to the outside atmosphere using a gas refrigerant. To date, Stirling systems have been expensive and have not had the right kind of heat exchanger to help cool air efficiently. Infinia is using chip cooling technology from the computer industry to make improvements to the heat exchanger and improve system performance. Infinia’s air conditioner uses helium gas as refrigerant, an environmentally benign gas that does not react with other chemicals and does not burn. Infinia’s improvements to the Stirling cycle system will enable the cost-effective mass production of high-efficiency air conditioners that use no polluting refrigerants.

  2. Simulation and performance analysis of a quadruple-effect lithium bromide-water absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Zaltash, A.; DeVault, R.C.

    1994-04-01

    In order to investigate the possibility of improving utilization of high temperature heat sources, such as natural gas, for absorption chillers, performance simulation has been conducted for a quadruple-effect lithium bromide-water cycle, capable of substantial performance improvement over state-of-the-art double-effect cycles. The system investigated includes four condensers and four desorbers coupled together, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; based on prior experience, a parallel flow system was perferred over series flow, and double-condenser coupling (DCC) was employed, extending from triple-effect cycles, to further improve performance. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was used to investigate the performances of the cycle. The simulation was carried out over a range of operating conditions, including investigation of the influence of some major design parameters. A coefficient of performance in the neighborhood of 2.0 (cooling) was calculated at the design point, with a heat supply temperature of 600{degrees}F at the solution outlet from the high temperature desorber. With some optimization of the weak (pumped) solution flowrate and of the solution split among the four desorbers, this COP may be raised above 2.2, without any increase in the heat transfer surface of the system`s components.

  3. Development of a high-efficiency, gas-fired, absorption heat pump for residential and small-commercial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, B. A.

    1990-09-01

    The purpose of the total project is to develop a gas fired absorption heat pump for residential and small commercial applications that will produce at least 1.6 Btu of heating and 0.7 Btu of cooling per Btu of heat content in the gas being burned. The primary technology advances that can be used to attain the new goals are higher efficiency cycles, increased flue efficiency, and better fluids. Flue efficiency technology is well developed, and fan assisted combustion systems with condensing heat exchangers can limit flue and insulation losses to the 10 pct range. If this 10 pct loss assumption is made, the resulting target cycle COPs are 1.78 in heating mode and 0.78 in cooling mode at the ARI rating conditions. The objective of Phase 1 was to analyze working fluids and absorption-cycle concepts that are capable of performing at the target COPs and are potentially competitive with existing space-conditioning products in cost, operating life, and reliability. Six advanced cycles were evaluated with ammonia/water as the fluid pair. Then additional analysis was performed with other fluid pairs to determine whether cycle ranking would change depending on which fluid was used. It was concluded that the preferred cycle/fluid was the generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle using ammonia/water as the fluid pair. A cost estimate made by an independent manufacturing engineering firm for a residential heat pump based on the cycle/fluid combination determined that the GAX heat pump could be cost competitive with existing products.

  4. Permeability enhancement by shock cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffiths, Luke; Heap, Michael; Reuschlé, Thierry; Baud, Patrick; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2015-04-01

    The permeability of an efficient reservoir, e.g. a geothermal reservoir, should be sufficient to permit the circulation of fluids. Generally speaking, permeability decreases over the life cycle of the geothermal system. As a result, is usually necessary to artificially maintain and enhance the natural permeability of these systems. One of the methods of enhancement -- studied here -- is thermal stimulation (injecting cold water at low pressure). This goal of this method is to encourage new thermal cracks within the reservoir host rocks, thereby increasing reservoir permeability. To investigate the development of thermal microcracking in the laboratory we selected two granites: a fine-grained (Garibaldi Grey granite, grain size = 0.5 mm) and a course-grained granite (Lanhelin granite, grain size = 2 mm). Both granites have an initial porosity of about 1%. Our samples were heated to a range of temperatures (100-1000 °C) and were either cooled slowly (1 °C/min) or shock cooled (100 °C/s). A systematic microstructural (2D crack area density, using standard stereological techniques, and 3D BET specific surface area measurements) and rock physical property (porosity, P-wave velocity, uniaxial compressive strength, and permeability) analysis was undertaken to understand the influence of slow and shock cooling on our reservoir granites. Microstructurally, we observe that the 2D crack surface area per unit volume and the specific surface area increase as a result of thermal stressing, and, for the same maximum temperature, crack surface area is higher in the shock cooled samples. This observation is echoed by our rock physical property measurements: we see greater changes for the shock cooled samples. We can conclude that shock cooling is an extremely efficient method of generating thermal microcracks and modifying rock physical properties. Our study highlights that thermal treatments are likely to be an efficient method for the "matrix" permeability enhancement of

  5. Elastocaloric cooling materials and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Ichiro

    2015-03-01

    We are actively pursuing applications of thermoelastic (elastocaloric) cooling using shape memory alloys. Latent heat associated with martensitic transformation of shape memory alloys can be used to run cooling cycles with stress-inducing mechanical drives. The coefficient of performance of thermoelastic cooling materials can be as high as 11 with the directly measured DT of around 17 °C. Depending on the stress application mode, the number of cycles to fatigue can be as large as of the order of 105. Efforts to design and develop thermoelastic alloys with long fatigue life will be discussed. The current project at the University of Maryland is focused on development of building air-conditioners, and at Maryland Energy and Sensor Technologies, smaller scale commercial applications are being pursued. This work is carried out in collaboration with Jun Cui, Yiming Wu, Suxin Qian, Yunho Hwang, Jan Muehlbauer, and Reinhard Radermacher, and it is funded by the ARPA-E BEETIT program and the State of Maryland.

  6. User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for cost analysis of geothermal district-heating-and-cooling systems. Volume I. Main text

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, H.D.; Fassbender, L.L.; Bloomster, C.H.

    1982-09-01

    The purpose of this model is to calculate the costs of residential space heating, space cooling, and sanitary water heating or process heating (cooling) using geothermal energy from a hydrothermal reservoir. The model can calculate geothermal heating and cooling costs for residential developments, a multi-district city, or a point demand such as an industrial factory or commercial building. GEOCITY simulates the complete geothermal heating and cooling system, which consists of two principal parts: the reservoir and fluid transmission system and the distribution system. The reservoir and fluid transmission submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of thermal energy supplied to the distribution system by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the exploration, development, and operation of the reservoir and fluid transmission system. The distribution system submodel calculates the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) delivered by the distribution system to the end-users by simulating the technical design and cash flows for the construction and operation of the distribution system. Geothermal space heating is assumed to be provided by circulating hot water through radiators, convectors, fan-coil units, or other in-house heating systems. Geothermal process heating is provided by directly using the hot water or by circulating it through a process heat exchanger. Geothermal space or process cooling is simulated by circulating hot water through lithium bromide/water absorption chillers located at each building. Retrofit costs for both heating and cooling applications can be input by the user. The life-cycle cost of thermal energy from the reservoir and fluid transmission system to the distribution system and the life-cycle cost of heat (chill) to the end-users are calculated using discounted cash flow analysis.

  7. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, Gregory W.; Kotsubo, Vincent Y.

    1992-01-01

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of .sup.3 He in a single phase .sup.3 He-.sup.4 He solution. The .sup.3 He in superfluid .sup.4 He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid .sup.3 He at an initial concentration in superfluid .sup.4 He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of .sup.4 He while restricting passage of .sup.3 He. The .sup.3 He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K.

  8. Superfluid thermodynamic cycle refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Swift, G.W.; Kotsubo, V.Y.

    1992-12-22

    A cryogenic refrigerator cools a heat source by cyclically concentrating and diluting the amount of [sup 3]He in a single phase [sup 3]He-[sup 4]He solution. The [sup 3]He in superfluid [sup 4]He acts in a manner of an ideal gas in a vacuum. Thus, refrigeration is obtained using any conventional thermal cycle, but preferably a Stirling or Carnot cycle. A single phase solution of liquid [sup 3]He at an initial concentration in superfluid [sup 4]He is contained in a first variable volume connected to a second variable volume through a superleak device that enables free passage of [sup 4]He while restricting passage of [sup 3]He. The [sup 3]He is compressed (concentrated) and expanded (diluted) in a phased manner to carry out the selected thermal cycle to remove heat from the heat load for cooling below 1 K. 12 figs.

  9. The discovery of large amounts of cold, X-ray absorbing matter in cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, D. A.; Fabian, A. C.; Johnstone, R. M.; Mushotzky, R. F.; Arnaud, K. A.

    1991-01-01

    The discovery of significant excess absorption in the X-ray spectra of 12 clusters of galaxies is reported. The spectra also require a cooling-flow component, which confirms the results of imaging studies of the clusters showing the strongly peaked emission characteristic of cooling flows. The total mass of absorbing gas is determined on the assumption that it is distributed through the cooling flow region and has cosmic abundance. It is shown that the gas is most likely in the form of small cold clouds. The excess absorption is interpreted as being due to photoelectric absorption in cold gas clouds distributed through the cooling flows.

  10. Turbopump thermodynamic cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patten, T. C.; Mckee, H. B.

    1972-01-01

    System for cooling turbopumps used in cryogenic fluid storage facilities is described. Technique uses thermodynamic propellant vent to intercept pump heat at desired conditions. Cooling system uses hydrogen from outside source or residual hydrogen from cryogenic storage tank.

  11. Cooling Water Intakes

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Industries use large volumes of water for cooling. The water intakes pull large numbers of fish and other organisms into the cooling systems. EPA issues regulations on intake structures in order to minimize adverse environmental impacts.

  12. Liquid cooled garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Liquid cooled garments employed in several applications in which severe heat is encountered are discussed. In particular, the use of the garments to replace air line cooling units in a variety of industrial processing situations is discussed.

  13. Metamaterial enhances natural cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-03-01

    A new metamaterial film that uses passive radiative cooling to dissipate heat from an object and provides cooling without a power input has been developed by a team at the University of Colorado Boulder in the US.

  14. Liquid-Cooled Garment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A liquid-cooled bra, offshoot of Apollo moon suit technology, aids the cancer-detection technique known as infrared thermography. Water flowing through tubes in the bra cools the skin surface to improve resolution of thermograph image.

  15. Data center cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Dang, Hien P; Parida, Pritish R; Schultz, Mark D; Sharma, Arun

    2015-03-17

    A data center cooling system may include heat transfer equipment to cool a liquid coolant without vapor compression refrigeration, and the liquid coolant is used on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack housed in the data center. The system may also include a controller-apparatus to regulate the liquid coolant flow to the liquid cooled information technology equipment rack through a range of liquid coolant flow values based upon information technology equipment temperature thresholds.

  16. Cooling of Stored Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, F.

    1986-06-10

    Beam cooling methods developed for the accumulation of antiprotons are being employed to assist in the performance of experiments in Nuclear and Particle Physics with ion beams stored in storage rings. The physics of beam cooling, and the ranges of utility of stochastic and electron cooling are discussed in this paper.

  17. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan,J.M.; Blaskiewicz, M. M.; Severino, F.

    2009-05-04

    After the success of longitudinal stochastic cooling of bunched heavy ion beam in RHIC, transverse stochastic cooling in the vertical plane of Yellow ring was installed and is being commissioned with proton beam. This report presents the status of the effort and gives an estimate, based on simulation, of the RHIC luminosity with stochastic cooling in all planes.

  18. Infrared Opacities in Dense Atmospheres of Cool White Dwarf Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalski, P. M.; Blouin, S.; Dufour, P.

    2017-03-01

    Dense, He-rich atmospheres of cool white dwarfs represent a challenge to the modeling. This is because these atmospheres are constituted of a dense fluid in which strong multi-atomic interactions determine their physics and chemistry. Therefore, the ideal-gas-based description of absorption is no longer adequate, which makes the opacities of these atmospheres difficult to model. This is illustrated with severe problems in fitting the spectra of cool, He-rich stars. Good description of the infrared (IR) opacity is essential for proper assignment of the atmospheric parameters of these stars. Using methods of computational quantum chemistry we simulate the IR absorption of dense He/H media. We found a significant IR absorption from He atoms (He-He-He CIA opacity) and a strong pressure distortion of the H2-He collision-induced absorption (CIA). We discuss the implication of these results for the interpretation of the spectra of cool stars.

  19. Laser cooling of CdS nanobelts: thickness matters.

    PubMed

    Li, Dehui; Zhang, Jun; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-08-12

    We report on the thickness dependent laser cooling in CdS nanobelts pumped by a 532 nm green laser. The lowest achievable cooling temperature is found to strongly depend on thickness. No net cooling can be achieved in nanobelts with a thickness below 65 nm due to nearly zero absorption and larger surface nonradiative recombination. While for nanobelts thicker than ~120 nm, the reabsorption effect leads to the reduction of the cooling temperature. Based on the thickness dependent photoconductivity gain, mean emission energy and external quantum efficiency, the modeling of the normalized temperature change suggests a good agreement with the experimental results.

  20. Cooling water distribution system

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Richard

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system for a nuclear reactor containment vessel. Disclosed is a cooling water distribution system for introducing cooling water by gravity uniformly over the outer surface of a steel containment vessel using an interconnected series of radial guide elements, a plurality of circumferential collector elements and collector boxes to collect and feed the cooling water into distribution channels extending along the curved surface of the steel containment vessel. The cooling water is uniformly distributed over the curved surface by a plurality of weirs in the distribution channels.

  1. Postexercise Cooling Rates in 2 Cooling Jackets

    PubMed Central

    Brade, Carly; Dawson, Brian; Wallman, Karen; Polglaze, Ted

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Context: Cooling jackets are a common method for removing stored heat accumulated during exercise. To date, the efficiency and practicality of different types of cooling jackets have received minimal investigation. Objective: To examine whether a cooling jacket containing a phase-change material (PC17) results in more rapid postexercise cooling than a gel cooling jacket and a no-jacket (control) condition. Design: Randomized, counterbalanced design with 3 experimental conditions. Setting: Participants exercised at 75% V̇o2max workload in a hot climate chamber (temperature  =  35.0 ± 1.4°C, relative humidity  =  52 ± 4%) for 30 minutes, followed by postexercise cooling for 30 minutes in cool laboratory conditions (ambient temperature  =  24.9 ± 1.8°C, relative humidity  =  39% ± 10%). Patients or Other Participants: Twelve physically active men (age  =  21.3 ± 1.1 years, height  =  182.7 ± 7.1 cm, body mass  =  76.2 ± 9.5 kg, sum of 6 skinfolds  =  50.5 ± 6.9 mm, body surface area  =  1.98 ± 0.14 m2, V̇o2max  =  49.0 ± 7.0 mL·kg−1·min−1) participated. Intervention(s): Three experimental conditions, consisting of a PC17 jacket, a gel jacket, and no jacket. Main Outcome Measure(s): Core temperature (TC), mean skin temperature (TSk), and TC cooling rate (°C/min). Results: Mean peak TC postexercise was 38.49 ± 0.42°C, 38.57 ± 0.41°C, and 38.55 ± 0.40°C for the PC17 jacket, gel jacket, and control conditions, respectively. No differences were observed in peak TC cooling rates among the PC17 jacket (0.038 ± 0.007°C/min), gel jacket (0.040 ± 0.009°C/min), and control (0.034 ± 0.010°C/min, P > .05) conditions. Between trials, no differences were calculated for mean TSk cooling. Conclusions: Similar cooling rates for all 3 conditions indicate that there is no benefit associated with wearing the PC17 or gel jacket. PMID:20210620

  2. Cryogenic cooling systems for thermal imaging equipment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, D. K.

    1984-01-01

    For maximum sensitivity in the 8-12 micron waveband, thermal imaging devices which employ cadmium mercury telluride detectors for conversion of the thermal signal to electrical form (for further amplification, conditioning, and display) must be cooled and maintained at a steady 80-85 K. Commonly employed cooling engines are the Stirling cycle and the Joule-Thomson effect types. The former use pressurized He gas and, in the sizes used in existing thermal imagers, consume 100 watts. The latter avoid the mechanical vibration and cyclic cooling problems of the Stirling cycle devices, but require a compressed gas bottle supply. Attention is presently given to the elimination of the gas bottle requirement by feeding the Joule-Thomson cooler from a small, high pressure compressor that is driven by a low power electric motor.

  3. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  4. Evolution of cool-roof standards in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Akbari, Hashem; Akbari, Hashem; Levinson, Ronnen

    2008-07-11

    Roofs that have high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance stay cool in the sun. A roof with lower thermal emittance but exceptionally high solar reflectance can also stay cool in the sun. Substituting a cool roof for a noncool roof decreases cooling-electricity use, cooling-power demand, and cooling-equipment capacity requirements, while slightly increasing heating-energy consumption. Cool roofs can also lower citywide ambient air temperature in summer, slowing ozone formation and increasing human comfort. Provisions for cool roofs in energy-efficiency standards can promote the building- and climate-appropriate use of cool roofing technologies. Cool-roof requirements are designed to reduce building energy use, while energy-neutral cool-roof credits permit the use of less energy-efficient components (e.g., larger windows) in a building that has energy-saving cool roofs. Both types of measures can reduce the life-cycle cost of a building (initial cost plus lifetime energy cost). Since 1999, several widely used building energy-efficiency standards, including ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, the International Energy Conservation Code, and California's Title 24 have adopted cool-roof credits or requirements. This paper reviews the technical development of cool-roof provisions in the ASHRAE 90.1, ASHRAE 90.2, and California Title 24 standards, and discusses the treatment of cool roofs in other standards and energy-efficiency programs. The techniques used to develop the ASHRAE and Title 24 cool-roof provisions can be used as models to address cool roofs in building energy-efficiency standards worldwide.

  5. USAF Physiological Studies of Personal Microclimate Cooling: A Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-01

    53 vi 11h. Thermal comfort ratings during continuous work. AC = Ambient Air Cooling; NC = No Cooling...43 10b Thermal Comfort (TC) and Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) at the End of 45-Min Work Cycles in...47 10d Thermal Comfort (TC) and Ratings of Perceived Exertion (RPE) at the End o! 30

  6. Stochastic cooling in RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan J. M.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Mernick, K.

    2012-05-20

    The full 6-dimensional [x,x'; y,y'; z,z'] stochastic cooling system for RHIC was completed and operational for the FY12 Uranium-Uranium collider run. Cooling enhances the integrated luminosity of the Uranium collisions by a factor of 5, primarily by reducing the transverse emittances but also by cooling in the longitudinal plane to preserve the bunch length. The components have been deployed incrementally over the past several runs, beginning with longitudinal cooling, then cooling in the vertical planes but multiplexed between the Yellow and Blue rings, next cooling both rings simultaneously in vertical (the horizontal plane was cooled by betatron coupling), and now simultaneous horizontal cooling has been commissioned. The system operated between 5 and 9 GHz and with 3 x 10{sup 8} Uranium ions per bunch and produces a cooling half-time of approximately 20 minutes. The ultimate emittance is determined by the balance between cooling and emittance growth from Intra-Beam Scattering. Specific details of the apparatus and mathematical techniques for calculating its performance have been published elsewhere. Here we report on: the method of operation, results with beam, and comparison of results to simulations.

  7. Hole Cooling Is Much Faster than Electron Cooling in PbSe Quantum Dots.

    PubMed

    Spoor, Frank C M; Kunneman, Lucas T; Evers, Wiel H; Renaud, Nicolas; Grozema, Ferdinand C; Houtepen, Arjan J; Siebbeles, Laurens D A

    2016-01-26

    In semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), charge carrier cooling is in direct competition with processes such as carrier multiplication or hot charge extraction that may improve the light conversion efficiency of photovoltaic devices. Understanding charge carrier cooling is therefore of great interest. We investigate high-energy optical transitions in PbSe QDs using hyperspectral transient absorption spectroscopy. We observe bleaching of optical transitions involving higher valence and conduction bands upon band edge excitation. The kinetics of rise of the bleach of these transitions after a pump laser pulse allow us to monitor, for the first time, cooling of hot electrons and hot holes separately. Our results show that holes cool significantly faster than electrons in PbSe QDs. This is in contrast to the common assumption that electrons and holes behave similarly in Pb chalcogenide QDs and has important implications for the utilization of hot charge carriers in photovoltaic devices.

  8. Annual DOE active solar heating and cooling contractors' review meeting. Premeeting proceedings and project summaries

    SciTech Connect

    None,

    1981-09-01

    Ninety-three project summaries are presented which discuss the following aspects of active solar heating and cooling: Rankine solar cooling systems; absorption solar cooling systems; desiccant solar cooling systems; solar heat pump systems; solar hot water systems; special projects (such as the National Solar Data Network, hybrid solar thermal/photovoltaic applications, and heat transfer and water migration in soils); administrative/management support; and solar collector, storage, controls, analysis, and materials technology. (LEW)

  9. Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A A; Neymark, J

    1994-11-01

    We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

  10. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  11. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2017-03-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  12. Gas turbine cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Bancalari, Eduardo E.

    2001-01-01

    A gas turbine engine (10) having a closed-loop cooling circuit (39) for transferring heat from the hot turbine section (16) to the compressed air (24) produced by the compressor section (12). The closed-loop cooling system (39) includes a heat exchanger (40) disposed in the flow path of the compressed air (24) between the outlet of the compressor section (12) and the inlet of the combustor (14). A cooling fluid (50) may be driven by a pump (52) located outside of the engine casing (53) or a pump (54) mounted on the rotor shaft (17). The cooling circuit (39) may include an orifice (60) for causing the cooling fluid (50) to change from a liquid state to a gaseous state, thereby increasing the heat transfer capacity of the cooling circuit (39).

  13. Cooling by Thermodynamic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patitsas, S. N.

    2016-11-01

    A method is described for cooling conductive channels to below ambient temperature. The thermodynamic induction principle dictates that the electrically biased channel will cool if the electrical conductance decreases with temperature. The extent of this cooling is calculated in detail for both cases of ballistic and conventional transport with specific calculations for carbon nanotubes and conventional metals, followed by discussions for semiconductors, graphene, and metal-insulator transition systems. A theorem is established for ballistic transport stating that net cooling is not possible. For conventional transport, net cooling is possible over a broad temperature range, with the range being size-dependent. A temperature clamping scheme for establishing a metastable nonequilibrium stationary state is detailed and followed with discussion of possible applications to on-chip thermoelectric cooling in integrated circuitry and quantum computer systems.

  14. Triple effect absorption chiller utilizing two refrigeration circuits

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    A triple effect absorption method and apparatus having a high coefficient of performance. Two single effect absorption circuits are combined with heat exchange occurring between a condenser and absorber of a high temperature circuit, and a generator of a low temperature circuit. The evaporators of both the high and low temperature circuits provide cooling to an external heat load.

  15. The cooling of particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sessler, A.M.

    1994-10-01

    A review is given of the various methods which can be employed for cooling particle beams. These methods include radiation damping, stimulated radiation damping, ionization cooling, stochastic cooling, electron cooling, laser cooling, and laser cooling with beam coupling. Laser Cooling has provided beams of the lowest temperatures, namely 1 mK, but only for ions and only for the longitudinal temperature. Recent theoretical work has suggested how laser cooling, with the coupling of beam motion, can be used to reduce the ion beam temperature in all three directions. The majority of this paper is devoted to describing laser cooling and laser cooling with beam coupling.

  16. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Conway, Lawrence E.; Stewart, William A.

    1991-01-01

    A containment cooling system utilizes a naturally induced air flow and a gravity flow of water over the containment shell which encloses a reactor core to cool reactor core decay heat in two stages. When core decay heat is greatest, the water and air flow combine to provide adequate evaporative cooling as heat from within the containment is transferred to the water flowing over the same. The water is heated by heat transfer and then evaporated and removed by the air flow. After an initial period of about three to four days when core decay heat is greatest, air flow alone is sufficient to cool the containment.

  17. High energy electron cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    High energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. The questions of using electron cooling with and without a magnetic field are presented for discussion at this workshop. The electron cooling method was suggested by G. Budker in the middle sixties. The original idea of the electron cooling was published in 1966. The design activities for the NAP-M project was started in November 1971 and the first run using a proton beam occurred in September 1973. The first experiment with both electron and proton beams was started in May 1974. In this experiment good result was achieved very close to theoretical prediction for a usual two component plasma heat exchange.

  18. Stacking with stochastic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caspers, Fritz; Möhl, Dieter

    2004-10-01

    Accumulation of large stacks of antiprotons or ions with the aid of stochastic cooling is more delicate than cooling a constant intensity beam. Basically the difficulty stems from the fact that the optimized gain and the cooling rate are inversely proportional to the number of particles 'seen' by the cooling system. Therefore, to maintain fast stacking, the newly injected batch has to be strongly 'protected' from the Schottky noise of the stack. Vice versa the stack has to be efficiently 'shielded' against the high gain cooling system for the injected beam. In the antiproton accumulators with stacking ratios up to 105 the problem is solved by radial separation of the injection and the stack orbits in a region of large dispersion. An array of several tapered cooling systems with a matched gain profile provides a continuous particle flux towards the high-density stack core. Shielding of the different systems from each other is obtained both through the spatial separation and via the revolution frequencies (filters). In the 'old AA', where the antiproton collection and stacking was done in one single ring, the injected beam was further shielded during cooling by means of a movable shutter. The complexity of these systems is very high. For more modest stacking ratios, one might use azimuthal rather than radial separation of stack and injected beam. Schematically half of the circumference would be used to accept and cool new beam and the remainder to house the stack. Fast gating is then required between the high gain cooling of the injected beam and the low gain stack cooling. RF-gymnastics are used to merge the pre-cooled batch with the stack, to re-create free space for the next injection, and to capture the new batch. This scheme is less demanding for the storage ring lattice, but at the expense of some reduction in stacking rate. The talk reviews the 'radial' separation schemes and also gives some considerations to the 'azimuthal' schemes.

  19. A Lithium Bromide Absorption Chiller with Cold Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-15

    TO R A G E A LITHIUM BROMIDE ABSORPTION CHILLER WITH COLD STORAGE William Gerstler, et al, General Electric Global Research UNCLASSIFIED UNLIMITED...Research ABSTRACT A LiBr-based absorption chiller can use waste heat or solar energy to produce useful space cooling for small buildings...However, operating this absorption chiller at high ambient tem- peratures may result in performance degradation, crystallization in the absorber, and

  20. Liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors with passive cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Fanning, Alan W.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of cooling medium flow circuits which cooperate to remove and carry heat away from the fuel core upon loss of the normal cooling flow circuit to areas external thereto.

  1. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  2. Cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kowalewski, Markus; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de; Morigi, Giovanna; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2011-09-15

    The efficiency of cavity sideband cooling of trapped molecules is theoretically investigated for the case in which the infrared transition between two rovibrational states is used as a cycling transition. The molecules are assumed to be trapped either by a radiofrequency or optical trapping potential, depending on whether they are charged or neutral, and confined inside a high-finesse optical resonator that enhances radiative emission into the cavity mode. Using realistic experimental parameters and COS as a representative molecular example, we show that in this setup, cooling to the trap ground state is feasible.

  3. Elastocaloric cooling: Stretch to actively cool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ossmer, Hinnerk; Kohl, Manfred

    2016-10-01

    The elastocaloric effect can be exploited in solid-state cooling technologies as an alternative to conventional vapour compression. Now, an elastocaloric device based on the concept of active regeneration achieves a temperature lift of 15.3 K and efficiencies competitive with other caloric-based approaches.

  4. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline on ventilation cooling is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  5. Cool Earth Solar

    SciTech Connect

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2013-04-22

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  6. Why Cool Roofs?

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Steven

    2010-01-01

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  7. Liquid Cooled Garments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Astronauts working on the surface of the moon had to wear liquid-cooled garments under their space suits as protection from lunar temperatures which sometimes reach 250 degrees Fahrenheit. In community service projects conducted by NASA's Ames Research Center, the technology developed for astronaut needs has been adapted to portable cooling systems which will permit two youngsters to lead more normal lives.

  8. Why Cool Roofs?

    ScienceCinema

    Chu, Steven

    2016-07-12

    By installing a cool roof at DOE, the federal government and Secretary Chu are helping to educate families and businesses about the important energy and cost savings that can come with this simple, low-cost technology. Cool roofs have the potential to quickly and dramatically reduce global carbon emissions while saving money every month on consumers' electrical bills.

  9. S'COOL Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Linda

    2004-01-01

    This article describes one fifth grade's participation in in NASA's S'COOL (Students' Cloud Observations On-Line) Project, making cloud observations, reporting them online, exploring weather concepts, and gleaning some of the things involved in authentic scientific research. S?COOL is part of a real scientific study of the effect of clouds on…

  10. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  11. DOAS, Radiant Cooling Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Hastbacka, Mildred; Dieckmann, John; Bouza, Antonio

    2012-12-01

    The article discusses dedicated outdoor air systems (DOAS) and radiant cooling technologies. Both of these topics were covered in previous ASHRAE Journal columns. This article reviews the technologies and their increasing acceptance. The two steps that ASHRAE is taking to disseminate DOAS information to the design community, available energy savings and the market potential of radiant cooling systems are addressed as well.

  12. Cool Earth Solar

    ScienceCinema

    Lamkin, Rob; McIlroy, Andy; Swalwell, Eric; Rajan, Kish

    2016-07-12

    In a public-private partnership that takes full advantage of the Livermore Valley Open Campus (LVOC) for the first time, Sandia National Laboratories and Cool Earth Solar have signed an agreement that could make solar energy more affordable and accessible. In this piece, representatives from Sandia, Cool Earth Solar, and leaders in California government all discuss the unique partnership and its expected impact.

  13. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  14. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, E.P. Jr.

    1999-01-12

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed there between. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock. 2 figs.

  15. Water cooled steam jet

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Jr., Edward P.

    1999-01-01

    A water cooled steam jet for transferring fluid and preventing vapor lock, or vaporization of the fluid being transferred, has a venturi nozzle and a cooling jacket. The venturi nozzle produces a high velocity flow which creates a vacuum to draw fluid from a source of fluid. The venturi nozzle has a converging section connected to a source of steam, a diffuser section attached to an outlet and a throat portion disposed therebetween. The cooling jacket surrounds the venturi nozzle and a suction tube through which the fluid is being drawn into the venturi nozzle. Coolant flows through the cooling jacket. The cooling jacket dissipates heat generated by the venturi nozzle to prevent vapor lock.

  16. Hydronic rooftop cooling systems

    DOEpatents

    Bourne, Richard C.; Lee, Brian Eric; Berman, Mark J.

    2008-01-29

    A roof top cooling unit has an evaporative cooling section that includes at least one evaporative module that pre-cools ventilation air and water; a condenser; a water reservoir and pump that captures and re-circulates water within the evaporative modules; a fan that exhausts air from the building and the evaporative modules and systems that refill and drain the water reservoir. The cooling unit also has a refrigerant section that includes a compressor, an expansion device, evaporator and condenser heat exchangers, and connecting refrigerant piping. Supply air components include a blower, an air filter, a cooling and/or heating coil to condition air for supply to the building, and optional dampers that, in designs that supply less than 100% outdoor air to the building, control the mixture of return and ventilation air.

  17. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, F.W.; Willett, F.T.

    1999-07-20

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number. 13 figs.

  18. Turbine blade cooling

    DOEpatents

    Staub, Fred Wolf; Willett, Fred Thomas

    2000-01-01

    A turbine rotor blade comprises a shank portion, a tip portion and an airfoil. The airfoil has a pressure side wall and a suction side wall that are interconnected by a plurality of partition sidewalls, defining an internal cooling passageway within the airfoil. The internal cooling passageway includes at least one radial outflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the shank portion towards the tip portion and at least one radial inflow passageway to direct a cooling medium flow from the tip portion towards the shank portion. A number of mixing ribs are disposed on the partition sidewalls within the radial outflow passageways so as to enhance the thermal mixing of the cooling medium flow, thereby producing improved heat transfer over a broad range of the Buoyancy number.

  19. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Marriner, J.

    1986-08-01

    The topics discussed are the stochastic cooling systems in use at Fermilab and some of the techniques that have been employed to meet the particular requirements of the anti-proton source. Stochastic cooling at Fermilab became of paramount importance about 5 years ago when the anti-proton source group at Fermilab abandoned the electron cooling ring in favor of a high flux anti-proton source which relied solely on stochastic cooling to achieve the phase space densities necessary for colliding proton and anti-proton beams. The Fermilab systems have constituted a substantial advance in the techniques of cooling including: large pickup arrays operating at microwave frequencies, extensive use of cryogenic techniques to reduce thermal noise, super-conducting notch filters, and the development of tools for controlling and for accurately phasing the system.

  20. Solar space heating and cooling by selective use of the components of a desiccant cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbud, Ihsan Aladdin

    The economic advantages of by-passing various components of a desiccant cooling system under conditions not requiring their use are estimated by evaluating the annual costs of heating and cooling a commercial building in three representative U.S. cities. Life-cycle costs of systems employing solar heat for space heating and desiccant regeneration are compared with those using electric heat. The costs of purchasing and operating heating and desiccant cooling systems, with and without solar heat supply, are compared with those employing conventional heating and vapor compression cooling. The conditions under which commercial buildings can be cooled with desiccant systems at costs competitive with conventional systems are identified. A commercially available vapor compression air conditioner is used as a standard of comparison for energy consumption and room comfort. Heating and cooling requirements of the building are determined by use of the BLAST computer model in a simulation of long term system operation. Performance of the desiccant cooling system and life cycle savings obtained by its use are determined by simulation employing the TRNSYS computer model. TRNSYS compatible subroutines are developed to simulate operation of the desiccant equipment, the building, and the controllers that operate and monitor the system components. The results are presented in tabular and graphical form. This study shows that in the widely different climates represented in Los Angeles, New York, and Miami, by-passing various components in the desiccant cooling system when they are not needed is economically advantageous. Operation cost of the complete system decreased by 47.3% in Los Angeles, by 30.9% in New York City, and by 23.9% in Miami by not operating the desiccant wheel and other elements. The ventilation desiccant cooling system has major economic advantage over conventional systems under conditions of moderate humidity, as in Los Angeles and New York City. In Miami, however

  1. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study. Instructor's Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power output. The efficiency…

  2. In Hot Water: A Cooling Tower Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cochran, Justin; Raju, P. K.; Sankar, Chetan

    2005-01-01

    Problem Statement: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant operated by Southern Nuclear Operating Company, a subsidiary of Southern Company, has found itself at a decision point. Vogtle depends on their natural draft cooling towers to remove heat from the power cycle. Depending on the efficiency of the towers, the cycle can realize more or less power…

  3. Molecular absorption in transition region spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Innes, D.; Ayres, T.; Peter, H.; Curdt, W.; Jaeggli, S.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We present observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of absorption features from a multitude of cool atomic and molecular lines within the profiles of Si IV transition region lines. Many of these spectral lines have not previously been detected in solar spectra. Methods: We examined spectra taken from deep exposures of plage on 12 October 2013. We observed unique absorption spectra over a magnetic element which is bright in transition region line emission and the ultraviolet continuum. We compared the absorption spectra with emission spectra that is likely related to fluorescence. Results: The absorption features require a population of sub-5000 K plasma to exist above the transition region. This peculiar stratification is an extreme deviation from the canonical structure of the chromosphere-corona boundary. The cool material is not associated with a filament or discernible coronal rain. This suggests that molecules may form in the upper solar atmosphere on small spatial scales and introduces a new complexity into our understanding of solar thermal structure. It lends credence to previous numerical studies that found evidence for elevated pockets of cool gas in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  4. MEIC electron cooling program

    SciTech Connect

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is a high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.

  5. MEIC electron cooling program

    DOE PAGES

    Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2014-12-01

    Cooling of proton and ion beams is essential for achieving high luminosities (up to above 1034 cm-2s-1) for MEIC, a Medium energy Electron-Ion Collider envisioned at JLab [1] for advanced nuclear science research. In the present conceptual design, we utilize the conventional election cooling method and adopted a multi-staged cooling scheme for reduction of and maintaining low beam emittances [2,3,4]. Two electron cooling facilities are required to support the scheme: one is a low energy (up to 2 MeV) DC cooler installed in the MEIC ion pre-booster (with the proton kinetic energy up to 3 GeV); the other is amore » high electron energy (up to 55 MeV) cooler in the collider ring (with the proton kinetic energy from 25 to 100 GeV). The high energy cooler, which is based on the ERL technology and a circulator ring, utilizes a bunched electron beam to cool bunched proton or ion beams. To complete the MEIC cooling concept and a technical design of the ERL cooler as well as to develop supporting technologies, an R&D program has been initiated at Jefferson Lab and significant progresses have been made since then. In this study, we present a brief description of the cooler design and a summary of the progress in this cooling R&D.« less

  6. Cryogenic generator cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckels, P. W.; Fagan, T. J.; Parker, J. H., Jr.; Long, L. J.; Shestak, E. J.; Calfo, R. M.; Hannon, W. F.; Brown, D. B.; Barkell, J. W.; Patterson, A.

    The concept for a hydrogen cooled aluminum cryogenic generator was presented by Schlicher and Oberly in 1985. Following their lead, this paper describes the thermal design of a high voltage dc, multimegawatt generator of high power density. The rotor and stator are cooled by saturated liquid and supercritical hydrogen, respectively. The brushless exciter on the same shaft is also cooled by liquid hydrogen. Component development testing is well under way and some of the test results concerning the thermohydraulic performance of the conductors are reported. The aluminum cryogenic generator's characteristics are attractive for hydrogen economy applications.

  7. [Scalp cooling for chemotherapy-induced alopecia].

    PubMed

    Komen, Marion M C; Smorenburg, Carolien H; van den Hurk, Corina J G; Nortier, J W R Hans

    2011-01-01

    Alopecia is a very common side effect of cytostatic therapy and is considered one of the most emotionally distressing effects. To prevent alopecia scalp cooling is currently used in some indications in medical oncology in 59 hospitals in the Netherlands. The success of scalp cooling depends on various factors such as type of chemotherapy, dose, infusion time, number of treatment cycles and combinations of drugs. In general, scalp cooling is well tolerated. The reported side-effects are headache, coldness, dizziness and sometimes claustrophobia. An increase in the risk of scalp metastases has not been demonstrated. Proceeding from the South Netherlands Comprehensive Cancer Centre a national working group is put together in order to draw up a national guideline for chemotherapy-induced alopecia.

  8. The Transient Response of Cooling Ponds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, E. Eric

    1982-10-01

    Cooling ponds are a form of closed cycle cooling used for steam-electric power plants. Because of their thermal inertia they provide an advantage over cooling towers in filtering fluctuations in intake temperature, which results in improved plant efficiency. By using linear systems theory, the transient behavior of various types of ponds is analyzed in response to periodic meteorological conditions (characterized by equilibrium temperature) and plant operational conditions (characterized by condenser temperature rise). Frequency response is expressed in terms of dimensionless ratios involving frequency of input forcing, characteristic hydraulic residence and surface response times, and appropriate mixing parameters. Results are also interpreted with respect to physical design variables, such as pond area, depth, degree of stratification, intake submergence, discharge entrance mixing, condenser flow rate, and temperature rise.

  9. Supercritical CO2 Power Cycles: Design Considerations for Concentrating Solar Power

    SciTech Connect

    Neises, Ty; Turchi, Craig

    2014-09-01

    A comparison of three supercritical CO2 Brayton cycles: the simple cycle, recompression cycle and partial-cooling cycle indicates the partial-cooling cycle is favored for use in concentrating solar power (CSP) systems. Although it displays slightly lower cycle efficiency versus the recompression cycle, the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to have lower total recuperator size, as well as a lower maximum s-CO2 temperature in the high-temperature recuperator. Both of these effects reduce recuperator cost. Furthermore, the partial-cooling cycle provides a larger temperature differential across the turbine, which translates into a smaller, more cost-effective thermal energy storage system. The temperature drop across the turbine (and by extension, across a thermal storage system) for the partial-cooling cycle is estimated to be 23% to 35% larger compared to the recompression cycle of equal recuperator conductance between 5 and 15 MW/K. This reduces the size and cost of the thermal storage system. Simulations by NREL and Abengoa Solar indicate the partial-cooling cycle results in a lower LCOE compared with the recompression cycle, despite the former's slightly lower cycle efficiency. Advantages of the recompression cycle include higher thermal efficiency and potential for a smaller precooler. The overall impact favors the use of a partial-cooling cycle for CSP compared to the more commonly analyzed recompression cycle.

  10. Theoretical model for Sub-Doppler Cooling with EIT System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peiru; Tengdin, Phoebe; Anderson, Dana; Rey, Ana Maria; Holland, Murray

    2016-05-01

    We propose a of sub-Doppler cooling mechanism that takes advantage of the unique spectral features and extreme dispersion generated by the so-called Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) effect, a destructive quantum interference phenomenon experienced by atoms with Lambda-shaped energy levels when illuminated by two light fields with appropriate frequencies. By detuning the probe lasers slightly from the ``dark resonance'', we observe that atoms can be significantly cooled down by the strong viscous force within the transparency window, while being just slightly heated by the diffusion caused by the small absorption near resonance. In contrast to polarization gradient cooling or EIT sideband cooling, no external magnetic field or external confining potential are required. Using a semi-classical method, analytical expressions, and numerical simulations, we demonstrate that the proposed EIT cooling method can lead to temperatures well below the Doppler limit. This work is supported by NSF and NIST.

  11. Active skin cooling in conjunction with laser dermatologic surgery.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J S; Majaron, B; Kelly, K M

    2000-12-01

    The clinical objective in the laser treatment of patients with specific dermatoses is to maximize thermal damage to the target chromophore while minimizing injury to the normal skin. Unfortunately, for some lesions, the threshold incident light dosage for epidermal injury can be very close to the threshold for permanent removal of the target chromophore, thus precluding the use of higher light dosages. An important method of overcoming the aforementioned problem is to selectively cool the most superficial layers of the skin. Although melanin absorption will result in heat production during laser exposure, cooling the epidermis can prevent its temperature elevation from exceeding the threshold for thermal injury. Spatially selective cooling can be achieved by active cooling using a cryogen spray or cold sapphire contact handpieces. These devices promote rapid and spatially selective epidermal cooling to low temperatures without affecting the target chromophore temperature before the laser pulse is delivered. Cooling has become an Integral part in the emerging discipline of laser dermatologic surgery. Attend almost any academic dermatology conference and you are likely to find many lectures that relate to cooling during dermatologic laser surgery. Although cooling in conjunction with laser therapy has become the clinical standard for many laser procedures, considerable controversy surrounds this methodology. We present herewith an overview of currently used techniques for active cooling of human skin and explore their advantages and disadvantages in relationship to specific dermatoses amenable to laser therapy.

  12. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  13. Waveguide cooling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B. C. J.; Hartop, R. W.

    1981-04-01

    An improved system is described for cooling high power waveguides by the use of cooling ducts extending along the waveguide, which minimizes hot spots at the flanges where waveguide sections are connected together. The cooling duct extends along substantially the full length of the waveguide section, and each flange at the end of the section has a through hole with an inner end connected to the duct and an opposite end that can be aligned with a flange hole in another waveguide section. Earth flange is formed with a drainage groove in its face, between the through hole and the waveguide conduit to prevent leakage of cooling fluid into the waveguide. The ducts have narrowed sections immediately adjacent to the flanges to provide room for the installation of fasteners closely around the waveguide channel.

  14. Warm and Cool Dinosaurs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mannlein, Sally

    2001-01-01

    Presents an art activity in which first grade students draw dinosaurs in order to learn about the concept of warm and cool colors. Explains how the activity also helped the students learn about the concept of distance when drawing. (CMK)

  15. Why Exercise Is Cool

    MedlinePlus

    ... Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? Why Exercise Is Cool KidsHealth > For Kids > Why Exercise Is ... day and your body will thank you later! Exercise Makes Your Heart Happy You may know that ...

  16. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie.

    1992-01-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  17. Bunched beam stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jie

    1992-09-01

    The scaling laws for bunched-beam stochastic cooling has been derived in terms of the optimum cooling rate and the mixing condition. In the case that particles occupy the entire sinusoidal rf bucket, the optimum cooling rate of the bunched beam is shown to be similar to that predicted from the coasting-beam theory using a beam of the same average density and mixing factor. However, in the case that particles occupy only the center of the bucket, the optimum rate decrease in proportion to the ratio of the bunch area to the bucket area. The cooling efficiency can be significantly improved if the synchrotron side-band spectrum is effectively broadened, e.g. by the transverse tune spread or by using a double rf system.

  18. Evaporative Cooling Membrane Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lomax, Curtis (Inventor); Moskito, John (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An evaporative cooling membrane device is disclosed having a flat or pleated plate housing with an enclosed bottom and an exposed top that is covered with at least one sheet of hydrophobic porous material having a thin thickness so as to serve as a membrane. The hydrophobic porous material has pores with predetermined dimensions so as to resist any fluid in its liquid state from passing therethrough but to allow passage of the fluid in its vapor state, thereby, causing the evaporation of the fluid and the cooling of the remaining fluid. The fluid has a predetermined flow rate. The evaporative cooling membrane device has a channel which is sized in cooperation with the predetermined flow rate of the fluid so as to produce laminar flow therein. The evaporative cooling membrane device provides for the convenient control of the evaporation rates of the circulating fluid by adjusting the flow rates of the laminar flowing fluid.

  19. Laser cooling of solids

    SciTech Connect

    Epstein, Richard I; Sheik-bahae, Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    We present an overview of solid-state optical refrigeration also known as laser cooling in solids by fluorescence upconversion. The idea of cooling a solid-state optical material by simply shining a laser beam onto it may sound counter intuitive but is rapidly becoming a promising technology for future cryocooler. We chart the evolution of this science in rare-earth doped solids and semiconductors.

  20. Refrigerant directly cooled capacitors

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, John S.; Seiber, Larry E.; Marlino, Laura D.; Ayers, Curtis W.

    2007-09-11

    The invention is a direct contact refrigerant cooling system using a refrigerant floating loop having a refrigerant and refrigeration devices. The cooling system has at least one hermetic container disposed in the refrigerant floating loop. The hermetic container has at least one electronic component selected from the group consisting of capacitors, power electronic switches and gating signal module. The refrigerant is in direct contact with the electronic component.

  1. WATER COOLED RETORT COVER

    DOEpatents

    Ash, W.J.; Pozzi, J.F.

    1962-05-01

    A retort cover is designed for use in the production of magnesium metal by the condensation of vaporized metal on a collecting surface. The cover includes a condensing surface, insulating means adjacent to the condensing surface, ind a water-cooled means for the insulating means. The irrangement of insulation and the cooling means permits the magnesium to be condensed at a high temperature and in massive nonpyrophoric form. (AEC)

  2. Mechano-caloric cooling device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Luna, Jack; Abbassi, P.; Carandang, R. M.

    1989-01-01

    The mechano-caloric effect is potentially useful in the He II temperature range. Aside from demonstration work, little quantification effort appears to have been known since other refrigeration possibilities have been available for some time. Successful He II use-related system examples are as follows: in space, the utilization of the latent heat of vaporization has been quite successful in vapor-liquid phase separation (VLPS) in conjunction with thermomechanical force application in plugs. In magnet cooling systems, the possibility of using the mechano-caloric cooling effect in conjunction with thermo-mechanical circulation pump schemes, has been assessed (but not quantified yet to the extent desirable). A third example is quoted in conjunction with superfluid wind tunnel studies and liquid helium tow tank for surface vessels respectively. In all of these (partially future) R and D areas, the question of refrigerator effectiveness using the mechano-caloric effect appears to be relevant, possibly in conjunction with questions of reliability and simplicity. The present work is concerned with quantification of phenomena including simplified thermodynamic cycle calculations.

  3. Performance of an irreversible quantum refrigeration cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ji-Zhou; Ouyang, Wei-Pin; Wu, Xin

    2006-01-01

    A new model of a quantum refrigeration cycle composed of two adiabatic and two isomagnetic field processes is established. The working substance in the cycle consists of many non-interacting spin-1/2 systems. The performance of the cycle is investigated, based on the quantum master equation and semi-group approach. The general expressions of several important performance parameters, such as the coefficient of performance, cooling rate and power input, are given. It is found that the coefficient of performance of this cycle is in the closest analogy to that of the classical Carnot cycle. Furthermore, at high temperatures the optimal relations of the cooling rate and the maximum cooling rate are analysed in detail. Some performance characteristic curves of the cycle are plotted, such as the cooling rate versus the maximum ratio between high and low ``temperatures'' of the working substances, the maximum cooling rate versus the ratio between high and low ``magnetic fields'' and the ``temperature'' ratio between high and low reservoirs. The obtained results are further generalized and discussed, so that they may be directly applied to describing the performance of the quantum refrigerator using spin-J systems as the working substance. Finally, the optimum characteristics of the quantum Carnot and Ericsson refrigeration cycles are derived by analogy.

  4. Polk power station syngas cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, S.D.

    1995-01-01

    Tampa Electric Company (TEC) is in the site development and construction phase of the new Polk Power Station Unit No. 1. This will be the first unit at a new site and will use Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Technology. The unit will utilize Texaco`s oxygen-blown, entrained-flow coal gasification, along with combined cycle power generation, to produce nominal 260MW. Integral to the gasification process is the syngas cooling system. The design, integration, fabrication, transportation, and erection of this equipment have provided and continue to provide major challenges for this project.

  5. Comparing Social Stories™ to Cool versus Not Cool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leaf, Justin B.; Mitchell, Erin; Townley-Cochran, Donna; McEachin, John; Taubman, Mitchell; Leaf, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    In this study we compared the cool versus not cool procedure to Social Stories™ for teaching various social behaviors to one individual diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. The researchers randomly assigned three social skills to the cool versus not cool procedure and three social skills to the Social Stories™ procedure. Naturalistic probes…

  6. Broadband Optical Cooling of Molecular Rotors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lien, Chien-Yu

    Laser cooling of atoms is a widely utilized technique in scientific research, and has been developed over more than three decades. Recently, optically controlling and manipulating the external and internal degrees of freedom of molecules has aroused wide interest in the physics and chemistry communities. However, owing to the more complicated internal structure of molecules, laser cooling of molecules is still underdeveloped. Here we demonstrate cooling the rotation of trapped molecular ions from room temperature to 4 K. The molecule of interest, AlH+, is co-trapped and sympathetically cooled with Ba+ to milliKelvin temperatures in its translational degree of freedom. The nearly diagonal Franck-Condon-Factors between the electronic X and A states of AlH+ create semi-closed cycling transitions between the vibrational ground states of X and A states. A spectrally filtered femtosecond laser is used to optically pump the population to the two lowest rotational levels, with opposite parities, in as little as 100 mus by driving the A-X transition. In addition, a cooling scheme including vibrational relaxation brings the population to the N=0positive-parity level on the order of 100 ms. The population distribution among the rotational levels is detected by resonance-enhanced multiphoton dissociation (REMPD) and time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (TOFMS). This technique opens new avenues to many further studies such as high-precision molecular quantum logic spectroscopy (mQLS) and fundamental constant measurements.

  7. 53. VIEW LOOKING S.E. AT THE CATALYZER BUILDINGS, COOLING SHEDS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    53. VIEW LOOKING S.E. AT THE CATALYZER BUILDINGS, COOLING SHEDS AND ABSORPTION BUILDINGS IN THE BACKGROUND. MAY 29, 1919. - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. Cool Flame Quenching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Howard; Chapek, Richard

    2001-01-01

    Cool flame quenching distances are generally presumed to be larger than those associated with hot flames, because the quenching distance scales with the inverse of the flame propagation speed, and cool flame propagation speeds are often times slower than those associated with hot flames. To date, this presumption has never been put to a rigorous test, because unstirred, non-isothermal cool flame studies on Earth are complicated by natural convection. Moreover, the critical Peclet number (Pe) for quenching of cool flames has never been established and may not be the same as that associated with wall quenching due to conduction heat loss in hot flames, Pe approx. = 40-60. The objectives of this ground-based study are to: (1) better understand the role of conduction heat loss and species diffusion on cool flame quenching (i.e., Lewis number effects), (2) determine cool flame quenching distances (i.e, critical Peclet number, Pe) for different experimental parameters and vessel surface pretreatments, and (3) understand the mechanisms that govern the quenching distances in premixtures that support cool flames as well as hot flames induced by spark-ignition. Objective (3) poses a unique fire safety hazard if conditions exist where cool flame quenching distances are smaller than those associated with hot flames. For example, a significant, yet unexplored risk, can occur if a multi-stage ignition (a cool flame that transitions to a hot flame) occurs in a vessel size that is smaller than that associated with the hot quenching distance. To accomplish the above objectives, a variety of hydrocarbon-air mixtures will be tested in a static reactor at elevated temperature in the laboratory (1g). In addition, reactions with chemical induction times that are sufficiently short will be tested aboard NASA's KC-135 microgravity (mu-g) aircraft. The mu-g results will be compared to a numerical model that includes species diffusion, heat conduction, and a skeletal kinetic mechanism

  9. Solar-Heated and Cooled Office Building--Columbus, Ohio

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1982-01-01

    Final report documents solar-energy system installed in office building to provide space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. Collectors mounted on roof track Sun and concentrate rays on fluid-circulating tubes. Collected energy is distributed to hot-water-fired absorption chiller and space-heating and domestic-hot-water preheating systems.

  10. Cool WISPs for stellar cooling excesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giannotti, Maurizio; Irastorza, Igor; Redondo, Javier; Ringwald, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Several stellar systems (white dwarfs, red giants, horizontal branch stars and possibly the neutron star in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A) show a mild preference for a non-standard cooling mechanism when compared with theoretical models. This exotic cooling could be provided by Weakly Interacting Slim Particles (WISPs), produced in the hot cores and abandoning the star unimpeded, contributing directly to the energy loss. Taken individually, these excesses do not show a strong statistical weight. However, if one mechanism could consistently explain several of them, the hint could be significant. We analyze the hints in terms of neutrino anomalous magnetic moments, minicharged particles, hidden photons and axion-like particles (ALPs). Among them, the ALP or a massless HP represent the best solution. Interestingly, the hinted ALP parameter space is accessible to the next generation proposed ALP searches, such as ALPS II and IAXO and the massless HP requires a multi TeV energy scale of new physics that might be accessible at the LHC.

  11. Mg II Chromospheric Emission Line Bisectors Of HD39801 And Its Relation With The Activity Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García García, Leonardo Enrique; Pérez Martínez, M. Isabel

    2016-07-01

    Betelgeuse is a cool star of spectral type M and luminosity class I. In the present work, the activity cycle of Betelgeuse was obtained from the integrated emission flux of the Mg II H and K lines, using more than 250 spectra taken from the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) online database. Of which it was found, based on a Lomb Scargle periodogram, a cycle of 16 years, along with 2 sub-cycles with a period of the order of 0.60 and 0.65 years, which may be due to turbulence or possible stellar flares. In addition, an analysis of line asymmetry was made by means of the chromospheric emission line bisectors, due to the strong self-absorption observed in this lines, the blue and red wings were analyzed independently. In order to measure such asymmetry, a "line shift" was calculated, from which several cycles of variability were obtained from a Lomb Scargle periodogram, spanning from few months to 4 years. In the sense, the most significant cycle is about 0.44 and 0.33 years in the blue and red wing respectively. It is worth noting, that the rotation period of the star doesn't play an important role in the variability of the Mg II lines. This technique provides us with a new way to study activity cycles of evolved stars.

  12. Carrier cooling in colloidal quantum wells.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Matthew; Ithurria, Sandrine; Schaller, Richard D; Dolzhnikov, Dmitriy S; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2012-12-12

    It has recently become possible to chemically synthesize atomically flat semiconductor nanoplatelets with monolayer-precision control over the platelet thickness. It has been suggested that these platelets are quantum wells; that is, carriers in these platelets are confined in one dimension but are free to move in the other two dimensions. Here, we report time-resolved photoluminescence and transient-absorption measurements of carrier relaxation that confirm the quantum-well nature of these nanomaterials. Excitation of the nanoplatelets by an intense laser pulse results in the formation of a high-temperature carrier population that cools back down to ambient temperature on the time scale of several picoseconds. The rapid carrier cooling indicates that the platelets are well-suited for optoelectronic applications such as lasers and modulators.

  13. X ray opacity in cluster cooling flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Michael W.; Sarazin, Craig L.

    1993-01-01

    We have calculated the emergent x-ray properties for a set of spherically symmetric, steady-state cluster cooling flow models including the effects of radiative transfer. Opacity due to resonant x-ray lines, photoelectric absorption, and electron scattering have been included in these calculations, and homogeneous and inhomogeneous gas distributions were considered. The effects of photoionization opacity are small for both types of models. In contrast, resonant line optical depths can be quite high in both homogeneous and inhomogeneous models. The presence of turbulence in the gas can significantly lower the line opacity. We find that integrated x-ray spectra for the flow cooling now are only slightly affected by radiative transfer effects. However x-ray line surface brightness profiles can be dramatically affected by radiative transfer. Line profiles are also strongly affected by transfer effects. The combined effects of opacity and inflow cause many of the lines in optically thick models to be asymmetrical.

  14. Menstrual Cycle

    MedlinePlus

    ... receive Pregnancy email updates Enter email Submit The menstrual cycle Day 1 starts with the first day of ... drop around Day 25 . This signals the next menstrual cycle to begin. The egg will break apart and ...

  15. Coronal Structures in Cool Stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliversen, Ronald (Technical Monitor); Dupree, Andrea K.

    2005-01-01

    We have extended our study of the structure of coronas in cool stars to very young stars still accreting from their surrounding disks. In addition we are pursing the connection between coronal X-rays and a powerful diagnostic line in the infrared, the He I 10830Angstrom transition of helium. Highlights of these are summarized below including publications during this reporting period and presentations. Spectroscopy of the infrared He I (lambda10830) line with KECK/NIRSPEC and IRTF/CSHELL and of the ultraviolet C III (lambda977) and O VI (lambda1032) emission with FUSE reveals that the classical T Tauri star TW Hydrae exhibits P Cygni profiles, line asymmetries, and absorption indicative of a continuous, fast (approximately 400 kilometers per second), hot (approximately 300,000 K) accelerating outflow with a mass loss rate approximately 10(exp -11)-10(exp -12) solar mass yr(sup -1) or larger. Spectra of T Tauri N appear consistent with such a wind. The source of the emission and outflow seems restricted to the stars themselves. Although the mass accretion rate is an order of magnitude less for TW Hya than for T Tau, the outflow reaches higher velocities at chromospheric temperatures in TW Hya. Winds from young stellar objects may be substantially hotter and faster than previously thought. The ultraviolet emission lines, when corrected for absorption are broad. Emission associated with the accretion flow and shock is likely to show turbulent broadening. We note that the UV line widths are significantly larger than the X-ray line widths. If the X-rays from TW Hya are generated at the accretion shock, the UV lines may not be directly associated with the shock. On the other hand, studies of X-ray emission in young star clusters, suggest that the strength of the X-ray emission is correlated with stellar rotation, thus casting doubt on an accretion origin for the X-rays. We are beginning to access the infrared spectral region where the He I 108308Angstroms transition

  16. Advanced heat pump cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Groll, E.A.; Radermacher, R.

    1993-07-01

    The desorption and absorption process of a vapor compression heat pump with a solution circuit (VCHSC) proceeds at gliding temperature intervals, which can be adjusted over a wide range. In case that the gliding temperature intervals in the desorber and the absorber overlap, a modification of the VCHSC employing a desorber/absorber heat exchange (DAHX) can be introduced, which results in an extreme reduction of the pressure ratio. Although the DAHX-cycle has features of a two-stage cycle, it still requires only one solution pump, one separator and one compressor. Such a cycle for the working pair ammonia/water is built in the Energy Laboratory of the Center for Environmental Energy Engineering at the University of Maryland. The experimental results obtained with the research plant are discussed and compared to those calculated with a simulation program. The possible temperature lift between heat source and heat sink depending on the achievable COP are presented.

  17. Cooling in a compound bucket

    SciTech Connect

    Shemyakin, A.; Bhat, C.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Burov, A.; Hu, M.; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    Electron cooling in the Fermilab Recycler ring is found to create correlation between longitudinal and transverse tails of the antiproton distribution. By separating the core of the beam from the tail and cooling the tail using 'gated' stochastic cooling while applying electron cooling on the entire beam, one may be able to significantly increase the overall cooling rate. In this paper, we describe the procedure and first experimental results.

  18. Effects of Pulsing on Film Cooling of Gas Turbine Airfoils

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-09

    turbine engine . 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 70 14. SUBJECT TERMS: Turbine blade ; Film cooling ; Pulsed jet 16. PRICE CODE 17...with additional research, ultimately allowing for an increased efficiency in a gas turbine engine . 2 Keywords Turbine blade Film cooling Pulsed jet ... engine for aircraft propulsion…………………. 11 Figure 2: Thermodynamic cycle of a general turbine engine . ………………………..…… 11

  19. System and method for cooling a combustion gas charge

    DOEpatents

    Massey, Mary Cecelia; Boberg, Thomas Earl

    2010-05-25

    The present invention relates to a system and method for cooling a combustion gas charge prior. The combustion gas charge may include compressed intake air, exhaust gas, or a mixture thereof. An evaporator is provided that may then receive a relatively high temperature combustion gas charge and discharge at a relatively lower temperature. The evaporator may be configured to operate with refrigeration cycle components and/or to receive a fluid below atmospheric pressure as the phase-change cooling medium.

  20. Monitoring Cray Cooling Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Maxwell, Don E; Ezell, Matthew A; Becklehimer, Jeff; Donovan, Matthew J; Layton, Christopher C

    2014-01-01

    While sites generally have systems in place to monitor the health of Cray computers themselves, often the cooling systems are ignored until a computer failure requires investigation into the source of the failure. The Liebert XDP units used to cool the Cray XE/XK models as well as the Cray proprietary cooling system used for the Cray XC30 models provide data useful for health monitoring. Unfortunately, this valuable information is often available only to custom solutions not accessible by a center-wide monitoring system or is simply ignored entirely. In this paper, methods and tools used to harvest the monitoring data available are discussed, and the implementation needed to integrate the data into a center-wide monitoring system at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is provided.

  1. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, Paul F.; Cooke, Franklin E.; Fitch, James R.

    1994-01-01

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA.

  2. Passive containment cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Billig, P.F.; Cooke, F.E.; Fitch, J.R.

    1994-01-25

    A passive containment cooling system includes a containment vessel surrounding a reactor pressure vessel and defining a drywell therein containing a non-condensable gas. An enclosed wetwell pool is disposed inside the containment vessel, and a gravity driven cooling system (GDCS) pool is disposed above the wetwell pool in the containment vessel and is vented to the drywell. An isolation pool is disposed above the GDCS pool and includes an isolation condenser therein. The condenser has an inlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for receiving the non-condensable gas along with any steam released therein following a loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA). The condenser also has an outlet line disposed in flow communication with the drywell for returning to the drywell both liquid condensate produced upon cooling of the steam and the non-condensable gas for reducing pressure within the containment vessel following the LOCA. 1 figure.

  3. Cooling of neutron stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pethick, C. J.

    1992-01-01

    It is at present impossible to predict the interior constitution of neutron stars based on theory and results from laboratory studies. It has been proposed that it is possible to obtain information on neutron star interiors by studying thermal radiation from their surfaces, because neutrino emission rates, and hence the temperature of the central part of a neutron star, depend on the properties of dense matter. The theory predicts that neutron stars cool relatively slowly if their cores are made up of nucleons, and cool faster if the matter is in an exotic state, such as a pion condensate, a kaon condensate, or quark matter. This view has recently been questioned by the discovery of a number of other processes that could lead to copious neutrino emission and rapid cooling.

  4. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ,M.BRENNAN,J.M.CAMERON,P.WEI,J.

    2003-05-12

    Emittance growth due to Intra-Beam Scattering significantly reduces the heavy ion luminosity lifetime in RHIC. Stochastic cooling of the stored beam could improve things considerably by counteracting IBS and preventing particles from escaping the rf bucket [1]. High frequency bunched-beam stochastic cooling is especially challenging but observations of Schottky signals in the 4-8 GHz band indicate that conditions are favorable in RHIC [2]. We report here on measurements of the longitudinal beam transfer function carried out with a pickup kicker pair on loan from FNAL TEVATRON. Results imply that for ions a coasting beam description is applicable and we outline some general features of a viable momentum cooling system for RHIC.

  5. Research on cooling effectiveness in stepped slot film cooling vane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yulong; Wu, Hong; Zhou, Feng; Rong, Chengjun

    2016-06-01

    As one of the most important developments in air cooling technology for hot parts of the aero-engine, film cooling technology has been widely used. Film cooling hole structure exists mainly in areas that have high temperature, uneven cooling effectiveness issues when in actual use. The first stage turbine vanes of the aero-engine consume the largest portion of cooling air, thereby the research on reducing the amount of cooling air has the greatest potential. A new stepped slot film cooling vane with a high cooling effectiveness and a high cooling uniformity was researched initially. Through numerical methods, the affecting factors of the cooling effectiveness of a vane with the stepped slot film cooling structure were researched. This paper focuses on the cooling effectiveness and the pressure loss in different blowing ratio conditions, then the most reasonable and scientific structure parameter can be obtained by analyzing the results. The results show that 1.0 mm is the optimum slot width and 10.0 is the most reasonable blowing ratio. Under this condition, the vane achieved the best cooling result and the highest cooling effectiveness, and also retained a low pressure loss.

  6. Combustor liner cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Lacy, Benjamin Paul; Berkman, Mert Enis

    2013-08-06

    A combustor liner is disclosed. The combustor liner includes an upstream portion, a downstream end portion extending from the upstream portion along a generally longitudinal axis, and a cover layer associated with an inner surface of the downstream end portion. The downstream end portion includes the inner surface and an outer surface, the inner surface defining a plurality of microchannels. The downstream end portion further defines a plurality of passages extending between the inner surface and the outer surface. The plurality of microchannels are fluidly connected to the plurality of passages, and are configured to flow a cooling medium therethrough, cooling the combustor liner.

  7. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2004-11-02

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  8. Anomalous law of cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-01

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  9. Anomalous law of cooling.

    PubMed

    Lapas, Luciano C; Ferreira, Rogelma M S; Rubí, J Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton's law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  10. Superconductor rotor cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Gamble, Bruce B.; Sidi-Yekhlef, Ahmed; Schwall, Robert E.; Driscoll, David I.; Shoykhet, Boris A.

    2002-01-01

    A system for cooling a superconductor device includes a cryocooler located in a stationary reference frame and a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with a rotating reference frame in which the superconductor device is located. A method of cooling a superconductor device includes locating a cryocooler in a stationary reference frame, and transferring heat from a superconductor device located in a rotating reference frame to the cryocooler through a closed circulation system external to the cryocooler. The closed circulation system interfaces the stationary reference frame with the rotating reference frame.

  11. Anomalous law of cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Lapas, Luciano C.; Ferreira, Rogelma M. S.; Rubí, J. Miguel; Oliveira, Fernando A.

    2015-03-14

    We analyze the temperature relaxation phenomena of systems in contact with a thermal reservoir that undergoes a non-Markovian diffusion process. From a generalized Langevin equation, we show that the temperature is governed by a law of cooling of the Newton’s law type in which the relaxation time depends on the velocity autocorrelation and is then characterized by the memory function. The analysis of the temperature decay reveals the existence of an anomalous cooling in which the temperature may oscillate. Despite this anomalous behavior, we show that the variation of entropy remains always positive in accordance with the second law of thermodynamics.

  12. Hybrid Cooling for Geothermal Power Plants: Final ARRA Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathan, D.

    2013-06-01

    Many binary-cycle geothermal plants use air as the heat rejection medium. Usually this is accomplished by using an air-cooled condenser (ACC) system to condense the vapor of the working fluid in the cycle. Many air-cooled plants suffer a loss of production capacity of up to 50% during times of high ambient temperatures. Use of limited amounts of water to supplement the performance of ACCs is investigated. Deluge cooling is found to be one of the least-cost options. Limiting the use of water in such an application to less than one thousand operating hours per year can boost plant output during critical high-demand periods while minimizing water use in binary-cycle geothermal power plants.

  13. Vesicular transport and apotransferrin in intestinal iron absorption, as shown in the Caco-2 cell model.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Mizue; Linder, Maria C

    2006-02-01

    The potential roles of vesicular transport and apotransferrin (entering from the blood) in intestinal Fe absorption were investigated using Caco-2 cell monolayers with tight junctions in bicameral chambers as a model. As shown previously, addition of 39 microM apotransferrin (apoTf) to the basolateral fluid during absorption studies markedly stimulated overall transport of 1 microM (59)Fe from the apical to the basal chamber and stimulated its basolateral release from prelabeled cells, implicating endo- and exocytosis. Rates of transport more than doubled. Uptake was also stimulated, but only 20%. Specific inhibitors of aspects of vesicular trafficking were applied to determine their potential effects on uptake, retention, and basolateral (overall) transport of (59)Fe. Nocodazole and 5'-(4-fluorosulfonylbenzoyl)-adenosine each reduced uptake and basolateral transport up to 50%. Brefeldin A inhibited about 10%. Tyrphostin A8 (AG10) reduced uptake 35% but markedly stimulated basolateral efflux, particularly that dependent on apoTf. Cooling of cells to 4 degrees C (which causes depolymerization of microtubules and lowers energy availability) profoundly inhibited uptake and basolateral transfer of Fe (7- to 12-fold). Apical efflux (which was substantial) was not temperature affected. Our results support the involvement of apoTf cycling in intestinal Fe absorption and indicate that as much as half of the iron uses apoTf and non-apoTf-dependent vesicular pathways to cross the basolateral membrane and brush border of enterocytes.

  14. A lightweight ambient air-cooling unit for use in hazardous environments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y T; Constable, S H; Bomalaski, S H

    1997-01-01

    Recent research demonstrated (a) the effectiveness of intermittent conditioned air cooling during rest breaks to significantly reduce cumulative heat storage and (b) that longer work sessions were possible for individuals wearing chemical defense ensembles. To further advance this concept, a strategy for implementing continuous air cooling was conceived; ambient air cooling was added during work cycles and conditioned air cooling was delivered during rest periods. A compact battery-powered beltpack cooling unit (3.9 kg) designed and made at the U.S. Air Force Armstrong Laboratory was used to deliver 5.7 L/sec filtered ambient air during work cycles: 4.7 L/sec to the body and 1 L/sec to the face. Five experimental cycles were conducted in a thermally controlled chamber under warm conditions (32 degrees C, 40% relative humidity) with (1) no cooling-intermittent work, (2) intermittent cooling, (3) continuous cooling during intermittent exercise, and (4) no cooling-continuous work and (5) ambient air cooling during continuous exercise. Intermittent, conditioned, and continuous air cooling resulted in significant reductions in rectal temperature, mean skin temperature, and heart rate as compared with the no-cooling trials. The continuous air-cooling trial significantly improved thermal comfort and sweat evaporation. Results suggest that ambient air delivered during work cycles by a lightweight portable unit (in conjunction with conditioned air delivered during rest periods), can definitely improve personal comfort, reduce skin temperature, and decrease the cumulative fatigue common to repeated work/rest cycles in selected military and industrial applications in which individuals work in chemical defense ensembles.

  15. Proposal for Laser Cooling of Complex Polyatomic Molecules.

    PubMed

    Kozyryev, Ivan; Baum, Louis; Matsuda, Kyle; Doyle, John M

    2016-11-18

    An experimentally feasible strategy for direct laser cooling of polyatomic molecules with six or more atoms is presented. Our approach relies on the attachment of a metal atom to a complex molecule, where it acts as an active photon cycling site. We describe a laser cooling scheme for alkaline earth monoalkoxide free radicals taking advantage of the phase space compression of a cryogenic buffer-gas beam. Possible applications are presented including laser cooling of chiral molecules and slowing of molecular beams using coherent photon processes.

  16. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong n8 band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  17. First Ground-Based Infrared Solar Absorption Measurements of Free Tropospheric Methanol (CH3OH): Multidecade Infrared Time Series from Kitt Peak (31.9 deg N 111.6 deg W): Trend, Seasonal Cycle, and Comparison with Previous Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, Curtis P.; Mahieu, Emmanuel; Chiou, Linda; Herbin, Herve

    2009-01-01

    Atmospheric CH3OH (methanol) free tropospheric (2.09-14-km altitude) time series spanning 22 years has been analyzed on the basis of high-spectral resolution infrared solar absorption spectra of the strong vs band recorded from the U.S. National Solar Observatory on Kitt Peak (latitude 31.9degN, 111.6degW, 2.09-km altitude) with a 1-m Fourier transform spectrometer (FTS). The measurements span October 1981 to December 2003 and are the first long time series of CH3OH measurements obtained from the ground. The results were analyzed with SFIT2 version 3.93 and show a factor of three variations with season, a maximum at the beginning of July, a winter minimum, and no statistically significant long-term trend over the measurement time span.

  18. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N -2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  19. Multistage quantum absorption heat pumps.

    PubMed

    Correa, Luis A

    2014-04-01

    It is well known that heat pumps, while being all limited by the same basic thermodynamic laws, may find realization on systems as "small" and "quantum" as a three-level maser. In order to quantitatively assess how the performance of these devices scales with their size, we design generalized N-dimensional ideal heat pumps by merging N-2 elementary three-level stages. We set them to operate in the absorption chiller mode between given hot and cold baths and study their maximum achievable cooling power and the corresponding efficiency as a function of N. While the efficiency at maximum power is roughly size-independent, the power itself slightly increases with the dimension, quickly saturating to a constant. Thus, interestingly, scaling up autonomous quantum heat pumps does not render a significant enhancement beyond the optimal double-stage configuration.

  20. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    PubMed Central

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators. PMID:24492860

  1. Quantum-enhanced absorption refrigerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correa, Luis A.; Palao, José P.; Alonso, Daniel; Adesso, Gerardo

    2014-02-01

    Thermodynamics is a branch of science blessed by an unparalleled combination of generality of scope and formal simplicity. Based on few natural assumptions together with the four laws, it sets the boundaries between possible and impossible in macroscopic aggregates of matter. This triggered groundbreaking achievements in physics, chemistry and engineering over the last two centuries. Close analogues of those fundamental laws are now being established at the level of individual quantum systems, thus placing limits on the operation of quantum-mechanical devices. Here we study quantum absorption refrigerators, which are driven by heat rather than external work. We establish thermodynamic performance bounds for these machines and investigate their quantum origin. We also show how those bounds may be pushed beyond what is classically achievable, by suitably tailoring the environmental fluctuations via quantum reservoir engineering techniques. Such superefficient quantum-enhanced cooling realises a promising step towards the technological exploitation of autonomous quantum refrigerators.

  2. Curved film cooling admission tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, R. W.; Papell, S. S. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    Effective film cooling to protect a wall surface from a hot fluid which impinges on or flows along the surface is provided. A film of cooling fluid having increased area is provided by changing the direction of a stream of cooling fluid through an angle of from 135 deg. to 165 deg. before injecting it through the wall into the hot flowing gas. The 1, cooling fluid is injected from an orifice through a wall into a hot flowing gas at an angle to form a cooling fluid film. Cooling fluid is supplied to the orifice from a cooling fluid source via a turbulence control passageway having a curved portion between two straight portions. The angle through which the direction of the cooling fluid is turned results in less mixing of the cooling fluid with the hot gas, thereby substantially increasing the length of the film in a downstream direction.

  3. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, Kent Goran; McLaurin, Leroy Dixon; Bertsch, Oran Leroy; Lowe, Perry Eugene

    1998-01-01

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn.

  4. Turbomachine rotor with improved cooling

    DOEpatents

    Hultgren, K.G.; McLaurin, L.D.; Bertsch, O.L.; Lowe, P.E.

    1998-05-26

    A gas turbine rotor has an essentially closed loop cooling air scheme in which cooling air drawn from the compressor discharge air that is supplied to the combustion chamber is further compressed, cooled, and then directed to the aft end of the turbine rotor. Downstream seal rings attached to the downstream face of each rotor disc direct the cooling air over the downstream disc face, thereby cooling it, and then to cooling air passages formed in the rotating blades. Upstream seal rings attached to the upstream face of each disc direct the heated cooling air away from the blade root while keeping the disc thermally isolated from the heated cooling air. From each upstream seal ring, the heated cooling air flows through passages in the upstream discs and is then combined and returned to the combustion chamber from which it was drawn. 5 figs.

  5. MHD Integrated Topping Cycle Project

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    This eighteenth quarterly technical progress report of the MHD Integrated Topping cycle Project presents the accomplishments during the period November 1, 1991 to January 31, 1992. The precombustor is fully assembled. Manufacturing of all slagging stage components has been completed. All cooling panels were welded in place and the panel/shell gap was filled with RTV. Final combustor assembly is in progress. The low pressure cooling subsystem (LPCS) was delivered to the CDIF. Second stage brazing issues were resolved. The construction of the two anode power cabinets was completed.

  6. Variants of closing the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Andrianova, E. A. Davidenko, V. D.; Tsibulskiy, V. F.; Tsibulskiy, S. V.

    2015-12-15

    Influence of the nuclear energy structure, the conditions of fuel burnup, and accumulation of new fissile isotopes from the raw isotopes on the main parameters of a closed fuel cycle is considered. The effects of the breeding ratio, the cooling time of the spent fuel in the external fuel cycle, and the separation of the breeding area and the fissile isotope burning area on the parameters of the fuel cycle are analyzed.

  7. Active cooling requirements for propellant storage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Recent NASA and DOD mission models have indicated future needs for orbital cryogenic storage and supply systems. Two thermal control systems which show the greatest promise for improving propellant storage life were evaluated. One system was an open cycle thermodynamic vent type with a refrigeration system for partial hydrogen reliquefaction located at the LH2 tank and a vapor cooled shield for integrated and non-integrated tank designs to reduce boiloff. The other was a closed system with direct refrigeration at the LH2 tank. A reversed Brayton cycle unit was baselined for the propellant processor. It is concluded that: (1) reliquefaction systems are not attractive for minimizing propellant boiloff; (2) open cycle systems may not be economically attractive for long term storage; (3) a number of refrigeration systems are available to assist in the long term storage of cryogenic propellants; and (4) shields can significantly improve the performance of mechanical coolers.

  8. Nanofibrous membrane-based absorption refrigeration system

    SciTech Connect

    Isfahani, RN; Sampath, K; Moghaddam, S

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents a study on the efficacy of highly porous nanofibrous membranes for application in membrane-based absorbers and desorbers. Permeability studies showed that membranes with a pore size greater than about one micron have a sufficient permeability for application in the absorber heat exchanger. Membranes with smaller pores were found to be adequate for the desorber heat exchanger. The membranes were implemented in experimental membrane-based absorber and desorber modules and successfully tested. Parametric studies were conducted on both absorber and desorber processes. Studies on the absorption process were focused on the effects of water vapor pressure, cooling water temperature, and the solution velocity on the absorption rate. Desorption studies were conducted on the effects of wall temperature, vapor and solution pressures, and the solution velocity on the desorption rate. Significantly higher absorption and desorption rates than in the falling film absorbers and desorbers were achieved. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasser, M. G.; Sherman, A.; Studer, P. A.; Daniels, A.; Goldowsky, M. P. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A long lifetime Stirling cycle cryogenic cooler particularly adapted for space applications is described. It consists of a compressor section centrally aligned end to end with an expansion section, and respectively includes a reciprocating compressor piston and displacer radially suspended in interconnecting cylindrical housings by active magnetic bearings and has adjacent reduced clearance regions so as to be in noncontacting relationship therewith and wherein one or more of these regions operate as clearance seals. The piston and displacer are reciprocated in their housings by linear drive motors to vary the volume of respectively adjacent compression and expansion spaces which contain a gaseous working fluid and a thermal regenerator to effect Stirling cycle cryogenic cooling.

  10. Rotating diffuser for pressure recovery in a steam cooling circuit of a gas turbine

    DOEpatents

    Eldrid, Sacheverel Q.; Salamah, Samir A.; DeStefano, Thomas Daniel

    2002-01-01

    The buckets of a gas turbine are steam-cooled via a bore tube assembly having concentric supply and spent cooling steam return passages rotating with the rotor. A diffuser is provided in the return passage to reduce the pressure drop. In a combined cycle system, the spent return cooling steam with reduced pressure drop is combined with reheat steam from a heat recovery steam generator for flow to the intermediate pressure turbine. The exhaust steam from the high pressure turbine of the combined cycle unit supplies cooling steam to the supply conduit of the gas turbine.

  11. Measure Guideline: Ventilation Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Springer, D.; Dakin, B.; German, A.

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of this measure guideline is to provide information on a cost-effective solution for reducing cooling system energy and demand in homes located in hot-dry and cold-dry climates. This guideline provides a prescriptive approach that outlines qualification criteria, selection considerations, and design and installation procedures.

  12. Transpiration Cooling Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Ries, Heidi R.; Scotti, Stephen J.; Choi, Sang H.

    1997-01-01

    The transpiration cooling method was considered for a scram-jet engine to accommodate thermally the situation where a very high heat flux (200 Btu/sq. ft sec) from hydrogen fuel combustion process is imposed to the engine walls. In a scram-jet engine, a small portion of hydrogen fuel passes through the porous walls of the engine combustor to cool the engine walls and at the same time the rest passes along combustion chamber walls and is preheated. Such a regenerative system promises simultaneously cooling of engine combustor and preheating the cryogenic fuel. In the experiment, an optical heating method was used to provide a heat flux of 200 Btu/sq. ft sec to the cylindrical surface of a porous stainless steel specimen which carried helium gas. The cooling efficiencies by transpiration were studied for specimens with various porosity. The experiments of various test specimens under high heat flux have revealed a phenomenon that chokes the medium flow when passing through a porous structure. This research includes the analysis of the system and a scaling conversion study that interprets the results from helium into the case when hydrogen medium is used.

  13. Designing Cool Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A NASA SBIR contract served as the beginning for the development of Daat Research Corporation's Coolit software. Coolit is a unique computational fluid dynamics (CFD) application aimed at thermal and cooling design problems. Coolit can generate 3-D representations of the thermofluid environment and "sketch" the component on the computer. The software modeling reduces time and effort in prototype building and testing.

  14. Warm and Cool Cityscapes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jubelirer, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    Painting cityscapes is a great way to teach first-grade students about warm and cool colors. Before the painting begins, the author and her class have an in-depth discussion about big cities and what types of buildings or structures that might be seen in them. They talk about large apartment and condo buildings, skyscrapers, art museums,…

  15. Brain cooling therapy.

    PubMed

    Gancia, P; Pomero, G

    2010-06-01

    Therapeutic hypothermia (whole body or selective head cooling) is becoming standard of care for brain injury in infants with perinatal hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE). Brain cooling reduces the rate of apoptosis and early necrosis, reduces cerebral metabolic rate and the release of nitric oxide and free radicals. Animal models of perinatal brain injury show histological and functional improvement due to of early hypothermia. The brain protection depends on the temperature and time delay between insult and beginning of treatment (more effective with cooling to 33 +/- 0.5 degrees C, and less than 6 hours after hypoxic-ischemic insult). Recent meta-analyses and systematic reviews in human neonates show reduction in mortality and long-term neurodevelopmental disability at 12-24 months of age, with more favourable effects in the less severe forms of HIE. The authors describe their experience in 53 term newborns with moderate-severe HIE treated with whole body cooling between 2001 and 2009, and studied with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and general movements (GMs) assessment. The creation of a network connecting the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit with the level I-II hospitals of the reference area, as part of regional network, is of paramount importance to enroll potential candidates and to start therapeutic hypothermia within optimal time window.

  16. Guide to Cool Roofs

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-01

    Traditional dark-colored roofing materials absorb sunlight, making them warm in the sun and increasing the need for air conditioning. White or special "cool color" roofs absorb less sunlight, stay cooler in the sun and transmit less heat into the building.

  17. ELECTRON COOLING FOR RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI,I.

    2001-05-13

    The Accelerator Collider Department (CAD) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is operating the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which includes the dual-ring, 3.834 km circumference superconducting collider and the venerable AGS as the last part of the RHIC injection chain. CAD is planning on a luminosity upgrade of the machine under the designation RHIC II. One important component of the RHIC II upgrade is electron cooling of RHIC gold ion beams. For this purpose, BNL and the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics in Novosibirsk entered into a collaboration aimed initially at the development of the electron cooling conceptual design, resolution of technical issues, and finally extend the collaboration towards the construction and commissioning of the cooler. Many of the results presented in this paper are derived from the Electron Cooling for RHIC Design Report [1], produced by the, BINP team within the framework of this collaboration. BNL is also collaborating with Fermi National Laboratory, Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility and the University of Indiana on various aspects of electron cooling.

  18. Stability of cooled beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosser, J.; Carli, C.; Chanel, M.; Madsen, N.; Maury, S.; Möhl, D.; Tranquille, G.

    2000-02-01

    Because of their high density together with extremely small spreads in betatron frequency and momentum, cooled beams are very vulnerable to incoherent and coherent space-charge effects and instabilities. Moreover, the cooling system itself, i.e. the electron beam in the case of e-cooling, presents large linear and non-linear "impedances" to the circulating ion beam, in addition to the usual beam-environment coupling impedances of the storage ring. Beam blow-up and losses, attributed to such effects, have been observed in virtually all the existing electron cooling rings. The adverse effects seem to be more pronounced in those rings, like CELSIUS, that are equipped with a cooler capable of reaching the presently highest energy (100-300 keV electrons corresponding to 180-560 MeV protons). The stability conditions will be revisited with emphasis on the experience gained at LEAR. It will be argued that for all present coolers, three conditions are necessary (although probably not sufficient) for the stability of intense cold beams: (i) operation below transition energy, (ii) active damping to counteract coherent instability, and (iii) careful control of the e-beam neutralisation. An extrapolation to the future "medium energy coolers", planned to work for (anti)protons of several GeV, will also be attempted.

  19. Elementary stochastic cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Tollestrup, A.V.; Dugan, G

    1983-12-01

    Major headings in this review include: proton sources; antiproton production; antiproton sources and Liouville, the role of the Debuncher; transverse stochastic cooling, time domain; the accumulator; frequency domain; pickups and kickers; Fokker-Planck equation; calculation of constants in the Fokker-Planck equation; and beam feedback. (GHT)

  20. Use of a temperature-initiated passive cooling system (TIPACS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor cavity cooling system (RCCS)

    SciTech Connect

    Forsberg, C.W.; Conklin, J.; Reich, W.J.

    1994-04-01

    A new type of passive cooling system has been invented (Forsberg 1993): the Temperature-Initiated Passive Cooling System (TIPACS). The characteristics of the TIPACS potentially match requirements for an improved reactor-cavity-cooling system (RCCS) for the modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). This report is an initial evaluation of the TIPACS for the MHTGR with a Rankines (steam) power conversion cycle. Limited evaluations were made of applying the TIPACS to MHTGRs with reactor pressure vessel temperatures up to 450 C. These temperatures may occur in designs of Brayton cycle (gas turbine) and process heat MHTGRs. The report is structured as follows. Section 2 describes the containment cooling issues associated with the MHTGR and the requirements for such a cooling system. Section 3 describes TIPACS in nonmathematical terms. Section 4 describes TIPACS`s heat-removal capabilities. Section 5 analyzes the operation of the temperature-control mechanism that determines under what conditions the TIPACS rejects heat to the environment. Section 6 addresses other design and operational issues. Section 7 identifies uncertainties, and Section 8 provides conclusions. The appendixes provide the detailed data and models used in the analysis.

  1. Effect of tropospheric aerosols upon atmospheric infrared cooling rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan, MR.; Cess, R. D.

    1978-01-01

    The effect of tropospheric aerosols on atmospheric infrared cooling rates is investigated by the use of recent models of infrared gaseous absorption. A radiative model of the atmosphere that incorporates dust as an absorber and scatterer of infrared radiation is constructed by employing the exponential kernel approximation to the radiative transfer equation. Scattering effects are represented in terms of a single scattering albedo and an asymmetry factor. The model is applied to estimate the effect of an aerosol layer made of spherical quartz particles on the infrared cooling rate. Calculations performed for a reference wavelength of 0.55 microns show an increased greenhouse effect, where the net upward flux at the surface is reduced by 10% owing to the strongly enhanced downward emission. There is a substantial increase in the cooling rate near the surface, but the mean cooling rate throughout the lower troposphere was only 10%.

  2. Consider the cold facts about steam-jet vacuum cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Decker, L.O. )

    1993-01-01

    This article compares the advantages of steam-jet vacuum cooling systems with mechanical compression or absorption systems. Steam-jet vacuum systems are popular where large flow rates of cool water are continuously required. Some utility and cogeneration plants find steam-jet cooling a convenient use for excess summer steam to improve the summer load balance between steam production and electric power generation. Initial costs depend on size and capacity. A 100-200 ton unit may be comparable to a mechanical system of the same size. In addition a cooling tower will be needed where river, pond, or lake water is not available. Simplicity and reliability of the system means savings in maintenance costs.

  3. Electron Cooling Study for MEIC

    SciTech Connect

    He, Zhang; Douglas, David R.; Derbenev, Yaroslav S.; Zhang, Yuhong

    2015-09-01

    Electron cooling of the ion beams is one critical R&D to achieve high luminosities in JLab's MEIC proposal. In the present MEIC design, a multi-staged cooling scheme is adapted, which includes DC electron cooling in the booster ring and bunched beam electron cooling in the collider ring at both the injection energy and the collision energy. We explored the feasibility of using both magnetized and non-magnetized electron beam for cooling, and concluded that a magnetized electron beam is necessary. Electron cooling simulation results for the newly updated MEIC design is also presented.

  4. CO2 cooling in terrestrial planet thermospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bougher, S. W.; Hunten, D. M.; Roble, R. G.

    1994-01-01

    We examine the recent progress in the debate on the CO2-O relaxation rate, its temperature dependence, and its corresponding impact on the thermospheric heat budgets of Venus, Earth, and Mars. This comparative approach provides the broadest range of conditions under which a common CO2-O relaxation rate should provide consistent results. New global mean calculations are presented for the heat budgets of these three planets using large CO2-O relaxation rates that have been inferred recently from Earth CO2 radiance measurements and laboratory studies. Results indicate that available Venus and Mars data constrain the CO2-O relaxation rate to be 2-4 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s at 300 K. For Venus, this strong cooling serves as an effective thermostat that gives rise to a small variation of thermospheric temperatures over the solar cycle, just as observed. Conversely, CO2 cooling does not appear to be dominant in the dayside heat budget of the Mars thermosphere over most of the solar cycle. For the Earth, this strong cooling implies that the lower thermosphere does not typically require significant eddy diffusion or heat conduction. However, global-scale dynamics or an additional heating mechanism may be needed to restore calculated temperatures to observed values when relaxation rates exceeding 2 x 10(exp -12)/cu cm/s are employed.

  5. Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.A. ); Wipke, K. )

    1992-05-01

    The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69% more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44% less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration. 8 refs.

  6. Desiccant cooling using unglazed transpired solar collectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaran, A. A.; Wipke, K.

    1992-05-01

    The use of unglazed solar collectors for desiccant regeneration in a solid desiccant cooling cycle was investigated because these collectors are lower in cost than conventional glazed flat-plate collectors. Using computer models, the performance of a desiccant cooling ventilation cycle integrated with either unglazed transpired collectors or conventional glazed flat-plate collectors was obtained. We found that the thermal performance of the unglazed system was lower than the thermal performance of the glazed system because the unglazed system could not take advantage of the heat of adsorption released during the dehumidification process. For a 3-ton cooling system, although the area required for the unglazed collector was 69 percent more than that required for the glazed collector, the cost of the unglazed collector array was 44 percent less than the cost of the glazed collector array. The simple payback period of the unglazed system was half of the payback period of the glazed collector when compared to an equivalent gas-fired system. Although the use of unglazed transpired collectors makes economic sense, some practical considerations may limit their use in desiccant regeneration.

  7. Low-Absorption Liquid Crystals for Infrared Beam Steering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-22

    clearing point of 51.5 "C and its melting point is lower than -10 °C due to super-cooling effect . We also measured its transmission spectrum in the...thickness (or effective optical path length) increases, then the absorption will increase exponentially, as Eq. (1) indicates. To improve transmittance... effective mass (m) as: (0 = -yjic/m. (3) As the effective mass increases the vibration frequency decreases, i.e., the absorption band shifts toward a

  8. Combined rankine and vapor compression cycles

    DOEpatents

    Radcliff, Thomas D.; Biederman, Bruce P.; Brasz, Joost J.

    2005-04-19

    An organic rankine cycle system is combined with a vapor compression cycle system with the turbine generator of the organic rankine cycle generating the power necessary to operate the motor of the refrigerant compressor. The vapor compression cycle is applied with its evaporator cooling the inlet air into a gas turbine, and the organic rankine cycle is applied to receive heat from a gas turbine exhaust to heat its boiler within one embodiment, a common condenser is used for the organic rankine cycle and the vapor compression cycle, with a common refrigerant, R-245a being circulated within both systems. In another embodiment, the turbine driven generator has a common shaft connected to the compressor to thereby eliminate the need for a separate motor to drive the compressor. In another embodiment, an organic rankine cycle system is applied to an internal combustion engine to cool the fluids thereof, and the turbo charged air is cooled first by the organic rankine cycle system and then by an air conditioner prior to passing into the intake of the engine.

  9. Laser cooling of a semiconductor by 40 kelvin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Dehui; Chen, Renjie; Xiong, Qihua

    2013-01-24

    absorption. Our findings suggest that, alternatively, group-II-VI semiconductors with strong exciton-LOP coupling could be harnessed to achieve laser cooling and open the way to optical refrigeration based on semiconductors.

  10. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-11-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  11. Advanced materials for radiation-cooled rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reed, Brian; Biaglow, James; Schneider, Steven

    1993-01-01

    The most common material system currently used for low thrust, radiation-cooled rockets is a niobium alloy (C-103) with a fused silica coating (R-512A or R-512E) for oxidation protection. However, significant amounts of fuel film cooling are usually required to keep the material below its maximum operating temperature of 1370 C, degrading engine performance. Also the R-512 coating is subject to cracking and eventual spalling after repeated thermal cycling. A new class of high-temperature, oxidation-resistant materials are being developed for radiation-cooled rockets, with the thermal margin to reduce or eliminate fuel film cooling, while still exceeding the life of silicide-coated niobium. Rhenium coated with iridium is the most developed of these high-temperature materials. Efforts are on-going to develop 22 N, 62 N, and 440 N engines composed of these materials for apogee insertion, attitude control, and other functions. There is also a complimentary NASA and industry effort to determine the life limiting mechanisms and characterize the thermomechanical properties of these materials. Other material systems are also being studied which may offer more thermal margin and/or oxidation resistance, such as hafnium carbide/tantalum carbide matrix composites and ceramic oxide-coated iridium/rhenium chambers.

  12. Comparative life cycle assessment of standard and green roofs.

    PubMed

    Saiz, Susana; Kennedy, Christopher; Bass, Brad; Pressnail, Kim

    2006-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is used to evaluate the benefits, primarily from reduced energy consumption, resulting from the addition of a green roof to an eight story residential building in Madrid. Building energy use is simulated and a bottom-up LCA is conducted assuming a 50 year building life. The key property of a green roof is its low solar absorptance, which causes lower surface temperature, thereby reducing the heat flux through the roof. Savings in annual energy use are just over 1%, but summer cooling load is reduced by over 6% and reductions in peak hour cooling load in the upper floors reach 25%. By replacing the common flat roof with a green roof, environmental impacts are reduced by between 1.0 and 5.3%. Similar reductions might be achieved by using a white roof with additional insulation for winter, but more substantial reductions are achieved if common use of green roofs leads to reductions in the urban heat island.

  13. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  14. Minimization of temperature for laser cooling of Yb-ion-doped crystals.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Andrei; Rozhdestvensky, Yuriy; Perlin, Evgeniy

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, quantum mechanical calculations of cooling characteristics for the Yb3+:  YLF system with use of the vibronic model of laser cooling are presented. Dynamics of the laser cooling process for the seven-level system of an Yb ion is described by the density-matrix formalism. Dependences of the cooling characteristics on the pump intensity are obtained for various temperatures and absorption coefficients of impurity ions. It is shown that the pump intensity, at which the net cooling power has a maximum, depends on temperature. Thus, choosing the intensities, which correspond to the net cooling power maximum over the entire temperature range, we achieve a lower sample temperature at a shorter time than in the case of using a constant intensity throughout the cooling process. Calculations are performed for the parameters of the Yb3+:YLF system.

  15. Effect of cooling on Clostridium perfringens in pea soup.

    PubMed

    de Jong, A E I; Rombouts, F M; Beumer, R R

    2004-02-01

    Foods associated with Clostridium perfringens outbreaks are usually abused after cooking. Because of their short generation times, C. perfringens spores and cells can grow out to high levels during improper cooling. Therefore, the potential of C. perfringens to multiply in Dutch pea soup during different cooling times was investigated. Tubes of preheated pea soup (50 degrees C) were inoculated with cocktails of cells or heat-activated spores of this pathogen. The tubes were linearly cooled to 15 degrees C in time spans of 3, 5, 7.5, and 10 h and were subsequently stored in a refrigerator at 3 or 7 degrees C for up to 84 h. Cell numbers increased by 1-log cycle during the 3-h cooling period and reached their maximum after 10 h of cooling. Subsequent refrigeration hardly reduced cell numbers. Cooling of 3.75 liters of pea soup in an open pan showed that this amount of pea soup cooled from 50 to 15 degrees C in 5 h, which will allow a more than 10-fold increase in cell numbers. These findings emphasize the need of good hygienic practices and quick cooling of heated foods after preparation.

  16. High-temperature gas-cooled reactors: preliminary safety and environmental information document. Volume IV

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Information is presented concerning medium-enriched uranium/thorium once-through fuel cycle; medium-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle fuel; high-enrichment uranium-235/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; high-enrichment uranium-233/thorium recycle (spiked) fuel cycle; and gas-turbine high-temperature gas-cooled reactor.

  17. Solid oxide fuel cell application in district cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Qattan, Ayman; ElSherbini, Abdelrahman; Al-Ajmi, Kholoud

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents analysis of the performance of a combined cooling and power (CCP) system for district cooling. The cogeneration system is designed to provide cooling for a low-rise residential district of 27,300 RT (96 MWc). A solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generates electric power to operate chillers, and the exhaust fuel and heat from the SOFC run gas turbines and absorption chillers. Thermal energy storage is utilized to reduce system capacity. Part-load operation strategies target maximizing energy efficiency. The operation of the system is compared through an hourly simulation to that of packaged air-conditioning units typically used to cool homes. The CCP system with the district cooling arrangement improves the cooling-to-fuel efficiency by 346%. The peak power requirement is reduced by 57% (24 MW) and the total fuel energy is reduced by 54% (750 TJ y-1). The system cuts annual carbon dioxide emissions to less than half and reduces other harmful emissions. A cost analysis of the system components and operation resulted in a 53% reduction in the cost per ton-hour of cooling over traditional systems.

  18. STOCHASTIC COOLING FOR BUNCHED BEAMS.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.

    2005-05-16

    Problems associated with bunched beam stochastic cooling are reviewed. A longitudinal stochastic cooling system for RHIC is under construction and has been partially commissioned. The state of the system and future plans are discussed.

  19. Cooling Devices in Laser therapy

    PubMed Central

    Das, Anupam; Sarda, Aarti; De, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Cooling devices and methods are now integrated into most laser systems, with a view to protecting the epidermis, reducing pain and erythema and improving the efficacy of laser. On the basis of method employed, it can be divided into contact cooling and non-contact cooling. With respect to timing of irradiation of laser, the nomenclatures include pre-cooling, parallel cooling and post-cooling. The choice of the cooling device is dictated by the laser device, the physician's personal choice with respect to user-friendliness, comfort of the patient, the price and maintenance costs of the device. We hereby briefly review the various techniques of cooling, employed in laser practice. PMID:28163450

  20. Evaluation by Rocket Combustor of C/C Composite Cooled Structure Using Metallic Cooling Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takegoshi, Masao; Ono, Fumiei; Ueda, Shuichi; Saito, Toshihito; Hayasaka, Osamu

    In this study, the cooling performance of a C/C composite material structure with metallic cooling tubes fixed by elastic force without chemical bonding was evaluated experimentally using combustion gas in a rocket combustor. The C/C composite chamber was covered by a stainless steel outer shell to maintain its airtightness. Gaseous hydrogen as a fuel and gaseous oxygen as an oxidizer were used for the heating test. The surface of these C/C composites was maintained below 1500 K when the combustion gas temperature was about 2800 K and the heat flux to the combustion chamber wall was about 9 MW/m2. No thermal damage was observed on the stainless steel tubes that were in contact with the C/C composite materials. The results of the heating test showed that such a metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure is able to control the surface temperature as a cooling structure (also as a heat exchanger) as well as indicated the possibility of reducing the amount of coolant even if the thermal load to the engine is high. Thus, application of this metallic tube-cooled C/C composite structure to reusable engines such as a rocket-ramjet combined-cycle engine is expected.

  1. Selective radiative cooling with MgO and/or LiF layers

    DOEpatents

    Berdahl, Paul H.

    1986-01-01

    A material for a wavelength-selective radiative cooling system, the material comprising an infrared-reflective substrate coated with magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride in a polycrystalline form. The material is non-absorptive for short wavelengths, absorptive from 8 to 13 microns, and reflective at longer wavelengths. The infrared-reflective substrate inhibits absorption at wavelengths shorter than 8 microns, and the magnesium oxide and/or lithium fluoride layers reflect radiation at wavelengths longer than 13 microns.

  2. Cooling tower water conditioning study. [using ozone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, M. F.; French, K. R.

    1979-01-01

    Successful elimination of cooling tower treatment chemicals was demonstrated. Three towers functioned for long periods of time with ozone as the only treatment for the water. The water in the systems was reused as much as 30 times (cycles of concentration) without deleterious effects to the heat exchangers. Actual system blow-down was eliminated and the only makeup water added was that required to replace the evaporation and mist entrainment losses. Minimum water savings alone are approximately 75.1 1/kg/year. Cost estimates indicate that a savings of 55 percent was obtained on the systems using ozone. A major problem experienced in the use of ozone for cooling tower applications was the difficulty of accurate concentration measurements. The ability to control the operational characteristics relies on easily and accurately determined concentration levels. Present methods of detection are subject to inaccuracies because of interfering materials and the rapid destruction of the ozone.

  3. Modeling active galactic nucleus feedback in cool-core clusters: The balance between heating and cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2014-07-01

    We study the long-term evolution of an idealized cool-core galaxy cluster under the influence of momentum-driven active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback using three-dimensional high-resolution (60 pc) adaptive mesh refinement simulations. The feedback is modeled with a pair of precessing jets whose power is calculated based on the accretion rate of the cold gas surrounding the supermassive black hole (SMBH). The intracluster medium first cools into clumps along the propagation direction of the jets. As the jet power increases, gas condensation occurs isotropically, forming spatially extended structures that resemble the observed Hα filaments in Perseus and many other cool-core clusters. Jet heating elevates the gas entropy, halting clump formation. The cold gas that is not accreted onto the SMBH settles into a rotating disk of ∼10{sup 11} M {sub ☉}. The hot gas cools directly onto the disk while the SMBH accretes from its innermost region, powering the AGN that maintains a thermally balanced state for a few Gyr. The mass cooling rate averaged over 7 Gyr is ∼30 M {sub ☉} yr{sup –1}, an order of magnitude lower than the classic cooling flow value. Medium resolution simulations produce similar results, while in low resolution runs, the cluster experiences cycles of gas condensation and AGN outbursts. Owing to its self-regulating mechanism, AGN feedback can successfully balance cooling with a wide range of model parameters. Our model also produces cold structures in early stages that are in good agreement with the observations. However, the long-lived massive cold disk is unrealistic, suggesting that additional physical processes are still needed.

  4. Vaporization Would Cool Primary Battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhandari, Pradeep; Miyake, Robert N.

    1991-01-01

    Temperature of discharging high-power-density primary battery maintained below specified level by evaporation of suitable liquid from jacket surrounding battery, according to proposal. Pressure-relief valve regulates pressure and boiling temperature of liquid. Less material needed in cooling by vaporization than in cooling by melting. Technique used to cool batteries in situations in which engineering constraints on volume, mass, and location prevent attachment of cooling fins, heat pipes, or like.

  5. AIR COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Szilard, L.

    1958-05-27

    A nuclear reactor of the air-cooled, graphite moderated type is described. The active core consists of a cubicle mass of graphite, approximately 25 feet in each dimension, having horizontal channels of square cross section extending between two of the opposite faces, a plurality of cylindrical uranium slugs disposed in end to end abutting relationship within said channels providing a space in the channels through which air may be circulated, and a cadmium control rod extending within a channel provided in the moderator. Suitable shielding is provlded around the core, as are also provided a fuel element loading and discharge means, and a means to circulate air through the coolant channels through the fuel charels to cool the reactor.

  6. Cooling our tomorrows economically

    SciTech Connect

    Watt, J.R. )

    1992-06-01

    This paper reports that summer cooling poses unprecedented problems in the years ahead for architects, engineers, manufacturers, contractors and users. True, millions of tons of fine volcanic ash from the Philippines' Mt. Pinatubo and soot from Kuwait's burned oil wells now encircle the globe, creating temporary shade. The eruption also sent up related weights of sulfur dioxide (convertible to stratospheric sulfate aerosols) for further shading. Together, they may briefly counteract global warming, but rising greenhouse gases guarantee the latter will return with renewed force. Greenhouse gas production continues, making global warming certain, even if all CFCs are phased out, for they are minor greenhouse problems. Cooling loads will increase faster than rising temperatures as populations increase and move south, and as comfort and clean air standards rise. In addition, the fear of skin cancer, cataracts and related retinal and immune system damage may shortly keep more people indoors in summer, thereby raising internal loads.

  7. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  8. Water Cooled Mirror Design

    SciTech Connect

    Dale, Gregory E.; Holloway, Michael Andrew; Pulliam, Elias Noel

    2015-03-30

    This design is intended to replace the current mirror setup being used for the NorthStar Moly 99 project in order to monitor the target coupon. The existing setup has limited movement for camera alignment and is difficult to align properly. This proposed conceptual design for a water cooled mirror will allow for greater thermal transfer between the mirror and the water block. It will also improve positioning of the mirror by using flexible vacuum hosing and a ball head joint capable of a wide range of motion. Incorporating this design into the target monitoring system will provide more efficient cooling of the mirror which will improve the amount of diffraction caused by the heating of the mirror. The process of aligning the mirror for accurate position will be greatly improved by increasing the range of motion by offering six degrees of freedom.

  9. Cooling loads in laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, C.K.; Cook, M.R.

    1999-07-01

    The heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system for a laboratory must be designed with consideration for safety, air cleanliness, and space temperature. The primary safety concern is to ensure proper coordination between fume hood exhaust and makeup air supply. Air cleanliness is maintained by properly filtering supply air, by delivering adequate room air changes, and by ensuring proper pressure relationships between the laboratory and adjacent spaces. Space temperature is maintained by supplying enough cooling air to offset the amount of heat generated in the room. Each of these factors must be considered, and the one that results in the largest ventilation rate is used to establish the supply and exhaust airflows. The project described in this paper illustrates a case where cooling load is the determining factor in the sizing of the air systems.

  10. Cooled particle accelerator target

    DOEpatents

    Degtiarenko, Pavel V.

    2005-06-14

    A novel particle beam target comprising: a rotating target disc mounted on a retainer and thermally coupled to a first array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially inwardly from the retainer and mesh without physical contact with a second array of spaced-apart parallel plate fins that extend radially outwardly from and are thermally coupled to a cooling mechanism capable of removing heat from said second array of spaced-apart fins and located within the first array of spaced-apart parallel fins. Radiant thermal exchange between the two arrays of parallel plate fins provides removal of heat from the rotating disc. A method of cooling the rotating target is also described.

  11. Self pumping magnetic cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaudhary, V.; Wang, Z.; Ray, A.; Sridhar, I.; Ramanujan, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    Efficient thermal management and heat recovery devices are of high technological significance for innovative energy conservation solutions. We describe a study of a self-pumping magnetic cooling device, which does not require external energy input, employing Mn-Zn ferrite nanoparticles suspended in water. The device performance depends strongly on magnetic field strength, nanoparticle content in the fluid and heat load temperature. Cooling (ΔT) by ~20 °C and ~28 °C was achieved by the application of 0.3 T magnetic field when the initial temperature of the heat load was 64 °C and 87 °C, respectively. These experiments results were in good agreement with simulations performed with COMSOL Multiphysics. Our system is a self-regulating device; as the heat load increases, the magnetization of the ferrofluid decreases; leading to an increase in the fluid velocity and consequently, faster heat transfer from the heat source to the heat sink.

  12. Dry Air Cooler Modeling for Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J.; Lv, Q.

    2016-07-28

    Modeling for commercially available and cost effective dry air coolers such as those manufactured by Harsco Industries has been implemented in the Argonne National Laboratory Plant Dynamics Code for system level dynamic analysis of supercritical carbon dioxide (sCO2) Brayton cycles. The modeling can now be utilized to optimize and simulate sCO2 Brayton cycles with dry air cooling whereby heat is rejected directly to the atmospheric heat sink without the need for cooling towers that require makeup water for evaporative losses. It has sometimes been stated that a benefit of the sCO2 Brayton cycle is that it enables dry air cooling implying that the Rankine steam cycle does not. A preliminary and simple examination of a Rankine superheated steam cycle and an air-cooled condenser indicates that dry air cooling can be utilized with both cycles provided that the cycle conditions are selected appropriately

  13. Frequency Comb Cooling Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-18

    frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected 1. REPORT DATE (DD-MM-YYYY) 4. TITLE...Aug-2011 18-May-2012 Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited Final report on frequency comb cooling project The views, opinions and/or... frequency combs ). Recently the power and spectral coverage of frequency combs have grown considerably with projected average powers above 10 kW. We

  14. Cooled Ion Frequency Standard

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-27

    on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy (Springer Verlag, 1988) to be published. 8. "High Accuracy Spectroscopy of Stored Ions," D.J...Wineland, W.M. Itano, J.S. Bergquist, J.J. Bollinger, F. Diedrich and S.L. Gilbert, Proc. 4th Symp. on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy...Proc. 4th Symp. on Frequency Standards and Metrology, Ancona , Italy (Springer Verlag, 1988) to be published. 10. "Quantative Study of Laser Cooling in

  15. Conduction cooled tube supports

    DOEpatents

    Worley, Arthur C.; Becht, IV, Charles

    1984-01-01

    In boilers, process tubes are suspended by means of support studs that are in thermal contact with and attached to the metal roof casing of the boiler and the upper bend portions of the process tubes. The support studs are sufficiently short that when the boiler is in use, the support studs are cooled by conduction of heat to the process tubes and the roof casing thereby maintaining the temperature of the stud so that it does not exceed 1400.degree. F.

  16. Heating, Cooling, Ventilating Handbook.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    conditioners. Heaters. Blowers. Fire tube boilers. Water tube boilers. Electrostatic precipitators. Superheaters. Air handling systems, Work units. Abstract...install tubes. .................... . Analyze boiler water samples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. Boiler, Water Tube Assist boiler inspector in...ANO INSTALL COOLING (CHILLEC WATER ) OR HEATING COIL CI1-99 TO% All HANDLING SYSTEM). No REPERENCE WOaRK UNIT DESCRIPTION NOUNS UNITS ViB I PwV-S-Rl

  17. Cooled Ion Frequency Standard.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    report on our measurement of the Hg gj factor. This was an important step in the project because of the necessity of "mixing" the Zeeman 201Hg th 201...reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. in April, concentrates on detailed measurements made of systematic effects in this system. Two key features are: (1) an...stored ion frequency standard systematic effects since laser cooling is easier to achieve than in Hg . 2. "Strongly coupled" liquid and solid plasmas

  18. Laser Cooling of Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-01-01

    state coolers such as thermoelectric (Peltier) devices. Several studies have shown that ytterbium- or thulium -doped solids should be capable of providing...that there is an advantage of pumping with lower energy photons. This increased effi- ciency was part of the motivation for investigating thulium ...the quantum efficiency. For pure thulium -doped material, non-radiative decay can over- whelm anti-Stokes cooling, depending on the properties of the

  19. Conduction cooling: multicrate fastbus hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Makowiecki, D.; Sims, W.; Larsen, R.

    1980-11-01

    Described is a new and novel approach for cooling nuclear instrumentation modules via heat conduction. The simplicity of liquid cooled crates and ease of thermal management with conduction cooled modules are described. While this system was developed primarily for the higher power levels expected with Fastbus electronics, it has many general applications.

  20. Water-Cooled Optical Thermometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menna, A. A.

    1987-01-01

    Water-cooled optical probe measures temperature of nearby radiating object. Intended primarily for use in silicon-growing furnace for measuring and controlling temperatures of silicon ribbon, meniscus, cartridge surfaces, heaters, or other parts. Cooling water and flushing gas cool fiber-optic probe and keep it clean. Fiber passes thermal radiation from observed surface to measuring instrument.

  1. Designing modern furnace cooling systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merry, J.; Sarvinis, J.; Voermann, N.

    2000-02-01

    An integrated multidisciplinary approach to furnace design that considers the interdependence between furnace cooling elements and other furnace systems, such as binding, cooling water, and instrumentation, is necessary to achieve maximum furnace production and a long refractory life. The retrofit of the BHP Hartley electric furnace and the Kidd Creek copper converting furnace are successful examples of an integrated approach to furnace cooling design.

  2. Project S'COOL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Carolyn J.; Chambers, Lin H.

    1998-01-01

    The Students Clouds Observations On-Line or S'COOL project was piloted in 1997. It was created with the idea of using students to serve as one component of the validation for the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument which was launched with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November, 1997. As part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise CERES is interested in the role clouds play in regulating our climate. Over thirty schools became involved in the initial thrust of the project. The CERES instrument detects the location of clouds and identifies their physical properties. S'COOL students coordinate their ground truth observations with the exact overpass of the satellite at their location. Their findings regarding cloud type, height, fraction and opacity as well as surface conditions are then reported to the NASA Langley Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data is then accessible to both the CERES team for validation and to schools for educational application via the Internet. By March of 1998 ninety-three schools, in nine countries had enrolled in the S'COOL project. Joining the United States participants were from schools in Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The project is gradually becoming the global project envisioned by the project s creators. As students obtain the requested data useful for the scientists, it was hoped that students with guidance from their instructors would have opportunity and motivation to learn more about clouds and atmospheric science as well.

  3. Lamination cooling system

    SciTech Connect

    Rippel, Wally E.; Kobayashi, Daryl M.

    2005-10-11

    An electric motor, transformer or inductor having a lamination cooling system including a stack of laminations, each defining a plurality of apertures at least partially coincident with apertures of adjacent laminations. The apertures define a plurality of cooling-fluid passageways through the lamination stack, and gaps between the adjacent laminations are sealed to prevent a liquid cooling fluid in the passageways from escaping between the laminations. The gaps are sealed by injecting a heat-cured sealant into the passageways, expelling excess sealant, and heat-curing the lamination stack. The apertures of each lamination can be coincident with the same-sized apertures of adjacent laminations to form straight passageways, or they can vary in size, shape and/or position to form non-axial passageways, angled passageways, bidirectional passageways, and manifold sections of passageways that connect a plurality of different passageway sections. Manifold members adjoin opposite ends of the lamination stack, and each is configured with one or more cavities to act as a manifold to adjacent passageway ends. Complex manifold arrangements can create bidirectional flow in a variety of patterns.

  4. Cab Heating and Cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Damman, Dennis

    2005-10-31

    Schneider National, Inc., SNI, has concluded the Cab Heating and Cooling evaluation of onboard, engine off idling solutions. During the evaluation period three technologies were tested, a Webasto Airtronic diesel fired heater for cold weather operation, and two different approaches to cab cooling in warm weather, a Webasto Parking Cooler, phase change storage system and a Bergstrom Nite System, a 12 volt electrical air conditioning approach to cooling. Diesel fired cab heaters were concluded to provide adequate heat in winter environments down to 10 F. With a targeted idle reduction of 17%, the payback period is under 2 years. The Webasto Parking Cooler demonstrated the viability of this type of technology, but required significant driver involvement to achieve maximum performance. Drivers rated the technology as ''acceptable'', however, in individual discussions it became apparent they were not satisfied with the system limitations in hot weather, (over 85 F). The Bergstrom Nite system was recognized as an improvement by drivers and required less direct driver input to operate. While slightly improved over the Parking Cooler, the hot temperature limitations were only slightly better. Neither the Parking Cooler or the Nite System showed any payback potential at the targeted 17% idle reduction. Fleets who are starting at a higher idle baseline may have a more favorable payback.

  5. Simulation and performance analysis of a 4-effect lithium bromide-water absorption chiller

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Zaltash, A.; DeVault, R.C.

    1995-02-01

    Performance simulation has been conducted for a 4-effect lithium bromide-water chiller, capable of substantial performance improvement over state-of-the-art double-effect cycles. The system investigated includes four condensers and four desorbers coupled together, forming an extension of the conventional double-effect cycle; based on prior analytical studies, a parallel flow system was preferred over series flow, and double-condenser coupling was employed, to further improve performance. A modular computer code for simulation of absorption systems (ABSIM) was used to investigate the performances of the cycle. The simulation was carried out to investigate the influence of some major design parameters. A coefficient of performance around 2.0 (cooling) was calculated at the design point, with a heat supply temperature of 600{degrees}F (315{degrees}C) at the solution outlet from the high temperature desorber. With some optimization of the weak (pumped) solution flowrate and of the solution split among the four desorbers, this COP may be raised above 2.2.

  6. Heating and cooling of a two-dimensional electron gas by terahertz radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Budkin, G. V.; Tarasenko, S. A.

    2011-04-15

    The absorption of terahertz radiation by free charge carriers in n-type semiconductor quantum wells accompanied by the interaction of electrons with acoustic and optical phonons is studied. It is shown that intrasubband optical transitions can cause both heating and cooling of the electron gas. The cooling of charge carriers occurs in a certain temperature and radiation frequency region where light is most efficiently absorbed due to intrasubband transitions with emission of optical phonons. In GaAs quantum wells, the optical cooling of electrons occurs most efficiently at liquid nitrogen temperatures, while cooling is possible even at room temperature in GaN heterostructures.

  7. Ground state cooling of a nanomechanical resonator in the nonresolved regime via quantum interference.

    PubMed

    Xia, Keyu; Evers, Jörg

    2009-11-27

    Ground state cooling of a nanomechanical resonator coupled to a superconducting flux qubit is discussed. By inducing quantum interference to cancel unwanted heating excitations, ground state cooling becomes possible in the nonresolved regime. The qubit is modeled as a three-level system in Lambda configuration, and the driving fluxes are applied such that the qubit absorption spectrum exhibits electromagnetically induced transparency, thereby canceling the unwanted excitations. As our scheme allows the application of strong cooling fields, fast and efficient cooling can be achieved.

  8. Thermotunneling Based Cooling Systems for High Efficiency Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Aimi, Marco; Arik, Mehmet; Bray, James; Gorczyca, Thomas; Michael, Darryl; Weaver, Stan

    2007-09-30

    GE Global Research's overall objective was to develop a novel thermotunneling-cooling device. The end use for these devices is the replacement of vapor cycle compression (VCC) units in residential and commercial cooling and refrigeration systems. Thermotunneling devices offer many advantages over vapor cycle compression cooling units. These include quiet, reliable, non-moving parts operation without refrigerant gases. Additionally theoretical calculations suggest that the efficiency of thermotunneling devices can be 1.5-2x that of VCC units. Given these attributes it can be seen that thermotunneling devices have the potential for dramatic energy savings and are environmentally friendly. A thermotunneling device consists of two low work function electrodes separated by a sub 10 nanometer-sized gap. Cooling by thermotunneling refers to the transport of hot electrons across the gap, from the object to be cooled (cathode) to the heat rejection electrode (anode), by an applied potential. GE Global Research's goal was to model, design, fabricate devices and demonstrate cooling base on the thermotunneling technology.

  9. Short-Cycle Adsorption Refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, C. K.

    1988-01-01

    Modular adsorption/Joule-Thomson-effect refrigerator offers fast regeneration; adsorption/desorption cycle time expected to be 1 minute. Pressurized hydrogen generated by bank of compressor modules during heating phase passes through system of check valves and expands in Joule-Thomson junction as it enters refrigeration chamber. Hydrogen absorbs heat from load before it is sucked out by another bank of compressor modules in cooling phase.

  10. Cycle Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, Steven A.

    2012-03-20

    1. The Cycle Analysis code is an Microsoft Excel code that performs many different types of thermodynamic cycle analysis for power producing systems. The code will calculate the temperature and pressure and all other thermodynamic properties at the inlet and outlet of each component. The code also calculates the power that is produced, the efficiency, and the heat transported in the heater, gas chiller and recuperators. The code provides a schematic of the loop and provides the temperature and pressure at each location in the loop. The code also provides a T-S (temperature-entropy) diagram of the loop and often it provides an pressure enthalpy plot as well. 2. This version of the code concentrates on supercritical CO2 power cycles, but by simply changing the name of the working fluid many other types of fluids can be analyzed. The Cycle Analysis code provided here contains 18 different types of power cycles. Each cycle is contained in one worksheet or tab that the user can select. The user can change the yellow highlighted regions to perform different thermodynamic cycle analysis.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on layered photosystem II membrane particles suggests manganese-centered oxidation of the oxygen-evolving complex for the S0-S1, S1-S2, and S2-S3 transitions of the water oxidation cycle.

    PubMed

    Iuzzolino, L; Dittmer, J; Dörner, W; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Dau, H

    1998-12-08

    By application of microsecond light flashes the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) was driven through its functional cycle, the S-state cycle. The S-state population distribution obtained by the application of n flashes (n = 0. 6) was determined by analysis of EPR spectra; Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra were collected. Taking into consideration the likely statistical error in the data and the variability stemming from the use of three different approaches for the determination of edge positions, we obtained an upshift of the edge position by 0.8-1.5, 0.5-0.9, and 0.6-1.3 eV for the S0-S1, S1-S2, and S2-S3 transitions, respectively, and a downshift by 2.3-3.1 eV for the S3-S0 transition. These results are highly suggestive of Mn oxidation state changes for all four S-state transitions. In the S0-state spectrum, a clearly resolved shoulder in the X-ray spectrum around 6555 eV points toward the presence of Mn(II). We propose that photosynthetic oxygen evolution involves cycling of the photosystem II manganese complex through four distinct oxidation states of this tetranuclear complex: Mn(II)-Mn(III)-Mn(IV)2 in the S0-state, Mn(III)2-Mn(IV)2 in the S1-state, Mn(III)1-Mn(IV)3 in the S2-state, and Mn(IV)4 in the S3-state.

  12. Model atmospheres for cool supergiant stars.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, D. R.; Johnson, H. R.

    1972-01-01

    The results of an exploratory grid of model atmospheres for cool giant stars are used to illustrate the effect of varying the chemical composition of the atmosphere. The effects of composition changes (depletion of C and O, enrichment of N, and increase in the ratio C/O), which might be expected from processing of the original material of a star through the CNO cycle of nuclear burning, are studied. The models also include the important CN opacity. They are illustrated by giving several representative T-P and T-tau diagrams, spectral energy curves, and column density tables of molecules.

  13. Cooled membrane for high sensitivity gas sampling.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ruifen; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2014-04-18

    A novel sample preparation method that combines the advantages of high surface area geometry and cold surface effect was proposed to achieve high sensitivity gas sampling. To accomplish this goal, a device that enables the membrane to be cooled down was developed for sampling, and a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer was used for separation and quantification analysis. Method development included investigation of the effect of membrane temperature, membrane size, gas flow rate and humidity. Results showed that high sensitivity for equilibrium sampling, such as limonene sampling in the current study could be achieved by either cooling down the membrane and/or using a large volume extraction phase. On the other hand, for pre-equilibrium extraction, in which the extracted amount was mainly determined by membrane surface area and diffusion coefficient, high sensitivity could be obtained by using thinner membranes with a larger surface and/or a higher sampling flow rate. In addition, humidity showed no significant influence on extraction efficiency, due to the absorption property of the liquid extraction phase. Next, the limit of detection (LOD) was found, and the reproducibility of the developed cooled membrane gas sampling method was evaluated. Results showed that LODs with a membrane diameter of 19mm at room temperature sampling were 9.2ng/L, 0.12ng/L, 0.10ng/L for limonene, cinnamaldehyde and 2-pentadecanone, respectively. Intra- and inter-membrane sampling reproducibility revealed RSD% lower than 8% and 13%, respectively. Results uniformly demonstrated that the proposed cooled membrane device could serve as an alternative powerful tool for future gas sampling.

  14. Exercise and Quadriceps Muscle Cooling Time

    PubMed Central

    Long, Blaine C; Cordova, Mitchell L; Brucker, Jody B; Demchak, Timothy J; Stone, Marcus B

    2005-01-01

    Context: Cryotherapy is commonly used for a variety of purposes; however, the body's response to cryotherapy immediately postexercise is unknown. Objective: To investigate the effect of prior exercise on crushed-ice–bag treatment of a large muscle group. Design: 2 × 3 repeated-measures design on depth (1 cm and 2 cm below adipose tissue) and treatment (exercise followed by ice, exercise followed by no ice, and no exercise followed by ice). Setting: Sports Injury Research Laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Six physically active, uninjured male volunteers. Intervention(s): For the 2 exercise conditions, subjects rode a stationary cycle ergometer at 70% to 80% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, as calculated by the Karvonen method. For the no-exercise condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. The cryotherapy treatment consisted of a 1-kg ice bag applied to the anterior mid thigh. For the no-ice condition, subjects lay supine on a treatment table. Main Outcome Measure(s): Time required for the intramuscular temperatures at the 1-cm and 2-cm depths below adipose tissue to return to pre-exercise baseline and time required to cool the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature. Results: The time to cool the rectus femoris to the pre-exercise temperature using a crushed-ice–bag treatment was reduced by approximately 40 minutes (P < .001). The ice bag cooled the 1-cm and 2-cm depths to the pre-exercise temperature within 7 minutes (P = .38), but the 2-cm tissue depth took nearly 13.5 minutes longer to cool than the 1-cm depth when no ice was applied (P = .001). The 1-cm depth cooled to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature about 8 minutes sooner than the 2-cm depth, regardless of whether the tissue was exercised or not (P < .001). Exercise shortened the cooling time to 10°C below the pre-exercise temperature by approximately 13 minutes (P = .05). Conclusions: Exercise before cooling with a crushed-ice bag enhanced

  15. Design Considerations for Economically Competitive Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Hongbin Zhang; Haihua Zhao

    2009-05-01

    The technological viability of sodium cooled fast reactors (SFR) has been established by various experimental and prototype (demonstration) reactors such as EBR-II, FFTF, Phénix, JOYO, BN-600 etc. However, the economic competitiveness of SFR has not been proven yet. The perceived high cost premium of SFRs over LWRs has been the primary impediment to the commercial expansion of SFR technologies. In this paper, cost reduction options are discussed for advanced SFR designs. These include a hybrid loop-pool design to optimize the primary system, multiple reheat and intercooling helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion system and the potential for suppression of intermediate heat transport system. The design options for the fully passive decay heat removal systems are also thoroughly examined. These include direct reactor auxiliary cooling system (DRACS), reactor vessel auxiliary cooling system (RVACS) and the newly proposed pool reactor auxiliary cooling system (PRACS) in the context of the hybrid loop-pool design.

  16. MEMS Device Being Developed for Active Cooling and Temperature Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, Matthew E.

    2001-01-01

    High-capacity cooling options remain limited for many small-scale applications such as microelectronic components, miniature sensors, and microsystems. A microelectromechanical system (MEMS) is currently under development at the NASA Glenn Research Center to meet this need. It uses a thermodynamic cycle to provide cooling or heating directly to a thermally loaded surface. The device can be used strictly in the cooling mode, or it can be switched between cooling and heating modes in milliseconds for precise temperature control. Fabrication and assembly are accomplished by wet etching and wafer bonding techniques routinely used in the semiconductor processing industry. Benefits of the MEMS cooler include scalability to fractions of a millimeter, modularity for increased capacity and staging to low temperatures, simple interfaces and limited failure modes, and minimal induced vibration.

  17. Heat transfer from protein crystals: implications for flash-cooling and X-ray beam heating.

    PubMed

    Kriminski, S; Kazmierczak, M; Thorne, R E

    2003-04-01

    Three problems involving heat transfer from a protein crystal to a cooling agent are analyzed: flash-cooling in a cold nitrogen- or helium-gas stream, plunge-cooling into liquid nitrogen, propane or ethane and crystal heating in a cold gas stream owing to X-ray absorption. Heat transfer occurs by conduction inside the crystal and by convection from the crystal's outer surface to the cooling fluid. For flash-cooling in cold gas streams, heat transfer is limited by the rate of external convection; internal temperature gradients and crystal strains during cooling are very small. Helium gas provides only a threefold improvement in cooling rates relative to nitrogen because its much larger thermal conductivity is offset by its larger kinematic viscosity. Characteristic cooling times vary with crystal size L as L(3/2) and theoretical estimates of these times are consistent with experiments. Plunge-cooling into liquid cryogens, which can give much smaller convective thermal resistances provided that surface boiling is eliminated, can increase cooling rates by more than an order of magnitude. However, the internal conduction resistance is no longer negligible, producing much larger internal temperature gradients and strains that may damage larger crystals. Based on this analysis, factors affecting the success of flash-cooling experiments can be ordered from most to least important as follows: (1) crystal solvent content and solvent composition, (2) crystal size and shape, (3) amount of residual liquid around the crystal, (4) cooling method (liquid plunge versus gas stream), (5) choice of gas/liquid and (6) relative speed between cooling fluid and crystal. Crystal heating by X-ray absorption on present high-flux beamlines should be small. For a fixed flux and illuminated area, heating can be reduced by using crystals with areas normal to the beam that are much larger than the beam area.

  18. Technical use of solar energy: Conversion from solar to thermal energy, solar cooling and thermal energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arafa, A.; Fisch, N.; Hahne, E.; Kraus, K.; Seemann, D.; Seifert, B.; Sohns, J.; Schetter, G.; Schweigerer, W.

    1983-12-01

    Experimental and theoretical studies in the field of solar energy utilization are reviewed. Specific topics considered are: flat plate water collectors, solar absorbers, air collectors, solar absorption cooling, solar simulators, aquifiers, latent heat stores, and space heating systems.

  19. Asian Aerosols: A Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory general circulation model sensitivity study of model response to aerosol optical depth and aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Randles, C. A.; Ramaswamy, V.

    2007-12-01

    Atmospheric absorption by black carbon (BC) aerosol heats the atmosphere while simultaneously cooling the surface and reducing latent and sensible heat fluxes from the land. Recent studies have shown that absorbing BC aerosol can have a large impact on regional climates, including modification of the hydrological cycle. However, significant uncertainties remain with regards to (a) the total amount of all aerosol species and (b) the amount of aerosol absorption. Here we present a GCM sensitivity study focusing on the influences due to total aerosol amount and aerosol absorption in the south and east Asian regions. Six experiments are conducted to test the equilibrium response of the GFDL AM2 GCM (under conditions of prescribed, observed sea surface temperatures) to (i) changes in aerosol absorption caused by changes in BC aerosol amount, and (ii) aerosol extinction optical depth increases corresponding to the year 1990 relative to a control case of 1950. In order to systematically explore the uncertainties in aerosol loading and absorption, the sensitivity experiments are classified into four regimes: low extinction optical depth, low absorption; low extinction optical depth, high absorption; high extinction optical depth, low absorption; and high extinction optical depth, high absorption. Changes in surface temperature and changes in the hydrological cycle are generally insignificant when lower aerosol extinction optical depths are considered. For higher extinction optical depths, the change in the modeled regional circulation relative to the control circulation over south and east Asia is affected by the amount of aerosol absorption and contrasts sharply to the regional circulation change associated with increasing only scattering aerosols. When increasing absorbing aerosols over the region, low-level convergence and increases in vertical velocity overcome the stabilizing effects of the absorbing aerosol and enhance the monsoonal circulation and precipitation rate

  20. Models for predicting the performance of Brayton-cycle engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korakianitis, T.; Wilson, D. G.

    1994-04-01

    Gas turbine performance is the result of choices of type of cycle, cycle temperature ratio, pressure ratio, cooling flows, and component losses. The output is usually given as efficiency (thermal, propulsive, specific thrust, overall efficiency) versus specific power. This paper presents a set of computer programs for the performance prediction of shaft-power and jet-propulsion cycles: simple, regenerative, intercooled-regenerative, turbojet, and turbofan. Each cycle is constructed using individual component modules. Realistic assumptions are specified for component efficiencies as functions of pressure ratio, cooling mass-flow rate as a function of cooling technology levels, and various other cycle losses. The programs can be used to predict design point and off-design point operation using appropriate component efficiencies. The effects of various cycle choices on overall performance are discussed.

  1. Cycling injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, G. C.

    1993-01-01

    Bicycle-related injuries have increased as cycling has become more popular. Most injuries to recreational riders are associated with overuse or improper fit of the bicycle. Injuries to racers often result from high speeds, which predispose riders to muscle strains, collisions, and falls. Cyclists contact bicycles at the pedals, seat, and handlebars. Each is associated with particular cycling injuries. Images Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8471908

  2. Cooled artery extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gernert, Nelson J. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    An artery vapor trap. A heat pipe artery is constructed with an extension protruding from the evaporator end of the heat pipe beyond the active area of the evaporator. The vapor migrates into the artery extension because of gravity or liquid displacement, and cooling the extension condenses the vapor to liquid, thus preventing vapor lock in the working portion of the artery by removing vapor from within the active artery. The condensed liquid is then transported back to the evaporator by the capillary action of the artery extension itself or by wick located within the extension.

  3. Superconducting magnet cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Vander Arend, Peter C.; Fowler, William B.

    1977-01-01

    A device is provided for cooling a conductor to the superconducting state. The conductor is positioned within an inner conduit through which is flowing a supercooled liquid coolant in physical contact with the conductor. The inner conduit is positioned within an outer conduit so that an annular open space is formed therebetween. Through the annular space is flowing coolant in the boiling liquid state. Heat generated by the conductor is transferred by convection within the supercooled liquid coolant to the inner wall of the inner conduit and then is removed by the boiling liquid coolant, making the heat removal from the conductor relatively independent of conductor length.

  4. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-08-04

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  5. Cooled, temperature controlled electrometer

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, John P.

    1992-01-01

    A cooled, temperature controlled electrometer for the measurement of small currents. The device employs a thermal transfer system to remove heat from the electrometer circuit and its environment and dissipate it to the external environment by means of a heat sink. The operation of the thermal transfer system is governed by a temperature regulation circuit which activates the thermal transfer system when the temperature of the electrometer circuit and its environment exceeds a level previously inputted to the external variable temperature control circuit. The variable temperature control circuit functions as subpart of the temperature control circuit. To provide temperature stability and uniformity, the electrometer circuit is enclosed by an insulated housing.

  6. COOLED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Binner, C.R.; Wilkie, C.B.

    1958-03-18

    This patent relates to a design for a reactor of the type in which a fluid coolant is flowed through the active portion of the reactor. This design provides for the cooling of the shielding material as well as the reactor core by the same fluid coolant. The core structure is a solid moderator having coolant channels in which are disposed the fuel elements in rod or slug form. The coolant fluid enters the chamber in the shield, in which the core is located, passes over the inner surface of said chamber, enters the core structure at the center, passes through the coolant channels over the fuel elements and out through exhaust ducts.

  7. Turbine airfoil film cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hylton, Larry D.

    1986-01-01

    Emphasis is placed on developing more accurate analytical models for predicting turbine airfoil external heat transfer rates. Performance goals of new engines require highly refined, accurate design tools to meet durability requirements. In order to obtain improvements in analytical capabilities, programs are required which focus on enhancing analytical techniques through verification of new models by comparison with relevant experimental data. The objectives of the current program are to develop an analytical approach, based on boundary layer theory, for predicting the effects of airfoil film cooling on downstream heat transfer rates and to verify the resulting analytical method by comparison of predictions with hot cascade data obtained under this program.

  8. Cooling apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Mayes, James C.

    2009-05-05

    A device and method provide for cooling of a system having an energy source, one or more devices that actively consume energy, and one or more devices that generate heat. The device may include one or more thermoelectric coolers ("TECs") in conductive engagement with at least one of the heat-generating devices, and an energy diverter for diverting at least a portion of the energy from the energy source that is not consumed by the active energy-consuming devices to the TECs.

  9. Cooling and shielding systems for infrared detectors - requirements and limits.

    PubMed

    Wiecek, B

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents three main cooling systems used for infrared detectors. At first thermoelectric devices are discussed. They allow cooling down the detector with low efficiency and not to the very low temperature. They do not generate any vibrations and therefore are suitable for thermal detectors, where the microphone effect can decrease their performance. Photon detectors need to be cooled down even to 77K or better. The only way to have such deep cooling is to use the cooler based on thermodynamic cycle such as Stirling one. With the high efficiency one can easily obtain cryogenic temperature for a detector. The electromagnetic noise and vibration generation are the main disadvantages of using such devices. Joule-Thomson effect during gas expansion is 3rdcooling system discussed in the paper. It is highly effective process, used for gas liquefaction too. The working gas is being removed during cooling into the atmosphere, so the need of continuous supplying with compressed one, what makes this system very difficult for remote applications. In the paper, simple calculations are presented to illustrate the advantages and disadvantages of the different cooling systems.

  10. Influence of solar variability on the infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere from 2002 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mlynczak, Martin G; Hunt, Linda A; Mertens, Christopher J; Thomas Marshall, B; Russell, James M; Woods, Thomas; Earl Thompson, R; Gordley, Larry L

    2014-01-01

    Infrared radiative cooling of the thermosphere by carbon dioxide (CO2, 15 µm) and by nitric oxide (NO, 5.3 µm) has been observed for 12 years by the Sounding of the Atmosphere using Broadband Emission Radiometry (SABER) instrument on the Thermosphere-Ionosphere-Mesosphere Energetics and Dynamics satellite. For the first time we present a record of the two most important thermospheric infrared cooling agents over a complete solar cycle. SABER has documented dramatic variability in the radiative cooling on time scales ranging from days to the 11 year solar cycle. Deep minima in global mean vertical profiles of radiative cooling are observed in 2008–2009. Current solar maximum conditions, evidenced in the rates of radiative cooling, are substantially weaker than prior maximum conditions in 2002–2003. The observed changes in thermospheric cooling correlate well with changes in solar ultraviolet irradiance and geomagnetic activity during the prior maximum conditions. NO and CO2 combine to emit 7 × 1018 more Joules annually at solar maximum than at solar minimum. Key Points First record of thermospheric IR cooling rates over a complete solar cycleIR cooling in current solar maximum conditions much weaker than prior maximumVariability in thermospheric IR cooling observed on scale of days to 11 years PMID:26074647

  11. Citywide Impacts of Cool Roof and Rooftop Solar Photovoltaic Deployment on Near-Surface Air Temperature and Cooling Energy Demand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salamanca, F.; Georgescu, M.; Mahalov, A.; Moustaoui, M.; Martilli, A.

    2016-10-01

    Assessment of mitigation strategies that combat global warming, urban heat islands (UHIs), and urban energy demand can be crucial for urban planners and energy providers, especially for hot, semi-arid urban environments where summertime cooling demands are excessive. Within this context, summertime regional impacts of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment on near-surface air temperature and cooling energy demand are examined for the two major USA cities of Arizona: Phoenix and Tucson. A detailed physics-based parametrization of solar photovoltaic panels is developed and implemented in a multilayer building energy model that is fully coupled to the Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale numerical model. We conduct a suite of sensitivity experiments (with different coverage rates of cool roof and rooftop solar photovoltaic deployment) for a 10-day clear-sky extreme heat period over the Phoenix and Tucson metropolitan areas at high spatial resolution (1-km horizontal grid spacing). Results show that deployment of cool roofs and rooftop solar photovoltaic panels reduce near-surface air temperature across the diurnal cycle and decrease daily citywide cooling energy demand. During the day, cool roofs are more effective at cooling than rooftop solar photovoltaic systems, but during the night, solar panels are more efficient at reducing the UHI effect. For the maximum coverage rate deployment, cool roofs reduced daily citywide cooling energy demand by 13-14 %, while rooftop solar photovoltaic panels by 8-11 % (without considering the additional savings derived from their electricity production). The results presented here demonstrate that deployment of both roofing technologies have multiple benefits for the urban environment, while solar photovoltaic panels add additional value because they reduce the dependence on fossil fuel consumption for electricity generation.

  12. Magnetic refrigeration for maser amplifier cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a multifrequency upconverter-maser system for the DSN has created the need to develop a closed-cycle refrigerator (CCR) capable of providing more than 3 watts of refrigeration capability at 4.5 K. In addition, operating concerns such as the high cost of electrical power consumption and the loss of maser operation due to CCR failures require that improvements be made to increase the efficiency and reliability of the CCR. One refrigeration method considered is the replacement of the Joule-Thomson expansion circuit with a magnetic refrigeration. Magnetic refrigerators can provide potentially reliable and highly efficient refrigeration at a variety of temperature ranges and cooling power. The concept of magnetic refrigeration is summarized and a literature review of existing magnetic refrigerator designs which have been built and tested and that may also be considered as possibilities as a 4 K to 15 K magnetic refrigeration stage for the DSN closed-cycle refrigerator is provided.

  13. Absorption type water chiller fired directly by waste heat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, K. L.; Kalwar, K.

    1982-08-01

    The direct use of waste heat as heating element in a water chiller of the absorption type was studied. The chilled water is used as cooling element in the industrial process, producing the waste heat or for conditioning the workplace or further located places. The heat source is gaseous or liquid. The cooling capacity is in the range from 10 to 120 kW. After reviewing the different absorption systems, LiBr/H20 proved to be the most suitable. The process retained for experimenting was the manufacturing of synthetic materials polymer industry and was tested in two different factories. It is proved that the use of absorption type water chillers is practicable with an efficiency of 10% to 25% of the waste heat energy, but that the existing chillers need extensive conversion for obtaining economical operation when using a low temperature heating source.

  14. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  15. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  16. Emergency core cooling system

    DOEpatents

    Schenewerk, William E.; Glasgow, Lyle E.

    1983-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled fast breeder reactor provided with an emergency core cooling system includes a reactor vessel which contains a reactor core comprising an array of fuel assemblies and a plurality of blanket assemblies. The reactor core is immersed in a pool of liquid metal coolant. The reactor also includes a primary coolant system comprising a pump and conduits for circulating liquid metal coolant to the reactor core and through the fuel and blanket assemblies of the core. A converging-diverging venturi nozzle with an intermediate throat section is provided in between the assemblies and the pump. The intermediate throat section of the nozzle is provided with at least one opening which is in fluid communication with the pool of liquid sodium. In normal operation, coolant flows from the pump through the nozzle to the assemblies with very little fluid flowing through the opening in the throat. However, when the pump is not running, residual heat in the core causes fluid from the pool to flow through the opening in the throat of the nozzle and outwardly through the nozzle to the assemblies, thus providing a means of removing decay heat.

  17. ASTROMAG coil cooling study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maytal, Ben-Zion; Vansciver, Steven W.

    1990-01-01

    ASTROMAG is a planned particle astrophysics magnetic facility. Basically it is a large magnetic spectrometer outside the Earth's atmosphere for an extended period of time in orbit on a space station. A definition team summarized its scientific objectives assumably related to fundamental questions of astrophysics, cosmology, and elementary particle physics. Since magnetic induction of about 7 Tesla is desired, it is planned to be a superconducting magnet cooled to liquid helium 2 temperatures. The general structure of ASTROMAG is based on: (1) two superconducting magnetic coils, (2) dewar of liquid helium 2 to provide cooling capability for the magnets; (3) instrumentation, matter-anti matter spectrometer (MAS) and cosmic ray isotope spectrometer (CRIS); and (4) interfaces to the shuttle and space station. Many configurations of the superconducting magnets and the dewar were proposed and evaluated, since those are the heart of the ASTROMAG. Baseline of the magnet configuration and cryostat as presented in the phase A study and the one kept in mind while doing the present study are presented. ASTROMAG's development schedule reflects the plan of launching to the space station in 1995.

  18. Feasibility assessment of vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling on water-cooked pork.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiaoguang; Chen, Hui; Liu, Yi; Dai, Ruitong; Li, Xingmin

    2012-01-01

    Vacuum cooling followed by immersion vacuum cooling was designed to cool water-cooked pork (1.5±0.05 kg) compared with air blast cooling (4±0.5°C, 2 m/s), vacuum cooling (10 mbar) and immersion vacuum cooling. This combined cooling method was: vacuum cooling to an intermediate temperature of 25°C and then immersion vacuum cooling with water of 10°C to the final temperature of 10°C. It was found that the cooling loss of this combined cooling method was significantly lower (P<0.05) than those of air blast cooling and vacuum cooling. This combined cooling was faster (P<0.05) than air blast cooling and immersion vacuum cooling in terms of cooling rate. Moreover, the pork cooled by combined cooling method had significant differences (P<0.05) in water content, color and shear force.

  19. Passive cooling safety system for liquid metal cooled nuclear reactors

    DOEpatents

    Hunsbedt, Anstein; Boardman, Charles E.; Hui, Marvin M.; Berglund, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    A liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a passive cooling system for removing residual heat resulting from fuel decay during reactor shutdown. The passive cooling system comprises a plurality of partitions surrounding the reactor vessel in spaced apart relation forming intermediate areas for circulating heat transferring fluid which remove and carry away heat from the reactor vessel. The passive cooling system includes a closed primary fluid circuit through the partitions surrounding the reactor vessel and a partially adjoining secondary open fluid circuit for carrying transferred heat out into the atmosphere.

  20. SIMULATING THE COOLING FLOW OF COOL-CORE CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Li Yuan; Bryan, Greg L.

    2012-03-01

    We carry out high-resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of a cool core cluster, resolving the flow from Mpc scales down to pc scales. We do not (yet) include any active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating, focusing instead on cooling in order to understand how gas reaches the supermassive black hole at the center of the cluster. We find that, as the gas cools, the cluster develops a very flat temperature profile, undergoing a cooling catastrophe only in the central 10-100 pc of the cluster. Outside of this region, the flow is smooth, with no local cooling instabilities, and naturally produces very little low-temperature gas (below a few keV), in agreement with observations. The gas cooling in the center of the cluster rapidly forms a thin accretion disk. The amount of cold gas produced at the very center grows rapidly until a reasonable estimate of the resulting AGN heating rate (assuming even a moderate accretion efficiency) would overwhelm cooling. We argue that this naturally produces a thermostat which links the cooling of gas out to 100 kpc with the cold gas accretion in the central 100 pc, potentially closing the loop between cooling and heating. Isotropic heat conduction does not affect the result significantly, but we show that including the potential well of the brightest cluster galaxy is necessary to obtain the correct result. Also, we found that the outcome is sensitive to resolution, requiring very high mass resolution to correctly reproduce the small transition radius.