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Sample records for absorption differential phase

  1. Spectral x-ray phase contrast imaging for single-shot retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery.

    PubMed

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2014-11-01

    In this Letter, we propose the first single-shot, noninterferometric x-ray imaging method for simultaneous retrieval of absorption, phase, and differential-phase imagery with quantitative accuracy. Our method utilizes a photon-counting spectral x-ray detector in conjunction with a simplified transport-of-intensity equation for coded-aperture phase-contrast imaging to efficiently solve the retrieval problem. This method can utilize an incoherent and polychromatic (clinical or laboratory) x-ray tube and can enable retrieval for a wide range and composition of material properties. The proposed method has been validated via computer simulations and is expected to significantly benefit applications that are sensitive to complexity of measurement, radiation dose and imaging time. PMID:25361350

  2. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  3. Phase jitter in a differential phase experiment.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanenbaum, B. S.; Connolly, D. J.; Austin, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Austin (1971) had concluded that, because of the 'phase jitter,' the differential phase experiment is useful over a more limited height range than the differential absorption experiment. Several observations are presented to show that this conclusion is premature. It is pointed out that the logical basis of the differential absorption experiment also requires that the O- and X-mode echoes, at a given time, come from the same irregularities. Austin's calculations are believed to contain a systematic error above 80 km.

  4. Infrared differential absorption for atmospheric pollutant detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Byer, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Progress made in the generation of tunable infrared radiation and its application to remote pollutant detection by the differential absorption method are summarized. It is recognized that future remote pollutant measurements depended critically on the availability of high energy tunable transmitters. Futhermore, due to eye safety requirements, the transmitted frequency must lie in the 1.4 micron to 13 micron infrared spectral range.

  5. Four-phase differential phase shift resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M.

    1973-01-01

    Two systems have been developed to resolve phase uncertainty without transmitting reference signals. In both methods signal is impressed on carrier as differential, rather than absolute, phase shift. At the receiver four-phase demodulation and logic process unambiguously resolves differential phase shift of input carrier.

  6. Differential phase shift of partially reflected radio waves.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, D. J.

    1971-01-01

    The addition of phase difference measurements to differential absorption experiments is shown to be both feasible and desirable. The phase information can provide a more sensitive measurement of electron density above about 75 km. The differential phase shift is only weakly dependent on collision frequency in this range, and so an accurate collision frequency profile is not a prerequisite. The differential phase shift and differential absorption measurements taken together can provide both electron density and collision frequency data from about 70 to 90 km.

  7. Differential absorption lidar sensing of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Browell, E.V.

    1989-03-01

    The Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique has been used since the early 1970s for remote measurements of ozone (O/sub 3/) in the lower atmosphere. To investigate large-scale variations of O/sub 3/ and aerosols in the troposphere and lower stratosphere, a versatile airborne DIAL system was developed in 1980 at the NASA Langley Research Center. This DIAL system currently has the capability to measure O/sub 3/ and multiple-wavelength aerosol profiles to a range of over 8 km above and below the aircraft simultaneously. Eleven major field experiments have been conducted with the NASA air-borne DIAL system since 1980 to study the transport and chemistry related to O/sub 3/ and aerosols. This paper discusses the DIAL technique for deriving O/sub 3/ profiles from lidar measurements. The NASA airborne DIAL system is described, and examples of a broad range of O/sub 3/ and aerosol measurements are presented.

  8. PHASE DIFFERENTIAL INDICATING CIRCUIT

    DOEpatents

    Kirsten, F.A.

    1962-01-01

    An electronic circuit for totalizing the net phase difference between two alternating current signals is designed which responds to both increasing and decreasing phase changes. A phase comparator provldes an output pulse for each 360 deg of phase difference occurring, there being a negative pulse for phase shtft in one direction and a positive pulse for a phase shift in the opposite direction. A counting circuit utilizing glow discharge tubes receives the negative and positive pulses at a single input terminal and provides a running net total, pulses of one polarity dded and pulses of the opposite polarity being subtracted. The glow discharge tubes may be decaded to increase the total count capacity. (AEC)

  9. Differentiation method for phase recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özcan, Meriç

    2015-03-01

    Here we consider a derivative based method for phase recovery and demonstrate a numerical method that can be described as differentiate and cross multiply operation to obtain the phase gradient. This method uses quadrature phase data that is in sine and cosine form, which is a natural outcome many interferometric measurements including that of digital holographic reconstruction. Since the differentiation is performed on trigonometric functions which are discrete, it is shown that the method of differentiation and the sampling rate are important considerations especially for the noise corrupt signals. The method is initially developed for 1D phase signals, and then later extended to 2D. Noise performance of the method is also investigated, and it is shown that for extremely noisy signals the method can be adapted to an iteration routine which recovers the phase successfully. We present simulations and the experimental results which show the validity of the approach.

  10. Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar Algorithm Intercomparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godin, Sophie; Carswell, Allen I.; Donovan, David P.; Claude, Hans; Steinbrecht, Wolfgang; McDermid, I. Stuart; McGee, Thomas J.; Gross, Michael R.; Nakane, Hideaki; Swart, Daan P. J.; Bergwerff, Hans B.; Uchino, Osamu; von der Gathen, Peter; Neuber, Roland

    1999-10-01

    An intercomparison of ozone differential absorption lidar algorithms was performed in 1996 within the framework of the Network for the Detection of Stratospheric Changes (NDSC) lidar working group. The objective of this research was mainly to test the differentiating techniques used by the various lidar teams involved in the NDSC for the calculation of the ozone number density from the lidar signals. The exercise consisted of processing synthetic lidar signals computed from simple Rayleigh scattering and three initial ozone profiles. Two of these profiles contained perturbations in the low and the high stratosphere to test the vertical resolution of the various algorithms. For the unperturbed profiles the results of the simulations show the correct behavior of the lidar processing methods in the low and the middle stratosphere with biases of less than 1% with respect to the initial profile to as high as 30 km in most cases. In the upper stratosphere, significant biases reaching 10% at 45 km for most of the algorithms are obtained. This bias is due to the decrease in the signal-to-noise ratio with altitude, which makes it necessary to increase the number of points of the derivative low-pass filter used for data processing. As a consequence the response of the various retrieval algorithms to perturbations in the ozone profile is much better in the lower stratosphere than in the higher range. These results show the necessity of limiting the vertical smoothing in the ozone lidar retrieval algorithm and questions the ability of current lidar systems to detect long-term ozone trends above 40 km. Otherwise the simulations show in general a correct estimation of the ozone profile random error and, as shown by the tests involving the perturbed ozone profiles, some inconsistency in the estimation of the vertical resolution among the lidar teams involved in this experiment.

  11. Differential absorption radar techniques: water vapor retrievals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millán, Luis; Lebsock, Matthew; Livesey, Nathaniel; Tanelli, Simone

    2016-06-01

    Two radar pulses sent at different frequencies near the 183 GHz water vapor line can be used to determine total column water vapor and water vapor profiles (within clouds or precipitation) exploiting the differential absorption on and off the line. We assess these water vapor measurements by applying a radar instrument simulator to CloudSat pixels and then running end-to-end retrieval simulations. These end-to-end retrievals enable us to fully characterize not only the expected precision but also their potential biases, allowing us to select radar tones that maximize the water vapor signal minimizing potential errors due to spectral variations in the target extinction properties. A hypothetical CloudSat-like instrument with 500 m by ˜ 1 km vertical and horizontal resolution and a minimum detectable signal and radar precision of -30 and 0.16 dBZ, respectively, can estimate total column water vapor with an expected precision of around 0.03 cm, with potential biases smaller than 0.26 cm most of the time, even under rainy conditions. The expected precision for water vapor profiles was found to be around 89 % on average, with potential biases smaller than 77 % most of the time when the profile is being retrieved close to surface but smaller than 38 % above 3 km. By using either horizontal or vertical averaging, the precision will improve vastly, with the measurements still retaining a considerably high vertical and/or horizontal resolution.

  12. First attempt to monitor atmospheric glyoxal using differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Liang; Lundin, Patrik; Somesfalean, Gabriel; Hu, Jiandong; Zhao, Guangyu; Svanberg, Sune; Bood, Joakim; Vrekoussis, Mihalis; Papayannis, Alexandros

    2012-11-01

    Glyoxal (CHOCHO), as an indicator of photochemical "hot spots", was for the first time the subject of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) campaign. The strongest absorption line of glyoxal in the blue wavelength region - 455.1 nm - was chosen as the experimental absorption wavelength. In order to handle the effects of absorption cross-section variation of the interfering gas - nitrogen dioxide (NO2) - three-wavelength DIAL measurements simultaneously detecting glyoxal and NO2, were performed. The differential absorption curves, recorded in July 2012, indicate an extremely low glyoxal concentration in Lund, Sweden, although it is expected to be peaking at this time of the year.

  13. Phase Fluctuation Absorption Spectroscopy of Small Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluckiger, David Ulrich

    The purpose of this dissertation is to establish a viable mass measurement technique for in situ aerosol. Adaptation of the photothermal effect in a Mach-Zehnder interferometer provided high mass sensitivity in an instrument employing Phase Fluctuation Laser Optical Heterodyne (PFLOH) absorption spectroscopy. The theory of aerosol absorption of electromagnetic energy and subsequent thermalization in continuum, Rayleigh regime region is presented. From this theory the general behavior of PFLOH detection of aerosol is described and shown to give a signal proportional to the absorption species mass. Furthermore the signal is shown to be linear in excitation energy and modulation frequency, and scalable. The instrument is calibrated and shown to behave as predicted. PFLOH detection is then used in determining the mass size distribution of the aerosol component of the ozone-isoprene and ozone -(alpha)-pinene products as a function of isoprene and (alpha) -pinene concentration.

  14. A Two Micron Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffrey Y.; VanValkenburg, Randal L.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-micron coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)/Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument measures atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) from a ground platform. It allows the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop. Keywords: Differential Absorption Lidar, Near Infrared Laser,

  15. Differential phase shift keyed signal resolver

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hopkins, P. M.; Wallingford, W. M. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A differential phase shift keyed signal resolver resolves the differential phase shift in the incoming signal to determine the data content thereof overcoming phase uncertainty without requiring a transmitted reference signal.

  16. REMOTE SENSING OF OZONE USING AN INFRARED DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A prototype airborne downlooking infrared differential absorption system using CO2 TEA (transverse excited atmospheric) lasers is described. The system uses two wavelengths and topographic reflection to measure the integrated column concentration of ozone between the laser source...

  17. Further advancement of differential optical absorption spectroscopy: theory of orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liudchik, Alexander M

    2014-08-10

    A modified version of the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method is presented. The technique is called orthogonal optical absorption spectroscopy (OOAS). A widespread variant of DOAS with smoothing of the registered spectrum and absorption cross sections being made employing a polynomial regression is a particular case of OOAS. The concept of OOAS provides a variety of new possibilities for constructing computational schemes and analyzing the influence of different error sources on calculated concentrations. PMID:25320931

  18. [Study of retrieving formaldehyde with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Qu, Xiao-Ying; Hu, Lin

    2009-01-01

    The present paper introduces the method of retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). The authors measured ambient HCHO in Beijing region with the help of differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument made by ourself, and discussed numerous factors in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), especially, the choice of HCHO wave band, how to avoid absorption of ambient SO2, NO2 and O3, and the influence of the Xenon lamp spectrum structure on the absorption of ambient HCHO. The authors achieved the HCHO concentration by simultaneously retrieving the concentrations of HCHO, SO2, NO2 and O3 with non-linear least square fitting method, avoiding the effect of choosing narrow wave of HCHO and the residual of SO2, NO2, O3 and the Xenon lamp spectrum structure in retrieving process to attain the concentration of HCHO, Finally the authors analyzed the origin of error in retrieving the concentration of HCHO with differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and the total error is within 13.7% in this method. PMID:19385238

  19. Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption technique to retrieve columnar water vapor

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaepfer, D.; Itten, K.I.; Borel, C.C.; Keller, J.

    1998-09-01

    Differential absorption techniques are suitable to retrieve the total column water vapor contents from imaging spectroscopy data. A technique called Atmospheric Precorrected Differential Absorption (APDA) is derived directly from simplified radiative transfer equations. It combines a partial atmospheric correction with a differential absorption technique. The atmospheric path radiance term is iteratively corrected during the retrieval of water vapor. This improves the results especially over low background albedos. The error of the method for various ground reflectance spectra is below 7% for most of the spectra. The channel combinations for two test cases are then defined, using a quantitative procedure, which is based on MODTRAN simulations and the image itself. An error analysis indicates that the influence of aerosols and channel calibration is minimal. The APDA technique is then applied to two AVIRIS images acquired in 1991 and 1995. The accuracy of the measured water vapor columns is within a range of {+-}5% compared to ground truth radiosonde data.

  20. [Spectral calibration for space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hai-Jin; Liu, Wen-Qing; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhao, Min-Jie; Jiang, Yu; Xue, Hui

    2012-11-01

    Space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer is used for remote sensing of atmospheric trace gas global distribution. This instrument acquires high accuracy UV/Vis radiation scattered or reflected by air or earth surface, and can monitor distribution and variation of trace gases based on differential optical absorption spectrum algorithm. Spectral calibration is the premise and base of quantification of remote sensing data of the instrument, and the precision of calibration directly decides the level of development and application of the instrument. Considering the characteristic of large field, wide wavelength range, high spatial and spectral resolution of the space-borne differential optical absorption spectrometer, a spectral calibration method is presented, a calibration device was built, the equation of spectral calibration was calculated through peak searching and regression analysis, and finally the full field spectral calibration of the instrument was realized. The precision of spectral calibration was verified with Fraunhofer lines of solar light. PMID:23387142

  1. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  2. AIR MONITORING BY DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETRY IN BAYTOWN, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report documents the results of a field study carried out in Baytown, Texas in August 1993. ne goal of the field study was to evaluate calibration and audit procedures for a differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) system. he other major goal of the study was to c...

  3. REMOTE MONITORING OF GASEOUS POLLUTANTS BY DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LASER TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-ended laser radar (LIDAR) system was designed, built, and successfully operated to measure range-resolved concentrations of NO2, SO2, and O3 in the atmosphere using a Differential Absorption of Scattered Energy (DASE) LIDAR technique. The system used a flash-lamp pumped ...

  4. Differential optical absorption spectrometer for measurement of tropospheric pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelisti, F.; Baroncelli, A.; Bonasoni, P.; Giovanelli, G.; Ravegnani, F.

    1995-05-01

    Our institute has recently developed a differential optical absorption spectrometry system called the gas analyzer spectrometer correlating optical absorption differences (GASCOAD), which features as a detector a linear image sensor that uses an artificial light source for long-path tropospheric-pollution monitoring. The GASCOAD, its method of eliminating interference from background sky light, and subsequent spectral analysis are reported and discussed. The spectrometer was used from 7 to 22 February 1993 in Milan, a heavily polluted metropolitan area, to measure the concentrations of SO2, NO2, O3, and HNO2 averaged over a 1.7-km horizontal light path. The findings are reported and briefly discussed.

  5. Fiber-optic differential absorption sensor for accurately monitoring biomass in a photobioreactor.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Nianbing; Liao, Qiang; Zhu, Xun; Zhao, Mingfu

    2015-01-10

    A fiber-optic differential absorption sensor was developed to accurately monitor biomass growth in a photobioreactor. The prepared sensor consists of two probes: the sensor and the reference. The sensor probe was employed to monitor the biomass and changes in the liquid-phase concentration in a culture. To separate the liquids from photosynthetic bacteria CQK 01 and measure the liquid-phase concentration, a proposed polyimide-silica hybrid membrane was coated on the sensing region of the reference probe. A linear relationship was observed between the sensor output signal and the biomass from the lag phase to the decline phase. PMID:25967621

  6. Towards quantitative atmospheric water vapor profiling with differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Gunn, Lachlan J; Abbott, Derek

    2015-08-24

    Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) is a powerful laser-based technique for trace gas profiling of the atmosphere. However, this technique is still under active development requiring precise and accurate wavelength stabilization, as well as accurate spectroscopic parameters of the specific resonance line and the effective absorption cross-section of the system. In this paper we describe a novel master laser system that extends our previous work for robust stabilization to virtually any number of multiple side-line laser wavelengths for the future probing to greater altitudes. In this paper, we also highlight the significance of laser spectral purity on DIAL accuracy, and illustrate a simple re-arrangement of a system for measuring effective absorption cross-section. We present a calibration technique where the laser light is guided to an absorption cell with 33 m path length, and a quantitative number density measurement is then used to obtain the effective absorption cross-section. The same absorption cell is then used for on-line laser stabilization, while microwave beat-frequencies are used to stabilize any number of off-line lasers. We present preliminary results using ∼300 nJ, 1 μs pulses at 3 kHz, with the seed laser operating as a nanojoule transmitter at 822.922 nm, and a receiver consisting of a photomultiplier tube (PMT) coupled to a 356 mm mirror. PMID:26368258

  7. Study on the elemental mercury absorption cross section based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Haiming; Yao, Penghui

    2015-08-01

    With the method of ultraviolet absorption spectrum, the exact absorption cross-section with the light source of the low-pressure mercury lamp was determined, during which the optimum wavelength for mercury concentrations inversion was 253.69 nm, the highest detection limit was 0.177 μg/cm3, and the lowest detection limit was 0.034 μg/cm3. Furthermore, based on the differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS), the relationship between the integral parameters (IP) and the concentration as well as the signal-noise ration (SNR) under the conditions of gas flow was determined and the lowest detection limit was figured out to be 0.03524 μg/cm3, providing a method of DOAS to de-noise through the comparison between the mercury concentration values produced by DOAS and that produced by the wavelet de-noising method (db5). It turned out that the differential optical absorption spectroscopy had a strong anti-interference ability, while the wavelet de-noising method was not suitable for measuring the trace concentration change.

  8. Phase tracking with differential dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haubois, Xavier; Lacour, Sylvestre; Perrin, Guy S.; Dembet, Roderick; Fedou, Pierre; Eisenhauer, Frank; Rousselet-Perraut, Karine; Straubmeier, Christian; Amorim, Antonio; Brandner, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    Differential chromatic dispersion in single-mode optical fibres leads to a loss of contrast of the white light fringe. For the GRAVITY instrument, this aspect is critical since it limits the fringe tracking performance. We present a real-time algorithm that compensates for differential dispersion due to varying fibre lengths using prior calibration of the optical fibres. This correction is limited by the accuracy to which the fibres stretch is known. We show how this affects the SNR on the white light fringe for different scenarios and we estimate how this phenomenon might eventually impact the astrometric accuracy of GRAVITY observations.

  9. Effect of differential spectral reflectance on DIAL measurements using topographic targets. [Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, W. B.

    1982-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric gases and temperature made using topographic targets to provide the backscattered signal are subject to errors from the differential spectral reflectance of the target materials. The magnitude of this effect is estimated for a number of DIAL measurements reported in the literature. Calculations are presented for several topographic targets. In general the effect on a DIAL measurement increases directly with increasing wavelength and laser line separation, and inversely with differential absorption coefficient and distance to the target. The effect can be minimized by using tunable or isotope lasers to reduce the laser line separation or by using additional reference wavelengths to determine the surface differential spectral reflectance.

  10. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved. PMID:20539344

  11. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  12. Multi-wavelength differential absorption measurements of chemical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.

    The probability of accurate detection and quantification of airborne species is enhanced when several optical wavelengths are used to measure the differential absorption of molecular spectral features. Characterization of minor atmospheric constituents, biological hazards, and chemical plumes containing multiple species is difficult when using current approaches because of weak signatures and the use of a limited number of wavelengths used for identification. Current broadband systems such as Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) have either limitations for long-range propagation, or require transmitter power levels that are unsafe for operation in urban environments. Passive hyperspectral imaging systems that utilize absorption of solar scatter at visible and infrared wavelengths, or use absorption of background thermal emission, have been employed routinely for detection of airborne chemical species. Passive approaches have operational limitations at various ranges, or under adverse atmospheric conditions because the source intensity and spectrum is often an unknown variable. The work presented here describes a measurement approach that uses a known source of a low transmitted power level for an active system, while retaining the benefits of broadband and extremely long-path absorption operations. An optimized passive imaging system also is described that operates in the 3 to 4 mum window of the mid-infrared. Such active and passive instruments can be configured to optimize the detection of several hydrocarbon gases, as well as many other species of interest. Measurements have provided the incentive to develop algorithms for the calculations of atmospheric species concentrations using multiple wavelengths. These algorithms are used to prepare simulations and make comparisons with experimental results from absorption data of a supercontinuum laser source. The MODTRAN model is used in preparing the simulations, and also in developing additional

  13. Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Measurements from Air and Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Ismail, S.; Grant, W. B.

    1998-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems have been used for the measurement of ozone, water vapor, and aerosols from aircraft platforms for over 18 years, yielding new insights into atmospheric chemistry, composition, and dynamics in large-scale field experiments conducted all over the world. The successful deployment of the lidar in-space technology experiment (LITE) in September 1994 demonstrated that space-based lidars can also collect valuable information on the global atmosphere. This paper reviews some of the contributions of the NASA Langley Research Center's airborne ozone and water vapor DIAL systems and space-based LITE system to the understanding of the atmosphere and discusses the feasibility and advantages of putting DIAL systems in space for routine atmospheric measurements of ozone and/or water vapor and aerosols and clouds. The technology and applications of the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique have progressed significantly since the first DIAL measurements of Schotland, and airborne DIAL measurements of ozone and water vapor are frequently being made in a wide range of field experiments. In addition, plans are underway to develop DIAL systems for use on satellites for continuous global measurements. This paper will highlight the history of airborne lidar and DIAL systems, summarize the major accomplishments of the NASA Langley DIAL program, and discuss specifications and goals for DIAL systems in space.

  14. [Retrieval of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xie, Pin-Hua; Fu, Qiang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Qin, Min; Li, Ang; Liu, Shi-Sheng; Wei, Qing-Nong

    2006-09-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, e. g. SO2, NO2, O3 etc. However, unlike the absorption spectra of SO2 and NO2, the analysis of aromatic compounds is difficult and strongly suffers from the cross interference of other absorbers (Herzberg bands of oxygen, ozone and sulfur dioxide), especially with relatively low concentrations of aromatic compounds in the atmosphere. In the present paper, the DOAS evaluation of aromatic compounds was performed by nonlinear least square fit with two interpolated oxygen optical density spectra at different path lengths and reference spectra of ozone at different temperature and SO2 cross section to correct the interference from absorbers of O2, O3 and SO2. The measurement of toluene, benzene, (m, p, o) xylene and phenol with a DOAS system showed that DOAS method is suitable for monocyclic aromatic compounds monitoring in the atmosphere. PMID:17112022

  15. Bayesian estimation of differential interferometer phase

    SciTech Connect

    Stockton, John K.; Wu Xinan; Kasevich, Mark A.

    2007-09-15

    We apply Bayesian logic to optimally estimate the differential phase in a discrete-time, dual-interferometer measurement. This method is particularly relevant to the case of a gravity gradiometer, where the gravity gradient between cold-atom fountain interferometers can be estimated from the differential phase, despite the presence of large common phase (acceleration) fluctuations. Given an accurate model, the bias-free algorithm we present is optimal and leverages experimental knowledge of the system noise, classical or quantum, to outperform other typical estimators, including ellipse-fitting techniques.

  16. Monitoring of volcanic sulphur dioxide emissions using differential absorption lidar (DIAL), differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), and correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.; Cecchi, G.; Pantani, L.; Ferrara, R.; Caltabiano, T.

    1998-10-01

    The total fluxes of sulphur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano were studied using optical remote sensing techniques in three shipborne field experiments (1992, 1994, and 1997). The main purpose of the experiments was to compare active (laser) techniques with passive monitoring. Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurements were implemented by placing the Swedish mobile lidar system on board the Italian research vessel Urania, sailing under the volcanic plumes. Simultaneously, the passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique was used for assessing the total overhead gas burden. Finally, correlation spectroscopy (COSPEC) was also implemented in one of the campaigns. Differences in integrated gas column assessment are expected and observed, mostly connected to complex scattering conditions influencing the passive measurements. Since such measurements are much employed in routine volcanic monitoring it is of great interest to model and provide corrections to the raw data obtained. Lidar measurements proved to be quite useful for this purpose. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, SO2 fluxes of the order of 1000, 100, and 10 tonnes/day were measured for Mt. Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano, respectively.

  17. High pressure x-ray absorption studies of phase transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada, J.M.; Ingalls, R.; Crozier, E.D.

    1984-01-01

    High pressure generally changes all of the properties of substances, leading to phase transitions in many cases. This paper reviews how such phase changes reveal themselves in x-ray absorption spectra. Examples are given using the salts NaBr, RbCl, CuBr, and SnSe. (DLC)

  18. Cost reduction in absorption chillers: Phase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Leigh, R.W.

    1989-02-01

    A research program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has addressed the possibility of dramatically lowering the first costs of absorption chillers through lowered material intensity and the use of lower cost materials, primarily in the heat exchangers which make up the bulk of the operating components of these systems. This must be done while retaining the best performance characteristics available today, a gross design point coefficient of performance (COP) of 1.3 and a net design (seasonal) average COP of 1.0 (0.90) in a directly fired, double effect unit. We have investigated several possible routes to these goals, and here report on these findings, focusing on the areas that appear most promising. The candidate technologies include the use of polymer film heat exchangers in several applications, the use of thin strips of new, corrosion resistant alloys to replace thicker, less impervious metals in applications exposed to gas flames, and copper or cupro-nickel foils in contact with system water. The use of such materials is only possible in the context of new heat exchanger and system designs, which are also discussed. To lend focus, we have concentrated on a directly fired double effect system providing capacity only. If successful, these techniques will also find wide applicability in heat pumps, cogeneration systems, solar cooling, heat recovery and chemical process heat transfer. 46 refs., 24 figs., 22 tabs.

  19. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Browell, E V; Wilkerson, T D; McIlrath, T J

    1979-10-15

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements. PMID:20216627

  20. Water vapor differential absorption lidar development and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.; Wilkerson, T. D.; Mcllrath, T. J.

    1979-01-01

    A ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system is described which has been developed for vertical range-resolved measurements of water vapor. The laser transmitter consists of a ruby-pumped dye laser, which is operated on a water vapor absorption line at 724.372 nm. Part of the ruby laser output is transmitted simultaneously with the dye laser output to determine atmospheric scattering and attenuation characteristics. The dye and ruby laser backscattered light is collected by a 0.5-m diam telescope, optically separated in the receiver package, and independently detected using photomultiplier tubes. Measurements of vertical water vapor concentration profiles using the DIAL system at night are discussed, and comparisons are made between the water vapor DIAL measurements and data obtained from locally launched rawinsondes. Agreement between these measurements was found to be within the uncertainty of the rawinsonde data to an altitude of 3 km. Theoretical simulations of this measurement were found to give reasonably accurate predictions of the random error of the DIAL measurements. Confidence in these calculations will permit the design of aircraft and Shuttle DIAL systems and experiments using simulation results as the basis for defining lidar system performance requirements

  1. X-ray differential phase-contrast tomographic reconstruction with a phase line integral retrieval filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Li, Chen

    2015-04-01

    We report an alternative reconstruction technique for x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT). This approach is based on a new phase line integral projection retrieval filter, which is rooted in the derivative property of the Fourier transform and counteracts the differential nature of the DPC-CT projections. It first retrieves the phase line integral from the DPC-CT projections. Then the standard filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithms popular in x-ray absorption-contrast CT are directly applied to the retrieved phase line integrals to reconstruct the DPC-CT images. Compared with the conventional DPC-CT reconstruction algorithms, the proposed method removes the Hilbert imaginary filter and allows for the direct use of absorption-contrast FBP algorithms. Consequently, FBP-oriented image processing techniques and reconstruction acceleration softwares that have already been successfully used in absorption-contrast CT can be directly adopted to improve the DPC-CT image quality and speed up the reconstruction.

  2. Methods for deacidizing gaseous mixtures by phase enhanced absorption

    DOEpatents

    Hu, Liang

    2012-11-27

    An improved process for deacidizing a gaseous mixture using phase enhanced gas-liquid absorption is described. The process utilizes a multiphasic absorbent that absorbs an acid gas at increased rate and leads to reduced overall energy costs for the deacidizing operation.

  3. Laser speckle effects on hard target differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    MacKerrow, E.P.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.

    1996-04-01

    Reflection of laser light from a diffuse surface exhibits a complex interference pattern known as laser speckle. Measurement of the reflected intensity from remote targets, common to ``hard-target`` differential absorption lidar (DIAL) requires consideration of the statistical properties of the reflected light. The authors have explored the effects of laser speckle on the noise statistics for CO{sub 2} DIAL. For an ensemble of independent speckle patterns it is predicted that the variance for the measured intensity is inversely proportional to the number of speckle measured. They have used a rotating drum target to obtain a large number of independent speckle and have measured the predicted decrease in the variance after correlations due to system drifts were accounted for. Measurements have been made using both circular and linear polarized light. These measurements show a slight improvement in return signal statistics when circular polarization is used. The authors have conducted experiments at close range to isolate speckle phenomena from other phenomena, such as atmospheric turbulence and platform motion thus allowing them to gain a full understanding of speckle. They have also studied how to remove correlation in the data due to albedo inhomogeneities producing a more statistically independent ensemble of speckle patterns. They find that some types of correlation are difficult to remove from the data.

  4. Progress Report on Frequency - Modulated Differential Absorption Lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, Bret D.; Harper, Warren W.; Myers, Tanya L.; Taubman, Matthew S.; Williams, Richard M.; Schultz, John F.

    2001-12-15

    Modeling done at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in FY2000 predicted improved sensitivity for remote chemical detection by differential absorption lidar (DIAL) if frequency-modulated (FM) lasers were used. This improved sensitivity results from faster averaging away of speckle noise and the recently developed quantum cascade (QC) lasers offer the first practical method for implementing this approach in the molecular fingerprint region of the infrared. To validate this model prediction, a simple laboratory bench FM-DIAL system was designed, assembled, tested, and laboratory-scale experiments were carried out during FY2001. Preliminary results of the FM DIAL experiments confirm the speckle averaging advantages predicted by the models. In addition, experiments were performed to explore the use of hybrid QC - CO2 lasers for achieving sufficient frequency-modulated laser power to enable field experiments at longer ranges (up to one kilometer or so). This approach will allow model validation at realistic ranges much sooner than would be possible if one had to first develop master oscillator - power amplifier systems utilizing only QC devices. Amplification of a QC laser with a CO2 laser was observed in the first hybrid laser experiments, but the low gain and narrow linewidth of the CO2 laser available for these experiments prevented production of a high-power FM laser beam.

  5. Micropulse water vapor differential absorption lidar: transmitter design and performance.

    PubMed

    Nehrir, Amin R; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2012-10-22

    An all diode-laser-based micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laser transmitter for tropospheric water vapor and aerosol profiling is presented. The micropulse DIAL (MPD) transmitter utilizes two continuous wave (cw) external cavity diode lasers (ECDL) to seed an actively pulsed, overdriven tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA). The MPD laser produces up to 7 watts of peak power over a 1 µs pulse duration (7 µJ) and a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. Spectral switching between the online and offline seed lasers is achieved on a 1Hz basis using a fiber optic switch to allow for more accurate sampling of the atmospheric volume between the online and offline laser shots. The high laser spectral purity of greater than 0.9996 coupled with the broad tunability of the laser transmitter will allow for accurate measurements of tropospheric water vapor in a wide range of geographic locations under varying atmospheric conditions. This paper describes the design and performance characteristics of a third generation MPD laser transmitter with enhanced laser performance over the previous generation DIAL system. PMID:23187280

  6. Rayleigh-backscattering doppler broadening correction for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Lanlan; Zhang, Yinchao; Chen, Siying; Guo, Pan; Chen, He

    2015-11-01

    The spectral broadening by Rayleigh backscattering can cause large changes in water vapor echo signals, causing errors when the water vapor concentration is inversed by differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A correction algorithm is proposed to revise the errors due to the effect of laser spectral broadening. The relative errors of water vapor are calculated in cases of different aerosol distribution and temperature changes before and after correction. The results show that measurement errors due to the Doppler broadening are more than 5% before correction and a 2% measurement error after corrected for the case of a smooth, background aerosol distribution. However, due to the high aerosol gradients and strong temperature inversion, errors can be up to 40% and 10% with no corrections for this effect, respectively. The relative errors can reduce to less than 2% after correction. Hence, the correction algorithm for Rayleigh Doppler broadening can improve detection accuracy in H2O DIAL measurements especially when it is applied to high aerosol concentration or strong temperature inversion.

  7. Carbon Dioxide Separation from Flue Gas by Phase Enhanced Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tim Fout

    2007-06-30

    A new process, phase enhanced absorption, was invented. The method is carried out in an absorber, where a liquid carrier (aqueous solution), an organic mixture (or organic compound), and a gas mixture containing a gas to be absorbed are introduced from an inlet. Since the organic mixture is immiscible or at least partially immiscible with the liquid carrier, the organic mixture forms a layer or small parcels between the liquid carrier and the gas mixture. The organic mixture in the absorber improves mass transfer efficiency of the system and increases the absorption rate of the gas. The organic mixture serves as a transportation media. The gas is finally accumulated in the liquid carrier as in a conventional gas-liquid absorption system. The presence of the organic layer does not hinder the regeneration of the liquid carrier or recovery of the gas because the organic layer is removed by a settler after the absorption process is completed. In another aspect, the system exhibited increased gas-liquid separation efficiency, thereby reducing the costs of operation and maintenance. Our study focused on the search of the organic layer or transportation layer to enhance the absorption rate of carbon dioxide. The following systems were studied, (1) CO{sub 2}-water system and CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer system; (2) CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution system and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate aqueous solution-organic layer system. CO{sub 2}-water and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate systems are the traditional gas-liquid absorption processes. The CO{sub 2}-water-organic layer and CO{sub 2}-Potassium Carbonate-organic layer systems are the novel absorption processes, phase enhanced absorption. As we mentioned early, organic layer is used for the increase of absorption rate, and plays the role of transportation of CO{sub 2}. Our study showed that the absorption rate can be increased by adding the organic layer. However, the enhanced factor is highly depended on the

  8. Nocturnal Measurements of HONO by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wojtal, P.; McLaren, R.

    2011-12-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) was used to quantify the concentration of HONO, NO2 and SO2 in the nocturnal urban atmosphere at York University over a period of one year. These measurements form a comprehensive HONO data set, including a large range of temperatures, relative humidity, surface conditions (snow, water, dry, etc.) and NO2 concentrations. Laboratory studies and observations within the nocturnal boundary layer reported in the literature suggest heterogeneous conversion of NO2 on surface adsorbed water as the major nighttime source of HONO. HONO formation and photolysis is believed to represent a major source term in the hydroxyl radical budget in polluted continental regions. Currently, most air quality models tend to significantly underpredict HONO, caused by the lack of understanding of HONO formation processes and the parameters that affect its concentration. Recently, we reported nocturnal pseudo steady states (PSS) of HONO in an aqueous marine environment and a conceptual model for HONO formation on aqueous surfaces was proposed. The data set collected at York University is being analyzed with a view towards further understanding the nighttime HONO formation mechanism and testing several hypotheses: 1) A HONO PSS can exist during certain times at night in an urban area in which the HONO concentration is independent of NO2, given the surface contains sufficient water coverage and is saturated with nitrogen containing precursors; 2) The concentration of HONO is positively correlated with temperature during periods where a PSS exists; 3) Different conversion efficiencies of NO2 to HONO exist on dry, wet and snow surfaces; 4) HONO formation has a NO2 order dependence between 0 and 2nd order, dependant on NO2 concentration, relative humidity, etc. The data set will be presented along with statistical analysis that sheds new light on the source of HONO in urban areas at night.

  9. Reduced-background gas-phase absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sweetser, J N; Trebino, R

    1998-08-15

    We propose and demonstrate a new method for single-shot multiplex absorption spectroscopy that permits enhanced sensitivity in the simultaneous measurement of multiple spectral lines in rapidly changing gas-phase media, such as turbulent flames. It uses an ultrashort laser pulse that propagates through the absorbing medium, for which the relevant absorption information resides in the free-induction decay that is trailing behind the transmitted pulse. Time gating out most of the transmitted pulse, but not the free-induction decay, enhances the relative fraction of light that contains absorption information when the spectrum is measured. This procedure reduces the background associated with the input light, thus enhancing detection sensitivity. PMID:18087501

  10. Differential Phase Interferometry with the Keck Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vasisht, Gautam; Colavita, M. Mark

    2004-01-01

    We summarize the Differential Phase (DP) technique as well as the planned implementation at the Keck Interferometer. Multicolor phase measurements are potentially a powerful astrophysical probe - and can allow ground-based direct detection of extrasolar planets. Better than 0.1 mrad phase measurements in the infrared can allow the Keck Interferometer to detect radiation from the so-called hot-Jupiter or 'Roaster' class of planets. At JPL, we are presently developing and testing instrumentation that will enable these extremely sensitive measurements. First on-sky observations are expected to start in mid-2004. In this article we describe DP and other related techniques, provide an outline of the instrument and present results from preliminary laboratory experiments.

  11. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%. PMID:24104135

  12. Phase retrieval and differential phase-contrast imaging with low-brilliance X-ray sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeiffer, Franz; Weitkamp, Timm; Bunk, Oliver; David, Christian

    2006-04-01

    X-ray radiographic absorption imaging is an invaluable tool in medical diagnostics and materials science. For biological tissue samples, polymers or fibre composites, however, the use of conventional X-ray radiography is limited due to their weak absorption. This is resolved at highly brilliant X-ray synchrotron or micro-focus sources by using phase-sensitive imaging methods to improve the contrast. However, the requirements of the illuminating radiation mean that hard-X-ray phase-sensitive imaging has until now been impractical with more readily available X-ray sources, such as X-ray tubes. In this letter, we report how a setup consisting of three transmission gratings can efficiently yield quantitative differential phase-contrast images with conventional X-ray tubes. In contrast with existing techniques, the method requires no spatial or temporal coherence, is mechanically robust, and can be scaled up to large fields of view. Our method provides all the benefits of contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive imaging, but is also fully compatible with conventional absorption radiography. It is applicable to X-ray medical imaging, industrial non-destructive testing, and to other low-brilliance radiation, such as neutrons or atoms.

  13. Differential phase contrast: An integral perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubk, A.; Zweck, J.

    2015-02-01

    Differential phase contrast (DPC) in a scanning transmission electron microscope is a widely employed technique for probing electromagnetic fields on the nanoscale. We show that the DPC signal corresponds to the averaged lateral probability current of the scattered electron probe. Based on this result we discuss the interpretation of DPC in terms of the projected electric and magnetic fields and the influence of experimental parameters thereon. We further show that DPC can be interpreted as a quantum weak measurement and that the reciprocal broad beam illumination technique is given by an astigmatic transport of intensity reconstruction.

  14. Optimization of A 2-Micron Laser Frequency Stabilization System for a Double-Pulse CO2 Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Yu, Jirong; Bai, Yingsin; Koch, Grady; Petros, Mulugeta; Trieu, Bo; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    A carbon dioxide (CO2) Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for accurate CO2 concentration measurement requires a frequency locking system to achieve high frequency locking precision and stability. We describe the frequency locking system utilizing Frequency Modulation (FM), Phase Sensitive Detection (PSD), and Proportional Integration Derivative (PID) feedback servo loop, and report the optimization of the sensitivity of the system for the feed back loop based on the characteristics of a variable path-length CO2 gas cell. The CO2 gas cell is characterized with HITRAN database (2004). The method can be applied for any other frequency locking systems referring to gas absorption line.

  15. Advanced sine wave modulation of continuous wave laser system for atmospheric CO(2) differential absorption measurements.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joel F; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R

    2014-02-10

    In this theoretical study, modulation techniques are developed to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. A continuous wave (CW) lidar system using sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) pseudo-noise (PN) codes is described for making simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Amplitude and phase-shift keying (PSK) modulated intensity modulation (IM) carriers, in addition to a hybrid-pulse technique are investigated, which exhibit optimal autocorrelation properties. A method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions, which does not significantly degrade the resolution or introduce sidelobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth. PMID:24663259

  16. Differential optical absorption techniques for diagnostics of coal gasification. Technical progress report, April-June 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-08-01

    The application of differential optical absorption (DOA) techniques for the in-situ determination of the chemical composition of coal gasification process streams is investigated. Absorption spectra of relevant molecular species and the temperature and pressure effects on DOA-determined spectral characteristics of these species will be determined and cataloged. A system will be configured, assembled, and tested. 10 references, 1 figure.

  17. [Retrieval of tropospheric NO2 by multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-hua; Si, Fu-qi; Dou, Ke; Li, Ang; Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-qing

    2010-09-01

    A method of retrieving NO2 in troposphere based on multi axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) was introduced. The differential slant column density (dSCD) of NO2 was evaluated by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS), removing the Fraunhofer structure and Ring effect. Combining the results of different observing directions, the tropospheric NO2 differential slant column density (deltaSCD) was evaluated, and the air mass factor (AMF) was calculated with the radiative transfer model SCIATRAN and the tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) was retrieved. To ensure the accuracy of the results, it was compared with the results of long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS), a good accordance was shown with the correlation coefficients of 0.94027 and 0.96924. PMID:21105419

  18. Microscopic Description of Intraband Absorption in Graphene: The Occurrence of Transient Negative Differential Transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadi, Faris; Winzer, Torben; Malic, Ermin; Knorr, Andreas; Göttfert, F.; Mittendorff, M.; Winnerl, S.; Helm, M.

    2014-07-01

    We present a microscopic explanation of the controversially discussed transient negative differential transmission observed in degenerate optical pump-probe measurements in graphene. Our approach is based on the density matrix formalism allowing a time- and momentum-resolved study of carrier-light, carrier-carrier, and carrier-phonon interaction on microscopic footing. We show that phonon-assisted optical intraband transitions give rise to transient absorption in the optically excited hot carrier system counteracting pure absorption bleaching of interband transitions. While interband transition bleaching is relevant in the first hundreds of fs after the excitation, intraband absorption sets in at later times. In particular, in the low excitation regime, these intraband absorption processes prevail over the absorption bleaching resulting in a zero crossing of the differential transmission. Our findings are in good qualitative agreement with recent experimental pump-probe studies.

  19. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  20. Ocean optics estimation for absorption, backscattering, and phase function parameters.

    PubMed

    Hakim, Ammar H; McCormick, Norman J

    2003-02-20

    We propose and test an inverse ocean optics procedure with numerically simulated data for the determination of inherent optical properties using in-water radiance measurements. If data are available at only one depth within a deep homogeneous water layer, then the single-scattering albedo and the single parameter that characterizes the Henyey-Greenstein phase function can be estimated. If data are available at two depths, then these two parameters can be determined along with the optical thickness so that the absorption and scattering coefficients, and also the backscattering coefficient, can be estimated. With a knowledge of these parameters, the albedo and Lambertian fraction of reflected radiance of the bottom can be determined if measurements are made close to the bottom. A simplified method for determining the optical properties of the water also is developed for only three irradiance-type measurements if the radiance is approximately in the asymptotic regime. PMID:12617207

  1. A water vapor monitor using differential infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, D. E.; Goodsell, D. S.

    1981-09-01

    A water vapor monitor was developed with adequate sensitivity and versatility for a variety of applications. Two applications are the continuous monitoring of water in ambient air and the measuring of the mass of water desorbed from aerosol filters. The sample gas may be held static, or flow continuously through the 56 cc sample cell, temperature controlled at 45 C. Infrared energy from a tungsten-iodide bulb passes through a rotating filter wheel and the sample cell to a PbS detector. The infrared beam passes through the sample gas twice to produce a total optical path of 40 cm. The infrared beam passes alternately through two semicircular narrow bandpass filters. Absorption by the water vapor in the sample produces a 30-Hz modulation of the detector signal that is proportional to the water concentration. The maximum concentration that can be measured accurately is approximately 5%.

  2. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  3. Error Reduction Methods for Integrated-path Differential-absorption Lidar Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Jeffrey R.; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T.

    2012-01-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log".

  4. Advanced Sine Wave Modulation of Continuous Wave Laser System for Atmospheric CO2 Differential Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, Joel F.; Lin, Bing; Nehrir, Amin R.

    2014-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center in collaboration with ITT Exelis have been experimenting with Continuous Wave (CW) laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) as a means of performing atmospheric CO2 column measurements from space to support the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission.Because range resolving Intensity Modulated (IM) CW lidar techniques presented here rely on matched filter correlations, autocorrelation properties without side lobes or other artifacts are highly desirable since the autocorrelation function is critical for the measurements of lidar return powers, laser path lengths, and CO2 column amounts. In this paper modulation techniques are investigated that improve autocorrelation properties. The modulation techniques investigated in this paper include sine waves modulated by maximum length (ML) sequences in various hardware configurations. A CW lidar system using sine waves modulated by ML pseudo random noise codes is described, which uses a time shifting approach to separate channels and make multiple, simultaneous online/offline differential absorption measurements. Unlike the pure ML sequence, this technique is useful in hardware that is band pass filtered as the IM sine wave carrier shifts the main power band. Both amplitude and Phase Shift Keying (PSK) modulated IM carriers are investigated that exibit perfect autocorrelation properties down to one cycle per code bit. In addition, a method is presented to bandwidth limit the ML sequence based on a Gaussian filter implemented in terms of Jacobi theta functions that does not seriously degrade the resolution or introduce side lobes as a means of reducing aliasing and IM carrier bandwidth.

  5. The joint estimation of differential delay, Doppler, and phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wax, M.

    1982-09-01

    In radio and sonar applications it sometimes happens that narrow-band signals, originated from a remote source and observed at a pair of receivers, differ by unknown differential phase and Doppler shift in addition to the differential delay corresponding to the range difference. The correspondence presents the joint maximum likelihood (ML) estimate of the differential delay, Doppler, and phase and examines their accuracy by deriving the Cramer-Rao bound. It is shown that joint ML estimators are the values of the delay and Doppler that maximize the magnitude of a generalized ambiguity function analogous to the one used in radar. It is also shown that for long observation time and high enough signal-to-noise ratio there is no degradation in the accuracy of the time-delay estimator due to the additional phase and Doppler uncertainty and that the differential Doppler is uncorrelated with the differential delay and phase estimators.

  6. D-region differential-phase measurements and ionization variability studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, R. M.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Measurements of electron densities in the D region are made by the partial-reflection differential-absorption and differential-phase techniques. The differential-phase data are obtained by a hard-wired phase-measuring system. Electron-sensity profiles obtained by the two techniques on six occasions are plotted and compared. Electron-density profiles obtained at the same time on 30 occasions during the years 1975 through 1977 are averaged to form a single profile for each technique. The effect of varying the assumed collision-frequency profile on these averaged profiles is studied. Time series of D-region electron-sensity data obtained by 3.4 minute intervals on six days during the summer of 1977 are examined for wave-like disturbances and tidal oscillations.

  7. Ultra-violet and visible absorption characterization of explosives by differential reflectometry.

    PubMed

    Dubroca, Thierry; Moyant, Kyle; Hummel, Rolf E

    2013-03-15

    This study presents some optical properties of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX, HMX and tetryl, specifically their absorption spectra as a function of concentration in various solvents in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We utilize a standoff explosives detection method, called differential reflectometry (DR). TNT was diluted in six different solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, ethyl acetate, methanol, and toluene), which allowed for a direct comparison of absorption features over a wide range of concentrations. A line-shape analysis was adopted with great accuracy (R(2)>0.99) to model the absorption features of TNT in differential reflectivity spectra. We observed a blue shift in the pertinent absorption band with decreasing TNT concentration for all solvents. Moreover, using this technique, it was found that for all utilized solvents the concentration of TNT as well as of RDX, HMX, and tetryl, measured as a function of the transition wavelength of the ultra-violet absorption edge in differential reflectivity spectra shows three distinct regions. A model is presented to explain this behavior which is based on intermolecular hydrogen bonding of explosives molecules with themselves (or lack thereof) at different concentrations. Other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and π-stacking contribute to slight variations in the resulting spectra, which were determined to be rather insignificant in comparison to hydrogen bonding. The results are aimed towards a better understanding of the DR spectra of explosives energetic materials. PMID:23299022

  8. Ultra-violet and visible absorption characterization of explosives by differential reflectometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Moyant, Kyle; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2013-03-01

    This study presents some optical properties of TNT (2,4,6-trinitrotoluene), RDX, HMX and tetryl, specifically their absorption spectra as a function of concentration in various solvents in the ultraviolet and visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. We utilize a standoff explosives detection method, called differential reflectometry (DR). TNT was diluted in six different solvents (acetone, acetonitrile, ethanol, ethyl acetate, methanol, and toluene), which allowed for a direct comparison of absorption features over a wide range of concentrations. A line-shape analysis was adopted with great accuracy (R2 > 0.99) to model the absorption features of TNT in differential reflectivity spectra. We observed a blue shift in the pertinent absorption band with decreasing TNT concentration for all solvents. Moreover, using this technique, it was found that for all utilized solvents the concentration of TNT as well as of RDX, HMX, and tetryl, measured as a function of the transition wavelength of the ultra-violet absorption edge in differential reflectivity spectra shows three distinct regions. A model is presented to explain this behavior which is based on intermolecular hydrogen bonding of explosives molecules with themselves (or lack thereof) at different concentrations. Other intermolecular forces such as dipole-dipole interactions, London dispersion forces and π-stacking contribute to slight variations in the resulting spectra, which were determined to be rather insignificant in comparison to hydrogen bonding. The results are aimed towards a better understanding of the DR spectra of explosives energetic materials.

  9. Airborne Measurements of CO2 Column Absorption and Range Using a Pulsed Direct-Detection Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; Weaver, Clark J.; Mao, Jianping; Allan, Graham R.; Hasselbrack, William E.; Browell, Edward V.

    2013-01-01

    We report on airborne CO2 column absorption measurements made in 2009 with a pulsed direct-detection lidar operating at 1572.33 nm and utilizing the integrated path differential absorption technique. We demonstrated these at different altitudes from an aircraft in July and August in flights over four locations in the central and eastern United States. The results show clear CO2 line shape and absorption signals, which follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude from 3 to 13 km. The lidar measurement statistics were also calculated for each flight as a function of altitude. The optical depth varied nearly linearly with altitude, consistent with calculations based on atmospheric models. The scatter in the optical depth measurements varied with aircraft altitude as expected, and the median measurement precisions for the column varied from 0.9 to 1.2 ppm. The altitude range with the lowest scatter was 810 km, and the majority of measurements for the column within it had precisions between 0.2 and 0.9 ppm.

  10. The concentration-estimation problem for multiple-wavelength differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Payne, A.N.

    1994-07-01

    We are seeking to develop a reliable methodology for multi-chemicai detection and discrimination based upon multi-wavelength differential absorption lidar measurements. In this paper, we summarize some preliminary results of our efforts to devise suitable concentration-estimation algorithms for use in detection and discrimination schemes.

  11. LONG PATH DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER AND EPA-APPROVED FIXED POINT METHODS INTERCOMPARISON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential optical absorption spectrometry (DOAS) has been used by a number of investigators over the past 10 years to measure a wide range of gaseous air pollutants. ecently OPSIS AB, Lund, Sweden, has developed and made commercially available DOAS instrument that has a number...

  12. AIR QUALITY MONITORING IN ATLANTA WITH THE DIFFERENTIAL OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTROMETER

    EPA Science Inventory

    During July and August of 1990, a differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) made by OPSIS Inc. was used to measure gaseous air pollutants over three separate open paths in Atlanta, GA. ver path 1 (1099 m) and path 2 (1824 m), ozone (O3), sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen d...

  13. [Concentration retrieving method of SO2 using differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on statistics].

    PubMed

    Liu, Bin; Sun, Chang-Ku; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yu-Mei; Liu, Jun-Ping

    2011-01-01

    A concentration retrieving method using statistics is presented, which is applied in differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for measuring the concentration of SO2. The method uses the standard deviation of the differential absorption to represents the gas concentration. Principle component analysis (PCA) method is used to process the differential absorption spectrum. In the method, the basis data for the concentration retrieval of SO2 is the combination of the PCA processing result, the correlation coefficient, and the standard deviation of the differential absorption. The method is applied to a continuous emission monitoring system (CEMS) with optical path length of 0.3 m. Its measuring range for SO2 concentration is 0-5 800 mg x m(-3). The nonlinear calibration and the temperature compensation for the system were executed. The full scale error of the retrieving concentration is less than 0.7% FS. And the measuring result is -4.54 mg x m(-3) when the concentration of SO2 is zero. PMID:21428087

  14. Retrieval of Aerosol Profiles using Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Selami; Frieß, Udo; Apituley, Arnoud; Henzing, Bas; Baars, Holger; Heese, Birgit; Althausen, Dietrich; Adam, Mariana; Putaud, Jean-Philippe; Zieger, Paul; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    Multi Axis Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is a well established measurement technique to derive atmospheric trace gas profiles. Using MAX-DOAS measurements of trace gases with a known vertical profile, like the oxygen-dimer O4, it is possible to retrieve information on atmospheric aerosols. Based on the optimal estimation method, we have developed an algorithm which fits simultaneously measured O4 optical densities and relative intensities at several wavelengths and elevation angles to values simulated by a radiative transfer model. Retrieval parameters are aerosol extinction profile and optical properties such as single scattering albedo, phase function and Angström exponent. In 2008 and 2009 several intercomparison campaigns with established aerosol measurement techniques took place in Cabauw/Netherlands, Melpitz/Germany, Ispra/Italy and Leipzig/Germany, where simultaneous DOAS, lidar, Sun photometer and Nephelometer measurements were performed. Here we present results of the intercomparisons for cloud free conditions. The correlation of the aerosol optical thickness retrieved by the DOAS technique and the Sun photometer shows coefficients of determination from 0.96 to 0.98 and slopes from 0.94 to 1.07. The vertical structure of the DOAS retrieved aerosol extinction profiles compare favourably with the structures seen by the backscatter lidar. However, the vertical spatial development of the boundary layer is reproduced with a lower resolution by the DOAS technique. Strategies for the near real-time retrieval of trace gas profiles, aerosol profiles and optical properties will be discussed as well.

  15. [Research on the NO2 mean concentration measurement with target differential optical absorption spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jin; Si, Fu-Qi; Zhou, Hai-Jin; Zhao, Min-Jie; Dou, Ke; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2013-04-01

    A new monitoring method of NO2 concentration near ground with the target difference absorption spectrum technology (Target DOAS) is introduced in the present paper. This method is based on the passive difference absorption spectrum technology. The instrument collects solar reflection spectrum of remote objectives, such as wall of building and mountain, and a specific reference spectrum is chosen to subtract the influence of trace gases from the target to atmospheric top, then integrated concentration of NO2 along the path between the target and instrument can be calculated through the differential absorption spectra inversion algorithm. Since the distance between the instrument and target is given, the mean concentration of NO2 can be derived. With developed Target DOAS instrument, NO2 concentration measurement was carried out in Hefei. And comparison was made between the target DOAS and long path difference absorption spectrometer. Good consistency was presented, proving the feasibility of this method. PMID:23841393

  16. Total fluxes of sulfur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano measured by differential absorption lidar and passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edner, H.; Ragnarson, P.; Svanberg, S.; Wallinder, E.; Ferrara, R.; Cioni, R.; Raco, B.; Taddeucci, G.

    1994-09-01

    The total flux of sulfur dioxide from the Italian volcanoes Etna, Stromboli, and Vulcano was determined using the differential absorption lidar technique. The measurements were performed from an oceanographic research ship making traverses under the volcanic plumes with the lidar system sounding vertically. By combining the integrated gas concentration over the plume cross section with wind velocity data, it was possible to determine the total fluxes of SO2 from the three volcanoes, all measured within a 3-day period in September 1992. We found total fluxes of about 25, 180, and 1300 t/d for Vulcano, Stromboli, and Etna, respectively. These data, collected with an active remote-sensing technique, were compared with simultaneous recording with passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) using the sky radiation as the light source. Since the geometry of the light paths crossing the volcanic plume is not well defined in the passive measurements, a correction to the DOAS data is required. The SO2 results are also compared with previously available data from correlation spectroscopy measurements. Lidar measurements on atomic mercury were also made for the plumes from Stromboli and Vulcano, but the system sensitivity and range only allowed estimates of upper limits for the Hg fluxes.

  17. Pressure Measurements Using an Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar. Part 1; Analysis of the Systematic Error Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flamant, Cyrille N.; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Korb, C. Laurence; Evans, Keith D.; Palm, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    Remote airborne measurements of the vertical and horizontal structure of the atmospheric pressure field in the lower troposphere are made with an oxygen differential absorption lidar (DIAL). A detailed analysis of this measurement technique is provided which includes corrections for imprecise knowledge of the detector background level, the oxygen absorption fine parameters, and variations in the laser output energy. In addition, we analyze other possible sources of systematic errors including spectral effects related to aerosol and molecular scattering interference by rotational Raman scattering and interference by isotopic oxygen fines.

  18. Differential phase acoustic microscope for micro-NDE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waters, David D.; Pusateri, T. L.; Huang, S. R.

    1992-01-01

    A differential phase scanning acoustic microscope (DP-SAM) was developed, fabricated, and tested in this project. This includes the acoustic lens and transducers, driving and receiving electronics, scanning stage, scanning software, and display software. This DP-SAM can produce mechanically raster-scanned acoustic microscopic images of differential phase, differential amplitude, or amplitude of the time gated returned echoes of the samples. The differential phase and differential amplitude images provide better image contrast over the conventional amplitude images. A specially designed miniature dual beam lens was used to form two foci to obtain the differential phase and amplitude information of the echoes. High image resolution (1 micron) was achieved by applying high frequency (around 1 GHz) acoustic signals to the samples and placing two foci close to each other (1 micron). Tone burst was used in this system to obtain a good estimation of the phase differences between echoes from the two adjacent foci. The system can also be used to extract the V(z) acoustic signature. Since two acoustic beams and four receiving modes are available, there are 12 possible combinations to produce an image or a V(z) scan. This provides a unique feature of this system that none of the existing acoustic microscopic systems can provide for the micro-nondestructive evaluation applications. The entire system, including the lens, electronics, and scanning control software, has made a competitive industrial product for nondestructive material inspection and evaluation and has attracted interest from existing acoustic microscope manufacturers.

  19. Differential absorption lidar technique for measurement of the atmospheric pressure profile

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new two-wavelength lidar technique for remotely measuring the pressure profile using the trough absorption region between two strong lines in the oxygen A band is described. The theory of integrated vertical path, differential ranging, and horizontal-path pressure measurements is given, with methods to desensitize and correct for temperature effects. The properties of absorption troughs are described and shown to reduce errors due to laser frequency jitter by up to two orders of magnitude. A general analysis, including laser bandwidth effects, demonstrates that pressure measurements with an integrated-vertical-path technique are typically fifty times more accurate than with a differential ranging technique. Simulations show 0.1-0.3 percent accuracy for ground and Shuttle-based pressure-profile and surface-pressure experiments.

  20. Ground-based imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy of atmospheric gases.

    PubMed

    Lohberger, Falko; Hönninger, Gerd; Platt, Ulrich

    2004-08-20

    We describe a compact remote-sensing instrument that permits spatially resolved mapping of atmospheric trace gases by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and present our first applications of imaging of the nitrogen dioxide contents of the exhaust plumes of two industrial emitters. DOAS permits the identification and quantification of various gases, e.g., NO2, SO2, and CH2O, from their specific narrowband (differential) absorption structures with high selectivity and sensitivity. With scattered sunlight as the light source, DOAS is used with an imaging spectrometer that is simultaneously acquiring spectral information on the incident light in one spatial dimension (column). The second spatial dimension is scanned by a moving mirror. PMID:15352396

  1. Error reduction methods for integrated-path differential-absorption lidar measurements.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jeffrey R; Numata, Kenji; Wu, Stewart T

    2012-07-01

    We report new modeling and error reduction methods for differential-absorption optical-depth (DAOD) measurements of atmospheric constituents using direct-detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidars. Errors from laser frequency noise are quantified in terms of the line center fluctuation and spectral line shape of the laser pulses, revealing relationships verified experimentally. A significant DAOD bias is removed by introducing a correction factor. Errors from surface height and reflectance variations can be reduced to tolerable levels by incorporating altimetry knowledge and "log after averaging", or by pointing the laser and receiver to a fixed surface spot during each wavelength cycle to shorten the time of "averaging before log". PMID:22772254

  2. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    PubMed

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air. PMID:20125492

  3. Studies of the differential absorption rocket experiment. [to measure atmospheric electron density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ginther, J. C.; Smith, L. G.

    1975-01-01

    Investigations of the ionosphere, in the rocket program of the Aeronomy Laboratory, include a propagation experiment, the data from which may be analyzed in several modes. This report considers in detail the differential absorption experiment. The sources of error and limitations of sensitivity are discussed. Methods of enhancing the performance of the experiment are described. Some changes have been made in the system and the improvement demonstrated. Suggestions are made for further development of the experiment.

  4. Differential absorption lidars for remote sensing of atmospheric pressure and temperature profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. Laurence; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Famiglietti, Joseph; Walden, Harvey; Prasad, Coorg

    1995-01-01

    A near infrared differential absorption lidar technique is developed using atmospheric oxygen as a tracer for high resolution vertical profiles of pressure and temperature with high accuracy. Solid-state tunable lasers and high-resolution spectrum analyzers are developed to carry out ground-based and airborne measurement demonstrations and results of the measurements presented. Numerical error analysis of high-altitude airborne and spaceborne experiments is carried out, and system concepts developed for their implementation.

  5. A 2-Micron Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development For Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Reithmaier, Karl; Bai, Yingxin; Trieu, Bo C.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-micron pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement.

  6. The capability of fluoroscopic systems to determine differential Roentgen-ray absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.; Crepeau, R. L.

    1975-01-01

    A clinical fluoroscopic unit used in conjunction with a TV image digitization system was investigated to determine its capability to evaluate differential absorption between two areas in the same field. Fractional contrasts and minimum detectability for air, several concentrations of Renografin-60, and aluminum were studied using phantoms of various thicknesses. Results showed that the videometric response, when treated as contrast, shows a linear response with absorber thickness up to considerable thicknesses.

  7. Helical x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhihua; Thériault-Lauzier, Pascal; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2011-03-01

    Helical computed tomography revolutionized the field of x-ray computed tomography two decades ago. The simultaneous translation of an image object with a standard computed tomography acquisition allows for fast volumetric scan for long image objects. X-ray phase sensitive imaging methods have been studied over the past few decades to provide new contrast mechanisms for imaging an object. A Talbot-Lau grating interferometer based differential phase contrast imaging method has recently demonstrated its potential for implementation in clinical and industrial applications. In this work, the principles of helical computed tomography are extended to differential phase contrast imaging to produce volumetric reconstructions based on fan-beam data. The method demonstrates the potential for helical differential phase contrast CT to scan long objects with relatively small detector coverage in the axial direction.

  8. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. I. MEASUREMENTS AND DESCRIPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; O'Connell, J.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M.; Wiktorowicz, Sloane J. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to determine precision binary orbits, study the geometries of triple and quadruple star systems, and discover previously unknown faint astrometric companions as small as giant planets. PHASES measurements made with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) from 2002 until PTI ceased normal operations in late 2008 are presented. Infrared differential photometry of several PHASES targets were measured with Keck Adaptive Optics and are presented.

  9. Water vapor spectroscopy in the 815-nm wavelength region for Differential Absorption Lidar measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Browell, Edward V.

    1995-01-01

    The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique was first applied to the remote measurement of atmospheric water vapor profiles from airborne platforms in 1981. The successful interpretation of the lidar profiles relies strongly on an accurate knowledge of specific water vapor absorption line parameters: line strength, pressure broadening coefficient, pressure-induced shift coefficient and the respective temperature-dependence factors. NASA Langley Research Center has developed and is currently testing an autonomous airborne water vapor lidar system: LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment). This DIAL system uses a Nd:YAG-pumped Ti:Sapphire laser seeded by a diode laser as a lidar transmitter. The tunable diode has been selected to operate in the 813-818 nm wavelength region. This 5-nm spectral interval offers a large distribution of strengths for temperature-insensitive water vapor absorption lines. In support of the LASE project, a series of spectroscopic measurements were conducted for the 16 absorption lines that have been identified for use in the LASE measurements. Prior to this work, the experimental data for this water vapor absorption band were limited - to our knowledge - to the line strengths and to the line positions.

  10. [Study on removing the lamp spectrum structure in differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Qu, Xiao-ying; Li, Yu-jin

    2010-11-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range, and nowadays this technique has been widely utilized to measure trace polluted gases in the atmosphere e.g. SO2, NO2, O3, HCHO, etc. However, there exists lamp (xenon lamp or deuteriumlamp) spectrum structure in the measured band (300-700 nm) of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, which badly impacts on precision of retrieving the concentration of trace gases in the atmosphere. People home and abroad generally employ two ways to handle this problem, one is segmenting band retrieving method, another is remedial retrieving method. In the present paper, a new retrieving method to deal with this trouble is introduced. The authors used moving-window average smoothing method to obtain the slow part of the absorption spectra of atmosphere, then achieved the lamp (xenon lamp in the paper) spectrum structure in the measured band of the absorption spectra of atmosphere. The authors analyzed and retrieved the measured spectrum of the atmosphere, and the result is better than the forenamed ways. Chi-square of residuum is 2.995 x 10(-4), and this method was proved to be able to avoid shortcoming of choosing narrowband and disadvantage of discovering the new component of atmosphere in retrieving the concentration of air pollutants and measuring the air pollutants. PMID:21284148

  11. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST

    SciTech Connect

    Idei, H. Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Yamamoto, M. K.

    2014-11-15

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  12. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUEST.

    PubMed

    Idei, H; Nagata, K; Mishra, K; Yamamoto, M K; Itado, T; Akimoto, R; Hanada, K; Zushi, H

    2014-11-01

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect. PMID:25430255

  13. Adaptive array technique for differential-phase reflectometry in QUESTa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Nagata, K.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Itado, T.; Akimoto, R.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.

    2014-11-01

    A Phased Array Antenna (PAA) was considered as launching and receiving antennae in reflectometry to attain good directivity in its applied microwave range. A well-focused beam was obtained in a launching antenna application, and differential-phase evolution was properly measured by using a metal reflector plate in the proof-of-principle experiment at low power test facilities. Differential-phase evolution was also evaluated by using the PAA in the Q-shu University Experiment with Steady State Spherical Tokamak (QUEST). A beam-forming technique was applied in receiving phased-array antenna measurements. In the QUEST device that should be considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave effect was significantly observed with perturbed phase evolution. A new approach using derivative of measured field on propagating wavenumber was proposed to eliminate the standing wave effect.

  14. Toward clinical differential phase contrast mammography: preliminary evaluations and image processing schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Wang, Z.; Thüring, T.; David, C.; Rössl, E.; van Stevendaal, U.; Köhler, T.; Trippel, M.; Singer, G.; Kubik-Huch, R. A.; Hohl, M. K.; Hauser, N.

    2013-05-01

    Phase contrast and scattering-based X-ray imaging are very promising tools for medical diagnostics because they are able to provide additional and complementary information to traditional absorption-based methods. In this work, we discuss the investigation of three native breast samples with a grating interferometer equipped with a conventional X-ray tube, the full study being published in ref. [1]. We briefly introduce a method to fuse absorption, differential phase and scattering signals into a unique image with improved diagnostic contents. Our approach yields complementary and inaccessible information on the electron density distribution and the small-angle scattering power of the sample which could potentially answer clinically relevant, yet unresolved questions such as the capability to unequivocally discern between (pre-) malignant changes and post-operative scars or to distinguish cancer-invaded regions within healthy tissue.

  15. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  16. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  17. Novel gas sensor combined active fiber loop ring-down and dual wavelengths differential absorption method.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanjie; Chang, Jun; Ni, Jiasheng; Wang, Qingpu; Liu, Tongyu; Wang, Chang; Wang, Pengpeng; Lv, Guangping; Peng, Gangding

    2014-05-01

    A novel active fiber loop ring-down gas sensor combined with dual wavelengths differential absorption method is proposed. Two Distributed Feedback Laser Diodes (DFB LDs) with different wavelengths are employed. One LD whose wavelength covered with the absorption line of target gas is used for sensing. Another LD whose wavelength is centered outside the absorption line is used for reference. The gas absorption loss can be obtained by differencing the reference signal and sensing signal. Compared with traditional method of one wavelength employed, it can eliminate the influence of the cavity loss variety and photoelectric device drift in the system efficiently. An Erbium Doped Fiber Amplifier (EDFA) with Automatic Gain Control (AGC) is used to compensate the loss of the light in the ring-down cavity, which will increase the cavity round trips and improve the precision of gas detection. And two fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are employed to get rid of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectrum noise as filters. The calibrating ethyne samples of different concentrations are measured with a 65 mm long gas cell in order to evaluate the effect of reference. The results show the relative deviation is found to be less than ± 0.4% of 0.1% ethyne when a certain additional loss from 0 to 1.2dB is introduced to the cavity and the relative deviation of measured concentration is less than ± 0.5% over 24 hours. PMID:24921822

  18. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols.

    PubMed

    Higdon, N S; Browell, E V; Ponsardin, P; Grossmann, B E; Butler, C F; Chyba, T H; Mayo, M N; Allen, R J; Heuser, A W; Grant, W B; Ismail, S; Mayor, S D; Carter, A F

    1994-09-20

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H(2)O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and > 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H(2)O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H(2)O absorption-line parameters were perfo med to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H(2)O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H(2)O radiosondes. The H(2)O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by ≤ 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions. PMID:20941181

  19. Airborne differential absorption lidar system for measurements of atmospheric water vapor and aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Arlen F.; Allen, Robert J.; Mayo, M. Neale; Butler, Carolyn F.; Grossman, Benoist E.; Ismail, Syed; Grant, William B.; Browell, Edward V.; Higdon, Noah S.; Mayor, Shane D.; Ponsardin, Patrick; Hueser, Alene W.

    1994-01-01

    An airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed at the NASA Langley Research Center for remote measurements of atmospheric water vapor (H2O) and aerosols. A solid-state alexandrite laser with a 1-pm linewidth and greater than 99.85% spectral purity was used as the on-line transmitter. Solid-state avalanche photodiode detector technology has replaced photomultiplier tubes in the receiver system, providing an average increase by a factor of 1.5-2.5 in the signal-to-noise ratio of the H2O measurement. By incorporating advanced diagnostic and data-acquisition instrumentation into other subsystems, we achieved additional improvements in system operational reliability and measurement accuracy. Laboratory spectroscopic measurements of H2O absorption-line parameters were performed to reduce the uncertainties in our knowledge of the absorption cross sections. Line-center H2O absorption cross sections were determined, with errors of 3-6%, for more than 120 lines in the 720-nm region. Flight tests of the system were conducted during 1989-1991 on the NASA Wallops Flight Facility Electra aircraft, and extensive intercomparison measurements were performed with dew-point hygrometers and H2O radiosondes. The H2O distributions measured with the DIAL system differed by less than 10% from the profiles determined with the in situ probes in a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  20. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  1. [Measurement and retrieval of indicators for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Peng, Fu-Min; Xie, Pin-Hua; Shao, Shi-Yong; Li, Yu-Jin; Lin, Yi-Hui; Li, Su-Wen; Qin, Min; Liu, Wen-Qing

    2008-03-01

    Featuring excellent response characteristics and detection sensitivity and with much lower operational cost, differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) can be a powerful tool to trace concentration variation of trace indicators -O3, Ox (O3 + NO2) and HCHO for fast VOCs atmospheric photochemistry. But it's difficult to measure those gases accurately because of trace concentration. Here using a self-made DOAS system, the accurate measurement of those indicators was achieved through improving the ratio of signal to noise ratio and correcting the background scattering light; the retrieving method of those indicators was developed through eliminating the temperature effect of absorption cross section, accurately removing the intrinsic structure and lamp structure of spectrum. The preference of different spectral windows that could be used for the concentration retrieval of those indicators was analyzed and compared including interfering factors, results retrieved and the accuracy. PMID:18536400

  2. [Measurement of OH radicals in flame with high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Liu, Wen-Qing; Kan, Rui-Feng; Si, Fu-Qi; Xu, Zhen-Yu; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Xie, Pin-Hua

    2011-10-01

    The present paper describes a new developed high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument used for the measurement of OH radicals in flame. The instrument consists of a Xenon lamp for light source; a double pass high resolution echelle spectrometer with a resolution of 3.3 pm; a multiple-reflection cell of 20 meter base length, in which the light reflects in the cell for 176 times, so the whole path length of light can achieve 3 520 meters. The OH radicals'6 absorption lines around 308 nm were simultaneously observed in the experiment. By using high resolution DOAS technology, the OH radicals in candles, kerosene lamp, and alcohol burner flames were monitored, and their concentrations were also inverted. PMID:22250529

  3. Atmospheric effects on CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Petrin, R.R.; Nelson, D.H.; Schmitt, M.J.

    1996-03-01

    The ambient atmosphere between the laser transmitter and the target can affect CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) measurement sensitivity through a number of different processes. In this work, we will address two of the sources of atmospheric interference with CO{sub 2} DIAL measurements: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and extinction due to absorption by atmospheric gases. Measurements of atmospheric extinction under different atmospheric conditions are presented and compared to a standard atmospheric transmission model (FASCODE). We have also investigated the effects of atmospheric turbulence on system performance. Measurements of the effective beam size after propagation are compared to model predictions using simultaneous measurements of atmospheric turbulence as input to the model. These results are also discussed in the context of the overall effect of beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence on the sensitivity of DIAL measurements.

  4. A robust optical parametric oscillator and receiver telescope for differential absorption lidar of greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Iain; Jack, James W.; Rae, Cameron F.; Moncrieff, John B.

    2015-10-01

    We report the development of a differential absorption lidar instrument (DIAL) designed and built specifically for the measurement of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. The DIAL is integrated into a commercial astronomical telescope to provide high-quality receiver optics and enable automated scanning for three-dimensional lidar acquisition. The instrument is portable and can be set up within a few hours in the field. The laser source is a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO) which outputs light at a wavelength tunable near 1.6 μm. This wavelength region, which is also used in telecommunications devices, provides access to absorption lines in both carbon dioxide at 1573 nm and methane at 1646 nm. To achieve the critical temperature stability required for a laserbased field instrument the four-mirror OPO cavity is machined from a single aluminium block. A piezoactuator adjusts the cavity length to achieve resonance and this is maintained over temperature changes through the use of a feedback loop. The laser output is continuously monitored with pyroelectric detectors and a custom-built wavemeter. The OPO is injection seeded by a temperature-stabilized distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD) with a wavelength locked to the absorption line centre (on-line) using a gas cell containing pure carbon dioxide. A second DFB-LD is tuned to a nearby wavelength (off-line) to provide the reference required for differential absorption measurements. A similar system has been designed and built to provide the injection seeding wavelengths for methane. The system integrates the DFB-LDs, drivers, locking electronics, gas cell and balanced photodetectors. The results of test measurements of carbon dioxide are presented and the development of the system is discussed, including the adaptation required for the measurement of methane.

  5. Cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) system for measuring atmospheric mercury using differential absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, A.; Obrist, D.; Moosmuller, H.; Moore, C.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric elemental mercury (Hg0) is a globally pervasive element that can be transported and deposited to remote ecosystems where it poses — particularly in its methylated form — harm to many organisms including humans. Current techniques for measurement of atmospheric Hg0 require several liters of sample air and several minutes for each analysis. Fast-response (i.e., 1 second or faster) measurements would improve our ability to understand and track chemical cycling of mercury in the atmosphere, including high frequency Hg0 fluctuations, sources and sinks, and chemical transformation processes. We present theory, design, challenges, and current results of our new prototype sensor based on cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) for fast-response measurement of Hg0 mass concentrations. CRDS is a direct absorption technique that implements path-lengths of multiple kilometers in a compact absorption cell using high-reflectivity mirrors, thereby improving sensitivity and reducing sample volume compared to conventional absorption spectroscopy. Our sensor includes a frequency-doubled, dye-laser emitting laser pulses tunable from 215 to 280 nm, pumped by a Q-switched, frequency tripled Nd:YAG laser with a pulse repetition rate of 50 Hz. We present how we successfully perform automated wavelength locking and stabilization of the laser to the peak Hg0 absorption line at 253.65 nm using an external isotopically-enriched mercury (202Hg0) cell. An emphasis of this presentation will be on the implementation of differential absorption measurement whereby measurements are alternated between the peak Hg0 absorption wavelength and a nearby wavelength "off" the absorption line. This can be achieved using a piezo electric tuning element that allows for pulse-by-pulse tuning and detuning of the laser "online" and "offline" of the Hg absorption line, and thereby allows for continuous correction of baseline extinction losses. Unexpected challenges with this approach included

  6. Evaluation wavelength range mapping, a tool to optimize the evaluation window in differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-04-01

    Optical remote sensing via Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to assess various trace gases in the atmosphere. Measurement instruments are usually classified into active instruments applying an artificial light source and passive instruments using natural light sources, e.g., scattered or direct sunlight. Platforms range from ground based to satellites and trace gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Naturally, the evaluation of gathered spectra needs to be tuned to each specific case and trace gas of interest due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should be as large as possible and include the largest differential absorption features of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize sensitivity. However, the differential optical densities of other absorbers should be minimized in order to prevent interferences between different absorption cross sections. Furthermore, instrumental specific features and wavelength dependent radiative transfer effects may have malicious effects and lead to erroneous values. Usually a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Evaluation wavelength range mapping is an easily applied tool to visualize wavelength depending evaluation features of DOAS and to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range. As an example, synthetic spectra are studied which simulate passive DOAS measurements of stratospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) by Zenith-DOAS and Multi-Axis DOAS (MAX-DOAS) measurements of BrO in volcanic plumes. The influence of the I0-effect and the Ring-effect on the respective retrievals are demonstrated. However, due to the general nature of the tool it is applicable to any DOAS measurement and the technique also allows to study any other wavelength dependent influences on retrieved trace gas columns.

  7. Differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system and components

    DOEpatents

    Stutman, Daniel; Finkenthal, Michael

    2014-07-01

    A differential phase contrast X-ray imaging system includes an X-ray illumination system, a beam splitter arranged in an optical path of the X-ray illumination system, and a detection system arranged in an optical path to detect X-rays after passing through the beam splitter.

  8. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with phase modulation to combat sequential attacks

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiroki; Oka, Toru; Inoue, Kyo

    2011-11-15

    Phase-modulated differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) is presented for combating sequential attacks that most severely restrict the DPS-QKD system distance. Slow phase modulation imposed onto the DPS signal obstructs the optimum unambiguous state discrimination measurement conducted in the sequential attack and improves the QKD distance as a result. The condition with which the phase modulation does not degrade the DPS-QKD system performance is also described.

  9. COMPENSATIONAL THREE-WAVELENGTH DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR TECHNIQUE FOR REDUCING THE INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENTIAL SCATTERING ON OZONE-CONCENTRATION MEASUREMENTS.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A three-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) technique for the UV spectral region is presented that reduces the influence of aerosol differential scattering on measured O3-concentration profiles. The principal advantage of this approach is that, to a good first approxi...

  10. Remote sensing of propane and methane by means of a differential absorption lidar by topographic reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Geiger, Allen R.

    1996-04-01

    The development of a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system in the mid-IR region for the detection and monitoring of light hydrocarbons is presented. Two lithium niobate optical parametric oscillators provided the signal and reference wavelengths. With the aid of a retroreflector, the system detected 0.63 ppm of propane and 0.05 ppm of methane in the atmosphere at a greater than 1 mile range in the controlled release tests. Subsequently, the system mapped a petroleum deposit in eastern New Mexico.

  11. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  12. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  13. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  14. [Real-time forecasting model for monitoring pollutant with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Feng-Sui; Yang, Yi-Jun

    2009-11-01

    For real-time and on-line monitoring DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) system, a model based on an improved Elman network for monitoring pollutant concentrations was proposed. In order to reduce the systematical complexity, the forecasting factors have been obtained based on the step-wise regression method. The forecasting factors were current concentrations, temperature and relative humidity, and wind speed and wind direction. The dynamic back propagation (BP) algorithm was used for creating training set. The experiment results show that the predicted value follows the real well. So the modified Elman network can meet the demand of DOAS system's real time forecasting. PMID:20101985

  15. Investigation of potential of differential absorption Lidar techniques for remote sensing of atmospheric pollutants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C. F.; Shipley, S. T.; Allen, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system uses two high conversion efficiency dye lasers which are optically pumped by two frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers mounted rigidly on a supporting structure that also contains the transmitter, receiver, and data system. The DIAL system hardware design and data acquisition system are described. Timing diagrams, logic diagrams, and schematics, and the theory of operation of the control electronics are presented. Success in obtaining remote measurements of ozone profiles with an airborne systems is reported and results are analyzed.

  16. Airborne measurements of atmospheric methane column abundance using a pulsed integrated-path differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Riris, Haris; Numata, Kenji; Li, Steve; Wu, Stewart; Ramanathan, Anand; Dawsey, Martha; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Randolph; Abshire, James B

    2012-12-01

    We report airborne measurements of the column abundance of atmospheric methane made over an altitude range of 3-11 km using a direct detection integrated-path differential-absorption lidar with a pulsed laser emitting at 1651 nm. The laser transmitter was a tunable, seeded optical parametric amplifier pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, and the receiver used a photomultiplier detector and photon-counting electronics. The results follow the expected changes with aircraft altitude, and the measured line shapes and optical depths show good agreement with theoretical calculations. PMID:23207402

  17. Differential absorption and Raman lidar for water vapor profile measurements - A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar and Raman lidar have been applied to the range-resolved measurements of water vapor density for more than 20 years. Results have been obtained using both lidar techniques that have led to improved understanding of water vapor distributions in the atmosphere. This paper reviews the theory of the measurements, including the sources of systematic and random error; the progress in lidar technology and techniques during that period, including a brief look at some of the lidar systems in development or proposed; and the steps being taken to improve such lidar systems.

  18. Magnetic field induced differential neutron phase contrast imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Strobl, M.; Treimer, W.; Walter, P.; Keil, S.; Manke, I.

    2007-12-17

    Besides the attenuation of a neutron beam penetrating an object, induced phase changes have been utilized to provide contrast in neutron and x-ray imaging. In analogy to differential phase contrast imaging of bulk samples, the refraction of neutrons by magnetic fields yields image contrast. Here, it will be reported how double crystal setups can provide quantitative tomographic images of magnetic fields. The use of magnetic air prisms adequate to split the neutron spin states enables a distinction of field induced phase shifts and these introduced by interaction with matter.

  19. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, developed jointly by the University of Alabama at Huntsville and NASA, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min temporal integration

  20. Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Subhourly Variation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuang, Shi; Burris, John F.; Newchurch, Michael J.; Johnson, Steve; Long, Stephania

    2011-01-01

    A tropospheric ozone Differential Absorption Lidar system, developed jointly by The University of Alabama in Huntsville and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, is making regular observations of ozone vertical distributions between 1 and 8 km with two receivers under both daytime and nighttime conditions using lasers at 285 and 291 nm. This paper describes the lidar system and analysis technique with some measurement examples. An iterative aerosol correction procedure reduces the retrieval error arising from differential aerosol backscatter in the lower troposphere. Lidar observations with coincident ozonesonde flights demonstrate that the retrieval accuracy ranges from better than 10% below 4 km to better than 20% below 8 km with 750-m vertical resolution and 10-min 17 temporal integration.

  1. Image fusion in x-ray differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haas, W.; Polyanskaya, M.; Bayer, F.; Gödel, K.; Hofmann, H.; Rieger, J.; Ritter, A.; Weber, T.; Wucherer, L.; Durst, J.; Michel, T.; Anton, G.; Hornegger, J.

    2012-02-01

    Phase-contrast imaging is a novel modality in the field of medical X-ray imaging. The pioneer method is the grating-based interferometry which has no special requirements to the X-ray source and object size. Furthermore, it provides three different types of information of an investigated object simultaneously - absorption, differential phase-contrast and dark-field images. Differential phase-contrast and dark-field images represent a completely new information which has not yet been investigated and studied in context of medical imaging. In order to introduce phase-contrast imaging as a new modality into medical environment the resulting information about the object has to be correctly interpreted. The three output images reflect different properties of the same object the main challenge is to combine and visualize these data in such a way that it diminish the information explosion and reduce the complexity of its interpretation. This paper presents an intuitive image fusion approach which allows to operate with grating-based phase-contrast images. It combines information of the three different images and provides a single image. The approach is implemented in a fusion framework which is aimed to support physicians in study and analysis. The framework provides the user with an intuitive graphical user interface allowing to control the fusion process. The example given in this work shows the functionality of the proposed method and the great potential of phase-contrast imaging in medical practice.

  2. Differential phase contrast with a segmented detector in a scanning X-ray microprobe

    PubMed Central

    Hornberger, B.; de Jonge, M. D.; Feser, M.; Holl, P.; Holzner, C.; Jacobsen, C.; Legnini, D.; Paterson, D.; Rehak, P.; Strüder, L.; Vogt, S.

    2008-01-01

    Scanning X-ray microprobes are unique tools for the nanoscale investigation of specimens from the life, environmental, materials and other fields of sciences. Typically they utilize absorption and fluorescence as contrast mechanisms. Phase contrast is a complementary technique that can provide strong contrast with reduced radiation dose for weakly absorbing structures in the multi-keV range. In this paper the development of a segmented charge-integrating silicon detector which provides simultaneous absorption and differential phase contrast is reported. The detector can be used together with a fluorescence detector for the simultaneous acquisition of transmission and fluorescence data. It can be used over a wide range of photon energies, photon rates and exposure times at third-generation synchrotron radiation sources, and is currently operating at two beamlines at the Advanced Photon Source. Images obtained at around 2 keV and 10 keV demonstrate the superiority of phase contrast over absorption for specimens composed of light elements. PMID:18552427

  3. Single-step, quantitative x-ray differential phase contrast imaging using spectral detection in a coded aperture setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Mini; Liang, Zhihua

    2015-03-01

    In this abstract we describe the first non-interferometric x-ray phase contrast imaging (PCI) method that uses only a single-measurement step to retrieve with quantitative accuracy absorption, phase and differential phase. Our approach is based on utilizing spectral information from photon counting spectral detectors in conjunction with a coded aperture PCI setting to simplify the x-ray "phase problem" to a one-step method. The method by virtue of being single-step with no motion of any component for a given projection image has significantly high potential to overcome the barriers currently faced by PCI.

  4. Development of a Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar for Range Resolved Atmospheric CO2 Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulgueta; Chen, Songsheng; Bai, Yingxin; Petzar, Paul J.; Trieu, Bo. C.; Koch, Grady J.; Beyon, Jeffery J.; Singh, Upendra N.

    2010-01-01

    A pulsed, 2-m coherent Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) / Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) transceiver, developed under the Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP) at NASA, is integrated into a fully functional lidar instrument. This instrument will measure atmospheric CO2 profiles (by DIAL) initially from a ground platform, and then be prepared for aircraft installation to measure the atmospheric CO2 column densities in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) and lower troposphere. The airborne prototype CO2 lidar can measure atmospheric CO2 column density in a range bin of 1km with better than 1.5% precision at horizontal resolution of less than 50km. It can provide the image of the pooling of CO2 in lowlying areas and performs nighttime mass balance measurements at landscape scale. This sensor is unique in its capability to study the vertical ABL-free troposphere exchange of CO2 directly. It will allow the investigators to pursue subsequent in science-driven deployments, and provides a unique tool for Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Night, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) validation that was strongly advocated in the recent ASCENDS Workshop.

  5. UV differential optical absorption method for measuring sulfur content in coal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Feihu; Xu, Chuanlong; Wang, Shimin

    2012-02-01

    Determining the sulfur content in coal rapidly and accurately can provide a technical basis for the enterprises and the environmental administration departments. A novel method for measuring the sulfur content in coal based on UV differential optical absorption is presented in this paper. However, compared with the applications in atmosphere monitoring, the UV differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for the sulfur content measurement in coal has the problems that the concentration range of SO2 in the flue gas is wider and the optical path-length of the gas cell is shorter. To solve these problems, an improved DOAS algorithm based on a finite impulse response (FIR) filter and a nonlinear compensation technique is proposed. An experimental measurement system based on the modified DOAS is designed and established. The standard SO2 gas and five kinds of standard coals are experimentally tested. Theoretical and experimental results show that the lower detection limit of the system is better than 0.014%, and the repeatability of the measurement system fairly meets the national standard of China. The system has advantages of low maintenance and shorter measurement duration (4 min).

  6. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Theory and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borel, Christoph C.; Schlaepfer, Daniel

    1996-01-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels; (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels. (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an "Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption" (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than +5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  7. Temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar measurements of water vapor in the 720-nm region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, Edward V.; Ismail, Syed; Grossmann, Benoist E.

    1991-01-01

    Recently measured properties of water vapor (H2O) absorption lines have been used in calculations to evalute the temperature sensitivity of differential absorption lidar (Dial) H2O measurements. This paper estimates the temperature sensitivity of H2O lines in the 717-733-nm region for both H2O mixing ratio and number density measurements, and discusses the influence of the H2O line ground state energies E-double-prime, the H2O absorption linewidths, the linewidth temperature dependence parameter, and the atmospheric temperature and pressure variations with altitude and location on the temperature sensitivity calculations. Line parameters and temperature sensitivity calculations for 67 H2O lines in the 720-nm band are given which can be directly used in field experiments. Water vapor lines with E-double-prime values in the 100-300/cm range were found to be optimum for Dial measurements of H2O number densities, while E-double-prime values in the 250-500/cm range were found to be optimum for H2O mixing ratio measurements.

  8. Phase-sensitive optical coherence reflectometer with differential phase-shift keying of probe pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, A E; Vdovenko, V S; Sergachev, I A; Simikin, D E; Gorshkov, B G; Potapov, V T

    2014-10-31

    We report a new method for reconstructing the signal shape of the external dynamic perturbations along the entire length of the fibre of an optical coherence reflectometer. The method proposed is based on differential phase-shift keying of a probe pulse and demodulation of scattered light by the phase diversity technique. Possibilities of the method are demonstrated experimentally. (fibre-optic sensors)

  9. [Retrieval of NO2 total vertical columns by direct-sun differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Xie, Pin-hua; Li, Ang; Xu, Jin; Zeng, Yi; Si, Fu-qi; Wu, Feng-cheng

    2012-04-01

    An appropriate reference spectrum is essential for the direct-sun differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DS-DOAS). It depends on the real reference spectrum to retrieve the total vertical column density (VCD). The spectrum detected at the time with minimum sun zenith angle under the relative clear atmospheric condition in the measurement period was conventionally selected as the reference spectrum. Because there is still untracked NO2 absorption structure in the reference spectrum, the VCD retrieved based on the above spectrum is actually relative VCD, which results in larger error. To solve this problem, a new method was investigated. A convolution of extraterrestrial high-precision solar Fraunhofer spectrum and the instrumental function of the spectrometer was computed and chosen as the reference spectrum. The error induced by NO2 absorption structure in the reference spectrum was removed. Then the fitting error of slant column density (SCD) retrieved by this method was analyzed. The correlation between the absolute SCD and the differential slant column density (dSCD) was calculated. The result shows that the error of SCD retrieved by this new method is below 1.6 x 10(16) molecules x cm(-2) on March 7, 2011, while the error generated by the normal method is about 4.25 x 10(16) molecules x cm(-2). The new method decreased more than 62% error. In addition, the results throughout the day were compared to the troposphere VCD from MAX-DOAS and they are in good agreement. It indicates that the new method could effectively reduce the VCD error of the common way. PMID:22715747

  10. Boundary value problem for phase retrieval from unidirectional X-ray differential phase images.

    PubMed

    Gasilov, Sergei; Mittone, Alberto; Horng, Annie; Bravin, Alberto; Baumbach, Tilo; Geith, Tobias; Reiser, Maximilian; Coan, Paola

    2015-05-18

    The phase retrieval problem can be reduced to the second order partial differential equation. In order to retrieve the absolute values of the X-ray phase and to minimize the reconstruction artifacts we defined the mixed inhomogeneous boundary condition using available a priori information about the sample. Finite element technique was used to solve the boundary value problem. The approach is validated on numerical and experimental phantoms. In order to demonstrate a possible application of the method, we have processed an entire tomographic set of differential phase images and estimated the magnitude of the refractive index decrement for some tissues inside complex biomedical samples. PMID:26074580

  11. Measuring the acoustic absorption coefficient in biological tissue specimens using ultrasonic phase conjugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smagin, N. V.; Krutyansky, L. M.; Zelenova, Z. V.; Brysev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic absorption has been measured in a series of biological tissue specimens—porcine muscle, renal and fat tissues—by the standard insert-substitution method, as well as by ultrasonic phase conjugation. Comparison of the experimental results and revealed differences confirm the promise of using phase conjugate waves to measure acoustic losses in biological objects. It is demonstrated that in inhomogeneous tissues, the phase conjugation method makes it possible to obtain a more reliable estimate of dissipative losses.

  12. Conditional-likelihood approach to material decomposition in spectral absorption-based or phase-contrast CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2015-03-01

    Material decomposition in absorption-based X-ray CT imaging suffers certain inefficiencies when differentiating among soft tissue materials. To address this problem, decomposition techniques turn to spectral CT, which has gained popularity over the last few years. Although proven to be more effective, such techniques are primarily limited to the identification of contrast agents and soft and bone-like materials. In this work, we introduce a novel conditional likelihood, material-decomposition method capable of identifying any type of material objects scanned by spectral CT. The method takes advantage of the statistical independence of spectral data to assign likelihood values to each of the materials on a pixel-by-pixel basis. It results in likelihood images for each material, which can be further processed by setting certain conditions or thresholds, to yield a final material-diagnostic image. The method can also utilize phase-contrast CT (PCI) data, where measured absorption and phase-shift information can be treated as statistically independent datasets. In this method, the following cases were simulated: (i) single-scan PCI CT, (ii) spectral PCI CT, (iii) absorption-based spectral CT, and (iv) single-scan PCI CT with an added tumor mass. All cases were analyzed using a digital breast phantom; although, any other objects or materials could be used instead. As a result, all materials were identified, as expected, according to their assignment in the digital phantom. Materials with similar attenuation or phase-shift values (e.g., glandular tissue, skin, and tumor masses) were especially successfully when differentiated by the likelihood approach.

  13. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2009-11-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Therefore they are strictly valid for weak absorptions and narrow wavelength intervals (strictly only for monochromatic radiation). For medium and strong absorption (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is not linear anymore. As well, for large wavelength intervals the wavelength dependent differences in the travelled light-paths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, by taking into account these dependencies, the applicability of the DOAS method can be extended also to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals. Common approaches for this correction are the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a-priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function calculation by radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis. Thus the variability of the SCD in the fit window is determined by the retrieval itself. This new approach gives a description of the SCD that is as close to reality as desired (depending on the order of the Taylor expansion), and is independent from any assumptions or a-priori knowledge of the considered absorbers. In case studies for

  14. Simple phase extraction in x-ray differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Liu; Jin-Chuan, Guo; Yao-Hu, Lei; Ji, Li; Han-Ben, Niu

    2016-02-01

    A fast and simple method to extract phase-contrast images from interferograms is proposed, and its effectiveness is demonstrated through simulation and experiment. For x-ray differential phase contrast imaging, a strong attenuation signal acts as an overwhelming background intensity that obscures the weak phase signal so that no obvious phase-gradient information is detectable in the raw image. By subtracting one interferogram from another, chosen at particular intervals, the phase signal can be isolated and magnified. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61101175, 61571305, and 61227802).

  15. Phase Effects on Mesoscale Object X-ray Absorption Images

    SciTech Connect

    Martz, Jr., H E; Aufderheide, M B; Barty, A; Lehman, S K; Kozioziemski, B J; Schneberk, D J

    2004-09-24

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory particular emphasis is being placed on the nondestructive characterization (NDC) of 'mesoscale' objects.[Martz and Albrecht 2003] We define mesoscale objects as objects that have mm extent with {micro}m features. Here we confine our discussions to x-ray imaging methods applicable to mesoscale object characterization. The goal is object recovery algorithms including phase to enable emerging high-spatial resolution x-ray imaging methods to ''see'' inside or image mesoscale-size materials and objects. To be successful our imaging characterization effort must be able to recover the object function to one micrometer or better spatial resolution over a few millimeters field-of-view with very high contrast.

  16. Image fusion algorithm for differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roessl, Ewald; Koehler, Thomas; van Stevendaal, Udo; Martens, Gerhard; Hauser, Nik; Wang, Zhentian; Stampanoni, Marco

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase-contrast imaging in the x-ray domain provides three physically complementary signals:1, 2 the attenuation, the differential phase-contrast, related to the refractive index, and the dark-field signal, strongly influenced by the total amount of radiation scattered into very small angles. In medical applications, it is of the utmost importance to present to the radiologist all clinically relevant information in as compact a way as possible. Hence, the need arises for a method to combine two or more of the above mentioned signals into one image containing all information relevant for diagnosis. We present an image composition algorithm that fuses the attenuation image and the differential phase contrast image into a composite, final image based on the assumption that the real and imaginary part of the complex refractive index of the sample can be related by a constant scaling factor. The merging is performed in such a way that the composite image is characterized by minimal noise-power at each frequency component.

  17. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-01

    By adding a Talbot-Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot-Lau interferometer on the system MTF.

  18. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-06-21

    By adding a Talbot-Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot-Lau interferometer on the system MTF. PMID:23685949

  19. Spatial resolution characterization of differential phase contrast CT systems via modulation transfer function (MTF) measurements

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-01-01

    By adding a Talbot–Lau interferometer to a conventional x-ray absorption computed tomography (CT) imaging system, both differential phase contrast (DPC) signal and absorption contrast signal can be simultaneously measured from the same set of CT measurements. The imaging performance of such multi-contrast x-ray CT imaging systems can be characterized with standard metrics such as noise variance, noise power spectrum, contrast-to-noise ratio, modulation transfer function (MTF), and task-based detectability index. Among these metrics, the measurement of the MTF can be challenging in DPC-CT systems due to several confounding factors such as phase wrapping and the difficulty of using fine wires as probes. To address these technical challenges, this paper discusses a viable and reliable method to experimentally measure the MTF of DPC-CT. It has been found that the spatial resolution of DPC-CT is degraded, when compared to that of the corresponding absorption CT, due to the presence of a source grating G0 in the Talbot-Lau interferometer. An effective MTF was introduced and experimentally estimated to describe the impact of the Talbot–Lau interferometer on the system MTF. PMID:23685949

  20. Differential Phase-Contrast Scanning X-Ray Microscope For Observation Of Low-Z element Specimen

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Akihisa; Uesugi, Kentaro; Suzuki, Yoshio

    2010-07-23

    Differential phase-contrast scanning x-ray microscope/microtomography have been developed. A fast readout charge-coupled device (CCD) camera coupled with a visible-light conversion unit is used as a detector to record the transmitted intensity distribution of far-field image for every pixel in a scan. Simultaneous absorption and phase-contrast images are given from a single scan by image-processing of the CCD frames. The system is constructed at BL20XU of SPring-8, and its feasibility is demonstrated at the photon energy of 8 keV. A tantalum test chart is observed and its finest structure of 140 nm pitch pattern is clearly observed. Measured phase sensitivity is approximately {lambda}/270. Some low-Z element specimens are observed and obtained phase contrast image shows much higher sensitivity than that of absorption contrast.

  1. Predictions of silicon avalanche photodiode detector performance in water vapor differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenimer, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Performance analyses are presented which establish that over most of the range of signals expected for a down-looking differential absorption lidar (DIAL) operated at 16 km the silicon avalanche photodiode (APD) is the preferred detector for DIAL measurements of atmospheric water vapor in the 730 nm spectral region. The higher quantum efficiency of the APD's, (0.8-0.9) compared to a photomultiplier's (0.04-0.18) more than offsets the higher noise of an APD receiver. In addition to offering lower noise and hence lower random error the APD's excellent linearity and impulse recovery minimize DIAL systematic errors attributable to the detector. Estimates of the effect of detector system parameters on overall random and systematic DIAL errors are presented, and performance predictions are supported by laboratory characterization data for an APD receiver system.

  2. Active differential optical absorption spectroscopy for NO2 gas pollution using blue light emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljalal, Abdulaziz; Gasmi, Khaled; Al-Basheer, Watheq

    2015-05-01

    Availability of high intensity light emitting diodes in the blue region offer excellent opportunity for using them in active Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to detect air pollution. Their smooth and relatively broad spectral emissions as well as their long life make them almost ideal light sources for active DOAS. In this study, we report the usage of a blue light emitting diode in an active DOAS setup to measure traces of NO2 gas and achieving few parts per billion detection limit for a path length of 300 m. Details of the setup will be presented along with the effects on measurement accuracy due to shifts in the measured spectra calibration and due to using theoretical instrument Gaussian function instead of the measured instrument function.

  3. Concurrent multiaxis differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for the measurement of tropospheric nitrogen dioxide.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Roland J; Corlett, Gary K; Friess, Udo; Monks, Paul S

    2006-10-01

    The development of a new concurrent multiaxis (CMAX) sky viewing spectrometer to monitor rapidly changing urban concentrations of nitrogen dioxide is detailed. The CMAX differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique involves simultaneous spectral imaging of the zenith and off-axis measurements of spatially resolved scattered sunlight. Trace-gas amounts are retrieved from the measured spectra using the established DOAS technique. The potential of the CMAX DOAS technique to derive information on rapidly changing concentrations and the spatial distribution of NO2 in an urban environment is demonstrated. Three example data sets are presented from measurements during 2004 of tropospheric NO2 over Leicester, UK (52.62 degrees N, 1.12 degrees W). The data demonstrate the current capabilities and future potential of the CMAX DOAS method in terms of the ability to measure real-time spatially disaggregated urban NO2. PMID:16983440

  4. Development of a Pulsed 2-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer; Refaat, Tamer

    2013-01-01

    Atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) is an important greenhouse gas that significantly contributes to the carbon cycle and global radiation budget on Earth. Active remote sensing of CO2 is important to address several limitations that contend with passive sensors. A 2-micron double-pulsed, Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar instrument for ground and airborne atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements via direct detection method is being developed at NASA Langley Research Center. This active remote sensing instrument will provide an alternate approach of measuring atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capability by having high signal-to-noise ratio level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. Commercial, on the shelf, components are implemented for the detection system. Instrument integration will be presented in this paper as well as a background for CO2 measurement at NASA Langley research Center

  5. Elemental biological imaging by differential absorption with a laser-produced x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, C.; Mercer, I.; Svanberg, S.; Herrlin, K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate the novel application of hard x rays emitted by a laser-produced plasma for differential imaging of elements. An x-ray-emitting laser-produced plasma, obtained by the focusing of radiation from a 10-Hz terawatt laser, is used for biological imaging. The x-ray source can be arranged to yield characteristic x-ray emission lines with photon energies that bridge the K absorption edge of a chosen atomic species. One can obtain element-specific radiographs by recording transillumination images for different target materials on digital image plates and by subsequently subtracting or dividing the images. Successful phantom and experimental animal imaging are performed utilizing tantalum and gadolinium as target materials for the terawatt laser and gadolinium as the imaged contrast agent.

  6. [Air pollutants study by differential optical absorption spectroscopy with transmit-receive fibers].

    PubMed

    Wei, Yong-Jie; Geng, Xiao-Juan; Chen, Bo; Liu, Cui-Cui; Chen, Wen-Liang

    2013-10-01

    The differential optical absorption spectroscopy system is presented to monitor air pollutants, such as SO2, NO2, etc. The system employs a reflective telescope to collimate light source and focus absorbed light. A combined transmitting and receiving fiber bundle is set to the focus of a concave mirror. A Xenon lamp works as the light source. The light is coupled into the transmitting fiber, and then collimated by the reflective telescope system. After absorbed by the pollutants, the light is reflected by a pyramid mirror far away the telescope. Then the absorbed light is incident on the concave mirror the second time, and focused on the focal plane again. The receiving fiber induces the light which carries the information of the measured gas into a spectrometer. We can get the concentration of the pollutants by DOAS algorithm. Experimental results show that the proposed method can be adopted to measure some pollutants in air quality monitoring. PMID:24409736

  7. [Studies on the remote measurement of the emission of formaldehyde by mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-Cheng; Xie, Pin-Hua; Li, Ang; Si, Fu-Qi; Dou, Ke; Liu, Yu; Xu, Jin; Wang, Jie

    2011-11-01

    Formaldehyde (HCHO) is the most abundant carbonyl compounds that play an important role in atmospheric chemistry and photochemical reactions. Formaldehyde is an important indicator of atmospheric reactivity and urban atmospheric aerosol precursors. In the present paper, the emission of formaldehyde from chemical area was measured using the mobile differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). This instrument uses the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source with successful sampling in the area loop. Vertical column density was retrieved by this system, combined with the meteorological wind field and car speed information, the emission of formaldehyde in the area was estimated. The authors carried out the measuring experiment in one chemical plant in Beijing using this technology. The result showed that the average value of the flux of formaldehyde in this area was 605 kg x h(-1) during the measuring period. PMID:22242505

  8. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Quick, C.R.; Zardecki, A.; Porch, W.M.; Whitehead, M.; Walters, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  9. Wave optics simulation of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle effects in CO2 differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, Douglas H.; Petrin, Roger R.; MacKerrow, Edward P.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Quick, Charles R., Jr.; Zardecki, Andrew; Porch, William M.; Whitehead, Michael C.; Walters, Donald L.

    1998-09-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO2 differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We will address the interaction of two of these processes: effects due to beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence and effects due to reflective speckle. Atmospheric turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has a major impact on the sensitivity of CO2 DIAL. The interaction of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is of great importance in the performance of a DIAL system. A Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code has previously been developed at the Naval Postgraduate School that models the effects of atmospheric turbulence as propagation through a series of phase screens with appropriate atmospheric statistical characteristics. This code has been modified to include the effects of reflective speckle. The performance of this modified code with respect to the combined effects of atmospheric turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. Results are compared with a combination of experimental data and analytical models.

  10. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Theory and simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Borel, C.C.; Schlaepfer, D.

    1996-03-01

    Two different approaches exist to retrieve columnar water vapor from imaging spectrometer data: (1) Differential absorption techniques based on: (a) Narrow-Wide (N/W) ratio between overlapping spectrally wide and narrow channels (b) Continuum Interpolated Band Ratio (CIBR) between a measurement channel and the weighted sum of two reference channels; and (2) Non-linear fitting techniques which are based on spectral radiative transfer calculations. The advantage of the first approach is computational speed and of the second, improved retrieval accuracy. Our goal was to improve the accuracy of the first technique using physics based on radiative transfer. Using a modified version of the Duntley equation, we derived an {open_quote}Atmospheric Pre-corrected Differential Absorption{close_quote} (APDA) technique and described an iterative scheme to retrieve water vapor on a pixel-by-pixel basis. Next we compared both, the CIBR and the APDA using the Duntley equation for MODTRAN3 computed irradiances, transmissions and path radiance (using the DISORT option). This simulation showed that the CIBR is very sensitive to reflectance effects and that the APDA performs much better. An extensive data set was created with the radiative transfer code 6S over 379 different ground reflectance spectra. The calculated relative water vapor error was reduced significantly for the APDA. The APDA technique had about 8% (vs. over 35% for the CIBR) of the 379 spectra with a relative water vapor error of greater than {+-}5%. The APDA has been applied to 1991 and 1995 AVIRIS scenes which visually demonstrate the improvement over the CIBR technique.

  11. Development of a differential absorption lidar for identification of carbon sequestration site leakage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, William Eric

    This thesis describes the development and deployment of a near-infrared scanning micropulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for monitoring carbon dioxide sequestration site integrity. The DIAL utilizes a custom-built lidar (light detection and ranging) transmitter system based on two commercial tunable diode lasers operating at 1.571 microm, an acousto-optic modulator, fiber optic switches, and an Erbium-doped fiber amplifier to generate 65 microJ 200 ns pulses at a 15 kHz repetition rate. Backscattered laser transmitter light is collected with an 11 inch Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope where it is optically filtered to reduce background noise. A fiber-coupled photomultiplier tube operating in the photon counting mode is then used to monitor the collected return signal. Averaging over periods typically of one hour permit range-resolved measurements of carbon dioxide from 1 to 2.5 km with a typical error of 40 ppm. For monitoring a field site, the system scans over a field area by pointing the transmitter and receiver with a computer controlled motorized commercial telescope base. The system has made autonomous field measurements in an agricultural field adjacent to Montana State University and at the Kevin Dome carbon sequestration site in rural northern Montana. Comparisons have been made with an in situ sensor showing agreement between the two measurements to within the 40 error of the DIAL. In addition to the work on the 1.57 micron DIAL, this thesis also presents work done at NASA Langley Research Center on the development and deployment of a 2 micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. The 2 micron system utilizes a low repetition rate 140 mJ double pulsed Ho:Tm:YLF laser developed at NASA Langley.

  12. New concept design of differential absorption lidar: fusion of DIAL and TDLS methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lytkine, Alexandre; Lau, Brian; Lim, Alan; Jaeger, Wolfgang; Tulip, John

    2007-10-01

    We propose a new approach to range-resolved remote gas sensing in the atmosphere based on a combination of a DIAL and tunable-laser diode spectroscopy (TDLS) methods. To add range-resolving capabilities to a TDLS sensor we propose to arrange a group of retroreflectors (RRs) dividing an absorption path into adjacent measurement sections similar to those utilized by conventional DIAL systems. We implemented two techniques for the interrogation of the RRs: 1) scanning a beam of a continuous-wave laser over RRs sequentially; 2) using a time delay between returns from different RRs illuminated with a pulsed laser. We employed scanning technique with a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) operating near 1389 nm. A single-pulse interrogation method was demonstrated with a 10.9-μm quantum cascade laser (QCL) suitable for detection of ammonia, ethylene and water vapor in the atmosphere. Gas sensing and ranging was performed over distances varying from ~ 1 m up to ~ 1 km. Using VCSEL we attained a 0.5-s time resolution in gas concentration profiling with a 10-cm spatial resolution. Minimum interrogation time of a group of RRs was ~ 9 ms. A new generation of differential absorption LIDARs can be developed for range-resolved gas sensing in the atmosphere over distances up to ~ 1 km. The instruments can be used for a variety of applications ranging from fencing industrial areas to monitor fluxes of atmospheric pollutants to continuous air quality control in populated areas

  13. High-resolution atmospheric water vapor measurements with a scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, F.; Behrendt, A.; Muppa, S. K.; Metzendorf, S.; Riede, A.; Wulfmeyer, V.

    2014-11-01

    The scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) is presented. The UHOH DIAL is equipped with an injection-seeded frequency-stabilized high-power Ti:sapphire laser operated at 818 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz. A scanning transceiver unit with a 80 cm primary mirror receives the atmospheric backscatter signals. The system is capable of water vapor measurements with temporal resolutions of a few seconds and a range resolution between 30 and 300 m at daytime. It allows to investigate surface-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes with high resolution. In this paper, we present the design of the instrument and illustrate its performance with recent water vapor measurements taken in Stuttgart-Hohenheim and in the frame of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE). HOPE was located near research center Jülich, in western Germany, in spring 2013 as part of the project "High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction" (HD(CP)2). Scanning measurements reveal the 3-dimensional structures of the water vapor field. The influence of uncertainties within the calculation of the absorption cross-section at wavelengths around 818 nm for the WV retrieval is discussed. Radiosonde intercomparisons show a very small bias between the instruments of only (-0.04 ± 0.11) g m-3 or (-1.0 ± 2.3) % in the height range of 0.5 to 3 km.

  14. Micropulse differential absorption lidar for identification of carbon sequestration site leakage.

    PubMed

    Johnson, William; Repasky, Kevin S; Carlsten, John L

    2013-05-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for identification of carbon dioxide leaks at carbon sequestration sites has been developed and initial data has been collected at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes operating in the continuous-wave mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto-optic modulator is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium-doped fiber amplifier to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 μJ, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 μm. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photomultiplier tube module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL has measured carbon dioxide profiles from 1 to 2.5 km with 60 min temporal averaging. Comparisons of DIAL measurements with a Licor LI-820 gas analyzer point sensor have been made. PMID:23669765

  15. [Study on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Data Processing Based on Chirp-Z Transformation].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hai-ming; Li, Guang-jie; Wu, Hao

    2015-06-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) is a commonly used atmospheric pollution monitoring method. Denoising of monitoring spectral data will improve the inversion accuracy. Fourier transform filtering method is effectively capable of filtering out the noise in the spectral data. But the algorithm itself can introduce errors. In this paper, a chirp-z transform method is put forward. By means of the local thinning of Fourier transform spectrum, it can retain the denoising effect of Fourier transform and compensate the error of the algorithm, which will further improve the inversion accuracy. The paper study on the concentration retrieving of SO2 and NO2. The results show that simple division causes bigger error and is not very stable. Chirp-z transform is proved to be more accurate than Fourier transform. Results of the frequency spectrum analysis show that Fourier transform cannot solve the distortion and weakening problems of characteristic absorption spectrum. Chirp-z transform shows ability in fine refactoring of specific frequency spectrum. PMID:26601381

  16. NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2012-05-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 levels in the Kowloon Tong and Mongkok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to mixing ratios reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time (13:30-14:30 LT - local time).

  17. Multi-phase functionalization of titanium for enhanced photon absorption in the vis-NIR region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thakur, Pooja; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-10-01

    Inadequate absorption of Near Infrared (NIR) photons by conventional silicon solar cells has been a major stumbling block towards the attainment of a high efficiency “full spectrum” solar cell. An effective enhancement in the absorption of such photons is desired as they account for a considerable portion of the tappable solar energy. In this work, we report a remarkable gain observed in the absorption of photons in the near infrared and visible region (400 nm-1000 nm) by a novel multi-phased oxide of titanium. Synthesised via a single step ultra-fast laser pulse interaction with pure titanium, characterisation studies have identified this oxide of titanium to be multi-phased and composed of Ti3O, (TiO.716)3.76 and TiO2 (rutile). Computed to have an average band gap value of 2.39 eV, this ultrafast laser induced multi-phased titanium oxide has especially exhibited steady absorption capability in the NIR range of 750-1000 nm, which to the best of our knowledge, was never reported before. The unique NIR absorption properties of the laser functionalised titanium coupled with the simplicity and versatility of the ultrafast laser interaction process involved thereby provides tremendous potential towards the photon sensitization of titanium and thereafter for the inception of a “full spectrum” solar device.

  18. Multi-phase functionalization of titanium for enhanced photon absorption in the vis-NIR region

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Pooja; Tan, Bo; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-01-01

    Inadequate absorption of Near Infrared (NIR) photons by conventional silicon solar cells has been a major stumbling block towards the attainment of a high efficiency “full spectrum” solar cell. An effective enhancement in the absorption of such photons is desired as they account for a considerable portion of the tappable solar energy. In this work, we report a remarkable gain observed in the absorption of photons in the near infrared and visible region (400 nm–1000 nm) by a novel multi-phased oxide of titanium. Synthesised via a single step ultra-fast laser pulse interaction with pure titanium, characterisation studies have identified this oxide of titanium to be multi-phased and composed of Ti3O, (TiO.716)3.76 and TiO2 (rutile). Computed to have an average band gap value of 2.39 eV, this ultrafast laser induced multi-phased titanium oxide has especially exhibited steady absorption capability in the NIR range of 750–1000 nm, which to the best of our knowledge, was never reported before. The unique NIR absorption properties of the laser functionalised titanium coupled with the simplicity and versatility of the ultrafast laser interaction process involved thereby provides tremendous potential towards the photon sensitization of titanium and thereafter for the inception of a “full spectrum” solar device. PMID:26477578

  19. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-07-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science.

  20. Error analysis of Raman differential absorption lidar ozone measurements in ice clouds.

    PubMed

    Reichardt, J

    2000-11-20

    A formalism for the error treatment of lidar ozone measurements with the Raman differential absorption lidar technique is presented. In the presence of clouds wavelength-dependent multiple scattering and cloud-particle extinction are the main sources of systematic errors in ozone measurements and necessitate a correction of the measured ozone profiles. Model calculations are performed to describe the influence of cirrus and polar stratospheric clouds on the ozone. It is found that it is sufficient to account for cloud-particle scattering and Rayleigh scattering in and above the cloud; boundary-layer aerosols and the atmospheric column below the cloud can be neglected for the ozone correction. Furthermore, if the extinction coefficient of the cloud is ?0.1 km(-1), the effect in the cloud is proportional to the effective particle extinction and to a particle correction function determined in the limit of negligible molecular scattering. The particle correction function depends on the scattering behavior of the cloud particles, the cloud geometric structure, and the lidar system parameters. Because of the differential extinction of light that has undergone one or more small-angle scattering processes within the cloud, the cloud effect on ozone extends to altitudes above the cloud. The various influencing parameters imply that the particle-related ozone correction has to be calculated for each individual measurement. Examples of ozone measurements in cirrus clouds are discussed. PMID:18354611

  1. Absorption intensity tunability in the near infrared region using phase-change nanostructure (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozdemir, Abdurrahman; Saraydemir, Safak; Barut, Bilal; Kocer, Hasan

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured thin film absorbers embedded with phase-change material (PCM) can provide large level of absorption intensity tunability in the near-infrared region. Germanium Antimonide Tellurite (Ge2Sb1Te4-GST) was employed as the phase-change material in the designed structures. The structure is composed of a periodic grating-type array of 200 nm thick Au buried with 100 nm-thick GST layer from the top of the Au layer. The period of the gratings is 2 μm and in each period, GST width is 0.5 μm. GST was selected as the active PCM because its optical properties undergo a substantial change during a structural transition from the amorphous to the crystalline phase. The optical absorption properties of the designed structures with respect to the geometric and material parameters were systematically investigated using finite-difference time-domain computations. It was shown that absorption intensity in the near-infrared region was tuned from the near-perfect to the near-zero level by switching the PCM from its amorphous to crystalline states. The distributions of the electric field and absorbed power at the resonant wavelengths with respect to different phases of the GST were investigated to further explain the physical origin of the absorption tuning. This study provides a path toward the realization of tunable infrared absorbers for the applications, such as selective infrared emitters, infrared camouflage, sensors, and photovoltaic devices.

  2. Retrieval interval mapping, a tool to optimize the spectral retrieval range in differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, L.; Sihler, H.; Lampel, J.; Wagner, T.; Platt, U.

    2012-06-01

    Remote sensing via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) has become a standard technique to identify and quantify trace gases in the atmosphere. The technique is applied in a variety of configurations, commonly classified into active and passive instruments using artificial and natural light sources, respectively. Platforms range from ground based to satellite instruments and trace-gases are studied in all kinds of different environments. Due to the wide range of measurement conditions, atmospheric compositions and instruments used, a specific challenge of a DOAS retrieval is to optimize the parameters for each specific case and particular trace gas of interest. This becomes especially important when measuring close to the detection limit. A well chosen evaluation wavelength range is crucial to the DOAS technique. It should encompass strong absorption bands of the trace gas of interest in order to maximize the sensitivity of the retrieval, while at the same time minimizing absorption structures of other trace gases and thus potential interferences. Also, instrumental limitations and wavelength depending sources of errors (e.g. insufficient corrections for the Ring effect and cross correlations between trace gas cross sections) need to be taken into account. Most often, not all of these requirements can be fulfilled simultaneously and a compromise needs to be found depending on the conditions at hand. Although for many trace gases the overall dependence of common DOAS retrieval on the evaluation wavelength interval is known, a systematic approach to find the optimal retrieval wavelength range and qualitative assessment is missing. Here we present a novel tool to determine the optimal evaluation wavelength range. It is based on mapping retrieved values in the retrieval wavelength space and thus visualize the consequence of different choices of retrieval spectral ranges, e.g. caused by slightly erroneous absorption cross sections, cross correlations and

  3. Coding for slow frequency hopped differential phase shift keying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Gulliver, T. A.; Mason, Lloyd J.; Blake, Ian F.

    The performance of Reed-Solomon (RS) error-correcting codes with slow frequency hopped (SFH) differential phase shift keying (DPSK) signaling is analyzed and evaluated under worst-case partial-band noise (PBN) and worst-case multitone (MT) jamming. The results of a study of the bit error rate (BER) performance of this coded system are presented. A representative set of the performance curves is shown. SFH is used because the differential signaling required only the phase of the previous received signal as a reference. Using DPSK eliminates the need to establish a phase reference for the hop, as with coherent signaling. From the results it is clear that the number of codeword symbols per hop must be small in order for the RS code to provide protection against jamming. Otherwise, no improvement over uncoded DPSK is gained. Lowering the symbols per hop can be achieved either by reducing the number of bits per hop, or interleaving the RS codewords to a depth determined by the hop length and RS code parameters.

  4. Extending differential optical absorption spectroscopy for limb measurements in the UV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puä·Ä«Te, J.; Kühl, S.; Deutschmann, T.; Platt, U.; Wagner, T.

    2010-05-01

    Methods of UV/VIS absorption spectroscopy to determine the constituents in the Earth's atmosphere from measurements of scattered light are often based on the Beer-Lambert law, like e.g. Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). While the Beer-Lambert law is strictly valid for a single light path only, the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of any absorber can be approximated as linear also for scattered light observations at a single wavelength if the absorption is weak. If the light path distribution is approximated not to vary with wavelength, also linearity between the optical depth and the product of the cross-section and the concentration of an absorber can be assumed. These assumptions are widely made for DOAS applications for scattered light observations. For medium and strong absorption of scattered light (e.g. along very long light-paths like in limb geometry) the relation between the optical depth and the concentration of an absorber is no longer linear. In addition, for broad wavelength intervals the differences in the travelled light-paths at different wavelengths become important, especially in the UV, where the probability for scattering increases strongly with decreasing wavelength. However, the DOAS method can be extended to cases with medium to strong absorptions and for broader wavelength intervals by the so called air mass factor modified (or extended) DOAS and the weighting function modified DOAS. These approaches take into account the wavelength dependency of the slant column densities (SCDs), but also require a priori knowledge for the air mass factor or the weighting function from radiative transfer modelling. We describe an approach that considers the fitting results obtained from DOAS, the SCDs, as a function of wavelength and vertical optical depth and expands this function into a Taylor series of both quantities. The Taylor coefficients are then applied as additional fitting parameters in the DOAS analysis

  5. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-03

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  6. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2008-10-21

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  7. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-07-17

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  8. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2007-10-02

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  9. Method of differential-phase/absolute-amplitude QAM

    DOEpatents

    Dimsdle, Jeffrey William

    2009-09-01

    A method of quadrature amplitude modulation involving encoding phase differentially and amplitude absolutely, allowing for a high data rate and spectral efficiency in data transmission and other communication applications, and allowing for amplitude scaling to facilitate data recovery; amplitude scale tracking to track-out rapid and severe scale variations and facilitate successful demodulation and data retrieval; 2.sup.N power carrier recovery; incoherent demodulation where coherent carrier recovery is not possible or practical due to signal degradation; coherent demodulation; multipath equalization to equalize frequency dependent multipath; and demodulation filtering.

  10. Helical differential X-ray phase-contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fu, Jian; Willner, Marian; Chen, Liyuan; Tan, Renbo; Achterhold, Klaus; Bech, Martin; Herzen, Julia; Kunka, Danays; Mohr, Juergen; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2014-05-01

    We report on the first experimental results of helical differential phase-contrast computed tomography (helical DPC-CT) with a laboratory X-ray tube source and a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer. The results experimentally verify the feasibility of helical data acquisition and reconstruction in phase-contrast imaging, in analogy to its use in clinical CT systems. This allows fast and continuous volumetric scans for long objects with lengths exceeding the dimension of the detector. Since helical CT revolutionized the field of medical CT several years ago, we anticipate that this method will bring the same significant impact on the future medical and industrial applications of X-ray DPC-CT. PMID:24518822

  11. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Aslund, Magnus

    2012-09-15

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography. Methods: Phase-contrast imaging is a promising technology that may emerge as an alternative or adjunct to conventional absorption contrast. In particular, phase contrast may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio compared to absorption contrast because the difference in phase shift between soft-tissue structures is often substantially larger than the absorption difference. We have developed a comprehensive cascaded-systems framework to investigate Talbot interferometry, which is a technique for differential phase-contrast imaging. Analytical expressions for the MTF and NPS were derived to calculate the NEQ and a task-specific ideal-observer detectability index under assumptions of linearity and shift invariance. Talbot interferometry was compared to absorption contrast at equal dose, and using either a plane wave or a spherical wave in a conceivable mammography geometry. The impact of source size and spectrum bandwidth was included in the framework, and the trade-off with photon economy was investigated in some detail. Wave-propagation simulations were used to verify the analytical expressions and to generate example images. Results: Talbot interferometry inherently detects the differential of the phase, which led to a maximum in NEQ at high spatial frequencies, whereas the absorption-contrast NEQ decreased monotonically with frequency. Further, phase contrast detects differences in density rather than atomic number, and the optimal imaging energy was found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than for absorption

  12. Ideal-observer detectability in photon-counting differential phase-contrast imaging using a linear-systems approach

    PubMed Central

    Fredenberg, Erik; Danielsson, Mats; Stayman, J. Webster; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.; Åslund, Magnus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a cascaded-systems framework based on the noise-power spectrum (NPS), modulation transfer function (MTF), and noise-equivalent number of quanta (NEQ) for quantitative evaluation of differential phase-contrast imaging (Talbot interferometry) in relation to conventional absorption contrast under equal-dose, equal-geometry, and, to some extent, equal-photon-economy constraints. The focus is a geometry for photon-counting mammography. Methods: Phase-contrast imaging is a promising technology that may emerge as an alternative or adjunct to conventional absorption contrast. In particular, phase contrast may increase the signal-difference-to-noise ratio compared to absorption contrast because the difference in phase shift between soft-tissue structures is often substantially larger than the absorption difference. We have developed a comprehensive cascaded-systems framework to investigate Talbot interferometry, which is a technique for differential phase-contrast imaging. Analytical expressions for the MTF and NPS were derived to calculate the NEQ and a task-specific ideal-observer detectability index under assumptions of linearity and shift invariance. Talbot interferometry was compared to absorption contrast at equal dose, and using either a plane wave or a spherical wave in a conceivable mammography geometry. The impact of source size and spectrum bandwidth was included in the framework, and the trade-off with photon economy was investigated in some detail. Wave-propagation simulations were used to verify the analytical expressions and to generate example images. Results: Talbot interferometry inherently detects the differential of the phase, which led to a maximum in NEQ at high spatial frequencies, whereas the absorption-contrast NEQ decreased monotonically with frequency. Further, phase contrast detects differences in density rather than atomic number, and the optimal imaging energy was found to be a factor of 1.7 higher than for absorption

  13. Feasibility of using energy-resolving detectors in differential phase-contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baturin, Pavlo

    2016-03-01

    In a common clinical setting, conventional absorption-based imaging provides relatively good contrast between bonelike and soft-tissue materials. The reliability of material differentiation, however, is hampered when materials with similar absorption properties are scanned. This problem can be addressed by utilizing a spectral imaging technique whereby multiple X-ray measurements are taken at different beam conditions. In this work, we discuss the possibility of using a spectral imaging approach in a grating-based, differential-phase contrast-imaging (DPCI) modality. Two approaches, dual exposure with a conventional flat-panel detector (FPD) and a single exposure with a photon-counting energy-resolving detector (PCD), were reviewed. The feasibility of a single-exposure DPCI and a two-bin PCD setup was assessed quantitatively by a least-squares minimization algorithm applied to an X-ray diffraction pattern. It was shown that a two-peak-shaped X-ray spectrum can allow PCDs to be placed unambiguously at single Talbot distances making it possible to simultaneously detect photons in each energy bin with comparable efficiencies. The results of this work can help build a bridge between two rapidly developing imaging modalities, X-ray spectral imaging and X-ray DPCI.

  14. X-ray Emission and Absorption Lines During the SSS Phase of RS Ophiuchi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönrich, R. A.; Ness, J.-U.

    2008-12-01

    The high-resolution X-ray spectra of the sixth outburst of RS Ophiuchi revealed P Cygni-like line profiles. We use the column densities of selected isolated absorption lines to derive the nitrogen-to-oxygen abundance ratio. We next discuss the origin of the emission lines, which may originate from the shock, and the absorption and emission lines may thus have a different formation history. Finally, we discuss the correlation of high-amplitude variability detected during the early SSS phase with variability in the hardness ratio that follows the same pattern but is shifted by 1000~sec.

  15. Tropospheric ozone differential-absorption lidar using stimulated Raman scattering in carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Nakazato, Masahisa; Nagai, Tomohiro; Sakai, Tetsu; Hirose, Yasuo

    2007-04-20

    A UV ozone differential-absorption lidar (DIAL) utilizing a Nd:YAG laser and a single Raman cell filled with carbon dioxide (CO(2)) is designed, developed, and evaluated. The generated wavelengths are 276, 287, and 299 nm, comprising the first to third Stokes lines of the stimulated Raman scattering technique. The correction terms originated from the aerosol extinction, the backscatter, and the absorption by other gases are estimated using a model atmosphere. The experimental results demonstrate that the emitted output energies were 13 mJ/pulse at 276 nm and 287 nm and 5 mJ/pulse at 299 nm, with pump energy of 91 mJ/pulse and a CO(2) pressure of 0.7 MPa. The three Stokes lines account for 44.0% of the available energy. The use of argon or helium as a buffer gas in the Raman cell was also investigated, but this leads to a dramatic decrease in the third Stokes line, which makes this wavelength practically unusable. Our observations confirmed that 30 min of integration were sufficient to observe ozone concentration profiles up to 10 km. Aerosol extinction and backscatter correction are estimated and applied. The aerosol backscatter correction profile using 287 and 299 nm as reference wavelengths is compared with that using 355 nm. The estimated statistical error is less than 5% at 1.5 km and 10% at 2.6 km. Comparisons with the operational carbon-iodine type chemical ozonesondes demonstrate 20% overestimation of the ozone profiles by the DIAL technique. PMID:17415396

  16. Development and testing of a frequency-agile optical parametric oscillator system for differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weibring, P.; Smith, J. N.; Edner, H.; Svanberg, S.

    2003-10-01

    An all-solid-state fast-tuning lidar transmitter for range- and temporally resolved atmospheric gas concentration measurements has been developed and thoroughly tested. The instrument is based on a commercial optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system, which has been redesigned with piezoelectric transducers mounted on the wavelength-tuning mirror and on the crystal angle tuning element in the OPO. Piezoelectric transducers similarly control a frequency-mixing stage and doubling stage, which have been incorporated to extend system capabilities to the mid-IR and UV regions. The construction allows the system to be tuned to any wavelength, in any order, in the range of the piezoelectric transducers on a shot-to-shot basis. This extends the measurement capabilities far beyond the two-wavelength differential absorption lidar method and enables simultaneous measurements of several gases. The system performance in terms of wavelength, linewidth, and power stability is monitored in real time by an étalon-based wave meter and gas cells. The tests showed that the system was able to produce radiation in the 220-4300-nm-wavelength region, with an average linewidth better than 0.2 cm-1 and a shot-to-shot tunability up to 160 cm-1 within 20 ms. The utility of real-time linewidth and wavelength measurements is demonstrated by the ability to identify occasional poor quality laser shots and disregard these measurements. Also, absorption cell measurements of methane and mercury demonstrate the performance in obtaining stable wavelength and linewidth during rapid scans in the mid-IR and UV regions.

  17. [Study on determination of plume velocity by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-hua; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Dou, Ke; Lin, Yi-hui

    2008-10-01

    Differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique has been used to measure various trace gases in the atmosphere by their strongly structured absorption of radiation in the UV and visible spectral range. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source can obtain the continuous column density distribution of air pollutants (such as SO2 and NO2) by scanning the plume emitted from sources on a mobile platform, then with the plume velocity information the total emission value can be ultimately estimated. In practice it is hard to calculate the total emission because there is no efficient way to accurately get the plume velocity which is the most important parameter. Usually the wind speed near ground is used as the actual plume speed, which constitutes the greatest source of uncertainty in the passive DOAS measurements for the total emission calculation. A passive DOAS method for the determination of plume velocity of pollution source was studied in the present paper. Two passive DOAS systems were placed under the plume along the plume transmission direction to observed the scattered sunlight at one fixed sepasation angle, and then the plume velocity was derived from the time delay resulting from the plume moving a certain distance, and also the plume height needed in the plume velocity calculation was measured by the same two passive DOAS systems. Measurement of the plume emitted from a certain power plant was carried out by the two passive DOAS systems and the plume velocities of 3.6 and 5.4 m x s(-1) at two separate moments were derived. The comparison with the wind speed measured at the same time by the single theodolite wind observation method indicates that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to determine the plume velocity by monitoring the total emission from sources. PMID:19123375

  18. Halo mass dependence of H I and O VI absorption: evidence for differential kinematics

    SciTech Connect

    Mathes, Nigel L.; Churchill, Christopher W.; Nielsen, Nikole M.; Trujillo-Gomez, Sebastian; Kacprzak, Glenn G.; Charlton, Jane; Muzahid, Sowgat

    2014-09-10

    We studied a sample of 14 galaxies (0.1 < z < 0.7) using HST/WFPC2 imaging and high-resolution HST/COS or HST/STIS quasar spectroscopy of Lyα, Lyβ, and O VI λλ1031, 1037 absorption. The galaxies, having 10.8 ≤ log (M {sub h}/M {sub ☉}) ≤ 12.2, lie within D = 300 kpc of quasar sightlines, probing out to D/R {sub vir} = 3. When the full range of M {sub h} and D/R {sub vir} of the sample are examined, ∼40% of the H I absorbing clouds can be inferred to be escaping their host halo. The fraction of bound clouds decreases as D/R {sub vir} increases such that the escaping fraction is ∼15% for D/R {sub vir} < 1, ∼45% for 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, and ∼90% for 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3. Adopting the median mass log M {sub h}/M {sub ☉} = 11.5 to divide the sample into 'higher' and 'lower' mass galaxies, we find a mass dependency for the hot circumgalactic medium kinematics. To our survey limits, O VI absorption is found in only ∼40% of the H I clouds in and around lower mass halos as compared to ∼85% around higher mass halos. For D/R {sub vir} < 1, lower mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼65%, whereas higher mass halos have an escape fraction of ∼5%. For 1 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 2, the escape fractions are ∼55% and ∼35% for lower mass and higher mass halos, respectively. For 2 ≤ D/R {sub vir} < 3, the escape fraction for lower mass halos is ∼90%. We show that it is highly likely that the absorbing clouds reside within 4R {sub vir} of their host galaxies and that the kinematics are dominated by outflows. Our finding of 'differential kinematics' is consistent with the scenario of 'differential wind recycling' proposed by Oppenheimer et al. We discuss the implications for galaxy evolution, the stellar to halo mass function, and the mass-metallicity relationship of galaxies.

  19. NONLINEAR-APPROXIMATION TECHNIQUE FOR DETERMINING VERTICAL OZONE-CONCENTRATION PROFILES WITH A DIFFERENTIAL-ABSORPTION LIDAR

    EPA Science Inventory

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone concentration profiles from backscattered signals obtained by a multi-wavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration...

  20. Development of a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Bares, A.; Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.

    2010-12-01

    Rising levels of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the Earth’s atmosphere have been identified as a major contributor to climate change. Geologic carbon sequestration has the potential for mitigating CO2 emission into the atmosphere by capturing CO2 at power generation facilities and storing the CO2 in geologic formations. Several technological challenges need to be overcome for successful geologic sequestration of CO2 including surface monitoring tools and techniques for monitoring CO2 sequestration sites to ensure site integrity and public safety. Researchers at Montana State University are developing an eye-safe scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) capable of spatially mapping above-ground CO2 number densities for carbon sequestration site monitoring. The eye-safe scanning CO2 DIAL utilizes a temperature tunable fiber pigtailed distributed feedback (DFB) laser operating wavelength of 1.573 μm to access CO2 absorption features. The output of the DFB laser is split using an inline fiber splitter with part of the light sent to an optical wavemeter to monitor the operating wavelength of the laser transmitter. The remaining light is modulated using an inline acousto-optic modulator producing a pulse train with a 20 kHz pulse repetition frequency and a 2 μs duration. This pulse train is amplified in a commercial fiber amplifier producing up to 80 μJ per pulse energy. The output from the fiber amplifier is sent horizontally through the atmosphere and the scattered light is collected using a 28 cm diameter commercial Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and focused into a multimode optical fiber. A fiber coupled photomultiplier (PMT) tube is then used to monitor the light collected by the DIAL receiver. Data is collected in the following manner. The DFB laser is tuned to the online wavelength of the CO2 absorption feature and data is collected for a user defined time. A feedback loop utilizing the optical wavemeter is used

  1. Measuring rainwater content by radar using propagation differential phase shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    While radars measure several quantities closely coupled to the rainfall rate, for frequencies less than 15 GHz, estimates of the rainwater content W are traditionally computed from the radar reflectivity factor Z or the rate of attenuation A--quantities only weakly related to W. Consequently, instantaneous point estimates of W using Z and A are often erroneous. A more natural, alternative parameter for estimating W at these frequencies is the specific polarization propagation differential phase shift phi(sub DP), which is a measure of the change in the difference between phases of vertically (V) and horizontally (H) polarized waves with increasing distance from a radar. It is now well known that W is nearly linearly related to phi(sub DP) divided by (1 - reversed R), where reversed R is the mass-weighted mean axis ratio of the raindrops. Unfortunately, such relations are not widely used in part because measurements of phi(sub DP) are scarce but also because one must determine reversed R. In this work it is shown that this parameter can be estimated using the differential reflectivity (Z(sub H)/Z(sub V) at 3 GHz. An alternative technique is suggested for higher frequencies when the differential reflectivity becomes degraded by attenuation. While theory indicates that it should be possible using phi(sub DP) to estimate W quite accurately, measurement errors increase the uncertainty to +/- 18%-35% depending on reversed R. While far from ideal, it appears that these estimates are likely to be considerably more accurate than those deduced using currently available methods.

  2. Iris as a reflector for differential absorption low-coherence interferometry to measure glucose level in the anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zeng, Nan; Ji, Yanhong; Li, Yao; Dai, Xiangsong; Li, Peng; Duan, Lian; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    We present a method of glucose concentration detection in the anterior chamber with a differential absorption optical low-coherent interferometry (LCI) technique. Back-reflected light from the iris, passing through the anterior chamber twice, was selectively obtained with the LCI technique. Two light sources, one centered within (1625 nm) and the other centered outside (1310 nm) of a glucose absorption band were used for differential absorption measurement. In the eye model and pig eye experiments, we obtained a resolution glucose level of 26.8 mg/dL and 69.6 mg/dL, respectively. This method has a potential application for noninvasive detection of glucose concentration in aqueous humor, which is related to the glucose concentration in blood.

  3. Phase-dependent absorption features in X-ray spectra of XDINSs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghese, A.; Rea, N.

    2016-06-01

    A detailed pulse phase spectroscopy using all the available XMM-Newton observations of X-ray dim isolated neutron stars (XDINSs) have revealed the presence of narrow and strongly phase-dependent absorption X-ray features. The first discovered was in the X-ray spectrum of the nearby XDINS RX J0720.4-3125. The line seems to be stable in time over a timespan of 12 years and is present in 20% of the pulsar rotation. Because of its narrow width and its strong dependency on the rotational phase, the spectral line is probably due to proton cyclotron absorption in a ˜10^{14} G confined magnetic structure (with a field strength about 7 times the dipolar field of this pulsar). Performing the same analysis to all archival XDINS data, a new possible candidate was found in the X-ray spectrum of RX J1308.6+2127. This absorption feature shows the same phase dependency and energy as the first one, revealing the presence of a high-B structure close to the stellar surface. This result supports the proposed scenario of XDINSs being aged magnetars, having still a strong non-dipolar crustal B-field component.

  4. Three-dimensional observations of atmospheric humidity with a scanning differential absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Riede, Andrea; Wagner, Gerd; Pal, Sandip; Bauer, Heinz; Radlach, Marcus; Späth, Florian

    2009-09-01

    A novel scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system has been developed. This instrument is mobile and was applied successfully in two field campaigns: COPS 2007 (Convective and Orographically-induced Precipitation Study), a research and development project of the World Weather Research Programme, and FLUXPAT2009 within the German Research Foundation project Patterns in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Systems: monitoring, modeling and data assimilation". In this paper, the instrument is described and its capabilities are illustrated with measurements examples. The DIAL provides remote sensing data of the atmospheric water-vapor field with previously unachieved resolution. The data products of the DIAL are profiles of absolute humidity with typical resolutions of 15 to 300 m with a temporal resolution of 1 to 10 s and a maximum range of several kilometers at both day and night. But spatial and temporal resolution can be traded off against each other. Intercomparisons with other instruments confirm high accuracy. Beside humidity, also the backscatter field and thus aerosols and clouds are observed simultaneously. The DIAL transmitter is based on an injection-seeded Titanium:Sapphire laser operated at 820 nm which is end-pumped with a diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser. By use of a scanning transmitter with an 80-cm receiving telescope, the measurements can be performed in any direction of interest and the 3-dimensional structure of the water vapor field can be observed.

  5. Mid-infrared carbon monoxide detection system using differential absorption spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming; Sui, Yue; Li, Guo-lin; Zheng, Chuan-tao; Chen, Mei-mei; Wang, Yi-ding

    2015-11-01

    A differential carbon monoxide (CO) concentration sensing device using a self-fabricated spherical mirror (e.g. light-collector) and a multi-pass gas-chamber is presented in this paper. Single-source dual-channel detection method is adopted to suppress the interferences from light source, optical path and environmental changes. Detection principle of the device is described, and both the optical part and the electrical part are developed. Experiments are carried out to evaluate the sensing performance on CO concentration. The results indicate that at 1.013×105 Pa and 298 K, the limit of detection (LoD) is about 11.5 mg/m3 with an absorption length of 40 cm. As the gas concentration gets larger than 115 mg/m3 (1.013×105 Pa, 298 K), the relative detection error falls into the range of -1.7%—+1.9%. Based on 12 h long-term measurement on the 115 mg/m3 and 1 150 mg/m3 CO samples, the maximum detection errors are about 0.9% and 5.5%, respectively. Due to the low cost and competitive characteristics, the proposed device shows potential applications in CO detection in the circumstances of coal-mine production and environmental protection.

  6. Applicability of light-emitting diodes as light sources for active differential optical absorption spectroscopy measurements.

    PubMed

    Kern, Christoph; Trick, Sebastian; Rippel, Bernhard; Platt, Ulrich

    2006-03-20

    We present what is to our knowledge the first use of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light sources for long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements of trace gases in the open atmosphere. Modern LEDs represent a potentially advantageous alternative to thermal light sources, in particular to xenon arc lamps, which are the most common active DOAS light sources. The radiative properties of a variety of LEDs were characterized, and parameters such as spectral shape, spectral range, spectral stability, and ways in which they can be influenced by environmental factors were analyzed. The spectra of several LEDs were found to contain Fabry-Perot etalon-induced spectral structures that interfered with the DOAS evaluation, in particular when a constant temperature was not maintained. It was shown that LEDs can be used successfully as light sources in active DOAS experiments that measure NO2 and NO3 near 450 and 630 nm, respectively. Average detection limits of 0.3 parts in 10(9) and 16 parts in 10(12) respectively, were obtained by use of a 6 km light path in the open atmosphere. PMID:16579579

  7. Summertime measurements of benzene and toluene in Athens using a differential optical absorption spectroscopy system.

    PubMed

    Petrakis, Michael; Psiloglou, Basil; Kassomenos, Pavlos A; Cartalis, Costas

    2003-09-01

    In this paper, measurements of benzene, toluene, p,m-xylene, ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and sulfur dioxide (SO2) made using the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique during a 4-month period of summer 2000 (June-September) in Athens, Greece, are presented. An assessment of benzene mean value concentrations during this 4-month period exceeded 10 microg/m3, which is 2 times greater than the average yearly limit proposed by European authorities. Toluene measurements present mean values of approximately 33 microg/m3. Benzene and especially toluene measurements are highly correlated with NO2 and anticorrelated with O3. High values of benzene, NO2, and toluene are also correlated with winds from the southeast section, an area of industrial activity where emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have been recorded in previous studies. O3 is correlated with winds from the south-southwest section affected by the sea breeze circulation. Diurnal variations of O3, NO2, and SO2 concentrations are compatible with measurements from the stations of the Ministry of Environment's network. Outliers are combined with weak winds from the south-southwest. As far as p,m-xylene measurements are concerned, there is a poor correlation between gas chromatography (GC) and DOAS Opsis measurements, also observed in previous relevant campaigns and eventually a criticism in the use of the DOAS Opsis model for the measurement of p,m-xylene. PMID:13678363

  8. Ultra Narrowband Optical Filters for Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stenholm, Ingrid; DeYoung, Russell J.

    2001-01-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems are being deployed to make vertical profile measurements of atmospheric water vapor from ground and airborne platforms. One goal of this work is to improve the technology of such DIAL systems that they could be deployed on space-based platforms. Since background radiation reduces system performance, it is important to reduce it. One way to reduce it is to narrow the bandwidth of the optical receiver system. However, since the DIAL technique uses two or more wavelengths, in this case separated by 0.1 nm, a fixed-wavelength narrowband filter that would encompass both wavelengths would be broader than required for each line, approximately 0.02 nm. The approach employed in this project is to use a pair of tunable narrowband reflective fiber Bragg gratings. The Bragg gratings are germanium-doped silica core fiber that is exposed to ultraviolet radiation to produce index-of-refraction changes along the length of the fiber. The gratings can be tuned by stretching. The backscattered laser radiation is transmitted through an optical circulator to the gratings, reflected back to the optical circulator by one of the gratings, and then sent to a photodiode. The filter reflectivities were >90 percent, and the overall system efficiency was 30 percent.

  9. Differential Absorption Measurements of Atmospheric Water Vapor with a Coherent Lidar at 2050.532 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.; Dharamsi, Amin; Davis, Richard E.; Petros, Mulugeta; McCarthy, John C.

    1999-01-01

    Wind and water vapor are two major factors driving the Earth's atmospheric circulation, and direct measurement of these factors is needed for better understanding of basic atmospheric science, weather forecasting, and climate studies. Coherent lidar has proved to be a valuable tool for Doppler profiling of wind fields, and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has shown its effectiveness in profiling water vapor. These two lidar techniques are generally considered distinctly different, but this paper explores an experimental combination of the Doppler and DIAL techniques for measuring both wind and water vapor with an eye-safe wavelength based on a solid-state laser material. Researchers have analyzed and demonstrated coherent DIAL water vapor measurements at 10 micrometers wavelength based on CO2 lasers. The hope of the research presented here is that the 2 gm wavelength in a holmium or thulium-based laser may offer smaller packaging and more rugged operation that the CO2-based approach. Researchers have extensively modeled 2 um coherent lasers for water vapor profiling, but no published demonstration is known. Studies have also been made, and results published on the Doppler portion, of a Nd:YAG-based coherent DIAL operating at 1.12 micrometers. Eye-safety of the 1.12 micrometer wavelength may be a concern, whereas the longer 2 micrometer and 10 micrometer systems allow a high level of eyesafety.

  10. Effect of temperature on passive remote sensing of chemicals by differential absorption radiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holland, Stephen K.; Krauss, Roland H.; Laufer, Gabriel

    2005-10-01

    Differential absorption radiometry (DAR), using uncooled detectors, is a simple, low-cost method for passive remote sensing of hazardous chemicals for domestic security applications. However, radiometric temperature differences (ΔTeffective) between a target gas species and its background affect detection sensitivity. Two DARs with sensitivities to methanol, diisopropyl methylphosphonate (DIMP), and dimethyl methylphosphonate (DMMP), all spectral or physical simulants of hazardous chemicals, were developed and used to experimentally determine the effect of |ΔTeffective| on detection sensitivity. An analytical model was also developed and compared with the experimental results. With a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR)>5, a |ΔTeffective|≥2 K is sufficient for rapid (≤1 s) detection of methanol at <0.03 atm cm and DMMP and DIMP at <0.001 atm cm. These measured sensitivities suggest that rapid detection of hazardous chemical vapor clouds below lethal dose concentrations can be achieved using room-temperature pyroelectric detectors. Measurements were within 3% of the analytical predictions.

  11. Evaluation of tropospheric water vapor profiling using eye-safe, infrared differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Rye, B.J. |; Machol, J.L.; Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.

    1996-05-14

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. In addition, these should be acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. To date, application of profiles have been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness and high operating cost, or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost. Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the studies reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of solving some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameters representative of current technologies. These simulations are also applied to determine the strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application.

  12. Field-deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-03-01

    A field-deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes was constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with optomechanical and thermal stability; multistage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions; rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions; and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing, and intercomparisons are performed and discussed. In general, the instrument has a 150 m range resolution with a 10 min temporal resolution; 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument is shown capable of autonomous long-term field operation - 50 days with a > 95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  13. Field deployable diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for profiling water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S. M.; Repasky, K. S.; Morley, B.; Moen, D.; Hayman, M.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2014-11-01

    A field deployable water vapor profiling instrument that builds on the foundation of the preceding generations of diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) laboratory prototypes has been constructed and tested. Significant advances are discussed, including: a unique shared telescope design that allows expansion of the outgoing beam for eye-safe operation with opto-mechanical and thermal stability, multi-stage optical filtering enabling measurement during daytime bright-cloud conditions, rapid spectral switching between the online and offline wavelengths enabling measurements during changing atmospheric conditions, and enhanced performance at lower ranges by the introduction of a new filter design and the addition of a wide field-of-view channel. Performance modeling, testing and intercomparisons have been performed and are discussed. In general, the instrument has 150 m range resolution with 10 min temporal resolution - 1 min temporal resolution in the lowest 2 km of the atmosphere is demonstrated. The instrument was shown capable of autonomous long term field operation - 50 days with a >95% uptime - under a broad set of atmospheric conditions and potentially forms the basis for a ground-based network of eye-safe autonomous instruments needed for the atmospheric sciences research and forecasting communities.

  14. Design of differential optical absorption spectroscopy long-path telescopes based on fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Merten, André; Tschritter, Jens; Platt, Ulrich

    2011-02-10

    We present a new design principle of telescopes for use in the spectral investigation of the atmosphere and the detection of atmospheric trace gases with the long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. A combination of emitting and receiving fibers in a single bundle replaces the commonly used coaxial-Newton-type combination of receiving and transmitting telescope. This very simplified setup offers a higher light throughput and simpler adjustment and allows smaller instruments, which are easier to handle and more portable. The higher transmittance was verified by ray-tracing calculations, which result in a theoretical factor threefold improvement in signal intensity compared with the old setup. In practice, due to the easier alignment and higher stability, up to factor of 10 higher signal intensities were found. In addition, the use of a fiber optic light source provides a better spectral characterization of the light source, which results in a lower detection limit for trace gases studied with this instrument. This new design will greatly enhance the usability and the range of applications of active DOAS instruments. PMID:21343997

  15. Urban atmospheric formaldehyde concentrations measured by a differential optical absorption spectroscopy method.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Wang, Shangshang; Zhou, Rui; Zhou, Bin

    2014-02-01

    In this study a differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) method was used to monitor formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations in Shanghai ambient air at a research station in Fudan University. The measurements were carried out during April 2010-April 2011 and a total of 120 940 recorded data points were obtained. The average HCHO concentration was found to be the highest (10.0 ppbv) during August 2010 and the lowest (2.0 ppbv) during April 2010. The diurnal variation of HCHO and O3 followed very similar trends in all the seasons. This was evident from the fact that HCHO had a strong positive correlation with O3. Both peaked once in the morning (07:00-09:00 local time), and once in the night (16:00-19:00 local time). The peak concentrations varied from season to season, which could be attributed to the seasonal variation in anthropogenic activity, traffic movement and atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The background HCHO concentration in 2011 winter (similar to 12.0 ppbv) was an order of magnitude higher than that observed in 2010 spring (similar to 2.0 ppbv); corresponding with the results of several pollution controls adopted by the Shanghai administrative government before and after the EXPO 2010 period (May 1, 2010-Oct. 31 2010). This study contributed the basic information for understanding the concentration level and the chemical processes of atmospheric HCHO in a major metropolitan area. PMID:24362786

  16. [Studies on the data processing method in chlorine measurement by differential optical absorption spectroscopy technology].

    PubMed

    Ye, Cong-Lei; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Li, Ang; Ling, Liu-Yi; Hu, Ren-Zhi; Yang, Jing-Wen

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique, experimental measurements of chlorine was carried out in the laboratory with a small self-built experimental system. In dealing with the standard cross-section of chlorine, we presented two different methods: triangle filtering and polynomial fitting. Experiments showed that the concentration of chlorine could be accurately retrieved by the latter one. Simulation results showed that the error of retrieval result by fifth-order polynomial fitting was smaller than by other orders and an actual retrieval example shows that the fitting spectrums were nearly coincident with the measured spectrums with a residual delta(peak to peak) below 5 per hundred; The results measured in different sample pools displayed a high linearity of 0.9961 by this method. The main sources of errors during the entire experiment were simply analyzed. According to the experimental result above, it is feasible to detect chlorine using DOAS technology by polynomial fitting. PMID:23016314

  17. A Water Vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR Design for Unpiloted Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeYoung, Russell J.; Mead, Patricia F.

    2004-01-01

    This system study proposes the deployment of a water vapor Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system on an Altair unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platform. The Altair offers improved payload weight and volume performance, and longer total flight time as compared to other commercial UAV's. This study has generated a preliminary design for an Altair based water vapor DIAL system. The design includes a proposed DIAL schematic, a review of mechanical challenges such as temperature and humidity stresses on UAV deployed DIAL systems, an assessment of the available capacity for additional instrumentation (based on the proposed design), and an overview of possible weight and volume improvements associated with the use of customized electronic and computer hardware, and through the integration of advanced fiber-optic and laser products. The results of the study show that less than 17% of the available weight, less than 19% of the volume capacity, and approximately 11% of the electrical capacity is utilized by the proposed water vapor DIAL system on the Altair UAV.

  18. Airborne 2-Micron Double-Pulsed Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar for Column CO2 Measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Remus, Ruben G.; Fay, James J.; Reithmaier, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Double-pulse 2-micron lasers have been demonstrated with energy as high as 600 millijouls and up to 10 Hz repetition rate. The two laser pulses are separated by 200 microseconds and can be tuned and locked separately. Applying double-pulse laser in DIAL system enhances the CO2 measurement capability by increasing the overlap of the sampled volume between the on-line and off-line. To avoid detection complicity, integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar provides higher signal-to-noise ratio measurement compared to conventional range-resolved DIAL. Rather than weak atmospheric scattering returns, IPDA rely on the much stronger hard target returns that is best suited for airborne platforms. In addition, the IPDA technique measures the total integrated column content from the instrument to the hard target but with weighting that can be tuned by the transmitter. Therefore, the transmitter could be tuned to weight the column measurement to the surface for optimum CO2 interaction studies or up to the free troposphere for optimum transport studies. Currently, NASA LaRC is developing and integrating a double-Pulsed 2-micron direct detection IPDA lidar for CO2 column measurement from an airborne platform. The presentation will describe the development of the 2-micron IPDA lidar system and present the airborne measurement of column CO2 and will compare to in-situ measurement for various ground target of different reflectivity.

  19. Observation of phycoerythrin-containing cyanobacteria and other phytoplankton groups from space using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy on SCIAMACHY data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracher, Astrid; Dinter, Tilman; Burrows, John P.; Vountas, Marco; Röttgers, Rüdiger; Peeken, Ilka

    In order to understand the marine phytoplankton's role in the global marine ecosystem and biogeochemical cycles it is necessary to derive global information on the distribution of major functional phytoplankton types (PFT) in the world oceans. In our study we use instead of the common ocean color sensors such as CZCS, SeaWiFS, MODIS, MERIS, with rather low spectral resolution, the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) to study the retrieval of phytoplankton distribution and absorption with the satellite sensor Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric Chartography (SCIAMACHY). SCIAMACHY measures back scattered solar radiation in the UV-Vis-NIR spectral region with a high spectral resolution (0.2 to 1.5 nm). We used in-situ measured phytoplankton absorption spectra from two different RV Polarstern expeditions where different phytoplankton groups were representing or dominating the phytoplankton composition in order to identify these characteristic absorption spectra in SCIAMACHY data in the range of 430 to 500 nm and also to identify absorption from cyanobacterial photosynthetic pigment phycoerythrin. Our results show clearly these absorptions in the SCIAMACHY data. The conversion of these differential absorptions by including the information of the light penetration depth (according to Vountas et al., Ocean Science, 2007) globally distributed pigment concentrations for these characteristic phytoplankton groups for two monthly periods (Feb-March 2004, Oct-Nov 2005 and Oct-Nov 2007) are derived. The satellite retrieved information on cyanobacteria (Synechococcus sp. and Prochlorococcus sp.) and diatoms distribution matches well with the concentration measured from collocated water samples with HPLC technique and also to global model analysis with the NASA Ocean Biogeochemical Model (NOBM from http://reason.gsfc.nasa.gov/OPS/Giovanni/) according to Gregg and Casey 2006 and Gregg 2006. Results are of great importance for global modelling of

  20. Evaluation of absorption/stripping for second phase expansion of KG gas cracker

    SciTech Connect

    1995-12-01

    This report addresses technology evaluation for a second phase expansion of BP Chemical Ltd.`s (BPCL) KG cracker. Its primary objective was to determine if the absorption/stripping technology being developed by BPCL is competitive with cryogenic demethanization technology. The expansion basis for this evaluation is a 150,000 MTA ethylene increment. This increment represents an increase in KG`s capacity from 450,000 MTA after the current expansion to an ultimate capacity of 600,000 MTA. Two recovery systems for a 150,000 MTA expansion are compared: (1) Case A - Absorption/Stripping Expansion; and (2) Case B - ARS Expansion. Another objective of this report was to confirm the magnitude of the economic advantages of the absorption/stripping technology for grass roots applications. For that evaluation, absorption/stripping was compared with the original 350,000 MTA KG recovery system. The two additional 350,000 MTA grass roots cases evaluated are: (1) Case C - Absorption/Stripping - Grass Roots Design; (2) Case D - Conventional Cryogenic Recovery (Original KG 350,000 MTA design).

  1. X-ray phase imaging using a Gd-based absorption grating fabricated by imprinting technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashiro, Wataru; Kato, Kosuke; Sadeghilaridjani, Maryam; Momose, Atsushi; Shinohara, Takenao; Kato, Hidemi

    2016-04-01

    A high-aspect-ratio absorption grating with a pitch of several µm is a key component of X-ray grating interferometery, which is an X-ray phase imaging technique that allows for highly sensitive X-ray imaging with a compact laboratory X-ray source. Here, we report that X-ray phase imaging was successfully performed at 15 keV by using a 23 ± 1-µm-height, 9-µm-pitch absorption grating (10 × 10 mm2) based on Gd (Gd60Cu25Al15) fabricated by a metallic glass imprinting technique. The imprinting technique is cost-efficient and has a high-production rate, and will be widely used for fabricating gratings not only for X-rays but also neutrons in the near future.

  2. Effect of coherence loss in differential phase contrast imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Weixing; Ning, Ruola; Liu, Jiangkun

    2014-03-01

    Coherence property of x-rays is critical in the grating-based differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging because it is the physical foundation that makes any form of phase contrast imaging possible. Loss of coherence is an important experimental issue, which results in increased image noise and reduced object contrast in DPC images and DPC cone beam CT (DPC-CBCT) reconstructions. In this study, experimental results are investigated to characterize the visibility loss (a measurement of coherence loss) in several different applications, including different-sized phantom imaging, specimen imaging and small animal imaging. Key measurements include coherence loss (relative intensity changes in the area of interest in phase-stepping images), contrast and noise level in retrieved DPC images, and contrast and noise level in reconstructed DPC-CBCT images. The influence of size and composition of imaged object (uniform object, bones, skin hairs, tissues, and etc) will be quantified. The same investigation is also applied for moiré pattern-based DPC-CBCT imaging with the same exposure dose. A theoretical model is established to relate coherence loss, noise level in phase stepping images (or moiré images), and the contrast and noise in the retrieved DPC images. Experiment results show that uniform objects lead to a small coherence loss even when the attenuation is higher, while objects with large amount of small structures result in huge coherence loss even when the attenuation is small. The theoretical model predicts the noise level in retrieved DPC images, and it also suggests a minimum dose required for DPC imaging to compensate for coherence loss.

  3. Phase Reconstruction of Strong-Field Excited Systems by Transient-Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuoye; Cavaletto, Stefano M; Ott, Christian; Meyer, Kristina; Mi, Yonghao; Harman, Zoltán; Keitel, Christoph H; Pfeifer, Thomas

    2015-07-17

    The evolution of a V-type three-level system is studied, whose two resonances are coherently excited and coupled by two ultrashort laser pump and probe pulses, separated by a varying time delay. We relate the quantum dynamics of the excited multilevel system to the absorption spectrum of the transmitted probe pulse. In particular, by analyzing the quantum evolution of the system, we interpret how atomic phases are differently encoded in the time-delay-dependent spectral absorption profiles when the pump pulse either precedes or follows the probe pulse. This scheme is experimentally applied to atomic Rb, whose fine-structure-split 5s  (2)S{1/2}→5p(2)P{1/2} and 5s(2)S_{1/2}→5p(2)P{3/2} transitions are driven by the combined action of a pump pulse of variable intensity and a delayed probe pulse. The provided understanding of the relationship between quantum phases and absorption spectra represents an important step towards full time-dependent phase reconstruction (quantum holography) of bound-state wave packets in strong-field light-matter interactions with atoms, molecules, and solids. PMID:26230787

  4. Laser Based Instruments Using Differential Absorption Detection for Above and Below Ground Monitoring of Carbon Dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphries, S. D.; Barr, J. L.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.; Spangler, L. H.; Dobeck, L. M.

    2008-12-01

    Carbon capture and sequestration in geologic formations provides a method to remove carbon dioxide (CO2) from entering the Earth's atmosphere. An important issue for the successful storage of CO2 is the ability to monitor geologic sequestration sites for leakage to verify site integrity. A field site for testing the performance of CO2 detection instruments and techniques has been developed by the Zero Emissions Research Technology (ZERT) group at Montana State University. A field experiment was conducted at the ZERT field site beginning July 9th, 2008 and ending August 7th, 2008 to test the performance of several CO2 detection instruments. The field site allows a controlled flow rate of CO2 to be released underground through a 100 m long horizontal pipe placed below the water table. A flow rate of 0.3 tons CO2/day was used for the entirety of this experiment. This paper describes the results from two laser based instruments that use differential absorption techniques to determine CO2 concentrations in real time both above and below the ground surface. Both instruments use a continuous wave (cw) temperature tunable distributed feedback (DFB) laser capable of tuning across several CO2 and water vapor absorption features between at 2003 nm and 2006 nm. The first instrument uses the DFB laser to measure path integrated atmospheric concentrations of CO2. The second instrument uses the temperature tunable DFB laser to monitor underground CO2 concentrations using a buried photonic bandgap optical fiber. The above ground instrument operated nearly continuously during the CO2 release experiment and an increase in atmospheric CO2 concentration above the release pipe of approximately 2.5 times higher than the background was observed. The underground instrument also operated continuously during the experiment and saw an increase in underground CO2 concentration of approximately 15 times higher than the background. These results from the 2008 ZERT field experiment demonstrate

  5. Performance Simulations of Spaceborne Methane Observations by Integrated-Path Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Ehret, Gerhard; Amediek, Axel

    A lidar-based satellite instrument for global observations of atmospheric methane is foreseen whose expected performance and technical feasibility are currently investigated in planning phase 0/A. Methane is, after carbon dioxide, the second most important greenhouse gas, whereby its anthropogenic emissions are much more uncertain. In addition, climate change may cause an important positive feedback of yet unknown intensity by release of methane from melting permafrost soils and ocean sediments. The current observational network is not able to monitor these sources with sufficient density and accuracy: While the ground-based in-situ network is too sparse, existing passive remote sensors on spacecraft are not accurate enough. Preliminary studies show that lidar with a realistic instrument design on a LEO platform has the potential to overcome these shortcomings and to measure methane with an accuracy and spatial resolution that satisfies the requirements of the user community. The presentation will include basic issues such as the selection of suitable methane absorption wavelengths, key per-formance parameters of instrument and spacecraft, and an assessment of the residual bias. It will highlight critical performance parameters such as instrument noise and surface reflectivity, and list the instrument and platform characteristics needed to fulfil the user requirements.

  6. Diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, S.; Weckwerth, T.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carbone, R.

    2012-12-01

    We are in the process of evaluating the performance of an eye-safe, low-cost, diode-laser-based, water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) profiler. This class of instrument may be capable of providing continuous water vapor and aerosol backscatter profiles at high vertical resolution in the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) for periods of months to years. The technology potentially fills a national long term observing facility gap and could greatly benefit micro- and meso-meteorology, water cycle, carbon cycle and, more generally, biosphere-hydrosphere-atmosphere interaction research at both weather and climate variability time scales. For the evaluation, the Montana State University 3rd generation water vapor DIAL was modified to enable unattended operation for a period of several weeks. The performance of this V3.5 version DIAL was tested at MSU and NCAR in June and July of 2012. Further tests are currently in progress with Howard University at Beltsville, Maryland; and with the National Weather Service and Oklahoma University at Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas. The presentation will include a comparison of DIAL profiles against meteorological "truth" at the aforementioned locations including: radiosondes, Raman lidars, microwave and IR radiometers, AERONET and SUOMINET systems. Instrument reliability, uncertainty, systematic biases, detection height statistics, and environmental complications will be evaluated. Performance will be judged in the context of diverse scientific applications that range from operational weather prediction and seasonal climate variability, to more demanding climate system process studies at the land-canopy-ABL interface. Estimating the extent to which such research and operational applications can be satisfied with a low cost autonomous network of similar instruments is our principal objective.

  7. Characterization of Cirrus Cloud Properties by Airborne Differential Absorption and High Spectral Resolution Lidar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Gross, S.; Schäfler, A.; Wirth, M.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.

    2014-12-01

    Despite the large impact of cirrus clouds on the Earth's climate system, their effects are still only poorly understood. Our knowledge of the climate effect of cirrus clouds is mainly based on theoretical simulations using idealized cloud structure and microphysics, as well as radiative transfer approximations. To improve the representation of cirrus clouds in idealized simulations and circulation models, we need a better understanding of the micro- and macrophysical properties of cirrus clouds. Airborne lidar measurements provide two-dimensional information of the atmospheric structure, and are thus a suitable tool to study the fine-structure of cirrus clouds, as well as their macrophysical properties. Aerosol and water vapor was measured with the airborne high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) and differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system WALES of the German Aerospace Center (DLR), Oberpfaffenhofen. The system was operated onboard the German high altitude and long range research aircraft HALO during the Next-generation remote sensing for validation studies campaign (NARVAL) in December 2013 over the tropical North-Atlantic and in January 2014 out of Iceland, and during the ML-Cirrus campaign in March/April 2014 over Central and Southern Europe. During NARVAL 18 flights with more than 110 flight hours were performed providing a large number of cirrus cloud overpasses with combined lidar and radar instrumentation. In the framework of the ML-Cirrus campaign 17 flights with more than 80 flight hours were performed to characterize cirrus cloud properties in different environmental conditions using a combination of remote sensing (e.g. lidar) and in-situ observations. In our presentation we will give a general overview of the campaigns and of the WALES measurements. We will show first results from the aerosol and water vapor lidar measurements with focus on the structure of cirrus clouds, the humidity distribution within and outside the cloud and on the impact of the

  8. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grund, Christian J.; Hardesty, R. Michael; Rye, Barry J.

    1995-04-01

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution, acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost, are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. Application of profiles acquired with current techniques, have, to date, been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness of solution (e.g. high resolution infrared (IR) Fourier transform radiometry), poor spatial and temporal coverage and high operating cost (e.g. radiosondes), or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost (e.g. Raman lidar). Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the study reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential to solve some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameterizations representative of current technologies. These models are also applied to diagnose and evaluate other strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application. This work is to continue in the direction of evaluating yet smaller and lower-cost laser diode-based systems for routine monitoring of the lower altitudes using photon counting detection methods. We regard the present report as interim in nature and will update and extend it as a final report at the end of the term of the contract.

  9. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1995-04-03

    Continuous, high quality profiles of water vapor, free of systematic bias, and of moderate temporal and spatial resolution, acquired over long periods at low operational and maintenance cost, are fundamental to the success of the ARM CART program. The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance, and the correction of other CART site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. Application of profiles acquired with current techniques, have, to date, been limited by vertical resolution and uniqueness of solution [e.g. high resolution infrared (IR) Fourier transform radiometry], poor spatial and temporal coverage and high operating cost (e.g. radiosondes), or diminished daytime performance, lack of eye-safety, and high maintenance cost (e.g. Raman lidar). Recent developments in infrared laser and detector technology make possible compact IR differential absorption lidar (DIAL) systems at eye-safe wavelengths. In the study reported here, we develop DIAL system performance models and examine the potential of to solve some of the shortcomings of previous methods using parameterizations representative of current technologies. These models are also applied to diagnose and evaluate other strengths and weaknesses unique to the DIAL method for this application. This work is to continue in the direction of evaluating yet smaller and lower-cost laser diode-based systems for routine monitoring of the lower altitudes using photon counting detection methods. We regard the present report as interim in nature and will update and extend it as a final report at the end of the term of the contract.

  10. Spectral interferometric microscopy reveals absorption by individual optical nanoantennas from extinction phase.

    PubMed

    Gennaro, Sylvain D; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Verellen, Niels; Van Dorpe, Pol; Moshchalkov, Victor V; Maier, Stefan A; Oulton, Rupert F

    2014-01-01

    Optical antennas transform light from freely propagating waves into highly localized excitations that interact strongly with matter. Unlike their radio frequency counterparts, optical antennas are nanoscopic and high frequency, making amplitude and phase measurements challenging and leaving some information hidden. Here we report a novel spectral interferometric microscopy technique to expose the amplitude and phase response of individual optical antennas across an octave of the visible to near-infrared spectrum. Although it is a far-field technique, we show that knowledge of the extinction phase allows quantitative estimation of nanoantenna absorption, which is a near-field quantity. To verify our method we characterize gold ring-disk dimers exhibiting Fano interference. Our results reveal that Fano interference only cancels a bright mode's scattering, leaving residual extinction dominated by absorption. Spectral interference microscopy has the potential for real-time and single-shot phase and amplitude investigations of isolated quantum and classical antennas with applications across the physical and life sciences. PMID:24781663

  11. Hard x-ray phase contrast imaging using single absorption grating and hybrid semiconductor pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Krejci, Frantisek; Jakubek, Jan; Kroupa, Martin

    2010-11-01

    A method for x-ray phase contrast imaging is introduced in which only one absorption grating and a microfocus x-ray source in a tabletop setup are used. The method is based on precise subpixel position determination of the x-ray pattern projected by the grating directly from the pattern image. For retrieval of the phase gradient and absorption image (both images obtained from one exposure), it is necessary to measure only one projection of the investigated object. Thus, our method is greatly simplified compared with the phase-stepping method and our method can significantly reduce the time-consuming scanning and possibly the unnecessary dose. Furthermore, the technique works with a fully polychromatic spectrum and gives ample variability in object magnification. Consequently, the approach can open the way to further widespread application of phase contrast imaging, e.g., into clinical practice. The experimental results on a simple testing object as well as on complex biological samples are presented. PMID:21133473

  12. Tomographic multiaxis-differential optical absorption spectroscopy observations of Sun-illuminated targets: a technique providing well-defined absorption paths in the boundary layer.

    PubMed

    Frins, Erna; Bobrowski, Nicole; Platt, Ulrich; Wagner, Thomas

    2006-08-20

    A novel experimental procedure to measure the near-surface distribution of atmospheric trace gases by using passive multiaxis differential absorption optical spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) is proposed. The procedure consists of pointing the receiving telescope of the spectrometer to nonreflecting surfaces or to bright targets placed at known distances from the measuring device, which are illuminated by sunlight. We show that the partial trace gas absorptions between the top of the atmosphere and the target can be easily removed from the measured total absorption. Thus it is possible to derive the average concentration of trace gases such as NO(2), HCHO, SO(2), H(2)O, Glyoxal, BrO, and others along the line of sight between the instrument and the target similar to the well-known long-path DOAS observations (but with much less expense). If tomographic arrangements are used, even two- or three-dimensional trace gas distributions can be retrieved. The basic assumptions of the proposed method are confirmed by test measurements taken across the city of Heidelberg. PMID:16892129

  13. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  14. High energy X-ray phase and dark-field imaging using a random absorption mask.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Kashyap, Yogesh; Cai, Biao; Sawhney, Kawal

    2016-01-01

    High energy X-ray imaging has unique advantage over conventional X-ray imaging, since it enables higher penetration into materials with significantly reduced radiation damage. However, the absorption contrast in high energy region is considerably low due to the reduced X-ray absorption cross section for most materials. Even though the X-ray phase and dark-field imaging techniques can provide substantially increased contrast and complementary information, fabricating dedicated optics for high energies still remain a challenge. To address this issue, we present an alternative X-ray imaging approach to produce transmission, phase and scattering signals at high X-ray energies by using a random absorption mask. Importantly, in addition to the synchrotron radiation source, this approach has been demonstrated for practical imaging application with a laboratory-based microfocus X-ray source. This new imaging method could be potentially useful for studying thick samples or heavy materials for advanced research in materials science. PMID:27466217

  15. Correction of data truncation artifacts in differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The use of grating based Talbot-Lau interferometry permits the acquisition of differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging with a conventional medical x-ray source and detector. However, due to the limited area of the gratings, limited area of the detector, or both, data truncation image artifacts are often observed in tomographic DPC acquisitions and reconstructions, such as tomosynthesis (limited-angle tomography). When data are truncated in the conventional x-ray absorption tomosynthesis imaging, a variety of methods have been developed to mitigate the truncation artifacts. However, the same strategies used to mitigate absorption truncation artifacts do not yield satisfactory reconstruction results in DPC tomosynthesis reconstruction. In this work, several new methods have been proposed to mitigate data truncation artifacts in a DPC tomosynthesis system. The proposed methods have been validated using experimental data of a mammography accreditation phantom, a bovine udder, as well as several human cadaver breast specimens using a bench-top DPC imaging system at our facility.

  16. Correction of data truncation artifacts in differential phase contrast (DPC) tomosynthesis imaging.

    PubMed

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-10-01

    The use of grating based Talbot-Lau interferometry permits the acquisition of differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging with a conventional medical x-ray source and detector. However, due to the limited area of the gratings, limited area of the detector, or both, data truncation image artifacts are often observed in tomographic DPC acquisitions and reconstructions, such as tomosynthesis (limited-angle tomography). When data are truncated in the conventional x-ray absorption tomosynthesis imaging, a variety of methods have been developed to mitigate the truncation artifacts. However, the same strategies used to mitigate absorption truncation artifacts do not yield satisfactory reconstruction results in DPC tomosynthesis reconstruction. In this work,several new methods have been proposed to mitigate data truncation artifacts in a DPC tomosynthesis system. The proposed methods have been validated using experimental data of a mammography accreditation phantom, a bovine udder, as well as several human cadaver breast specimens using a bench-top DPC imaging system at our facility. PMID:26394181

  17. Challenges and Solutions for Frequency and Energy References for Spaceborne and Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fix, Andreas; Quatrevalet, Mathieu; Witschas, Benjamin; Wirth, Martin; Büdenbender, Christian; Amediek, Axel; Ehret, Gerhard

    2016-06-01

    The stringent requirements for both the frequency stability and power reference represent a challenging task for Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidars (IPDA) to measure greenhouse gas columns from satellite or aircraft. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. The concepts and realization of these important sub-systems are discussed.

  18. Study of electron transition energies between anions and cations in spinel ferrites using differential UV-vis absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, L. C.; Wu, L. Q.; Li, S. Q.; Li, Z. Z.; Tang, G. D.; Qi, W. H.; Ge, X. S.; Ding, L. L.

    2016-07-01

    It is very important to determine electron transition energies (Etr) between anions and different cations in order to understand the electrical transport and magnetic properties of a material. Many authors have analyzed UV-vis absorption spectra using the curve (αhν)2 vs E, where α is the absorption coefficient and E(=hν) is the photon energy. Such an approach can give only two band gap energies for spinel ferrites. In this paper, using differential UV-vis absorption spectra, dα/dE vs E, we have obtained electron transition energies (Etr) between the anions and cations, Fe2+ and Fe3+ at the (A) and [B] sites and Ni2+ at the [B] sites for the (A)[B]2O4 spinel ferrite samples CoxNi0.7-xFe2.3O4 (0.0≤x≤0.3), CrxNi0.7Fe2.3-xO4 (0.0≤x≤0.3) and Fe3O4. We suggest that the differential UV-vis absorption spectra should be accepted as a general analysis method for determining electron transition energies between anions and cations.

  19. Coherent phase control of resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shian Lu, Chenhui; Jia, Tianqing; Sun, Zhenrong; Qiu, Jianrong

    2013-11-04

    We theoretically and experimentally demonstrate the quantum coherent control of the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption in rare-earth ions by the phase-shaped femtosecond laser pulse. Our theoretical results show that the resonance-mediated two-photon absorption can be effectively controlled, but the control efficiency depends on the laser repetition rate in real experiment due to the long lifetime and the short decoherence time of the excited state, and the larger laser repetition rate yields the lower control efficiency. These theoretical results are experimentally confirmed in glass sample doped with Er{sup 3+} by utilizing the femtosecond lasers with low repetition rate of 1 kHz and high repetition rate of 80 MHz.

  20. Measurement of nitrogen dioxide in cigarette smoke using quantum cascade tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shorter, Joanne H.; Nelson, David D.; Zahniser, Mark S.; Parrish, Milton E.; Crawford, Danielle R.; Gee, Diane L.

    2006-04-01

    Although nitrogen dioxide (NO 2) has been previously reported to be present in cigarette smoke, the concentration estimates were derived from kinetic calculations or from measurements of aged smoke, where NO 2 was formed some time after the puff was taken. The objective of this work was to use tunable infrared laser differential absorption spectroscopy (TILDAS) equipped with a quantum cascade (QC) laser to determine if NO 2 could be detected and quantified in a fresh puff of cigarette smoke. A temporal resolution of ˜0.16 s allowed measurements to be taken directly as the NO 2 was formed during the puff. Sidestream cigarette smoke was sampled to determine if NO 2 could be detected using TILDAS. Experiments were conducted using 2R4F Kentucky Reference cigarettes with and without a Cambridge filter pad. NO 2 was detected only in the lighting puff of whole mainstream smoke (without a Cambridge filter pad), with no NO 2 detected in the subsequent puffs. The measurement precision was ˜1.0 ppbV Hz -1/2, which allows a detection limit of ˜0.2 ng in a 35 ml puff volume. More NO 2 was generated in the lighting puff using a match or blue flame lighter (29 ± 21 ng) than when using an electric lighter (9 ± 3 ng). In the presence of a Cambridge filter pad, NO 2 was observed in the gas phase mainstream smoke for every puff (total of 200 ± 30 ng/cigarette) and is most likely due to smoke chemistry taking place on the Cambridge filter pad during the smoke collection process. Nitrogen dioxide was observed continuously in the sidestream smoke starting with the lighting puff.

  1. Extracting the differential phase in dual atom interferometers by modulating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ping; Zhong, Jia-Qi; Chen, Xi; Li, Run-Bing; Li, Da-Wei; Zhu, Lei; Song, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Ming-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    We present a new scheme for measuring the differential phase in dual atom interferometers. The magnetic field is modulated in one interferometer, and the differential phase can be extracted without measuring the amplitude of the magnetic field by combining the ellipse and linear fitting methods. The gravity gradient measurements are discussed based on dual atom interferometers. Numerical simulation shows that the systematic error of the differential phase measurement is largely decreased when the duration of the magnetic field is symmetrically modulated. This combined fitting scheme has a high accuracy for measuring an arbitrary differential phase in dual atom interferometers.

  2. Development and Testing of a Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar For Carbon Sequestration Site Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soukup, B.; Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for carbon sequestration site monitoring is under development and testing at Montana State University. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the on-line absorption wavelength at 1571.4067 nm and the second operating at the off-line wavelength at 1571.2585 nm. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between on-line and off-line operation. After the fiber optic switches, an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 J and a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a fiber coupled photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The PMT has a 3% quantum efficiency, a dark count rate of 90 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz. Recently, a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD) operating in the geiger mode has been incorporated into the DIAL receiver. The APD has a quantum efficiency of 10%, a dark count rate of 10 kHz, and a maximum count rate of 1 MHz and provides a much larger dynamic range than the PMT. Both the PMT and APD provide TTL logic pulses that are monitored using a multichannel scaler card used to count the return photons as a function of time of flight and are thus interchangeable. The DIAL instrument was developed at the 1.571 m wavelength to take advantage of commercial-off-the-shelf components. The instrument is operated using a custom Labview program that switches to the DMLD operating at the on-line wavelength, locks this laser to a user defined wavelength setting, and collects return signals for a user defined time. The control program switches to the DMLD operating at the off

  3. Anatomical background noise power spectrum in differential phase contrast breast images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrett, John; Ge, Yongshuai; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In x-ray breast imaging, the anatomical noise background of the breast has a significant impact on the detection of lesions and other features of interest. This anatomical noise is typically characterized by a parameter, β, which describes a power law dependence of anatomical noise on spatial frequency (the shape of the anatomical noise power spectrum). Large values of β have been shown to reduce human detection performance, and in conventional mammography typical values of β are around 3.2. Recently, x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) and the associated dark field imaging methods have received considerable attention as possible supplements to absorption imaging for breast cancer diagnosis. However, the impact of these additional contrast mechanisms on lesion detection is not yet well understood. In order to better understand the utility of these new methods, we measured the β indices for absorption, DPC, and dark field images in 15 cadaver breast specimens using a benchtop DPC imaging system. We found that the measured β value for absorption was consistent with the literature for mammographic acquisitions (β = 3.61±0.49), but that both DPC and dark field images had much lower values of β (β = 2.54±0.75 for DPC and β = 1.44±0.49 for dark field). In addition, visual inspection showed greatly reduced anatomical background in both DPC and dark field images. These promising results suggest that DPC and dark field imaging may help provide improved lesion detection in breast imaging, particularly for those patients with dense breasts, in whom anatomical noise is a major limiting factor in identifying malignancies.

  4. Scattered light and accuracy of the cross-section measurements of weak absorptions: Gas and liquid phase UV absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fahr, A.; Braun, W.; Kurylo, M. J.

    1993-01-01

    Ultraviolet absorption cross sections of CH3CFCl2(HCFC-141b) were determined in the gas phase (190-260 nm) and liquid phase (230-260 mm) at 298 K. The liquid phase absorption cross sections were then converted into accurate gas phase values using a previously described procedure. It has been demonstrated that scattered light from the shorter-wavelength region (as little as several parts per thousand) can seriously compromise the absorption cross-section measurement, particularly at longer wavelengths where cross sections are low, and can be a source of discrepancies in the cross sections of weakly absorbing halocarbons reported in the literature. A modeling procedure was developed to assess the effect of scattered light on the measured absorption cross section in our experiments, thereby permitting appropriate corrections to be made on the experimental values. Modeled and experimental results were found to be in good agreement. Experimental results from this study were compared with other available determinations and provide accurate input for calculating the atmospheric lifetime of HCFC-141b.

  5. Diode-Laser-Based Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Long Term Autonomous Field Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moen, D.; Repasky, K. S.; Spuler, S.; Nehrir, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    The rapidly changing spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the planetary boundary layer influences dynamical and physical processes that drive weather phenomena, general circulation patterns, radiative transfer, and the global water cycle. The ability to measure the water vapor distribution continuously within the lower troposphere has been identified as a high priority measurement capability needed by both the weather forecasting and climate science communities. This presentation provides an update on an economical and compact diode-laser-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) which has demonstrated the capability of meeting these high priority measurement needs. The DIAL instrument utilizes two continuous wave distributed feedback diode lasers to injection seed a current modulated tapered semiconductor optical amplifier. An improved switching time between the on-line and off-line wavelength, on the order of 16.7 ms, allows the instrument to retrieve water vapor profiles in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions. A shared telescope design based on a 40.64 cm diameter Dobsonian telescope allows the outgoing beam to be eye-safe at the exit of the telescope. The DIAL receiver utilizes the Dobsonian telescope to collect the scattered light and direct it through an optical narrow bandpass filter (NBF) and a Fabry-Perot etalon with a free spectral range of 0.1 nm which is equal to the wavelength difference between the on-line and off-line DIAL wavelengths. A beam splitter directs 90% of the scattered light through a second NBF, and couples it onto a fiber coupled avalanche photodiode (APD), providing a far field measurement. The remaining 10% of the light passing through the beam splitter is incident on a free space coupled APD, providing a wider field of view for water vapor measurements at lower altitudes. The two channel receiver allows water vapor measurement between 500 m and 4 km/6km during daytime/nighttime operation, respectively. The DIAL

  6. Estimation of boundary layer humidity fluxes and statistics from airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiemle, Christoph; Ehret, Gerhard; Giez, Andreas; Davis, Kenneth J.; Lenschow, Donald H.; Oncley, Steven P.

    1997-12-01

    The water vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the German Aerospace Research Establishment (DLR) was flown aboard the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Electra research aircraft during the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). The downward looking lidar system measured two-dimensional fields of aerosol backscatter and water vapor mixing ratio in the convective boundary layer (CBL) and across the CBL top (zt). We show a case study of DIAL observations of vertical profiles of mean water vapor, water vapor variance, skewness, and integral scale in the CBL. In the entrainment zone (EZ) and down to about 0.3 zi the DIAL observations agree with in situ observations and mixed-layer similarity theory. Below, the water vapor optical depth becomes large and the DIAL signal-to-noise ratio degrades. Knowing the water vapor surface flux and the convective velocity scale w* from in situ aircraft measurements, we derive entrainment fluxes by applying the mixed-layer gradient (MLG) and mixed-layer variance (MLV) methods to DIAL mixing ratio gradient and variance profiles. Entrainment flux estimates are sensitive to our estimate of zt. They are shown to be rather insensitive to the input surface flux and to the DIAL data spatial resolution within the investigated range. The estimates break down above about 0.9 zt as the flux-gradient and flux-variance relationships were developed to describe the large-scale mixing in the mid-CBL. The agreement with in situ entrainment flux estimations is within 30% for the MLV method. On a flight leg with significant mesoscale variability the entrainment flux turns out to be 70% higher than the in situ value. This is in good agreement with the fact that large-eddy simulations (LES) of mean water vapor profiles and variances, upon which the MLG and MLV methods are based, do not include mesoscale variability. The additional water vapor variance from mesoscales may then lead to the overestimate of the flux. Deviations from

  7. 3-D water vapor field in the atmospheric boundary layer observed with scanning differential absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Späth, Florian; Behrendt, Andreas; Muppa, Shravan Kumar; Metzendorf, Simon; Riede, Andrea; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution three-dimensional (3-D) water vapor data of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) are required to improve our understanding of land-atmosphere exchange processes. For this purpose, the scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim (UHOH) was developed as well as new analysis tools and visualization methods. The instrument determines 3-D fields of the atmospheric water vapor number density with a temporal resolution of a few seconds and a spatial resolution of up to a few tens of meters. We present three case studies from two field campaigns. In spring 2013, the UHOH DIAL was operated within the scope of the HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment (HOPE) in western Germany. HD(CP)2 stands for High Definition of Clouds and Precipitation for advancing Climate Prediction and is a German research initiative. Range-height indicator (RHI) scans of the UHOH DIAL show the water vapor heterogeneity within a range of a few kilometers up to an altitude of 2 km and its impact on the formation of clouds at the top of the ABL. The uncertainty of the measured data was assessed for the first time by extending a technique to scanning data, which was formerly applied to vertical time series. Typically, the accuracy of the DIAL measurements is between 0.5 and 0.8 g m-3 (or < 6 %) within the ABL even during daytime. This allows for performing a RHI scan from the surface to an elevation angle of 90° within 10 min. In summer 2014, the UHOH DIAL participated in the Surface Atmosphere Boundary Layer Exchange (SABLE) campaign in southwestern Germany. Conical volume scans were made which reveal multiple water vapor layers in three dimensions. Differences in their heights in different directions can be attributed to different surface elevation. With low-elevation scans in the surface layer, the humidity profiles and gradients can be related to different land cover such as maize, grassland, and forest as well as different surface layer

  8. [Research on the influence of LED temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy for measuring NO2].

    PubMed

    Ling, Liu-Yi; Xie, Pin-Hua; Qin, Min; Zheng, Ni-Na; Ye, Cong-Lei; Li, Ang; Hu, Ren-Zhi

    2012-11-01

    Influences of LEDs (without etalon structure and center wavelengths are respectively 370 nm (near-UV), 452 nm (blue) and 660 nm(red)) temperature shifts on differential optical absorption spectroscopy(DOAS) for measuring NO2 were studied. NO2 absorption spectra were formed using LED emitting spectra at 10 degrees C. The measured LED spectra at other temperatures were used as reference spectra of DOAS. Thus, NO2 differential optical densities under different LED temperature shifts were acquired and then NO2 differential cross-sections were fitted to the acquired differential optical densities. From fitting results, the linear relations of 0.995, 0.945 and 0.989 correlation between delta of fitting residual and near-UV, blue and red LEDs temperature shifts were found and their slopes are respectively 1.12 x 10(-3), 5.25 x 10(-5) and 7.45 x 10(-4) degrees C(-1). The fitting results show that the influence of temperature shifts of blue LED on DOAS retrieval is negligible and the temperature shifts of near-UV and red LED are impressible to DOAS measurement resulting in degradation of detection sensitivity. The retrieval results of blue LED with and without etalon with similar temperature properties were compared and showed that etalon of LED will greatly increase the influence of temperature shifts of LED on DOAS retrieval. PMID:23387143

  9. New signal extraction method in x-ray differential phase contrast imaging with a tilted collinear analyzer grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Yongshuai; Garrett, John; Li, Ke; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2015-03-01

    In a grating interferometer-based x-ray differential phase contrast (DPC) imaging system, an analyzer grating (i.e. a G2 grating) is typically used to help record the important refraction information obtained with the phase stepping technique. Such a method requires the sequential movement of the G2 grating as well as multiple x-ray exposures to perform phase stepping, and thus conventional DPC imaging is very time-consuming. Additionally, it also has some mechanical instability issues due to the movement of the G2 grating. To accelerate the data acquisition speed and achieve single shot x-ray DPC imaging with a collinear type G2 grating, in this study, a new signal extraction method had been investigated. With this alternative approach, a non-zero angle of rotation between the diffraction pattern (generated by the G1 grating) and the collinear G2 grating is used during the entire data acquisition. Due to this deliberate grating misalignment, a visible moiré pattern with a certain period shall be detected. Initial experiments have demonstrated that this new signal extraction method is able to provide us with three different types of signal: absorption, differential phase, and the dark field image signals. Although the spatial resolution for both the differential phase and the dark field images is blurred by several pixel length due to the used interpolation operation, the absorption image maintains the same spatial resolution as in the conventional x-ray imaging. This developed novel signal analysis method enables single shot DPC imaging and can greatly reduce the data acquisition time, thus facilitating the implementation of DPC imaging in the medical field.

  10. Differential phase microscope and micro-tomography with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, N.; Hashizume, J.; Goto, M.; Yamaguchi, M.; Tsujimura, T.; Aoki, S.

    2013-10-01

    An x-ray differential phase microscope with a Foucault knife-edge scanning filter was set up at the bending magnet source BL3C, Photon Factory. A reconstructed phase profile from the differential phase image of an aluminium wire at 5.36 keV was fairly good agreement with the numerical simulation. Phase tomography of a biological specimen, such as an Artemia cyst, could be successfully demonstrated.

  11. Thermooptic-based differential measurements of weak solute absorptions with an interferometer.

    PubMed

    Cremers, D A; Keller, R A

    1982-05-01

    An interferometric method of measuring small differences between weak optical absorptions of solutions has been developed using the thermooptic effect. To record the small changes in optical path length ~lambda/200 due to heating, it was necessary to stabilize the fringe pattern with respect to slow thermal drift using a galvanometer-driven compensator plate controlled by a closed feedback loop. Fringe shifts from background absorptions were nulled out to better than 1 part in 400, permitting the measurement of differences in absorptions between two solutions that were l/100th of background. Using laser powers of 100 mW, absorptions approximately 5 x 10(-6) cm(-1) (base e) could be measured with CC1(4) solutions. PMID:20389912

  12. Equilibrium phase diagrams and water absorption properties of aqueous mixtures of malonic acid and inorganic salts.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salcedo, D.; Salgado-Olea, G.

    2006-12-01

    Tropospheric aerosols are usually complex mixtures of inorganic and organic components. Although the thermodynamic properties of inorganic aerosols have been widely studied, the effect of organics on such properties is still under discussion. Solubility in water, water activity of aqueous solutions, deliquescence relative humidity (DRH), eutonic composition, and eutonic DRH were determined for bulk mixtures of malonic acid with ammonium sulfate, ammonium bisulfate, and ammonium nitrate at 25oC over the full range of composition (from 0 wt% to the solubility limit of the mixture components). The data was used to construct equilibrium phase diagrams, which show the phase of the mixtures as a function of total composition, dry mixture composition, water content, and ambient relative humidity. Measured water activity of liquid solutions was compared with an extended Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) expression, which then was used to predict water absorption of the mixtures.

  13. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources.

    PubMed

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mírian L A F; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray μCT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumbá (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based μCT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies. PMID:26306692

  14. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  15. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor using a pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs laser. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rall, Jonathan A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Lidar measurements using pseudonoise code modulated AlGaAs lasers are reported. Horizontal path lidar measurements were made at night to terrestrial targets at ranges of 5 and 13 km with 35 mW of average power and integration times of one second. Cloud and aerosol lidar measurements were made to thin cirrus clouds at 13 km altitude with Rayleigh (molecular) backscatter evident up to 9 km. Average transmitter power was 35 mW and measurement integration time was 20 minutes. An AlGaAs laser was used to characterize spectral properties of water vapor absorption lines at 811.617, 816.024, and 815.769 nm in a multipass absorption cell using derivative spectroscopy techniques. Frequency locking of an AlGaAs laser to a water vapor absorption line was achieved with a laser center frequency stability measured to better than one-fifth of the water vapor Doppler linewidth over several minutes. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric water vapor were made in both integrated path and range-resolved modes using an externally modulated AlGaAs laser. Mean water vapor number density was estimated from both integrated path and range-resolved DIAL measurements and agreed with measured humidity values to within 6.5 percent and 20 percent, respectively. Error sources were identified and their effects on estimates of water vapor number density calculated.

  16. Phase speed spectra of transient eddy fluxes and critical layer absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randel, William J.; Held, Isaac M.

    1991-01-01

    Tropospheric zonal mean eddy fluxes of heat and momentum, and the divergence of the Eliassen-Palm flux, are decomposed into contributions from different zonal phase speeds. Data analyzed are the European Center for Medium Range Weather Forecasts operational global analyses covering 1980-1987. Eastward moving medium-scale waves (zonal waves 4-7) dominate the spectra of lower tropospheric heat fluxes in both hemispheres and all seasons. Upper tropospheric wave flux spectra are similar to the low level spectra in midlatitudes, but shift to slower zonal phase speeds as low latitudes are approached. The cause of this shift is the selective absorption of faster moving components in midlatitudes as the waves propagate meridionally. Latitude-phase speed distributions of eddy fluxes are constructed and compared to the zonal mean wind structure. These results demonstrate that upper tropospheric eddies break and decelerate the zonal mean flow approximately 10-20 deg in latitude away from their critical line (where phase speed equals zonal wind speed). Comparisons are also made with results from the middle stratosphere.

  17. [The retrieval of ozone column densities by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy during summer at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu-Han; Liu, Wen-Qing; Bian, Lin-Gen; Lu, Chang-Gui; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Sun, Li-Guang

    2011-02-01

    Daily ozone column densities were monitored by Passive DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) from December 10th, 2008 to Feb 19th, 2009 at Zhongshan Station, Antarctic (69 degrees 22'24" S, 76 degrees 22'14" E). Considering the absorption of O3, OClO, NO2, O4, BrO and the Ring effect, ozone slant column densities were retrieved using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source. The results showed that there was no obvious "ozone hole" during the monitoring period, but ozone VCD (vertical column density) had greatly changed within short time scale, especially in middle December and early February. The analysis of passive DOAS and Brewer measurements of ozone VCD showed good agreement with the correlative coefficient of 0.863, while satellite board OMI measurements with the correlative coefficient of 0.840, which confirmed the validity of the monitoring of Passive DOAS. PMID:21510403

  18. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Páli, T; Marsh, D

    1998-09-01

    The dependence on spin-lattice (T1) relaxation of the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal (V'1) detected in phase quadrature with the Zeeman modulation has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally for nitroxide spin labels. Spectral simulations were performed by iterative solution of the Bloch equations that contained explicitly both the modulation and microwave magnetic fields (T. Páli, V. A. Livshits, and D. Marsh, 1996, J. Magn. Reson. B 113, 151-159). It was found that, of the various non-linear EPR displays, the first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal, recorded under conditions of partial saturation of the microwave absorption, is particularly favorable for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements because of its superior signal intensity and relative insensitivity to spin-spin (T2) relaxation. By varying the Zeeman modulation frequency it is also possible to tune the optimum sensitivity of the V'1-signal to different ranges of the T1-relaxation time. A Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz appears to be particularly suited to spin label applications. Calibrations are given for the dependence on T1-relaxation time of both the amplitude and the second integral of the V'1-signal recorded under standard conditions. Experiments on different spin labels in solution and in membranes demonstrate the practical usable sensitivity of the V'1-signal, even at modulation frequencies of 25 kHz, and these are used to investigate the dependence on microwave field intensity, in comparison with theoretical predictions. The practicable sensitivity to spin-lattice relaxation enhancements is demonstrated experimentally for a spin-labeled membrane system in the presence of paramagnetic ions. The first-harmonic out-of-phase V'1-signal appears to be the non-linear CW EPR method of choice for determining T1-relaxation enhancements in spin-labeled systems. PMID:9740736

  19. Atmospheric pre-corrected differential absorption techniques to retrieve columnar water vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 data

    SciTech Connect

    Schlaepfer, D.; Borel, C.C.; Keller, J.

    1996-03-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 run resolution. This data includes information on constituents of the earth`s surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various rationing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. This work testS the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of tropospheric water vapor.

  20. Atmospheric Pre-Corrected Differential Absorption Techniques to Retrieve Columnar Water Vapor: Application to AVIRIS 91/95 Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlaepfer, Daniel; Borel, Christoph C.; Keller, Johannes; Itten, Klaus I.

    1996-01-01

    Water vapor is one of the main forces for weather development as well as for mesoscale air transport processes. The monitoring of water vapor is therefore an important aim in remote sensing of the atmosphere. Current operational systems for water vapor detection use primarily the emission in the thermal infrared (AVHRR, GOES, ATSR, Meteosat) or in the microwave radiation bands (DMSP). The disadvantage of current satellite systems is either a coarse spatial (horizontal) resolution ranging from one to tens of kilometers or a limited insight into the lower atmosphere. Imaging spectrometry on the other hand measures total column water vapor contents at a high spatial horizontal resolution and has therefore the potential of filling these gaps. The sensors of the AVIRIS instrument are capable of acquiring hyperspectral data in 224 bands located in the visible and near infrared at 10 nm resolution. This data includes the information on constituents of the earth's surface as well as of the atmosphere. The optical measurement of water vapor can be performed using sensor channels located in bands or lines of the absorption spectrum. The AVIRIS sensor has been used to retrieve water vapor and with less accuracy carbon dioxide, oxygen and ozone. To retrieve the water vapor amount, the so called differential absorption technique has been applied. The goal of this technique is to eliminate background factors by taking a ratio between channels within the absorption band and others besides the band. Various ratioing methods on the basis of different channels and calculation techniques were developed. The influence of a trace gas of interest on the radiance at the sensor level is usually simulated by using radiative transfer codes. In this study, the spectral transmittance and radiance are calculated by MODTRAN3 simulations with the new DISORT option. The objective of this work is to test the best performing differential absorption techniques for imaging spectrometry of

  1. Revealing electronic structure changes in Chevrel phase cathodes upon Mg insertion using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wan, Liwen F; Wright, Joshua; Perdue, Brian R; Fister, Timothy T; Kim, Soojeong; Apblett, Christopher A; Prendergast, David

    2016-06-29

    Following previous work predicting the electronic response of the Chevrel phase Mo6S8 upon Mg insertion (Thöle et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 22548), we provide the experimental proof, evident in X-ray absorption spectroscopy, to illustrate the charge compensation mechanism of the Chevrel phase compound during Mg insertion and de-insertion processes. PMID:27314253

  2. Differential intestinal absorption of two fatty acid isomers: Elaidic and oleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, A.; Echinard, B.; Carlier, H. )

    1987-12-01

    The absorption of {sup 14}C-labeled oleic acid and {sup 14}C-labeled elaidic acid was studied in bile- and pancreatic juice-diverted adult rats. In some cases these acids were compared with {sup 14}C-labeled palmitic acid absorption. Sodium taurocholate-emulsified test infusates containing an equimolar mixture of monopalmitin and two fatty acids (oleic and elaidic or palmitic), one of which was {sup 14}C labeled, were infused through a duodenal canula. The chyle was collected from the mesenteric lymphatic vessel by plastic tubing. Among the three fatty acids studied, oleic acid exhibited the highest lymphatic recovery rate. Elaidic and palmitic acids appeared more slowly and in lesser amounts. Simultaneously, the highest amount of chylomicrons was observed when the lipid emulsion contained oleic acid alone; the lowest was observed when elaidic acid was the only unsaturated fatty acid. Experimental data have also shown that compared with elaidic acid, oleic acid is preferentially incorporated into the lymph triglycerides. The authors conclude from the data presented that the enterocytic enzymes involved in the absorption of lipids show a high degree of specificity related to the fatty acid isomery, since the absorption of elaidic acid differs markedly from its isomer oleic acid.

  3. Acousto-optically tuned isotopic CO{sub 2} lasers for long-range differential absorption LIDAR

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, D.C.; Busch, G.E.; Hewitt, C.J.; Remelius, D.K.; Shimada, Tsutomu; Strauss, C.E.M.; Wilson, C.W.

    1998-12-01

    The authors are developing 2--100 kHz repetition rate CO{sub 2} lasers with milliJoule pulse energies, rapid acousto-optic tuning and isotopic gas mixes, for Differential Absorption LIDAR (DIAL) applications. The authors explain the tuning method, which uses a pair of acousto-optic modulators and is capable of random access to CO{sub 2} laser lines at rates of 100 kHz or more. The laser system is also described, and they report on performance with both normal and isotopic gas mixes.

  4. Development and operation of a real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1985-01-01

    Computer hardware and software of the NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) sysatem were improved. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment for remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentration from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed with the capability of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights were successfully performed on board the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1984. Improvements on the DIAL data acquisition system (DAS) are described.

  5. Appraisal of Surface Hopping as a Tool for Modeling Condensed Phase Linear Absorption Spectra.

    PubMed

    Petit, Andrew S; Subotnik, Joseph E

    2015-09-01

    Whereas surface hopping is usually used to study populations and mean-field dynamics to study coherences, in two recent papers, we described a procedure for calculating dipole-dipole correlation functions (and therefore absorption spectra) directly from ensembles of surface hopping trajectories. We previously applied this method to a handful of one-dimensional model problems intended to mimic the gas phase. In this article, we now benchmark this new procedure on a set of multidimensional model problems intended to mimic the condensed phase and compare our results against other standard semiclassical methods. By comparison, we demonstrate that methods that include only dynamical information from one PES (the standard Kubo approaches) exhibit large discrepancies with the results of exact quantum dynamics. Furthermore, for model problems with nonadiabatic excited state dynamics but no quantized vibrational structure in the spectra, our surface hopping approach performs comparably to using Ehrenfest dynamics to calculate the electronic coherences. That being said, however, when quantized vibrational structures are present in the spectra but the electronic states are uncoupled, performing the dynamics on the mean PES still outperforms our present method. These benchmark results should influence future studies that use ensembles of independent semiclassical trajectories to model linear as well as multidimensional spectra in the condensed phase. PMID:26575927

  6. Two-phase Flow Patterns in High Temperature Generator of Absorption Chiller / Heater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Masahiro; Kanuma, Hitoshi; Sekoguchi, Kotohiko; Takeishi, Masayuki

    There is a lack of information about vapor-liquid two-phase flow patterns determined using void signals in high temperature generator of absorption chiller/heater. Sensing void fraction has been hampered because lithium bromide aqueous solution of strong alkalinity is employed as working fluid at high temperature and high level of vacuum. New void sensor applicable to such difficult conditions was developed. The void Fractions at 48 locations in a high temperature generator were measured simultaneously in both cooling and heating operations. Analysis of void signals detected reveals that the most violent boiling occurs at the upper part of rear plate of combustion chamber and the first line of vertical tubes located in the flue. The flow patterns are strongly affected by the system pressure difference between the cooling and heating operations: there appear bubbly, slug and froth flows in the cooling operation, but only bubbly flow in the heating operation.

  7. Plasmon-induced absorption in stacked metamaterials based on phase retardation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Ming-Li; Yuan, Shu-Qing; Dai, Ke-Jie; Song, Yue-Li; Zhou, Feng-Qun; He, Jin-Na

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, based on the constructive interference of plasmonic dipolar and quadrupolar modes, a classical analogue of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) is demonstrated theoretically in a stacked metamaterial consisting of a short metal strip (which acts as a bright resonator) and a long metal strip (acting as a dark resonator), which has been reported to support the electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) effect. The transition from EIA to EIT can be clearly observed in the absorbance spectra via varying the vertical spacing between two resonant oscillators. With the help of the coupled two-oscillator model, the phase shift between the bright and dark resonance modes is calculated by fitting the simulated absorbance spectra, which reveals the physical mechanisms behind constructive and destructive interference effects in EIT/EIA metamaterials.

  8. Liquid-phase microextraction combined with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry: A review.

    PubMed

    de la Calle, Inmaculada; Pena-Pereira, Francisco; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2016-09-14

    An overview of the combination of liquid-phase microextraction (LPME) techniques with graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry (GFAAS) is reported herein. The high sensitivity of GFAAS is significantly enhanced by its association with a variety of miniaturized solvent extraction approaches. LPME-GFAAS thus represents a powerful combination for determination of metals, metalloids and organometallic compounds at (ultra)trace level. Different LPME modes used with GFAAS are briefly described, and the experimental parameters that show an impact in those microextraction processes are discussed. Special attention is paid to those parameters affecting GFAAS analysis. Main issues found when coupling LPME and GFAAS, as well as those strategies reported in the literature to solve them, are summarized. Relevant applications published on the topic so far are included. PMID:27566338

  9. Spatially resolved gas phase composition measurements in supersonic flows using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Paci, Paolo; Zvinevich, Yury; Tanimura, Shinobu; Wyslouzil, Barbara E; Zahniser, Mark; Shorter, Joanne; Nelson, David; McManus, Barry

    2004-11-22

    We used a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer to follow the condensation of D(2)O in a supersonic Laval nozzle. We measured both the concentration of the condensible vapor and the spectroscopic temperature as a function of position and compared the results to those inferred from static pressure measurements. Upstream and in the early stages of condensation, the quantitative agreement between the different experimental techniques is good. Far downstream, the spectroscopic results predict a lower gas phase concentration, a higher condensate mass fraction, and a higher temperature than the pressure measurements. The difference between the two measurement techniques is consistent with a slight compression of the boundary layers along the nozzle walls during condensation. PMID:15549871

  10. Aerosol absorption measurement at SWIR with water vapor interference using a differential photoacoustic spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Wenyue; Liu, Qiang; Wu, Yi

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric aerosol plays an important role in atmospheric radiation balance through absorbing and scattering the solar radiation, which changes local weather and global climate. Accurate measurement is highly requested to estimate the radiative effects and climate effects of atmospheric aerosol. Photoacoustic spectroscopy (PAS) technique, which observes the aerosols on their natural suspended state and is insensitive to light scattering, is commonly recognized as one of the best candidates to measure the optical absorption coefficient (OAC) of aerosols. In the present work, a method of measuring aerosol OAC at the wavelength where could also be absorbed by water vapor was proposed and corresponding measurements of the absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol at the short wave infrared (SWIR, 1342 nm) wavelength were carried out. The spectrometer was made up of two high performance homemade photoacoustic cells. To improve the sensitivity, several methods were presented to control the noise derived from gas flow and vibration from the sampling pump. Calibration of the OAC and properties of the system were also studied in detail. Using the established PAS instrument, measurement of the optical absorption properties of the atmospheric aerosol were carried out in laboratory and field environment. PMID:26368414

  11. A new ground-based differential absorption sunphotometer for measuring atmospheric columnar CO2 and preliminary applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yisong; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Xingying; Xu, Hua; Li, Donghui; Li, Kaitao

    2015-10-01

    Carbon dioxide is commonly considered as the most important greenhouse gas. Ground-based remote sensing technology of acquiring CO2 columnar concentration is needed to provide validation for spaceborne CO2 products. A new groundbased sunphotometer prototype for remotely measuring atmospheric CO2 is introduced in this paper, which is designed to be robust, portable, automatic and suitable for field observation. A simple quantity, Differential Absorption Index (DAI) related to CO2 optical depth, is proposed to derive the columnar CO2 information based on the differential absorption principle around 1.57 micron. Another sun/sky radiometer CE318, is used to provide correction parameters of aerosol extinction and water vapor absorption. A cloud screening method based on the measurement stability is developed. A systematic error assessment of the prototype and DAI is also performed. We collect two-year DAI observation from 2010 to 2012 in Beijing, analyze the DAI seasonal variation and find that the daily average DAI decreases in growing season and reaches to a minimum on August, while increases after that until January of the next year, when DAI reaches its highest peak, showing generally the seasonal cycle of CO2. We also investigate the seasonal differences of DAI variation and attribute the tendencies of high in the morning and evening while low in the noon to photosynthesis efficiency variation of vegetation and anthropogenic emissions. Preliminary comparison between DAI and model simulated XCO2 (Carbon Tracker 2011) is conducted, showing that DAI roughly reveals some temporal characteristics of CO2 when using the average of multiple measurements.

  12. Measurement of Gas and Aerosol Phase Absorption Spectra across the Visible and Near-IR Using Supercontinuum Photoacoustic Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Radney, James G; Zangmeister, Christopher D

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a method to measure the absorption spectra of gas and aerosol species across the visible and near-IR (500 to 840 nm) using a photoacoustic (PA) spectrometer and a pulsed supercontinuum laser source. Measurements of gas phase absorption spectra were demonstrated using H2O(g) as a function of relative humidity (RH). The measured absorption intensities and peak shapes were able to be quantified and compared to spectra calculated using the 2012 High Resolution Transmission (HITRAN2012) database. Size and mass selected nigrosin aerosol was used to measure absorption spectra across the visible and near-IR. Spectra were measured as a function of aerosol size/mass and show good agreement to Mie theory calculations. Lastly, we measured the broadband absorption spectrum of flame generated soot aerosol at 5% and 70% RH. For the high RH case, we are able to quantifiably separate the soot and water absorption contributions. For soot, we observe an enhancement in the mass specific absorption cross section ranging from 1.5 at 500 nm (p < 0.01) to 1.2 at 840 nm (p < 0.2) and a concomitant increase in the absorption Ångström exponent from 1.2 ± 0.4 (5% RH) to 1.6 ± 0.3 (70% RH). PMID:26098142

  13. RADON PRESSURE DIFFERENTIAL PROJECT, PHASE I - FLORIDA RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests on 70 central Florida houses to assess and characterize pressure differentials in new (age 5 years or less) Florida houses. Blower door tests determined house airtightness and air distribution system leakage. The 70 houses had an average airtight...

  14. RADON PRESSURE DIFFERENTIAL PROJECT - PHASE I - FLORIDA RESEARCH PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of tests on 70 central Florida houses to assess and characterize pressure differentials in new (age 5 years or less) Florida houses. Blower door tests determined house airtightness and air distribution system leakage. The 70 houses had an average airtight...

  15. Optical Absorptions of Oxygenated Carbon Chain Cations in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, F.-X.; Rice, C. A.; Chakraborty, A.; Fulara, J.; Maier, J. P.

    2016-06-01

    The gas-phase electronic spectra of linear OC4O+ and a planar C6H2O+ isomer were obtained at a rotational temperature of ≈10 K. Absorption measurements in a 6 K neon matrix were followed by gas-phase observations in a cryogenic radiofrequency ion trap. The origin bands of the 1{}2{{{\\Pi }}}u ≤ftarrow X{}2{{{\\Pi }}}g transition of OC4O+ and the 1{}2A{}2 ≤ftarrow X{}2B1 of HCCC(CO)CCH+ lie at 417.31 ± 0.01 nm and 523.49 ± 0.01 nm, respectively. These constitute the first electronic spectra of oxygenated carbon chain cations studied under conditions that are relevant to the diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs), as both have a visible transition. The recent analysis of the 579.5 nm DIB indicates that small carriers, five to seven heavy atoms, continue to be possible candidates (Huang & Oka 2015). Astronomical implications are discussed regarding this kind of oxygenated molecules.

  16. Deciphering complex, functional structures with synchrotron-based absorption and phase contrast tomographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stampanoni, M.; Reichold, J.; Weber, B.; Haberthür, D.; Schittny, J.; Eller, J.; Büchi, F. N.; Marone, F.

    2010-09-01

    Nowadays, thanks to the high brilliance available at modern, third generation synchrotron facilities and recent developments in detector technology, it is possible to record volumetric information at the micrometer scale within few minutes. High signal-to-noise ratio, quantitative information on very complex structures like the brain micro vessel architecture, lung airways or fuel cells can be obtained thanks to the combination of dedicated sample preparation protocols, in-situ acquisition schemes and cutting-edge imaging analysis instruments. In this work we report on recent experiments carried out at the TOMCAT beamline of the Swiss Light Source [1] where synchrotron-based tomographic microscopy has been successfully used to obtain fundamental information on preliminary models for cerebral fluid flow [2], to provide an accurate mesh for 3D finite-element simulation of the alveolar structure of the pulmonary acinus [3] and to investigate the complex functional mechanism of fuel cells [4]. Further, we introduce preliminary results on the combination of absorption and phase contrast microscopy for the visualization of high-Z nanoparticles in soft tissues, a fundamental information when designing modern drug delivery systems [5]. As an outlook we briefly discuss the new possibilities offered by high sensitivity, high resolution grating interferomtery as well as Zernike Phase contrast nanotomography [6].

  17. Phase-dependent high refractive index without absorption in a four-level inverted-Y atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Qiang Zeng; Fu-Ti Liu; Yu-Ping Wang; Zeng-Hui Gao

    2015-01-31

    We consider a closed four-level inverted-Y system in the presence and the absence of a microwave field. It is found that due to the quantum coherence between the two lower levels, either induced by the spontaneous decay or by the microwave field, the refraction – absorption properties of the system can be modulated by controlling the relative phase of the applied fields in both driven ways. In particular, by properly setting the values of the relative phase, the desirable high index of refraction without absorption can be achieved. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  18. Testing of Cerex Open Path Ultraviolet Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy Systems for Fenceline Monitoring Applications

    EPA Science Inventory

    Industrial facilities, energy production, and refining operations can be significant sources of gas-phase air pollutants. Some industrial emissions originate from fugitive sources (leaks) or process malfunctions and can be mitigated if identified. In recent amendments to the Nati...

  19. A symbiotic bacterium differentially influences arsenate absorption and transformation in Dunaliella salina under different phosphate regimes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ya; Zhang, Chun Hua; Lin, Man Man; Ge, Ying

    2016-11-15

    In this study, we investigated the effects of a symbiotic bacterium and phosphate (PO4(3-)) nutrition on the toxicity and metabolism of arsenate (As(V)) in Dunaliella salina. The bacterium was identified as Alteromonas macleodii based on analysis of its 16S rRNA gene sequence. When no As(V) was added, A. macleodii significantly enhanced the growth of D. salina, irrespective of PO4(3-) nutrition levels, but this effect was reversed after As(V)+PO4(3-) treatment (1.12mgL(-1)) for 3 days. Arsenic (As) absorption by the non-axenic D. salina was significantly higher than that by its axenic counterpart during incubation with 1.12mgL(-1) PO4(3-). However, when the culture was treated with 0.112mgL(-1) PO4(3-), As(V) reduction and its subsequent arsenite (As(III)) excretion by non-axenic D. salina were remarkably enhanced, which, in turn, contributed to lower As absorption in non-axenic algal cells from days 7 to 9. Moreover, dimethylarsinic acid was synthesized by D. salina alone, and the rates of its production and excretion were accelerated when the PO4(3-) concentration was 0.112mgL(-1). Our data demonstrate that A. macleodii strongly affected As toxicity, uptake, and speciation in D. salina, and these impacts were mediated by PO4(3-) in the cultures. PMID:27450336

  20. Mechanism of Pressure-Induced Phase Transitions, Amorphization, and Absorption-Edge Shift in Photovoltaic Methylammonium Lead Iodide.

    PubMed

    Szafrański, Marek; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2016-09-01

    Our single-crystal X-ray diffraction study of methylammonium lead triiodide, MAPbI3, provides the first comprehensive structural information on the tetragonal phase II in the pressure range to 0.35 GPa, on the cubic phase IV stable between 0.35 and 2.5 GPa, and on the isostructural cubic phase V observed above 2.5 GPa, which undergoes a gradual amorphization. The optical absorption study confirms that up to 0.35 GPa, the absorption edge of MAPbI3 is red-shifted, allowing an extension of spectral absorption. The transitions to phases IV and V are associated with the abrupt blue shifts of the absorption edge. The strong increase of the energy gap in phase V result in a spectacular color change of the crystal from black to red around 3.5 GPa. The optical changes have been correlated with the pressure-induced strain of the MAPbI3 inorganic framework and its frustration, triggered by methylammonium cations trapped at random orientations in the squeezed voids. PMID:27538989

  1. Feasibility of tropospheric water vapor profiling using infrared heterodyne differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    Grund, C.J.; Hardesty, R.M.; Rye, B.J.

    1996-04-01

    The development and verification of realistic climate model parameterizations for clouds and net radiation balance and the correction of other site sensor observations for interferences due to the presence of water vapor are critically dependent on water vapor profile measurements. In this study, we develop system performance models and examine the potential of infrared differential absoroption lidar (DIAL) to determine the concentration of water vapor.

  2. Influence of spatial differential reflection parameters on 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene (TNT) absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubroca, Thierry; Guetard, Ga"l.; Hummel, Rolf E.

    2012-06-01

    Differential reflectometry has been shown to be a sensitive and fast tool to detect explosive substances on surfaces such as luggage and parcel. This paper elucidates the influence of several parameters on the sensitivity of the technique. An expression for the reflected intensity that contains the influence of angle of incidence, wavelength of the incident light, and surface roughness has been established. The feature used to identify and detect TNT stems mainly from the diffuse component of the reflected light. This spectral "finger-print" shape does not change by varying these parameters. The maximum sensitivity is obtained for samples which are strongly diffusive and weakly specular.

  3. Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: The Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O'Connor, Peter B.

    2013-06-01

    The method of phasing broadband Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by 100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode.

  4. Absorption-Mode Fourier Transform Mass Spectrometry: the Effects of Apodization and Phasing on Modified Protein Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yulin; Li, Huilin; Wills, Rebecca H.; Perez-Hurtado, Pilar; Yu, Xiang; Kilgour, David. P. A.; Barrow, Mark P.; Lin, Cheng; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2014-01-01

    The method of phasing broadband FT-ICR spectra allows plotting the spectra in the absorption-mode; this new approach significantly improves the quality of the data at no extra cost. Herein, an internal calibration method for calculating the phase function has been developed, and successfully applied to the top-down spectra of modified proteins, where the peak intensities vary by >100×. The result shows that the use of absorption-mode spectra allows more peaks to be discerned within the recorded data, and this can reveal much greater information about the protein and modifications under investigation. In addition, noise and harmonic peaks can be assigned immediately in the absorption-mode. PMID:23568027

  5. Development and proof-testing of advanced absorption refrigeration cycle concepts. Report on Phases 1 and 1A

    SciTech Connect

    Modahl, R.J.; Hayes, F.C.

    1992-03-01

    The overall objectives of this project are to evaluate, develop, and proof-test advanced absorption refrigeration cycles that are applicable to residential and commercial heat pumps for space conditioning. The heat pump system is to be direct-fired with natural gas and is to use absorption working fluids whose properties are known. Target coefficients of performance (COPs) are 1.6 at 47{degrees}F and 1.2 at 17{degrees} in the heating mode, and 0.7 at 95{degree}F in the cooling mode, including the effect of flue losses. The project is divided into three phases. Phase I entailed the analytical evaluation of advanced cycles and included the selection of preferred concepts for further development. Phase II involves the development and testing of critical components and of a complete laboratory breadboard version of the selected system. Phase III calls for the development of a prototype unit and is contingent on the successful completion of Phase II. This report covers Phase I work on the project. In Phase 1, 24 advanced absorption cycle/fluid combinations were evaluated, and computer models were developed to predict system performance. COP, theoretical pump power, and internal heat exchange were calculated for each system, and these calculations were used as indicators of operating and installed costs in order to rank the relative promise of each system. The highest ranking systems involve the cycle concept of absorber/generator heat exchange, generator heat exchanger/absorber heat exchange, regeneration, and resorption/desorption, in combination with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary absorption fluid mixture or with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary solution. Based upon these conclusions, the recommendation was made to proceed to Phase II, the laboratory breadboard proof-of- concept.

  6. Active optics for dynamical correction of fluctuations of atmospheric refraction on a differential optical absorption spectroscopy device.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Inzunza, Rodrigo A; Gutiérrez, Javier; Saavedra, Carlos

    2012-10-20

    We have designed and developed a feedback mechanism for continuous monitoring in a long-pass differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) setup. This allows one to correct photo-thermal deflection due to the local fluctuations refraction index of the air. For this purpose, using an unbalanced beam splitter, a small fraction of the collected DOAS signal is imaged onto a low-cost CCD camera using a biconvex lens, while the other portion of the signal is coupled into a fiber optic for trace gas detection. By monitoring the registered signal at the CCD camera, a feedback mechanism acting on the transversal position of the lens is able to compensate an arbitrary transversal displacement of the collected signal at the focal plane of the receiver telescope, allowing an optimal coupling into the optical fiber. PMID:23089775

  7. Multibeam long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy instrument: a device for simultaneous measurements along multiple light paths.

    PubMed

    Pundt, Irene; Mettendorf, Kai Uwe

    2005-08-10

    A novel long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) apparatus for measuring tropospheric trace gases and the first results from its use are presented: We call it the multibeam instrument. It is the first active DOAS device that emits several light beams simultaneously through only one telescope and with only one lamp as a light source, allowing simultaneous measurement along multiple light paths. In contrast to conventional DOAS instruments, several small mirrors are positioned near the lamp, creating multiple virtual light sources that emit one light beam each in one specific direction. The possibility of error due to scattering between the light beams is negligible. The trace-gas detection limits of NO2, SO2, O3, and H2CO are similar to those of the traditional long-path DOAS instrument. PMID:16114540

  8. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  9. [Measurement of atmospheric NO3 radical with long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy based on red light emitting diodes].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Wang, Jiang-Tao; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Xu-De

    2013-02-01

    Nitrate radical (NO3) is the most important oxidant in the tropospheric nighttime chemistry. Due to its high reactivity and low atmospheric concentrations, modern red light emitting diodes (LEDs) was proposed as light source in long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) to measure NO3 radical in the atmosphere. The spectral properties of Luxeon LXHL-MD1D LEDs were analyzed in the present paper. The principle of LEDs-DOAS system to measure nitrate radical was studied in this paper. The experimental setup and retrieval method of NO3 radical were discussed in this paper. The retrieved example of NO3 was given and the time series of NO3 concentrations was performed for a week. The results showed that the detection limits of LEDs-DOAS system were 12 ppt for atmospheric NO3 radical when the optical path of LEDs-DOAS system was 2.8 km. PMID:23697129

  10. THz Differential Radar for Detection of Weak Molecular Absorption Lines in Bio-Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Hamid

    2006-03-01

    THz frequency range (300-3000 GHz) promises unique capabilities and advantages for detection of trace gases and biological aerosols immersed in the atmosphere. Techniques used for microwave atmospheric remote sensing can be used within the atmospheric transmission windows to carry out standoff detection of biological markers in real time. THz spectroscopy has been used as an important new tool in investigations of atmospheric molecular gases and a wide range of airborne biological materials. We have embarked upon development of field deployable THz differential radar. Bio-aerosols are the most difficult analytes to face due to their heterogeneity in size, toxicity, and bio/chemical composition. JPL has demonstrated monolithic solid-state THz sources with impressive output power. The sources are enabled by W-band power amplifiers and planar Schottky diode multipliers. These, together with room temperature detectors (based on the same technology), allow one to make a compact and robust transmitter/receiver with sufficient sensitivity and frequency agility to carry out detailed investigation of various molecular vapors and bio-aerosols at standard temperature and pressure. Current status of the THz differential radar technology development effort along with future trends will be presented.

  11. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Air Pollution by Dye Laser Measurement of Differential Absorption of Elastic Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S. A.; Gergely, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical study of a lidar system which uses tunable organic dye lasers to accurately determine spatial distribution of molecular air pollutants. Also described will be experimental work to date on simultaneous multiwavelength output dye laser sources for this system. Basically the scheme determines the concentration of air pollutants by measuring the differential absorption of an (at least) two wavelength lidar signal elastically backscattered by the atmosphere. Only relative measurements of the backscattered intensity at each of the two wavelengths, one on and one off the resonance absorption of the pollutant in question, are required. The various parameters of the scheme are examined and the component elements required for a system of this type discussed, with emphasis on the dye laser source. Potential advantages of simultaneous multiwavelength outputs are described. The use of correlation spectroscopy in this context is examined. Comparisons are also made for the use of infrared probing wavelengths and sources instead of dye lasers. Estimates of the sensitivity and accuracy of a practical dye laser system of this type, made for specific pollutants, snow it to have inherent advantages over other schemes for determining pollutant spatial distribution.

  12. Measurements of atmospheric NO3 radicals in Hefei using LED-based long path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Lu; Min, Qin; Pin-Hua, Xie; Jun, Duan; Wu, Fang; Liu-Yi, Ling; Lan-Lan, Shen; Jian-Guo, Liu; Wen-Qing, Liu

    2016-02-01

    NO3 radicals accumulate during the night, thereby being the most critical night oxidant. Owing to the low concentration and dramatic variation, the detection of atmospheric NO3 radicals is still challenging. In this paper, an LED-based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LPDOAS) instrument is developed for measuring the atmospheric NO3 radicals. This instrument is composed of a Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope, a combined emitting and receiving fiber, and a red LED equipped with a thermostat, and has a center wavelength of 660 nm, covering the NO3 strongest absorption peak (662 nm). The influence of LED temperature fluctuations is discussed. The temperature of the LED lamp with a home-made thermostat is tested, showing a stability of ±0.1 °C. The principle and fitting analyses of LED-LPDOAS are presented. A retrieval example and a time series of NO3 radical concentrations with good continuity for one night are shown. The detection limit of NO3 for 2.6-km optical path is about 10 ppt. Project supported by the “Strategic Priority Research Program” of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (Grant Nos. XDB05040200 and XDB05010500).

  13. Long term NO2 measurements in Hong Kong using LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, K. L.; Pöhler, D.; Kuhlmann, G.; Hartl, A.; Platt, U.; Wenig, M. O.

    2011-11-01

    In this study we present the first long term measurements of atmospheric nitrogen dioxide (NO2) using a LED based Long Path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) instrument. This instrument is measuring continuously in Hong Kong since December 2009, first in a setup with a 550 m absorption path and then with a 3820 m path at about 30 m to 50 m above street level. The instrument is using a high power blue light LED with peak intensity at 450 nm coupled into the telescope using a Y-fibre bundle. The LP-DOAS instrument measures NO2 concentrations in the Kowloon Tong and Mong Kok district of Hong Kong and we compare the measurement results to concentrations reported by monitoring stations operated by the Hong Kong Environmental Protection Department in that area. Hourly averages of coinciding measurements are in reasonable agreement (R = 0.74). Furthermore, we used the long-term data set to validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) NO2 data product. Monthly averaged LP-DOAS and OMI measurements correlate well (R = 0.84) when comparing the data for the OMI overpass time. We analyzed weekly patterns in both data sets and found that the LP-DOAS detects a clear weekly cycle with a reduction on weekends during rush hour peaks, whereas OMI is not able to observe this weekly cycle due to its fix overpass time.

  14. Differential effects of some natural compounds on the transdermal absorption and penetration of caffeine and salicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Muhammad, Faqir; Riviere, Jim E

    2015-04-10

    Many natural products have the potential to modulate the dermal penetration of topically applied drugs and chemicals. We studied the effect of five natural compounds (hydroxycitronellal, limonene 1,2-epoxide, terpinyl acetate, p-coumaric acid, transferrulic acid) and ethanol on the transdermal penetration of two marker drugs ((14)C-caffeine and (14)C-salicylic acid) in a flow through in vitro porcine skin diffusion system. The parameters of flux, permeability, diffusivity, and percent dose absorbed/retained were calculated and compared. The dermal absorption of (14)C-caffeine was significantly higher with terpinyl acetate and limonene 1,2-epoxide as compared to ethanol; while dermal absorption of (14)C-salicylic acid was significantly greater with hydroxycitronellal and limonene 1,2-epoxide as compared to ethanol. A 10-fold increase in flux and permeability of caffeine with terpinyl acetate was observed while limonene increased flux of caffeine by 4-fold and permeability by 3-fold. Hydroxycitronellal and limonene increased salicylic acid's flux and permeability over 2-fold. The other natural compounds tested did not produce statistically significant effects on dermal penetration parameters for both caffeine and salicylic acid (p≥0.05). These results emphasize the differential effects of natural substances on the transdermal penetration of hydrophilic (caffeine) and hydrophobic (salicylic acid) drugs. PMID:25681718

  15. A Ground-Based Profiling Differential Absorption LIDAR System for Measuring CO2 in the Planetary Boundary Layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Arlyn E.; Burris, John F.; Abshire, James B.; Krainak, Michael A.; Riris, Haris; Sun, Xiao-Li; Collatz, G. James

    2002-01-01

    Ground-based LIDAR observations can potentially provide continuous profiles of CO2 through the planetary boundary layer and into the free troposphere. We will present initial atmospheric measurements from a prototype system that is based on components developed by the telecommunications industry. Preliminary measurements and instrument performance calculations indicate that an optimized differential absorption LIDAR (DIAL) system will be capable of providing continuous hourly averaged profiles with 250m vertical resolution and better than 1 ppm precision at 1 km. Precision increases (decreases) at lower (higher) altitudes and is directly proportional to altitude resolution and acquisition time. Thus, precision can be improved if temporal or vertical resolution is sacrificed. Our approach measures absorption by CO2 of pulsed laser light at 1.6 microns backscattered from atmospheric aerosols. Aerosol concentrations in the planetary boundary layer are relatively high and are expected to provide adequate signal returns for the desired resolution. The long-term goal of the project is to develop a rugged, autonomous system using only commercially available components that can be replicated inexpensively for deployment in a monitoring network.

  16. Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Optimizations Based on Pre-Analyzed Atmospheric Data for ASCENDS Mission Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pliutau, Denis; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a modeling method based on data reductions is investigated which includes pre analyzed MERRA atmospheric fields for quantitative estimates of uncertainties introduced in the integrated path differential absorption methods for the sensing of various molecules including CO2. This approach represents the extension of our existing lidar modeling framework previously developed and allows effective on- and offline wavelength optimizations and weighting function analysis to minimize the interference effects such as those due to temperature sensitivity and water vapor absorption. The new simulation methodology is different from the previous implementation in that it allows analysis of atmospheric effects over annual spans and the entire Earth coverage which was achieved due to the data reduction methods employed. The effectiveness of the proposed simulation approach is demonstrated with application to the mixing ratio retrievals for the future ASCENDS mission. Independent analysis of multiple accuracy limiting factors including the temperature, water vapor interferences, and selected system parameters is further used to identify favorable spectral regions as well as wavelength combinations facilitating the reduction in total errors in the retrieved XCO2 values.

  17. Determination of aromatic compounds in water by solid phase microextraction and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. 1. Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Wittkamp, B.L.; Hawthorne, S.B.; Tilotta, D.C.

    1997-03-15

    A simple method is described for determining aromatic compounds (i.e., benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, etc.) in water that combines solid phase microextraction (SPME) and ultraviolet (UV) absorption spectroscopy. The extraction medium consists of a small `chip` of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (total volume of nearly 80 {mu}L) that is immersed in a water sample contaminated with an aromatic compound. Equilibrium is first allowed to establish between the analyte in the water and the extraction medium, and the concentration of the aromatic compound is then determined directly in the sorbent chip by UV spectroscopy. Calibration information on this new method was obtained for 11 aromatic compounds commonly found in unleaded gasoline (e.g., benzene, toluene, naphthalene, etc). It was found that equilibrium is established in the range of 30-50 min, with the exception of 1-methylnaphthalene and naphthalene, which equilibrated within 100 min. Detection limits for the aromatic compounds at their equilibration times range from 0.40 to 12 ppb except for benzene (97 ppb). Relative standard deviations of the SPME-UV measurements are 3-12%. 17 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  18. Ozone monitoring using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) and UV photometry instruments in Sohar, Oman.

    PubMed

    Nawahda, Amin

    2015-08-01

    Ground level ozone (O3) concentrations were measured across Sohar highway in Oman during a four-month period from September to December 2014 by using an open-path deferential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) instrument. The monthly average concentrations of O3 varied from 19.6 to 29.4 ppb. The measurements of O3 are compared with the measurements of a non-open-path UV photometry analyzer (UVP). The percent difference (PD) concept and linear regression methods were used to compare the readings of the two instruments. The findings show high correlation coefficients between the measurements of the DOAS and UVP instruments. The DOAS measurements of O3 are found to be less than those measured by the UVP instrument; the correlation coefficients between absolute PD values and meteorological parameters and PM2.5 were very low indicating a minor effect; therefore, titrations of O3 by traffic emissions and difference in elevation could be the reason for the difference in the measurements of the two instruments. PMID:26138853

  19. Nonlinear-approximation technique for determining vertical ozone-concentration profiles with a differential-absorption lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Vladimir A.; Bristow, Michael P.; McElroy, James L.

    1996-08-01

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone-concentration profiles (O 3 ) from backscattered signals obtained by a multiwavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profiles by signal noise and other phenomena such as aerosol inhomogeneity. Before the O 3 profiles are derived, the dominant measurement errors are estimated and uncertainty boundaries for the measured profiles are established. The off- to on-line signal ratio is transformed into an intermediate function, and analytical approximations of the function are then determined. The separation of low- and high-frequency constituents of the measured ozone profile is made by the application of different approximation fits to appropriate intermediate functions. The low-frequency constituents are approximated with a low-order polynomial fit, whereas the high-frequency constituents are approximated with a trigonometric fit. The latter fit makes it possible to correct the measured O 3 profiles in zones of large ozone-concentration gradients where the low-order polynomial fit is found to be insufficient. Application of this technique to experimental data obtained in the lower troposphere shows that erroneous fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profile by signal noise and aerosol inhomogeneity undergo a significant reduction in comparison with the results from the conventional technique based on straightforward numerical differentiation.

  20. Spatial and temporal variations in NO(2) distributions over Beijing, China measured by imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanlim; Kim, Young J; Jung, Jinsang; Lee, Chulkyu; Heue, Klaus-Peter; Platt, Ulrich; Hu, Min; Zhu, Tong

    2009-04-01

    During the CAREBEIJING campaign in 2006, imaging differential optical absorption spectroscopy (I-DOAS) measurements were made from 08:00 to 16:00 on September 9 and 10 over Beijing, China. Detailed images of the near-surface NO(2) differential slant column density (DSCD) distribution over Beijing were obtained. Images with less than a 30-min temporal resolution showed both horizontal and vertical variations in NO(2) distributions. For DSCD to mixing ratio conversion, path length along the lines of I-DOAS lines of sight was estimated using the light-extinction coefficient and Angstrom exponent data obtained by a transmissometer and a sunphotometer, respectively. Mixing ratios measured by an in-situ NO(2) analyzer were compared with those estimated by the I-DOAS instrument. The obtained temporal and spatial variations in NO(2) distributions measured by I-DOAS for the two days are interpreted with consideration of the locations of the major NO(x) sources and local wind conditions. I-DOAS measurements have been applied in this study for estimating NO(2) distribution over an urban area with multiple and distributed emission sources. Results are obtained for estimated temporal and spatial NO(2) distributions over the urban atmosphere; demonstrating the capability of the I-DOAS technique. We discuss in this paper the use of I-DOAS measurements to estimate the NO(2) distribution over an urban area with multiple distributed emission sources. PMID:19111964

  1. Nonlinear-approximation technique for determining vertical ozone-concentration profiles with a differential-absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Kovalev, V A; Bristow, M P; McElroy, J L

    1996-08-20

    A new technique is presented for the retrieval of ozone-concentration profiles (O(3)) from backscattered signals obtained by a multiwavelength differential-absorption lidar (DIAL). The technique makes it possible to reduce erroneous local fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profiles by signal noise and other phenomena such as aerosol inhomogeneity. Before the O(3) profiles are derived, the dominant measurement errors are estimated and uncertainty boundaries for the measured profiles are established. The off- to on-line signal ratio is transformed into an intermediate function, and analytical approximations of the function are then determined. The separation of low- and high-frequency constituents of the measured ozone profile is made by the application of different approximation fits to appropriate intermediate functions. The low-frequency constituents are approximated with a low-order polynomial fit, whereas the high-frequency constituents are approximated with a trigonometric fit. The latter fit makes it possible to correct the measured O(3) profiles in zones of large ozone-concentration gradients where the low-order polynomial fit is found to be insufficient. Application of this technique to experimental data obtained in the lower troposphere shows that erroneous fluctuations induced in the ozone-concentration profile by signal noise and aerosol inhomogeneity undergo a significant reduction in comparison with the results from the conventional technique based on straightforward numerical differentiation. PMID:21102905

  2. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support on which the active phase is dispersed can affect the percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Our objective is to characterize the physical chemistry of the active phase-oxide support interaction by spectroscopic methods and to correlate this structure with catalytic function. Two catalytic systems and their associated techniques (x-ray absorption and NMR) are discussed in this progress report. Firstly, the interaction of Pt-Ni supported on silica and L-zeolite are characterized and compared by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Secondly, we present both experimental and calculational developments of NMR for the investigation of amorphous silica-alumina catalysts and/or supports.

  3. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Pattey, E.; van Haarlem, R.; O'Brien, J. M.; Herndon, S. C.

    2009-12-01

    A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) for measurements of ammonia has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of ammonia to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering ammonia-free background air and calibration gas standards. This instrument has been found to have a detection limit of 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS) during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of ammonia with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30-1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the ammonia time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE) in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May-July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an ammonia gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation with 1 min time resolution (R2=0.93) between the two instruments at the beginning of the study, when regular background subtraction was applied to the QC

  4. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) for measurements of atmospheric ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R. A.; Murphy, J. G.; Pattey, E.; van Haarlem, R.; O'Brien, J. M.; Herndon, S. C.

    2010-03-01

    A compact, fast-response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) for measurements of ammonia (NH3) has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 0.5 L multiple pass absorption cell with an effective path length of 76 m. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically-cooled Mercury Cadmium Telluride (HgCdTe) infrared detector. A novel sampling inlet was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz tube with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of NH3 to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles, and additional ports for delivering NH3-free background air and calibration gas standards. The level of noise in this instrument has been found to be 0.23 ppb at 1 Hz. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometer (TDLAS) during a laboratory intercomparison. The effect of humidity and heat on the surface interaction of NH3 with sample tubing was investigated at mixing ratios ranging from 30-1000 ppb. Humidity was seen to worsen the NH3 time response and considerable improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42CTL chemiluminescence-based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE) in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May-July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an NH3 gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation at 1 min time resolution (R2 = 0.93) between the two instruments at the beginning of the study, when regular background subtraction was applied to the QC-TILDAS. An overall good

  5. Characterizing a Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC-TILDAS) for Measurements of Atmospheric Ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, R.; Murphy, J. G.; van Haarlem, R.; Pattey, E.; O'Brien, J.

    2009-05-01

    A compact, fast response Quantum Cascade Tunable Infrared Laser Differential Absorption Spectrometer (QC- TILDAS) for measurements of ammonia has been evaluated under both laboratory and field conditions. Absorption of radiation from a pulsed, thermoelectrically cooled QC laser occurs at reduced pressure in a 76 m path length, 0.5 L volume multiple pass absorption cell. Detection is achieved using a thermoelectrically cooled HgCdTe infrared detector. A novel sampling technique was used, consisting of a short, heated, quartz inlet with a hydrophobic coating to minimize the adsorption of ammonia to surfaces. The inlet contains a critical orifice that reduces the pressure, a virtual impactor for separation of particles and additional ports for delivering ammonia free background air and calibration gas standards. This instrument has been found to have a detection limit of 0.3 ppb with a time resolution of 1 s. The sampling technique has been compared to the results of a conventional lead salt Tunable Diode Laser (TDL) absorption spectrometer during a laboratory intercomparison. Various lengths and types of sample inlet tubing material, heated and unheated, under dry and ambient humidity conditions with ammonia concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ppb were investigated. Preliminary analysis suggests the time response improves with the use of short, PFA tubing sampling lines. No significant improvement was observed when using a heated sampling line and humidity was seen to play an important role on the bi-exponential decay of ammonia. A field intercomparison of the QC-TILDAS with a modified Thermo 42C chemiluminescence based analyzer was also performed at Environment Canada's Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments (CARE) in the rural town of Egbert, ON between May-July 2008. Background tests and calibrations using two different permeation tube sources and an ammonia gas cylinder were regularly carried out throughout the study. Results indicate a very good correlation

  6. Double-pulse 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar airborne validation for atmospheric carbon dioxide measurement.

    PubMed

    Refaat, Tamer F; Singh, Upendra N; Yu, Jirong; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Ismail, Syed

    2016-05-20

    Field experiments were conducted to test and evaluate the initial atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) measurement capability of airborne, high-energy, double-pulsed, 2-μm integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar. This IPDA was designed, integrated, and operated at the NASA Langley Research Center on-board the NASA B-200 aircraft. The IPDA was tuned to the CO2 strong absorption line at 2050.9670 nm, which is the optimum for lower tropospheric weighted column measurements. Flights were conducted over land and ocean under different conditions. The first validation experiments of the IPDA for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing, focusing on low surface reflectivity oceanic surface returns during full day background conditions, are presented. In these experiments, the IPDA measurements were validated by comparison to airborne flask air-sampling measurements conducted by the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory. IPDA performance modeling was conducted to evaluate measurement sensitivity and bias errors. The IPDA signals and their variation with altitude compare well with predicted model results. In addition, off-off-line testing was conducted, with fixed instrument settings, to evaluate the IPDA systematic and random errors. Analysis shows an altitude-independent differential optical depth offset of 0.0769. Optical depth measurement uncertainty of 0.0918 compares well with the predicted value of 0.0761. IPDA CO2 column measurement compares well with model-driven, near-simultaneous air-sampling measurements from the NOAA aircraft at different altitudes. With a 10-s shot average, CO2 differential optical depth measurement of 1.0054±0.0103 was retrieved from a 6-km altitude and a 4-GHz on-line operation. As compared to CO2 weighted-average column dry-air volume mixing ratio of 404.08 ppm, derived from air sampling, IPDA measurement resulted in a value of 405.22±4.15  ppm with 1.02% uncertainty and

  7. Intermediate-field two-photon absorption enhancement by shaped femtosecond pulses: Tolerance to phase deviation from perfect antisymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Chuntonov, Lev; Rybak, Leonid; Gandman, Andrey; Amitay, Zohar

    2010-04-15

    We study in detail the coherent interference mechanism leading to the intermediate-field two-photon absorption enhancement recently found for shaped femtosecond pulses with spectral phases that are antisymmetric around one-half of the transition frequency. We particularly investigate the tolerance of the phenomenon to the phase deviation from perfect antisymmetry. We theoretically and experimentally find that this tolerance increases as the field strength increases. For the present Na excitation, the enhancement occurs even when {approx}30% of the phase pattern is not antisymmetric. Our findings are of particular importance for multichannel coherent control scenarios.

  8. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  9. Differentiating the growth phases of single bacteria using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strola, S. A.; Marcoux, P. R.; Schultz, E.; Perenon, R.; Simon, A.-C.; Espagnon, I.; Allier, C. P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present a longitudinal study of bacteria metabolism performed with a novel Raman spectrometer system. Longitudinal study is possible with our Raman setup since the overall procedure to localize a single bacterium and collect a Raman spectrum lasts only 1 minute. Localization and detection of single bacteria are performed by means of lensfree imaging, whereas Raman signal (from 600 to 3200 cm-1) is collected into a prototype spectrometer that allows high light throughput (HTVS technology, Tornado Spectral System). Accomplishing time-lapse Raman spectrometry during growth of bacteria, we observed variation in the net intensities for some band groups, e.g. amides and proteins. The obtained results on two different bacteria species, i.e. Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis clearly indicate that growth affects the Raman chemical signature. We performed a first analysis to check spectral differences and similarities. It allows distinguishing between lag, exponential and stationary growth phases. And the assignment of interest bands to vibration modes of covalent bonds enables the monitoring of metabolic changes in bacteria caused by growth and aging. Following the spectra analysis, a SVM (support vector machine) classification of the different growth phases is presented. In sum this longitudinal study by means of a compact and low-cost Raman setup is a proof of principle for routine analysis of bacteria, in a real-time and non-destructive way. Real-time Raman studies on metabolism and viability of bacteria pave the way for future antibiotic susceptibility testing.

  10. Determination of Phase Ratio in Polymorphic Materials by X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: The Case of Anatase and Rutile Phase Mixture in TiO2

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, M. F.; Klysubun, W.; Kityakarn, S.; Worayingyong, A.; Zhang, S. B.; Wei, S. H.; Onkaw, D.; Songsiriritthigul, P.; Rujirawat, S.; Limpijumnong, S.

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) can be used as an unconventional characterization technique to determine the proportions of different crystal phases in polymorphic samples. As an example, we show that ratios of anatase and rutile phases contained in the TiO{sub 2} samples obtained by XAS are in agreement with conventional x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements to within a few percent. We suggest that XAS measurement is a useful and reliable technique that can be applied to study the phase composition of highly disordered or nanoparticle polymorphic materials, where traditional XRD technique might be difficult.

  11. Speed Measurement and Motion Analysis of Chang'E-3 Rover Based on Differential Phase Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, C.; Liu, Q. H.; Zheng, X.; He, Q. B.; Wu, Y. J.

    2015-07-01

    On 2013 December 14, the Chang'E-3 made a successful soft landing on the lunar surface, and then carried out the tasks of separating the lander and the rover, and taking the photos of each other. With the same beam VLBI (Very long baseline interferometry) technique to observe the signals transmitted by the lander and the rover simultaneously, the differential phase delay between them is calculated, which can reflect a minor change of the rover's position on a scale of a few centimeters. Based on the high sensitivity of differential phase delay, the rover's speeds during 5 movements are obtained with an average of 0.056 m/s. The relationship between the rover's shake in moving process, and lunar terrain is analyzed by using the spectrum of the residual of the differential phase delay after the first-order polynomial fitting.

  12. Speed Measurement and Motion Analysis of Chang'E-3 Rover Based on Differential Phase Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Pan; Qing-hui, Liu; Xin, Zheng; Qing-bao, He; Ya-jun, Wu

    2016-04-01

    On 14th December 2013, the Chang'E-3 made a successful soft landing on the lunar surface, and then carried out the tasks of separating the lander and the rover, and taking pictures of each other. With the same beam VLBI (Very Long Baseline Interferometry) technique to observe the signals transmitted by the lander and the rover simultaneously, the differential phase delay between them is calculated, which can reflect the minor changes of the rover's position on a scale of a few centimeters. Based on the high sensitivity of differential phase delay, the rover's speeds during 5 movements are obtained with an average of 0.056 m/s. The relationship between the rover's shake in the moving process and the lunar terrain is analyzed by using the spectrum of the residual of the differential phase delay after the first-order polynomial fitting.

  13. Differential X-ray phase-contrast imaging with a grating interferometer using a laboratory X-ray micro-focus tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Kwon-Ha; Ryu, Jong Hyun; Jung, Chang Won; Ryu, Cheol Woo; Kim, Young Jo; Kwon, Young Man; Park, Miran; Cho, Seungryong; Chon, Kwon Su

    2014-12-01

    X-ray phase-contrast imaging can provide images with much greater soft-tissue contrast than conventional absorption-based images. In this paper, we describe differential X-ray phase-contrast images of insect specimens that were obtained using a grating-based Talbot interferometer and a laboratory X-ray source with a spot size of a few tens of micrometers. We developed the interferometer on the basis of the wavelength, periods, and height of the gratings; the field of view depends on the size of the grating, considering the refractive index of the specimen. The phase-contrast images were acquired using phase-stepping methods. The phase contrast imaging provided a significantly enhanced soft-tissue contrast compared with the attenuation data. The contour of the sample was clearly visible because the refraction from the edges of the object was strong in the differential phase-contrast image. Our results demonstrate that a grating-based Talbot interferometer with a conventional X-ray tube may be attractive as an X-ray imaging system for generating phase images. X-ray phase imaging obviously has sufficient potential and is expected to soon be a great tool for medical diagnostics.

  14. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S.; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A.; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J.

    2015-04-01

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers.

  15. Comparison of different numerical treatments for x-ray phase tomography of soft tissue from differential phase projections.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Daniele; Vaz, Raquel; Svalbe, Imants; Morgan, Kaye S; Marathe, Shashidhara; Xiao, Xianghui; Assoufid, Lahsen; Anderson, Rebecca A; Topczewski, Jacek; Bryson-Richardson, Robert J

    2015-04-21

    X-ray imaging of soft tissue is made difficult by their low absorbance. The use of x-ray phase imaging and tomography can significantly enhance the detection of these tissues and several approaches have been proposed to this end. Methods such as analyzer-based imaging or grating interferometry produce differential phase projections that can be used to reconstruct the 3D distribution of the sample refractive index. We report on the quantitative comparison of three different methods to obtain x-ray phase tomography with filtered back-projection from differential phase projections in the presence of noise. The three procedures represent different numerical approaches to solve the same mathematical problem, namely phase retrieval and filtered back-projection. It is found that obtaining individual phase projections and subsequently applying a conventional filtered back-projection algorithm produces the best results for noisy experimental data, when compared with other procedures based on the Hilbert transform. The algorithms are tested on simulated phantom data with added noise and the predictions are confirmed by experimental data acquired using a grating interferometer. The experiment is performed on unstained adult zebrafish, an important model organism for biomedical studies. The method optimization described here allows resolution of weak soft tissue features, such as muscle fibers. PMID:25802946

  16. Gas-phase absorption cross sections of 24 monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the UV and IR spectral ranges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etzkorn, Thomas; Klotz, Björn; Sørensen, Søren; Patroescu, Iulia V.; Barnes, Ian; Becker, Karl H.; Platt, Ulrich

    Absorption cross sections of 24 volatile and non-volatile derivatives of benzene in the ultraviolet (UV) and the infrared (IR) regions of the electromagnetic spectrum have been determined using a 1080 l quartz cell. For the UV a 0.5 m Czerny-Turner spectrometer coupled with a photodiode array detector (spectral resolution 0.15 nm) was used. IR spectra were recorded with an FT-IR spectrometer (Bruker IFS-88, spectral resolution 1 cm -1). Absolute absorption cross sections and the instrument function are given for the UV, while for the IR, absorption cross sections and integrated band intensities are reported. The study focused primarily on the atmospherically relevant methylated benzenes (benzene, toluene, o-xylene, m-xylene, p-xylene, 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, ethylbenzene, styrene) and their ring retaining oxidation products (benzaldehyde, o-tolualdehyde, m-tolualdehyde, p-tolualdehyde, phenol, o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, 2,3-dimethylphenol, 2,4-dimethylphenol, 2,5-dimethylphenol, 2,6-dimethylphenol, 3,4-dimethylphenol, 3,5-dimethylphenol, 2,4,6-trimethylphenol and ( E,Z)- and ( E,E)-2,4-hexadienedial). The UV absorption cross sections reported here can be used for the evaluation of DOAS spectra (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) for measurements of the above compounds in the atmosphere and in reaction chambers, while the IR absorption cross sections will primarily be useful in laboratory studies on atmospheric chemistry, where FT-IR spectrometry is an important tool.

  17. Gas Phase Absorption Spectroscopy of C+60 and C+70 in a Cryogenic Ion Trap: Comparison with Astronomical Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, E. K.; Holz, M.; Maier, J. P.; Gerlich, D.; Walker, G. A. H.; Bohlender, D.

    2016-05-01

    Recent low-temperature laboratory measurements and astronomical observations have proved that the fullerene cation {{{C}}}60+ is responsible for four diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). These absorptions correspond to the strongest bands of the lowest electronic transition. The gas phase spectrum below 10 {{K}} is reported here for the full wavelength range encompassed by the electronic transition. The absorption spectrum of {{{C}}}70+, with its origin band at 7959.2 {{\\mathringA }}, has been obtained under similar laboratory conditions. Observations made toward the reddened star {HD} 183143 were used in a specific search for the absorption of these fullerene cations in diffuse clouds. In the case of {{{C}}}60+, one further band in the astronomical spectrum at 9348.5 \\mathringA is identified, increasing the total number of assigned DIBs to five. Numerous other {{{C}}}60+ absorptions in the laboratory spectrum are found to lie below the astronomical detection limit. Special emphasis is placed on the laboratory determination of absolute absorption cross-sections. For {{{C}}}60+ this directly yields a column density, N({{{C}}}60+), of 2× {10}13 {{{cm}}}-2 in diffuse clouds, without the need to rely on theoretical oscillator strengths. The intensity of the {{{C}}}70+ electronic transition in the range 7000–8000 Å is spread over many features of similar strength. Absorption cross-section measurements indicate that even for a similar column density, the individual absorption bands of {{{C}}}70+ will be too weak to be detected in the astronomical spectra, which is confirmed giving an upper limit of 2 {{m\\mathringA }} to the equivalent width. Based on observations obtained at the Canada‑France‑Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) which is operated by the National Research Council of Canada, the Institut National des Sciences de l’Univers of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique of France, and the University of Hawaii.

  18. High-power Ti:sapphire laser at 820 nm for scanning ground-based water-vapor differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Gerd; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker; Späth, Florian; Schiller, Max

    2013-04-10

    The Ti:sapphire (TISA) laser transmitter of the mobile, three-dimensional-scanning water-vapor differential absorption lidar (DIAL) of the University of Hohenheim is described in detail. The dynamically-stable, unidirectional ring resonator contains a single Brewster-cut TISA crystal, which is pumped from both sides with 250 Hz using a diode-pumped frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser. The resonator is injection seeded and actively frequency-stabilized using a phase-sensitive technique. The TISA laser is operating near 820 nm, which is optimum for ground-based water-vapor DIAL measurements. An average output power of up to 6.75 W with a beam quality factor of M2<2 is reached. The pointing stability is <13 μrad (rms), the depolarization <1%. The overall optical-optical conversion efficiency is up to 19%. The pulse length is 40 ns with a pulse linewidth of <157 MHz. The short- and long-term frequency stabilities are 10 MHz (rms). A spectral purity of 99.9% was determined by pointing to a stratus cloud in low-elevation scanning mode with a cloud bottom height of ≈2.4 km. PMID:23670775

  19. Huygens-Fresnel Wave-Optics Simulation of Atmosphere Optical Turbulence and Reflective Speckle in CO{sub 2} Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.H.; Petrin, R.R.; MacKerrow, E.P.; Schmitt, M.J.; Foy, B.R.; Koskelo, A.C.; McVey, B.D.; Quick, C.R.; Porch, W.M.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.; Archuleta, F.A.; Whitehead, M.C.; Walters, D.L.

    1999-03-23

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. We have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these process: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. In this work, we briefly review a description of our model including the limitations along with previous simulation s of individual effects. The performance of our modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements and show good agreement. In addition, advanced studies have been performed to demonstrate the utility of our model in assessing the effects for different lidar geometries on RMS noise and correlation ''size'' in the receiver plane.

  20. Huygens-Fresnel wave-optics simulation of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle in CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, D.; Petrin, R.; MacKerrow, E.; Schmitt, M.; Foy, B.; Koskelo, A.; McVey, B.; Quick, C.; Porch, W.; Fite, C.; Archuleta, F.; Whitehead, M.; Tiee, J.; Walters, D.

    1999-04-01

    The measurement sensitivity of CO{sub 2} differential absorption lidar (DIAL) can be affected by a number of different processes. The authors have previously developed a Huygens-Fresnel wave optics propagation code to simulate the effects of two of these processes: effects caused by beam propagation through atmospheric optical turbulence and effects caused by reflective speckle. Atmospheric optical turbulence affects the beam distribution of energy and phase on target. These effects include beam spreading, beam wander and scintillation which can result in increased shot-to-shot signal noise. In addition, reflective speckle alone has been shown to have a major impact on the sensitivity of CO{sub 2} DIAL. However, in real DIAL systems it is a combination of these phenomena, the interaction of atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle, that influences the results. The performance of the modified code with respect to experimental measurements affected by atmospheric optical turbulence and reflective speckle is examined. The results of computer simulations are directly compared with lidar measurements. The limitations of the model are also discussed. In addition, studies have been performed to determine the importance of key parameters in the simulation. The results of these studies and their impact on the overall results will be presented.

  1. Real-time monitoring of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene in a photoreaction chamber with a tunable mid-infrared laser and ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Parsons, Matthew T; Sydoryk, Ihor; Lim, Alan; McIntyre, Thomas J; Tulip, John; Jäger, Wolfgang; McDonald, Karen

    2011-02-01

    We describe the implementation of a mid-infrared laser-based trace gas sensor with a photoreaction chamber, used for reproducing chemical transformations of benzene, toluene, and p-xylene (BTX) gases that may occur in the atmosphere. The system performance was assessed in the presence of photoreaction products including aerosol particles. A mid-infrared external cavity quantum cascade laser (EC-QCL)-tunable from 9.41-9.88 μm (1012-1063 cm(-1))-was used to monitor gas phase concentrations of BTX simultaneously and in real time during chemical processing of these compounds with hydroxyl radicals in a photoreaction chamber. Results are compared to concurrent measurements using ultraviolet differential optical absorption spectroscopy (UV DOAS). The EC-QCL based system provides quantitation limits of approximately 200, 200, and 600 parts in 10(9) (ppb) for benzene, toluene, and p-xylene, respectively, which represents a significant improvement over our previous work with this laser system. Correspondingly, we observe the best agreement between the EC-QCL measurements and the UV DOAS measurements with benzene, followed by toluene, then p-xylene. Although BTX gas-detection limits are not as low for the EC-QCL system as for UV DOAS, an unidentified by-product of the photoreactions was observed with the EC-QCL, but not with the UV DOAS system. PMID:21283225

  2. Chromium speciation by solid phase extraction on Dowex M 4195 chelating resin and determination by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Saygi, Kadriye Ozlem; Tuzen, Mustafa; Soylak, Mustafa; Elci, Latif

    2008-05-30

    A solid phase extraction procedure has been established for chromium speciation in natural water samples prior to determination by atomic absorption spectrometry. The procedure is based on the solid phase extraction of the Cr(VI)- Dowex M 4195 chelating resin. After oxidation of Cr(III) to Cr(VI) by using H2O2, the presented method was applied to the determination of the total chromium. The level of Cr(III) is calculated by difference of total chromium and Cr(VI) levels. The procedure was optimized for some analytical parameters including pH, eluent type, flow rates of sample and eluent, matrix effects, etc. The presented method was applied for the speciation of chromium in natural water samples with satisfactory results (recoveries >95%, RSDs <10%). In the determinations of chromium species, flame atomic absorption spectrometer was used. The results were checked by using NIST SRM 2711 Montana soil and GBW 07603 Bush branched and leaves. PMID:17951001

  3. A note on the generation of phase plane plots on a digital computer. [for solution of nonlinear differential equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    A technique is presented for generating phase plane plots on a digital computer which circumvents the difficulties associated with more traditional methods of numerical solving nonlinear differential equations. In particular, the nonlinear differential equation of operation is formulated.

  4. Compact Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an airborne ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2001-02-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonics at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (b-BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5'5'20 mm3) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900nm and its third harmonics at 300nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30mJ at 300nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900nm to 300nm is 30%.

  5. Measurements of NO2, SO2, O3, benzene and toluene using differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Hao, Nan; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Dan; Sun, Yi; Gao, Song; Chen, Limin

    2006-01-01

    NO2, SO2, O3, benzene, and toluene were measured in Taopu industry park of Shanghai during the period June to August 2003 by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique. The daily average concentrations of SO2, NO2, and O3 ranged from 5.7 ppb to 40 ppb, 22 ppb to 123 ppb, and 10.6 ppb to 23 ppb respectively. SO2 and NO2 concentrations were found to depend on wind direction. The diurnal variation of NO2 concentrations had two peaks due to traffic emission. Our DOAS measurements of NO2, SO2 and O3 were compared with the conventional measurement instruments (API automatic monitoring instrument). The concept of a percent difference (PD) and linear regression methods were employed to study the difference between DOAS and API instruments. The correlation analysis between PD values and meteorological parameters and analysis of abnormal higher absolute PD values indicated that the lower visibility induced the bad compatibility between the two systems. The results showed that both systems exhibited strong compatibility with good correlation, therefore the DOAS system is able to provide reliable information on distribution patterns of major air pollutants. Average benzene and toluene concentrations were 1.4 and 8.0 ppb respectively. PMID:16948427

  6. Ground-based differential absorption lidar for water-vapor profiling: assessment of accuracy, resolution, and meteorological applications.

    PubMed

    Wulfmeyer, V; Bösenberg, J

    1998-06-20

    The accuracy and the resolution of water-vapor measurements by use of the ground-based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system of the Max-Planck-Institute (MPI) are determined. A theoretical analysis, intercomparisons with radiosondes, and measurements in high-altitude clouds allow the conclusion that, with the MPI DIAL system, water-vapor measurements with a systematic error of <5% in the whole troposphere can be performed. Special emphasis is laid on the outstanding daytime and nighttime performance of the DIAL system in the lower troposphere. With a time resolution of 1 min the statistical error varies between 0.05 g/m(3) in the near range using 75 m and-depending on the meteorological conditions-approximately 0.25 g/m(3) at 2 km using 150-m vertical resolution. When the eddy correlation method is applied, this accuracy and resolution are sufficient to determine water-vapor flux profiles in the convective boundary layer with a statistical error of <10% in each data point to approximately 1700 m. The results have contributed to the fact that the DIAL method has finally won recognition as an excellent tool for tropospheric research, in particular for boundary layer research and as a calibration standard for radiosondes and satellites. PMID:18273352

  7. First measurements of a carbon dioxide plume from an industrial source using a ground based mobile differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Robinson, R A; Gardiner, T D; Innocenti, F; Finlayson, A; Woods, P T; Few, J F M

    2014-08-01

    The emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) from industrial sources is one of the main anthropogenic contributors to the greenhouse effect. Direct remote sensing of CO2 emissions using optical methods offers the potential for the identification and quantification of CO2 emissions. We report the development and demonstration of a ground based mobile differential absorption lidar (DIAL) able to measure the mass emission rate of CO2 in the plume from a power station. To our knowledge DIAL has not previously been successfully applied to the measurement of emission plumes of CO2 from industrial sources. A significant challenge in observing industrial CO2 emission plumes is the ability to discriminate and observe localised concentrations of CO2 above the locally observed background level. The objectives of the study were to modify our existing mobile infrared DIAL system to enable CO2 measurements and to demonstrate the system at a power plant to assess the feasibility of the technique for the identification and quantification of CO2 emissions. The results of this preliminary study showed very good agreement with the expected emissions calculated by the site. The detection limit obtained from the measurements, however, requires further improvement to provide quantification of smaller emitters of CO2, for example for the detection of fugitive emissions. This study has shown that in principle, remote optical sensing technology will have the potential to provide useful direct data on CO2 mass emission rates. PMID:24933364

  8. Investigation of PBL schemes combining the WRF model simulations with scanning water vapor differential absorption lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milovac, Josipa; Warrach-Sagi, Kirsten; Behrendt, Andreas; Späth, Florian; Ingwersen, Joachim; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2016-01-01

    Six simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model differing in planetary boundary layer (PBL) schemes and land surface models (LSMs) are investigated in a case study in western Germany during clear-sky weather conditions. The simulations were performed at 2 km resolution with two local and two nonlocal PBL schemes, combined with two LSMs (NOAH and NOAH-MP). Resulting convective boundary layer (CBL) features are investigated in combination with high-resolution water vapor differential absorption lidar measurements at an experimental area. Further, the simulated soil-vegetation-atmosphere feedback processes are quantified applying a mixing diagram approach. The investigation shows that the nonlocal PBL schemes simulate a deeper and drier CBL than the local schemes. Furthermore, the application of different LSMs reveals that the entrainment of dry air depends on the energy partitioning at the land surface. The study demonstrates that the impact of processes occurring at the land surface is not constrained to the lower CBL but extends up to the interfacial layer and the lower troposphere. With respect to the choice of the LSM, the discrepancies in simulating a diurnal change of the humidity profiles are even more significant at the interfacial layer than close to the land surface. This indicates that the representation of land surface processes has a significant impact on the simulation of mixing properties within the CBL.

  9. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-04-13

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 degrees C and -15 degrees C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  10. [Studies on the remote measurement of the distribution of city gaseous pollutant by mobile passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Wu, Feng-cheng; Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-hua; Xu, Jin; Shi, Peng; Qin, Min; Wang, Man-hua; Wang, Jie; Zhang, Yong

    2011-03-01

    An optical remote sensing method based on passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy for the measurement of the distribution of city gaseous pollutant was studied. The passive DOAS system, which was installed in a car, successively measures the interested area (such as city, industrial area) and the column density was obtained by DOAS fitting process using the zenith scattered sunlight. The mobile DOAS was applied to measurement in Shenzhen City during the continuous six days and got the distribution of SO2, NO2 in this paper. It showed that the pollution in the west is higher than in the east. The average concentration in the west is 2.0 times higher than the eastern for SO2 and 3.6 times for NO2. And comparison of the values between mobile DOAS and the point instrument was carried out in Baguang site. There was an agreement between the two instruments, the correlation coefficient was 0.86 for SO2, while 0.57 for NO2. The results indicate that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS is an effective means of rapidly determining the distribution of city gaseous pollutant. PMID:21595196

  11. Observation of halogen species in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, by active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pöhler, Denis; Vogel, Leif; Frieß, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    In the polar tropospheric boundary layer, reactive halogen species (RHS) are responsible for ozone depletion as well as the oxidation of elemental mercury and dimethyl sulphide. After polar sunrise, air masses enriched in reactive bromine cover areas of several million square kilometers. Still, the source and release mechanisms of halogens are not completely understood. We report measurements of halogen oxides performed in the Amundsen Gulf, Arctic, during spring 2008. Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) measurements were set up offshore, several kilometers from the coast, directly on the sea ice, which was never done before. High bromine oxide concentrations were detected frequently during sunlight hours with a characteristic daily cycle showing morning and evening maxima and a minimum at noon. The, so far, highest observed average mixing ratio in the polar boundary layer of 41 pmol/mol (equal to pptv) was detected. Only short sea ice contact is required to release high amounts of bromine. An observed linear decrease of maximum bromine oxide levels with ambient temperature during sunlight, between -24 °C and -15 °C, provides indications on the conditions required for the emission of RHS. In addition, the data indicate the presence of reactive chlorine in the Arctic boundary layer. In contrast to Antarctica, iodine oxide was not detected above a detection limit of 0.3 pmol/mol. PMID:20160121

  12. Process for rapid detection of fratricidal defects on optics using Linescan Phase Differential Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ravizza, F L; Nostrand, M C; Kegelmeyer, L M; Hawley, R A; Johnson, M A

    2009-11-05

    Phase-defects on optics used in high-power lasers can cause light intensification leading to laser-induced damage of downstream optics. We introduce Linescan Phase Differential Imaging (LPDI), a large-area dark-field imaging technique able to identify phase-defects in the bulk or surface of large-aperture optics with a 67 second scan-time. Potential phase-defects in the LPDI images are indentified by an image analysis code and measured with a Phase Shifting Diffraction Interferometer (PSDI). The PSDI data is used to calculate the defects potential for downstream damage using an empirical laser-damage model that incorporates a laser propagation code. A ray tracing model of LPDI was developed to enhance our understanding of its phase-defect detection mechanism and reveal limitations.

  13. Non-interferometer Phase-differential Imaging Method with a Single Telescope Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    Non-interferometer phase-differential imaging method for direct imaging of the astronomical objects will be presented. The feasibility of non-interferometry method to retrieve the phase differential images of the astronomical objects is demonstrated in the laboratory experiments exploiting the two-dimensional Foucault knife-edge filtering method which is installed on a single telescope. The experiment setup is essentially analogous to the Schlieren imaging apparatus that can be taken images using an incoherent light source. The fractional derivation filtering by the two-dimensional knife-edge filter is developed in order to acquire the phase information of the object. The intensities of filtering images by the 2D knife-edge at several points along the optical axis of the telescope are substituted in the transport-intensity equation to obtain phase-differential images of the astronomical objects. Then the phase-differential images are obtained by two image intensities taken along the optical axis. In our experiment, a mono-directional scanning scheme of the 2DFK was exploited to reduce number of scan as well as increase the spatial resolution of images. An illuminated light out of a bundle of optical fibers as an artificial astronomical object is used our laboratory based experiment. The light from the each optical fibers in the fiber bundle that intensities have exiguously different or barely visible are represented the brightness of the astronomical objects. The experiment result, the phase contrast images, shows that barely identified object from an intensity based image has rendered almost equivalent contrast as the bright object. It represents that our proposed method can be recovered from phase difference of the object light that could not be identified from the intensity of objects brightness. The proposed method has a feature of render phase-differential images as well as compensates atmospheric turbulence with the setup mounting on a single-telescope. The

  14. Differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with segmented pulse trains

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hiroki; Inoue, Kyo

    2011-06-15

    We present a modified scheme of differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) for improving its performance. A transmitter sends a weak coherent pulse train segmented with vacant pulses. Then, a receiver can find eavesdropping by monitoring the photon detection rate at particular time slots. Simulations show that the proposed scheme is robust against a sequential attack and a general individual attack.

  15. Exact analysis of a balanced receiver for differential phase-shift keying signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Keang-Po

    2007-03-01

    The performance of differential phase-shift keying signals with a balanced receiver is exactly analyzed by using a closed-form expression without approximation. The numerical results are well matched with previous results based on the saddle-point approximation. The error probability is calculated exactly using the well-known Marcum Q function.

  16. Combined optical coherence phase microscopy and impedance sensing measurements of differentiating adipose derived stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnaninchi, P. O.

    2010-02-01

    There is a growing interest in monitoring differentiating stem cells in 2D culture without the use of labelling agents. In this study we explore the feasibility of a multimodality method that combines impedance sensing (IS) and optical coherence phase microscopy (OCPM) to monitor the main biological events associated with adipose derived stem cells differentiation into different lineages. Adipose derived stem cells were cultured in Mesenpro RS medium on gold electrode arrays. The system (ECIS, Applied biophysics) is connected to a lock-in amplifier controlled by a computer, and the complex impedance is derived from the in phase and out of phase voltages. Multi-frequency measurements spanning from 500Hz to 100 kHz are recorded every 2 minutes. The Optical coherence phase microscope is build around a Thorlabs engine (930nm FWHM: 90nm) and connected to a custom build microscope probe. The IS and OCPM were successfully integrated. The electrode area (250um) was imaged with a lateral resolution of 1.5um during impedance measurements. Impedance sensing gave an average measurement of differentiation, as a change in impedance over the electrode area, whereas OCPM provides additional information on the cellular events occurring on top of the electrode. The information retrieved from OCPM will feed a mathematical model correlating cellular differentiation and impedance variation. In this study we have demonstrated the feasibility of integrating two non-invasive monitoring techniques that will be instrumental in designing stem cell based screening assays.

  17. 3D Algebraic Iterative Reconstruction for Cone-Beam X-Ray Differential Phase-Contrast Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Jian; Hu, Xinhua; Velroyen, Astrid; Bech, Martin; Jiang, Ming; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-01-01

    Due to the potential of compact imaging systems with magnified spatial resolution and contrast, cone-beam x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) has attracted significant interest. The current proposed FDK reconstruction algorithm with the Hilbert imaginary filter will induce severe cone-beam artifacts when the cone-beam angle becomes large. In this paper, we propose an algebraic iterative reconstruction (AIR) method for cone-beam DPC-CT and report its experiment results. This approach considers the reconstruction process as the optimization of a discrete representation of the object function to satisfy a system of equations that describes the cone-beam DPC-CT imaging modality. Unlike the conventional iterative algorithms for absorption-based CT, it involves the derivative operation to the forward projections of the reconstructed intermediate image to take into account the differential nature of the DPC projections. This method is based on the algebraic reconstruction technique, reconstructs the image ray by ray, and is expected to provide better derivative estimates in iterations. This work comprises a numerical study of the algorithm and its experimental verification using a dataset measured with a three-grating interferometer and a mini-focus x-ray tube source. It is shown that the proposed method can reduce the cone-beam artifacts and performs better than FDK under large cone-beam angles. This algorithm is of interest for future cone-beam DPC-CT applications. PMID:25775480

  18. Imaging microscopy by phase-contrast engine: retardation-modulated differential interference contrast microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwata, Hiroshi; Itoh, Masahide

    2014-11-01

    In the field of biology and medicine, observation object of the microscope has been changing from the thin specimen to the thick living tissue. Furthermore, observation of the internal structure of a living tissue is also desired by low invasion. However, the real structure of a phase object with three-dimensional distribution such as a living tissue is difficult to observe, because of the influence of the phase distribution before and behind of observation position. We enabled observation of the internal structure of living tissue without stain, by adding a new function to reduce the influence of phase distribution to our Retardation-Modulated differential interference contrast (RM-DIC) microscope system.

  19. Preparation of Few-Layer Bismuth Selenide by Liquid-Phase-Exfoliation and Its Optical Absorption Properties

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Liping; Lin, Zhiqin; Peng, Jian; Weng, Jian; Huang, Yizhong; Luo, Zhengqian

    2014-01-01

    Bismuth selenide (Bi2Se3), a new topological insulator, has attracted much attention in recent years owing to its relatively simple band structure and large bulk band gap. Compared to bulk, few-layer Bi2Se3 is recently considered as a highly promising material. Here, we use a liquid-phase exfoliation method to prepare few-layer Bi2Se3 in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone or chitosan acetic solution. The resulted few-layer Bi2Se3 dispersion demonstrates an interesting absorption in the visible light region, which is different from bulk Bi2Se3 without any absorption in this region. The absorption spectrum of few-layer Bi2Se3 depends on its size and layer number. At the same time, the nonlinear and saturable absorption of few-layer Bi2Se3 thin film in near infrared is also characterized well and further exploited to generate laser pulses by a passive Q-switching technique. Stable Q-switched operation is achieved with a lower pump threshold of 9.3 mW at 974 nm, pulse energy of 39.8 nJ and a wide range of pulse-repetition-rate from 6.2 to 40.1 kHz. Therefore, the few-layer Bi2Se3 may excite a potential applications in laser photonics and optoelectronic devices. PMID:24762534

  20. Development of an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Carbon Dioxide Profilings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, W.; Repasky, K. S.; Nehrir, A. R.; Carlsten, J.

    2011-12-01

    A differential absorption lidar (DIAL) for monitoring carbon dioxide (CO2) is under development at Montana State University using commercially available parts. Two distributed feedback (DFB) lasers, one at the on-line wavelength and one at the off-line wavelength are used to injection seed a fiber amplifier. The DIAL operates in the 1.57 micron carbon dioxide absorption band at an on-line wavelength of 1.5714060 microns. The laser transmitter produces 40 μJ pulses with a pulse duration of 1 μs and a pulse repetition frequency of 20 kHz. The scattered light from the laser transmitter is collected using a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope. The light collected by the telescope is collimated and then filtered using a 0.8 nm FWHM narrowband interference filter. After the optical filter, the light is coupled into a multimode optical fiber with a 1000 μm core diameter. The output from the optical fiber is coupled into a photomultiplier tube (PMT) used to monitor the return signal. The analog output from the PMT is next incident on a discriminator producing TTL logic pulses for photon counting. The output from the PMT and discriminator is monitored using a multichannel scalar card allowing the counting of the TTL pulses as a function of range. Data from the DIAL instrument is collected in the following manner. The fiber amplifier is injection seeded first with the on-line DFB laser. The return signal as a function of range is integrated using the multichannel scalar for a user defined time, typically set at 6 s. The off-line DFB laser is then used to injection seed the fiber amplifier and the process is repeated. This process is repeated for a user defined period. The CO2 concentration as a function of range is calculated using the on-line and off-line return signals with the DIAL equation. A comparison of the CO2 concentration measured using the DIAL instrument at 1.5 km and a Li-Cor LI-820 in situ sensor located at 1.5 km from the DIAL over a 2.5 hour period

  1. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2012-02-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM: the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference-free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia for 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day, the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales, the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  2. Two instruments based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) to measure accurate ammonia concentrations in the atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volten, H.; Bergwerff, J. B.; Haaima, M.; Lolkema, D. E.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Potma, C. J. M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; van Pul, W. A. J.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2011-08-01

    We present two Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) instruments built at RIVM, the RIVM DOAS and the miniDOAS. Both instruments provide virtually interference free measurements of NH3 concentrations in the atmosphere, since they measure over an open path, without suffering from inlet problems or interference problems by ammonium aerosols dissociating on tubes or filters. They measure concentrations up to at least 200 μg m-3, have a fast response, low maintenance demands, and a high up-time. The RIVM DOAS has a high accuracy of typically 0.15 μg m-3 for ammonia over 5-min averages and over a total light path of 100 m. The miniDOAS has been developed for application in measurement networks such as the Dutch National Air Quality Monitoring Network (LML). Compared to the RIVM DOAS it has a similar accuracy, but is significantly reduced in size, costs, and handling complexity. The RIVM DOAS and miniDOAS results showed excellent agreement (R2 = 0.996) during a field measurement campaign in Vredepeel, the Netherlands. This measurement site is located in an agricultural area and is characterized by highly variable, but on average high ammonia concentrations in the air. The RIVM-DOAS and miniDOAS results were compared to the results of the AMOR instrument, a continuous-flow wet denuder system, which is currently used in the LML. Averaged over longer time spans of typically a day the (mini)DOAS and AMOR results agree reasonably well, although an offset of the AMOR values compared to the (mini)DOAS results exists. On short time scales the (mini)DOAS shows a faster response and does not show the memory effects due to inlet tubing and transport of absorption fluids encountered by the AMOR. Due to its high accuracy, high uptime, low maintenance and its open path, the (mini)DOAS shows a good potential for flux measurements by using two (or more) systems in a gradient set-up and applying the aerodynamic gradient technique.

  3. [Studies on the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutant from an area by passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Ang; Xie, Pin-Hua; Liu, Wen-Qing; Liu, Jian-Guo; Dou, Ke

    2009-01-01

    An optical remote sensing method based on passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) for the determination of the flux of SO2 or other gaseous pollutants from an area (such as industrial area, city) which includes many different atmospheric pollution sources was studied in the present paper. Passive DOAS using the zenith scattered sunlight as the light source provides the column density (the integrated concentration of atmospheric absorbers along the light path) and has been successfully applied to the determination of the flux of gaseous pollutants emitted from the volcano or point source. Passive DOAS instrument installed in a car scanned the plume emitted from an area by circling around the area in this paper. Column density of each selected gaseous pollutant was retrieved from zenith scattered sunlight spectra collected by the instrument by spectral analysis method of passive DOAS in their particular absorption spectral range respectively. Combined with the meteorological (wind field) information during the period of measurement, the net flux value of gaseous pollutant from this area during the measurement could be estimated. DOAS method used to obtain the column density of gaseous pollutant in the section plane of the plume emitted from source and the method of net flux calculation of gaseous pollutant from a certain area are described. Also a passive DOAS instrument was developed and installed in a car to scan the gaseous pollutants from the area surrounded by the 5th Ring Road in Beijing city during a field campaign in the summer of 2005. The SO2 net flux 1.13 x 10(4) kg x h(-1) and NO2 net flux 9.3 x 10(3) kg x h(-1) from this area were derived separately after the passive DOAS measured the entire ring road and the wind data were roughly estimated from wind profile radar. The results indicate that this optical remote sensing method based on passive DOAS can be used to rapidly determine the flux of gaseous pollutant (such as SO2, NO2

  4. Quantification and parametrization of non-linearity effects by higher-order sensitivity terms in scattered light differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puķīte, Jānis; Wagner, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    We address the application of differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) of scattered light observations in the presence of strong absorbers (in particular ozone), for which the absorption optical depth is a non-linear function of the trace gas concentration. This is the case because Beer-Lambert law generally does not hold for scattered light measurements due to many light paths contributing to the measurement. While in many cases linear approximation can be made, for scenarios with strong absorptions non-linear effects cannot always be neglected. This is especially the case for observation geometries, for which the light contributing to the measurement is crossing the atmosphere under spatially well-separated paths differing strongly in length and location, like in limb geometry. In these cases, often full retrieval algorithms are applied to address the non-linearities, requiring iterative forward modelling of absorption spectra involving time-consuming wavelength-by-wavelength radiative transfer modelling. In this study, we propose to describe the non-linear effects by additional sensitivity parameters that can be used e.g. to build up a lookup table. Together with widely used box air mass factors (effective light paths) describing the linear response to the increase in the trace gas amount, the higher-order sensitivity parameters eliminate the need for repeating the radiative transfer modelling when modifying the absorption scenario even in the presence of a strong absorption background. While the higher-order absorption structures can be described as separate fit parameters in the spectral analysis (so-called DOAS fit), in practice their quantitative evaluation requires good measurement quality (typically better than that available from current measurements). Therefore, we introduce an iterative retrieval algorithm correcting for the higher-order absorption structures not yet considered in the DOAS fit as well as the absorption dependence on

  5. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD

  6. Differential laser absorption spectrometry for global profiling of tropospheric carbon dioxide: selection of optimum sounding frequencies for high-precision measurements.

    PubMed

    Menzies, Robert T; Tratt, David M

    2003-11-20

    We discuss the spectroscopic requirements for a laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) approach to high-precision carbon dioxide (CO2) measurements in the troposphere. Global-scale, high-precision CO2 measurements are highly desirable in an effort to improve understanding and quantification of the CO2 sources and sinks and their impact on global climate. We present differential absorption sounding characteristics for selected LAS transmitter laser wavelengths, emphasizing the effects of atmospheric temperature profile uncertainties. Candidate wavelengths for lower-troposphere measurements are identified in the CO2 bands centered near 1.57, 1.60, and 2.06 microm. PMID:14658457

  7. Detection of metal vapour in the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch by resonance absorption of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Günter; Verleger, Jobst

    1996-03-01

    The electron emission mechanism which is active at the cathode of a pseudospark switch leads to thermal overloading of emission sites followed by the evaporation of cathode material. As a consequence, metal vapour should be present very shortly after the beginning of current flow. However, it has never been possible to observe metal vapour by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) prior to the cessation of current. In the present work resonance absorption of laser light was used to detect molybdenum vapour from the cathode during the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch. To observe the narrow-band absorption the laser light which had passed the switch was introduced into a molybdenum hollow cathode lamp where it caused fluorescence from molybdenum vapour. The intensity of the fluorescence light from the hollow cathode lamp was proportional to the intensity of the laser light left after the absorption process in the pseudospark. For a current amplitude of 12 kA and a pulse duration of 0022-3727/29/3/040/img1, it is shown that molybdenum vapour is definitely present shortly after the current maximum, well before the current stops flowing. The neutral vapour density in the high-current phase is estimated to amount to at least 0022-3727/29/3/040/img2. It is concluded that LIF fails to detect metal vapour prior to the cessation of current, mainly because the fluorescence process is severely disturbed by electronic collisions which deplete the upper fluorescence level.

  8. A tilted grating interferometer for full vector field differential x-ray phase contrast tomography.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Simon; Donath, Tilman; David, Christian; Pfeiffer, Franz; Marone, Federica; Modregger, Peter; Stampanoni, Marco

    2011-12-01

    We report on a setup for differential x-ray phase-contrast imaging and tomography, that measures the full 2D phase-gradient information. The setup uses a simple one-dimensional x-ray grating interferometer, in which the grating structures of the interferometer are oriented at a tilt angle with respect to the sample rotation axis. In such a configuration, the differential phase images from opposing tomography projections can be combined to yield both components of the gradient vector. We show how the refractive index distribution as well as its x, y, and z gradient components can be reconstructed directly from the recorded projection data. The method can equally well be applied at conventional x-ray tube sources, to analyzer based x-ray imaging or neutron imaging. It is demonstrated with measurements of an x-ray phantom and a rat brain using synchrotron radiation. PMID:22273882

  9. Aqueous glucose measurement using differential absorption-based frequency domain optical coherence tomography at wavelengths of 1310 nm and 1625 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Pauline; Manoj, Murali; Sujatha, N.; Vasa, Nilesh J.; Rao, Suresh R.

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a combination of differential absorption technique and frequency domain optical coherence tomography for detection of glucose, which is an important analyte in medical diagnosis of diabetes. Differential absorption technique is used to detect glucose selectively in the presence of interfering species especially water and frequency domain optical coherence tomography (FDOCT) helps to obtain faster acquisition of depth information. Two broadband super-luminescent diode (SLED) sources with centre wavelengths 1586 nm (wavelength range of 1540 to 1640 nm) and 1312 nm (wavelength range of 1240 to 1380 nm) and a spectral width of ≍ 60 nm (FWHM) are used. Preliminary studies on absorption spectroscopy using various concentrations of aqueous glucose solution gave promising results to distinguish the absorption characteristics of glucose at two wavelengths 1310 nm (outside the absorption band of glucose) and 1625 nm (within the absorption band of glucose). In order to mimic the optical properties of biological skin tissue, 2% and 10% of 20% intralipid with various concentrations of glucose (0 to 4000 mg/dL) was prepared and used as sample. Using OCT technique, interference spectra were obtained using an optical spectrum analyzer with a resolution of 0.5 nm. Further processing of the interference spectra provided information on reflections from the surfaces of the cuvette containing the aqueous glucose sample. Due to the absorption of glucose in the wavelength range of 1540 nm to 1640 nm, a trend of reduction in the intensity of the back reflected light was observed with increase in the concentration of glucose.

  10. Oxygen K-edge absorption spectra of small molecules in the gas phase

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, B.X.; Kirz, J.; Sham, T.K.

    1986-01-01

    The absorption spectra of O/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/ and OCS have been recorded in a transmission mode in the energy region from 500 to 950 eV. Recent observation of EXAFS in these molecules is confirmed in this study. 7 refs., 3 figs.

  11. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements using broadband cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) featuring a low cost webcam based prism spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Engstrom, Julia; Wong, Donald; Islam, Meez; Kaminski, Clemens F

    2013-11-01

    Cavity enhanced techniques enable high sensitivity absorption measurements in the liquid phase but are typically more complex, and much more expensive, to perform than conventional absorption methods. The latter attributes have so far prevented a wide spread use of these methods in the analytical sciences. In this study we demonstrate a novel BBCEAS instrument that is sensitive, yet simple and economical to set up and operate. We use a prism spectrometer with a low cost webcam as the detector in conjunction with an optical cavity consisting of two R = 0.99 dielectric mirrors and a white light LED source for illumination. High sensitivity liquid phase measurements were made on samples contained in 1 cm quartz cuvettes placed at normal incidence to the light beam in the optical cavity. The cavity enhancement factor (CEF) with water as the solvent was determined directly by phase shift cavity ring down spectroscopy (PS-CRDS) and also by calibration with Rhodamine 6G solutions. Both methods yielded closely matching CEF values of ~60. The minimum detectable change in absorption (αmin) was determined to be 6.5 × 10(-5) cm(-1) at 527 nm and was limited only by the 8 bit resolution of the particular webcam detector used, thus offering scope for further improvement. The instrument was used to make representative measurements on dye solutions and in the determination of nitrite concentrations in a variation of the widely used Griess Assay. Limits of detection (LOD) were ~850 pM for Rhodamine 6G and 3.7 nM for nitrite, respectively. The sensitivity of the instrument compares favourably with previous cavity based liquid phase studies whilst being achieved at a small fraction of the cost hitherto reported, thus opening the door to widespread use in the community. Further means of improving sensitivity are discussed in the paper. PMID:24049768

  12. A microsecond time resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure synchrotron study of phase transitions in Fe undergoing ramp heating at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, C.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Occelli, F.; Torchio, R.; Recoules, V.; Loubeyre, P.

    2014-03-07

    We report a microsecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure study using synchrotron radiation to dynamically detect structural phase transitions in Fe undergoing rapid heating along a quasi-isochoric path. Within a few ms, we observed two structural phase transitions, which transform the ambient bcc phase of Fe into the fcc phase, and then into the liquid phase. This example illustrates the opportunities offered by energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the study of matter under extreme dynamic conditions. Advanced simulations are compared to these data.

  13. Glutathionylation and Reduction of Methacrolein in Tomato Plants Account for Its Absorption from the Vapor Phase.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shoko; Matsubara, Yayoi; Mwenda, Cynthia Mugo; Koeduka, Takao; Sakami, Takuya; Tani, Akira; Matsui, Kenji

    2015-11-01

    A large portion of the volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are oxygenated to yield reactive carbonyl species, which have a big impact on atmospheric chemistry. Deposition to vegetation driven by the absorption of reactive carbonyl species into plants plays a major role in cleansing the atmosphere, but the mechanisms supporting this absorption have been little examined. Here, we performed model experiments using methacrolein (MACR), one of the major reactive carbonyl species formed from isoprene, and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Tomato shoots enclosed in a jar with MACR vapor efficiently absorbed MACR. The absorption efficiency was much higher than expected from the gas/liquid partition coefficient of MACR, indicating that MACR was likely metabolized in leaf tissues. Isobutyraldehyde, isobutyl alcohol, and methallyl alcohol (MAA) were detected in the headspace and inside tomato tissues treated with MACR vapor, suggesting that MACR was enzymatically reduced. Glutathione (GSH) conjugates of MACR (MACR-GSH) and MAA (MAA-GSH) were also detected. MACR-GSH was essentially formed through spontaneous conjugation between endogenous GSH and exogenous MACR, and reduction of MACR-GSH to MAA-GSH was likely catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent enzyme in tomato leaves. Glutathionylation was the metabolic pathway most responsible for the absorption of MACR, but when the amount of MACR exceeded the available GSH, MACR that accumulated reduced photosynthetic capacity. In an experiment simulating the natural environment using gas flow, MACR-GSH and MAA-GSH accumulation accounted for 30% to 40% of the MACR supplied. These results suggest that MACR metabolism, especially spontaneous glutathionylation, is an essential factor supporting MACR absorption from the atmosphere by tomato plants. PMID:26169680

  14. Climatology and Dynamics of Water Vapor: Three Years of Sounding with the Differential Absorption Lidar on Mt. Zugspitze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogelmann, Hannes; Trickl, Thomas

    2010-05-01

    Water vapor is the the most important greenhouse gas and its vertical distribution plays a major role for the radiative balance. In particular in the upper troposphere the radiative transfer is very sensitive to small changes of the water-vapor concentration. At the same time the water-vapor distribution strongly depends on atmospheric dynamics and, thus, can serve as a good tracer for airmass histories. In order to access water-vapor profiles with a high resolution in time (typically 15 min) and a high vertical resolution (50 m to 300 m) throughout the free troposphere (3 km to 12 km a.s.l.) a differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system with excellent daytime capability has been developed and installed at the Schneefernerhaus research station (UFS) on Mt. Zugspitze (Germany) at an altitude of 2675 m a.s.l. (Vogelmann and Trickl 2008). The DIAL system is in routine operation since January 2007 and recording water-vapor profiles on one or two days a week. We present results from the first three years of operation. A climatology is derived and different water-vapor profile-types are assigned to typical large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns as well as to local-scale circulation patterns for the lower altitudes, in particular in the summer season, when the orographic convection reaches altitudes higher than 3 km a.s.l.. Particular attention is spent on stratospheric air intrusion events, which exhibit a maximum at the Alpine summit levels during the winter season (Trickl et al., 2010). Based on daily intrusion forecast-model by ETH Zürich simultaneousmeasurements with the water-vapor DIAL and the ozone-lidar at Garmisch-Partenkirchen have been carried out. In combination also with the in-situ measurements at the Zugspitze summit several intrusions have been very well characterized. In one exciting case a large-scale stratospheric intrusion took place during a lidar intercomparison campaign (LUAMI 2008) with an airborne DIAL. The intrusion layer was mapped by

  15. Phase Transfer-Catalyzed Fast CO2 Absorption by MgO-Based Absorbents with High Cycling Capacity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Keling; Li, Xiaohong S.; Li, Weizhen; Rohatgi, Aashish; Duan, Yuhua; Singh, Prabhakar; Li, Liyu; King, David L.

    2014-06-01

    CO2 capture from pre-combustion syngas in the temperature range of 250-400°C is highly desirable from an energy efficiency perspective. Thermodynamically, MgO is a promising material for CO2 capture, but the gas-solid reaction to produce MgCO3 is kinetically slow due to high lattice energy. We report here fast CO2 absorption over a solid MgO-molten nitrate/nitrite aggregate through phase transfer catalysis, in which the molten phase serves as both a catalyst and reaction medium. Reaction with CO2 at the gas-solid-liquid triple phase boundary results in formation of MgCO3 with significant reaction rate and a high conversion of MgO. This methodology is also applicable to other alkaline earth oxides, inspiring the design of absorbents which require activation of the bulk material.

  16. Reverse micelles in supercritical fluids. (2) Fluorescence and absorption spectral probes of adjustable aggregation in the two-phase region

    SciTech Connect

    Yazdi, P.; McFann, G.J.; Fox, M.A.; Johnston, K.P. )

    1990-09-06

    The properties of bis(2-ethylhexyl) sodium sulfosuccinate (AOT) reverse micelles and microemulsions in supercritical fluid (SCF) ethane, liquid propane, and other alkanes are reported. The microscopic environment inside the reverse micelles was investigated with the absorption probe pyridine N-oxide and the fluorescence probe 8-anilino-1-naphthalenesulfonic acid (ANS). The microscopic behavior is related directly to a macroscopic property, the water-to-surfactant ratio W{sub o}. In the one-phase region, a reverse micelle in a SCF is much like that in a liquid solvent. However, in the two-phase region, both the microscopic and macroscopic properties may be adjusted with pressure in ethane and propane, because of changes in the partitioning of the components between the phases.

  17. Vibrationally Resolved Absorption and Fluorescence Spectra of Firefly Luciferin: A Theoretical Simulation in the Gas Phase and in Solution.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-Yuan; Liu, Ya-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Firefly bioluminescence has been applied in several fields. However, the absorption and fluorescence spectra of the substrate, luciferin, have not been observed at the vibrational level. In this study, the vibrationally resolved absorption and fluorescence spectra of firefly luciferin (neutral form LH2 , phenolate ion form LH(-) and dianion form L(2-) ) are simulated using the density functional method and convoluted by a Gaussian function, with displacement, distortion and Duschinsky effects in the framework of the Franck-Condon approximation. Both neutral and anionic forms of the luciferin are considered in the gas phase and in solution. The simulated spectra have desired band maxima with the experimental ones. The vibronic structure analysis reveals that the features of the most contributive vibrational modes coincide with the key geometry-changing region during transition between the ground state and the first singlet excited state. PMID:27165852

  18. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10/sup -3/ cm/sup -1/. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 x 10/sup -6/ cm/sup -1/.

  19. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1984-05-08

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect have been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical path length of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10[sup [minus]3] cm[sup [minus]1]. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5 [times] 10[sup [minus]6] cm[sup [minus]1]. 6 figs.

  20. Apparatus and method for quantitative measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity between two samples using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, David A.; Keller, Richard A.

    1984-01-01

    An apparatus and method for the measurement of small differences in optical absorptivity of weakly absorbing solutions using differential interferometry and the thermooptic effect has been developed. Two sample cells are placed in each arm of an interferometer and are traversed by colinear probe and heating laser beams. The interrogation probe beams are recombined forming a fringe pattern, the intensity of which can be related to changes in optical pathlength of these laser beams through the cells. This in turn can be related to small differences in optical absorptivity which results in different amounts of sample heating when the heating laser beams are turned on, by the fact that the index of refraction of a liquid is temperature dependent. A critical feature of this invention is the stabilization of the optical path of the probe beams against drift. Background (solvent) absorption can then be suppressed by a factor of approximately 400. Solute absorptivities of about 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 can then be determined in the presence of background absorptions in excess of 10.sup.-3 cm.sup.-1. In addition, the smallest absorption measured with the instant apparatus and method is about 5.times. 10.sup.-6 cm.sup.-1.

  1. 315mJ, 2-micrometers Double-Pulsed Coherent Differential Absorption Lidar Transmitter for Atmospheric CO2 Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Jirong; Trieu, Bo; Bai, Yingxin; Koch, Grady; Chen, Songsheng; Petzar, Paul; Singh, Upendra N.; Kavaya, Michael J.; Beyon, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    The design of a double pulsed, injection seeded, 2-micrometer compact coherent Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) transmitter for CO2 sensing is presented. This system is hardened for ground and airborne applications. The design architecture includes three continuous wave lasers which provide controlled on and off line seeding, injection seeded power oscillator and a single amplifier operating in double pass configuration. As the derivative a coherent Doppler wind lidar, this instrument has the added benefit of providing wind information. The active laser material used for this application is a Ho: Tm:YLF crystal operates at the eye-safe wavelength. The 3-meter long folded ring resonator produces energy of 130-mJ (90/40) with a temporal pulse length around 220 nanoseconds and 530 nanosecond pulses for on and off lines respectively. The separation between the two pulses is on the order of 200 microseconds. The line width is in the order of 2.5MHz and the beam quality has an M(sup 2) of 1.1 times diffraction limited beam. A final output energy for a pair of both on and off pulses as high as 315 mJ (190/125) at a repetition rate of 10 Hz is achieved. The operating temperature is set around 20 C for the pump diode lasers and 10 C for the rod. Since the laser design has to meet high-energy as well as high beam quality requirements, close attention is paid to the laser head design to avoid thermal distortion in the rod. A side-pumped configuration is used and heat is removed uniformly by passing coolant through a tube slightly larger than the rod to reduce thermal gradient. This paper also discusses the advantage of using a long upper laser level life time laser crystal for DIAL application. In addition issues related to injection seeding with two different frequencies to achieve a transform limited line width will be presented.

  2. Development of a portable active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy system for volcanic gas measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vita, Fabio; Kern, Christoph; Inguaggiato, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Active long-path differential optical absorption spectroscopy (LP-DOAS) has been an effective tool for measuring atmospheric trace gases for several decades. However, instruments were large, heavy and power-inefficient, making their application to remote environments extremely challenging. Recent developments in fibre-coupling telescope technology and the availability of ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDS) have now allowed us to design and construct a lightweight, portable, low-power LP-DOAS instrument for use at remote locations and specifically for measuring degassing from active volcanic systems. The LP-DOAS was used to measure sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions from La Fossa crater, Vulcano, Italy, where column densities of up to 1.2 × 1018 molec cm−2 (~ 500 ppmm) were detected along open paths of up to 400 m in total length. The instrument's SO2 detection limit was determined to be 2 × 1016 molec cm−2 (~ 8 ppmm), thereby making quantitative detection of even trace amounts of SO2 possible. The instrument is capable of measuring other volcanic volatile species as well. Though the spectral evaluation of the recorded data showed that chlorine monoxide (ClO) and carbon disulfide (CS2) were both below the instrument's detection limits during the experiment, the upper limits for the X / SO2 ratio (X = ClO, CS2) could be derived, and yielded 2 × 10−3 and 0.1, respectively. The robust design and versatility of the instrument make it a promising tool for monitoring of volcanic degassing and understanding processes in a range of volcanic systems.

  3. Measurement of atmospheric ammonia at a dairy using differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the mid-ultraviolet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, George H.; Rumburg, Brian; Havig, Jeff; Lamb, Brian; Westberg, Hal; Yonge, David; Johnson, Kristen; Kincaid, Ronald

    Ammonia is the most abundant basic gas in the atmosphere, and after N 2 and N 2O is the most abundant nitrogen-containing specie (Seinfeld and Pandis, 1998. Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics: from air pollution to climate changes. Wiley, New York). Typical concentrations of ammonia in the boundary layer range from <1 part per billion by volume (ppbv) in the free continental troposphere to parts per million (ppmv) levels over animal waste lagoons and near animal stalls. Agricultural activities are the dominant global source of ammonia emissions and a major environmental concern. In the US, ≈85% of ammonia emissions come from livestock operations (EPA Trends, 1998. www.epa.gov/ttn/chief/trends98/chapter2.pdf). Dairy farms constitute a large fraction of the livestock inventory. Current estimates of ammonia emissions to the atmosphere are characterized by a high degree of uncertainty, and so it is very important to obtain better estimates of ammonia emissions. We are working at the Washington State University research dairy to quantify ammonia emissions and investigate the effects of various mitigation strategies on those emissions. We describe here a new instrument utilizing the differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) technique to measure ammonia in the mid-ultraviolet with a detectability limit of about 1 ppb. DOAS avoids many of the problems that have thwarted past ammonia concentration measurements. Initial results show concentrations in the barn/concrete yard areas in the tens of parts per million range, over the slurry lagoons of hundreds of parts per billion to low parts per million, and low parts per million levels after initial slurry applications onto pastureland. Future papers will report on emission fluxes from the various parts of the dairy and the results of mitigation strategies; we show here initial data results. For a recent review of ammonia volatilization from dairy farms, see Bussink and Oenema (Nutrient Cycling in Agroecosystems 51

  4. The proteomics of quiescent and nonquiescent cell differentiation in yeast stationary-phase cultures.

    PubMed

    Davidson, George S; Joe, Ray M; Roy, Sushmita; Meirelles, Osorio; Allen, Chris P; Wilson, Melissa R; Tapia, Phillip H; Manzanilla, Elaine E; Dodson, Anne E; Chakraborty, Swagata; Carter, Mark; Young, Susan; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    As yeast cultures enter stationary phase in rich, glucose-based medium, differentiation of two major subpopulations of cells, termed quiescent and nonquiescent, is observed. Differences in mRNA abundance between exponentially growing and stationary-phase cultures and quiescent and nonquiescent cells are known, but little was known about protein abundance in these cells. To measure protein abundance in exponential and stationary-phase cultures, the yeast GFP-fusion library (4159 strains) was examined during exponential and stationary phases, using high-throughput flow cytometry (HyperCyt). Approximately 5% of proteins in the library showed twofold or greater changes in median fluorescence intensity (abundance) between the two conditions. We examined 38 strains exhibiting two distinct fluorescence-intensity peaks in stationary phase and determined that the two fluorescence peaks distinguished quiescent and nonquiescent cells, the two major subpopulations of cells in stationary-phase cultures. GFP-fusion proteins in this group were more abundant in quiescent cells, and half were involved in mitochondrial function, consistent with the sixfold increase in respiration observed in quiescent cells and the relative absence of Cit1p:GFP in nonquiescent cells. Finally, examination of quiescent cell-specific GFP-fusion proteins revealed symmetry in protein accumulation in dividing quiescent and nonquiescent cells after glucose exhaustion, leading to a new model for the differentiation of these cells. PMID:21289090

  5. The proteomics of quiescent and nonquiescent cell differentiation in yeast stationary-phase cultures

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, George S.; Joe, Ray M.; Roy, Sushmita; Meirelles, Osorio; Allen, Chris P.; Wilson, Melissa R.; Tapia, Phillip H.; Manzanilla, Elaine E.; Dodson, Anne E.; Chakraborty, Swagata; Carter, Mark; Young, Susan; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    As yeast cultures enter stationary phase in rich, glucose-based medium, differentiation of two major subpopulations of cells, termed quiescent and nonquiescent, is observed. Differences in mRNA abundance between exponentially growing and stationary-phase cultures and quiescent and nonquiescent cells are known, but little was known about protein abundance in these cells. To measure protein abundance in exponential and stationary-phase cultures, the yeast GFP-fusion library (4159 strains) was examined during exponential and stationary phases, using high-throughput flow cytometry (HyperCyt). Approximately 5% of proteins in the library showed twofold or greater changes in median fluorescence intensity (abundance) between the two conditions. We examined 38 strains exhibiting two distinct fluorescence-intensity peaks in stationary phase and determined that the two fluorescence peaks distinguished quiescent and nonquiescent cells, the two major subpopulations of cells in stationary-phase cultures. GFP-fusion proteins in this group were more abundant in quiescent cells, and half were involved in mitochondrial function, consistent with the sixfold increase in respiration observed in quiescent cells and the relative absence of Cit1p:GFP in nonquiescent cells. Finally, examination of quiescent cell–specific GFP-fusion proteins revealed symmetry in protein accumulation in dividing quiescent and nonquiescent cells after glucose exhaustion, leading to a new model for the differentiation of these cells. PMID:21289090

  6. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features.

    PubMed

    Cina, Jeffrey A; Kovac, Philip A; Jumper, Chanelle C; Dean, Jacob C; Scholes, Gregory D

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done. PMID:27155654

  7. Ultrafast transient absorption revisited: Phase-flips, spectral fingers, and other dynamical features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cina, Jeffrey A.; Kovac, Philip A.; Jumper, Chanelle C.; Dean, Jacob C.; Scholes, Gregory D.

    2016-05-01

    We rebuild the theory of ultrafast transient-absorption/transmission spectroscopy starting from the optical response of an individual molecule to incident femtosecond pump and probe pulses. The resulting description makes use of pulse propagators and free molecular evolution operators to arrive at compact expressions for the several contributions to a transient-absorption signal. In this alternative description, which is physically equivalent to the conventional response-function formalism, these signal contributions are conveniently expressed as quantum mechanical overlaps between nuclear wave packets that have undergone different sequences of pulse-driven optical transitions and time-evolution on different electronic potential-energy surfaces. Using this setup in application to a simple, multimode model of the light-harvesting chromophores of PC577, we develop wave-packet pictures of certain generic features of ultrafast transient-absorption signals related to the probed-frequency dependence of vibrational quantum beats. These include a Stokes-shifting node at the time-evolving peak emission frequency, antiphasing between vibrational oscillations on opposite sides (i.e., to the red or blue) of this node, and spectral fingering due to vibrational overtones and combinations. Our calculations make a vibrationally abrupt approximation for the incident pump and probe pulses, but properly account for temporal pulse overlap and signal turn-on, rather than neglecting pulse overlap or assuming delta-function excitations, as are sometimes done.

  8. Cu2ZnSnS4 absorption layers with controlled phase purity

    PubMed Central

    Su, Chia-Ying; -Yen Chiu, Chiu; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) with controlled phase purity. The precursor was first prepared using sequential electrodeposition of Cu, Zn, and Sn in different orders. The Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio in each stacking order was also varied. The precursor was subjected to annealing at 200°C and sulfurization at 500°C in a 5%-H2S/Ar atmosphere for the formation of CZTS. The phase evolutions during the electrodeposition and annealing stages, and the final phase formation at the sulfurization stage were examined using both x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy, both of which are shown to be complimentary tools for phase identification. Detailed growth path is therefore reported. We also demonstrate by controlling the stacking order and the Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio, CZTS with a phase purity as high as 93% is obtained. PMID:25801219

  9. Cu2ZnSnS4 absorption layers with controlled phase purity.

    PubMed

    Su, Chia-Ying; Chiu, Chiu-Yen; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) with controlled phase purity. The precursor was first prepared using sequential electrodeposition of Cu, Zn, and Sn in different orders. The Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio in each stacking order was also varied. The precursor was subjected to annealing at 200°C and sulfurization at 500°C in a 5%-H2S/Ar atmosphere for the formation of CZTS. The phase evolutions during the electrodeposition and annealing stages, and the final phase formation at the sulfurization stage were examined using both x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy, both of which are shown to be complimentary tools for phase identification. Detailed growth path is therefore reported. We also demonstrate by controlling the stacking order and the Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio, CZTS with a phase purity as high as 93% is obtained. PMID:25801219

  10. Cu2ZnSnS4 absorption layers with controlled phase purity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Chia-Ying; -Yen Chiu, Chiu; Ting, Jyh-Ming

    2015-03-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) with controlled phase purity. The precursor was first prepared using sequential electrodeposition of Cu, Zn, and Sn in different orders. The Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio in each stacking order was also varied. The precursor was subjected to annealing at 200°C and sulfurization at 500°C in a 5%-H2S/Ar atmosphere for the formation of CZTS. The phase evolutions during the electrodeposition and annealing stages, and the final phase formation at the sulfurization stage were examined using both x-ray diffractometry and Raman spectroscopy, both of which are shown to be complimentary tools for phase identification. Detailed growth path is therefore reported. We also demonstrate by controlling the stacking order and the Cu/(Sn+Zn) ratio, CZTS with a phase purity as high as 93% is obtained.

  11. Performance investigation of a hospital-grade x-ray tube-based differential phase-contrast cone beam CT system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yang; Ning, Ruola; Cai, Weixing; Liu, Jiangkun; Conover, David

    2012-03-01

    Differential phase contrast technique could be the next breakthrough in the field of CT imaging. While traditional absorption-based X-ray CT imaging is inefficient at differentiating soft tissues, phase-contrast technique offers great advantage as being able to produce higher contrast images utilizing the phase information of objects. Our long term goal is to develop a gantry-based hospital-grade X-ray tube differential phase contrast cone-beam CT (DPC-CBCT) technology which is able to achieve higher contrast noise ratio (CNR) in soft tissue imaging without increasing the dose level. Based on the micro-focus system built last year, a bench-top hospital-grade X-ray tube DPC-CBCT system is designed and constructed. The DPC-CBCT system consists of an X-ray source, i.e. a hospital-grade X-ray tube and a source grating, a high-resolution detector, a rotating phantom holder, a phase grating and an analyzer grating. Threedimensional (3-D) phase-coefficients are reconstructed, providing us with images enjoying higher CNR than, yet equivalent dose level to, a conventional CBCT scan. Three important aspects of the system are investigated: a) The The system's performance in term of CNR of the reconstruction image with regard to dose levels, b) the impacts of different phase stepping schemes, i.e. 5 steps to 8 steps, in term of CNR on the reconstruction images, and c) the influence of magnification or position of the phantom on image quality, chiefly CNR. The investigations are accomplished via phantom study.

  12. Size-isolation of ultrasound-mediated phase change perfluorocarbon droplets using differential centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Karla P; Radhakrishnan, Kirthi; Stewart, Kyle; Snider, Lindsay; Ryan, Devin; Haworth, Kevin J

    2016-05-01

    Perfluorocarbon droplets that are capable of an ultrasound-mediated phase transition have applications in diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound. Techniques to modify the droplet size distribution are of interest because of the size-dependent acoustic response of the droplets. Differential centrifugation has been used to isolate specific sizes of microbubbles. In this work, differential centrifugation was employed to isolate droplets with diameters between 1 and 3 μm and 2 and 5 μm from an initially polydisperse distribution. Further, an empirical model was developed for predicting the droplet size distribution following differential centrifugation and to facilitate the selection of centrifugation parameters for obtaining desired size distributions. PMID:27250199

  13. Iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed laminography from differential phase measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harasse, Sébastien; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2011-08-01

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed laminography is demonstrated for the volume reconstruction of extended flat objects, not suitable to the usual tomographic scan. Using a Talbot interferometer, differential phase measurements are obtained and used to reconstruct the real part of the complex refractive index. The specific geometry of laminography leads to unsampled frequencies in a double cone in the reciprocal space, which degrades the spatial resolution in the direction normal to the object plane. First, the filtered backprojection formula from differential measurements is derived. Then, reconstruction is improved by the use of prior information of compact support and limited range, included in an iterative filtered backprojection algorithm. An implementation on GPU hardware was required to handle the reconstruction of volumes within a reasonable time. A synchrotron radiation experiment on polymer meshes is reported and results of the iterative reconstruction are compared with the simpler filtered backprojection.

  14. Iterative reconstruction in x-ray computed laminography from differential phase measurements.

    PubMed

    Harasse, Sébastien; Yashiro, Wataru; Momose, Atsushi

    2011-08-15

    Phase-contrast X-ray computed laminography is demonstrated for the volume reconstruction of extended flat objects, not suitable to the usual tomographic scan. Using a Talbot interferometer, differential phase measurements are obtained and used to reconstruct the real part of the complex refractive index. The specific geometry of laminography leads to unsampled frequencies in a double cone in the reciprocal space, which degrades the spatial resolution in the direction normal to the object plane. First, the filtered backprojection formula from differential measurements is derived. Then, reconstruction is improved by the use of prior information of compact support and limited range, included in an iterative filtered backprojection algorithm. An implementation on GPU hardware was required to handle the reconstruction of volumes within a reasonable time. A synchrotron radiation experiment on polymer meshes is reported and results of the iterative reconstruction are compared with the simpler filtered backprojection. PMID:21935020

  15. Analysis of structure and phase composition of rails subjected to differential hardening at different regimes

    SciTech Connect

    Gromov, V. E. Morozov, K. V. Konovalov, S. V.; Alsaraeva, K. V.; Semina, O. A.; Ivanov, Yu. F.; Volkov, K. V.

    2014-11-14

    Differential hardening of rails by compressed air in different regimes is accompanied by formation of morphologically different structure, being formed according to the diffusion mechanism of γ↔α transformation and consisting of grains of lamellar pearlite, free ferrite and grains of ferrite-carbide mixture. By methods of transmission electron microscopy the layer by layer analysis of differentially hardened rails has been carried out, the quantitative parameters of the structure, phase composition and dislocation substructure have been established and their comparison has been made for different regimes of hardening. It has been found that the structure-phase states being formed have gradient character, defined by the hardening regime, direction of study from the surface of rolling and by depth of location of layer under study.

  16. Hemocyte differentiation mediates the mosquito late-phase immune response against Plasmodium in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Ryan C.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium parasites must complete development in the mosquito vector for transmission to occur. The mosquito innate immune response is remarkably efficient in limiting parasite numbers. Previous work has identified a LPS-induced TNFα transcription factor (LITAF)-like transcription factor, LITAF-like 3 (LL3), which significantly influences parasite numbers. Here, we demonstrate that LL3 does not influence invasion of the mosquito midgut epithelium or ookinete-to-oocyst differentiation but mediates a late-phase immune response that decreases oocyst survival. LL3 expression in the midgut and hemocytes is activated by ookinete midgut invasion and is independent of the mosquito microbiota, suggesting that LL3 may be a component of a wound-healing response. LL3 silencing abrogates the ability of mosquito hemocytes to differentiate and respond to parasite infection, implicating hemocytes as critical modulators of the late-phase immune response. PMID:26080400

  17. Hemocyte differentiation mediates the mosquito late-phase immune response against Plasmodium in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Smith, Ryan C; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2015-06-30

    Plasmodium parasites must complete development in the mosquito vector for transmission to occur. The mosquito innate immune response is remarkably efficient in limiting parasite numbers. Previous work has identified a LPS-induced TNFα transcription factor (LITAF)-like transcription factor, LITAF-like 3 (LL3), which significantly influences parasite numbers. Here, we demonstrate that LL3 does not influence invasion of the mosquito midgut epithelium or ookinete-to-oocyst differentiation but mediates a late-phase immune response that decreases oocyst survival. LL3 expression in the midgut and hemocytes is activated by ookinete midgut invasion and is independent of the mosquito microbiota, suggesting that LL3 may be a component of a wound-healing response. LL3 silencing abrogates the ability of mosquito hemocytes to differentiate and respond to parasite infection, implicating hemocytes as critical modulators of the late-phase immune response. PMID:26080400

  18. Absorption and decomposition of ozone in a three-phase split-rectangular airlift reactor under ultrasonic irradiation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yin; Zhong, Xin; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ozone absorption was investigated in a three-phase split-rectangular airlift reactor under ultrasonic irradiation using γ-Al2O3 as catalyst. The reactor consisted of a square column (50 × 50 mm) with the height of 120 mm, divided into a riser and a downcomer by a baffle, 50 mm in width, 4 mm in thickness and 50 mm in total height. An absorption kinetic model was proposed to determine the volumetric mass transfer coefficient of ozone kLaA. The results showed that kLaA increased from 0.409 to 0.712 min(-1) as power density rose from 27.2 to 100.3 W L(-1), comparing with 0.242 min(-1) in the absence of ultrasonic irradiation. The increase in gas flow rate and catalyst loading also favored the increase of kLaA. The degassing effect due to ultrasonic irradiation could be ignored in the ozone absorption process. PMID:27120632

  19. X–ray absorption, phase and dark–field tomography through a beam tracking approach

    PubMed Central

    Vittoria, Fabio A.; Endrizzi, Marco; Diemoz, Paul C.; Zamir, Anna; Wagner, Ulrich H.; Rau, Christoph; Robinson, Ian K.; Olivo, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    We present a development of the beam–tracking approach that allows its implementation in computed tomography. One absorbing mask placed before the sample and a high resolution detector are used to track variations in the beam intensity distribution caused by the sample. Absorption, refraction, and dark–field are retrieved through a multi–Gaussian interpolation of the beam. Standard filtered back projection is used to reconstruct three dimensional maps of the real and imaginary part of the refractive index, and of the dark–field signal. While the method is here demonstrated using synchrotron radiation, its low coherence requirements suggest a possible implementation with laboratory sources. PMID:26541117

  20. ``Plug and play'' quantum key distribution system with differential phase shift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chunyuan; Wu, Guang; Chen, Xiuliang; Zeng, Heping

    2003-09-01

    We propose a "plug and play" scheme for the long-distance fiber-based cryptosystem based on the differential phase shift quantum key distribution, where any birefringence effects and polarization-dependent losses in the transmission fiber are automatically compensated by using a Faraday mirror. This system not only has stable performance but also creates keys 8/3 times more efficiently than the conventional cryptosystem based on the BB84 protocol.

  1. Development of a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar for Atmospheric CO2 Concentration Measurement by Direct Detection Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, J.; Singh, U. N.; Petros, M.; Bai, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a 2-micron Pulsed Differential Absorption Lidar instrument for ground and airborne measurements via direct detection method. This instrument will provide an alternate approach to measure atmospheric CO2 concentrations with significant advantages. A high energy pulsed approach provides high-precision measurement capbility by having high signal-to-noise level and unambiguously eliminates the contamination from aerosols and clouds that can bias the IPDA measurement. A key component of the CO2 DIAL system, transceiver, is an existing, airborne ready, robust hardware which can provide 250mJ at 10Hz with double pulse format specifically designed for DIAL instrument. The exact wavelengths of the transceiver are controlled by well defined CW seed laser source to provide the required injection source for generating on-and-off line wavelength pulses sequentially. The compact, rugged, highly reliable transceiver is based on the unique Ho:Tm:YLF high-energy 2-micron pulsed laser technology. All the optical mounts are custom designed and have space heritage. They are designed to be adjustable and lockable and hardened to withstand vibrations that can occur in airborne operation. For the direct detection lidar application, a large primary mirror size is preferred. A 14 inch diameter telescope will be developed for this program. The CO2 DIAL/IPDA system requires many electronic functions to operate. These include diode, RF, seed laser, and PZT drivers; injection seeding detection and control; detector power supplies; and analog inputs to sample various sensors. Under NASA Laser Risk Reduction Program (LRRP), a control unit Compact Laser Electronics (CLE), is developed for the controlling the coherent wind lidar transceiver. Significant modifications and additions are needed to update it for CO2 lidar controls. The data acquisition system was built for ground CO2 measurement demonstration. The software will be updated for

  2. Improving the Current Understanding of the Evolution and Vertical Processes of Tropospheric Ozone Using a Ground Based Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, John T.

    Although characterizing the interactions of ozone throughout the entire troposphere are important for health and climate processes, there is a lack of routine measurements of vertical profiles within the United States. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) has been developed and validated within the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet). Two scientifically interesting ozone episodes are presented that were observed during the 2014 Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER AQ) campaign at Ft. Collins, Colorado. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL measurements are analyzed alongside aircraft spirals over the lidar site, co-located ozonesonde launches, aerosol lidar profiles and other TOLNet ozone lidar profiles. In both case studies, back trajectories, meteorological maps, and comparisons to air quality models are presented to better explain the sources and evolution of ozone. The first case study, occurring between 22-23 July 2014, indicates enhanced concentrations of ozone at Ft. Collins during nighttime hours, which was due to the complex recirculation of ozone within the foothills of the Rocky Mountain region. Although quantifying the ozone increase aloft during recirculation episodes has been historically difficult, results indicate that an increase of 20 - 30 ppbv of ozone at the Ft. Collins site has been attributed to this recirculation. The second case, occurring between Aug 4-8th 2014, characterizes a dynamical exchange of ozone between the stratosphere and the troposphere. This case, along with seasonal model parameters from previous years, is used to estimate

  3. Transport-of-intensity phase imaging using Savitzky-Golay differentiation filter--theory and applications.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Chao; Chen, Qian; Yu, Yingjie; Asundi, Anand

    2013-03-11

    Several existing strategies for estimating the axial intensity derivative in the transport-of-intensity equation (TIE) from multiple intensity measurements have been unified by the Savitzky-Golay differentiation filter--an equivalent convolution solution for differentiation estimation by least-squares polynomial fitting. The different viewpoint from the digital filter in signal processing not only provides great insight into the behaviors, the shortcomings, and the performance of these existing intensity derivative estimation algorithms, but more important, it also suggests a new way of improving solution strategies by extending the applications of Savitzky-Golay differentiation filter in TIE. Two novel methods for phase retrieval based on TIE are presented--the first by introducing adaptive-degree strategy in spatial domain and the second by selecting optimal spatial frequencies in Fourier domain. Numerical simulations and experiments verify that the second method outperforms the existing methods significantly, showing reliable retrieved phase with both overall contrast and fine phase variations well preserved. PMID:23482106

  4. Human volunteer study on the inhalational and dermal absorption of N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) from the vapour phase.

    PubMed

    Bader, Michael; Wrbitzky, Renate; Blaszkewicz, Meinolf; Schäper, Michael; van Thriel, Christoph

    2008-01-01

    N-Methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) is a versatile organic solvent frequently used for surface cleaning such as paint stripping or graffiti removal. Liquid NMP is rapidly absorbed through the skin but dermal vapour phase absorption might also play an important role for the uptake of the solvent. This particular aspect was investigated in an experimental study with 16 volunteers exposed to 80 mg/m(3) NMP for 8 h under either whole-body, i.e. inhalational plus dermal, or dermal-only conditions. Additionally, the influence of moderate physical workload on the uptake of NMP was studied. The urinary concentrations of NMP and its metabolites 5-hydroxy-N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (5-HNMP) and 2-hydroxy-N-methylsuccinimide (2-HMSI) were followed for 48 h and analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Percutaneous uptake delayed the elimination peak times and the apparent biological half-lives of NMP and 5-HNMP. Under resting conditions, dermal-only exposure resulted in the elimination of 71 +/- 8 mg NMP equivalents as compared to 169 +/- 15 mg for whole-body exposure. Moderate workload yielded 79 +/- 8 mg NMP (dermal-only) and 238 +/- 18 mg (whole-body). Thus, dermal absorption from the vapour phase may contribute significantly to the total uptake of NMP, e.g. from workplace atmospheres. As the concentration of airborne NMP does not reflect the body dose, biomonitoring should be carried out for surveillance purposes. PMID:17721780

  5. Tunable Picosecond Laser Pulses via the Contrast of Two Reverse Saturable Absorption Phases in a Waveguide Platform.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yang; Chen, Lianwei; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yanxue; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Hong, Minghui; Chen, Feng

    2016-01-01

    How to enhance the optical nonlinearity of saturable absorption materials is an important question to improve the functionality of various applications ranging from the high power laser to photonic computational devices. We demonstrate the saturable absorption (SA) of VO2 film attributed to the large difference of optical nonlinearities between the two states of the phase-transition materials (VO2). Such VO2 film demonstrated significantly improved performance with saturation intensity higher than other existing ultrathin saturable absorbers by 3 orders due to its unique nonlinear optical mechanisms in the ultrafast phase change process. Owing to this feature, a Q-switched pulsed laser was fabricated in a waveguide platform, which is the first time to achieve picosecond pulse duration and maintain high peak power. Furthermore, the emission of this VO2 waveguide laser can be flexibly switched between the continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed operation regimes by tuning the temperature of the VO2 film, which enables VO2-based miniature laser devices with unique and versatile functions. PMID:27188594

  6. Tunable Picosecond Laser Pulses via the Contrast of Two Reverse Saturable Absorption Phases in a Waveguide Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yang; Chen, Lianwei; Wang, Dong; Chen, Yanxue; Akhmadaliev, Shavkat; Zhou, Shengqiang; Hong, Minghui; Chen, Feng

    2016-05-01

    How to enhance the optical nonlinearity of saturable absorption materials is an important question to improve the functionality of various applications ranging from the high power laser to photonic computational devices. We demonstrate the saturable absorption (SA) of VO2 film attributed to the large difference of optical nonlinearities between the two states of the phase-transition materials (VO2). Such VO2 film demonstrated significantly improved performance with saturation intensity higher than other existing ultrathin saturable absorbers by 3 orders due to its unique nonlinear optical mechanisms in the ultrafast phase change process. Owing to this feature, a Q-switched pulsed laser was fabricated in a waveguide platform, which is the first time to achieve picosecond pulse duration and maintain high peak power. Furthermore, the emission of this VO2 waveguide laser can be flexibly switched between the continuous-wave (CW) and pulsed operation regimes by tuning the temperature of the VO2 film, which enables VO2-based miniature laser devices with unique and versatile functions.

  7. A new image reconstruction method to improve noise properties in x-ray differential phase contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ke; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-03-01

    The noise properties of differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT) demonstrate some peculiar features. It has been both theoretically and experimentally demonstrated that the noise variance of DPC-CT scales with spatial resolution following an inverse first order relationship. This is in stark contrast to absorption CT, where the noise variance scales with spatial resolution following an inverse third power. In addition to the scaling relationship, the noise power spectrum (NPS) of DPC-CT is dominated by low spatial frequencies and demonstrates a singular behavior when approaching zero frequency. This focuses the peak noise power within low spatial frequencies while high-frequency noise is suppressed. This is again in contrast to the absorption CT case where the NPS smoothly transitions to zero at zero frequency. The singular behavior of the DPC-CT NPS visually affects image noise texture and may hinder observer perception. In this paper, a method is proposed to improve the noise properties in DPC-CT and potentially improve observer performance. Specifically, the low frequency component of the filtering kernel used in reconstruction has been regularized to modify the noise power at low spatial frequencies. This results in a high-pass filtering of the image. The high-pass filtered image is combined with the original image to generate the final image. As a result of these two operations, the noise power is shifted to the high spatial frequency direction, improving visual perception, while image reconstruction accuracy is maintained. Experimental phantom results are presented to validate the proposed method.

  8. The effects and inhibition of frequency offset on differential phase-shift keying detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hao; Zhou, Jing; Su, Shaojing; Pan, Zhongming

    2015-10-01

    Differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) has been widely implemented and developed in high-speed optical communication systems. The low error rate detection at high access rate is one of the considerable issues in practical engineering application. Balanced detection based on fiber Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer (MZDI) is the typical optical DPSK signal detecting method. It requires that the free spectrum range (FSR) of the MZDI equals the reciprocal of symbol period of the DPSK signal. For the reasons of ambient temperature variation and nonlinear phase noise, a dynamic frequency offset always exists between the FSR and the reciprocal of symbol period. That may introduce some optical signal-to-noise ratio (OSNR) costs and fault detections. Therefore, it is significant to inhibit the frequency offset on DPSK detection. In this paper, firstly, we discuss the effects of frequency offset on DPSK detection, and realize the conclusion that frequency offset is virtually equivalent to an additional phase difference between adjacent symbols. Secondly, through simulation, we analyze the feasibility of DPSK detection in the presence of a definite range of frequency offset, and present the quantitative computation of effective coverage, duty cycle, and optimal sampling time of symbol interference. Some issues which should be considered in practical implementation are also discussed. Finally, according to the relationship among phase difference, temperature and voltage, we propose a phase difference compensation scheme which can automatically adjust the voltage for optimal detections, and dynamically track the changing of ambient temperature and nonlinear phase noise. Furthermore, we ascertain the performance of the voltage requested for implementing the scheme. The scheme can be also developed to quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) and differential QPSK (DQPSK) modulation situations.

  9. Differential roles of P-glycoprotein, multidrug resistance-associated protein 2, and CYP3A on saquinavir oral absorption in Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Usansky, Helen H; Hu, Peidi; Sinko, Patrick J

    2008-05-01

    The objective of this investigation was to differentiate the roles of P-glycoprotein (Pgp), multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 (Mrp2), and CYP3A on saquinavir (SQV) oral absorption. With use of single-pass jejunal perfusion (in situ) and portal vein-cannulated rats (in vivo), SQV absorption was studied under chemical inhibition of Pgp [N-(4-[2-(1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-6,7-dimethoxy-2 isoquinolinyl)-ethyl]-phenyl)-9,10-dihydro-5-methoxy-9-oxo-4-acridine carboxamide (GF120918)], Mrp2 [(3-(((3-(2-(7-chloro-2-quinolinyl)-(E)-ethenyl)phenyl) ((3-(dimethylamino-3-oxopropyl)thio)methyl)-thio) propanoic acid (MK571)], and/or CYP3A (midazolam). Plasma concentrations of SQV and related metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. When given alone, SQV absorption was extremely low both in situ (F(a) = 0.07%) and in vivo [C(max) = 0.068 microg/ml; area under the curve (AUC) = 6.8 microg x min/ml]. Coadministration of GF120918 boosted SQV absorption by more than 20-fold with decreased variation in AUCs (percent coefficient of variation = 30% versus 100%). In contrast, coadministration of MK571 or midazolam increased SQV absorption only 2- to 3-fold without improving the variation in AUCs. SQV oral absorption was not further improved when it was given with GF120918 and midazolam or with GF120918 and MK571. The current results provide, for the first time, direct and explicit evidence that the low oral absorption of SQV is controlled by a secretory transporter, Pgp, and not by limited passive diffusion owing to its poor physicochemical properties. Pgp-mediated transport is also responsible for the highly variable oral bioavailability of SQV. In contrast, intestinal Mrp2 and intestinal CYP3A appear to play minor roles in SQV oral bioavailability. Given the differential and complex roles of Pgp and CYP3A in SQV oral absorption, the optimization of AIDS boosting regimens requires careful consideration to avoid therapy-limiting drug-drug transporter

  10. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  11. Recent developments on techniques for differential phase imaging at the medical beamline of ELETTRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arfelli, F.; Pelliccia, D.; Cedola, A.; Astolfo, A.; Bukreeva, I.; Cardarelli, P.; Dreossi, D.; Lagomarsino, S.; Longo, R.; Rigon, L.; Sodini, N.; Menk, R. H.

    2013-06-01

    Over the last decade different phase contrast approaches have been exploited at the medical beamline SYRMEP of the synchrotron radiation facility Elettra in Trieste, Italy. In particular special focus has been drawn to analyzer based imaging and the associated imaging theory and processing. Analyzer based Imaging (ABI) and Diffraction Enhanced Imaging (DEI) techniques have been successfully applied in several biomedical applications. Recently it has been suggested to translate the acquired knowledge in this field towards a Thomson Backscattering Source (TBS), which is presently under development at the Frascati National Laboratories of INFN (Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare) in Rome, Italy. Such source is capable of producing intense and quasi-monochromatic hard X-ray beams. For the technical implementation of biomedical phase imaging at the TBS a grating interferometer for differential phase contrast imaging has been designed and successfully tested at SYRMEP beamline.

  12. Multiple wall-reflection effect in adaptive-array differential-phase reflectometry on QUEST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Idei, H.; Mishra, K.; Yamamoto, M. K.; Fujisawa, A.; Nagashima, Y.; Hamasaki, M.; Hayashi, Y.; Onchi, T.; Hanada, K.; Zushi, H.; QUEST Team

    2016-01-01

    A phased array antenna and Software-Defined Radio (SDR) heterodyne-detection systems have been developed for adaptive array approaches in reflectometry on the QUEST. In the QUEST device considered as a large oversized cavity, standing wave (multiple wall-reflection) effect was significantly observed with distorted amplitude and phase evolution even if the adaptive array analyses were applied. The distorted fields were analyzed by Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) in wavenumber domain to treat separately the components with and without wall reflections. The differential phase evolution was properly obtained from the distorted field evolution by the FFT procedures. A frequency derivative method has been proposed to overcome the multiple-wall reflection effect, and SDR super-heterodyned components with small frequency difference for the derivative method were correctly obtained using the FFT analysis.

  13. Investigation of discrete imaging models and iterative image reconstruction in differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sidky, Emil Y.; Pan, Xiaochuan; Stampanoni, Marco; Modregger, Peter; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Differential X-ray phase-contrast tomography (DPCT) refers to a class of promising methods for reconstructing the X-ray refractive index distribution of materials that present weak X-ray absorption contrast. The tomographic projection data in DPCT, from which an estimate of the refractive index distribution is reconstructed, correspond to one-dimensional (1D) derivatives of the two-dimensional (2D) Radon transform of the refractive index distribution. There is an important need for the development of iterative image reconstruction methods for DPCT that can yield useful images from few-view projection data, thereby mitigating the long data-acquisition times and large radiation doses associated with use of analytic reconstruction methods. In this work, we analyze the numerical and statistical properties of two classes of discrete imaging models that form the basis for iterative image reconstruction in DPCT. We also investigate the use of one of the models with a modern image reconstruction algorithm for performing few-view image reconstruction of a tissue specimen. PMID:22565698

  14. Sensitivity analysis of a mixed-phase chemical mechanism using automatic differentiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Y.; Easter, R.C.

    1998-08-01

    A sensitivity analysis of a comprehensive mixed-phase chemical mechanism is conducted under a variety of atmospheric conditions. The local sensitivities of gas and aqueous phase species concentrations with respect to a variety of model parameters are calculated using the novel automatic differentiation ADIFOR tool. The main chemical reaction pathways in all phases, interfacial mass transfer processes, and ambient physical parameters that affect tropospheric O{sub 3} formation and O{sub 3}-precursor relations under all modeled conditions are identified and analyzed. The results show that the presence of clouds not only reduces many gas phase species concentrations and the total oxidizing capacity but alters O{sub 3}-precursor relations. Decreases in gas phase concentrations and photochemical formation rates of O{sub 3} can be up to 9{percent} and 100{percent}, respectively, depending on the preexisting atmospheric conditions. The decrease in O{sub 3} formation is primarily caused by the aqueous phase reactions of O{sub 2}{sup {minus}} with dissolved HO{sub 2} and O{sub 3} under most cloudy conditions. {copyright} 1998 American Geophysical Union

  15. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. II. Stellar parameters of rotating stars from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hadjara, M.; Domiciano de Souza, A.; Vakili, F.; Jankov, S.; Millour, F.; Meilland, A.; Khorrami, Z.; Chelli, A.; Baffa, C.; Hofmann, K.-H.; Lagarde, S.; Robbe-Dubois, S.

    2014-09-01

    Context. As previously demonstrated on Achernar, one can derive the angular radius, rotational velocity, axis tilt, and orientation of a fast-rotating star from the differential phases obtained by spectrally resolved long baseline interferometry using earth-rotation synthesis. Aims: We applied this method on a small sample of stars for different spectral types and classes, in order to generalize the technique to other rotating stars across the H-R diagram and determine their fundamental parameters. Methods: We used differential phase data from the AMBER/VLTI instrument obtained prior to refurbishing its spectrometer in 2010. With the exception of Fomalhaut, which has been observed in the medium-resolution mode of AMBER (λ/δλ ≈ 1500), our three other targets, Achernar, Altair, and δ Aquilae offered high-resolution (λ/δλ ≈ 12 000) spectro-interferometric data around the Brγ absorption line in K band. These data were used to constrain the input parameters of an analytical, still realistic model to interpret the observations with a systematic approach for the error budget analysis in order to robustly conclude on the physics of our 4 targets. We applied the super resolution provided by differential phases φdiff to measure the size (equatorial radius Req and angular diameter ⌀eq), the equatorial rotation velocity (Veq), the inclination angle (i), and the rotation axis position angle (PArot) of 4 fast-rotating stars: Achernar, Altair, δ Aquilae, and Fomalhaut. The stellar parameters of the targets were constrained using a semi-analytical algorithm dedicated to fast rotators SCIROCCO. Results: The derived parameters for each star were Req = 11.2 ± 0.5 R⊙, Veqsini = 290 ± 17 km s-1, PArot = 35.4° ± 1.4°, for Achernar; Req = 2.0 ± 0.2 R⊙, Veqsini = 226 ± 34 km s-1, PArot = -65.5° ± 5.5°, for Altair; Req = 2.2 ± 0.3 R⊙, Veqsini = 74 ± 35 km s-1, PArot = -101.2° ± 14°, for δ Aquilae; and Req = 1.8 ± 0.2 R⊙, Veqsini = 93 ± 16 km s-1

  16. Ultrafast all-optical temporal differentiation in integrated phase-shifted Bragg gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutkowska, Katarzyna A.; Duchesne, David; Strain, Michael J.; Azana, José; Morandotti, Roberto; Sorel, Marc

    2010-12-01

    All-optical communications and data processing exemplifies an important alternative to overcome the speed and bandwidth limitations imposed by electronics. Specifically, practical implementation of analog operations, including optical temporal differentiation, is fundamental for future ultrafast signal processing and computing networks. In addition, the development of fully integrated systems that allow on-single-chip operations is of significant interest. In this work we report the design, fabrication tolerances and first experimental demonstration of an integrated, ultrafast differentiator based on π-phase-shifted Bragg gratings. By using deeply-sidewall-etched Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) ridged waveguides, first-order optical differentiation has been achieved on sub-millimeters length scales, reaching THz processing speeds. The proposed device has numerous potential applications, including all-optical, analog solving of differential equations (important for virtual modeling of scientific phenomena)1, data processing and analysis2, as well as for the generation of Hermite-Gaussian waveforms (used for arbitrary optical coding and decoding)3.

  17. Shape of the absorption and fluorescence spectra of condensed phases and transition energies.

    PubMed

    Lagos, Miguel; Paredes, Rodrigo

    2014-11-13

    General integral expressions for the temperature-dependent profile of the spectral lines of photon absorption and emission by atomic or molecular species in a condensed environment are derived with no other hypothesis than: (a) The acoustic vibrational modes of the condensed host medium constitute the thermodynamic energy reservoir at a given constant temperature, and local electronic transitions modifying the equilibrium configuration of the surroundings are multiphonon events, regardless of the magnitude of the transition energy. (b) Electron-phonon coupling is linear in the variations of the bond length. The purpose is to develop a theoretical tool for the analysis of the spectra, allowing us to grasp highly accurate information from fitting the theoretical line shape function to experiment, including those spectra displaying wide features. The method is illustrated by applying it to two dyes, Lucifer Yellow CH and Coumarin 1, which display fluorescence maxima of 0.41 and 0.51 eV fwhm. Fitting the theoretical curves to the spectra indicates that the neat excitation energies are 2.58 eV ± 2.5% and 3.00 eV ± 2.0%, respectively. PMID:25321927

  18. Utility of opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging in differentiating sarcoma from benign bone lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kenneally, Barry E.; Gutowski, Christina J.; Reynolds, Alan W.; Morrison, William B.; Abraham, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the utility of opposed-phase magnetic resonance imaging (OP MRI) in differentiating malignant from benign bone lesions. Materials and methods MRI scans of musculoskeletal lesions including opposed-phase imaging sequences were reviewed by both an experienced musculoskeletal attending radiologist, and a second year radiology resident. The change in signal from IP to OP images was measured. The reviewers' evaluation of the lesions based on T1 and T2-weighted images was compared to their evaluation with inclusion of the OP sequences. Results Twenty-seven lesions in bone were analyzed: 4 malignant primary bone lesions, 3 malignant soft tissue lesions to bone, 3 metastases from visceral malignancies, and 17 benign bone lesions. Benign lesions of bone dropped in signal on OP imaging by an average of 37.1%. Five of the benign lesions decreased in signal by less than 20%, and two increased. Malignant bone lesions dropped in signal by an average of 0.69% with one of the ten lesions showing a greater than 20% drop. When OP sequences were included, concern for malignancy decreased in benign lesions and increased in malignant lesions, for both the resident and attending. Compared with standard MRI, inclusion of these sequences increased the overall confidence in diagnosis for both reviewers. Conclusion Opposed-phase imaging is helpful in differentiating benign from malignant lesions in bone. Confidence in diagnosis rose for both the attending and the resident as result of the inclusion of OP sequences. PMID:26730359

  19. Phase noise in oscillators as differential-algebraic systems with colored noise sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Alper

    2004-05-01

    Oscillators are key components of many kinds of systems, particularly electronic and opto-electronic systems. Undesired perturbations, i.e. noise, in practical systems adversely affect the spectral and timing properties of the signals generated by oscillators resulting in phase noise and timing jitter, which are key performance limiting factors, being major contributors to bit-error-rate (BER) of RF and possibly optical communication systems, and creating synchronization problems in clocked and sampled-data electronic systems. In this paper, we review our work on the theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of differential-algebraic equations (DAEs) with white and colored noise sources. The bulk of the work reviewed in this paper first appeared in [1], then in [2] and [3]. Prior to the work mentioned above, we developed a theory and numerical methods for nonlinear perturbation and noise analysis of oscillators described by a system of ordinary differential equations (ODEs) with white noise sources only [4, 5]. In this paper, we also discuss some open problems and issues in the modeling and analysis of phase noise both in free running oscillators and in phase/injection-locked ones.

  20. Differential Evolution Based Ascent Phase Trajectory Optimization for a Hypersonic Vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giri, Ritwik; Ghose, D.

    In this paper, a new method for the numerical computation of optimal, or nearly optimal, solutions to aerospace trajectory problems is presented. Differential Evolution (DE), a powerful stochastic real-parameter optimization algorithm is used to optimize the ascent phase of a hypersonic vehicle. The vehicle has to undergo large changes in altitude and associated aerodynamic conditions. As a result, its aerodynamic characteristics, as well as its propulsion parameters, undergo drastic changes. Such trajectory optimization problems can be solved by converting it to a non-linear programming (NLP) problem. One of the issues in the NLP method is that it requires a fairly large number of grid points to arrive at an optimal solution. Differential Evolution based algorithm, proposed in this paper, is shown to perform equally well with lesser number of grid points. This is supported by extensive simulation results.

  1. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  2. Development of 3.0-3.45 μm OPO laser based range resolved and hard-target differential absorption lidar for sensing of atmospheric methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veerabuthiran, S.; Razdan, A. K.; Jindal, M. K.; Sharma, R. K.; Sagar, Vikas

    2015-10-01

    We have developed a tripod mounted 3.0-3.45 μm OPO laser based differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system for sensing of atmospheric methane. The system operates with Nd: YAG laser pumped OPO laser, a 20 cm aperture telescope and a pan-tilt system to scan the atmosphere. Atmospheric transmission spectra over the entire spectral region are measured and indentified the absorption region of the various molecules in comparison with HITRAN. The backscattered signal for range resolved and hard target configuration up to a range of 400 m are measured with range resolution of 15 m. The stable daytime measurements of methane concentration varied from 1.9 ppm to 2.4 ppm with rms deviation of 0.2 ppm have been achieved. The measured concentration is in good agreement with reported values.

  3. Temperature Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy (tidas) and Simplified Atmospheric Air Mass Factor (samf) Techniques For The Measurement of Ozone Vertical Content From Gome Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zehner, C.; Casadio, S.; di Sarra, A.; Putz, E.

    A simple technique for the fast retrieval of ozone vertical amount from GOME (Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment) spectra is described in detail. The TIDAS (Tempera- ture Independent Differential Absorption Spectroscopy) technique uses GOME's ca- pability of measuring atmospheric spectra over a broad wavelength range with high spectral resolution. The ozone slant columns are retrieved by applying the Beer- Lambert law to two spectral windows where the ozone absorption cross sections show similar temperature dependence. A simple geometric air mass factor is computed for a fixed height spherical atmosphere (SAMF: Simplified Atmospheric air Mass Factor) to retrieve ozone vertical amounts. Vertical ozone values are compared to the GDP (GOME Data Processor), and to ground based ozone measurements.

  4. Spin relaxation measurements using first-harmonic out-of-phase absorption EPR signals: rotational motion effects.

    PubMed

    Livshits, V A; Marsh, D

    2000-07-01

    A recent survey of nonlinear continuous-wave (CW) EPR methods revealed that the first-harmonic absorption EPR signal, detected 90 degrees out of phase with respect to the Zeeman modulation (V(1)(')-EPR), is the most appropriate for determining spin-lattice relaxation enhancements of spin labels (V. A. Livshits, T. Páli, and D. Marsh, 1998, J. Magn. Reson. 134, 113-123). The sensitivity of such V(1)(')-EPR spectra to molecular rotational motion is investigated here by spectral simulations for nitroxyl spin labels, over the entire range of rotational correlation times. Determination of the effective spin-lattice relaxation times is less dependent on rotational mobility than for other nonlinear CW EPR methods, especially at a Zeeman modulation frequency of 25 kHz which is particularly appropriate for spin labels. This relative insensitivity to molecular motion further enhances the usefulness of the V(1)(')-EPR method. Calibrations of the out-of-phase to in-phase spectral intensity (and amplitude) ratios are given as a function of spin-lattice relaxation time, for the full range of spin-label rotational correlation times. Experimental measurements on spin labels in the slow, intermediate, and fast motional regimes of molecular rotation are used to test and validate the method. PMID:10873499

  5. Lead Is Not Off Center in PbTe: The Importance of r-Space Phase Information in Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keiber, T.; Bridges, F.; Sales, B. C.

    2013-08-01

    PbTe is a well-known thermoelectric material. Recent x-ray total scattering studies suggest that Pb moves off center along 100 in PbTe, by ˜0.2Å at 300 K, producing a split Pb-Te pair distribution. We present an extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) study of PbTe (and Tl doped PbTe) to determine if Pb or Te is off center. EXAFS provides sensitive r- or k-space phase information which can differentiate between a split peak for the Pb-Te distribution (indicative of off-center Pb) and a thermally broadened peak. We find no evidence for a split peak for Pb-Te or Te-Pb. At 300 K, the vibration amplitude for Pb-Te (or Te-Pb) is large; this thermally induced disorder is indicative of weak bonds, and the large disorder is consistent with the low thermal conductivity at 300 K. We also find evidence of an anharmonic potential for the nearest Pb-Te bonds, consistent with the overall anharmonicity found for the phonon modes. This effect is modeled by a “skew” factor (C3) which significantly improves the fit of the Pb-Te and Te-Pb peaks for the high temperature EXAFS data; C3 becomes significant above approximately 150-200 K. The consequences of these results will be discussed.

  6. A Low Phase Noise Fully Monolithic 6 GHz Differential Coupled NMOS LC-VCO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moalla, Dorra Mellouli; Cordeau, David; Mnif, Hassene; Paillot, Jean-Marie; Loulou, Mourad

    2016-01-01

    A fully monolithic 6 GHz low-phase noise Voltage-Controlled-Oscillator (VCO) is presented in this paper. It consists in two LC-NMOS differential VCOs coupled through a resistive network and is implemented on a 0.25 µm BiCMOS SiGe process. This proposed integrated VCO can be used also for phased-array applications to steer the beam over the entire spatial range. In this case, the radiation pattern of the phased antenna array is steered in a particular direction by establishing a constant phase progression in the oscillator chain which can be obtained by detuning the free-running frequencies of the two oscillators in the array. At 2.5 V power supply voltage and a power dissipation of 62.5 mW, the coupled VCO array features a measured worst case phase noise of -102.4 dBc/Hz and -125.64 dBc/Hz at 100 kHz and 1 MHz frequency offset respectively from a 6 GHz carrier. The tuning range is about 400 MHz, from 5.85 to 6.25 GHz, for a tuning voltage varying from 0 to 2.5 V.

  7. Investigating the radio-loud phase of broad absorption line quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruni, G.; González-Serrano, J. I.; Pedani, M.; Benn, C. R.; Mack, K.-H.; Holt, J.; Montenegro-Montes, F. M.; Jiménez-Luján, F.

    2014-09-01

    Context. Broad absorption lines (BALs) are present in the spectra of ~20% of quasars (QSOs); this indicates fast outflows (up to 0.2c) that intercept the observer's line of sight. These QSOs can be distinguished again into radio-loud (RL) BAL QSOs and radio-quiet (RQ) BAL QSOs. The first are very rare, even four times less common than RQ BAL QSOs. The reason for this is still unclear and leaves open questions about the nature of the BAL-producing outflows and their connection with the radio jet. Aims: We explored the spectroscopic characteristics of RL and RQ BAL QSOs with the aim to find a possible explanation for the rarity of RL BAL QSOs. Methods: We identified two samples of genuine BAL QSOs from SDSS optical spectra, one RL and one RQ, in a suitable redshift interval (2.5 < z < 3.5) that allowed us to observe the Mg ii and Hβ emission lines in the adjacent near-infrared (NIR) band. We collected NIR spectra of the two samples using the Telescopio Nazionale Galileo (TNG, Canary Islands). By using relations known in the literature, we estimated the black-hole mass, the broad-line region radius, and the Eddington ratio of our objects and compared the two samples. Results: We found no statistically significant differences from comparing the distributions of the cited physical quantities. This indicates that they have similar geometries, accretion rates, and central black-hole masses, regardless of whether the radio-emitting jet is present or not. Conclusions: These results show that the central engine of BAL QSOs has the same physical properties with and without a radio jet. The reasons for the rarity of RL BAL QSOs must reside in different environmental or evolutionary variables. Figure 3 is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  8. Mapping biological composition through quantitative phase and absorption X-ray ptychography.

    PubMed

    Jones, Michael W M; Elgass, Kirstin; Junker, Mark D; Luu, Mac B; Ryan, Michael T; Peele, Andrew G; van Riessen, Grant A

    2014-01-01

    Isolating compositional information in biological X-ray imaging can be problematic as such information is conflated with thickness and density variations when viewing in projection through a sample. We demonstrate an effective method for identifying variations in material composition by simultaneously using the quantitative phase and magnitude images provided through soft X-ray ptychography. Using this approach we show significantly increased contrast and improved reliability of the identification of intracellular features from uncharacterised samples. While demonstrated for X-ray ptychography, this method is immediately applicable to electron and optical microscopy methods where the complex transmission function of the sample is recovered. PMID:25348877

  9. On detector linearity and precision of beam shift detection for quantitative differential phase contrast applications.

    PubMed

    Zweck, Josef; Schwarzhuber, Felix; Wild, Johannes; Galioit, Vincent

    2016-09-01

    Differential phase contrast is a STEM imaging mode where minute sideways deflections of the electron probe are monitored, usually by using a position sensitive device (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Lohr et al., 2012 [2]) or, alternatively in some cases, a fast camera (Müller et al., 2012 [3,4]; Yang et al., 2015 [5]; Pennycook et al., 2015 [6]) as a pixelated detector. While traditionally differential phase contrast electron microscopy was mainly focused on investigations of micro-magnetic domain structures and their specific features, such as domain wall widths, etc. (Chapman, 1984 [1]; Chapman et al., 1978, 1981, 1985 [7-9]; Sannomiya et al., 2004 [10]), its usage has recently been extended to mesoscopic (Lohr et al., 2012, 2016 [2,12]; Bauer et al., 2014 [11]; Shibata et al., 2015 [13]) and nano-scale electric fields (Shibata et al., 2012 [14]; Mueller et al., 2014 [15]). In this paper, the various interactions which can cause a beam deflection are reviewed and expanded by two so far undiscussed mechanisms which may be important for biological applications. As differential phase contrast microscopy strongly depends on the ability to detect minute beam deflections we first treat the linearity problem for an annular four quadrant detector and then determine the factors which limit the minimum measurable deflection angle, such as S/N ratio, current density, dwell time and detector geometry. Knowing these factors enables the experimenter to optimize the set-up for optimum performance of the microscope and to get a clear figure for the achievable field resolution error margins. PMID:27376783

  10. Thiazide-sensitive Na+ -Cl- cotransporter (NCC) gene inactivation results in increased duodenal Ca2+ absorption, enhanced osteoblast differentiation and elevated bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Yang, Sung-Sen; Cheng, Chih-Jen; Liu, Shu-Ting; Huang, Shih-Ming; Chau, Tom; Chu, Pauling; Salter, Donald M; Lee, Herng-Sheng; Lin, Shih-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter (NCC) due to genetic mutations in Gitelman's syndrome (GS) or pharmacological inhibition with thiazide diuretics causes hypocalciuria and increased bone mineral density (BMD) with unclear extrarenal calcium (Ca(2+) ) regulation. We investigated intestinal Ca(2+) absorption and bone Ca(2+) metabolism in nonsense Ncc Ser707X (S707X) homozygous knockin mice (Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice). Compared to wild-type and heterozygous knockin littermates, Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had increased intestinal absorption of (45) Ca(2+) and expression of the active Ca(2+) transport machinery (transient receptor potential vanilloid 6, calbindin-D9K , and plasma membrane Ca(2+) ATPase isoform 1b). Ncc(S707X/S707X) mice had also significantly increased Ca(2+) content accompanied by greater mineral apposition rate (MAR) in their femurs and higher trabecular bone volume, cortical bone thickness, and BMD determined by μCT. Their osteoblast differentiation markers, such as bone alkaline phosphatase, procollagen I, osteocalcin, and osterix, were also significantly increased while osteoclast activity was unaffected. Analysis of marrow-derived bone cells, either treated with thiazide or directly cultured from Ncc S707X knockin mice, showed that the differentiation of osteoblasts was associated with increased phosphorylation of mechanical stress-induced focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In conclusion, NCC inhibition stimulates duodenal Ca(2+) absorption as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone Ca(2+) storage, possibly through a FAK/ERK dependent mechanism. PMID:24984877

  11. Trustworthiness of measurement devices in round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Zhu; Yin, Zhen-Qiang; Han, Zheng-Fu

    2016-02-01

    Round-robin differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution (RRDPS QKD) has been proposed to raise the noise tolerability of the channel. However, in practice, the measurement device in RRDPS QKD may be imperfect. Here, we show that, with these imperfections, the security of RRDPS may be damaged by proposing two attacks for RRDPS systems with uncharacterized measurement devices. One is valid even for a system with unit total efficiency, while the other is valid even when a single-photon state is sent. To prevent these attacks, either security arguments need to be fundamentally revised or further practical assumptions on the measurement device should be put.

  12. Fast gridding projectors for analytical and iterative tomographic reconstruction of differential phase contrast data.

    PubMed

    Arcadu, Filippo; Stampanoni, Marco; Marone, Federica

    2016-06-27

    This paper introduces new gridding projectors designed to efficiently perform analytical and iterative tomographic reconstruction, when the forward model is represented by the derivative of the Radon transform. This inverse problem is tightly connected with an emerging X-ray tube- and synchrotron-based imaging technique: differential phase contrast based on a grating interferometer. This study shows, that the proposed projectors, compared to space-based implementations of the same operators, yield high quality analytical and iterative reconstructions, while improving the computational efficiency by few orders of magnitude. PMID:27410628

  13. Attitude/attitude-rate estimation from GPS differential phase measurements using integrated-rate parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshman, Yaakov; Markley, Landis

    1998-01-01

    A sequential filtering algorithm is presented for attitude and attitude-rate estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) differential carrier phase measurements. A third-order, minimal-parameter method for solving the attitude matrix kinematic equation is used to parameterize the filter's state, which renders the resulting estimator computationally efficient. Borrowing from tracking theory concepts, the angular acceleration is modeled as an exponentially autocorrelated stochastic process, thus avoiding the use of the uncertain spacecraft dynamic model. The new formulation facilitates the use of aiding vector observations in a unified filtering algorithm, which can enhance the method's robustness and accuracy. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  14. Experimental phasing using zinc and sulfur anomalous signals measured at the zinc absorption peak.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Min-Kyu; Ji, Chang-Jun; Lee, Jin-Won; Cha, Sun-Shin

    2013-10-01

    Iron is an essential transition metal required for bacterial growth and survival. Excess free iron can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species that can cause severe damage to cellular functions. Cells have developed iron-sensing regulators to maintain iron homeostasis at the transcription level. The ferric uptake regulator (Fur) is an iron-responsive regulator that controls the expression of genes involved in iron homeostasis, bacterial virulence, stress resistance, and redox metabolism. Here, we report the expression, purification, crystallization, and phasing of the apo-form of Bacillus subtilis Fur (BsFur) in the absence of regulatory metal ions. Crystals were obtained by microbatch crystallization method at 295 K and diffraction data at a resolution of 2.6 Å was collected at the zinc peak wavelength (λ=1.2823 Å). Experimental phasing identified the positions of one zinc atom and four sulfur atoms of cysteine residues coordinating the zinc atom, indicating that the data contained a meaningful anomalous scattering originating from the ordered zinc-coordinating sulfur atoms, in spite of the small anomalous signals of sulfur atoms at the examined wavelength. PMID:24173644

  15. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  16. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples.

    PubMed

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G; Simpson, Myrna J; Maas, Werner E; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate (1)H and (13)C spectra for the different phases. In addition, (19)F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of (19)F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state. PMID:22425441

  17. Comprehensive multiphase NMR spectroscopy: Basic experimental approaches to differentiate phases in heterogeneous samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtier-Murias, Denis; Farooq, Hashim; Masoom, Hussain; Botana, Adolfo; Soong, Ronald; Longstaffe, James G.; Simpson, Myrna J.; Maas, Werner E.; Fey, Michael; Andrew, Brian; Struppe, Jochem; Hutchins, Howard; Krishnamurthy, Sridevi; Kumar, Rajeev; Monette, Martine; Stronks, Henry J.; Hume, Alan; Simpson, André J.

    2012-04-01

    Heterogeneous samples, such as soils, sediments, plants, tissues, foods and organisms, often contain liquid-, gel- and solid-like phases and it is the synergism between these phases that determine their environmental and biological properties. Studying each phase separately can perturb the sample, removing important structural information such as chemical interactions at the gel-solid interface, kinetics across boundaries and conformation in the natural state. In order to overcome these limitations a Comprehensive Multiphase-Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (CMP-NMR) probe has been developed, and is introduced here, that permits all bonds in all phases to be studied and differentiated in whole unaltered natural samples. The CMP-NMR probe is built with high power circuitry, Magic Angle Spinning (MAS), is fitted with a lock channel, pulse field gradients, and is fully susceptibility matched. Consequently, this novel NMR probe has to cover all HR-MAS aspects without compromising power handling to permit the full range of solution-, gel- and solid-state experiments available today. Using this technology, both structures and interactions can be studied independently in each phase as well as transfer/interactions between phases within a heterogeneous sample. This paper outlines some basic experimental approaches using a model heterogeneous multiphase sample containing liquid-, gel- and solid-like components in water, yielding separate 1H and 13C spectra for the different phases. In addition, 19F performance is also addressed. To illustrate the capability of 19F NMR soil samples, containing two different contaminants, are used, demonstrating a preliminary, but real-world application of this technology. This novel NMR approach possesses a great potential for the in situ study of natural samples in their native state.

  18. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2016-06-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-μm laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-μm integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  19. Triple-Pulsed Two-Micron Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar: A New Active Remote Sensing Capability with Path to Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    The two-micron wavelength is suitable for monitoring atmospheric water vapor and carbon dioxide, the two most dominant greenhouse gases. Recent advances in 2-micron laser technology paved the way for constructing state-of-the-art lidar transmitters for active remote sensing applications. In this paper, a new triple-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption lidar is presented. This lidar is capable of measuring either two species or single specie with two different weighting functions, simultaneously and independently. Development of this instrument is conducted at NASA Langley Research Center. Instrument scaling for projected future space missions will be discussed.

  20. Optical reading of field-effect transistors by phase-space absorption quenching in a single InGaAs quantum well conducting channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemla, D. S.; Bar-Joseph, I.; Klingshirn, C.; Miller, D. A. B.; Kuo, J. M.

    1987-03-01

    Absorption switching in a semiconductor quantum well by electrically varying the charge density in the quantum well conducting channel of a selectively doped heterostructure transistor is reported for the first time. The phase-space absorption quenching (PAQ) is observed at room temperature in an InGaAs/InAlAs grown on InP FET, and it shows large absorption coefficient changes with relatively broad spectral bandwidth. This PAQ is large enough to be used for direct optical determination of the logic state of the FET.

  1. High order surface aberration contributions from phase space analysis of differential rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Herkommer, Alois M

    2016-03-21

    Phase space methods are very popular for illumination systems or paraxial system analysis. In this paper it will be shown that it is also a promising tool to visualize and quantify surface aberration contributions, including all orders. The method is based on the calculation and propagation of a differential ray pair. In order to validate the method we compare to Aldis calculus, an exact method to determine high order aberrations in rotational symmetric systems. A triplet lens is used as an example to visualize the results. The analysis indicates that the phase space method is a very good approximation to Aldis calculus and moreover it is not limited to any symmetry assumptions. PMID:27136789

  2. Cone-beam differential phase-contrast laminography with x-ray tube source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, J.; Biernath, T.; Willner, M.; Amberger, M.; Meiser, J.; Kunka, D.; Mohr, J.; Herzen, J.; Bech, M.; Pfeiffer, F.

    2014-06-01

    We report on an x-ray cone-beam differential phase-contrast computed laminography (DPC-CL) method for tomographic reconstruction of thin and lamellar objects. We describe the specific scan geometry of DPC-CL, which consists of a Talbot-Lau grating interferometer and a lab-based x-ray tube source, and derive a filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction algorithm. The experimental results of a flat sphere phantom and a piece of ham demonstrate the validity of the proposed technique. The existing DPC-CL methods are based on synchrotron sources and the parallel-beam geometry. In contrast, our approach adopts a more accessible x-ray tube source and a cone-beam geometry. Therefore it significantly widens the application range of phase-contrast laminography, particularly in practical laboratory settings, beyond applications at large-scale synchrotron facilities.

  3. Atomic partial charges in condensed phase from an exact sum rule for infrared absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vuilleumier, Rodolphe

    2014-05-01

    A general sum rule for infrared intensities provides a definition of effective partial charges which can be experimentally obtained using isotopic substitutions and is valid in both gas and condensed phases. Of particular interest is the case of molecular liquids. We have, therefore, determined the hydrogen partial charges in liquid methanol and liquid water from the available literature. The resulting charges are 0.63 e and 0.14 e for hydrogen atoms bounded to the methanol oxygen and carbon atoms, respectively, and 0.55 e for hydrogen atoms in liquid water. The effective partial charges in liquid water were also computed from density functional based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations and found in good agreement with experiment.

  4. Oleic- and Docosahexaenoic Acid-Containing Phosphatidylethanolamines Differentially Phase Separate from Sphingomyelin

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, Saame Raza; LoCascio, Daniel S.; Soni, Smita P.; Wassall, Stephen R.; Stillwell, William

    2009-01-01

    A central tenet of the lipid raft model is the existence of non-raft domains. In support of this view, we have established in model membranes that a phosphatidylethanolamine (PE)-containing docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) forms organizationally distinct non-raft domains in the presence of sphingomyelin (SM) and cholesterol (Chol). We have shown that formation of DHA-rich domains is driven by unfavorable molecular interactions between the rigid Chol molecule and the highly flexible DHA acyl chain. However, the molecular interactions between SM and the DHA-containing PE, which could also contribute to the formation of DHA-rich non-raft domains, have not been sufficiently investigated. To address this issue, we use differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) to study the phase behavior of mixtures of SM with either 1-palmitoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0-22:6PE) or 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (16:0-18:1PE), an oleic acid (OA)-containing control, over a wide range of concentrations. Deconvolution of binary DSC scans shows that both 16:0-22:6PE and 16:0-18:1PE phase separate from SM. Analysis of transition temperatures and partial phase diagrams, constructed from the DSC scans for the first time, show that 16:0-22:6PE displays greater non-ideal mixing with SM compared to 16:0-18:1PE. Our findings support a model in which DHA- and OA-containing PEs differentially phase separate from SM over a wide range of molar ratios to initiate the formation of non-raft domains, which is greatly enhanced by DHA, but not OA, in the presence of cholesterol. PMID:19735642

  5. A staggered differential phase-shift keying modulation format for 100Gbit/s applications.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yufeng; Wen, Shuangchun; Chen, Lin; Li, Ying; Xu, Huiwen

    2008-08-18

    We propose and demonstrate by numerical simulation a new phase modulation format, the staggered differential phase-shift keying (SDPSK), for 100 Gbit/s applications. Non-return-to-zero (NRZ) SDPSK signals was generated by using two phase modulators, and return-to-zero (RZ) SDPSK signals with 50% duty cycle was generated by cascading a dual-arm Mach-Zehnder modulator. The demodulation of 2 bit/symbol can be simply achieved on 1 bit rate through only one Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer and a balanced receiver. By comparing the transmission characteristics of the two staggered phase modulation formats with those of NRZ-DPSK, RZ-DPSK, NRZ-DQPSK, and RZ-DQPSK, respectively, we show that, the SDPSK signal has similar chromatic dispersion and polarization-mode-dispersion tolerance to the DPSK signal with same NRZ or RZ shape, while the SDPSK signal has stronger nonlinear tolerance than the DPSK or DQPSK signal. In addition, the SDPSK signal has the best transmission performance when each signal was transmitted over 106km optical SMF+DCF, and then launched into a third-order Gaussian optical bandpass filter placed with beyond 125GHz bandwidth. PMID:18711532

  6. A fully-differential phase-locked loop frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lixue, Kuang; Baoyong, Chi; Lei, Chen; Wen, Jia; Zhihua, Wang

    2014-12-01

    A 40-GHz phase-locked loop (PLL) frequency synthesizer for 60-GHz wireless communication applications is presented. The electrical characteristics of the passive components in the VCO and LO buffers are accurately extracted with an electromagnetic simulator HFSS. A differential tuning technique is utilized in the voltage controlled oscillator (VCO) to achieve higher common-mode noise rejection and better phase noise performance. The VCO and the divider chain are powered by a 1.0 V supply while the phase-frequency detector (PFD) and the charge pump (CP) are powered by a 2.5 V supply to improve the linearity. The measurement results show that the total frequency locking range of the frequency synthesizer is from 37 to 41 GHz, and the phase noise from a 40 GHz carrier is -97.2 dBc/Hz at 1 MHz offset. Implemented in 65 nm CMOS, the synthesizer consumes a DC power of 62 mW, including all the buffers.

  7. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    PubMed Central

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms. PMID:27042684

  8. James Webb Space Telescope segment phasing using differential optical transfer functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codona, Johanan L.; Doble, Nathan

    2015-04-01

    Differential optical transfer function (dOTF) is an image-based, noniterative wavefront sensing method that uses two star images with a single small change in the pupil. We describe two possible methods for introducing the required pupil modification to the James Webb Space Telescope, one using a small (<λ/4) displacement of a single segment's actuator and another that uses small misalignments of the NIRCam's filter wheel. While both methods should work with NIRCam, the actuator method will allow both MIRI and NIRISS to be used for segment phasing, which is a new functionality. Since the actuator method requires only small displacements, it should provide a fast and safe phasing alternative that reduces the mission risk and can be performed frequently for alignment monitoring and maintenance. Since a single actuator modification can be seen by all three cameras, it should be possible to calibrate the non-common-path aberrations between them. Large segment discontinuities can be measured using dOTFs in two filter bands. Using two images of a star field, aberrations along multiple lines of sight through the telescope can be measured simultaneously. Also, since dOTF gives the pupil field amplitude as well as the phase, it could provide a first approximation or constraint to the planned iterative phase retrieval algorithms.

  9. An alternative approach to estimating rainfall rate by radar using propagation differential phase shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    In this work it is shown that for frequencies from 3 to 13 GHz, the ratio of the specific propagation differential phase shift phi(sub DP) to the rainfall rate can be specified essentially independently of the form of the drop size distribution by a function only of the mass-weighted mean drop size D(sub m). This significantly reduces one source of substantial bias errors common to most other techniques for measuring rain by radar. For frequencies 9 GHz and greater, the coefficient can be well estimated from the ratio of the specific differential attenuation to phi(sub DP), while at nonattenuating frequencies such as 3 GHz, the coefficient can be well estimated using the differential reflectivity. In practice it appears that this approach yields better estimates of the rainfall rate than any other current technique. The best results are most likely at 13.80 GHz, followed by those at 2.80 GHz. An optimum radar system for measuring rain should probably include components at a both frequencies so that when signals at 13.8 GHz are lost because of attenuation, good measurements are still possible at the lower frequency.

  10. Differential phase-contrast dark-field electron holography for strain mapping.

    PubMed

    Denneulin, Thibaud; Houdellier, Florent; Hÿtch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Strain mapping is an active area of research in transmission electron microscopy. Here we introduce a dark-field electron holographic technique that shares several aspects in common with both off-axis and in-line holography. Two incident and convergent plane waves are produced in front of the specimen thanks to an electrostatic biprism in the condenser system of a transmission electron microscope. The interference of electron beams diffracted by the illuminated crystal is then recorded in a defocused plane. The differential phase recovered from the hologram is directly proportional to the strain in the sample. The strain can be quantified if the separation of the images due to the defocus is precisely determined. The present technique has the advantage that the derivative of the phase is measured directly which allows us to avoid numerical differentiation. The distribution of the noise in the reconstructed strain maps is isotropic and more homogeneous. This technique was used to investigate different samples: a Si/SiGe superlattice, transistors with SiGe source/drain and epitaxial PZT thin films. PMID:26476802

  11. A comparison of de-noising methods for differential phase shift and associated rainfall estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiqun; Liu, Liping; Wu, Linlin; Wei, Qing

    2015-04-01

    Measured differential phase shift UDP is known to be a noisy unstable polarimetric radar variable, such that the quality of UDP data has direct impact on specific differential phase shift KDP estimation, and subsequently, the KDP-based rainfall estimation. Over the past decades, many UDP de-noising methods have been developed; however, the de-noising effects in these methods and their impact on KDP-based rainfall estimation lack comprehensive comparative analysis. In this study, simulated noisy UDP data were generated and de-noised by using several methods such as finite-impulse response (FIR), Kalman, wavelet, traditional mean, and median filters. The biases were compared between KDP from simulated and observed UDP radial profiles after de-noising by these methods. The results suggest that the complicated FIR, Kalman, and wavelet methods have a better de-noising effect than the traditional methods. After UDP was de-noised, the accuracy of the KDP-based rainfall estimation increased significantly based on the analysis of three actual rainfall events. The improvement in estimation was more obvious when KDP was estimated with UDP de-noised by Kalman, FIR, and wavelet methods when the average rainfall was heavier than 5 mm h ≥1. However, the improved estimation was not significant when the precipitation intensity further increased to a rainfall rate beyond 10 mm h ≥1. The performance of wavelet analysis was found to be the most stable of these filters.

  12. Radar Differential Phase Signatures of Ice Orientation for the Prediction of Lightning Initiation and Cessation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, L.D.; Petersen, W.A.; Deierling, W.

    2009-01-01

    other co-polar back-scattering radar measurements like differential reflectivity (Z(sub dr)) typically measured by operational dual-polarimetric radars are not sensitive to these changes in ice crystal orientation. However, prior research has demonstrated that oriented ice crystals cause significant propagation effects that can be routinely measured by most dual-polarimetric radars from X-band (3 cm) to S-band (10 cm) wavelengths using the differential propagation phase shift (often just called differential phase, phi(sub dp)) or its range derivative, the specific differential phase (K(sub dp)). Advantages of the differential phase include independence from absolute or relative power calibration, attenuation, differential attenuation and relative insensitivity to ground clutter and partial beam occultation effects (as long as the signal remains above noise). In research mode, these sorts of techniques have been used to anticipate initial cloud electrification, lightning initiation, and cessation. In this study, we develop a simplified model of ice crystal size, shape, orientation, dielectric, and associated radar scattering and propagation effects in order to simulate various idealized scenarios of ice crystals responding to a hypothetical electric field and their dual-polarimetric radar signatures leading up to lightning initiation and particularly cessation. The sensitivity of the K(sub dp) ice orientation signature to various ice properties and radar wavelength will be explored. Since K(sub dp) is proportional to frequency in the Rayleigh- Gans scattering regime, the ice orientation signatures should be more obvious at higher (lower) frequencies (wavelengths). As a result, simulations at radar wavelengths from 10 cm down to 1 cm (Ka-band) will be conducted. Resonance effects will be considered using the T-matrix method. Since most K(sub dp) Vbased observations have been shown at S-band, we will present ice orientation signatures from C-band (UAH/NASA ARMOR) and X

  13. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force. PMID:26297225

  14. A new differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington DC region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.) from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0-1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25% from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington DC area.

  15. A New Differential Absorption Lidar to Measure Sub-Hourly Fluctuation of Tropospheric Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore - Washington D.C. Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99 N, 76.84 W, 57 meters ASL) from 400 m to 12 km AGL. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm. Ozone is absorbed more strongly at 289 nm than at 299 nm. The DIAL technique exploits this difference between the returned backscatter signals to obtain the ozone number density as a function of altitude. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high pressure hydrogen and deuterium. Stimulated Raman Scattering (SRS) within the focus generates a significant fraction of the pump energy at the first Stokes shift. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the Stratospheric-Tropospheric Exchange (STE) of ozone is shown to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as assessing the validation and calibration of data. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19 percent from 0-1.5 km, 10-18 percent from 1.5-3 km, and 11-25 percent from 3 km to 12 km. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore

  16. Differential phase photoacoustic imaging for enhanced lateral and axial resolution imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iskander-Rizk, Sophinese; Kruizinga, Pieter; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2016-03-01

    The bandwidth limitation and aperture size of the transducer limits the resolution of a photoacoustic computed tomography system. If the separation between two sources is smaller than the point spread function width of the imaging system, they will appear as a single object at different wavelengths. It was shown previously in ultrasound motion imaging that phase difference between two consecutive frames can be used to detect lateral or axial motion with submicron resolution. We tested this method in the context of static PA imaging of two unresolved PA sources. We set up an experiment where we imaged a green and a yellow wire of 40 μm width with known relative absorption coefficients, separated by 355μm. Imaging was performed at 650nm and 460nm. The PA signal is recorded by a single element flat 1MHz transducer (Panametrics 0.5'' V303) in the plane of the wires, so the targets are axially spaced seen from the transducer. We reconstructed the signals originating from both unresolved sources and measured the separation between them to be 350 µm. Similar performance was obtained using an array transducer, viewing the wires from the top so they were laterally separated in the imaging plane. The signal at two different wavelengths was recorded using a commercial imaging system. The two-wavelength phase difference at every pair of channels provides an estimate of the distance between the two absorbers, determined to be 350 µm by the median of the two-channel estimates.

  17. Characterization and differential gene expression between two phenotypic phase variants in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Sheila K; Borewicz, Klaudyna; Johnson, Timothy; Xu, Wayne; Isaacson, Richard E

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium strain 798 has previously been shown to undergo phenotypic phase variation. One of the phenotypes expresses virulence traits such as adhesion, while the other phenotype does not. Phenotypic phase variation appears to correlate with the ability of this strain to cause persistent, asymptomatic infections of swine. A new method to detect cells in either phenotypic phase was developed using Evans Blue-Uranine agar plates. Using this new assay, rates of phenotypic phase variation were obtained. The rate of phase variation from non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-4) per cell per generation while phase variation from the adhesive to the non-adhesive phenotype was approximately 10(-6) per cell per generation. Two highly virulent S. Typhimurium strains, SL1344 and ATCC 14028, were also shown to undergo phase variation. However, while the rate from adhesive to non-adhesive phenotype was approximately the same as for strain 798, the non-adhesive to adhesive phenotype shift was 37-fold higher. Differential gene expression was measured using RNA-Seq. Eighty-three genes were more highly expressed by 798 cells in the adhesive phenotype compared to the non-adhesive cells. Most of the up-regulated genes were in virulence genes and in particular all genes in the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 were up-regulated. When compared to the virulent strain SL1344, expression of the virulence genes was approximately equal to those up-regulated in the adhesive phenotype of strain 798. A comparison of invasive ability demonstrated that strain SL1344 was the most invasive followed by the adhesive phenotype of strain 798, then the non-adhesive phenotype of strain 798. The least invasive strain was ATCC 14028. The genome of strain 798 was sequenced and compared to SL1344. Both strains had very similar genome sequences and gene deletions could not readily explain differences in the rates of phase variation from non-adhesive to the

  18. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. IV. THE TRIPLE STAR SYSTEMS 63 Gem A AND HR 2896

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Fekel, Francis C.; Williamson, M.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Hartkopf, William I.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co E-mail: maciej@ncac.torun.p

    2010-12-15

    Differential astrometry measurements from the Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) are used to constrain the astrometric orbit of the previously known {approx}<2 day subsystem in the triple system 63 Gem A and have detected a previously unknown two-year Keplerian wobble superimposed on the visual orbit of the much longer period (213 years) binary system HR 2896. 63 Gem A was already known to be triple from spectroscopic work, and absorption lines from all three stars can be identified and their individual Doppler shifts measured; new velocities for all three components are presented to aid in constraining the orbit and measuring the stellar masses. In fact, 63 Gem itself is a sextuple system: the hierarchical triple (Aa1-Aa2)-Ab (in which Aa1 and Aa2 orbit each other with a rapid period just under 2 days, and Ab orbits these every two years), plus three distant common proper motion companions. The very small astrometric perturbation caused by the inner pair in 63 Gem A stretches the limits of current astrometric capabilities, but PHASES observations are able to constrain the orientation of the orbit. The two bright stars comprising the HR 2896 long-period (213 year) system have a combined spectral type of K0III and the newly detected object's mass estimate places it in the regime of being an M dwarf. The motion of the stars are slow enough that their spectral features are always blended, preventing Doppler studies. The PHASES measurements and radial velocities (when available) have been combined with lower precision single-aperture measurements covering a much longer time frame (from eyepiece measurements, speckle interferometry, and adaptive optics) to improve the characterization of the long-period orbits in both binaries. The visual orbits of the short- and long-period systems are presented for both systems and used to calculate two possible values of the mutual inclinations between inner and outer orbits of 152{sup 0} {+-} 12

  19. The Split-Spectrum Method for Differential InSAR Ionospheric Phase Screen Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomba, G.; Eineder, M.

    2015-12-01

    The differential ionospheric path delay is a major error source in L-band interferograms. It is superimposed to topography and ground deformation signals hindering the measurement of geophysical processes like earthquakes. Exploiting the ionosphere dispersive nature of the ionosphere, the method separates the ionospheric component of the interferometric phase from the non-dispersive component, related to topography, ground motion and tropospheric path delay. An implementation of the split-spectrum method is in this work exposed in detail and its performance is analyzed. We test the method using various ALOS PALSAR interferometric pairs with different characteristics: high to low coherence, moving and non-moving terrain, with and without topography and different ionosphere states. Ionospheric errors of almost one meter have been corrected to a centimeter or millimeter level. The results show how the method is able to systematically compensate the ionospheric phase in interferograms. In this work we also present ALOS PALSAR ionospheric-free interferograms and the related ionospheric phase screens for the 2015 Nepal earthquake, the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, the 2008 Kyrgyzstan earthquake, and the 2011 Myanmar earthquke.

  20. Theoretical analysis of direct CP violation and differential decay width in in phase space around the resonances and

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Song, Ren; Su, Yu-Mo; Lü, Gang; Zheng, Bo

    2015-09-01

    We perform a theoretical study on direct CP violation in in phase space around the intermediate states and . The possible interference between the amplitudes corresponding to the two resonances is taken into account, and the relative strong phase of the two amplitudes is treated as a free parameter. Our analysis shows that by a properly chosen strong phase, both the CP violation strength and the differential decay width accommodate the experimental results.

  1. Measurement of optical absorption in polycrystalline CVD diamond plates by the phase photothermal method at a wavelength of 10.6 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Luk'yanov, A Yu; Serdtsev, E V; Volkov, P V; Ral'chenko, Viktor G; Savel'ev, A V; Konov, Vitalii I; Khomich, A V

    2008-12-31

    A highly-efficient phase photothermal method is developed for quantitative measurements of the small optical absorption coefficient in thin plates made of highly transparent materials in which bulk losses significantly exceed surface losses. The bulk absorption coefficient at 10.6 {mu}m is estimated in polycrystalline diamond plates grown from the vapour phase (a CVD diamond). The results are compared with those for natural and synthetic diamond single crystals and with the concentrations of nitrogen and hydrogen impurities. The absorption coefficient of the best samples of the CVD diamond did not exceed 0.06 cm{sup -1}, which, taking into account the high thermal conductivity of the CVD diamond (1800-2200 W mK{sup -1} at room temperature), makes this material attractive for fabricating output windows of high-power CO{sub 2} lasers, especially for manufacturing large-size optics. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  2. Relative position determination of a lunar rover using the biased differential phase delay of same-beam VLBI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Qinghui; Wu, Yajun; Zhao, Rongbing; Dai, Zhiqiang

    2011-12-01

    When only data transmission signals with a bandwidth of 1 MHz exist in the rover, the position can be obtained using the differential group delay data of the same-beam very long baseline interferometry (VLBI). The relative position between a lunar rover and a lander can be determined with an error of several hundreds of meters. When the guidance information of the rover is used to determine relative position, the rover's wheel skid behavior and integral movement may influence the accuracy of the determined position. This paper proposes a new method for accurately determining relative position. The differential group delay and biased differential phase delay are obtained from the same-beam VLBI observation, while the modified biased differential phase delay is obtained using the statistic mean value of the differential group delay and the biased phase delay as basis. The small bias in the modified biased phase delay is estimated together with other parameters when the relative position of the rover is calculated. The effectiveness of the proposed method is confirmed using the same-beam VLBI observation data of SELENE. The radio sources onboard the rover and the lander are designed for same-beam VLBI observations. The results of the simulations of the differential delay of the same-beam VLBI observation between the rover and the lander show that the differential delay is sensitive to relative position. An approach to solving the relative position and a strategy for tracking are also introduced. When the lunar topography data near the rover are used and the observations are scheduled properly, the determined relative position of the rover may be nearly as accurate as that solved using differential phase delay data.

  3. Experimental Passive Round-Robin Differential Phase-Shift Quantum Key Distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Jian-Yu; Cao, Zhu; Liu, Yang; Shen-Tu, Guo-Liang; Pelc, Jason S.; Fejer, M. M.; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Ma, Xiongfeng; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2015-05-01

    In quantum key distribution (QKD), the bit error rate is used to estimate the information leakage and hence determines the amount of privacy amplification—making the final key private by shortening the key. In general, there exists a threshold of the error rate for each scheme, above which no secure key can be generated. This threshold puts a restriction on the environment noises. For example, a widely used QKD protocol, the Bennett-Brassard protocol, cannot tolerate error rates beyond 25%. A new protocol, round-robin differential phase-shifted (RRDPS) QKD, essentially removes this restriction and can in principle tolerate more environment disturbance. Here, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a passive RRDPS QKD scheme. In particular, our 500 MHz passive RRDPS QKD system is able to generate a secure key over 50 km with a bit error rate as high as 29%. This scheme should find its applications in noisy environment conditions.

  4. Practical round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying-Ying; Bao, Wan-Su; Zhou, Chun; Li, Hong-Wei; Wang, Yang; Jiang, Mu-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a novel protocol named round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) quantum key distribution [Nature 509, 475(2014)] has been proposed. It can estimate information leakage without monitoring bit error rate. In this paper, we study the performance of RRDPS using heralded single photon source (HSPS) without and with decoy-state method, then compare it with the performance of weak coherent pulses (WCPs). From numerical simulation, we can see that HSPS performs better especially for shorter packet and higher bit error rate. Moreover, we propose a general theory of decoy-state method for RRDPS protocol based on only three decoy states and one signal state. Taking WCPs as an example, the three-intensity decoy-state protocol can distribute secret keys over a distance of 128 km when the length of pulses packet is 32, which confirms great practical interest of our method. PMID:27607679

  5. Application of linear-scale differential analysis in phase correlation method of image stitching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezzubik, Vitalii V.; Belashenkov, Nickolai R.; Losev, Sergei V.

    2016-03-01

    A robust method of creation of panoramic images which does not consume much processing resources is proposed and investigated. The phase correlation (PC) method is taken as a basic one because of simplicity of its algorithm and low computing time due to application of FFT technique. Standard PC procedure is modified by preprocessing of source frames of panoramic images in spatial domain. Preprocessing comprises Linear-Scale Differential Analysis (LSDA) with sequent content-dependent thresholding of intensity gradients. Method is proved for artificially blurred and noise corrupted images. It is shown that new robust algorithm allows to increase the productivity of creation of panoramic images keeping the probability of successive stitching close to maximum even for low-quality source frames.

  6. Two-Phase Cycle DBA (TCDBA) for Differentiated Services on EPON

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hye Kyung; Yoon, Won-Jin; Lee, Tae-Jin; Choo, Hyunseung; Chung, Min Young

    The Ethernet passive optical network (EPON), which is one of the PON technologies for realizing FTTx (Fiber-To-The-Curb/Home/Office), is a low-cost and high-speed solution to the bottleneck problem that occurs between a backbone network and end users. The EPON is compatible with existing customer devices that are equipped with an Ethernet card. To effectively control frame transmission from optical network units (ONUs) to an optical line termination (OLT), the EPON can use a multi-point control protocol (MPCP) with control functions in addition to the media access control (MAC) protocol function. In this paper, we propose a two-phase cycle dynamic bandwidth allocation (TCDBA) algorithm to increase the channel utilization on the uplink by allowing frame transmissions during computation periods, and combine the TCDBA algorithm with the queue management schemes performed within each ONU, in order to effectively support differentiated services. Additionally, we perform simulations to validate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. The results show that the proposed TCDBA algorithm improves the maximum throughput, average transmission delay, and average volume of frames discarded, compared with the existing algorithms. Furthermore, the proposed TCDBA algorithm is able to support differentiated quality of services (QoS).

  7. Radar Differential Phase Signatures of Ice Orientation for the Prediction of Lightning Initiation and Cessation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, L.D.; Petersen, W.A.; Deierling, W.

    2009-01-01

    other co-polar back-scattering radar measurements like differential reflectivity (Z(sub dr)) typically measured by operational dual-polarimetric radars are not sensitive to these changes in ice crystal orientation. However, prior research has demonstrated that oriented ice crystals cause significant propagation effects that can be routinely measured by most dual-polarimetric radars from X-band (3 cm) to S-band (10 cm) wavelengths using the differential propagation phase shift (often just called differential phase, phi(sub dp)) or its range derivative, the specific differential phase (K(sub dp)). Advantages of the differential phase include independence from absolute or relative power calibration, attenuation, differential attenuation and relative insensitivity to ground clutter and partial beam occultation effects (as long as the signal remains above noise). In research mode, these sorts of techniques have been used to anticipate initial cloud electrification, lightning initiation, and cessation. In this study, we develop a simplified model of ice crystal size, shape, orientation, dielectric, and associated radar scattering and propagation effects in order to simulate various idealized scenarios of ice crystals responding to a hypothetical electric field and their dual-polarimetric radar signatures leading up to lightning initiation and particularly cessation. The sensitivity of the K(sub dp) ice orientation signature to various ice properties and radar wavelength will be explored. Since K(sub dp) is proportional to frequency in the Rayleigh- Gans scattering regime, the ice orientation signatures should be more obvious at higher (lower) frequencies (wavelengths). As a result, simulations at radar wavelengths from 10 cm down to 1 cm (Ka-band) will be conducted. Resonance effects will be considered using the T-matrix method. Since most K(sub dp) Vbased observations have been shown at S-band, we will present ice orientation signatures from C-band (UAH/NASA ARMOR) and X

  8. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Stockett, Mark H; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2016-05-01

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion. PMID:27250388

  9. A cylindrical quadrupole ion trap in combination with an electrospray ion source for gas-phase luminescence and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockett, Mark H.; Houmøller, Jørgen; Støchkel, Kristian; Svendsen, Annette; Brøndsted Nielsen, Steen

    2016-05-01

    A relatively simple setup for collection and detection of light emitted from isolated photo-excited molecular ions has been constructed. It benefits from a high collection efficiency of photons, which is accomplished by using a cylindrical ion trap where one end-cap electrode is a mesh grid combined with an aspheric condenser lens. The geometry permits nearly 10% of the emitted light to be collected and, after transmission losses, approximately 5% to be delivered to the entrance of a grating spectrometer equipped with a detector array. The high collection efficiency enables the use of pulsed tunable lasers with low repetition rates (e.g., 20 Hz) instead of continuous wave (cw) lasers or very high repetition rate (e.g., MHz) lasers that are typically used as light sources for gas-phase fluorescence experiments on molecular ions. A hole has been drilled in the cylinder electrode so that a light pulse can interact with the ion cloud in the center of the trap. Simulations indicate that these modifications to the trap do not significantly affect the storage capability and the overall shape of the ion cloud. The overlap between the ion cloud and the laser light is basically 100%, and experimentally >50% of negatively charged chromophore ions are routinely photodepleted. The performance of the setup is illustrated based on fluorescence spectra of several laser dyes, and the quality of these spectra is comparable to those reported by other groups. Finally, by replacing the optical system with a channeltron detector, we demonstrate that the setup can also be used for gas-phase action spectroscopy where either depletion or fragmentation is monitored to provide an indirect measurement on the absorption spectrum of the ion.

  10. A rapid method to derive horizontal distributions of trace gases and aerosols near the surface using multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Li, A.; Xie, P. H.; Wagner, T.; Chen, H.; Liu, W. Q.; Liu, J. G.

    2014-06-01

    We apply a novel experimental procedure for the rapid measurement of the average volume mixing ratios (VMRs) and horizontal distributions of trace gases such as NO2, SO2, and HCHO in the boundary layer, which was recently suggested by Sinreich et al. (2013). The method is based on two-dimensional scanning multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS). It makes use of two facts (Sinreich et al., 2013): first, the light path for observations at 1° elevation angle traverses mainly air masses located close to the ground (typically < 200 m); second, the light path length can be calculated using the simultaneous measured absorption of the oxygen dimer O4. Thus, the average value of the trace gas VMR in the atmospheric layer between the surface and the particular altitude, for which this observation was sensitive, can be calculated. Compared to the originally proposed method, we introduce several important modifications and improvements: We apply the method only to measurements at 1° elevation angle (besides zenith view), for which the uncertainties of the retrieved values of the VMRs and surface extinctions are especially small. Using only 1° elevation angle for off-axis observation also allows an increased temporal resolution. We determine (and apply) correction factors (and their uncertainties) directly as function of the measured O4 absorption. Finally, the method is extended to trace gases analysed at other wavelengths and also to the retrieval of aerosol extinction. Depending on atmospheric visibility, the typical uncertainty of the results ranges from about 20% to 30%. We apply the rapid method to observations of a newly-developed ground-based multifunctional passive differential optical absorption spectroscopy (GM-DOAS) instrument in the north-west outskirts near Hefei in China. We report NO2, SO2, and HCHO VMRs and aerosol extinction for four azimuth angles and compare these results with those from simultaneous long-path DOAS observations

  11. Determination of aromatic compounds in water by solid phase microextraction and ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. 2. Application to fuel aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Wittkamp, B.L.; Tilotta, D.C.; Hawthorne, S.B.

    1997-03-15

    Solid phase microextraction is coupled with ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy to determine fuel aromatic hydrocarbons from unleaded gasoline, jet fuel (JP4), and no. 1 diesel fuel in water. A rectangular `chip` of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (OV-1) was used as the sorbent medium to selectively partition the various fuels from real water matrices without interferences from naturally occurring organics (e.g., humic and fulvic acids). Equilibration times are under 45 min for the majority of aromatic compounds and range from 150 to 300 min for the three fuels. However, it is shown that the fuels can be quantitated at significantly shorter extraction times (45 min), resulting in only a loss of nearly 2x in the detection limits. Detection limits for unleaded gasoline, JP4, and no. 1 diesel fuel (obtained at their 100% equilibration times) are 4.9, 17, and 9.0 ppb, respectively. In addition, recovery data for the aromatic components from unleaded gasoline, JP4, and no. 1 diesel fuel from two real water matrices are in the range of 87-106%, with RSDs in the range of 5.0-10%. 4 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  12. Determination of Low Levels of Lead in Beer Using Solid-Phase Extraction and Detection by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Vanessa N.; Borges, Simone S. O.; Neto, Waldomiro B.; Coelho, Nívia M. M.

    2011-01-01

    In this study, a method for the determination of low concentrations of lead in beer samples using solid-phase extraction with a flow injection analysis system and detection by flame atomic absorption spectrometry (FAAS) was developed. Moringa oleifera seeds were used as a biosorbent material. Chemical and flow variables of the online preconcentration system, such as sample pH, preconcentration flow rate, eluent flow rate, eluent concentration, particle size, and sorbent mass, were studied. The optimum extraction conditions were obtained using a sample pH of 6.0, sample flow rate of 6.0 mL min−1, 63.0 mg of sorbent mass, and 2.0 mol L−1 HNO3 at a flow rate of 2.0 mL min−1 as the eluent. With the optimized conditions, the preconcentration factor, precision, detection limit, consumption index, and sample throughput were estimated as 93, 0.3% (10.0 μg L−1, n = 7), 7.5 μg L−1, 0.11 mL, and 23 samples per hour, respectively. The method developed was successfully applied to beer samples and recovery tests, with recovery ranging from 80% to 100%. PMID:22013389

  13. Differentiation of biological hydroxyapatite compounds by infrared spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chassot, E.; Oudadesse, H.; Irigaray, J.; Curis, E.; Bénazeth, S.; Nicolis, I.

    2001-12-01

    Pure hydroxyapatite (HAP) and HAP doped with 800 ppm of zinc were implanted in cortical bone of femur diaphysis of ovines [J. L. Irigaray et al., Mater. Clin. Appl. 28, 399 (1999)]. We observed that the doped HAP was better resorbed than pure HAP. The first hypothesis is that zinc acts as a stimulator on macrophage cells and improves quantity and quality of osteoblast cells. The second hypothesis is that zinc yields HAP structure that is better resorbed in biological field. For our experiment we used HAP doped with 3000 ppm of zinc in order to have a good sensitivity. In the present work, chemical studies by inductively coupled plasma absorption emission spectrometry, x ray diffraction, and infrared were carried out to determine the composition of major and trace elements in the doped hydroxyapatite, and the crystallographic structure. These studies can indicate possible modifications induced by the insertion of zinc. We used the extended x-ray absorption fine structure experimental station of LURE (Orsay, France) to try to clarify the atomic surroundings of zinc in doped HAP structure and transformations induced in initial lattice. Despite the low zinc concentration, we got good quality fluorescence mode spectra. These spectra showed medium range order of the material that is consistent with its crystalline form. To perform the analysis, we compared the result obtained with another models like β tricalcium phosphate and we created theoretical models of zinc in substitution of calcium in order to reproduce as well as possible the experimental spectrum. After this study, only two models are coherent with experimental spectrum, zinc in substitution of calcium in site I and zinc in the interstice between the two hydroxydes.

  14. Phase transition and NH3 dynamics in [Ni(NH3)4](ReO4)2 studied by infrared absorption, X-ray powder diffraction and neutron scattering methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetmańczyk, Łukasz; Hetmańczyk, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    The phase transition in [Ni(NH3)4](ReO4)2 detected previously by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) at Tch = 188 K was now investigated by infrared absorption (FT-IR), incoherent inelastic and elastic neutron scattering (IINS, ND), and X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD) methods. The reorientational dynamics of NH3 groups was investigated by infrared band shape analysis (IRBS) and quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) methods. The infrared data show that some of the bands split in the vicinity of the phase transition temperature, which suggests a change in the crystal structure. The systematic narrowing of particular bands at cooling is also observed, but reorientational dynamics of NH3 is not stopped at the phase transition temperature, which is fully confirmed by the QENS analysis. The broadening of the quasielastic neutron scattering peak is clearly visible below the phase transition temperature. Both NPD and XRPD measurements indicate that a small change of crystal structure is associated with the phase transition.

  15. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R; Hopkins, W Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)-a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry-actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS. Graphical Abstract ᅟ. PMID:27094827

  16. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-04-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  17. A new approach to estimating rainwater content by radar using propagation differential phase shift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, A. R.; Caylor, I. J.

    1994-01-01

    As microwaves propagate through rain, the rate of phase change with increasing distance is different depending upon whether the transmissions are polarized horizontally or vertically. This rate of change is the so-called specific propagation differential phase shift phi(sub DP). This paper demonstrates that at several frequencies and over a wide domain the ratio of phi(sub DP) to the rainwater content W is nearly linearly related to D(sub m), the mass-weighted mean drop size. An investigation of errors indicates that this new approach is likely to yield more accurate estimates of W than the other classical reflectivity factor Z, attenuation, or polarization techniques. The most accurate estimates of W are most likely at the highest frequency considered, 13.80 GHz. In lieu of such high-frequency measurements, these somewhat esoteric results are made more concrete through an analysis of 3-GHz radar measurements collected during the Convection and Precipitation Experiment in a tropical rainstorm in Florida. Among the principal advantages of using phi(sub DP) to measure rain are that an absolute calibration of the radar is no longer required and the estimates are decoupled from measurements of the radar reflectivity factor. Consequently, temporal and spatial structures of rain estimates do not simply mimic those of the reflectivity factor, as happens for classical estimation techniques using Z.

  18. Experimental round-robin differential phase-shift quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-Huai; Cao, Yuan; Dai, Hui; Lin, Jin; Zhang, Zhen; Chen, Wei; Xu, Yu; Guan, Jian-Yu; Liao, Sheng-Kai; Yin, Juan; Zhang, Qiang; Ma, Xiongfeng; Peng, Cheng-Zhi; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-03-01

    In conventional quantum key distribution (QKD) protocols, security is guaranteed by estimating the amount of leaked information. Such estimation tends to overrate, leading to a fundamental threshold of the bit error rate, which becomes a bottleneck of practical QKD development. This bottleneck is broken through by the recent work of round-robin differential phase-shift (RRDPS) protocol, which eliminates the fundamental threshold of the bit error rate. The key challenge for the implementation of the RRDPS scheme lies in the realization of a variable-delay Mach-Zehnder interferometer, which requires active and random choice of many delays. By designing an optical system with multiple switches and employing an active phase stabilization technology, we successfully construct a variable-delay interferometer with 127 actively selectable delays. With this measurement, we experimentally demonstrate the RRDPS protocol and obtain a final key rate of 15.54 bps with a total loss of 18 dB and an error rate of 8.9%.

  19. Studying Gas-Phase Interconversion of Tautomers Using Differential Mobility Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J. Larry; Yang, Amy Meng-Ci; Melo, Luke R.; Hopkins, W. Scott

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we report on the use of differential mobility spectrometry (DMS) as a tool for studying tautomeric species, allowing a more in-depth interrogation of these elusive isomers using ion/molecule reactions and tandem mass spectrometry. As an example, we revisit a case study in which gas-phase hydrogen-deuterium exchange (HDX)—a probe of ion structure in mass spectrometry—actually altered analyte ion structure by tautomerization. For the N- and O-protonated tautomers of 4-aminobenzoic acid, when separated using DMS and subjected to subsequent HDX with trace levels of D2O, the anticipated difference between the exchange rates of the two tautomers is observed. However, when using higher levels of D2O or a more basic reagent, equivalent and almost complete exchange of all labile protons is observed. This second observation is a result of the interconversion of the N-protonated tautomer to the O-protonated form during HDX. We can monitor this transformation experimentally, with support from detailed molecular dynamics and electronic structure calculations. In fact, calculations suggest the onset of bulk solution phase properties for 4-aminobenzoic acid upon solvation with eight CH3OH molecules. These findings also underscore the need for choosing HDX reagents and conditions judiciously when separating interconvertible isomers using DMS.

  20. 2-Micron Triple-Pulse Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Development for Simultaneous Airborne Column Measurements of Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor in the Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Refaat, Tamer F.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    For more than 15 years, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has contributed in developing several 2-micron carbon dioxide active remote sensors using the DIAL technique. Currently, an airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is under development at NASA LaRC. This paper focuses on the advancement of the 2-micron triple-pulse IPDA lidar development. Updates on the state-of-the-art triple-pulse laser transmitter will be presented including the status of wavelength control, packaging and lidar integration. In addition, receiver development updates will also be presented, including telescope integration, detection systems and data acquisition electronics. Future plan for IPDA lidar system for ground integration, testing and flight validation will be presented.

  1. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Carolyn; Spencer, Randall

    1988-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system has undergone development and experimental deployment at NASA/Langley Res. Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. The DIAL Data Acquisition System (DAS) has undergone a number of improvements also. Due to the participation of the DIAL in the Global Tropospheric Experiment, modifications and improvements of the system were tested and used both in the lab and in air. Therefore, this is an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  2. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights of the DIAL system were successfully performed onboard the NASA Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1985. The DIAL Data Acquisition System has undergone a number of improvements over the past few years. These improvements have now been field tested. The theory behind a real time computer system as it applies to the needs of the DIAL system is discussed. This report is designed to be used as an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  3. Open-path quantum cascade laser-based system for simultaneous remote sensing of methane, nitrous oxide, and water vapor using chirped-pulse differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo, Paulo; Diaz, Adrian; Thomas, Benjamin; Gross, Barry; Moshary, Fred

    2015-10-01

    Methane and Nitrous Oxide are long-lived greenhouse gases in the atmosphere with significant global warming effects. We report on application of chirped-pulsed quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) to simultaneous measurements of these trace gases in both open-path fence-line and backscatter systems. The intra-pulse thermal frequency chip in a QCL can be time resolved and calibrated to allow for high resolution differential optical absorption spectroscopy over the spectral window of the chip, which for a DFB-QCL can be reach ~2cm-1 for a 500 nsec pulse. The spectral line-shape of the output from these lasers are highly stable from pulse to pulse over long period of time (> 1 day), and the system does not require frequent calibrations.

  4. Spaceborne profiling of atmospheric temperature and particle extinction with pure rotational Raman lidar and of relative humidity in combination with differential absorption lidar: performance simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2006-04-10

    The performance of a spaceborne temperature lidar based on the pure rotational Raman (RR) technique in the UV has been simulated. Results show that such a system deployed onboard a low-Earth-orbit satellite would provide global-scale clear-sky temperature measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with precisions that satisfy World Meteorological Organization (WMO) threshold observational requirements for numerical weather prediction and climate research applications. Furthermore, nighttime temperature measurements would still be within the WMO threshold observational requirements in the presence of several cloud structures. The performance of aerosol extinction measurements from space, which can be carried out simultaneously with temperature measurements by RR lidar, is also assessed. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of relative humidity measurements from space obtained from RR temperature measurements and water-vapor data measured with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique.

  5. Spaceborne profiling of atmospheric temperature and particle extinction with pure rotational Raman lidar and of relative humidity in combination with differential absorption lidar: performance simulations.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Paolo; Behrendt, Andreas; Wulfmeyer, Volker

    2006-04-10

    The performance of a spaceborne temperature lidar based on the pure rotational Raman (RR) technique in the UV has been simulated. Results show that such a system deployed onboard a low-Earth-orbit satellite would provide global-scale clear-sky temperature measurements in the troposphere and lower stratosphere with precisions that satisfy World Meteorological Organization (WMO) threshold observational requirements for numerical weather prediction and climate research applications. Furthermore, nighttime temperature measurements would still be within the WMO threshold observational requirements in the presence of several cloud structures. The performance of aerosol extinction measurements from space, which can be carried out simultaneously with temperature measurements by RR lidar, is also assessed. Furthermore, we discuss simulations of relative humidity measurements from space obtained from RR temperature measurements and water-vapor data measured with the differential absorption lidar (DIAL) technique. PMID:16623245

  6. The impact of absorption coefficient on polarimetric determination of Berry phase based depth resolved characterization of biomedical scattering samples: a polarized Monte Carlo investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Baba, Justin S; Koju, Vijay; John, Dwayne O

    2016-01-01

    The modulation of the state of polarization of photons due to scatter generates associated geometric phase that is being investigated as a means for decreasing the degree of uncertainty in back-projecting the paths traversed by photons detected in backscattered geometry. In our previous work, we established that polarimetrically detected Berry phase correlates with the mean photon penetration depth of the backscattered photons collected for image formation. In this work, we report on the impact of state-of-linear-polarization (SOLP) filtering on both the magnitude and population distributions of image forming detected photons as a function of the absorption coefficient of the scattering sample. The results, based on Berry phase tracking implemented Polarized Monte Carlo Code, indicate that sample absorption plays a significant role in the mean depth attained by the image forming backscattered detected photons.

  7. An investigation of catalytic active phase-support interactions by IR, NMR and x-ray absorption spectroscopies. Progress report, January 15, 1992--September 15, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, G.L.

    1992-09-01

    Active catalytic phases (metal, mixed metals, oxide or mixed oxides) interacting with oxide support on which the active phase is dispersed can affect the percentage exposed, the morphology of supported particles, the degree of reducibility of cations, etc., in a variety of ways. Our objective is to characterize the physical chemistry of the active phase-oxide support interaction by spectroscopic methods and to correlate this structure with catalytic function. Two catalytic systems and their associated techniques (x-ray absorption and NMR) are discussed in this progress report. Firstly, the interaction of Pt-Ni supported on silica and L-zeolite are characterized and compared by x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS). Secondly, we present both experimental and calculational developments of NMR for the investigation of amorphous silica-alumina catalysts and/or supports.

  8. Expression Profile of Drug and Nutrient Absorption Related Genes in Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) Cells Grown under Differentiation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Yong; Jin, Yisheng; Faria, Teresa N.; Tilford, Charles A.; He, Aiqing; Wall, Doris A.; Smith, Ronald L.; Vig, Balvinder S.

    2012-01-01

    The expression levels of genes involved in drug and nutrient absorption were evaluated in the Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) in vitro drug absorption model. MDCK cells were grown on plastic surfaces (for 3 days) or on Transwell® membranes (for 3, 5, 7, and 9 days). The expression profile of genes including ABC transporters, SLC transporters, and cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes was determined using the Affymetrix® Canine GeneChip®. Expression of genes whose probe sets passed a stringent confirmation process was examined. Expression of a few transporter (MDR1, PEPT1 and PEPT2) genes in MDCK cells was confirmed by RT-PCR. The overall gene expression profile was strongly influenced by the type of support the cells were grown on. After 3 days of growth, expression of 28% of the genes was statistically different (1.5-fold cutoff, p < 0.05) between the cells grown on plastic and Transwell® membranes. When cells were differentiated on Transwell® membranes, large changes in gene expression profile were observed during the early stages, which then stabilized after 5–7 days. Only a small number of genes encoding drug absorption related SLC, ABC, and CYP were detected in MDCK cells, and most of them exhibited low hybridization signals. Results from this study provide valuable reference information on endogenous gene expression in MDCK cells that could assist in design of drug-transporter and/or drug-enzyme interaction studies, and help interpret the contributions of various transporters and metabolic enzymes in studies with MDCK cells. PMID:24300234

  9. A differential optical absorption spectroscopy method for retrieval from ground-based Fourier transform spectrometers measurements of the direct solar beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Yanfeng; Duan, Minzheng; Tian, Wenshou; Min, Qilong

    2015-08-01

    A differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS)-like algorithm is developed to retrieve the column-averaged dryair mole fraction of carbon dioxide from ground-based hyper-spectral measurements of the direct solar beam. Different to the spectral fitting method, which minimizes the difference between the observed and simulated spectra, the ratios of multiple channel-pairs—one weak and one strong absorption channel—are used to retrieve from measurements of the shortwave infrared (SWIR) band. Based on sensitivity tests, a super channel-pair is carefully selected to reduce the effects of solar lines, water vapor, air temperature, pressure, instrument noise, and frequency shift on retrieval errors. The new algorithm reduces computational cost and the retrievals are less sensitive to temperature and H2O uncertainty than the spectral fitting method. Multi-day Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) measurements under clear-sky conditions at two sites (Tsukuba and Bremen) are used to derive xxxx for the algorithm evaluation and validation. The DOAS-like results agree very well with those of the TCCON algorithm after correction of an airmass-dependent bias.

  10. Inter-comparison of 2 microm Heterodyne Differential Absorption Lidar, Laser Diode Spectrometer, LICOR NDIR analyzer and flasks measurements of near-ground atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio.

    PubMed

    Gibert, Fabien; Joly, Lilian; Xuéref-Rémy, Irène; Schmidt, Martina; Royer, Adrien; Flamant, Pierre H; Ramonet, Michel; Parvitte, Bertrand; Durry, Georges; Zéninari, Virginie

    2009-01-01

    Remote sensing and in situ instruments are presented and compared in the same location for accurate CO(2) mixing ratio measurements in the atmosphere: (1) a 2.064 microm Heterodyne DIfferential Absorption Lidar (HDIAL), (2) a field deployable infrared Laser Diode Spectrometer (LDS) using new commercial diode laser technology at 2.68 microm, (3) LICOR NDIR analyzer and (4) flasks. LDS, LICOR and flasks measurements were made in the same location, LICOR and flasks being taken as reference. Horizontal HDIAL measurements of CO(2) absorption using aerosol backscatter signal are reported. Using new spectroscopic data in the 2 microm band and meteorological sensor measurements, a mean CO(2) mixing ratio is inferred by the HDIAL in a 1 km long path above the 15m height location of the CO(2) in situ sensors. We compare HDIAL and LDS measurements with the LICOR data for 30 min of time averaging. The mean standard deviation of the HDIAL and the LDS CO(2) mixing ratio results are 3.3 ppm and 0.89 ppm, respectively. The bias of the HDIAL and the LDS measurements are -0.54 ppm and -0.99 ppm, respectively. PMID:18718810

  11. X-ray phase-amplitude contrast mapping of single-crystal alloys near the absorption edge of the alloy impurity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulin, A. Yu.; Davis, J. R.; Jones, N. T.; Zaumseil, P.

    1998-11-01

    An experimental-analytical method for the nondestructive structural and chemical composition mapping of single-crystal alloys is proposed, implemented, and successfully tested. The technique is based on analytical measurements of phase and amplitude changes in a narrow polychromatic region near the absorption edge of the alloy impurity. Synchrotron radiation energies of 11.096-11.105 keV were used to measure the Bragg diffraction profiles near the absorption edge of germanium at 11.103 keV in SiGe/Si crystal alloy superstructures. Physical dimensions and chemical composition of SiGe alloys were determined with a spatial resolution 8.6 Å.

  12. Measurement of tropospheric trace gases by long-path differential absorption spectroscopy during the 1993 OH Photochemistry Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, J. W.; Jakoubek, R. O.; Mount, G. H.

    1997-03-01

    In August and September 1993 a comparative study of tropospheric long-path absorption techniques with in situ methods was performed for both the hydroxyl radical and the other important trace species. Long-path measurements were made over the 10.3 km path between Fritz Peak Observatory and Caribou Mine in the mountains 17 km west of Boulder, Colorado. At Caribou Mine, a 121 element, 1 m2 retroreflector array folds the optical path to give a total path of 20.6 km. The in situ instruments were located at Idaho Hill 0.5 km northwest of Caribou Mine. The optical design and analysis techniques used to obtain the path-integrated concentrations of O3, CH2O, SO2, and NO2 will be presented. The spectrograph used in this study is a 1/4 m double, crossed Czerny-Turner that employs a diode array detector allowing the acquisition of 40 nm spectral bands in the near UV and visible spectral regions. This system also utilizes automatic alignment and self-adjusting time integration so the system will acquire data in an unattended mode. The spectral bands selected for this study permit the simultaneous measurement of O3, NO2, CH2O, and SO2; NO2 and H2O; and NO3 and H2O. The data analysis uses a nonlinear least squares regression procedure to deduce the concentration of each of the species present in the atmosphere and also provides an effective method for removing the influence of scattered solar light for daytime measurements. An estimate of the measurement precision can be found by comparing atmospheric spectra analyzed with two different IO spectra; one measured through the atmosphere and the other a direct arc lamp spectrum.

  13. Phase unwrapping in spectral X-ray differential phase-contrast imaging with an energy-resolving photon-counting pixel detector.

    PubMed

    Epple, Franz M; Ehn, Sebastian; Thibault, Pierre; Koehler, Thomas; Potdevin, Guillaume; Herzen, Julia; Pennicard, David; Graafsma, Heinz; Noël, Peter B; Pfeiffer, Franz

    2015-03-01

    Grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging has proven to be feasible with conventional X-ray sources. The polychromatic spectrum generally limits the performance of the interferometer but benefit can be gained with an energy-sensitive detector. In the presented work, we employ the energy-discrimination capability to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts. We propose to use the phase shifts, which are measured in distinct energy bins, to estimate the optimal phase shift in the sense of maximum likelihood. We demonstrate that our method is able to correct for phase-wrapping artefacts, to improve the contrast-to-noise ratio and to reduce beam hardening due to the modelled energy dependency. The method is evaluated on experimental data which are measured with a laboratory Talbot-Lau interferometer equipped with a conventional polychromatic X-ray source and an energy-sensitive photon-counting pixel detector. Our work shows, that spectral imaging is an important step to move differential phase-contrast imaging closer to pre-clinical and clinical applications, where phase wrapping is particularly problematic. PMID:25163054

  14. Self-Calibration and Laser Energy Monitor Validations for a Double-Pulsed 2-Micron CO2 Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Singh, Upendra N.; Petros, Mulugeta; Remus, Ruben; Yu, Jirong

    2015-01-01

    Double-pulsed 2-micron integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is well suited for atmospheric CO2 remote sensing. The IPDA lidar technique relies on wavelength differentiation between strong and weak absorbing features of the gas normalized to the transmitted energy. In the double-pulse case, each shot of the transmitter produces two successive laser pulses separated by a short interval. Calibration of the transmitted pulse energies is required for accurate CO2 measurement. Design and calibration of a 2-micron double-pulse laser energy monitor is presented. The design is based on an InGaAs pin quantum detector. A high-speed photo-electromagnetic quantum detector was used for laser-pulse profile verification. Both quantum detectors were calibrated using a reference pyroelectric thermal detector. Calibration included comparing the three detection technologies in the single-pulsed mode, then comparing the quantum detectors in the double-pulsed mode. In addition, a self-calibration feature of the 2-micron IPDA lidar is presented. This feature allows one to monitor the transmitted laser energy, through residual scattering, with a single detection channel. This reduces the CO2 measurement uncertainty. IPDA lidar ground validation for CO2 measurement is presented for both calibrated energy monitor and self-calibration options. The calibrated energy monitor resulted in a lower CO2 measurement bias, while self-calibration resulted in a better CO2 temporal profiling when compared to the in situ sensor.

  15. Pretreatment of cultured preadipocytes with arachidonic acid during the differentiation phase without a cAMP-elevating agent enhances fat storage after the maturation phase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Ferdous; Syeda, Pinky Karim; Nartey, Michael Nii N; Rahman, Mohammad Shahidur; Islam, Mohammad Safiqul; Nishimura, Kohji; Jisaka, Mitsuo; Shono, Fumiaki; Yokota, Kazushige

    2016-03-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) and the related prostanoids exert complex effects on the adipocyte differentiation depending on the culture conditions and life stages. Here, we investigated the effect of the pretreatment of cultured 3T3-L1 preadipocytes with exogenous AA during the differentiation phase without 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), a cAMP-elevating agent, on the storage of fats after the maturation phase. This pretreatment with AA stimulated appreciably adipogenesis after the maturation phase as evident with the up-regulated gene expression of adipogenic markers. The stimulatory effect of the pretreatment with AA was attenuated by the co-incubation with each of cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors. Among exogenous prostanoids and related compounds, the pretreatment with MRE-269, a selective agonist of the IP receptor for prostaglandin (PG) I2, strikingly stimulated the storage of fats in adipocytes. The gene expression analysis of arachidonate COX pathway revealed that the transcript levels of inducible COX-2, membrane-bound PGE synthase-1, and PGF synthase declined more greatly in cultured preadipocytes treated with AA. By contrast, the expression levels of COX-1, cytosolic PGE synthase, and PGI synthase remained constitutive. The treatment of cultured preadipocytes with AA resulted in the decreased synthesis of PGE2 and PGF2α serving as anti-adipogenic PGs although the biosynthesis of pro-adipogenic PGI2 was up-regulated during the differentiation phase. Moreover, the gene expression levels of EP4 and FP, the respective prostanoid receptors for PGE2 and PGF2α, were gradually suppressed by the supplementation with AA, whereas that of IP for PGI2 remained relatively constant. Collectively, these results suggest the predominant role of endogenous PGI2 in the stimulatory effect of the pretreatment of cultured preadipoccytes with AA during the differentiation phase without IBMX on adipogenesis after the maturation phase. PMID:26928048

  16. A comparative study of optical absorption and photocatalytic properties of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase and rutile TiO{sub 2} doped with transition metal cations

    SciTech Connect

    Kernazhitsky, L.; Shymanovska, V.; Gavrilko, T.; Naumov, V.; Kshnyakin, V.; Khalyavka, T.

    2013-02-15

    The effect of nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2} doping with transition metal cations (Cu{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Co{sup 2+}, Cr{sup 3+}) on their optical absorption and photocatalytic properties was investigated. The obtained metal-doped TiO{sub 2} samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis absorption spectroscopy. It is shown that doping effect on anatase (A) and rutile (R) properties is quite different, being much stronger and complicated on A than on R. Contrary to doped R, doped A revealed a significant red shift of the absorption edge along with the band gap narrowing. Photocatalytic activity of anatase increases upon doping in the order: AR/Co>R/Cu>R/Fe>R/Cr, indicating the inhibitory effect of impurity cations. This fact correlates with the decrease in the UV absorption of the doped rutile in the region of the Hg-lamp irradiation at 4.88 eV. - Graphical abstract: A red shift of the absorption edge of nanocrystalline single-phase anatase after doping with transition metal cations. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Single-phase anatase and rutile powders surface-doped with transition metal cations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Absorption edge and band gap of rutile do not change with surface doping. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Band gap of surface-doped anatase reduces being the lowest for A/Fe. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping improves photocatalytic activity of anatase. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface-doping inhibits photocatalytic activity of rutile.

  17. Pixelated detectors and improved efficiency for magnetic imaging in STEM differential phase contrast.

    PubMed

    Krajnak, Matus; McGrouther, Damien; Maneuski, Dzmitry; Shea, Val O'; McVitie, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The application of differential phase contrast imaging to the study of polycrystalline magnetic thin films and nanostructures has been hampered by the strong diffraction contrast resulting from the granular structure of the materials. In this paper we demonstrate how a pixelated detector has been used to detect the bright field disk in aberration corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and subsequent processing of the acquired data allows efficient enhancement of the magnetic contrast in the resulting images. Initial results from a charged coupled device (CCD) camera demonstrate the highly efficient nature of this improvement over previous methods. Further hardware development with the use of a direct radiation detector, the Medipix3, also shows the possibilities where the reduction in collection time is more than an order of magnitude compared to the CCD. We show that this allows subpixel measurement of the beam deflection due to the magnetic induction. While the detection and processing is data intensive we have demonstrated highly efficient DPC imaging whereby pixel by pixel interpretation of the induction variation is realised with great potential for nanomagnetic imaging. PMID:27085170

  18. Ex vivo differential phase contrast and magnetic resonance imaging for characterization of human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Meletta, Romana; Borel, Nicole; Stolzmann, Paul; Astolfo, Alberto; Klohs, Jan; Stampanoni, Marco; Rudin, Markus; Schibli, Roger; Krämer, Stefanie D; Herde, Adrienne Müller

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive detection of specific atherosclerotic plaque components related to vulnerability is of high clinical relevance to prevent cerebrovascular events. The feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for characterization of plaque components was already demonstrated. We aimed to evaluate the potential of ex vivo differential phase contrast X-ray tomography (DPC) to accurately characterize human carotid plaque components in comparison to high field multicontrast MRI and histopathology. Two human plaque segments, obtained from carotid endarterectomy, classified according to criteria of the American Heart Association as stable and unstable plaque, were examined by ex vivo DPC tomography and multicontrast MRI (T1-, T2-, and proton density-weighted imaging, magnetization transfer contrast, diffusion-weighted imaging). To identify specific plaque components, the plaques were subsequently sectioned and stained for fibrous and cellular components, smooth muscle cells, hemosiderin, and fibrin. Histological data were then matched with DPC and MR images to define signal criteria for atherosclerotic plaque components. Characteristic structures, such as the lipid and necrotic core covered by a fibrous cap, calcification and hemosiderin deposits were delineated by histology and found with excellent sensitivity, resolution and accuracy in both imaging modalities. DPC tomography was superior to MRI regarding resolution and soft tissue contrast. Ex vivo DPC tomography allowed accurate identification of structures and components of atherosclerotic plaques at different lesion stages, in good correlation with histopathological findings. PMID:26179860

  19. Towards x-ray differential phase contrast imaging on a compact setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thüring, T.; Modregger, P.; Pinzer, B. R.; Wang, Z.; Rutishauser, S.; David, C.; Grund, T.; Kenntner, J.; Stampanoni, M.

    2011-03-01

    A new imaging setup, aimed to perform differential X-ray phase contrast (DPC) imaging with a Talbot interferometer on a microfocus X-ray tube, is demonstrated. The main features compared to recently proposed setups are an extremely short source to detector distance, high spatial resolution and a large field of view. The setup is designed for an immediate integration into a industrial micro CT scanner. In this paper, technical challenges of a compact setup, namely the critical source coherence and divergence, are discussed. A theoretical analysis using wave optics based computer simulations is performed to estimate the DPC signal visibility and the size of the field of view for a given setup geometry. The maximization of the signal visibility as a function of the inter-grating distance yields the optimal grating parameters. Imaging results using the optimized grating parameters are presented. The reduction of the field of view, being a consequence of the high beam divergence, was solved by fabricating new, cylindrically bent diffraction gratings. The fabrication process of these gratings required a change of the currently used wafer materials and an adaption of the manufacturing techniques. The implementation of the new setup represents a major step forward for the industrial application of the DPC technique.

  20. Phase integral approximation for coupled ordinary differential equations of the Schroedinger type

    SciTech Connect

    Skorupski, Andrzej A.

    2008-05-15

    Four generalizations of the phase integral approximation (PIA) to sets of ordinary differential equations of Schroedinger type [u{sub j}{sup ''}(x)+{sigma}{sub k=1}{sup N}R{sub jk}(x)u{sub k}(x)=0, j=1,2,...,N] are described. The recurrence relations for higher order corrections are given in a form valid to arbitrary order and for the matrix R(x)[{identical_to}(R{sub jk}(x))] either Hermitian or non-Hermitian. For Hermitian and negative definite R(x) matrices, a Wronskian conserving PIA theory is formulated, which generalizes Fulling's current conserving theory pertinent to positive definite R(x) matrices. The idea of a modification of the PIA, which is well known for one equation [u{sup ''}(x)+R(x)u(x)=0], is generalized to sets. A simplification of Wronskian or current conserving theories is proposed which in each order eliminates one integration from the formulas for higher order corrections. If the PIA is generated by a nondegenerate eigenvalue of the R(x) matrix, the eliminated integration is the only one present. In that case, the simplified theory becomes fully algorithmic and is generalized to non-Hermitian R(x) matrices. The general theory is illustrated by a few examples automatically generated by using the author's program in MATHEMATICA published in e-print arXiv:0710.5406 [math-ph].

  1. Interior tomography in x-ray differential phase contrast CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thériault Lauzier, Pascal; Qi, Zhihua; Zambelli, Joseph; Bevins, Nicholas; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2012-05-01

    Differential phase contrast computed tomography (DPC-CT) is an x-ray imaging method that uses the wave properties of imaging photons as the contrast mechanism. It has been demonstrated that DPC images can be obtained using a conventional x-ray tube and a Talbot-Lau-type interferometer. Due to the limited size of the gratings, current data acquisition systems only offer a limited field of view, and thus are prone to data truncation. As a result, the reconstructed DPC-CT image may suffer from image artifacts and increased inaccuracy in the reconstructed image values. In this paper, we demonstrate that a small region of interest (ROI) within a large object can be accurately and stably reconstructed using fully truncated projection datasets provided that a priori information on electron density is known for a small region inside the ROI. The method reconstructs an image iteratively to satisfy a group of physical conditions by using a projection onto convex set (POCS) approach. In this work, this POCS algorithm is validated using both numerical simulations and physical phantom experimental data. In both cases, the root mean square error is reduced by an order of magnitude with respect to the truncated analytic reconstructions. Truncation artifacts observed in the latter reconstructions are eliminated using the POCS algorithm.

  2. Enhanced squeezing by absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.

    2016-04-01

    Absorption is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex absorption spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires absorption of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the absorption spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, absorption can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to absorption.

  3. Solid-phase differential display and bacterial expression systems in selection and functional analysis of cDNAs.

    PubMed

    Ståhl, S; Odeberg, J; Larsson, M; Røsok, O; Ree, A H; Lundeberg, J

    1999-01-01

    Differential gene expression can be expected during activation and differentiation of cells as well as during pathological conditions, such as cancer. A number of strategies have been described to identify and understand isolated differentially expressed genes. The differential display methodology has rapidly become a widely used technique to identify differentially expressed mRNAs. In this chapter we described a variant of the differential display method based on solid-phase technology. The solid-phase procedure offers an attractive alternative to solution-based differential display because minute amounts of sample can be analyzed in considerably less time than previously. The employed solid support, monodisperse super paramagnetic beads, which circumvents precipitation and centrifugations steps, has also allowed for optimization of the critical enzymatic and preparative steps in the differential display methodology. We also described how bacterial expression can be used as a means to elucidate gene function. An efficient dual-expression system was presented, together with a basic concept describing how parallel expression of selected portions of cDNAs can be used for production of cDNA-encoded proteins as parts of affinity-tagged fusion proteins. The fusion proteins are suitable both for the generation of antibodies reactive to the target cDNA-encoded protein and for the subsequent affinity enrichment of such antibodies. Affinity-enriched antibodies have proved to be valuable tools in various assays, including immunoblotting and immunocytochemical staining, and can thus be used to localize the target cDNA-encoded protein to certain cells in a tissue section or even to a specific cell compartment or organelle within a cell. High-resolution localization of a cDNA-encoded protein would provide valuable information toward the understanding of protein function. PMID:10349662

  4. The Role of Paracrine and Autocrine Signaling in the Early Phase of Adipogenic Differentiation of Adipose-derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Vedel, Søren; Skafte-Pedersen, Peder; Sabourin, David; Collas, Philippe; Bruus, Henrik; Dufva, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction High cell density is known to enhance adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, suggesting secretion of signaling factors or cell-contact-mediated signaling. By employing microfluidic biochip technology, we have been able to separate these two processes and study the secretion pathways. Methods and results Adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) cultured in a microfluidic system was investigated under perfusion conditions with an adipogenic medium or an adipogenic medium supplemented with supernatant from differentiating ASCs (conditioned medium). Conditioned medium increased adipogenic differentiation compared to adipogenic medium with respect to accumulation of lipid-filled vacuoles and gene expression of key adipogenic markers (C/EBPα, C/EBPβ, C/EBPδ, PPARγ, LPL and adiponectin). The positive effects of conditioned medium were observed early in the differentiation process. Conclusions Using different cell densities and microfluidic perfusion cell cultures to suppress the effects of cell-released factors, we have demonstrated the significant role played by auto- or paracrine signaling in adipocyte differentiation. The cell-released factor(s) were shown to act in the recruitment phase of the differentiation process. PMID:23723991

  5. Comparative profiling of differentially expressed microRNAs between the follicular and luteal phases ovaries of goats.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Long; Chen, Tao; Sui, Menghua; Han, Chunyang; Fang, Fugui; Ma, Yuehui; Chu, Mingxing; Zhang, Xiaorong; Liu, Cuiyan; Ling, Yinghui

    2016-01-01

    To explore if the regulation at post-transcriptional level of follicular phase (Fols) to luteal phase (Luts) transition occurs in the ovaries of Anhuai goats, the differentially expressed microRNAs (miRNAs) of ovaries in the Fols and Luts were analyzed using Solexa sequencing in the study. In total, 320 known miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 339 and 353 known miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. In addition, 45 novel miRNAs were co-expressed in the two phases, 70 and 94 novel miRNAs were expressed in the ovary in the Fols and Luts, respectively. Let-7f was the highest expressed significantly different known miRNA in the two phases, and mir-159 was the highest expressed significantly different novel miRNA in the two phases, which may participate in the follicular-luteal transition of Anhuai goats. GO annotation and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to analyze the target genes of differentially expressed miRNAs detected in the two phases. The results will help to further understand the role of miRNAs in the regulation of follicular to luteal transition in goat ovaries. PMID:27610292

  6. Space-borne remote sensing of CO2, CH4, and N2O by integrated path differential absorption lidar: a sensitivity analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Kiemle, C.; Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Fix, A.; Houweling, S.

    2008-03-01

    CO2, CH4, and N2O are recognised as the most important greenhouse gases, the concentrations of which increase rapidly through human activities. Space-borne integrated path differential absorption lidar allows global observations at day and night over land and water surfaces in all climates. In this study we investigate potential sources of measurement errors and compare them with the scientific requirements. Our simulations reveal that moderate-size instruments in terms of telescope aperture (0.5 1.5 m) and laser average power (0.4 4 W) potentially have a low random error of the greenhouse gas column which is 0.2% for CO2 and 0.4% for CH4 for soundings at 1.6 μm, 0.4% for CO2 at 2.1 μm, 0.6% for CH4 at 2.3 μm, and 0.3% for N2O at 3.9 μm. Coherent detection instruments are generally limited by speckle noise, while direct detection instruments suffer from high detector noise using current technology. The wavelength selection in the vicinity of the absorption line is critical as it controls the height region of highest sensitivity, the temperature cross-sensitivity, and the demands on frequency stability. For CO2, an error budget of 0.08% is derived from our analysis of the sources of systematic errors. Among them, the frequency stability of ± 0.3 MHz for the laser transmitter and spectral purity of 99.9% in conjunction with a narrow-band spectral filter of 1 GHz (FWHM) are identified to be challenging instrument requirements for a direct detection CO2 system operating at 1.6 μm.

  7. A mobile differential absorption lidar to measure sub-hourly fluctuation of tropospheric ozone profiles in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, J. T.; McGee, T. J.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L. W.; Hoff, R. M.

    2014-10-01

    Tropospheric ozone profiles have been retrieved from the new ground-based National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center TROPospheric OZone DIfferential Absorption Lidar (GSFC TROPOZ DIAL) in Greenbelt, MD (38.99° N, 76.84° W, 57 m a.s.l.), from 400 m to 12 km a.g.l. Current atmospheric satellite instruments cannot peer through the optically thick stratospheric ozone layer to remotely sense boundary layer tropospheric ozone. In order to monitor this lower ozone more effectively, the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) has been developed, which currently consists of five stations across the US. The GSFC TROPOZ DIAL is based on the DIAL technique, which currently detects two wavelengths, 289 and 299 nm, with multiple receivers. The transmitted wavelengths are generated by focusing the output of a quadrupled Nd:YAG laser beam (266 nm) into a pair of Raman cells, filled with high-pressure hydrogen and deuterium, using helium as buffer gas. With the knowledge of the ozone absorption coefficient at these two wavelengths, the range-resolved number density can be derived. An interesting atmospheric case study involving the stratospheric-tropospheric exchange (STE) of ozone is shown, to emphasize the regional importance of this instrument as well as to assess the validation and calibration of data. There was a low amount of aerosol aloft, and an iterative aerosol correction has been performed on the retrieved data, which resulted in less than a 3 ppb correction to the final ozone concentration. The retrieval yields an uncertainty of 16-19% from 0 to 1.5 km, 10-18% from 1.5 to 3 km, and 11-25% from 3 to 12 km according to the relevant aerosol concentration aloft. There are currently surface ozone measurements hourly and ozonesonde launches occasionally, but this system will be the first to make routine tropospheric ozone profile measurements in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area.

  8. CHARM-F: An airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for the simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wirth, M.; Amediek, A.; Büdenbender, C.; Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Kiemle, C.; Quatrevalet, M.; Hoffmann, D.; Löhring, J.; Klein, V.; Schöggl, R.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) - in collaboration with Fraunhofer-Institut für Lasertechnik (ILT) and Kayser-Threde GmbH (KT) - is developing CHARM-F, an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) LIDAR for simultaneous measurement of CO2 and CH4 columns. Design goal is a compact and rugged instrument optimized for airborne use on board of DLR's long range research aircraft HALO. The main scientific goal of the instrument is to provide precise column measurements of CO2 and CH4 to infer fluxes of these important greenhouse gases by means of inverse modeling. For this purpose, very stringent requirements concerning accuracy and precision have to be met since typical surface sources and sinks alter the total column only by a few percent. To achieve this, CHARM-F uses laser sources emitting pulse-pairs with nanosecond duration which allows for a precise ranging and a proper separation of atmospheric influences (i.e. aerosol and clouds) from the ground return leading to an unambiguously defined column (no airmass factors involved). Two laser systems - one for each trace gas - are employed using highly efficient and robust Nd:YAG lasers to pump optical parametric oscillators (OPO) which convert the pump radiation to the desired measurement wavelengths in the near infrared. Each laser system emits a pulse pair having different wavelengths. One is tuned to an absorption line of the trace gas under consideration and the other one to a nearby wavelength with much less absorption. The close temporal pulse separation of 250 μs together with a relatively large spot size of 30 m on ground ensures that nearly the same area is illuminated by both pulses. To achieve single-mode operation, both the pump and the OPO are injection seeded. The seed lasers are locked to a gas cell filled with a mixture of CO2 and CH4 to ensure an absolute wavelength calibration. Furthermore, deviations of the wavelength between outgoing laser pulse and the seed lasers

  9. Understanding gas phase modifier interactions in rapid analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-01-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility- mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using mucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab-initio thermochemical results we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry in mobility differences, but at lower temperatures multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects. PMID:24452298

  10. Understanding Gas Phase Modifier Interactions in Rapid Analysis by Differential Mobility-Tandem Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafle, Amol; Coy, Stephen L.; Wong, Bryan M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Glick, James J.; Vouros, Paul

    2014-07-01

    A systematic study involving the use and optimization of gas-phase modifiers in quantitative differential mobility-mass spectrometry (DMS-MS) analysis is presented using nucleoside-adduct biomarkers of DNA damage as an important reference point for analysis in complex matrices. Commonly used polar protic and polar aprotic modifiers have been screened for use against two deoxyguanosine adducts of DNA: N-(deoxyguanosin-8-yl)-4-aminobiphenyl (dG-C8-4-ABP) and N-(deoxyguanosin-8-y1)-2-amino-l-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine (dG-C8-PhIP). Particular attention was paid to compensation voltage (CoV) shifts, peak shapes, and product ion signal intensities while optimizing the DMS-MS conditions. The optimized parameters were then applied to rapid quantitation of the DNA adducts in calf thymus DNA. After a protein precipitation step, adduct levels corresponding to less than one modification in 106 normal DNA bases were detected using the DMS-MS platform. Based on DMS fundamentals and ab initio thermochemical results, we interpret the complexity of DMS modifier responses in terms of thermal activation and the development of solvent shells. At very high bulk gas temperature, modifier dipole moment may be the most important factor in cluster formation and cluster geometry, but at lower temperatures, multi-neutral clusters are important and less predictable. This work provides a useful protocol for targeted DNA adduct quantitation and a basis for future work on DMS modifier effects.

  11. Observation of tropospheric NO2 by airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy in the Pearl River Delta region, south China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jin; Xie, Pin-Hua; Si, Fu-Qi; Li, Ang; Wu, Feng-Cheng; Wang, Yang; Liu, Jian-Guo; Liu, Wen-Qing; Andreas, Hartl; Chan, Ka Lok

    2014-09-01

    An airborne multi-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopic (AMAX-DOAS) instrument was developed and applied to measure tropospheric NO2 in the Pearl River Delta region in the south of China. By combining the measurements in nadir and zenith directions and analyzing the UV and visible spectral region using the DOAS method, information about tropospheric NO2 vertical columns was obtained. Strong tropospheric NO2 signals were detected when flying over heavilly polluted regions and point sources like plants. The AMAX-DOAS results were compared with ground-based MAX-DOAS observations in the southwest of Zhuhai city using the same parameters for radiative transport calculations. The difference in vertical column data between the two instruments is about 8%. Our data were also compared with those from OMI and fair agreement was obtained with a correlation coefficient R of 0.61. The difference between the two instruments can be attributed to the different spatial resolution and the temporal mismatch during the measurements.

  12. A Compact Ti:Sapphire Laser With its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) for an Airborne Ozone Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) Transmitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Songsheng; Storm, Mark E.; Marsh, Waverly D.; Petway, Larry B.; Edwards, William C.; Barnes, James C.

    2000-01-01

    A compact and high-pulse-energy Ti:Sapphire laser with its Third Harmonic Generation (THG) has been developed for an airborne ozone differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to study the distributions and concentrations of the ozone throughout the troposphere. The Ti:Sapphire laser, pumped by a frequency-doubled Nd:YAG laser and seeded by a single mode diode laser, is operated either at 867 nm or at 900 nm with a pulse repetition frequency of 20 Hz. High energy laser pulses (more than 110 mJ/pulse) at 867 nm or 900 nm with a desired beam quality have been achieved and utilized to generate its third harmonic at 289nm or 300nm, which are on-line and off-line wavelengths of an airborne ozone DIAL. After being experimentally compared with Beta-Barium Borate (beta - BaB2O4 or BBO) nonlinear crystals, two Lithium Triborate (LBO) crystals (5 x 5 x 20 cu mm) are selected for the Third Harmonic Generation (THG). In this paper, we report the Ti:Sapphire laser at 900 nm and its third harmonic at 300 nm. The desired high ultraviolet (UV) output pulse energy is more than 30 mJ at 300 nm and the energy conversion efficiency from 900 nm to 300 nm is 30%.

  13. Differential optical absorption spectrometer measurement of NO 2, SO 2, O 3, HCHO and aromatic volatile organics in ambient air of Kaohsiung Petroleum Refinery in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Kong Hwa; Sree, Usha; Hong Tseng, Sen; Wu, Chien-Hou; Lo, Jiunn-Guang

    UV-differential optical absorption spectrometer (DOAS) technique is considered as a promising technique to detect gaseous pollutants and was applied to conduct one-week continuous measurements in the Chinese Petroleum (CPC) refinery plant located in Lin Yuan industrial park of Kaohsiung, Southern Taiwan. With the combination of local meteorological information, including solar radiation, wind direction and speed, the results showed that the concentrations of aromatic compounds and formaldehyde (HCHO) were higher at night while the values of ozone, NO 2 and SO 2 were high during the day. The major source of aromatics was the aromatic extraction unit in the refinery while NO 2 and SO 2 were mainly emitted from chimneys with not very high average concentrations. Formaldehyde concentration was above 50 ppbv during night. There exists an apparent correlation between the variation of ground-level ozone concentration and photochemical reactions. The results indicate that in addition to benzene and toluene, ozone is a deleterious pollutant. The commercial DOAS system provides reliable information on distribution patterns of major air pollutants depending on their concentration levels in ambient air.

  14. New Results from Frequency and Energy Reference Measurements during the first Test Flight with the Airborne Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar System CHARM-F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehret, G.; Fix, A.; Amediek, A.; Quatrevalet, M.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Path Differential Absorption Lidar (IPDA) technique is regarded as a suitable means for the measurement of methane and carbon dioxide columns from satellite or aircraft platforms with unprecedented accuracy. Currently, the German-French methane mission MERLIN (Methan Remote Lidar Mission) is prepared. At the same time CHARM-F, an aircraft installed system has been developed at DLR as an airborne demonstrator for a spaceborne greenhouse gas mission. Both use e.g. optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) in a double-pulse mode as the transmitter. Of particular importance for both instruments are the sub-modules required for the frequency stabilization of the transmitter wavelength and, since the IPDA technique, in contrast to DIAL, requires the exact knowledge of the energy ratio of outgoing on-line. The coherence of the lidar transmitter gives rise to speckle effects which have to be considered for the monitoring of the energy ratio of outgoing on- and off-line pulses. For the frequency reference of CHARM-F, a very successful stabilization scheme has been developed which will also serve as the reference for MERLIN. In Spring 2015, CHARM-F was flown aboard the German HALO aircraft for the first time which enables a detailed view on the performance of both the energy calibration and frequency reference subsystems under real flight conditions. As an initial quality check we will compared the airborne results to previous lab measurements which have been performed under stable environmental conditions.

  15. Simulation and Theory of Speckle Noise for an Annular Aperture Frequency-Modulation Differential-Absorption LIDAR (FM-DIAL) System

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Paul E.; Batdorf, Michael T.; Strasburg, Jana D.; Harper, Warren W.

    2009-05-28

    This paper presents theory of speckle noise for a frequency-modulation differential-absorption LIDAR system along with simulation results. These results show an unexpected relationship between the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the speckle and the distance to the retro-reflector or target. In simulation, the use of an annular aperture in the system results in a higher SNR at midrange distances than at short or long distances. This peak in SNR occurs in the region where the laser’s Gaussian beam profile approximately fills the target. This was unexpected since it does not occur in the theory or simulations of the same system with a circular aperture. By including the autocorrelation of this annular aperture and expanding the complex correlation factor used in speckle models to include conditions not generally covered, a more complete theoretical model is derived for this system. Obscuration of the center of the beam at near distances is also a major factor in this relationship between SNR and distance. We conclude by comparing the resulting SNR as a function of distance from this expanded theoretical model to the simulations of the system over a double-pass horizontal range of 10 meters to 10 km at a wavelength of 1.28 micrometers

  16. Direct measurements of HONO and NO2 by tunable infrared differential absorption spectroscopy; Results from two field campaigns sampling aircraft exhaust and ambient urban air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H.; Santoni, G.; Herndon, S. C.; Wood, E. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Munger, J. W.; Wofsy, S. C.; Zahniser, M. S.; McManus, J. B.; Nelson, D. D.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrous acid (HONO) is an important source of hydroxyl radicals (OH), the main oxidizing agent in the atmosphere. However, gaseous HONO has historically proven difficult to measure accurately and to date there is no standard technique. We describe a new instrument capable of high-frequency measurements of HONO and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) mixing ratios by tunable infrared differential absorption spectrometry. Mid-infrared light from two continuous-wave mode quantum cascade lasers traverse a 210 m path through a multi-pass astigmatic cell at reduced pressures for the direct detection of HONO (1660 cm-1) and NO2 (1604 cm-1). We achieve an absorbance precision less than 3×10-6 Hz-1 in one second, which translates to detection limits (S/N=3) of 300 and 30 ppt for HONO and NO2, respectively, in one second. Both lasers and the detector are thermoelectrically cooled, facilitating long-term unattended measurements. We also report preliminary results from two field campaigns; the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment (AAFEX) and the Study of Houston Air Radical Precursors (SHARP). At AAFEX, HONO emission ratios relative to CO2 and NOy observed in commercial aircraft exhaust are larger than in most other combustion sources and likely to play a significant role in regional HOx chemistry. Preliminary analysis from the SHARP campaign shows good agreement in HONO and NO2 levels between various measurement techniques.

  17. Analysis of a random modulation single photon counting differential absorption lidar system for space-borne atmospheric CO2 sensing.

    PubMed

    Ai, X; Pérez-Serrano, A; Quatrevalet, M; Nock, R W; Dahnoun, N; Ehret, G; Esquivias, I; Rarity, J G

    2016-09-01

    The ability to observe the Earth's carbon cycles from space provides scientists an important tool to analyze climate change. Current proposed systems are mainly based on pulsed integrated path differential absorption lidar, in which two high energy pulses at different wavelengths interrogate the atmosphere sequentially for its transmission properties and are back-scattered by the ground. In this work an alternative approach based on random modulation single photon counting is proposed and analyzed; this system can take advantage of a less power demanding semiconductor laser in intensity modulated continuous wave operation, benefiting from a better efficiency, reliability and radiation hardness. Our approach is validated via numerical simulations considering current technological readiness, demonstrating its potential to obtain a 1.5 ppm retrieval precision for 50 km averaging with 2.5 W average power in a space-borne scenario. A major limiting factor is the ambient shot noise, if ultra-narrow band filtering technology could be applied, 0.5 ppm retrieval precision would be attainable. PMID:27607715

  18. Joint reconstruction of absorption and refractive properties in propagation-based x-ray phase-contrast tomography via a non-linear image reconstruction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yujia; Wang, Kun; Gursoy, Doga; Soriano, Carmen; De Carlo, Francesco; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    Propagation-based X-ray phase-contrast tomography (XPCT) provides the opportunity to image weakly absorbing objects and is being explored actively for a variety of important pre-clinical applications. Quantitative XPCT image reconstruction methods typically involve a phase retrieval step followed by application of an image reconstruction algorithm. Most approaches to phase retrieval require either acquiring multiple images at different object-to-detector distances or introducing simplifying assumptions, such as a single-material assumption, to linearize the imaging model. In order to overcome these limitations, a non-linear image reconstruction method has been proposed previously that jointly estimates the absorption and refractive properties of an object from XPCT projection data acquired at a single propagation distance, without the need to linearize the imaging model. However, the numerical properties of the associated non-convex optimization problem remain largely unexplored. In this study, computer simulations are conducted to investigate the feasibility of the joint reconstruction problem in practice. We demonstrate that the joint reconstruction problem is ill-posed and sensitive to system inconsistencies. Particularly, the method can generate accurate refractive index images only if the object is thin and has no phase-wrapping in the data. However, we also observed that, for weakly absorbing objects, the refractive index images reconstructed by the joint reconstruction method are, in general, more accurate than those reconstructed using methods that simply ignore the object's absorption.

  19. Quantitative Phase Composition of TiO2-Coated Nanoporous-Au Monoliths by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Correlations to Catalytic

    SciTech Connect

    Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Wichmann, Andre; Wittstock, Arne; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Ye, Jianchao; Willey, Trevor M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; van Buuren, Tony; Biener, Juergen; Baumer, Marcus; Biener, Monika M.

    2014-02-03

    Porous titania/metal composite materials have many potential applications in the fields of green catalysis, energy harvesting, and storage in which both the overall morphology of the nanoporous host material and the crystallographic phase of the titania (TiO 2) guest determine the material’s performance. New insights into the structure–function relationships of these materials were obtained by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy that, for example, provides quantitative crystallographic phase composition from ultrathin, nanostructured titania films, including sensitivity to amorphous components. We demonstrate that crystallographic phase, morphology, and catalytic activity of TiO 2-functionalized nanoporous gold (np-Au) can be controlled by a simple annealing procedure (T < 1300 K). The material was prepared by atomic layer deposition of ~2 nm thick TiO2 on millimeter-sized samples of np-Au (40–50 nm mean ligament size) and catalytically investigated with respect to aerobic CO oxidation. Moreover, the annealing-induced changes in catalytic activity are correlated with concurrent morphology and phase changes as provided by cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy.

  20. Quantitative Phase Composition of TiO2-Coated Nanoporous-Au Monoliths by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and Correlations to Catalytic

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bagge-Hansen, Michael; Wichmann, Andre; Wittstock, Arne; Lee, Jonathan R. I.; Ye, Jianchao; Willey, Trevor M.; Kuntz, Joshua D.; van Buuren, Tony; Biener, Juergen; Baumer, Marcus; et al

    2014-02-03

    Porous titania/metal composite materials have many potential applications in the fields of green catalysis, energy harvesting, and storage in which both the overall morphology of the nanoporous host material and the crystallographic phase of the titania (TiO 2) guest determine the material’s performance. New insights into the structure–function relationships of these materials were obtained by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy that, for example, provides quantitative crystallographic phase composition from ultrathin, nanostructured titania films, including sensitivity to amorphous components. We demonstrate that crystallographic phase, morphology, and catalytic activity of TiO 2-functionalized nanoporous gold (np-Au) can be controlled by amore » simple annealing procedure (T < 1300 K). The material was prepared by atomic layer deposition of ~2 nm thick TiO2 on millimeter-sized samples of np-Au (40–50 nm mean ligament size) and catalytically investigated with respect to aerobic CO oxidation. Moreover, the annealing-induced changes in catalytic activity are correlated with concurrent morphology and phase changes as provided by cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy.« less

  1. Glutathionylation and Reduction of Methacrolein in Tomato Plants Account for Its Absorption from the Vapor Phase1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Muramoto, Shoko; Matsubara, Yayoi; Mwenda, Cynthia Mugo; Koeduka, Takao; Sakami, Takuya; Tani, Akira; Matsui, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    A large portion of the volatile organic compounds emitted by plants are oxygenated to yield reactive carbonyl species, which have a big impact on atmospheric chemistry. Deposition to vegetation driven by the absorption of reactive carbonyl species into plants plays a major role in cleansing the atmosphere, but the mechanisms supporting this absorption have been little examined. Here, we performed model experiments using methacrolein (MACR), one of the major reactive carbonyl species formed from isoprene, and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. Tomato shoots enclosed in a jar with MACR vapor efficiently absorbed MACR. The absorption efficiency was much higher than expected from the gas/liquid partition coefficient of MACR, indicating that MACR was likely metabolized in leaf tissues. Isobutyraldehyde, isobutyl alcohol, and methallyl alcohol (MAA) were detected in the headspace and inside tomato tissues treated with MACR vapor, suggesting that MACR was enzymatically reduced. Glutathione (GSH) conjugates of MACR (MACR-GSH) and MAA (MAA-GSH) were also detected. MACR-GSH was essentially formed through spontaneous conjugation between endogenous GSH and exogenous MACR, and reduction of MACR-GSH to MAA-GSH was likely catalyzed by an NADPH-dependent enzyme in tomato leaves. Glutathionylation was the metabolic pathway most responsible for the absorption of MACR, but when the amount of MACR exceeded the available GSH, MACR that accumulated reduced photosynthetic capacity. In an experiment simulating the natural environment using gas flow, MACR-GSH and MAA-GSH accumulation accounted for 30% to 40% of the MACR supplied. These results suggest that MACR metabolism, especially spontaneous glutathionylation, is an essential factor supporting MACR absorption from the atmosphere by tomato plants. PMID:26169680

  2. Detection of a new 'nematic-like' phase in liquid crystal-amphiphile mixture by differential scanning calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Dan, Kaustabh Roy, Madhusudan Datta, Alokmay

    2014-04-24

    Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) studies on phase transitions of the pure liquid crystalline material N-4-methoxybenzylidene-4-butylaniline (MBBA) and mixtures of MBBA and the amphiphile Stearic Acid (StA) show significant changes in the behavior of mixture from pure MBBA, as regards the nematic-isotropic (N-I) transition temperature (T{sub c}) and other thermodynamic parameters like enthalpy, specific heat and activation energy with concentration of StA. In particular, the convexity of the Arrhenius plot in pure MBBA vanishes with StA concentration pointing to the formation of a new, perhaps 'nematic-like', phase in the mixtures.

  3. Upper bounds for the security of differential-phase-shift quantum key distribution with weak coherent states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curty, Marcos; Tamaki, Kiyoshi; Moroder, Tobias; Gómez-Sousa, Hipólito

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we present limitations imposed by sequential attacks on the maximal distance achievable by a differential-phase-shift (DPS) quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol with weak coherent pulses. Specifically, we compare the performance of two possible sequential attacks against DPS QKD where Eve realizes, respectively, optimal unambiguous state discrimination of Alice's signal states, and optimal unambiguous discrimination of the relative phases between consecutive signal states. We show that the second eavesdropping strategy provides tighter upper bounds for the security of a DPS QKD scheme than the former one.

  4. Analytical evaluation of the signal and noise propagation in x-ray differential phase-contrast computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raupach, Rainer; Flohr, Thomas G.

    2011-04-01

    We analyze the signal and noise propagation of differential phase-contrast computed tomography (PCT) compared with conventional attenuation-based computed tomography (CT) from a theoretical point of view. This work focuses on grating-based differential phase-contrast imaging. A mathematical framework is derived that is able to analytically predict the relative performance of both imaging techniques in the sense of the relative contrast-to-noise ratio for the contrast of any two materials. Two fundamentally different properties of PCT compared with CT are identified. First, the noise power spectra show qualitatively different characteristics implying a resolution-dependent performance ratio. The break-even point is derived analytically as a function of system parameters such as geometry and visibility. A superior performance of PCT compared with CT can only be achieved at a sufficiently high spatial resolution. Second, due to periodicity of phase information which is non-ambiguous only in a bounded interval statistical phase wrapping can occur. This effect causes a collapse of information propagation for low signals which limits the applicability of phase-contrast imaging at low dose.

  5. Unraveling the Solid-Liquid-Vapor Phase Transition Dynamics at the Atomic Level with Ultrafast X-Ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Lévy, A.; Goyon, C.; Combis, P.; Descamps, D.; Fourment, C.; Harmand, M.; Hulin, S.; Leguay, P. M.; Petit, S.; Peyrusse, O.; Santos, J. J.

    2011-12-01

    X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy (XANES) is a powerful probe of electronic and atomic structures in various media, ranging from molecules to condensed matter. We show how ultrafast time resolution opens new possibilities to investigate highly nonequilibrium states of matter including phase transitions. Based on a tabletop laser-plasma ultrafast x-ray source, we have performed a time-resolved (˜3ps) XANES experiment that reveals the evolution of an aluminum foil at the atomic level, when undergoing ultrafast laser heating and ablation. X-ray absorption spectra highlight an ultrafast transition from the crystalline solid to the disordered liquid followed by a progressive transition of the delocalized valence electronic structure (metal) down to localized atomic orbitals (nonmetal—vapor), as the average distance between atoms increases.

  6. Hybrid direct-detection differential phase shift keying-multipulse pulse position modulation techniques for optical communication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morra, Ahmed E.; Shalaby, Hossam M. H.; Hegazy, Salem F.; Obayya, Salah S. A.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, a hybrid differential phase shift keying-multipulse pulse position modulation (DPSK-MPPM) technique is proposed in order to enhance the receiver sensitivity of optical communication systems. Both binary and quadrature formats are adopted in the proposed systems. Direct-detection DPSK schemes that are based on an asymmetric Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a novel ultrafast discrete delay unit are presented to simplify the receiver implementation. Expressions for the bit-error rate (BER) of the proposed hybrid modulation techniques are derived taking into account the effect of the optical amplifier noise. Under the constraints of the same transmitted data rate, bandwidth, and average received optical signal-to-noise ratio, the BER performances of the proposed schemes are then evaluated numerically and compared with that of traditional differential binary phase shift keying (DBPSK), differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK), and MPPM schemes and with that of recent hybrid schemes. Furthermore, a comparison between the proposed systems and the traditional ones is held in terms of the bandwidth-utilization efficiency. Our results reveal that the proposed hybrid schemes are more energy-efficient and have higher receiver sensitivity compared with the traditional ones while improving the bandwidth-utilization efficiency. The proposed DPSK-MPPM system is ready to accommodate adjustable (or variable) bit rates, by virtue of the programmable delay integrated to the receiver system.

  7. Analysis of Absorption Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Gaseous- and Particle- Phase Emissions from Peat Fuel Combustion Under Controlled Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connolly, J. I.; Samburova, V.; Moosmüller, H.; Khlystov, A.

    2015-12-01

    Biomass and fossil fuel burning processes emit important organic pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) into the atmosphere. Smoldering combustion of peat is one of the largest contributors (up to 70%) of carbonaceous species and, therefore, it may be one of the main sources of these PAHs. PAHs can be detrimental to health, they are known to be potent mutagens and suspected carcinogens. They may also contribute to solar light absorption as the particles absorb in the blue and near ultraviolet (UV) region of the solar spectrum ("brown carbon" species). There is very little knowledge and large ambiguity regarding the contribution of PAHs to optical properties of organic carbon (OC) emitted from smoldering biomass combustion. This study focuses on quantifying and analyzing PAHs emitted from peat smoldering combustion to gain more knowledge on their optical properties. Five peat fuels collected in different regions of the world (Russia, USA) were burned under controlled conditions (e.g., relative humidity, combustion efficiency, fuel-moisture content) at the Desert Research Institute Biomass Burning facility (Reno, NV, USA). Combustion aerosols collected on TIGF filters followed by XAD resin cartridges were extracted and analyzed for gas-phase (semi-volatile) and particle-phase PAHs. Filter and XAD samples were extracted separately with dichloromethane followed by acetone using Accelerated Solvent Extractor (ACE 300, Dionex). To determine absorption properties, absorption spectra of extracts and standard PAHs were recorded between 190 and 900 nm with a UV/VIS spectrophotometer (PerkinElmer, Lambda 650). This poster will discuss the potential contribution of PAHs to brown carbon emitted from peat combustion and give a brief comparison with absorption spectra from biomass burning aerosols.

  8. Improving Atmospheric Correction for Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) Imaging Spectrometers with Iterative Fitting of Absorption By Three Phases of Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, E. A.; Thompson, D. R.; Green, R. O.; Gao, B. C.

    2014-12-01

    Airborne imaging spectrometers like the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) offer valuable insight into the Earth's terrestrial and ocean ecosystems, mineralogy, and land use. Estimating surface reflectance requires accounting for atmospheric absorption, which is sensitive to the local abundance of water vapor. Analysts typically estimate water vapor concentrations using the depths of absorption features, which can be inaccurate by up to 50% over surface features containing liquid water or ice. This can bias the retrieved water vapor maps and create atmospheric artifacts in reflectance spectra. A new retrieval method offers significant accuracy improvements over plant canopies or ice by estimating the path lengths of all three phases of water simultaneously, adjusting absorptions to best fit the measurement over a broader spectral interval. This paper assesses the remaining sources of error for the three-phase retrieval technique. We analyze retrievals for synthetic data when the 940 and 1140 nm wavelength features are fitted, for initial vapor path estimates ranging from 0 to ±50% accuracy. These tests indicate that most error comes from inaccuracy in the initial path estimate used to obtain vapor absorption coefficients. We evaluate a modified algorithm that uses multiple iterations to refine this estimate. Error is found to approach a constant value, demonstrating improved robustness to initialization conditions. We also assess the new iterative method using corrected AVIRIS data over various environments. The iterative method yields significantly better water vapor maps, reducing spurious correlations between vegetation canopy water and vapor estimates. The new iterative method offers accuracy improvements over traditional Visible/Short Wave Infrared (VSWIR) atmospheric correction methods, at modest computational cost.

  9. Effect of Ionization on Infrared and Electronic Absorption Spectra of Methyl and Ethyl Formate in the Gas Phase and in Astrophysical H2O Ice: A Computational Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naganathappa, Mahadevappa; Chaudhari, Ajay

    2011-04-01

    This work reports infrared and electronic absorption spectra of trans and gauche conformers of neutral ethyl formate, trans and cis conformers of neutral methyl formate, their ions in the gas phase, and neutral ethyl and methyl formate in astrophysical H2O ice. The second-order Møller-Plesset perturbation (MP2) method with TZVP basis set has been used to obtain ground-state geometries. An influence of ice on vibrational frequencies of neutral ethyl and methyl formate was obtained using integral equation formalism polarizable continnum model (IEFPCM). Significant shift in vibrational frequencies for neutral methyl and ethyl formate when studied in H2O ice and upon ionization is observed. Rotational and distortion constants for neutral ethyl and methyl formate from this work are in excellent agreement with the available experimental values. Electronic absorption spectra of conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions are obtained using time-dependent density functional method (TDDFT). The nature of electronic transitions is also identified. We suggested lines especially good to detect these molecules in interstellar medium. Using these lines, we can identify the conformers of ethyl and methyl formate in gas phase and H2O ice in interstellar medium. This comparative study should provide useful guidelines to detect conformers of ethyl and methyl formate and their ions in gas phase and neutral molecules in H2O ice in different astronomical environment.

  10. Cold vapor-solid phase microextraction using amalgamation in different Pd-based substrates combined with direct thermal desorption in a modified absorption cell for the determination of Hg by atomic absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Vanesa; Costas-Mora, Isabel; Lavilla, Isela; Bendicho, Carlos

    2011-02-01

    In this work, different Pd-based substrates (i.e. Pd wire, Pd-coated stainless steel wire and Pd-coated SiO 2) are tried for microextraction of Hg prior to its release into a modified quartz T-cell so as to develop a cost-effective, sensitive and easy-to-handle coupling between solid-phase microextraction (SPME) and atomic absorption spectrometry. The new design allows a direct sample injection from the SPME device into a quartz T-cell thus avoiding analyte dilution. Mercury amalgamation onto a Pd wire provided the best performance in respect to sensitivity and fiber lifetime, but Pd wires could not be implemented in the SPME device due to their poor mechanical characteristics. On the contrary, Pd-coated SiO 2 fibers could be easily adapted to the typical sampling device used for SPME. Narrow time-dependent absorption signal profiles that could be integrated within 25 s were obtained. The detection limit was 90 pg mL -1 of Hg, and the repeatability expressed as relative standard deviation was 4.3%.

  11. PLZT block data composers operated in differential phase mode. [lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate ceramic device for digital holographic memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, M. D.; Klingler, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    The use of PLZT ceramics with the 7/65/35 composition in block data composer (BDC) input devices for holographic memory systems has previously been described for operation in the strain biased, scattering, and edge effect modes. A new and promising mode of BDC operation is the differential phase mode in which each element of a matrix array BDC acts as a phase modulator. The phase modulation results from a phase difference in the optical path length between the electrically poled and depoled states of the PLZT. It is shown that a PLZT BDC can be used as a matrix-type phase modulator to record and process digital data by the differential phase mode in a holographic recording/processing system with readout contrast ratios of between 10:1 and 15:1. The differential phase mode has the advantages that strain bias is not required and that the thickness and strain variations in the PLZT are cancelled out.

  12. Boundary Layer Observations of Water Vapor and Aerosol Profiles with an Eye-Safe Micro-Pulse Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehrir, A. R.; Repasky, K. S.; Carlsten, J.; Ismail, S.

    2011-12-01

    Measurements of real-time high spatial and temporal resolution profiles of combined water vapor and aerosols in the boundary layer have been a long standing observational challenge to the meteorological, weather forecasting, and climate science communities. To overcome the high reoccurring costs associated with radiosondes as well as the lack of sufficient water vapor measurements over the continental united states, a compact and low cost eye-safe all semiconductor-based micro-pulse differential absorption lidar (DIAL) has been developed for water vapor and aerosol profiling in the lower troposphere. The laser transmitter utilizes two continuous wave external cavity diode lasers operating in the 830 nm absorption band as the online and offline seed laser sources. An optical switch is used to sequentially injection seed a tapered semiconductor optical amplifier (TSOA) with the two seed laser sources in a master oscillator power amplifier (MOPA) configuration. The TSOA is actively current pulsed to produce up to 7 μJ of output energy over a 1 μs pulse duration (150 m vertical resolution) at a 10 kHz pulse repetition frequency. The measured laser transmitter spectral linewidth is less than 500 kHz while the long term frequency stability of the stabilized on-line wavelength is ± 55 MHz. The laser transmitter spectral purity was measured to be greater than 0.9996, allowing for simultaneous measurements of water vapor in the lower and upper troposphere. The DIAL receiver utilizes a commercially available full sky-scanning capable 35 cm Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect the scattered light from the laser transmitter. Light collected by the telescope is spectrally filtered to suppress background noise and is coupled into a fiber optic cable which acts as the system field stop and limits the full angle field of view to 140 μrad. The light is sampled by a fiber coupled APD operated in a Geiger mode. The DIAL instrument is operated autonomously where water vapor and

  13. Future Performance of Ground-Based and Airborne Water-Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar. II. Simulations of the Precision of a Near-Infrared, High-Power System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulfmeyer, Volker; Walther, Craig

    2001-10-01

    Taking into account Poisson, background, amplifier, and speckle noise, we can simulate the precision of water-vapor measurements by using a 10-W average-power differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system. This system is currently under development at Hohenheim University, Germany, and at the American National Center for Atmospheric Research. For operation in the 940-nm region, a large set of measurement situations is described, including configurations that are considered for the first time to the authors knowledge. They include ultrahigh-resolution measurements in the surface layer (resolutions, 1.5 m and 0.1 s) and vertically pointing measurements (resolutions, 30 m and 1 s) from the ground to 2 km in the atmospheric boundary layer. Even during daytime, the DIAL system will have a measurement range from the ground to the upper troposphere (300 m, 10 min) that can be extended from a mountain site to the lower stratosphere. From the ground, for the first time of which the authors are aware, three-dimensional fields of water vapor in the boundary layer can be investigated within a range of the order of 15 km and with an averaging time of 10 min. From an aircraft, measurements of the atmospheric boundary layer (60 m, 1 s) can be performed from a height of 4 km to the ground. At higher altitudes, up to 18 km, water-vapor profiles can still be obtained from aircraft height level to the ground. When it is being flown either in the free troposphere or in the stratosphere, the system will measure horizontal water-vapor profiles up to 12 km. We are not aware of another remote-sensing technique that provides, simultaneously, such high resolution and accuracy.

  14. Application of surface pressure measurements of O2-band differential absorption radar system in three-dimensional data assimilation on hurricane: Part II - A quasi-observational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Qilong; Gong, Wei; Lin, Bing; Hu, Yongxiang

    2015-01-01

    This is the second part on assessing the impacts of assimilating various distributions of sea-level pressure (SLP) on hurricane simulations, using the Weather and Research Forecast (WRF) three dimensional variational data assimilation system (3DVAR). One key purpose of this series of study is to explore the potential of using remotely sensed sea surface barometric data from O2-band differential absorption radar system currently under development for server weather including hurricane forecasts. In this part II we further validate the conclusions of observational system simulation experiments (OSSEs) in the part I using observed SLP for three hurricanes that passed over the Florida peninsula. Three SLP patterns are tested again, including all available data near the Florida peninsula, and a band of observations either through the center or tangent to the hurricane position. Before the assimilation, a vortex SLP reconstruction technique is employed for the use of observed SLP as discussed in the part I. In agreement with the results from OSSEs, the performance of assimilating SLP is enhanced for the two hurricanes with stronger initial minimum SLP, leading to a significant improvement in the track and position relative to the control where no data are assimilated. On the other hand, however, the improvement in the hurricane intensity is generally limited to the first 24-48 h of integration, while a high resolution nested domain simulation, along with assimilation of SLP in the coarse domain, shows more profound improvement in the intensity. A diagnostic analysis of the potential vorticity suggests that the improved track forecasts are attributed to the combined effects of adjusting the steering wind fields in a consistent manner with having a deeper vortex, and the associated changes in the convective activity.

  15. THE PHASES DIFFERENTIAL ASTROMETRY DATA ARCHIVE. III. LIMITS TO TERTIARY COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Muterspaugh, Matthew W.; Lane, Benjamin F.; Kulkarni, S. R.; Konacki, Maciej; Burke, Bernard F.; Colavita, M. M.; Shao, M. E-mail: blane@draper.co

    2010-12-15

    The Palomar High-precision Astrometric Search for Exoplanet Systems (PHASES) monitored 51 subarcsecond binary systems to evaluate whether tertiary companions as small as Jovian planets orbited either the primary or secondary stars, perturbing their otherwise smooth Keplerian motions. Twenty-one of those systems were observed 10 or more times and show no evidence of additional companions. A new algorithm is presented for identifying astrometric companions and establishing the (companion mass)-(orbital period) combinations that can be excluded from existence with high confidence based on the PHASES observations, and the regions of mass-period phase space being excluded are presented for 21 PHASES binaries.

  16. THE H{alpha} VARIATIONS OF THE LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLE P CYGNI: DISCRETE ABSORPTION COMPONENTS AND THE SHORT S DORADUS-PHASE

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, N. D.; Gies, D. R.; Morrison, N. D.; Markova, N.; Hesselbach, E. N.; Percy, J. R. E-mail: gies@chara.gsu.edu E-mail: nmarkova@astro.bas.bg E-mail: jpercy@utm.utoronto.ca

    2011-04-15

    P Cygni is a prototype of the luminous blue variables (or S Doradus variables), and the star displays photometric and emission line variability on a timescale of years (known as the 'short S Doradus-phase' variations). Here we present new high-resolution H{alpha} spectroscopy of P Cyg that we combine with earlier spectra and concurrent V-band photometry to document the emission and continuum flux variations over a 24 year time span. We show that the emission and continuum fluxes vary in concert on timescales of 1.6 years and longer, but differ on shorter timescales. The H{alpha} profile shape also varies on the photometric timescales, and we describe the observed co-variations of the emission peak and absorption trough properties. We argue that the episodes of photometric and emission brightening are caused by increases in the size of the emission region that are related to variations in wind mass-loss rate and outflow speed. We find evidence of blueward accelerating, discrete absorption components (DACs) in the absorption trough of the H{alpha} profile, and these features have slower accelerations and longer durations than those observed in other lines. The DAC strengths also appear to vary on the photometric timescales, and we suggest that the propagation of the DAC-related wind structures is closely related to changes in the overall wind mass-loss rate and velocity.

  17. X-ray Absorption and Diffraction Studies of the Mixed-phase State of (CrxV1-x)2O3

    SciTech Connect

    D Pease; A Frenkel; V Krayzman; T Huang; P Shanthakumar; J Budnick; P Metcalf; F Chudnovsky; E Stern

    2011-12-31

    X-ray diffraction and vanadium x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) data have been obtained for (V{sub 1-x}Cr{sub x}){sub 2}O{sub 3} samples containing several concentrations of Cr, crossing the metal-insulator transition boundary. For single-phase single-crystal samples our theoretical results are generally in good qualitative agreement with our experimental single-crystal XANES, for both crystal orientations relative to the incident-beam electric vector. However, an anomalous peak occurs for both orientations in the K pre-edge of the single-crystal sample containing 1.2% Cr, a paramagnetic insulator sample that is in the concentration regime corresponding to the room-temperature two-phase (coexistence) region of the phase diagram. Upon increasing the temperature of the 0.4% Cr powdered material to 400 K so that one enters the two-phase region of the phase diagram, a similar peak appears and then diminishes at 600 K. These results, as well as experiments done by others involving room-temperature and low-temperature XANES of a 1.1% Cr sample, suggest that this feature in the V pre-edge structure is associated with the appearance under some circumstances of a small amount of highly distorted VO{sub 6} octahedra in the interface region between coexisting metal and insulating phases. Finally, we find that, for the two-phase regime, the concentration ratio of the metal-to-insulating phase varies between different regions from a sample batch of uniform composition made by the skull melting method.

  18. Macroscopic Differential Phase Shift Quantum Key Distribution Using an Optically Pre-Amplified Receiver

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukita, Tatsuya; Takada, Hiroshi; Inoue, Kyo

    2010-12-01

    Since it was noted that quantum computers could break public key cryptosystems based on number theory, extensive studies have been undertaken on quantum cryptography, which offers unconditionally secure communication based on quantum mechanics. We investigate a quantum key distribution (QKD) scheme using macroscopic coherent light with optically pre-amplified direct differential detection. A transmitter “Alice” sends a series of two macroscopic nonorthogonal coherent states that partially overlap due to quantum noise. A receiver “Bob” amplifies and receives it with direct differential detection followed by a thresholding process. To avoid difficulties in detection, our scheme uses conventional direct differential photodetection, not single-photon detection or homodyne detection as in previous QKD protocols. System performance assuming some eavesdropping is evaluated, the results of which suggest that our scheme is usable for short or medium distance.

  19. Beyond the diffraction limit of optical/IR interferometers. I. Angular diameter and rotation parameters of Achernar from differential phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domiciano de Souza, A.; Hadjara, M.; Vakili, F.; Bendjoya, P.; Millour, F.; Abe, L.; Carciofi, A. C.; Faes, D. M.; Kervella, P.; Lagarde, S.; Marconi, A.; Monin, J.-L.; Niccolini, G.; Petrov, R. G.; Weigelt, G.

    2012-09-01

    Context. Spectrally resolved long-baseline optical/IR interferometry of rotating stars opens perspectives to investigate their fundamental parameters and the physical mechanisms that govern their interior, photosphere, and circumstellar envelope structures. Aims: Based on the signatures of stellar rotation on observed interferometric wavelength-differential phases, we aim to measure angular diameters, rotation velocities, and orientation of stellar rotation axes. Methods: We used the AMBER focal instrument at ESO-VLTI in its high-spectral resolution mode to record interferometric data on the fast rotator Achernar. Differential phases centered on the hydrogen Br γ line (K band) were obtained during four almost consecutive nights with a continuous Earth-rotation synthesis during ~5 h/night, corresponding to ~60° position angle coverage per baseline. These observations were interpreted with our numerical code dedicated to long-baseline interferometry of rotating stars. Results: By fitting our model to Achernar's differential phases from AMBER, we could measure its equatorial radius Req = 11.6 ± 0.3 R⊙, equatorial rotation velocity Veq = 298 ± 9 km s-1, rotation axis inclination angle i = 101.5 ± 5.2°, and rotation axis position angle (from North to East) PArot = 34.9 ± 1.6°. From these parameters and the stellar distance, the equatorial angular diameter ⌀eq of Achernar is found to be 2.45 ± 0.09 mas, which is compatible with previous values derived from the commonly used visibility amplitude. In particular, ⌀eq and PArot measured in this work with VLTI/AMBER are compatible with the values previously obtained with VLTI/VINCI. Conclusions: The present paper, based on real data, demonstrates the super-resolution potential of differential interferometry for measuring sizes, rotation velocities, and orientation of rotating stars in cases where visibility amplitudes are unavailable and/or when the star is partially or poorly resolved. In particular, we showed

  20. Human cytomegalovirus mediates cell cycle progression through G(1) into early S phase in terminally differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, J; Baillie, J; Bryant, L; Caswell, R

    2000-06-01

    Terminal differentiation of embryonal carcinoma cells and monocytes has been shown to be important for their permissiveness for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, even though such terminally differentiated cells have withdrawn from the cell cycle and are, essentially, in G(0) arrest. Recently, data from a number of laboratories have shown that productive infection with HCMV of quiescent fibroblasts held reversibly in G(0) of the cell cycle can result in cell cycle progression, which results eventually in cycle arrest. In contrast to quiescent fibroblasts, the effect of HCMV on cells that have withdrawn irreversibly from the cell cycle due to terminal differentiation has not, so far, been addressed. Here, it is shown that, in cells that have arrested in G(0) as a result of terminal differentiation, HCMV is able to induce cell functions associated with progression of the cell cycle through G(1) into early S phase. This progression is correlated with a direct physical and functional interaction between the HCMV 86 kDa major immediate-early protein (IE86) and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21(Cip1). PMID:10811939