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Sample records for absorption distribution metabolism

  1. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Differential Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) parameters represent important connections between exposure to chemicals and the activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. ADME parameters u...

  2. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Gene Expression Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) impact chemical concentration and activation of molecular initiating events of Adverse Outcome Pathways (AOPs) in cellular, tissue, and organ level targets. In order to better describe ADME parameters and how they modulat...

  3. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of peginesatide, a novel erythropoiesis-stimulating agent, in rats

    PubMed Central

    Woodburn, Kathryn W.; Holmes, Christopher P.; Wilson, Susan D.; Fong, Kei-Lai; Press, Randall J.; Moriya, Yuu; Tagawa, Yoshihiko

    2011-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics(PK) (absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion) of peginesatide.a synthetic, PEGylated, investigational, peptide-based erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), was evaluated in rats. The PK profile was evaluated at 0.1-5 mg·kg−1 IV using unlabeled or [14C]-labeled peginesatide. Mass balance, tissue distribution and metabolism were evaluated following IV administration of 5 mg·kg−1 [14C]-peginesatide, with tissue distribution also evaluated by quantitative whole-body autoradiography (QWBA) following an IV dose of 17 mg·kg−1[14C]-peginesatide. Plasma clearance was slow and elimination was biphasic with unchanged peginesatide representing >90% of the total radioactivity of the total radioactive exposure. Slow uptake of the radiolabeled compound from the vascular compartment into the tissues was observed. Biodistribution to bone marrow and extramedullary hematopoietic sites, and to highly vascularized lymphatic and excretory tissues occurred. A predominant degradation event to occur in vivo was the loss of one PEG chain from the branched PEG moiety to generate mono-PEG. Renal excretion was the primary mechanism (41%) of elimination, with parent molecule (67%) the major moiety excreted. In conclusion, elimination of [14C]-peginesatide-derived radioactivity was extended, retention preferentially occurred at sites of erythropoiesis (bone marrow), and urinary excretion was the primary elimination route. PMID:22188389

  4. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion of 3-MCPD 1-Monopalmitate after Oral Administration in Rats.

    PubMed

    Gao, Boyan; Liu, Man; Huang, Guoren; Zhang, Zhongfei; Zhao, Yue; Wang, Thomas T Y; Zhang, Yaqiong; Liu, Jie; Yu, Liangli

    2017-03-29

    Fatty acid esters of monochloropropane 1,2-diol (3-MCPD) are processing-induced toxicants and have been detected in several food categories. This study investigated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of 3-MCPD esters in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats using 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate as the probe compound. The kinetics of 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate in plasma was investigated using SD rats, and the results indicated that 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate was absorbed directly in vivo and metabolized. Its primary metabolites in the liver, kidney, testis, brain, plasma, and urine were tentatively identified and measured at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h after oral administration. Structures were proposed for eight metabolites. 3-MCPD 1-monopalmitate was converted to free 3-MCPD, which formed the phase II metabolites. All of the metabolites were chlorine-related chemical components; most of them existed in urine, reflecting the excretion pattern of 3-MCPD esters. Understanding the metabolism of 3-MCPD esters in vivo is critical for assessing their toxicities.

  5. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of the Androgen Receptor Inhibitor Enzalutamide in Rats and Dogs.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Gibbons, Jacqueline A; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Fitzsimmons, Michael E; Nozawa, Kohei; Arai, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    Enzalutamide is an androgen receptor inhibitor that has been approved in several countries. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) data in animals would facilitate understanding of the efficacy and safety profiles of enzalutamide, but little information has been reported in public. The purpose of this study was to clarify the missing ADME profile in animals. ADME of 14 C-enzalutamide after oral administration as Labrasol solution were investigated in non-fasted male Sprague-Dawley rats and beagle dogs. Plasma concentrations of 14 C-enzalutamide peaked in rats and dogs at 6-8 h after a single oral administration. In most tissues, radioactivity concentration peaked at 4 h after administration. Excluding the gastrointestinal tract, tissues with the highest concentration of radioactivity were liver, fat, and adrenal glands. The tissue concentrations of radioactivity declined below the limit of quantitation or <0.89 % of maximum concentration by 168 h post-dose. Two known metabolites (M1 and M2) and at least 15 novel possible metabolites were detected in this study. M1 was the most abundant metabolite in both rats and dogs. Unchanged drug was a minor component in excreta. In intact rats, the mean urinary and fecal excretion of radioactivity accounted for 44.20 and 49.80 % of administered radioactivity, respectively. In intact dogs, mean urinary and fecal excretion was 62.00 and 22.30 % of the administered radioactivity, respectively. Rapid oral absorption was observed in rats and dogs when 14 C-enzalutamide was administered as Labrasol solution. Tissue distribution in rats was clarified. The elimination of enzalutamide is mediated primarily by metabolism. Species differences were observed in excretion route.

  6. Pre-clinical Characterization of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion Properties of TAK-063.

    PubMed

    Tohyama, Kimio; Sudo, Miyako; Morohashi, Akio; Kato, Suguru; Takahashi, Junzo; Tagawa, Yoshihiko

    2018-06-01

    TAK-063 is currently being developed to treat schizophrenia. In this study, we investigated the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) properties of TAK-063 using several paradigms. Following oral administration of TAK-063 at 0.3 mg/kg, bioavailability of TAK-063 was 27.4% in rats and 49.5% in dogs with elimination half-lives of 3.1 hr in rats and 3.7 hr in dogs. TAK-063 is a highly permeable compound without P-glycoprotein (P-gp) or breast cancer resistance protein substrate liability and can be readily absorbed into systemic circulation via the intestine. TAK-063 can also cross the blood-brain barrier. TAK-063 was metabolized mainly by CYP2C8 and CYP3A4/5, while incubation with human liver microsomes produced the major human metabolite, M-I as well as several unknown minor metabolites. Metabolism of TAK-063 to M-I occurs through hydroxylation of the mono-substituted pyrazole moiety. In vitro, TAK-063 was observed to inhibit CYP2C8, CYP2C19 and P-gp with IC 50 values of 8.4, 12 and 7.13 μM, respectively. TAK-063 was primarily excreted in the faeces in rats and dogs with M-I as a predominant component. The pre-clinical data from these ADME studies demonstrate a favourable pharmacokinetic profile for TAK-063 with good brain distribution supporting the feasibility of targeting central nervous system regions involved in schizophrenia pathophysiology. TAK-063 has recently been investigated in a phase 2 clinical trial (NCT02477020). © 2018 The Authors. Basic & Clinical Pharmacology & Toxicology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  7. Challenges and opportunities in absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion studies of therapeutic biologics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xin; Vugmeyster, Yulia

    2012-12-01

    With the advancement of biotechnology in the last two decades, optimized and novel modalities and platforms of biologic moieties have emerged rapidly in drug discovery pipelines. In addition, new technologies for delivering therapeutic biologics (e.g., needle-free devices, nanoparticle complexes), as well as novel approaches for disease treatments (e.g., stem cell therapy, individualized medicine), continue to be developed. While pharmacokinetic studies are routinely carried out for therapeutic biologics, experiments that elucidate underlying mechanisms for clearance and biodistribution or identify key factors that govern absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of biologics often are not thoroughly conducted. Realizing the importance of biologics as therapeutic agents, pharmaceutical industry has recently begun to move the research focus from small molecules only to a blended portfolio consisting of both small molecules and biologics. This trend brings many opportunities for scientists working in the drug disposition research field. In anticipation of these opportunities and associated challenges, this review highlights impact of ADME studies on clinical and commercial success of biologics, with a particular focus on emerging applications and technologies and linkage with mechanistic pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic modeling and biomarker research.

  8. Absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of decursin and decursinol angelate from Angelica gigas Nakai.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Min; Kim, Myo Jeong; Kang, Jae Seon

    2009-12-01

    The pharmacokinetics of decursin and decursinol angelate (D/DA) was investigated in male SD rats following oral and intravenous administration. D/DA and metabolites obtained from in vitro samples were evaluated by LC/MS. The level of D/DA and metabolized decursinol in the blood following oral and intravenous administration declined according to first-order kinetics, with T1/2 values of 56.67, 58.01 and 57.22 h, respectively, being observed after administration of a dose of 2 mg/kg body weight. The large intestine was the major site of disposition following oral administration. These data indicate that D/DA is rapidly absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. In in vitro experiment utilizing liver microsomal protein, the major metabolic reaction of D/DA occurred to change decursinol. The cumulative biliary, urinary, and fecal excretion of D/DA in bile duct-cannulated rats was 36.10+/-2.9, 25.35+/-3.8, and 34.20+/-3.2%, respectively, at 72 h after administration. These results indicate that the absorption of D/DA is almost complete, and that its metabolites are primarily excreted into feces through the bile. These results indicate that D/DA is subject to enterohepatic circulation.

  9. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of the Novel Helicase-Primase Inhibitor, Amenamevir (ASP2151), in Rodents.

    PubMed

    Ohtsu, Yoshiaki; Susaki, Yoko; Noguchi, Kiyoshi

    2018-05-10

    The helicase-primase inhibitor amenamevir (ASP2151) is a novel therapeutic agent which has been approved for the treatment of herpes zoster. The present study examined the pharmacokinetic profile of amenamevir in rodents and compared it with data from the literature of past and current established therapies (acyclovir and valaciclovir) to provide additional data to facilitate drug discovery and proper drug use. In situ absorption, blood and plasma radioactivity concentrations, tissue distribution, and excretion were determined using liquid scintillation counting. Plasma amenamevir concentrations were measured using a validated chromatographic method. Chemical structures of in vivo metabolites were investigated using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Amenamevir, after single intravenous administration to mice, had an elimination half-life of 2 h. Bioavailability was 40% after single oral administration. In situ absorption data indicated that amenamevir is mainly absorbed in the small intestine. The main component in mouse plasma was amenamevir, accounting for 87.9% of amenamevir-derived components. Our results suggest that the main elimination pathway in mice is oxidative metabolism at a methyl group and a 1,2,3-trisubstituted benzene ring followed by biliary and fecal excretion. Following oral administration of 14 C-amenamevir to mice, 100.63% of the dose (10.06% in urine and 90.46% in feces) was excreted by 96 h post-dose. The underlying mechanism of the improved pharmacokinetic profile of amenamevir was linked to an improved absorption ratio (not hepatic availability) compared to acyclovir, and qualitative differences in elimination (slow metabolism of amenamevir vs rapid urinary excretion of acyclovir/valaciclovir).

  10. Informing the Selection of Screening Hit Series with in Silico Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, and Toxicity Profiles.

    PubMed

    Sanders, John M; Beshore, Douglas C; Culberson, J Christopher; Fells, James I; Imbriglio, Jason E; Gunaydin, Hakan; Haidle, Andrew M; Labroli, Marc; Mattioni, Brian E; Sciammetta, Nunzio; Shipe, William D; Sheridan, Robert P; Suen, Linda M; Verras, Andreas; Walji, Abbas; Joshi, Elizabeth M; Bueters, Tjerk

    2017-08-24

    High-throughput screening (HTS) has enabled millions of compounds to be assessed for biological activity, but challenges remain in the prioritization of hit series. While biological, absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity (ADMET), purity, and structural data are routinely used to select chemical matter for further follow-up, the scarcity of historical ADMET data for screening hits limits our understanding of early hit compounds. Herein, we describe a process that utilizes a battery of in-house quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) models to generate in silico ADMET profiles for hit series to enable more complete characterizations of HTS chemical matter. These profiles allow teams to quickly assess hit series for desirable ADMET properties or suspected liabilities that may require significant optimization. Accordingly, these in silico data can direct ADMET experimentation and profoundly impact the progression of hit series. Several prospective examples are presented to substantiate the value of this approach.

  11. Ultrasound enhances calcium absorption of jujube fruit by regulating the cellular calcium distribution and metabolism of cell wall polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Huanhuan; Liu, Qiqi; Xu, Juan; Dong, Yu; Liu, Mengpei; Zong, Wei

    2017-12-01

    Ultrasound has been applied in fruit pre-washing processes. However, it is not sufficient to protect fruit from pathogenic infection throughout the entire storage period, and sometimes ultrasound causes tissue damage. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 , 10 g L -1 ) and ultrasound (350 W at 40 kHz), separately and in combination, on jujube fruit quality, antioxidant status, tissue Ca 2+ content and distribution along with cell wall metabolism at 20 °C for 6 days. All three treatments significantly maintained fruit firmness and peel color, reduced respiration rate, decay incidence, superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde and preserved higher enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, catalase and peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (ascorbic acid and glutathione) antioxidants compared with the control. Moreover, the combined treatment was more effective in increasing tissue Ca 2+ content and distribution, inhibiting the generation of water-soluble and CDTA-soluble pectin fractions, delaying the solubilization of Na 2 CO 3 -soluble pectin and having lower activities of cell wall-modifying enzymes (polygalacturonase and pectate lyase) during storage. These results demonstrated that the combination of CaCl 2 and ultrasound has potential commercial application to extend the shelf life of jujube fruit by facilitating Ca 2+ absorption and stabilizing the cell wall structure. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Metabolism of adiphenine. I. Absorption, distribution and excretion in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Michelot, J; Madelmont, J C; Jordan, D; Mornex, R; Meyniel, G

    1981-02-01

    1. The disposition of adiphenine labelled with 14C in two positions has been investigated in rats and mice after i.v. administration, and has been compared with that of the [14C]diethylethanolamine HCl and of the [14C]diphenylacetic acid. 2. Radioactivity in the blood declined in a biphasic manner. Biliary elimination depended upon the 14C-labelled compound administered: less than 5% dose for the diethylethanolamine moiety, 100% dose for the carboxylic moiety. Of the radioactivity appearing in rat bile, less than 1% is associated with unchanged adiphenine. 3. In preliminary metabolic studies, three major metabolites have been identified: diphenylacetic acid, diethylethanolamine and a diphenylacetic acid glucuronide. 4. Uptake by the brain of [14C]adiphenine shortly after dosing is 15 times greater than that of blood. Radioactivity is also found in the hypophysis, the adrenals and melanoid pigments, with a concn. up to 30 times greater than that found in the blood.

  13. THE ACQUISITION AND APPLICATION OF ABSORPTION, DISTRIBUTION, METABOLISM, AND EXCRETION (ADME) DATA IN AGRICULTURAL CHEMICAL SAFETY ASSESSMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A multi-sector international group of government, academic, and industry scientists has developed a proposal for an improved testing scheme for assessing the safety of crop protection chemicals. Incorporation of pharmacokinetic studies describing the absorption, distribution, me...

  14. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of loxoprofen after dermal application of loxoprofen gel to rats.

    PubMed

    Sawamura, Ryoko; Kazui, Miho; Kurihara, Atsushi; Izumi, Takashi

    2014-11-01

    1. Loxoprofen (LX), is a prodrug of the pharmacologically active form, trans-alcohol metabolite (trans-OH form), which shows very potent analgesic effect. In this study, the pharmacokinetics and metabolism of [(14)C]LX-derived radioactivity after dermal application of [(14)C]LX gel (LX-G) to rats were evaluated. 2. The area under concentration-time curve (AUC0-∞) of radioactivity in the plasma after the dermal application was 13.6% of that of the oral administration (p < 0.05). 3. After the dermal application, the radioactivity remained in the skin and skeletal muscle at the treated site for 168 h, whereas the AUC0-168 h of the radioactivity concentration in every tissue examined except the treated site was statistically lower than that after the oral administration (p < 0.05). 4. The trans-OH form was observed at high levels in the treated skin site at 0.5 h. Metabolite profiles in plasma, non-treated skin site and urine after the dermal application were comparable with those after the oral administration. 5. Renal excretion was the main route of elimination after the dermal application. 6. In conclusion, compared to the oral administration, the dermal application of [(14)C]LX-G showed lower systemic and tissue exposure with higher exposure in the therapeutic target site. The radioactivity revealed similar metabolite profiles in both administration routes.

  15. Using open source computational tools for predicting human metabolic stability and additional absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion, and toxicity properties.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Rishi R; Gifford, Eric M; Liston, Ted; Waller, Chris L; Hohman, Moses; Bunin, Barry A; Ekins, Sean

    2010-11-01

    Ligand-based computational models could be more readily shared between researchers and organizations if they were generated with open source molecular descriptors [e.g., chemistry development kit (CDK)] and modeling algorithms, because this would negate the requirement for proprietary commercial software. We initially evaluated open source descriptors and model building algorithms using a training set of approximately 50,000 molecules and a test set of approximately 25,000 molecules with human liver microsomal metabolic stability data. A C5.0 decision tree model demonstrated that CDK descriptors together with a set of Smiles Arbitrary Target Specification (SMARTS) keys had good statistics [κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.57, specificity = 0.91, and positive predicted value (PPV) = 0.64], equivalent to those of models built with commercial Molecular Operating Environment 2D (MOE2D) and the same set of SMARTS keys (κ = 0.43, sensitivity = 0.58, specificity = 0.91, and PPV = 0.63). Extending the dataset to ∼193,000 molecules and generating a continuous model using Cubist with a combination of CDK and SMARTS keys or MOE2D and SMARTS keys confirmed this observation. When the continuous predictions and actual values were binned to get a categorical score we observed a similar κ statistic (0.42). The same combination of descriptor set and modeling method was applied to passive permeability and P-glycoprotein efflux data with similar model testing statistics. In summary, open source tools demonstrated predictive results comparable to those of commercial software with attendant cost savings. We discuss the advantages and disadvantages of open source descriptors and the opportunity for their use as a tool for organizations to share data precompetitively, avoiding repetition and assisting drug discovery.

  16. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of [14C]-Volixibat in Healthy Men: Phase 1 Open-Label Study.

    PubMed

    Siebers, Nicholas; Palmer, Melissa; Silberg, Debra G; Jennings, Lee; Bliss, Caleb; Martin, Patrick T

    2018-02-01

    Volixibat is a potent inhibitor of the apical sodium-dependent bile acid transporter in development for the treatment of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. This phase 1, open-label study investigated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of [ 14 C]-volixibat in heathy men. Eligible men (n = 8) aged 18-50 years (body mass index 18.0-30.0 kg/m 2 ; weight >50 kg) received a single oral dose of [ 14 C]-volixibat 50 mg containing ~5.95 µCi radioactivity. The primary objectives were to assess the pharmacokinetics of [ 14 C]-volixibat and to determine the total radioactivity in whole blood, plasma, urine, and feces at pre-selected time points over 6 days. The secondary objectives were to characterize metabolites and to assess the safety and tolerability. Low concentrations of volixibat (range 0-0.179 ng/mL) were detected in plasma up to 8 h following administration; the pharmacokinetic parameters could not be calculated. No radioactivity was observed in plasma or whole blood. The percentage (mean ± standard deviation) of total radioactivity in urine was 0.01 ± 0.007%. The vast majority (92.3 ± 5.25%) of volixibat was recovered in feces (69.2 ± 33.1% within 24 h). Unchanged volixibat was the only radioactive component detected in feces. Adverse events were mild in severity and mostly gastrointestinal. Changes in laboratory values were not clinically meaningful. Following oral administration, [ 14 C]-volixibat was excreted unchanged from the parent compound almost exclusively via fecal excretion, indicating that the drug is minimally absorbed. Consistent with other studies, adverse events were primarily gastrointestinal in nature. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT02571192.

  17. The prediction of drug metabolism, tissue distribution, and bioavailability of 50 structurally diverse compounds in rat using mechanism-based absorption, distribution, and metabolism prediction tools.

    PubMed

    De Buck, Stefan S; Sinha, Vikash K; Fenu, Luca A; Gilissen, Ron A; Mackie, Claire E; Nijsen, Marjoleen J

    2007-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess a physiologically based modeling approach for predicting drug metabolism, tissue distribution, and bioavailability in rat for a structurally diverse set of neutral and moderate-to-strong basic compounds (n = 50). Hepatic blood clearance (CL(h)) was projected using microsomal data and shown to be well predicted, irrespective of the type of hepatic extraction model (80% within 2-fold). Best predictions of CL(h) were obtained disregarding both plasma and microsomal protein binding, whereas strong bias was seen using either blood binding only or both plasma and microsomal protein binding. Two mechanistic tissue composition-based equations were evaluated for predicting volume of distribution (V(dss)) and tissue-to-plasma partitioning (P(tp)). A first approach, which accounted for ionic interactions with acidic phospholipids, resulted in accurate predictions of V(dss) (80% within 2-fold). In contrast, a second approach, which disregarded ionic interactions, was a poor predictor of V(dss) (60% within 2-fold). The first approach also yielded accurate predictions of P(tp) in muscle, heart, and kidney (80% within 3-fold), whereas in lung, liver, and brain, predictions ranged from 47% to 62% within 3-fold. Using the second approach, P(tp) prediction accuracy in muscle, heart, and kidney was on average 70% within 3-fold, and ranged from 24% to 54% in all other tissues. Combining all methods for predicting V(dss) and CL(h) resulted in accurate predictions of the in vivo half-life (70% within 2-fold). Oral bioavailability was well predicted using CL(h) data and Gastroplus Software (80% within 2-fold). These results illustrate that physiologically based prediction tools can provide accurate predictions of rat pharmacokinetics.

  18. Absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of the ALK inhibitor alectinib: results from an absolute bioavailability and mass balance study in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Morcos, Peter N; Yu, Li; Bogman, Katrijn; Sato, Mika; Katsuki, Hisakazu; Kawashima, Kosuke; Moore, David J; Whayman, Matt; Nieforth, Keith; Heinig, Katja; Guerini, Elena; Muri, Dieter; Martin-Facklam, Meret; Phipps, Alex

    2017-03-01

    1. Alectinib is a highly selective, central nervous system-active small molecule anaplastic lymphoma kinase inhibitor. 2. The absolute bioavailability, metabolism, excretion and pharmacokinetics of alectinib were studied in a two-period single-sequence crossover study. A 50 μg radiolabelled intravenous microdose of alectinib was co-administered with a single 600 mg oral dose of alectinib in the first period, and a single 600 mg/67 μCi oral dose of radiolabelled alectinib was administered in the second period to six healthy male subjects. 3. The absolute bioavailability of alectinib was moderate at 36.9%. Geometric mean clearance was 34.5 L/h, volume of distribution was 475 L and the hepatic extraction ratio was low (0.14). 4. Near-complete recovery of administered radioactivity was achieved within 168 h post-dose (98.2%) with excretion predominantly in faeces (97.8%) and negligible excretion in urine (0.456%). Alectinib and its major active metabolite, M4, were the main components in plasma, accounting for 76% of total plasma radioactivity. In faeces, 84% of dose was excreted as unchanged alectinib with metabolites M4, M1a/b and M6 contributing to 5.8%, 7.2% and 0.2% of dose, respectively. 5. This novel study design characterised the full absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion properties in each subject, providing insight into alectinib absorption and disposition in humans.

  19. Analysis of global and absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination gene expression in the progressive stages of human nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Lake, April D; Novak, Petr; Fisher, Craig D; Jackson, Jonathan P; Hardwick, Rhiannon N; Billheimer, D Dean; Klimecki, Walter T; Cherrington, Nathan J

    2011-10-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is characterized by a series of pathological changes that range from simple fatty liver to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The objective of this study is to describe changes in global gene expression associated with the progression of human NAFLD. This study is focused on the expression levels of genes responsible for the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of drugs. Differential gene expression between three clinically defined pathological groups-normal, steatosis, and NASH-was analyzed. Genome-wide mRNA levels in samples of human liver tissue were assayed with Affymetrix GeneChip Human 1.0ST arrays. A total of 11,633 genes exhibited altered expression out of 33,252 genes at a 5% false discovery rate. Most gene expression changes occurred in the progression from steatosis to NASH. Principal component analysis revealed that hepatic disease status was the major determinant of differential ADME gene expression rather than age or sex of sample donors. Among the 515 drug transporters and 258 drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) examined, uptake transporters but not efflux transporters or DMEs were significantly over-represented in the number of genes down-regulated. These results suggest that uptake transporter genes are coordinately targeted for down-regulation at the global level during the pathological development of NASH and that these patients may have decreased drug uptake capacity. This coordinated regulation of uptake transporter genes is indicative of a hepatoprotective mechanism acting to prevent accumulation of toxic intermediates in disease-compromised hepatocytes.

  20. A computer model simulating human glucose absorption and metabolism in health and metabolic disease states

    PubMed Central

    Naftalin, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    A computer model designed to simulate integrated glucose-dependent changes in splanchnic blood flow with small intestinal glucose absorption, hormonal and incretin circulation and hepatic and systemic metabolism in health and metabolic diseases e.g. non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, (NAFLD), non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, (NASH) and type 2 diabetes mellitus, (T2DM) demonstrates how when glucagon-like peptide-1, (GLP-1) is synchronously released into the splanchnic blood during intestinal glucose absorption, it stimulates superior mesenteric arterial (SMA) blood flow and by increasing passive intestinal glucose absorption, harmonizes absorption with its distribution and metabolism. GLP-1 also synergises insulin-dependent net hepatic glucose uptake (NHGU). When GLP-1 secretion is deficient post-prandial SMA blood flow is not increased and as NHGU is also reduced, hyperglycaemia follows. Portal venous glucose concentration is also raised, thereby retarding the passive component of intestinal glucose absorption.   Increased pre-hepatic sinusoidal resistance combined with portal hypertension leading to opening of intrahepatic portosystemic collateral vessels are NASH-related mechanical defects that alter the balance between splanchnic and systemic distributions of glucose, hormones and incretins.The model reveals the latent contribution of portosystemic shunting in development of metabolic disease. This diverts splanchnic blood content away from the hepatic sinuses to the systemic circulation, particularly during the glucose absorptive phase of digestion, resulting in inappropriate increases in insulin-dependent systemic glucose metabolism.  This hastens onset of hypoglycaemia and thence hyperglucagonaemia. The model reveals that low rates of GLP-1 secretion, frequently associated with T2DM and NASH, may be also be caused by splanchnic hypoglycaemia, rather than to intrinsic loss of incretin secretory capacity. These findings may have therapeutic implications on GLP

  1. Flavonoid interactions during digestion, absorption, distribution and metabolism: a sequential structure-activity/property relationship-based approach in the study of bioavailability and bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Gerard Bryan; Smagghe, Guy; Grootaert, Charlotte; Zotti, Moises; Raes, Katleen; Van Camp, John

    2015-05-01

    Flavonoids are a group of polyphenols that provide health-promoting benefits upon consumption. However, poor bioavailability has been a major hurdle in their use as drugs or nutraceuticals. Low bioavailability has been associated with flavonoid interactions at various stages of the digestion, absorption and distribution process, which is strongly affected by their molecular structure. In this review, we use structure-activity/property relationship to discuss various flavonoid interactions with food matrices, digestive enzymes, intestinal transporters and blood proteins. This approach reveals specific bioactive properties of flavonoids in the gastrointestinal tract as well as various barriers for their bioavailability. In the last part of this review, we use these insights to determine the effect of different structural characteristics on the overall bioavailability of flavonoids. Such information is crucial when flavonoid or flavonoid derivatives are used as active ingredients in foods or drugs.

  2. Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical Absorption

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.

    2005-08-16

    A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-index and low-index quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon absorption resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-index and low-index quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.

  3. Extent of cutaneous metabolism during percutaneous absorption of xenobiotics.

    PubMed

    Bronaugh, R L; Stewart, R F; Storm, J E

    1989-07-01

    In vitro percutaneous absorption studies generally do not determine whether biotransformation occurs during passage of a substance through the skin. Since it has recently been demonstrated that several chemicals are metabolized during skin permeation, we investigated the metabolism of five additional compounds (14C-labeled) after application to fuzzy rat skin: caffeine, p,p'-DDT, butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT), salicylic acid, and acetyl ethyl tetramethyltetralin (AETT). The viability of skin was maintained with a tissue culture medium. Radioactivity of each substrate and any metabolites in skin and receptor fluid was measured so that the absorption and metabolism of water-insoluble compounds would be accurately determined. Percutaneous absorption ranged from a low of 13% of the applied dose for BHT to a high of 49% for DDT. BHT was metabolized in skin to 4-hydroxy-BHT and an unknown metabolite. Of the absorbed radioisotope, 6.6% was isolated in biotransformed products found mainly in the receptor fluid. AETT was also metabolized during absorption, with 1.9% of the absorbed radioisotope found in two unknown peaks. Caffeine, DDT, and salicylic acid were not metabolized during skin permeation. Skin and liver microsomal metabolism was measured for all compounds except DDT. Metabolism in skin was observed only for the compounds also biotransformed in the diffusion cell; BHT and AETT were metabolized at 113 and 2.5 pmol/min/mg protein, respectively. In this study, as in others, skin metabolism was substantially less than the corresponding metabolism in liver. Therefore, a low rate of liver metabolism such as that found for caffeine, salicylic acid, and DDT might often be predictive of the absence of measurable metabolism during skin permeation. It seems likely that for many compounds, the biotransformations in skin will be small in terms of the percentage of absorbed material that is metabolized. Nevertheless, with potent compounds, even small quantities of a metabolite

  4. Bifidobacterium breve with α-linolenic acid alters the composition, distribution and transcription factor activity associated with metabolism and absorption of fat

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Elaine; Wall, Rebecca; Lisai, Sara; Ross, R. Paul; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.; Fitzgerald, Gerald F.; Banni, Sebastiano; Quigley, Eamonn M.; Shanahan, Fergus; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    This study focused on the mechanisms that fatty acid conjugating strains - Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and Bifidobacterium breve DPC 6330 - influence lipid metabolism when ingested with α-linolenic acid (ALA) enriched diet. Four groups of BALB/c mice received ALA enriched diet (3% (w/w)) either alone or in combination with B. breve NCIMB 702258 or B. breve DPC 6330 (109 CFU/day) or unsupplemented control diet for six weeks. The overall n-3 PUFA score was increased in all groups receiving the ALA enriched diet. Hepatic peroxisomal beta oxidation increased following supplementation of the ALA enriched diet with B. breve (P < 0.05) and so the ability of the strains to produce c9t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was identified in adipose tissue. Furthermore, a strain specific effect of B. breve NCIMB 702258 was found on the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Liver triglycerides (TAG) were reduced following ALA supplementation, compared with unsupplemented controls (P < 0.01) while intervention with B. breve further reduced liver TAG (P < 0.01), compared with the ALA enriched control. These data indicate that the interactions of the gut microbiota with fatty acid metabolism directly affect host health by modulating n-3 PUFA score and the ECS. PMID:28265110

  5. Bifidobacterium breve with α-linolenic acid alters the composition, distribution and transcription factor activity associated with metabolism and absorption of fat.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Elaine; Wall, Rebecca; Lisai, Sara; Ross, R Paul; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F; Fitzgerald, Gerald F; Banni, Sebastiano; Quigley, Eamonn M; Shanahan, Fergus; Stanton, Catherine

    2017-03-07

    This study focused on the mechanisms that fatty acid conjugating strains - Bifidobacterium breve NCIMB 702258 and Bifidobacterium breve DPC 6330 - influence lipid metabolism when ingested with α-linolenic acid (ALA) enriched diet. Four groups of BALB/c mice received ALA enriched diet (3% (w/w)) either alone or in combination with B. breve NCIMB 702258 or B. breve DPC 6330 (10 9 CFU/day) or unsupplemented control diet for six weeks. The overall n-3 PUFA score was increased in all groups receiving the ALA enriched diet. Hepatic peroxisomal beta oxidation increased following supplementation of the ALA enriched diet with B. breve (P < 0.05) and so the ability of the strains to produce c9t11 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) was identified in adipose tissue. Furthermore, a strain specific effect of B. breve NCIMB 702258 was found on the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Liver triglycerides (TAG) were reduced following ALA supplementation, compared with unsupplemented controls (P < 0.01) while intervention with B. breve further reduced liver TAG (P < 0.01), compared with the ALA enriched control. These data indicate that the interactions of the gut microbiota with fatty acid metabolism directly affect host health by modulating n-3 PUFA score and the ECS.

  6. ABSORPTION MEASURE DISTRIBUTION IN Mrk 509

    SciTech Connect

    Adhikari, T. P.; Różańska, A.; Sobolewska, M.

    2015-12-20

    In this paper we model the observed absorption measure distribution (AMD) in Mrk 509, which spans three orders of magnitude in ionization level with a single-zone absorber in pressure equilibrium. AMD is usually constructed from observations of narrow absorption lines in radio-quiet active galaxies with warm absorbers. We study the properties of the warm absorber in Mrk 509 using recently published broadband spectral energy distribution observed with different instruments. This spectrum is an input in radiative transfer computations with full photoionization treatment using the titan code. We show that the simplest way to fully reproduce the shape of AMD is tomore » assume that the warm absorber is a single zone under constant total pressure. With this assumption, we found theoretical AMD that matches the observed AMD determined on the basis of the 600 ks reflection grating spectrometer XMM-Newton spectrum of Mrk 509. The softness of the source spectrum and the important role of the free–free emission breaks the usual degeneracy in the ionization state calculations, and the explicit dependence of the depths of AMD dips on density open a new path to the density diagnostic for the warm absorber. In Mrk 509, the implied density is of the order of 10{sup 8} cm{sup −3}.« less

  7. Pharmacokinetics, Metabolism, Distribution and Permeability of Nanomedicine.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Selvan; Suthar, Jitendra Kumar; Rokade, Rutuja; Deshpande, Pooja; Singh, Pooja; Pratinidhi, Ashutosh; Khambadkhar, Rajeshree; Utekar, Srushti

    2018-01-01

    Medical application of nanotechnology is termed as Nanomedicine and is widely used in healthcare industries. Nanotechnology has helped Physicians, Scientists and Technologists to understand the changes in cellular levels to develop nanomedicines and address the challenges faced by the healthcare sectors. Nanoparticles with less than 1nm in size have been used as drug delivery and gene delivery systems to accelerate the drug action in humans. Size of nanomaterials is akin to that of biomolecules and expected to have better interactions. Hence, its utility for various biomedical applications is explored. Pharmacokinetics, metabolism, permeability, distribution and elimination studies of nanoparticles are essential to understand its potency, toxicity threshold and confirm its safe use in humans. Reports were available for toxicity studies on nanoparticles, but work on metabolism, pharmacokinetics, distribution and permeability of nanomedicine is limited. Hence, the main focus of this review article is about metabolism, pharmacokinetics, permeability and biodistribution of nanomaterials used in nanomedicine. Nanomedicine is increasingly becoming important in the treatment of diseases and diagnosis. Size of the particle plays an important role. As the particle size decreases its effect to cure the disease increases. Pharmacokinetics, bioavailability, half-life, metabolism, biodistribution and permeability of nanomedicine were found to be better than that of microsized drugs. In vitro and In vivo ADME (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism and Excretion) studies are mandatory for pharmaceutical organic drugs. Similarly, nanomaterials should be subjected to both in vitro and in vivo ADME studies. Thus, nanomedicine can assist in the development of safe personalized medicine in humans. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. KAE609 (Cipargamin), a New Spiroindolone Agent for the Treatment of Malaria: Evaluation of the Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of a Single Oral 300-mg Dose of [14C]KAE609 in Healthy Male Subjects.

    PubMed

    Huskey, Su-Er W; Zhu, Chun-qi; Fredenhagen, Andreas; Kühnöl, Jürgen; Luneau, Alexandre; Jian, Zhigang; Yang, Ziping; Miao, Zhuang; Yang, Fan; Jain, Jay P; Sunkara, Gangadhar; Mangold, James B; Stein, Daniel S

    2016-05-01

    KAE609 [(1'R,3'S)-5,7'-dichloro-6'-fluoro-3'-methyl-2',3',4',9'-tetrahydrospiro[indoline-3,1'-pyridol[3,4-b]indol]-2-one] is a potent, fast-acting, schizonticidal agent in clinical development for the treatment of malaria. This study investigated the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of KAE609 after oral administration of [(14)C]KAE609 in healthy subjects. After oral administration to human subjects, KAE609 was the major radioactive component (approximately 76% of the total radioactivity in plasma); M23 was the major circulating oxidative metabolite (approximately 12% of the total radioactivity in plasma). Several minor oxidative metabolites (M14, M16, M18, and M23.5B) were also identified, each accounting for approximately 3%-8% of the total radioactivity in plasma. KAE609 was well absorbed and extensively metabolized, such that KAE609 accounted for approximately 32% of the dose in feces. The elimination of KAE609 and metabolites was primarily mediated via biliary pathways. M23 was the major metabolite in feces. Subjects reported semen discoloration after dosing in prior studies; therefore, semen samples were collected once from each subject to further evaluate this clinical observation. Radioactivity excreted in semen was negligible, but the major component in semen was M23, supporting the rationale that this yellow-colored metabolite was the main source of semen discoloration. In this study, a new metabolite, M16, was identified in all biologic matrices albeit at low levels. All 19 recombinant human cytochrome P450 enzymes were capable of catalyzing the hydroxylation of M23 to form M16 even though the extent of turnover was very low. Thus, electrochemistry was used to generate a sufficient quantity of M16 for structural elucidation. Metabolic pathways of KAE609 in humans are summarized herein and M23 is the major metabolite in plasma and excreta. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  9. [Absorption and metabolism of Chuanxiong Rhizoma decoction with multi-component sequential metabolism method].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Luo, Zhi-Qiang; Lv, Bei-Ran; Zhao, Hai-Yu; Dong, Ling

    2016-04-01

    The multiple components in Chinese herbal medicines (CHMS) will experience complex absorption and metabolism before entering the blood system. Previous studies often lay emphasis on the components in blood. However, the dynamic and sequential absorption and metabolism process following multi-component oral administration has not been studied. In this study, the in situ closed-loop method combined with LC-MS techniques were employed to study the sequential process of Chuanxiong Rhizoma decoction (RCD). A total of 14 major components were identified in RCD. Among them, ferulic acid, senkyunolide J, senkyunolide I, senkyunolide F, senkyunolide G, and butylidenephthalide were detected in all of the samples, indicating that the six components could be absorbed into blood in prototype. Butylphthalide, E-ligustilide, Z-ligustilide, cnidilide, senkyunolide A and senkyunolide Q were not detected in all the samples, suggesting that the six components may not be absorbed or metabolized before entering the hepatic portal vein. Senkyunolide H could be metabolized by the liver, while senkyunolide M could be metabolized by both liver and intestinal flora. This study clearly demonstrated the changes in the absorption and metabolism process following multi-component oral administration of RCD, so as to convert the static multi-component absorption process into a comprehensive dynamic and continuous absorption and metabolism process. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  10. A novel double-tracer technique to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of [14C]tofogliflozin after oral administration and concomitant intravenous microdose administration of [13C]tofogliflozin in humans.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Dietmar; Portron, Agnes; Backholer, Zoe; Lausecker, Berthold; Kawashima, Kosuke

    2013-06-01

    observed CL(R) of 25.7 ± 5.0 ml/min was higher than the product of the estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and fraction unbound in plasma (f(u)) (eGFR × f(u) 15 ml/min), indicating the presence of net active tubular secretion in the renal elimination of tofogliflozin. However, CLR contributed only 15.5 % to the CL of tofogliflozin, suggesting that reductions in CLR by renal impairment won't significantly affect systemic exposure to tofogliflozin. Tofogliflozin and its metabolite M1 were the only major circulating entities accounting for 46 ± 8.6 and 50 ± 8.2 %, respectively, of total circulating drug-related material, while the metabolite M5 was a minor circulating metabolite accounting for 3.0 ± 0.3 % of total circulating drug-related material. Both the M1 and M5 metabolites were excreted into urine and the major metabolite M1 did not exhibit active tubular secretion. These results demonstrate the utility of the double-tracer approach to provide essential pharmacokinetic data and excretion data for drug-related material in one study at the same dosing occasion. The data obtained allowed the characterization of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of tofogliflozin. Tofogliflozin exhibited highly favorable pharmacokinetic properties as demonstrated by its high F, low CL and a low V(ss. The presence of only one major circulating metabolite of tofogliflozin was unambiguously demonstrated. As a drug targeting the kidney, luminal exposure of the kidney is achieved by renal filtration and active tubular secretion.

  11. Absorption, metabolism and health effects of dietary flavonoids in man.

    PubMed

    Hollman, P C; Katan, M B

    1997-01-01

    Flavonoids are polyphenolic compounds that occur ubiquitously in foods of plant origin. Over 4,000 different flavonoids have been described, and they are categorized into flavonols, flavones, catechins, flavanones, anthocyanidins and isoflavonoids. Flavonoids have a variety of biological effects in numerous mammalian cell systems, in vitro as well in vivo. Recently, much attention has been paid to their antioxidant properties and to their inhibitory role in various stages of tumour development in animal studies. Quercetin, the major representative of the flavonol subclass, is a strong antioxidant, and prevents oxidation of low density lipoproteins in vitro. Oxidized low density lipoproteins are atherogenic, and are considered to be a crucial intermediate in the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. This agrees with observations in epidemiological studies that the intake of flavonols and flavones was inversely associated with subsequent coronary heart disease. However, no effects of flavonols on cancer were found in these studies. The extent of absorption of flavonoids is an important unsolved problem in judging their many alleged health effects. Flavonoids present in foods were considered non-absorbable because they are bound to sugars as beta-glycosides. Only free flavonoids without a sugar molecule, the so-called aglycones, were thought to be able to pass through the gut wall. Hydrolysis only occurs in the colon by microorganisms, which at the same time degrade flavonoids. We performed a study to quantify absorption of various dietary forms of quercetin. To our surprise, the quercetin glycosides from onions were absorbed far better than the pure aglycone. Subsequent pharmacokinetic studies with dietary quercetin glycosides showed marked differences in absorption rate and bioavailability. Absorbed quercetin was eliminated only slowly from the blood. The metabolism of flavonoids has been studied frequently in various animals, but very few data in humans are

  12. Metabolism of dietary sulphate: absorption and excretion in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Florin, T; Neale, G; Gibson, G R; Christl, S U; Cummings, J H

    1991-01-01

    Dietary sulphate may affect colonic pathophysiology because sulphate availability determines in part the activity of sulphate reducing bacteria in the bowel. The main product of sulphate reducing bacterial oxidative metabolism, hydrogen sulphide, is potentially toxic. Although it is generally believed that the sulphate ion is poorly absorbed, there are no available data on how much sulphate reaches the colon nor on the relative contributions from diet and endogenous sources. To resolve these questions, balance studies were performed on six healthy ileostomists and three normal subjects chosen because they did not have detectable sulphate reducing bacteria in their faeces. The subjects were fed diets which varied in sulphate content from 1.6-16.6 mmol/day. Sulphate was measured in diets, faeces (ileal effluent in ileostomists), and urine by anion exchange chromatography with conductivity detection. Overall there was net absorption of dietary sulphate, with the absorptive capacity of the gastrointestinal tract plateauing at 5 mmol/day in the ileostomists and exceeding 16 mmol/day in the normal subjects. Endogenous secretion of sulphate in the upper gastrointestinal tract was from 0.96-2.6 mmol/day. The dietary contribution to the colonic sulphate pool ranged up to 9 mmol/day, there being linear identity between diet and upper gastrointestinal losses for intakes above 7 mmol/day. Faecal losses of sulphate were trivial (less than 0.5 mmol/day) in the normal subjects at all doses. It is concluded that diet and intestinal absorption are the principal factors affecting the amounts of sulphate reaching the colon. Endogenous secretion of sulphate by colonic mucosa may also be important in determining amounts of sulphate in the colon. PMID:1855683

  13. Chiral Polychlorinated Biphenyls: Absorption, Metabolism and Excretion – A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kania-Korwel, Izabela; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    Seventy eight out of the 209 possible polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners are chiral, nineteen of which exist under ambient conditions as stable rotational isomers that are non-superimposable mirror images of each other. These congeners (C-PCBs) represent up to 6% by weight of technical PCB mixtures and undergo considerable atropisomeric enrichment in wildlife, laboratory animals and humans. The objective of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the processes involved in the absorption, metabolism and excretion of C-PCBs and their metabolites in laboratory animals and humans. C-PCBs are absorbed and excreted by passive diffusion, a process that, like other physicochemical processes, is inherently not atropselective. In mammals, metabolism by cytochrome P450 (P450) enzymes represents a major route of elimination for many C-PCBs. In vitro studies demonstrate that C-PCBs with a 2,3,6-trichlorosubstituion pattern in one phenyl ring are readily oxidized to hydroxylated PCB metabolites (HO-PCBs) by P450 enzymes, such as rat CYP2B1, human CYP2B6 and dog CYP2B11. The oxidation of C-PCBs is atropselective, thus resulting in a species and congener-dependent atropisomeric enrichment of C-PCBs and their metabolites. This atropisomeric enrichment of C-PCBs and their metabolites likely plays a poorly understood role in the atropselective toxicity of C-PCBs and, therefore, warrants further investigation. PMID:25651810

  14. Absorption and metabolism of milk thistle flavanolignans in humans.

    PubMed

    Calani, Luca; Brighenti, Furio; Bruni, Renato; Del Rio, Daniele

    2012-12-15

    This study evaluated the absorption and metabolism of milk thistle flavonolignans silychristin, silydianin, silybin and isosilybin isomers (all together known as silymarin) in humans. Fourteen volunteers consumed an extract of milk thistle and urine was collected up to 48 h after consumption. Thirty-one metabolites were identified in urine by means of HPLC-MS/MS, monoglucuronides being the most common excreted form, followed by sulphate-glucuronides and diglucuronides, respectively. The excretion of monoglucuronides peaked 2 h after consumption, whereas sulphate-glucuronide and diglucuronide excretion peaked at 8 h. The bioavailability of milk thistle flavanolignans was 0.45±0.28% (mean±SD). In conclusion, milk thistle flavonolignans are extensively modified after ingestion and recovered in urine as sulpho- and glucuronyl-conjugates, indicating a strong affinity for hepatic phase II enzymes. All future studies (in vitro and in vivo) dealing with the effects of milk thistle should start by considering the modification of its flavonolignans after ingestion by humans. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  15. Aminocyclopyrachlor absorption, translocation and metabolism in field 1 bindweed (convolulus arvensis)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Field bindweed (Convolvulus arvensis L.) is extremely susceptible to aminocyclopyrachlor compared to other weed species. Laboratory studies were conducted to determine if absorption, translocation, and metabolism of aminocyclopyrachlor in field bindweed differs from other, less susceptible species....

  16. Diphenamid metabolism in pepper and an ozone effect. I. Absorption, translocation, and the extent of metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, R.H.; Hoffer, B.L.

    Nutrient-solution-grown pepper (Capsicum frutescens L. Early Calwonder) absorbed 62% of the diphenamid (N,N-dimethyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide) supplied via the roots for 48 h, and 74% in 150 h. Extensive translocation accompanied absorption, and 70 +/- 3% of the absorbed /sup 14/C was present in shoots of plants harvested after 24- to 150-h treatments. Diphenamid was metabolized rapidly to chloroform-soluble and water-soluble compounds, and to unextracted residues. Chloroform-soluble compounds persisted for 150 h and accounted for more than 50% of the /sup 14/C in leaves. Water-soluble compounds other than N-hydroxymethyl-..beta..-D-glycosides accounted for 25% of the water-soluble metabolites in leaves of nonfumigated plants. Ozone fumigationmore » did not affect diphenamid absorption or translocation significantly. In leaves, ozone-enhanced accumulation of water-soluble metabolites more polar than N-hydroxymethyl-N-methyl-2,2-diphenylacetamide-..beta..-D-glucoside (MDAG) and unextracted residues was observed. Ozone fumigation reduced the accumulation of these /sup 14/C-fractions in roots. 16 references, 1 figure, 3 tables.« less

  17. Sound propagation and absorption in foam - A distributed parameter model.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, L.; Lieberman, S.

    1971-01-01

    Liquid-base foams are highly effective sound absorbers. A better understanding of the mechanisms of sound absorption in foams was sought by exploration of a mathematical model of bubble pulsation and coupling and the development of a distributed-parameter mechanical analog. A solution by electric-circuit analogy was thus obtained and transmission-line theory was used to relate the physical properties of the foams to the characteristic impedance and propagation constants of the analog transmission line. Comparison of measured physical properties of the foam with values obtained from measured acoustic impedance and propagation constants and the transmission-line theory showed good agreement. We may therefore conclude that the sound propagation and absorption mechanisms in foam are accurately described by the resonant response of individual bubbles coupled to neighboring bubbles.

  18. Metabolism of captopril carboxyl ester derivatives for percutaneous absorption.

    PubMed

    Gullick, Darren R; Ingram, Matthew J; Pugh, W John; Cox, Paul A; Gard, Paul; Smart, John D; Moss, Gary P

    2009-02-01

    To determine the metabolism of captopril n-carboxyl derivatives and how this may impact on their use as transdermal prodrugs. The pharmacological activity of the ester derivatives was also characterised in order to compare the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitory potency of the derivatives compared with the parent drug, captopril. The metabolism rates of the ester derivatives were determined in vitro (using porcine liver esterase and porcine ear skin) and in silico (using molecular modelling to investigate the potential to predict metabolism). Relatively slow pseudo first-order metabolism of the prodrugs was observed, with the ethyl ester displaying the highest rate of metabolism. A strong relationship was established between in-vitro methods, while in-silico methods support the use of in-vitro methods and highlight the potential of in-silico techniques to predict metabolism. All the prodrugs behaved as angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors, with the methyl ester displaying optimum inhibition. In-vitro porcine liver esterase metabolism rates inform in-vitro skin rates well, and in-silico interaction energies relate well to both. Thus, in-silico methods may be developed that include interaction energies to predict metabolism rates.

  19. Distribution of photon absorption rates across the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Williams, T P; Webbers, J P; Giordano, L; Henderson, R P

    1998-04-15

    1. An investigation into the distribution of light intensity across the rat retina was carried out on excised, intact rat eyes exposed to Ganzfeld illumination from a helium-neon laser (543 nm). 2. Some of the light entering the eyes exits through the sclera where its intensity can be monitored with an optical 'pick-up' that samples the intensity coming from a small region of external sclera and underlying retina. The spatial resolution of the pick-up is such that it samples light that has passed through ca 2 % of the rods in the rat eye. 3. Some of the laser light is absorbed by the rod pigment, rhodopsin, which gradually bleaches. Bleaching in the retina, in turn, causes an exponential increase in intensity emanating from the sclera. By monitoring this intensity increase, we are able to measure two important parameters in a single bleaching run: the local rhodopsin concentration and the local intensity falling on the rods. 4. With an ocular transmission photometer, we have measured both the local intensity and the local rhodopsin concentration across wide regions of rat retina. Both pigmented and albino rats were studied. 5. The distributions of rhodopsin and intensity were both nearly uniform; consequently, the product, (rhodopsin concentration) x (intensity), was similarly nearly equal across the retina. This means that the initial rate of photon absorption is about the same at all retinal locations. 6. Interpreted in terms of photostasis (the regulation of daily photon catch), this means that the rate of photon absorption is about the same in each rod, viz. 14 400 photons absorbed per rod per second. Since this rate of absorption is sufficient to saturate the rod, one possible purpose of photostasis is to maintain the rod system in a saturated state during daylight hours.

  20. Absorption, Metabolic Stability, and Pharmacokinetics of Ginger Phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Mukkavilli, Rao; Yang, Chunhua; Singh Tanwar, Reenu; Ghareeb, Ahmed; Luthra, Latika; Aneja, Ritu

    2017-03-30

    We have previously demonstrated promising anticancer efficacy of orally-fed whole ginger extract (GE) in preclinical prostate models emphasizing the importance of preservation of the natural "milieu". Essentially, GE primarily includes active ginger phenolics viz., 6-gingerol (6G), 8-gingerol (8G), 10-gingerol (10G), and 6-shogaol (6S). However, the druglikeness properties of active GE phenolics like solubility, stability, and metabolic characteristics are poorly understood. Herein, we determined the physicochemical and biochemical properties of GE phenolics by conducting in vitro assays and mouse pharmacokinetic studies with and without co-administration of ketoconazole (KTZ). GE phenolics showed low to moderate solubility in various pH buffers but were stable in simulated gastric and intestinal fluids, indicating their suitability for oral administration. All GE phenolics were metabolically unstable and showed high intrinsic clearance in mouse, rat, dog, and human liver microsomes. Upon oral administration of 250 mg/kg GE, sub-therapeutic concentrations of GE phenolics were observed. Treatment of plasma samples with β-glucuronidase (βgd) increased the exposure of all GE phenolics by 10 to 700-fold. Co-administration of KTZ with GE increased the exposure of free GE phenolics by 3 to 60-fold. Interestingly, when the same samples were treated with βgd, the exposure of GE phenolics increased by 11 to 60-fold, suggesting inhibition of phase I metabolism by KTZ but little effect on glucuronide conjugation. Correlating the in vitro and in vivo results, it is reasonable to conclude that phase II metabolism seems to be the predominant clearance pathway for GE phenolics. We present evidence that the first-pass metabolism, particularly glucuronide conjugation of GE phenolics, underlies low systemic exposure.

  1. Absorption and distribution of lycopene in rat colon.

    PubMed

    Oshima, S; Inakuma, T; Narisawa, T

    1999-01-01

    Colonic absorption and distribution of lycopene, which inhibited rat colon carcinogenesis in our previous studies, were investigated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Three groups of six rats each with or without a single-barreled colostomy at the mid colon were given a single intragastric or intracolonic dose of 0.2 mL of corn oil containing 12 mg of lycopene. Twenty-four hours later, all rats were sacrificed and the blood and some tissues were collected. The contents of lycopene in the samples were assayed by HPLC. Lycopene was detected in an appreciable amount in the liver, but only in trace amount in the serum of all rats treated with an intracolonic dose of lycopene and in rats with an intragastric dose. After an intragastric lycopene treatment, lycopene was detected in the mucosa of the proximal colon and of the distal colon of the colostomized rats, whose distal colon had been excluded from the fecal stream. A large amount of lycopene was recovered in the feces. None was detected in any sample from the control rats treated with an intragastric or intracolonic dose of plain corn oil. The results suggest that lycopene is absorbed from the colon and also from the small intestine. It might be concluded that both ways of absorption contribute to a comparative amount of lycopene accumulation in the colon mucosa after ingestion of this carotenoid.

  2. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W.; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-01-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. PMID:25231105

  3. Intestinal triacylglycerol synthesis in fat absorption and systemic energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yen, Chi-Liang Eric; Nelson, David W; Yen, Mei-I

    2015-03-01

    The intestine plays a prominent role in the biosynthesis of triacylglycerol (triglyceride; TAG). Digested dietary TAG is repackaged in the intestine to form the hydrophobic core of chylomicrons, which deliver metabolic fuels, essential fatty acids, and other lipid-soluble nutrients to the peripheral tissues. By controlling the flux of dietary fat into the circulation, intestinal TAG synthesis can greatly impact systemic metabolism. Genes encoding many of the enzymes involved in TAG synthesis have been identified. Among TAG synthesis enzymes, acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase 2 and acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (DGAT)1 are highly expressed in the intestine. Their physiological functions have been examined in the context of whole organisms using genetically engineered mice and, in the case of DGAT1, specific inhibitors. An emerging theme from recent findings is that limiting the rate of TAG synthesis in the intestine can modulate gut hormone secretion, lipid metabolism, and systemic energy balance. The underlying mechanisms and their implications for humans are yet to be explored. Pharmacological inhibition of TAG hydrolysis in the intestinal lumen has been employed to combat obesity and associated disorders with modest efficacy and unwanted side effects. The therapeutic potential of inhibiting specific enzymes involved in intestinal TAG synthesis warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. A double-tracer technique to characterize absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) of [14C]-basimglurant and absolute bioavailability after oral administration and concomitant intravenous microdose administration of [13C6]-labeled basimglurant in humans.

    PubMed

    Guerini, Elena; Schadt, Simone; Greig, Gerard; Haas, Ruth; Husser, Christophe; Zell, Manfred; Funk, Christoph; Hartung, Thomas; Gloge, Andreas; Mallalieu, Navita L

    2017-02-01

    1. The emerging technique of employing intravenous microdose administration of an isotope tracer concomitantly with an [ 14 C]-labeled oral dose was used to characterize the disposition and absolute bioavailability of a novel metabotropic glutamate 5 (mGlu5) receptor antagonist under clinical development for major depressive disorder (MDD). 2. Six healthy volunteers received a single 1 mg [ 12 C/ 14 C]-basimglurant (2.22 MBq) oral dose and a concomitant i.v. tracer dose of 100 μg of [ 13 C 6 ]-basimglurant. Concentrations of [ 12 C]-basimglurant and the stable isotope [ 13 C 6 ]-basimglurant were determined in plasma by a specific LC/MS-MS method. Total [ 14 C] radioactivity was determined in whole blood, plasma, urine and feces by liquid scintillation counting. Metabolic profiling was conducted in plasma, urine, blood cell pellet and feces samples. 3. The mean absolute bioavailability after oral administration (F) of basimglurant was ∼67% (range 45.7-77.7%). The major route of [ 14 C]-radioactivity excretion, primarily in form of metabolites, was in urine (mean recovery 73.4%), with the remainder excreted in feces (mean recovery 26.5%). The median t max for [ 12 C]-basimglurant after the oral administration was 0.71 h (range 0.58-1.00) and the mean terminal half-life was 77.2 ± 38.5 h. Terminal half-life for the [ 14 C]-basimglurant was 178 h indicating presence of metabolites with a longer terminal half-life. Five metabolites were identified with M1-Glucuronide as major and the others in trace amounts. There was minimal binding of drug to RBCs. IV pharmacokinetics was characterized with a mean ± SD CL of 11.8 ± 7.4 mL/h and a Vss of 677 ± 229 L. 4. The double-tracer technique used in this study allowed to simultaneously characterize the absolute bioavailability and disposition characteristics of the new oral molecular entity in a single study.

  5. Distribution, synthesis, and absorption of kynurenic acid in plants.

    PubMed

    Turski, Michal P; Turska, Monika; Zgrajka, Wojciech; Bartnik, Magdalena; Kocki, Tomasz; Turski, Waldemar A

    2011-05-01

    Kynurenic acid (KYNA) is an endogenous antagonist of the ionotropic glutamate receptors and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor as well as an agonist of the G-protein-coupled receptor GPR35. In this study, KYNA distribution and synthesis in plants as well as its absorption was researched. KYNA level was determined by means of the high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. KYNA was found in leaves, flowers, and roots of tested medicinal herbs: dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), common nettle (Urtica dioica), and greater celandine (Chelidoniummajus). The highest concentration of this compound was detected in leaves of dandelion--a mean value of 0.49 µg/g wet weight. It was shown that KYNA can be synthesized enzymatically in plants from its precursor, L-kynurenine, or absorbed by plants from the soil. Finally, the content of KYNA was investigated in 21 herbal tablets, herbal tea, herbs in sachets, and single herbs in bags. The highest content of KYNA in a maximum daily dose of herbal medicines appeared in St. John's wort--33.75 µg (tablets) or 32.60 µg (sachets). The pharmacological properties of KYNA and its presence in high concentrations in medicinal herbs may suggest that it possesses therapeutic potential, especially in the digestive system and should be considered a new valuable dietary supplement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Hyperpolarized 13C pyruvate mouse brain metabolism with absorptive-mode EPSI at 1 T

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miloushev, Vesselin Z.; Di Gialleonardo, Valentina; Salamanca-Cardona, Lucia; Correa, Fabian; Granlund, Kristin L.; Keshari, Kayvan R.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in echo-planar spectroscopic imaging experiments was explicitly modeled jointly in spatial and spectral dimensions. Using this as a basis, absorptive-mode type detection can be achieved by appropriate choice of spectral delays and post-processing techniques. We discuss the effects of gradient imperfections and demonstrate the implementation of this sequence at low field (1.05 T), with application to hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate imaging of the mouse brain. The sequence achieves sufficient signal-to-noise to monitor the conversion of hyperpolarized [1-13C] pyruvate to lactate in the mouse brain. Hyperpolarized pyruvate imaging of mouse brain metabolism using an absorptive-mode EPSI sequence can be applied to more sophisticated murine disease and treatment models. The simple modifications presented in this work, which permit absorptive-mode detection, are directly translatable to human clinical imaging and generate improved absorptive-mode spectra without the need for refocusing pulses.

  7. In vitro percutaneous absorption and metabolism of Bisphenol A (BPA) through fresh human skin.

    PubMed

    Toner, Frank; Allan, Graham; Dimond, Stephen S; Waechter, John M; Beyer, Dieter

    2018-03-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a high production volume compound. It is mainly used as a monomer to make polymers for various applications including food-contact materials. The primary route of exposure to BPA in the general population is through oral intake (EFSA 2015) however, other potential sources of exposure have also been identified, such as dermal contact. In the present study, the percutaneous absorption through human skin has been investigated in an in vitro study according to OECD TG 428 (Skin Absorption: In Vitro Method). In order to investigate potential dermal BPA metabolism during absorption, radiolabelled BPA was applied to fresh, metabolically competent, human skin samples (ring labelled 14 C BPA concentrations tested were 2.4, 12, 60 and 300mg/L). Measured as total radioactivity the mean absorbed dose (receptor compartment) ranged from 1.7-3.6% of the applied doses and the dermal delivery (epidermis+dermis+receptor compartment), sometimes also named bioavailable dose was 16-20% of the applied doses, with the majority of the radioactivity associated with epidermis compared to dermis and receptor fluid. No metabolism was observed in any of the epidermis samples; however some metabolism was observed in dermis and receptor fluid samples with formation of BPA-glucuronide and BPA-sulfate, and some polar metabolites. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Complex interactions between dietary and genetic factors impact lycopene metabolism and distribution

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Nancy E.; Erdman, John W.; Clinton, Steven K.

    2013-01-01

    Intake of lycopene, a red, tetraterpene carotenoid found in tomatoes is epidemiologically associated with a decreased risk of chronic disease processes, and lycopene has demonstrated bioactivity in numerous in vitro and animal models. However, our understanding of absorption, tissue distribution, and biological impact in humans remains very limited. Lycopene absorption is strongly impacted by dietary composition, especially the amount of fat. Concentrations of circulating lycopene in lipoproteins may be further influenced by a number of variations in genes related to lipid absorption and metabolism. Lycopene is not uniformly distributed among tissues, with adipose, liver, and blood being the major body pools, while the testes, adrenals, and liver have the greatest concentrations compared to other organs. Tissue concentrations of lycopene are likely dictated by expression of and genetic variation in lipoprotein receptors, cholesterol transporters, and carotenoid metabolizing enzymes, thus impacting lycopene accumulation at target sites of action. The novel application of genetic evaluation in concert with lycopene tracers will allow determination of which genes and polymorphisms define individual lycopene metabolic phenotypes, response to dietary variables, and ultimately determine biological and clinical outcomes. A better understanding of the relationship between diet, genetics, and lycopene distribution will provide necessary information to interpret epidemiological findings more accurately and to design effective, personalized clinical nutritional interventions addressing hypotheses regarding health outcomes. PMID:23845854

  9. Evaluation of intestinal metabolism and absorption using the Ussing chamber system equipped with intestinal tissue from rats and dogs.

    PubMed

    Miyake, Masateru; Kondo, Satoshi; Koga, Toshihisa; Yoda, Noriaki; Nakazato, Satoru; Emoto, Chie; Mukai, Tadashi; Toguchi, Hajime

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the intestinal metabolism and absorption in a mini-Ussing chamber equipped with animal intestinal tissues, based on the transport index (TI). TI value was defined as the sum of drug amounts transported to the basal-side component (X corr ) and drug amounts accumulated in the tissue (T corr ), which are normalized by AUC of a drug in the apical compartment, as an index for drug absorption. Midazolam was used as a test compound for the evaluation of intestinal metabolism and absorption. The metabolite formulation of midazolam was observed in both rats and dogs. Ketoconazole inhibited the intestinal metabolism of midazolam in rats and improved its intestinal absorption to a statistically significant extent. Therefore, the mini-Ussing chamber, equipped with animal intestinal tissues, showed potential to use the evaluation of the intestinal metabolism and absorption, including the assessment of species differences. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Chirag; Douard, Veronique; Yu, Shiyan; Gao, Nan; Ferraris, Ronaldo P.

    2015-01-01

    Dietary fructose that is linked to metabolic abnormalities can up-regulate its own absorption, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms are not known. We hypothesized that glucose transporter (GLUT) protein, member 5 (GLUT5) is the primary fructose transporter and that fructose absorption via GLUT5, metabolism via ketohexokinase (KHK), as well as GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane via the Ras-related protein-in-brain 11 (Rab11)a-dependent endosomes are each required for regulation. Introducing fructose but not lysine and glucose solutions into the lumen increased by 2- to 10-fold the heterogeneous nuclear RNA, mRNA, protein, and activity levels of GLUT5 in adult wild-type mice consuming chow. Levels of GLUT5 were >100-fold that of candidate apical fructose transporters GLUTs 7, 8, and 12 whose expression, and that of GLUT 2 and the sodium-dependent glucose transporter protein 1 (SGLT1), was not regulated by luminal fructose. GLUT5-knockout (KO) mice exhibited no facilitative fructose transport and no compensatory increases in activity and expression of SGLT1 and other GLUTs. Fructose could not up-regulate GLUT5 in GLUT5-KO, KHK-KO, and intestinal epithelial cell-specific Rab11a-KO mice. The fructose-specific metabolite glyceraldehyde did not increase GLUT5 expression. GLUT5 is the primary transporter responsible for facilitative absorption of fructose, and its regulation specifically requires fructose uptake and metabolism and normal GLUT5 trafficking to the apical membrane.—Patel, C., Douard, V., Yu, S., Gao, N., Ferraris, R. P. Transport, metabolism, and endosomal trafficking-dependent regulation of intestinal fructose absorption. PMID:26071406

  11. Absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG): An updated review.

    PubMed

    Gan, Ren-You; Li, Hua-Bin; Sui, Zhong-Quan; Corke, Harold

    2018-04-13

    Green tea is one of the most popular beverages in the world, especially in Asian countries. Consumption of green tea has been demonstrated to possess many health benefits, which mainly attributed to the main bioactive compound epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a flavone-3-ol polyphenol, in green tea. EGCG is mainly absorbed in the intestine, and gut microbiota play a critical role in its metabolism prior to absorption. EGCG exhibits versatile bioactivities, with its anti-cancer effect most attracting due to the cancer preventive effect of green tea consumption, and a great number of studies intensively investigated its anti-cancer effect. In this review, we therefore, first stated the absorption and metabolism process of EGCG, and then summarized its anti-cancer effect in vitro and in vivo, including its manifold anti-cancer actions and mechanisms, especially its anti-cancer stem cell effect, and next highlighted its various molecular targets involved in cancer inhibition. Finally, the anti-cancer effect of EGCG analogs and nanoparticles, as well as the potential cancer promoting effect of EGCG were also discussed. Understanding of the absorption, metabolism, anti-cancer effect and molecular targets of EGCG can be of importance to better utilize it as a chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agent.

  12. Distinguishing between the permeability relationships with absorption and metabolism to improve BCS and BDDCS predictions in early drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Larregieu, Caroline A; Benet, Leslie Z

    2014-04-07

    The biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biopharmaceutics drug distribution classification system (BDDCS) are complementary classification systems that can improve, simplify, and accelerate drug discovery, development, and regulatory processes. Drug permeability has been widely accepted as a screening tool for determining intestinal absorption via the BCS during the drug development and regulatory approval processes. Currently, predicting clinically significant drug interactions during drug development is a known challenge for industry and regulatory agencies. The BDDCS, a modification of BCS that utilizes drug metabolism instead of intestinal permeability, predicts drug disposition and potential drug-drug interactions in the intestine, the liver, and most recently the brain. Although correlations between BCS and BDDCS have been observed with drug permeability rates, discrepancies have been noted in drug classifications between the two systems utilizing different permeability models, which are accepted as surrogate models for demonstrating human intestinal permeability by the FDA. Here, we recommend the most applicable permeability models for improving the prediction of BCS and BDDCS classifications. We demonstrate that the passive transcellular permeability rate, characterized by means of permeability models that are deficient in transporter expression and paracellular junctions (e.g., PAMPA and Caco-2), will most accurately predict BDDCS metabolism. These systems will inaccurately predict BCS classifications for drugs that particularly are substrates of highly expressed intestinal transporters. Moreover, in this latter case, a system more representative of complete human intestinal permeability is needed to accurately predict BCS absorption.

  13. Distinguishing between the Permeability Relationships with Absorption and Metabolism To Improve BCS and BDDCS Predictions in Early Drug Discovery

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The biopharmaceutics classification system (BCS) and biopharmaceutics drug distribution classification system (BDDCS) are complementary classification systems that can improve, simplify, and accelerate drug discovery, development, and regulatory processes. Drug permeability has been widely accepted as a screening tool for determining intestinal absorption via the BCS during the drug development and regulatory approval processes. Currently, predicting clinically significant drug interactions during drug development is a known challenge for industry and regulatory agencies. The BDDCS, a modification of BCS that utilizes drug metabolism instead of intestinal permeability, predicts drug disposition and potential drug–drug interactions in the intestine, the liver, and most recently the brain. Although correlations between BCS and BDDCS have been observed with drug permeability rates, discrepancies have been noted in drug classifications between the two systems utilizing different permeability models, which are accepted as surrogate models for demonstrating human intestinal permeability by the FDA. Here, we recommend the most applicable permeability models for improving the prediction of BCS and BDDCS classifications. We demonstrate that the passive transcellular permeability rate, characterized by means of permeability models that are deficient in transporter expression and paracellular junctions (e.g., PAMPA and Caco-2), will most accurately predict BDDCS metabolism. These systems will inaccurately predict BCS classifications for drugs that particularly are substrates of highly expressed intestinal transporters. Moreover, in this latter case, a system more representative of complete human intestinal permeability is needed to accurately predict BCS absorption. PMID:24628254

  14. Impact of physiological, physicochemical and biopharmaceutical factors in absorption and metabolism mechanisms on the drug oral bioavailability of rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Hurst, Susan; Loi, Cho-Ming; Brodfuehrer, Joanne; El-Kattan, Ayman

    2007-08-01

    The onset, intensity and duration of therapeutic response to a compound depend on the intrinsic pharmacological activity of the drug and pharmacokinetic factors related to its absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination that are inherent to the biological system. The process of drug transfer from the site of administration to the systemic circulation and the interspecies factors that impact this process are the scope of this review. In general, the factors that influence oral drug bioavailability via absorption and metabolism can be divided into physicochemical/biopharmaceutical and physiological factors. Physicochemical and biopharmaceutical factors that influence permeability and solubility tend to be species independent. Although there are significant differences in the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal tract, these are not associated with significant differences in the rate and extent of drug absorption between rats and humans. However, species differences in drug metabolism in rats and humans did result in significant species differences in bioavailability. Overall, this review provides a better understanding of the interplay between drug physicochemical/biopharmaceutical factors and species differences/similarities in the absorption and metabolism mechanisms that affect oral bioavailability in rats and humans. This will enable a more rational approach to perform projection of oral bioavailability in human using available rat in vivo data.

  15. Anthocyanin Absorption and Metabolism by Human Intestinal Caco-2 Cells—A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kamiloglu, Senem; Capanoglu, Esra; Grootaert, Charlotte; Van Camp, John

    2015-01-01

    Anthocyanins from different plant sources have been shown to possess health beneficial effects against a number of chronic diseases. To obtain any influence in a specific tissue or organ, these bioactive compounds must be bioavailable, i.e., effectively absorbed from the gut into the circulation and transferred to the appropriate location within the body while still maintaining their bioactivity. One of the key factors affecting the bioavailability of anthocyanins is their transport through the gut epithelium. The Caco-2 cell line, a human intestinal epithelial cell model derived from a colon carcinoma, has been proven to be a good alternative to animal studies for predicting intestinal absorption of anthocyanins. Studies investigating anthocyanin absorption by Caco-2 cells report very low absorption of these compounds. However, the bioavailability of anthocyanins may be underestimated since the metabolites formed in the course of digestion could be responsible for the health benefits associated with anthocyanins. In this review, we critically discuss recent findings reported on the anthocyanin absorption and metabolism by human intestinal Caco-2 cells. PMID:26370977

  16. Gastrointestinal interactions, absorption, splanchnic metabolism and pharmacokinetics of orally ingested phenolic compounds.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Avila, J Abraham; Wall-Medrano, Abraham; Velderrain-Rodríguez, Gustavo R; Chen, C-Y Oliver; Salazar-López, Norma Julieta; Robles-Sánchez, Maribel; González-Aguilar, Gustavo A

    2017-01-25

    The positive health effects of phenolic compounds (PCs) have been extensively reported in the literature. An understanding of their bioaccessibility and bioavailability is essential for the elucidation of their health benefits. Before reaching circulation and exerting bioactions in target tissues, numerous interactions take place before and during digestion with either the plant or host's macromolecules that directly impact the organism and modulate their own bioaccessibility and bioavailability. The present work is focused on the gastrointestinal (GI) interactions that are relevant to the absorption and metabolism of PCs and how these interactions impact their pharmacokinetic profiles. Non-digestible cell wall components (fiber) interact intimately with PCs and delay their absorption in the small intestine, instead carrying them to the large intestine. PCs not bound to fiber interact with digestible nutrients in the bolus where they interfere with the digestion and absorption of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, cholesterol, bile salts and micronutrients through the inhibition of digestive enzymes and enterocyte transporters and the disruption of micelle formation. PCs internalized by enterocytes may reach circulation (through transcellular or paracellular transport), be effluxed back into the lumen (P-glycoprotein, P-gp) or be metabolized by phase I and phase II enzymes. Some PCs can inhibit P-gp or phase I/II enzymes, which can potentially lead to drug-nutrient interactions. The absorption and pharmacokinetic parameters are modified by all of the interactions within the digestive tract and by the presence of other PCs. Undesirable interactions have promoted the development of nanotechnological approaches to promote the bioaccessibility, bioavailability, and bioefficacy of PCs.

  17. Alteration of carbohydrates metabolism and midgut glucose absorption in Gromphadorhina portentosa after subchronic exposure to imidacloprid and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Sawczyn, Tomasz; Dolezych, Bogdan; Klosok, Marcin; Augustyniak, Maria; Stygar, Dominika; Buldak, Rafal J; Kukla, Michal; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that following exposure to insecticides, changes take place in the metabolism of carbohydrates and absorption in the midgut of insects. The Madagascar hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) was chosen for the experiment as a model organism, due to it being easy to breed and its relatively large alimentary tract, which was important when preparing the microperfusion midgut bioassay. In each group of cockroaches treated with imidacloprid and fenitrothion, absorption of glucose, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC), was elevated compared to the control group. Glucose in the hemolymph of the examined insects was present in a vestigial amount, often below the threshold of determination, so the determinable carbohydrate indices were: hemolymph trehalose concentration and fat body glycogen content. The level of trehalose found in the hemolymph of insects when exposed to fenitrothion, and irrespective of the level of concentration mixed into food, were significantly lower when comparing to the control samples. Imidacloprid acted analogically with one exception at the concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1) dry food where trehalose concentration did not differ from the control values. Coupling with fat body glycogen concentration was less visible and appeared only at the concentrations of 5 and 10 mg imidacloprid·kg(-1) dry food. As described in this study changes in the sugar distribution and midgut glucose absorption indicate that insects cover the increased energy needs induced by insecticides; also at the gastrointestinal tract level. The result indicates that the midgut glucose absorption parameters could be considered as a non-specific biomarker of insecticide toxicity.

  18. Absorption and distribution of orally administered jojoba wax in mice.

    PubMed

    Yaron, A; Samoiloff, V; Benzioni, A

    1982-03-01

    The liquid wax obtained from the seeds of the arid-land shrub jojoba (Simmondsia chinensis) is finding increasing use in skin treatment preparations. The fate of this wax upon reaching the digestive tract was studied. 14C-Labeled wax was administered intragastrically to mice, and the distribution of the label in the body was determined as a function of time. Most of the wax was excreted, but a small amount was absorbed, as was indicated by the distribution of label in the internal organs and the epididymal fat. The label was incorporated into the body lipids and was found to diminish with time.

  19. Metabolism drives distribution and abundance in extremophile fish

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Peter A.; Glover, Chris N.; McIntosh, Angus R.

    2017-01-01

    Differences in population density between species of varying size are frequently attributed to metabolic rates which are assumed to scale with body size with a slope of 0.75. This assumption is often criticised on the grounds that 0.75 scaling of metabolic rate with body size is not universal and can vary significantly depending on species and life-history. However, few studies have investigated how interspecific variation in metabolic scaling relationships affects population density in different sized species. Here we predict inter-specific differences in metabolism from niche requirements, thereby allowing metabolic predictions of species distribution and abundance at fine spatial scales. Due to the differences in energetic efficiency required along harsh-benign gradients, an extremophile fish (brown mudfish, Neochanna apoda) living in harsh environments had slower metabolism, and thus higher population densities, compared to a fish species (banded kōkopu, Galaxias fasciatus) in physiologically more benign habitats. Interspecific differences in the intercepts for the relationship between body and density disappeared when species mass-specific metabolic rates, rather than body sizes, were used to predict density, implying population energy use was equivalent between mudfish and kōkopu. Nevertheless, despite significant interspecific differences in the slope of the metabolic scaling relationships, mudfish and kōkopu had a common slope for the relationship between body size and population density. These results support underlying logic of energetic equivalence between different size species implicit in metabolic theory. However, the precise slope of metabolic scaling relationships, which is the subject of much debate, may not be a reliable indicator of population density as expected under metabolic theory. PMID:29176819

  20. Linking phytoplankton community metabolism to the individual size distribution.

    PubMed

    Padfield, Daniel; Buckling, Angus; Warfield, Ruth; Lowe, Chris; Yvon-Durocher, Gabriel

    2018-05-25

    Quantifying variation in ecosystem metabolism is critical to predicting the impacts of environmental change on the carbon cycle. We used a metabolic scaling framework to investigate how body size and temperature influence phytoplankton community metabolism. We tested this framework using phytoplankton sampled from an outdoor mesocosm experiment, where communities had been either experimentally warmed (+ 4 °C) for 10 years or left at ambient temperature. Warmed and ambient phytoplankton communities differed substantially in their taxonomic composition and size structure. Despite this, the response of primary production and community respiration to long- and short-term warming could be estimated using a model that accounted for the size- and temperature dependence of individual metabolism, and the community abundance-body size distribution. This work demonstrates that the key metabolic fluxes that determine the carbon balance of planktonic ecosystems can be approximated using metabolic scaling theory, with knowledge of the individual size distribution and environmental temperature. © 2018 The Authors. Ecology Letters published by CNRS and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cation distribution in NiZn-ferrite films via extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Koon, N. C.; Williams, C. M.; Zhang, Q.; Abe, M.; Kirkland, J. P.

    1996-04-01

    We have applied extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to study the cation distribution in a series of spin-sprayed NiZn-ferrite films. A least-squares fitting of experimental EXAFS data with theoretical, multiple-scattering, EXAFS data allowed the quantitative determination of site distributions for all transition metal cations.

  2. Laser absorption of carbon fiber reinforced polymer with randomly distributed carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Xu, Hebing; Li, Chao

    2018-03-01

    Laser processing of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) is a non-traditional machining method which has many prospective applications. The laser absorption characteristics of CFRP are analyzed in this paper. A ray tracing model describing the interaction of the laser spot with CFRP is established. The material model contains randomly distributed carbon fibers which are generated using an improved carbon fiber placement method. It was found that CFRP has good laser absorption due to multiple reflections of the light rays in the material’s microstructure. The randomly distributed carbon fibers make the absorptivity of the light rays change randomly in the laser spot. Meanwhile, the average absorptivity fluctuation is obvious during movement of the laser. The experimental measurements agree well with the values predicted by the ray tracing model.

  3. Interplay of Drug-Metabolizing Enzymes and Transporters in Drug Absorption and Disposition.

    PubMed

    Shi, Shaojun; Li, Yunqiao

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, the functional interplay between drug-metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) and drug transporters (DTs) in drug absorption and disposition, as well as the complex drug interactions (DIs), has become an intriguing contention, which has also been termed the "transport-metabolism interplay". The current mechanistic understanding for this interplay is first discussed. In the present article, studies investigating the interplay between cytochrome P450 enzymes (CYPs) and efflux transporters have been systematically reviewed in vitro, in situ, in silico, in animals and humans, followed by CYPs-uptake transporters, CYPs-uptake transporters-efflux transporters, and phase II metabolic enzymes-transporters interplay studies. Although several cellular, isolated organ and whole animal studies, in conjunction with simulation and modelling, have addressed the issue that DMEs and DTs can work cooperatively to affect the bioavailability of shared substrate drugs, convincing evidences in human studies are still lacking. Furthermore, the functional interplay between DMEs and DTs will be highly substrate- and dose- dependent. Additionally, we review recent studies to evaluate the influence of genetic variations in the interplay between DMEs and DTs, which might be helpful for the prediction of pharmacokinetics (PK) and possible DIs in human more correctly. There is strong evidence of coordinately regulated DEMs and DTs gene expression and protein activity (e.g. nuclear receptors). Taken together, further investigations and analysis are urgently needed to explore the functional interplay of DMEs and DTs and to delineate the underlying mechanisms.

  4. Variation in sensitivity, absorption and density of the central rod distribution with eccentricity.

    PubMed

    Tornow, R P; Stilling, R

    1998-01-01

    To assess the human rod photopigment distribution and sensitivity with high spatial resolution within the central +/-15 degrees and to compare the results of pigment absorption, sensitivity and rod density distribution (number of rods per square degree). Rod photopigment density distribution was measured with imaging densitometry using a modified Rodenstock scanning laser ophthalmoscope. Dark-adapted sensitivity profiles were measured with green stimuli (17' arc diameter, 1 degrees spacing) using a T ubingen manual perimeter. Sensitivity profiles were plotted on a linear scale and rod photopigment optical density distribution profiles were converted to absorption profiles of the rod photopigment layer. Both the absorption profile of the rod photopigment and the linear sensitivity profile for green stimuli show a minimum at the foveal center and increase steeply with eccentricity. The variation with eccentricity corresponds to the rod density distribution. Rod photopigment absorption profiles, retinal sensitivity profiles, and the rod density distribution are linearly related within the central +/-15 degrees. This is in agreement with theoretical considerations. Both methods, imaging retinal densitometry using a scanning laser ophthalmoscope and dark-adapted perimetry with small green stimuli, are useful for assessing the central rod distribution and sensitivity. However, at present, both methods have limitations. Suggestions for improving the reliability of both methods are given.

  5. CLUH couples mitochondrial distribution to the energetic and metabolic status.

    PubMed

    Wakim, Jamal; Goudenege, David; Perrot, Rodolphe; Gueguen, Naig; Desquiret-Dumas, Valerie; Chao de la Barca, Juan Manuel; Dalla Rosa, Ilaria; Manero, Florence; Le Mao, Morgane; Chupin, Stephanie; Chevrollier, Arnaud; Procaccio, Vincent; Bonneau, Dominique; Logan, David C; Reynier, Pascal; Lenaers, Guy; Khiati, Salim

    2017-06-01

    Mitochondrial dynamics and distribution are critical for supplying ATP in response to energy demand. CLUH is a protein involved in mitochondrial distribution whose dysfunction leads to mitochondrial clustering, the metabolic consequences of which remain unknown. To gain insight into the role of CLUH on mitochondrial energy production and cellular metabolism, we have generated CLUH-knockout cells using CRISPR/Cas9. Mitochondrial clustering was associated with a smaller cell size and with decreased abundance of respiratory complexes, resulting in oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) defects. This energetic impairment was found to be due to the alteration of mitochondrial translation and to a metabolic shift towards glucose dependency. Metabolomic profiling by mass spectroscopy revealed an increase in the concentration of some amino acids, indicating a dysfunctional Krebs cycle, and increased palmitoylcarnitine concentration, indicating an alteration of fatty acid oxidation, and a dramatic decrease in the concentrations of phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyeline, consistent with the decreased cell size. Taken together, our study establishes a clear function for CLUH in coupling mitochondrial distribution to the control of cell energetic and metabolic status. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Rapamycin does not affect post-absorptive protein metabolism in human skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dickinson, Jared M.; Drummond, Micah J.; Fry, Christopher S.; Gundermann, David M.; Walker, Dillon K.; Timmerman, Kyle L.; Volpi, Elena; Rasmussen, Blake B.

    2013-01-01

    Administration of the mTORC1 inhibitor, rapamycin, to humans blocks the increase in skeletal muscle protein synthesis in response to resistance exercise or amino acid ingestion. Objective To determine whether rapamycin administration influences basal post-absorptive protein synthesis or breakdown in human skeletal muscle. Materials/Methods Six young (26±2 years) subjects were studied during two separate trials, in which each trial was divided into two consecutive 2h basal periods. The trials were identical except during one trial a single oral dose (16mg) of rapamycin was administered immediately prior to the second basal period. Muscle biopsies were obtained from the vastus lateralis at 0, 2, and 4h to examine protein synthesis, mTORC1 signaling, and markers of autophagy (LC3B-I and LC3B-II protein) associated with each 2h basal period. Results During the Control trial, muscle protein synthesis, whole body protein breakdown (phenylalanine Ra), mTORC1 signaling, and markers of autophagy were similar between both basal periods (p>0.05). During the Rapamycin trial, these variables were similar to the Control trial (p>0.05) and were unaltered by rapamycin administration (p>0.05). Thus, post-absorptive muscle protein metabolism and mTORC1 signaling were not affected by rapamycin administration. Conclusions Short-term rapamycin administration may only impair protein synthesis in human skeletal muscle when combined with a stimulus such as resistance exercise or increased amino acid availability. PMID:22959478

  7. Prediction of intestinal absorption and metabolism of pharmacologically active flavones and flavanones.

    PubMed

    Serra, H; Mendes, T; Bronze, M R; Simplício, Ana Luísa

    2008-04-01

    Three glycosilated flavonoids (diosmin, hesperidin and naringin) and respective aglycones were characterized in terms of their apparent ionisation constants and bidirectional permeability using the cellular model Caco-2 as well as the artificial membrane model PAMPA. Ionisation curves were established by capillary electrophoresis. It was confirmed that significant amounts of the aglycones are ionised at physiological pH whereas the glycosides are in the neutral form. Permeation was not detected for the glycosides in either the apical-to-basolateral or basolateral-to-apical directions confirming the need for metabolism before absorption through the intestinal membrane. The aglycones permeated in both directions with apparent permeabilities (P(app)) in the range of 1-8x10(-5) cm/s. The results from both in vitro methods correlated providing some evidence of passive transport; however, the hypothesis of active transport cannot be excluded particularly in the case of diosmetin. Metabolism of the aglycones was detected with the cell model, more extensively when loading in the apical side. Some of the metabolites were identified as glucuronide conjugates by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  8. Extrapolation of systemic bioavailability assessing skin absorption and epidermal and hepatic metabolism of aromatic amine hair dyes in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Manwaring, John, E-mail: manwaring.jd@pg.com; Rothe, Helga; Obringer, Cindy

    Approaches to assess the role of absorption, metabolism and excretion of cosmetic ingredients that are based on the integration of different in vitro data are important for their safety assessment, specifically as it offers an opportunity to refine that safety assessment. In order to estimate systemic exposure (AUC) to aromatic amine hair dyes following typical product application conditions, skin penetration and epidermal and systemic metabolic conversion of the parent compound was assessed in human skin explants and human keratinocyte (HaCaT) and hepatocyte cultures. To estimate the amount of the aromatic amine that can reach the general circulation unchanged after passagemore » through the skin the following toxicokinetically relevant parameters were applied: a) Michaelis–Menten kinetics to quantify the epidermal metabolism; b) the estimated keratinocyte cell abundance in the viable epidermis; c) the skin penetration rate; d) the calculated Mean Residence Time in the viable epidermis; e) the viable epidermis thickness and f) the skin permeability coefficient. In a next step, in vitro hepatocyte K{sub m} and V{sub max} values and whole liver mass and cell abundance were used to calculate the scaled intrinsic clearance, which was combined with liver blood flow and fraction of compound unbound in the blood to give hepatic clearance. The systemic exposure in the general circulation (AUC) was extrapolated using internal dose and hepatic clearance, and C{sub max} was extrapolated (conservative overestimation) using internal dose and volume of distribution, indicating that appropriate toxicokinetic information can be generated based solely on in vitro data. For the hair dye, p-phenylenediamine, these data were found to be in the same order of magnitude as those published for human volunteers. - Highlights: • An entirely in silico/in vitro approach to predict in vivo exposure to dermally applied hair dyes • Skin penetration and epidermal conversion assessed in

  9. Gastrointestinal absorption of americium-241 by orally exposed swine: comparison of experimental results with predictions of metabolic models.

    PubMed

    Eisele, G R; Bernard, S R; Nestor, C W

    1987-10-01

    Two groups of 11-week-old swine (40 miniature and 40 domestic swine) received a single oral administration of 1.9 X 10(8) Bq (5.2 mCi) of 241Am citrate, and groups of eight animals, four of each type, were killed and sampled at 1, 2, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h and 30 days later. Uptake and excretion patterns of the radioactivity appeared to occur in three phases: rapid uptake, rapid excretion, and then a slower excretion. All animals were systematically dissected, and the eviscerated carcasses were autoclaved for separation of bone and muscle. The predominant site of deposition was bone, and autoclaving had little effect on releasing 241Am from either bone or muscle. The maximum fractional gastrointestinal absorption of 1.1 X 10(-3) occurred 8 h after radionuclide administration. The tissue distribution data suggest partitions of 50, 20, and 30%, for bone, liver, and other soft tissues, respectively. Two metabolic models were evaluated: a modified Mewhinney-Griffith model and the ICRP 30 model to compare the biological data with model predictions. All models underestimated the actual early time data, but the fits to the experimental results were better at later times.

  10. SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF ABSORPTION, LOCAL SUPPRESSION, AND EMISSIVITY REDUCTION OF SOLAR ACOUSTIC WAVES IN MAGNETIC REGIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Chou, D.-Y.; Yang, M.-H.; Zhao Hui

    Observed acoustic power in magnetic regions is lower than the quiet Sun because of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of solar acoustic waves in magnetic regions. In the previous studies, we have developed a method to measure the coefficients of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression of sunspots. In this study, we go one step further to measure the spatial distributions of three coefficients in two active regions, NOAA 9055 and 9057. The maps of absorption, emissivity reduction, and local suppression coefficients correlate with the magnetic map, including plage regions, except the emissivity reduction coefficient of NOAA 9055 wheremore » the emissivity reduction coefficient is too weak and lost among the noise.« less

  11. Time-resolved photoion imaging spectroscopy: Determining energy distribution in multiphoton absorption experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, D. B.; Shi, F. D.; Chen, L.; Martin, S.; Bernard, J.; Yang, J.; Zhang, S. F.; Chen, Z. Q.; Zhu, X. L.; Ma, X.

    2018-04-01

    We propose an approach to determine the excitation energy distribution due to multiphoton absorption in the case of excited systems following decays to produce different ion species. This approach is based on the measurement of the time-resolved photoion position spectrum by using velocity map imaging spectrometry and an unfocused laser beam with a low fluence and homogeneous profile. Such a measurement allows us to identify the species and the origin of each ion detected and to depict the energy distribution using a pure Poisson's equation involving only one variable which is proportional to the absolute photon absorption cross section. A cascade decay model is used to build direct connections between the energy distribution and the probability to detect each ionic species. Comparison between experiments and simulations permits the energy distribution and accordingly the absolute photon absorption cross section to be determined. This approach is illustrated using C60 as an example. It may therefore be extended to a wide variety of molecules and clusters having decay mechanisms similar to those of fullerene molecules.

  12. Absorption, metabolism and protective role of fruits and vegetables polyphenols against gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Metere, A; Giacomelli, L

    2017-12-01

    Growing evidence links free radicals to the aging processes, degenerative diseases and cancer, underlying the important role played by some antioxidants, as polyphenols, present in fruits and vegetables, which seem able to counteract the toxic effects induced by oxidative stress. The gastrointestinal tract is continuously exposed to oxidant and antioxidant substances and, in particular in this district, the food rich in antioxidants could exert a protective effect against the risk of cancer. Polyphenols have a direct protective effect on the gastrointestinal tract, detoxifying the Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS), preserving antioxidant proteins and complexing metals. Although polyphenols are a class of antioxidant largely represented in vegetables and fruits, we are still uncertain whether the beneficial effects of a diet rich in plant products, are mainly due to these compounds. Our knowledge does not allow to be sure about which antioxidants are capable of having therapeutic effects, through which mechanism, the exact therapeutic dose or how long they have to be taken to have a significant protective effect. In this review we take into account the most common antioxidants, usually found in the diet and the processes regulating their absorption, metabolism and excretion, in order to elucidate the mechanism that could be responsible for the protection against cancer.

  13. The effects of black pepper on the intestinal absorption and hepatic metabolism of drugs.

    PubMed

    Han, Hyo-Kyung

    2011-06-01

    There is currently a need for a better understanding of the mechanisms of food-drug interaction as well as the clinical implication to maximize the effectiveness and applicability of black pepper or its active component, piperine, as a bioavailability enhancer in the clinical arena. This review deals with the effects of black pepper and piperine on drug metabolizing enzymes as well as on intestinal drug absorption. The review provides the reader with a comprehensive update on the potential mechanisms and pharmacokinetic interactions of black pepper and piperine with co-administered medicines. The article also provides a comprehensive update on the current known issues with black pepper and piperine. The information provided is used to assess the clinical significance of black pepper and piperine and optimize their effectiveness as a bioavailability enhancer. For black pepper or piperine to be widely applicable in current medical practice, as a combination therapy, the clinical significance of food-drug interactions caused by concurrent use of black pepper or piperine should be carefully assessed with consideration for many compounding factors affecting the clinical outcome of pharmacokinetic interactions (e.g., dose, dosing regimen, genetic variation and species). Furthermore, the effective formulation strategy for the optimization of the pharmacokinetic characteristics of dietary components is crucial to improve their in vivo performance and ultimately maximize their effectiveness as a bioavailability enhancer.

  14. Glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism after guar gum ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simoes Nunes, C.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six non-anaesthetized Large White pigs (mean body weight 59 +/- 1.7 kg) were fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein and with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery. The animals were provided a basal none-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 6% guar gum (diet B) or 15% purified cellulose (diet C). The diets were given for 1 week and according to a replicated 3 x 3 latin-square design. On the last day of each adaptation period test meals of 800 g were given prior to blood sampling. The sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced the glucose absorption as well as the insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production. However, the reduction in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum was not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly produced by the gut. The liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion also appeared to decrease pancreatic glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very little effect on the parameters considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the latter internal metabolic effects.

  15. Comparative absorption, distribution, and excretion of titanium dioxide and zinc oxide nanoparticles after repeated oral administration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Wan-Seob; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Lee, Jong Kwon; Jeong, Jayoung; Che, Jeong-Hwan; Seok, Seung Hyeok

    2013-03-26

    The in vivo kinetics of nanoparticles is an essential to understand the hazard of nanoparticles. Here, the absorption, distribution, and excretion patterns of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles following oral administration were evaluated. Nanoparticles were orally administered to rats for 13 weeks (7 days/week). Samples of blood, tissues (liver, kidneys, spleen, and brain), urine, and feces were obtained at necropsy. The level of Ti or Zn in each sample was measured using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. TiO₂ nanoparticles had extremely low absorption, while ZnO nanoparticles had higher absorption and a clear dose-response curve. Tissue distribution data showed that TiO₂ nanoparticles were not significantly increased in sampled organs, even in the group receiving the highest dose (1041.5 mg/kg body weight). In contrast, Zn concentrations in the liver and kidney were significantly increased compared with the vehicle control. ZnO nanoparticles in the spleen and brain were minimally increased. Ti concentrations were not significantly increased in the urine, while Zn levels were significantly increased in the urine, again with a clear dose-response curve. Very high concentrations of Ti were detected in the feces, while much less Zn was detected in the feces. Compared with TiO₂ nanoparticles, ZnO nanoparticles demonstrated higher absorption and more extensive organ distribution when administered orally. The higher absorption of ZnO than TiO₂ nanoparticles might be due to the higher dissolution rate in acidic gastric fluid, although more thorough studies are needed.

  16. Intestinal absorption, organ distribution, and urinary excretion of the rare sugar D-psicose

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Hossain, Akram; Yamaguchi, Fuminori; Hirata, Yuko; Dong, Youyi; Kamitori, Kazuyo; Sui, Li; Nonaka, Machiko; Ueno, Masaki; Nishimoto, Kazuyuki; Suda, Hirofumi; Morimoto, Kenji; Shimonishi, Tsuyoshi; Saito, Madoka; Song, Tao; Konishi, Ryoji; Tokuda, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate intestinal absorption, organ distribution, and urinary elimination of the rare sugar D-psicose, a 3-carbon stereoisomer of D-fructose that is currently being investigated and which has been found to be strongly effective against hyperglycemia and hyperlipidemia. Methods This study was performed using radioactive D-psicose, which was synthesized enzymatically from radioactive D-allose. Concentrations in whole blood, urine, and organs were measured at different time points until 2 hours after both oral and intravenous administrations and 7 days after a single oral administration (100 mg/kg body weight) to Wistar rats. Autoradiography was also performed by injecting 100 mg/kg body weight of 14C-labeled D-psicose or glucose intravenously to C3H mice. Results Following oral administration, D-psicose easily moved to blood. The maximum blood concentration (48.5±15.6 μg/g) was observed at 1 hour. Excretion to urine was 20% within 1 hour and 33% within 2 hours. Accumulation to organs was detected only in the liver. Following intravenous administration, blood concentration was decreased with the half-life=57 minutes, and the excretion to urine was up to almost 50% within 1 hour. Similarly to the results obtained with oral administration, accumulation to organs was detected only in the liver. Seven days after the single-dose oral administration, the remaining amounts in the whole body were less than 1%. Autoradiography of mice showed results similar to those in rats. High signals of 14C-labeled D-psicose were observed in liver, kidney, and bladder. Interestingly, no accumulation of D-psicose was observed in the brain. Conclusion D-psicose was absorbed well after oral administration and eliminated rapidly after both oral and intravenous administrations, with short duration of action. The study provides valuable pharmacokinetic data for further drug development of D-psicose. Because the findings were mainly based on animal

  17. Nutrient Distribution and Absorption in the Colonial Hydroid Podocoryna carnea Is Sequentially Diffusive and Directional.

    PubMed

    Buss, Leo W; Anderson, Christopher P; Perry, Elena K; Buss, Evan D; Bolton, Edward W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution and absorption of ingested protein was characterized within a colony of Podocoryna carnea when a single polyp was fed. Observations were conducted at multiple spatial and temporal scales at three different stages of colony ontogeny with an artificial food item containing Texas Red conjugated albumin. Food pellets were digested and all tracer absorbed by digestive cells within the first 2-3 hours post-feeding. The preponderance of the label was located in the fed polyp and in a transport-induced diffusion pattern surrounding the fed polyp. After 6 hours post-feeding particulates re-appeared in the gastrovascular system and their absorption increased the area over which the nutrients were distributed, albeit still in a pattern that was centered on the fed polyp. At later intervals, tracer became concentrated in some stolon tips, but not in others, despite the proximity of these stolons either to the fed polyp or to adjacent stolons receiving nutrients. Distribution and absorption of nutrients is sequentially diffusive and directional.

  18. Tissue distribution and metabolism of triadimefon and triadimenol enantiomers in Chinese lizards (Eremias argus).

    PubMed

    Li, Jitong; Wang, Yinghuan; Li, Wei; Xu, Peng; Guo, Baoyuan; Li, Jianzhong; Wang, Huili

    2017-08-01

    Triadimefon (TF, S-(+)-TF, R-(-)-TF) and its metabolite triadimenol (TN, TN-A1, A2 and TN-B1, B2) are two systemic fungicides and both of them are chiral pharmaceuticals which are widely used in agricultural industry. Many researches focused on the toxicity effects of triadimefon on mammals, while the ecotoxicological data of tiradimefon on reptiles is limited. In order to understand the toxicity mechanism of triadimefon in reptiles, the current study administrated S-(+)-TF or R-(-)-TF traidimefon (50mg/kg bw ) to Chinese lizards (Eremias argus) respectively, the absorption, distribution of triadimefon and the formation of triadimenol were analysed at different sampling times. The metabolic pathways were demonstrated through relative gene expression using quantitative real-time PCR reaction. During the experiment time, triadimefon was quickly peaked to the maximum concentration within 12h in liver, brain, kidney, and plasma, eliminated slowly. The biotransformation in kidney was the lowest and fat possessed the worst degradation ability among others. The metabolite, triadimenol was detected in blood in 2h and reached to a plateau at about 12h in most organs (fat excepted), while the process of metabolism is stereoselective. The mainly metabolite in R-(-)-TF treated group was TN-B1, and TN-A2 in S-(+)-TF group which showed the selective metabolism to other species caused by environmental conditions, differences in the animal models and concentration of TF. The related gene expression of cyp1a1, cyp3a1 and hsd11β mRNA level in lizards showed different metabolic pathways in the liver and brain. Both P450s enzymes and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase participated in metabolic reaction in liver, while no 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase pathway observed in brain. This diversity in liver and brain may cause different degradation rate and ecotoxicological effect in different organs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Regional body fat distribution and metabolic profile in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Piché, Marie-Eve; Lapointe, Annie; Weisnagel, S John; Corneau, Louise; Nadeau, André; Bergeron, Jean; Lemieux, Simone

    2008-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how body fat distribution variables were associated with metabolic parameters in a sample of 113 postmenopausal women not receiving hormone therapy (56.9 +/- 4.4 years, 28.4 +/- 5.1 kg/m(2)). Body fat distribution variables (visceral adipose tissue [AT], subcutaneous AT, and total midthigh AT) were measured using computed tomography; body fat mass was assessed by hydrostatic weighing; insulin sensitivity was determined with the euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp; fasting plasma glucose (FPG) and 2-hour plasma glucose (2hPG) concentrations were measured by a 75-g oral glucose load; and (high-sensitivity) C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) was measured using a highly sensitive assay. After controlling for fat mass, visceral AT was positively associated with plasma triglyceride, hs-CRP, FPG, and 2hPG, and negatively associated with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and insulin sensitivity. Total midthigh AT was negatively associated with apolipoprotein B, FPG, and 2hPG, and positively associated with insulin sensitivity. Stepwise multiple regression analyses including abdominal visceral AT, subcutaneous AT and total midthigh AT as independent variables showed that abdominal visceral AT best predicted the variance in plasma triglyceride, HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein peak particle size, hs-CRP, FPG, 2hPG, and insulin sensitivity. Abdominal subcutaneous AT was a significant predictor of only insulin sensitivity, whereas total midthigh AT predicted HDL-C, low-density lipoprotein peak particle size, and apolipoprotein B. These multivariate analyses also indicated that total midthigh AT was favorably related to these outcomes, whereas abdominal visceral AT and subcutaneous AT were unfavorably related. These results confirmed that abdominal visceral fat is a critical correlate of metabolic parameters in postmenopausal women. In addition, a higher proportion of AT located in the total midthigh depot is associated with a favorable

  20. Dietary isoflavone absorption, excretion, and metabolism in captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Whitehouse-Tedd, Katherine M; Cave, Nicholas J; Ugarte, Claudia E; Waldron, Lucy A; Prasain, Jeevan K; Arabshahi, Alireza; Barnes, Stephen; Thomas, David G

    2011-12-01

    Dietary isoflavones, capable of influencing reproductive parameters in domestic cats (Felis catus), have been detected in commercial diets fed to captive cheetahs (Acinonyx jubatus). However, the absorptive and metabolic capacity of cheetahs towards isoflavones has not yet been studied. Experiments were designed to describe the plasma concentration-time curve, metabolite profile, and urinary and fecal excretion of genistein and daidzein in cheetahs following consumption of isoflavones. Four adult cheetahs were administered a single oral bolus of genistein and daidzein, and five juvenile cheetahs consuming a milk replacer formula found to contain isoflavones were also included. Urine was collected from all animals, and blood and feces were also collected from adult cheetahs following isoflavone exposure. Samples were analyzed for isoflavone metabolite concentration by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-multiple reaction ion monitoring mass spectrometry and high-performance liquid chromatography. Sulfate conjugates were the primary metabolites detected of both genistein and daidzein (60-80% of total isoflavones present) in the plasma and urine of cheetahs. A smaller proportion of daidzein was detected as conjugates in the urine of juvenile cheetahs, compared to adult cheetahs. Other metabolites included unconjugated genistein and daidzein, O-desmethylangolensin, and dihydrodaidzein, but not equol. Only 33% of the ingested genistein dose, and 9% of daidzein, was detected in plasma from adult cheetahs. However, of the ingested dose, 67% of genistein and 45% of daidzein were detected in the feces of adults. This study revealed that cheetahs appear efficient in their conjugation of absorbed dietary isoflavones and only a small fraction of ingested dose is absorbed. However, the capacity of the cheetah to conjugate genistein and daidzein with sulfate moieties appears lower than reported in the domestic cat. This may confer greater opportunity for biologic

  1. Distribution and metabolism of quaternary amines in salt marshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Gary M.

    1985-01-01

    Quaternary amines such as glycine betaine (GBT) are common osmotically active solutes in much of the marine biota. GBT is accumulated by various bacteria, algae, higher plants, invertebrates, and vertebrates in response to salinity or water stresses; in some species, GBT occurs at tens to hundreds of millimolar concentrations and can account for a significant fraction of total nitrogen. Initial studies suggest that GBT is readily converted to two potential methane precursors, trimethylamine (TMA) and acetate, in anoxic sediments. TMA is apparently the most important methane precursor in surface sediments containing sulfate reducing bacteria. In salt marshes, the bulk of the methane formed may be due to the metabolism of TMA rather than other substrates. Current research is focussed on testing this hypothesis and on determining the role of quaternary amino osmoregulatory solutes in methane fluxes from marine environments. Preliminary studies have dealt with several problems: (1) determination of GBT concentrations in the dominant flora and fauna of salt marshes; (2) synthesis of radiolabelled GBT for metabolic studies; and (3) determination of fates of BGT in marine sediments using radiotracers. Both GC and HPLC techniques have been used to assay GBT concentrations in plant and animal tissues. S. alterniflora is probably the only significant source of GBT (and indirectly of methane) since the biomass and distribution of most other species is limited. Current estimates suggest that S. alterniflora GBT could account for most of the methane efflux from salt marshes.

  2. Absorption, tissue distribution and excretion of radiolabelled compounds in rats after administration of [14C]-L-alpha-glycerylphosphorylcholine.

    PubMed

    Abbiati, G; Fossati, T; Lachmann, G; Bergamaschi, M; Castiglioni, C

    1993-01-01

    The kinetics and metabolism of L-alpha-glycerylphosphoryl-choline (alpha-GPC) were investigated in male and female rats after i.v. (10 mg/kg) and oral doses (100-300 mg/kg). alpha-GPC was labelled with [14C]-glycerol ([14G]-GPC) or [14C]-choline ([14C]-GPC). Different kinetic and metabolic profiles were observed after i.v. and oral administration. It is assumed that alpha-GPC is hydrolyzed by phosphodiesterases in the gut mucosa. The different labelled metabolites have different kinetic properties of absorption, distribution and clearance, leading to different blood concentration-time curves of total radioactivity. Both labelled compounds gave a wide distribution of radioactivity, particularly concentrated in the liver, kidney, lung and spleen compared to blood. Brain concentrations of [14C]-GPC were comparable to ([14G]-GPC) or lower than ([14C]-GPC) total blood radioactivity. The metabolite profile in the perfused brain showed a small amount of choline and two unknown metabolites, probably the same as in blood. In addition, choline was incorporated into brain phospholipids in increasing amounts within 24 h of dosing. In all cases renal and fecal excretion of radioactivity was low and comparable for [14G]-GPC and [14C]-GPC. Mostly the administered radioactivity was exhaled as 14CO2, this degradation being faster and more pronounced for the glycerol-labelled metabolites than for the choline-labelled metabolites for both routes of administration. In all cases the results were the same for male and female rats.

  3. Diode-Laser Absorption Sensor for Line-of-Sight Gas Temperature Distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Scott T.; Wang, Jian; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2001-08-01

    Line-of-sight diode-laser absorption techniques have been extended to enable temperature measurements in nonuniform-property flows. The sensing strategy for such flows exploits the broad wavelength-scanning abilities ( >1.7 nm ~ 30 cm-1 ) of a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) to interrogate multiple absorption transitions along a single line of sight. To demonstrate the strategy, a VCSEL-based sensor for oxygen gas temperature distributions was developed. A VCSEL beam was directed through paths containing atmospheric-pressure air with known (and relatively simple) temperature distributions in the 200 -700 K range. The VCSEL was scanned over ten transitions in the R branch of the oxygen A band near 760 nm and optionally over six transitions in the P branch. Temperature distribution information can be inferred from these scans because the line strength of each probed transition has a unique temperature dependence; the measurement accuracy and resolution depend on the details of this temperature dependence and on the total number of lines scanned. The performance of the sensing strategy can be optimized and predicted theoretically. Because the sensor exhibits a fast time response ( ~30 ms) and can be adapted to probe a variety of species over a range of temperatures and pressures, it shows promise for industrial application.

  4. The role of Monosaccharide Transport Proteins in carbohydrate assimilation, distribution, metabolism and homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cura, Anthony J.; Carruthers, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    The facilitated diffusion of glucose, galactose, fructose, urate, myoinositol and dehydroascorbic acid in mammals is catalyzed by a family of 14 monosaccharide transport proteins called GLUTs. These transporters may be divided into 3 classes according to sequence similarity and function/substrate specificity. GLUT1 appears to be highly expressed in glycolytically active cells and has been co-opted in vitamin C auxotrophs to maintain the redox state of the blood through transport of dehydroascorbate. Several GLUTs are definitive glucose/galactose transporters, GLUT2 and GLUT5 are physiologically important fructose transporters, GLUT9 appears to be a urate transporter while GLUT13 (HMIT1) is a proton/myoinositol co-transporter. The physiologic substrates of some GLUTs remain to be established. The GLUTs are expressed in a tissue specific manner where affinity, specificity and capacity for substrate transport are paramount for tissue function. Although great strides have been made in characterizing GLUT-catalyzed monosaccharide transport and mapping GLUT membrane topography and determinants of substrate specificity, a unifying model for GLUT structure and function remains elusive. The GLUTs play a major role in carbohydrate homeostasis and the redistribution of sugar-derived carbons among the various organ systems. This is accomplished through a multiplicity of GLUT-dependent glucose sensing and effector mechanisms that regulate monosaccharide ingestion, absorption, distribution, cellular transport and metabolism and recovery/retention. Glucose transport and metabolism have co-evolved in mammals to support cerebral glucose utilization. PMID:22943001

  5. A quantum perturbative pair distribution for determining interatomic potentials from extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, F.

    2002-11-01

    In this paper we develop a technique for determining interatomic potentials in materials in the quantum regime from single-shell extended x-ray absorption spectroscopy (EXAFS) spectra. We introduce a pair distribution function, based on ordinary quantum time-independent perturbation theory. In the proposed scheme, the model potential parameters enter the distribution through a fourth-order Taylor expansion of the potential, and are directly refined in the fit of the model signal to the experimental spectrum. We discuss in general the validity of our theoretical framework, namely the quantum regime and perturbative treatment, and work out a simple tool for monitoring the sensitivity of our theory in determining lattice anharmonicities based on the statistical F-test. As an example, we apply our formalism to an EXAFS spectrum at the Ag K edge of AgI at T = 77 K. We determine the Ag-I potential parameters and find good agreement with previous studies.

  6. Distribution and absorption of local anesthetics in inferior alveolar nerve block: evaluation by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Ay, Sinan; Küçük, Dervisşhan; Gümüş, Cesur; Kara, M Isa

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the distribution and absorption of local anesthetic solutions in inferior alveolar nerve block using magnetic resonance imaging. Forty healthy volunteers were divided into 4 groups and injected with 1.5 mL for inferior alveolar nerve block and 0.3 mL for lingual nerve block. The solutions used for the different groups were 2% lidocaine, 2% lidocaine with 0.125 mg/mL epinephrine, 4% articaine with 0.006 mg/mL epinephrine, and 4% articaine with 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All subjects had axial T2-weighted and fat-suppressed images at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection. The localization, area, and intensity (signal characteristics) of the solutions were analyzed and onset and duration times of the anesthesia were recorded. There were no significant differences between groups with regard to the intensity and area of the solutions at 0, 60, and 120 minutes after injection, but differences were found within each group. No between-group differences were found on magnetic resonance imaging in the distribution and absorption of lidocaine with or without epinephrine and articaine with 0.006 and 0.012 mg/mL epinephrine. All solutions were noticeably absorbed at 120 minutes after injection. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Influence of formulation and processing on absorption and metabolism of flavan-3-ols from tea and cocoa.

    PubMed

    Neilson, Andrew P; Ferruzzi, Mario G

    2011-01-01

    Flavan-3-ols are a major subclass of the class of plant phytochemicals known as flavonoids. Flavan-3-ols are commonly found in fruit, vegetable, and botanical products, including tea, cocoa, grapes, and apples. Both monomeric catechins and polymeric procyanidins are common in the diet, along with several derivatives produced by degradation of these species during processing. Both epidemiological and biological evidence suggests a health-protective role for dietary flavan-3-ols, leading to increased interest in the bioavailability of these compounds from foods. Flavan-3-ol bioavailability depends on numerous factors, including digestive release, absorption, metabolism, and elimination. In addition to these in vivo factors, the complexity of whole-food systems (physical form, flavan-3-ol form and dose, macronutrient and micronutrient profile, processing, etc.) influences the absorption efficiency and circulating profile of flavan-3-ols. An understanding of how food matrices may influence flavan-3-ol absorption will provide a framework to design and develop functional products that positively affect flavan-3-ol absorption and, by extension, potential bioactivity.

  8. Recent discoveries on absorption of dietary fat: Presence, synthesis, and metabolism of cytoplasmic lipid droplets within enterocytes.

    PubMed

    D'Aquila, Theresa; Hung, Yu-Han; Carreiro, Alicia; Buhman, Kimberly K

    2016-08-01

    Dietary fat provides essential nutrients, contributes to energy balance, and regulates blood lipid concentrations. These functions are important to health, but can also become dysregulated and contribute to diseases such as obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. Within enterocytes, the digestive products of dietary fat are re-synthesized into triacylglycerol, which is either secreted on chylomicrons or stored within cytoplasmic lipid droplets (CLDs). CLDs were originally thought to be inert stores of neutral lipids, but are now recognized as dynamic organelles that function in multiple cellular processes in addition to lipid metabolism. This review will highlight recent discoveries related to dietary fat absorption with an emphasis on the presence, synthesis, and metabolism of CLDs within this process. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of Metabolic Pathways and Absorption of Sea Cucumber Saponins, Holothurin A and Echinoside A, in Vitro and in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Song, Shanshan; Zhang, Lingyu; Cao, Jian; Xiang, Gao; Cong, Peixu; Dong, Ping; Li, Zhaojie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

    2017-08-01

    Sea cucumber saponins (SCSs) exhibit a wide spectrum of bioactivities, but their metabolic characteristics are not well elucidated. In this study, the metabolism of holothurin A (HA) and echinoside A (EA), 2 major saponins in sea cucumber, by gut microflora were investigated. First, we conducted an in vitro study, where in the SCSs were incubated with intestinal microflora and the metabolites were detected by high pressure liquid chromatography-high resolution mass spectrometry. We also conducted an in vivo study on rats, where in the intestinal contents, serum, urine, and feces were collected and evaluated after oral administration of SCSs. In the in vitro study, we identified 6 deglycosylated metabolites of HA and EA, assigned M1-M6. In the in vivo study, we found all the deglycosylated metabolites in the intestinal contents after oral administration, and both the metabolites and their prototype components could be absorbed. Four metabolites were identified in the serum, 6 in the urine, and 4 in the feces. The saponins with different structures showed different absorption characteristics in rats. According to our results, deglycosylation is the main intestinal microflora-mediated metabolic pathway for SCSs, and both the SCSs and deglycosylated metabolites can be absorbed by intestine. This study improves the understanding of the metabolism of HA and EA by gut flora, which will be useful for further analysis of the bioactivity mechanism of SCSs. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  10. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  11. The absorption, distribution, excretion and toxicity of mesoporous silica nanoparticles in mice following different exposure routes.

    PubMed

    Fu, Changhui; Liu, Tianlong; Li, Linlin; Liu, Huiyu; Chen, Dong; Tang, Fangqiong

    2013-03-01

    Mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSNs) are emerging as one of the promising nanomaterials for biomedical applications, but the nanomaterials-body interaction exposed by different administration routes remained poorly understood. In the present study, a systematic investigation of the absorption, distribution, excretion and toxicity of silica nanoparticles (SNs) with the average size of 110 nm after four different exposure routes including intravenous, hypodermic, intramuscular injection and oral administration to mice were achieved. The results showed that a fraction of the SNs administrated by the intramuscular and hypodermic injection could cross different biological barriers into the liver but with a low absorption rate. Exposing by oral administration, SNs were absorbed into the intestinal tract and persisted in the liver. And SNs administrated by intravenous injection were mainly present in the liver and spleen. In addition, SNs could cause inflammatory response around the injection sites after intramuscular and hypodermic injection. It was also found that SNs were mainly excreted through urine and feces after different exposure routes. This study will be helpful for selecting the appropriate exposed routes for the development of nanomaterials-based drug delivery system for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. COMPARING SPATIAL DISTRIBUTIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE MASS DERIVED FROM CORONAL ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Kucera, Therese

    2011-01-20

    In a previous study, Gilbert et al. derived the column density and total mass of solar prominences using a new technique, which measures how much coronal radiation in the Fe XII (195 A) spectral band is absorbed by prominence material, while considering the effects of both foreground and background radiation. In the present work, we apply this method to a sample of prominence observations in three different wavelength regimes: one in which only H{sup 0} is ionized (504 A < {lambda} < 911 A), a second where both H{sup 0} and He{sup 0} are ionized (228 A < {lambda} distribution of the column density from the continuum absorption in each extreme-ultraviolet observation. We find the total prominence mass is consistently lower in the 625 A observations compared to lines in the other wavelength regimes. There is a significant difference in total mass between the 625 A and 195 A lines, indicating the much higher opacity at 625 A is causing a saturation of the continuum absorption and thus, a potentially large underestimation of mass.« less

  13. Effects of cadmium on absorption, excretion, and distribution of nickel in rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhan; Gu, Jun-Ying; Wang, Xian-Wen; Fan, Qiao-Hui; Geng, Yan-Xia; Jiao, Zong-Xian; Hou, Yi-Ping; Wu, Wang-Suo

    2010-06-01

    The effects of cadmium (Cd (II)) on absorption, excretion, and distribution of nickel (Ni (II)) were studied in rats using (63)Ni-NiCl(2) as radiotracer in the presence and absence of CdCl(2), through intraperitoneal injection (i.p.). The time-concentration curves in the blood were fitted with a two-compartment model. The peak time (t ((peak))) is 0.31 h in the absence of Cd (II), and it is 5.5 h in the presence of Cd (II). The levels of nickels were higher at 3 h and lower (close to zero) at 24 h in all organs of interest, except kidneys, in the absence of Cd (II). There still residue Ni (II) at 72 h post-injection in the presence of Cd (II). The Cd (II) did effect the total Ni (II) excretion 24 h post-injection. Our study showed that cadmium has a competitive effect on the absorption of nickel and an inhibitory effect on the elimination of it, so cadmium may induce the bioaccumulation of nickel in the body.

  14. Absorption and distribution of cadmium in mice fed diets containing either inorganic or oyster-incorporated cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, M.F.; Hardy, J.T.; Miller, B.M.

    1984-02-01

    To determine the absorption, organ distribution, and retention of organically bound cadmium (Cd) and the effects of dietary zinc (Zn) on Cd metabolism, groups of mice were fed five different diets. The organic Cd used in the diets was in the form of lyophilized oyster (Crassostrea virginica) that had accumulated radiolabeled 109Cd through a plankton food chain. The mice were fed either a standard basal mouse diet (AIN-76) or diets containing five or eight times the Zn concentration of the basal diet. The source of Zn was either oyster tissue or ZnCO3. The concentration of organic and inorganic Cd providedmore » a dose of approximately 0.4 mg/kg. Diets prepared from oyster tissue probably contained all of the Cd and 85% of the Zn in organic form. Diets prepared with inorganic metals contained about the same Cd and Zn concentrations as the diets prepared with oyster. There was very little difference between the retention of Cd by mice that ingested organic (oyster bound) Cd and those fed inorganic Cd (CdCl2). However, when the Cd retained in the intestine was excluded, retention of organic Cd was significantly greater than that of inorganic Cd. The organ distribution of Cd differed significantly according to the chemical form of Cd fed (organic or inorganic) and the Zn level in the diet. The kidneys of mice fed organically bound Cd retained a higher percentage of the metal than the kidneys of those fed inorganic Cd. On the other hand, the livers of animals fed a low-Zn diet retained a higher percentage of the Cd than the livers of those fed a high-Zn diet, regardless of the dietary source of Cd.« less

  15. Distribution, pharmacokinetics and primary metabolism model of tramadol in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Huiqin; Jin, Hongwei; Peng, Huifang; Huang, Heqing

    2016-12-01

    The current study aimed to develop a rapid, robust and adequately sensitive method for simultaneous determination of the concentration of tramadol and its active metabolites in zebrafish. The pharmacokinetic and elimination pattern of tramadol and its major phase I metabolites following oral or intramuscular administration in zebrafish tissues was achieved using electrospray ionization‑quadrupole‑time of flight/mass spectrometry (ESI‑Q‑TOF/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC‑MS). Following administration, the metabolisms were detected in the brain, eyes, muscle and gill tissues within 1 h. Two tramadol metabolites, O‑ and N‑desmethyltramadol, were detected in brain tissue, with N‑desmethyltramadol detected at a higher level. Following GC‑MS detection the curve indicated an initial rapid phase, corresponding to the detection of the tramadol within 1 min, and reached peak value in the brain at 5 min. Faster drug clearance was detected in low‑dose groups, and concentration had dropped around the to initial level (1.11 µg) at 20 min, but was detectable for up to 3 h. However, it took 80 min to fall back to the initial value (1.73 µg) in the high‑dose groups, and tramadol was detectable for up to 4 h. This study developed and validated a simple and high throughput analytical procedure to determine the distribution and pharmacokinetic profiles of tramadol, and its primary metabolites in tissues of zebrafish.

  16. Metabolic changes associated with active water vapour absorption in the mealworm Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera, Tenebrionidae): a microcalorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Lars L; Westh, Peter; Wright, Jonathan C; Ramløv, Hans

    2006-03-01

    Water vapour absorption (WVA) is an important mechanism for water gain in several xeric insects. Theoretical calculations indicate that the energetic cost of WVA should be small (5-10% of standard metabolic rate) assuming realistic efficiencies. In this study we explored the relationship between WVA, metabolic heat flux (HFmet.) and CO2 release in larvae of Tenebrio molitor using microcalorimetry. By comparing metabolic heat flux with the catabolic rate estimated from VCO2 , we were able to differentiate anabolic and catabolic rates prior to and during WVA, while simultaneously monitoring water exchange. Three to four hours before the onset of WVA, larvae showed clear increases in HFmet. and catabolic flux, and a simultaneous decrease in anabolic flux. Following the onset of WVA, HFmet. decreased again until indistinguishable from control (non-absorbing) values. Possible factors contributing to the "preparatory phase" are discussed, including mobilization of Malpighian tubule transporters and muscular activity in the rectum. Absorbing larvae reduced the water activity of the calorimetric cell to 0.906, agreeing with gravimetric estimates of the critical equilibrium activity. Periods of movement during WVA coincided with decreased uptake fluxes, consistent with the animal's hydrostatic skeleton and the need to close the anus to generate pressure increases in the haemocoel.

  17. Comparing Spatial Distributions of Solar Prominence Mass Derived from Coronal Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilbert, Holly; Kilper, Gary; Alexander, David; Kucera, Therese

    2010-01-01

    In the present work we extend the use of this mass-inference technique to a sample of prominences observed in at least two coronal lines. This approach, in theory, allows a direct calculation of prominence mass and helium abundance and how these properties vary spatially and temporally. Our motivation is two-fold: to obtain a He(exp 0)/H(exp 0) abundance ratio, and to determine how the relative spatial distribution of the two species varies in prominences. The first of these relies on the theoretical expectation that the amount of absorption at each EUV wavelength is well-characterized. However, in this work we show that due to a saturation of the continuum absorption in the 625 A and 368 A lines (which have much higher opacity compared to 195 A-) the uncertainties in obtaining the relative abundances are too high to give meaningful estimates. This is an important finding because of its impact on future studies in this area. The comparison of the spatial distribution of helium and hydrogen presented here augments previous observational work indicating that cross-field diffusion of neutrals is an important mechanism for mass loss. Significantly different loss timescales for neutral He and H (helium drains much more rapidly than hydrogen) can impact prominence structure, and both the present and past studies suggest this mechanism is playing a role in structure and possibly dynamics. Section 2 of this paper contains a description of the observations and Section 3 summarizes the method used to infer mass along with the criteria imposed in choosing prominences appropriate for this study. Section 3 also contains a discussion of the problems due to limitations of the available data and the implications for determining relative abundances. We present our results in Section 4, including plots of radial-like scans of prominence mass in different lines to show the spatial distribution of the different species. The last section contains a discussion summarizing the importance

  18. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption and gut wall metabolism of verapamil in humans.

    PubMed

    Glaeser, Hartmut; Drescher, Siegfried; Hofmann, Ute; Heinkele, Georg; Somogyi, Andrew A; Eichelbaum, Michel; Fromm, Martin F

    2004-09-01

    In humans gut wall metabolism can be quantitatively as important as hepatic drug metabolism in limiting the systemic exposure to drugs after oral administration. However, it has been proposed that the role of gut wall metabolism might be overemphasized, because high luminal drug concentrations would lead to a saturation of gut wall metabolism. Therefore we investigated the impact of concentration and rate of intraluminal drug delivery on absorption (F(abs)) and gastrointestinal extraction (E(GI)) of a luminally administered cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 substrate (verapamil) using a multilumen perfusion catheter in combination with a stable isotope technique. Two 20-cm-long, adjacent jejunal segments were isolated with the multilumen perfusion catheter in 7 subjects. In this study 80 mg of unlabeled verapamil (d0-verapamil 15 min) was infused into one segment over a 15-minute period, 80 mg of 3-fold deuterated verapamil (d3-verapamil 240 min) was administered over a 240-minute period into the other segment, and simultaneously, 5 mg of 7-fold deuterated verapamil (d7-verapamil) was injected intravenously over a 15-minute period. The rate of intraluminal drug delivery had only a modest effect on bioavailability of the verapamil isotopes (after correction for F abs ) (F/F abs d3-verapamil 240 min versus d0-verapamil 15 min, 0.24 +/- 0.10 versus 0.20 +/- 0.09; P <.05). Accordingly, the E GI value for d3-verapamil 240 min was 0.50 +/- 0.18 compared with 0.59 +/- 0.14 for d0 -verapamil 15 min ( P <.05). In vivo, E GI (d0-verapamil 15 min ) correlated strongly with E GI (d3-verapamil 240 min ) (r = 0.94, P <.005). Moreover, intrinsic clearance of CYP3A4-mediated verapamil metabolism in homogenates of simultaneously collected shed enterocytes correlated with in vivo E GI of d0-verapamil 15 min /d3-verapamil 240 min (r = 0.62, P =.03). Substantial gut wall metabolism of verapamil occurs in humans and can be predicted from ex vivo data by use of shed enterocytes. The different

  20. Absorption, Distribution and Excretion of Four Forms of Titanium Dioxide Pigment in the Rat.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Thomas P; Magnuson, Berna

    2017-08-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) is a white color additive that has a long history of global approval and use in food. There is, however, considerable confusion regarding the applicability of the biological effects of novel, engineered, nano-sized forms of TiO 2 developed for nonpigmentary applications to the safety of oral exposure to food grade TiO 2 pigment. The objective of this study was to assess the absorption, distribution, and routes of excretion in rats after oral exposure to food grade TiO 2 . Four different grades of TiO 2 (200 ppm) or control (0 ppm) diets were fed to rats for 7 consecutive days, followed by control diet only for 1, 24, or 72 h. Concentrations of titanium in liver, kidney and muscle were mainly below the limit of detection (<0.1 to < 0.2 mg/kg wet weight); tissue concentrations of titanium above the LOD were in the range of 0.1 to 0.3 mg/kg wet weight for all groups. Whole blood concentrations of titanium were <0.04 mg/L for all groups. Urinary excretion of titanium was equivalent to <2% daily dose/L of urine for all groups and was generally below the limit of quantification (<0.04 mg/L). Feces represented the predominant route of excretion. These results demonstrate that there is no accumulation of titanium in tissues following consumption of diets containing 200 ppm food grade TiO 2 . No differences in systemic absorption of the 4 forms of TiO 2 were observed indicating that the bioavailability of TiO 2 is consistently low for the range of particle sizes and morphologies examined in this study. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  1. Estimation of the Intestinal Absorption and Metabolism Behaviors of 2- and 3-Monochloropropanediol Esters.

    PubMed

    Kaze, Naoki; Watanabe, Yomi; Sato, Hirofumi; Murota, Kaeko; Kotaniguchi, Miyako; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Inui, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Shinichi

    2016-08-01

    The regioisomers of the di- and mono-oleate of monochloropropanediol (MCPD) have been synthesized and subsequently hydrolyzed with pancreatic lipase and pancreatin to estimate the intestinal digestion and absorption of these compounds after their intake. The hydrolysates were analyzed by HPLC using a corona charged aerosol detection system, which allowed for the separation and detection of the different regioisomers of the MCPD esters. The hydrolysates were also analyzed by GC-MS to monitor the free MCPD. The results indicated that the two acyl groups of 2-MCPD-1,3-dioleate were smoothly hydrolyzed by pancreatic lipase and pancreatin to give free 2-MCPD. In contrast, the hydrolysis of 3-MCPD-1,2-dioleate proceeded predominantly at the primary position to produce 3-MCPD-2-oleate. 2-MCPD-1-oleate and 3-MCPD-1-oleate were further hydrolyzed to free 2- and 3-MCPD by pancreatic lipase and pancreatin, although the hydrolysis of 3-MCPD-2-oleate was 80 % slower than that of 3-MCPD-1-oleate. The intestinal absorption characteristics of these compounds were evaluated in vitro using a Caco-2 cell monolayer. The results revealed that the MCPD monooleates, but not the MCPD dioleates, were hydrolyzed to produce the free MCPD in the presence of the Caco-2 cells. The resulting free MCPD permeated the Caco-2 monolayer most likely via a diffusion mechanism because their permeation profiles were independent of the dose. Similar permeation profiles were obtained for 2- and 3-MCPDs.

  2. Multi-scale modularity and motif distributional effect in metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Gao, Shang; Chen, Alan; Rahmani, Ali; Zeng, Jia; Tan, Mehmet; Alhajj, Reda; Rokne, Jon; Demetrick, Douglas; Wei, Xiaohui

    2016-01-01

    Metabolism is a set of fundamental processes that play important roles in a plethora of biological and medical contexts. It is understood that the topological information of reconstructed metabolic networks, such as modular organization, has crucial implications on biological functions. Recent interpretations of modularity in network settings provide a view of multiple network partitions induced by different resolution parameters. Here we ask the question: How do multiple network partitions affect the organization of metabolic networks? Since network motifs are often interpreted as the super families of evolved units, we further investigate their impact under multiple network partitions and investigate how the distribution of network motifs influences the organization of metabolic networks. We studied Homo sapiens, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Escherichia coli metabolic networks; we analyzed the relationship between different community structures and motif distribution patterns. Further, we quantified the degree to which motifs participate in the modular organization of metabolic networks.

  3. Metabolism of Penicillins to Penicilloic Acids and 6-Aminopenicillanic Acid in Man and Its Significance in Assessing Penicillin Absorption

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M.; Kenig, M. D.; Hewitt, Valerie A.

    1973-01-01

    Penicillins can be metabolized to penicilloic acids in man, the extent being dependent on the penicillin structure. In the phenoxy penicillin series, phenoxymethyl penicillin was found to be particularly unstable, but the higher homologues were more stable. In the isoxazolyl series, oxacillin was unstable, and progressive insertion of halogen in the phenyl ring increased stability. Ampicillin and amoxycillin showed some instability, ampicillin possibly being the more stable. After intramuscular administration, carbenicillin was very stable in the body, ampicillin was fairly stable, and benzyl penicillin was unstable. It is important to take into account the penicilloic acid content of urine when estimating total absorption of a penicillin. Increased stability in the body as well as slower renal clearance can lead to high concentrations in the serum. Penicilloic acids seemed to be more slowly cleared from the body than penicillins. The liver is probably the site of inactivation. PMID:4364176

  4. MTBE inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor: uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats.

    PubMed

    Benson, J M; Barr, E B; Krone, J R

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of these studies was to extend previous evaluation of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE)* tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion in rats to include concentrations more relevant to human exposure (4 and 40 ppm) and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on the tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion of MTBE. Groups of male F344 rats were exposed nose-only for 4 hours to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE or to 20 or 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 or 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on MTBE tissue distribution, metabolism, and excretion, rats were exposed for 4 hours on each of 7 consecutive days to 20 or 200 ppm LFG with MTBE (4 or 40 ppm) followed on the eighth day by a similar exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Subgroups of rats were evaluated for respiratory parameters, initial body burdens, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. The concentrations of MTBE and its chief metabolite, tert-butyl alcohol (TBA), were measured in blood and kidney immediately after exposure, and the major urinary metabolites-2-hydroxyisobutyric acid (IBA) and 2-methyl-1,2-propanediol (2MePD)-were measured in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 hours of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. The observed initial body burden did not increase linearly between 4 and 400 ppm. At 400 ppm, elimination half-times of MTBE equivalents from liver increased and from lung, kidney, and testes decreased compared with the two smaller doses. Furthermore, at 400 ppm the elimination half-time for volatile organic compounds (VOCs

  5. Recent Developments in Delivery, Bioavailability, Absorption and Metabolism of Curcumin: the Golden Pigment from Golden Spice

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sahdeo; Tyagi, Amit K.

    2014-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a yellow pigment present in the spice turmeric (Curcuma longa) that has been associated with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer, antiviral, and antibacterial activities as indicated by over 6,000 citations. In addition, over one hundred clinical studies have been carried out with curcumin. One of the major problems with curcumin is perceived to be the bioavailability. How curcumin should be delivered in vivo, how bioavailable is it, how well curcumin is absorbed and how it is metabolized, is the focus of this review. Various formulations of curcumin that are currently available are also discussed. PMID:24520218

  6. Red wine alcohol promotes quercetin absorption and directs its metabolism towards isorhamnetin and tamarixetin in rat intestine in vitro.

    PubMed

    Dragoni, Stefania; Gee, Jennifer; Bennett, Richard; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2006-04-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been associated with beneficial effects on human health, and this has been attributed to the flavonoid content. Factors that influence the bioavailability of this group of polyphenolic compounds are therefore important. Using the rat cannulated everted jejunal sac technique, we have investigated the effect of alcohol on the intestinal absorption of quercetin and its 3-O-glucoside from red wine. Tissue preparations were incubated in whole or dealcoholised red wine, diluted 1 : 1 with Krebs buffer for 20 min at 37 degrees C, after which the mucosa was removed and processed for HPLC analysis. Tissues exposed to red wine had significantly higher amounts of both quercetin (x 3; P < 0.001) and quercetin-3-O-glucoside (x 1.5; P < 0.01) associated with them, compared with sacs incubated in the dealcoholised equivalent. In addition, both tamarixetin (T) and isorhamnetin (I), in the mucosal tissue from sacs exposed to the whole wine, were significantly elevated approximately two fold (P < 0.05; P < 0.01, respectively). Similar results were obtained when sacs were incubated in Krebs buffer containing a mixture of pure quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside with or without alcohol, and, although effects on the apparent absorption of Q and Q-3-G were not so marked, concentrations of the metabolites quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and I were significantly increased by the presence of alcohol (P < 0.01 and P < 0.001, respectively). It is therefore plausible that the moderate alcohol content of red wine contributes to its beneficial health effects in humans by both increasing the absorption of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside and by channelling their metabolism towards O-methylation to yield compounds (T and I), which have potential protective effects against cancer and cardiovascular diseases.

  7. Red wine alcohol promotes quercetin absorption and directs its metabolism towards isorhamnetin and tamarixetin in rat intestine in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Dragoni, Stefania; Gee, Jennifer; Bennett, Richard; Valoti, Massimo; Sgaragli, Giampietro

    2006-01-01

    Moderate consumption of red wine has been associated with beneficial effects on human health, and this has been attributed to the flavonoid content. Factors that influence the bioavailability of this group of polyphenolic compounds are therefore important. Using the rat cannulated everted jejunal sac technique, we have investigated the effect of alcohol on the intestinal absorption of quercetin and its 3-O-glucoside from red wine. Tissue preparations were incubated in whole or dealcoholised red wine, diluted 1 : 1 with Krebs buffer for 20 min at 37°C, after which the mucosa was removed and processed for HPLC analysis. Tissues exposed to red wine had significantly higher amounts of both quercetin (× 3; P<0.001) and quercetin-3-O-glucoside (× 1.5; P<0.01) associated with them, compared with sacs incubated in the dealcoholised equivalent. In addition, both tamarixetin (T) and isorhamnetin (I), in the mucosal tissue from sacs exposed to the whole wine, were significantly elevated approximately two fold (P<0.05; P<0.01, respectively). Similar results were obtained when sacs were incubated in Krebs buffer containing a mixture of pure quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside with or without alcohol, and, although effects on the apparent absorption of Q and Q-3-G were not so marked, concentrations of the metabolites quercetin-3-O-glucuronide and I were significantly increased by the presence of alcohol (P<0.01 and P<0.001, respectively). It is therefore plausible that the moderate alcohol content of red wine contributes to its beneficial health effects in humans by both increasing the absorption of quercetin and quercetin-3-O-glucoside and by channelling their metabolism towards O-methylation to yield compounds (T and I), which have potential protective effects against cancer and cardiovascular diseases. PMID:16444288

  8. Absorption, Distribution and Excretion of 14C-Probimane in Mice Bearing Lewis Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Da-Yong; Chen, Rui-Ting; Lu, Ting-Ren; Wu, Hong-Ying; Qu, Rong-Xin; Che, Jin-Yu; Xu, Bin

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous neoplasm metastasis, a fatalist pathological feature of cancer, is a long-evolving, multi-steps process that can now only be treated or controlled by drugs or immuno-modulators. Probimane (Pro), as a representative of the well-known class of antimetastatic agents ‘Bisdioxopiperazine compounds (Biz)’, is systematically studied for its absorption, distribution and excretion in mice bearing Lewis lung carcinoma by a radioactivity-detective method in this investigation. It is found that the 14C-Pro concentrations in different normal organs of mice at 2 hrs are very high and dramatically declined at 24 and 48 hrs. However, Pro concentrations in metastatic foci are slightly changed at the same time. Almost no change of Pro concentrations is observed in pulmonary metastatic nodules within 48 hrs. This evidence can be used to explain the characteristics of good metastatic inhibition by Biz compounds. The radioactivity in brain is relatively low because Pro can hardly penetrate into the blood-brain-barrier to eliminate brain tumors. The excretion of 14C-Pro is observed at the same ratios from both urine and feces and also at constant rates. These data are much useful for better understanding of the general pharmacological characters and possible antimetastatic mechanisms of actions of probimane and other Biz compounds from a new perspective and research angles. PMID:21179357

  9. Cation distribution in NiZn-ferrite films determined using x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, V. G.; Koon, N. C.; Williams, C. M.; Zhang, Q.; Abe, M.

    1996-04-01

    We have applied extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy to study the cation distribution in a series of spin-sprayed NiZn-ferrite films, Ni0.15ZnyFe2.85-yO4 (y=0.16, 0.23, 0.40, 0.60). The Ni, Zn, and Fe EXAFS were collected from each sample and analyzed to Fourier transforms. Samples of Ni-ferrite, Zn-ferrite, and magnetite were similarly studied as empirical standards. These standards, together with EXAFS data generated from the theoretical EXAFS FEFF codes, allowed the correlation of features in the Fourier transforms with specific lattice sites in the spinel unit cell. We find that the Ni ions reside mostly on the octahedral (B) sites whereas the Zn ions are predominantly on the tetrahedral (A) sites. The Fe ions reside on both A and B sites in a ratio determined by the ratio of Zn/Fe. The addition of Zn displaces a larger fraction of Fe cations onto the B sites serving to increase the net magnetization. The fraction of A site Ni ions is measured to increase peaking at ≊25% for y=0.6. At higher Zn concentrations (y≥0.5) the lattice experiences local distortions around the Zn sites causing a decrease in the superexchange resulting in a decrease in the net magnetization.

  10. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio, E-mail: gallardo@emc.uji.es

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix.more » Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.« less

  11. Signatures of a conical intersection in photofragment distributions and absorption spectra: Photodissociation in the Hartley band of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu., E-mail: Sergy.Grebenshchikov@ch.tum.de

    Photodissociation of ozone in the near UV is studied quantum mechanically in two excited electronic states coupled at a conical intersection located outside the Franck-Condon zone. The calculations, performed using recent ab initio PESs, provide an accurate description of the photodissociation dynamics across the Hartley/Huggins absorption bands. The observed photofragment distributions are reproduced in the two electronic dissociation channels. The room temperature absorption spectrum, constructed as a Boltzmann average of many absorption spectra of rotationally excited parent ozone, agrees with experiment in terms of widths and intensities of diffuse structures. The exit channel conical intersection contributes to the coherent broadeningmore » of the absorption spectrum and directly affects the product vibrational and translational distributions. The photon energy dependences of these distributions are strikingly different for fragments created along the adiabatic and the diabatic paths through the intersection. They can be used to reverse engineer the most probable geometry of the non-adiabatic transition. The angular distributions, quantified in terms of the anisotropy parameter β, are substantially different in the two channels due to a strong anticorrelation between β and the rotational angular momentum of the fragment O{sub 2}.« less

  12. MAMMALIAN METABOLISM AND DISTRIBUTION OF PERFLUOROOCTYL ETHANOL (8-2 TELOMER ALCOHOL) AND ITS OXIDATION METABOLITES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorinated compounds have been shown to be globally distributed, bioaccumulative, persistent and potentially toxic. It has been hypothesized that many precursor fluorinated compounds, including the telomer alcohols, degrade or metabolize to the common metabolite PFOA.

  13. Derangement of calcium metabolism in diabetes mellitus: negative outcome from the synergy between impaired bone turnover and intestinal calcium absorption.

    PubMed

    Wongdee, Kannikar; Krishnamra, Nateetip; Charoenphandhu, Narattaphol

    2017-01-01

    Both types 1 and 2 diabetes mellitus (T1DM and T2DM) are associated with profound deterioration of calcium and bone metabolism, partly from impaired intestinal calcium absorption, leading to a reduction in calcium uptake into the body. T1DM is associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and osteoporosis, whereas the skeletal changes in T2DM are variable, ranging from normal to increased and to decreased BMD. However, both types of DM eventually compromise bone quality through production of advanced glycation end products and misalignment of collagen fibrils (so-called matrix failure), thereby culminating in a reduction of bone strength. The underlying cellular mechanisms (cellular failure) are related to suppression of osteoblast-induced bone formation and bone calcium accretion, as well as to enhancement of osteoclast-induced bone resorption. Several other T2DM-related pathophysiological changes, e.g., osteoblast insulin resistance, impaired productions of osteogenic growth factors (particularly insulin-like growth factor 1 and bone morphogenetic proteins), overproduction of pro-inflammatory cytokines, hyperglycemia, and dyslipidemia, also aggravate diabetic osteopathy. In the kidney, DM and the resultant hyperglycemia lead to calciuresis and hypercalciuria in both humans and rodents. Furthermore, DM causes deranged functions of endocrine factors related to mineral metabolism, e.g., parathyroid hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 , and fibroblast growth factor-23. Despite the wealth of information regarding impaired bone remodeling in DM, the long-lasting effects of DM on calcium metabolism in young growing individuals, pregnant women, and neonates born to women with gestational DM have received scant attention, and their underlying mechanisms are almost unknown and worth exploring.

  14. Microbiome-mediated bile acid modification: Role in intestinal drug absorption and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Enright, Elaine F; Griffin, Brendan T; Gahan, Cormac G M; Joyce, Susan A

    2018-04-13

    Once regarded obscure and underappreciated, the gut microbiota (the microbial communities colonizing the gastrointestinal tract) is gaining recognition as an influencer of many aspects of human health. Also increasingly apparent is the breadth of interindividual variation in these co-evolved microbial-gut associations, presenting novel quests to explore implications for disease and therapeutic response. In this respect, the unearthing of the drug-metabolizing capacity of the microbiota has provided impetus for the integration of microbiological and pharmacological research. This review considers a potential mechanism, 'microbial bile acid metabolism', by which the intricate interplay between the host and gut bacteria may influence drug pharmacokinetics. Bile salts traditionally regarded as biological surfactants, synthesized by the host and biotransformed by gut bacteria, are now also recognized as signalling molecules that affect diverse physiological processes. Accumulating data indicate that bile salts are not equivalent with respect to their physicochemical properties, micellar solubilization capacities for poorly water-soluble drugs, crystallization inhibition tendencies nor potencies for bile acid receptor activation. Herein, the origin, physicochemical properties, physiological functions, plasticity and pharmaceutical significance of the human bile acid pool are discussed. Microbial dependant differences in the composition of the human bile acid pool, simulated intestinal media and commonly used preclinical species is highlighted to better understand in vivo performance predictiveness. While the precise impact of an altered gut microbiome, and consequently bile acid pool, in the biopharmaceutical setting remains largely elusive, the objective of this article is to aid knowledge acquisition through a detailed review of the literature. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Reconstruction of combustion temperature and gas concentration distributions using line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhirong; Sun, Pengshuai; Pang, Tao; Xia, Hua; Cui, Xiaojuan; Li, Zhe; Han, Luo; Wu, Bian; Wang, Yu; Sigrist, Markus W.; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-07-01

    Spatial temperature and gas concentration distributions are crucial for combustion studies to characterize the combustion position and to evaluate the combustion regime and the released heat quantity. Optical computer tomography (CT) enables the reconstruction of temperature and gas concentration fields in a flame on the basis of line-of-sight tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LOS-TDLAS). A pair of H2O absorption lines at wavelengths 1395.51 and 1395.69 nm is selected. Temperature and H2O concentration distributions for a flat flame furnace are calculated by superimposing two absorption peaks with a discrete algebraic iterative algorithm and a mathematical fitting algorithm. By comparison, direct absorption spectroscopy measurements agree well with the thermocouple measurements and yield a good correlation. The CT reconstruction data of different air-to-fuel ratio combustion conditions (incomplete combustion and full combustion) and three different types of burners (one, two, and three flat flame furnaces) demonstrate that TDLAS has the potential of short response time and enables real-time temperature and gas concentration distribution measurements for combustion diagnosis.

  16. Small Quaternary Inhibitors K298 and K524: Cholinesterases Inhibition, Absorption, Brain Distribution, and Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Karasova, Jana Zdarova; Hroch, Milos; Musilek, Kamil; Kuca, Kamil

    2016-02-01

    Inhibitors of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) may be used in the treatment of various cholinergic deficits, among them being myasthenia gravis (MG). This paper describes the first in vivo data for promising small quaternary inhibitors (K298 and K524): acute toxicity study, cholinesterase inhibition, absorption, and blood-brain barrier penetration. The newly prepared AChE inhibitors (bis-quinolinium and quinolinium compounds) possess a positive charge in the molecule which ensures that anti-AChE action is restricted to peripheral effect. HPLC-MS was used for determination of real plasma and brain concentration in the pharmacokinetic part of the study, and standard non-compartmental analysis was performed. The maximum plasma concentrations were attained at 30 min (K298; 928.76 ± 115.20 ng/ml) and 39 min (K524; 812.40 ± 54.96 ng/ml) after i.m. Both compounds are in fact able to target the central nervous system. It seems that the difference in the CNS distribution profile depends on an active efflux system. The K524 brain concentration was actively decreased to below an effective level; in contrast, K298 progressively accumulated in brain tissue. Peripheral AChE inhibitors are still first-line treatment in the mild forms of MG. Commonly prescribed carbamates have many severe side effects related to AChE carbamylation. The search for new treatment strategies is still important. Unlike carbamates, these new compounds target AChE via apparent π-π or π-cationic interaction aside at the AChE catalytic site.

  17. [The reconstruction of two-dimensional distributions of gas concentration in the flat flame based on tunable laser absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Zhi-Shen; Wang, Fei; Xing, Da-Wei; Xu, Ting; Yan, Jian-Hua; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2012-11-01

    The experimental method by using the tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy combined with the model and algo- rithm was studied to reconstruct the two-dimensional distribution of gas concentration The feasibility of the reconstruction program was verified by numerical simulation A diagnostic system consisting of 24 lasers was built for the measurement of H2O in the methane/air premixed flame. The two-dimensional distribution of H2O concentration in the flame was reconstructed, showing that the reconstruction results reflect the real two-dimensional distribution of H2O concentration in the flame. This diagnostic scheme provides a promising solution for combustion control.

  18. Human absorption and metabolism of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol ingested as olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf extract.

    PubMed

    de Bock, Martin; Thorstensen, Eric B; Derraik, José G B; Henderson, Harold V; Hofman, Paul L; Cutfield, Wayne S

    2013-11-01

    Phenolic compounds derived from the olive plant (Olea europaea L.), particularly hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein, have many beneficial effects in vitro. Olive leaves are the richest source of olive phenolic compounds, and olive leaf extract (OLE) is now a popular nutraceutical taken either as liquid or capsules. To quantify the bioavailability and metabolism of oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol when taken as OLE, nine volunteers (five males) aged 42.8 ± 7.4 years were randomized to receive either capsulated or liquid OLE as a single lower (51.1 mg oleuropein, 9.7 mg hydroxytyrosol) or higher (76.6 mg oleuropein, 14.5 mg hydroxytyrosol) dose, and then the opposite strength (but same formulation) a week later. Plasma and urine samples were collected at fixed intervals for 24 h post-ingestion. Phenolic content was analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. Conjugated metabolites of hydroxytyrosol were the primary metabolites recovered in plasma and urine after OLE ingestion. Peak oleuropein concentrations in plasma were greater following ingestion of liquid than capsule preparations (0.47 versus 2.74 ng/mL; p = 0.004), but no such effect was observed for peak concentrations of conjugated (sulfated and glucuronidated) hydroxytyrosol (p = 0.94). However, the latter peak was reached earlier with liquid preparation (93 versus 64 min; p = 0.031). There was a gender effect on the bioavailability of phenolic compounds, with males displaying greater plasma area under the curve for conjugated hydroxytyrosol (11,600 versus 2550 ng/mL; p = 0.048). All conjugated hydroxytyrosol metabolites were recovered in the urine within 8 h. There was wide inter-individual variation. OLE effectively delivers oleuropein and hydroxytrosol metabolites to plasma in humans. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Absorption and metabolism of orally fed arachidonic and linoleic acid in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Nilsson, A.; Melin, T.

    1988-11-01

    ({sup 3}H)arachidonic (({sup 3}H)20:4) and ({sup 14}C)linoleic acid ({sup 14}C)18:2 were fed to rats in Intralipid or cream. Later (30-240 min) the stomach, small intestine, plasma, and liver were analyzed for radioactivity in different lipid classes. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 were emptied from the stomach and absorbed by the intestine at similar rates. The ({sup 3}H)20:4:({sup 14}C)18:2 ratio of the lipids in the small intestinal wall increased, however, with time. This was due to a higher retention of ({sup 3}H)20:4 than ({sup 14}C)18:2 in intestinal phospholipids. In contrast, more of the ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in triacylglycerol of the smallmore » intestine and plasma. The highest {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratios were found in phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol. The {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of intestinal phosphatidylcholine varied with the type of fat vehicle used, being highest in the Intralipid experiments. After feeding Intralipid (30-60 min), significantly more of the plasma ({sup 3}H)20:4 than plasma ({sup 14}C)18:2 was in diacylglycerol, the {sup 3}H:{sup 14}C ratio of which was much higher than that of plasma free fatty acids. ({sup 3}H)20:4 and ({sup 14}C)18:2 of chyle triacylglycerol are thus metabolized differently.« less

  20. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig.

    PubMed

    Nunes, C S; Malmlöf, K

    1992-11-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  1. Effects of guar gum and cellulose on glucose absorption, hormonal release and hepatic metabolism in the pig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, C. S.; Malmlof, K.

    1992-01-01

    Six Large White pigs (mean body-weight 59 (SE 1.7) kg) were surgically fitted with permanent catheters in the portal vein, the brachiocephalic artery and the right hepatic vein, as well as with electromagnetic flow probes around the portal vein and the hepatic artery, and allowed to recover. The non-anaesthetized animals were given a basal non-fibre diet (diet A) alone or together with 60 g guar gum/kg (diet B) or 150 g purified cellulose/kg (diet C) by substitution for mica. The diets were given for weekly periods and according to a replicated 3 x 3 Latin square design. On the last day of each such adaptation period, test meals of 800 g were given before blood sampling. Sampling was continued for 8 h. Guar gum strongly reduced glucose apparent absorption without changing the absorption and the hepatic uptake profiles. Production rates of insulin, gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) were lowest after guar gum ingestion. However, the reductions in peripheral blood insulin levels caused by guar gum were not associated with a change in hepatic insulin extraction. IGF-1 appeared to be strongly secreted by the gut, whereas the liver had a net uptake of the peptide. Ingestion of guar gum increased the hepatic extraction coefficient of gut-produced IGF-1. Guar gum ingestion appeared also to decrease glucagon secretion. Cellulose at the level consumed had very few effects on the variables considered. It is suggested that the modulation of intestinal mechanisms by guar gum was sufficient to mediate the metabolic effects described.

  2. Pain-mediated altered absorption and metabolism of ibuprofen: an explanation for decreased serum enantiomer concentration after dental surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Fakhreddin; Kunz-Dober, Cornelia M

    1999-01-01

    Aims Rapid onset of analgesia is essential in the treatment of acute pain. There is evidence that conditions of stress cause delayed and decreased pain relief from oral analgesic products through impaired absorption. The aim was to determine the effect of surgery for removal of wisdom teeth on the plasma concentration-time profile of ibuprofen enantiomers. Methods Racemic ibuprofen, 200 mg in one group (n=7) and 600 mg in another group (n=7) was administered 1 week before (control) and again after (test) surgical removal of wisdom teeth. Serum concentrations of ibuprofen enantiomers were measured for 6 h. Results During the control phase, S- and R-ibuprofen concentrations were within the suggested therapeutic range. Surgery resulted in a 2 h delay in the mean time to peak concentration, significant decreases in serum ibuprofen concentration following both doses, and a fall to sub-optimal serum concentrations following the 200 mg dose. During the first 2 h after the 200 mg dose, dental extraction resulted in a significant reduction of the area under serum drug concentration (AUC (0, 2 h) mg l−1 h) from 5.6±2.9 to 1.6±1.8 (P<0.01) and from 5.5±3.0 to 2.1±2.0 (P<0.05) for S and R-ibuprofen, respectively. Similar observations were made following the 600 mg dose for AUC (0, 2 h) of S-ibuprofen (from 14.2±6.1 to 7.2±5.5 mg l−1 h, P<0.05) with no significant difference for R-ibuprofen (from 14.4±9.5 to 5.8±7.1). AUC (0, 6 h) was also significantly reduced by surgery. The pattern of stereoselectivity in serum ibuprofen concentration was reversed by surgery such that the S enantiomer was predominant in the control phase but not in the post-surgery phase, which is suggestive of reduced metabolic chiral inversion. Conclusions Surgery for wisdom tooth removal resulted in substantial decreases in the serum concentration of ibuprofen enantiomers and a prolongation in the time to peak concentration. Reduced absorption and altered metabolism are the likely cause of

  3. Distribution of genetic polymorphisms of genes encoding drug metabolizing enzymes & drug transporters - a review with Indian perspective.

    PubMed

    Umamaheswaran, Gurusamy; Kumar, Dhakchinamoorthi Krishna; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2014-01-01

    Phase I and II drug metabolizing enzymes (DME) and drug transporters are involved in the absorption, distribution, metabolism as well as elimination of many therapeutic agents, toxins and various pollutants. Presence of genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding these proteins has been associated with marked inter-individual variability in their activity that could result in variation in drug response, toxicity as well as in disease predisposition. The emergent field pharmacogenetics and pharmacogenomics (PGx) is a promising discipline, as it predicts disease risk, selection of proper medication with regard to response and toxicity, and appropriate drug dosage guidance based on an individual's genetic make-up. Consequently, genetic variations are essential to understand the ethnic differences in disease occurrence, development, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity. For that reason, it is necessary to establish the normative frequency of these genes in a particular population before unraveling the genotype-phenotype associations. Although a fair amount of allele frequency data are available in Indian populations, the existing pharmacogenetic data have not been compiled into a database. This review was intended to compile the normative frequency distribution of the variants of genes encoding DMEs (CYP450s, TPMT, GSTs, COMT, SULT1A1, NAT2 and UGTs) and transporter proteins (MDR1, OCT1 and SLCO1B1) with Indian perspective.

  4. Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of 14C-RDX Following Oral Administration to Minipigs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-02

    ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING... ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT... Covance Laboratories Inc. 3301 Kinsman Boulevard Madison, WI 53704-2595 Covance 7273-121 U.S. Army Center for Health Promotion and Preventive Medicine

  5. Incorporation of absorption and metabolism into liver toxicity prediction for phytochemicals: A tiered in silico QSAR approach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yitong

    2018-05-18

    An increased use of herbal dietary supplements has been associated with adverse liver effects such as elevated serum enzymes and liver failure. The safety assessment for herbal dietary supplements is challenging since they often contain complex mixtures of phytochemicals, most of which have unknown pharmacokinetic and toxicological properties. Rapid tools are needed to evaluate large numbers of phytochemicals for potential liver toxicity. The current study demonstrates a tiered approach combining identification of phytochemicals in liver toxic botanicals, followed by in silico quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) evaluation of these phytochemicals for absorption (e.g. permeability), metabolism (cytochromes P450) and liver toxicity (e.g. elevated transaminases). First, 255 phytochemicals from 20 botanicals associated with clinical liver injury were identified, and the phytochemical structures were subsequently used for QSAR evaluation. Among these identified phytochemicals, 193 were predicted to be absorbed and then used to generate metabolites, which were both used to predict liver toxicity. Forty-eight phytochemicals were predicted as liver toxic, either due to parent phytochemicals or metabolites. Among them, nineteen phytochemicals have previous evidence of liver toxicity (e.g. pyrrolizidine alkaloids), while the majority were newly discovered (e.g. sesquiterpenoids). These findings help reveal new toxic phytochemicals in herbal dietary supplements and prioritize future toxicological testing. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Assessment of veterinary drugs in plants using pharmacokinetic approaches: The absorption, distribution and elimination of tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole in ephemeral vegetables

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Ru; Rairat, Tirawat; Loh, Shih-Hurng; Wu, Yu-Chieh; Vickroy, Thomas W.

    2017-01-01

    The present study was carried out to demonstrate novel use of pharmacokinetic approaches to characterize drug behaviors/movements in the vegetables with implications to food safety. The absorption, distribution, metabolism and most importantly, the elimination of tetracycline (TC) and sulfamethoxazole (SMX) in edible plants Brassica rapa chinensis and Ipomoea aquatica grown hydroponically were demonstrated and studied using non-compartmental pharmacokinetic analysis. The results revealed drug-dependent and vegetable-dependent pharmacokinetic differences and indicated that ephemeral vegetables could have high capacity accumulating antibiotics (up to 160 μg g-1 for TC and 38 μg g-1 for SMX) within hours. TC concentration in the root (Cmax) could reach 11 times higher than that in the cultivation fluid and 3–28 times higher than the petioles/stems. Based on the volume of distribution (Vss), SMX was 3–6 times more extensively distributed than TC. Both antibiotics showed evident, albeit slow elimination phase with elimination half-lives ranging from 22 to 88 hours. For the first time drug elimination through the roots of a plant was demonstrated, and by viewing the root as a central compartment and continuous infusion without a loading dose as drug administration mode, it is possible to pharmacokinetically monitor the movement of antibiotics and their fate in the vegetables with more detailed information not previously available. Phyto-pharmacokinetic could be a new area worth developing new models for the assessment of veterinary drugs in edible plants. PMID:28797073

  7. Reconstruction of spatial distributions of sound velocity and absorption in soft biological tissues using model ultrasonic tomographic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Zotov, D. I.; Rumyantseva, O. D.

    2014-07-01

    A two-step algorithm is used to reconstruct the spatial distributions of the acoustic characteristics of soft biological tissues-the sound velocity and absorption coefficient. Knowing these distributions is urgent for early detection of benign and malignant neoplasms in biological tissues, primarily in the breast. At the first stage, large-scale distributions are estimated; at the second step, they are refined with a high resolution. Results of reconstruction on the base of model initial data are presented. The principal necessity of preliminary reconstruction of large-scale distributions followed by their being taken into account at the second step is illustrated. The use of CUDA technology for processing makes it possible to obtain final images of 1024 × 1024 samples in only a few minutes.

  8. Comparison of cadmium absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between two radish cultivars (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Xin, Juan; Zhao, Xiaohu; Tan, Qiling; Sun, Xuecheng; Hu, Chengxiao

    2017-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) absorption and accumulation vary greatly not only among plant species but also among cultivars within the same species. In order to better understand the mechanisms of Cd absorption, transportation and distribution, we examined the differences of Cd absorption, translocation, subcellular distribution and chemical forms between L19, a Cd-tolerant genotype, and H4, a Cd-sensitive genotype, using kinetic analysis and soil culture experiment. Kinetic assays showed that the different Cd concentrations between the two cultivars might be ascribed to root absorption and translocation from root to shoot. The investigations of subcellular distribution and chemical forms verified that Cd concentrations of all subcellular fractions in H4 were all higher than in L19. Meanwhile, most of the Cd was associated with cell walls in the root of H4, but the Cd in the root of L19 and leaf of the two cultivars was mainly stored in soluble fraction, which could be one possible mechanism of tolerance to Cd toxicity. In addition, Cd fractions extracted by 1M NaCl and 2% HAC were predominant in root and leaf of both cultivars and the concentrations and proportions extracted by water and 80% ethanol in root and 1M NaCl in leaf were all higher in H4 than in L19. These results indicate that the Cd in H4 is more active than L19, which could be responsible for the sensitivity of H4 to Cd damage. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The Metabolic Phenotype in Obesity: Fat Mass, Body Fat Distribution, and Adipose Tissue Function.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Gijs H

    2017-01-01

    The current obesity epidemic poses a major public health issue since obesity predisposes towards several chronic diseases. BMI and total adiposity are positively correlated with cardiometabolic disease risk at the population level. However, body fat distribution and an impaired adipose tissue function, rather than total fat mass, better predict insulin resistance and related complications at the individual level. Adipose tissue dysfunction is determined by an impaired adipose tissue expandability, adipocyte hypertrophy, altered lipid metabolism, and local inflammation. Recent human studies suggest that adipose tissue oxygenation may be a key factor herein. A subgroup of obese individuals - the 'metabolically healthy obese' (MHO) - have a better adipose tissue function, less ectopic fat storage, and are more insulin sensitive than obese metabolically unhealthy persons, emphasizing the central role of adipose tissue function in metabolic health. However, controversy has surrounded the idea that metabolically healthy obesity may be considered really healthy since MHO individuals are at increased (cardio)metabolic disease risk and may have a lower quality of life than normal weight subjects due to other comorbidities. Detailed metabolic phenotyping of obese persons will be invaluable in understanding the pathophysiology of metabolic disturbances, and is needed to identify high-risk individuals or subgroups, thereby paving the way for optimization of prevention and treatment strategies to combat cardiometabolic diseases. © 2017 The Author(s) Published by S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  10. Phytotransformation of TNT and distribution of metabolic products in Myriophyllum

    SciTech Connect

    Vanderford, M.; Hughes, J.

    Recent investigations indicate that 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) disappears from solution in the presence of aquatic macrophytes. Studies using (U) {sup 14}C TNT were conducted to monitor the fate of TNT and its transformation products in Myriophyllum aquaticum. Plants were exposed to TNT solution for several days and destructively sampled at the end of that time. Data for live plants were compared with those for heat killed controls and axenic Myriophyllum systems. Distribution of radiolabel was analyzed in the root, stem and leaf tissue of Myriophyllum directly by incineration of plant tissue and capture of {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. Tissues were also extractedmore » with methanol and subjected to scintillation analysis. Plant extracts were examined by HPLC for TNT and its known reduction products. A complete mass balance analysis was performed for the system. Significant differences in distribution of {sup 14}C were noted between the live and killed plants. For live plants, the majority of {sup 14}C associated with the plant was sequestered in the roots and was largely unextractable. Extracts of stem and leaf were lower in total {sup 14}C content, but the radiolabel was more extractable from these tissues. In the extracted fractions, TNT and monoamino transformation products were detected, but not in stoichiometric quantities. Investigations are currently underway to identify the extractable products of plant associated TNT transformation.« less

  11. A metabolite-centric view on flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic models

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Genome-scale metabolic models are important tools in systems biology. They permit the in-silico prediction of cellular phenotypes via mathematical optimisation procedures, most importantly flux balance analysis. Current studies on metabolic models mostly consider reaction fluxes in isolation. Based on a recently proposed metabolite-centric approach, we here describe a set of methods that enable the analysis and interpretation of flux distributions in an integrated metabolite-centric view. We demonstrate how this framework can be used for the refinement of genome-scale metabolic models. Results We applied the metabolite-centric view developed here to the most recent metabolic reconstruction of Escherichia coli. By compiling the balance sheets of a small number of currency metabolites, we were able to fully characterise the energy metabolism as predicted by the model and to identify a possibility for model refinement in NADPH metabolism. Selected branch points were examined in detail in order to demonstrate how a metabolite-centric view allows identifying functional roles of metabolites. Fructose 6-phosphate aldolase and the sedoheptulose bisphosphate bypass were identified as enzymatic reactions that can carry high fluxes in the model but are unlikely to exhibit significant activity in vivo. Performing a metabolite essentiality analysis, unconstrained import and export of iron ions could be identified as potentially problematic for the quality of model predictions. Conclusions The system-wide analysis of split ratios and branch points allows a much deeper insight into the metabolic network than reaction-centric analyses. Extending an earlier metabolite-centric approach, the methods introduced here establish an integrated metabolite-centric framework for the interpretation of flux distributions in genome-scale metabolic networks that can complement the classical reaction-centric framework. Analysing fluxes and their metabolic context simultaneously opens

  12. Analyses of absorption distribution of a rubidium cell side-pumped by a Laser-Diode-Array (LDA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hang; Han, Juhong; Rong, Kepeng; Wang, Shunyan; Cai, He; An, Guofei; Zhang, Wei; Yu, Qiang; Wu, Peng; Wang, Hongyuan; Wang, You

    2018-01-01

    A diode-pumped alkali laser (DPAL) has been regarded as one of the most potential candidates to achieve high power performances of next generation. In this paper, we investigate the physical properties of a rubidium cell side-pumped by a Laser-Diode-Array (LDA) in this study. As the saturated concentration of a gain medium inside a vapor cell is extremely sensitive to the temperature, the populations of every energy-level of the atomic alkali are strongly relying on the vapor temperature. Thus, the absorption characteristics of a DPAL are mainly dominated by the temperature distribution. In this paper, the temperature, absorption, and lasing distributions in the cross-section of a rubidium cell side-pumped by a LDA are obtained by means of a complicated mathematic procedure. Based on the original end-pumped mode we constructed before, a novel one-direction side-pumped theoretical mode has been established to explore the distribution properties in the transverse section of a rubidium vapor cell by combining the procedures of heat transfer and laser kinetics together. It has been thought the results might be helpful for design of a side-pumped configuration in a high-powered DPAL.

  13. Nutritional value of protein hydrolysis products (oligopeptides and free amino acids) as a consequence of absorption and metabolism kinetics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rerat, A.

    1995-01-01

    When pigs were submitted to duodenal infusion of solutions containing a large percentage of small peptides (PEP) or free amino acids with the same pattern (AAL) amino acids appear in the portal blood more rapidly and more uniformly after infusion of PEP then after infusion of AAL, with the notable exception of methionine for which the opposite was true. These differences were lowered when a carbohydrate (maltose dextrin) was present in the solution, but nevertheless remained significant for the first hour after the infusion. The long-term (8-hour) uptake of free amino acids into the liver and the peripheral tissues differed in profile according to the nature of the duodenal infusion. Peripheral uptake was appreciably less well balanced after infusion of free amino acids (deficiency of threonine and phenylalanine) than after infusion of small peptides (deficiency of methionine). Accordingly, in the rat, under conditions of discontinuous enteral nutrition the mixture of small peptides was of greater nutritive value than the mixture of free amino acids. It thus appears that the absorption kinetics which results in important variations in the temporal distribution of free amino acids in the tissues may be at the origin of transitory imbalances in tissue amino acid uptake, and as a result of a lower nutritive value.

  14. High Resolution X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy: Distribution of Matter in and around Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, Norbert; MIT/CAT Team

    2015-10-01

    The chemical evolution of the Universe embraces aspects that reachdeep into modern astrophysics and cosmology. We want to know how present and past matter is affected by various levels and types of nucleo-synthesis and stellar evolution. Three major categories were be identified: 1. The study of pre-mordial star formation including periods of super-massive black hole formation, 2. The embedded evolution of the intergalactic medium IGM, 3. The status and evolution of stars and the interstellar medium ISM in galaxies. Today a fourth category relates to our understanding of dark matter in relationwith these three categories. The X-ray band is particularly sensitive to K- and L-shell absorption and scattering from high abundant elements like C, N, O, Ne, Mg, Si, S,Ar, Ca, Fe, and Ni. Like the Lyman alpha forest in the optical band, absorbers in the IGM produce an X-ray line forest along the line of sight in the X-rayspectrum of a background quasar. Similary bright X-ray sources within galaxies and the Milky Way produce a continuum, which is being absorbed by elements invarious phases of the ISM. High resolution X-ray absorption surveys are possible with technologies ready for flight within decade. == high efficiency X-ray optics with optical performance 3== high resolution X-ray gratings with R 3000 for E 1.5 keV== X-ray micro-calorimeters with R 2000 for E 1.5 keV. The vision for the next decade needs to lead to means and strategies which allows us to perform such absorption surveys as effectively as surveys are now or in very near future quite common in astronomy pursued in other wave length bands such as optical, IR, and sub-mm.

  15. Effects of Kaolin Application on Light Absorption and Distribution, Radiation Use Efficiency and Photosynthesis of Almond and Walnut Canopies

    PubMed Central

    Rosati, Adolfo; Metcalf, Samuel G.; Buchner, Richard P.; Fulton, Allan E.; Lampinen, Bruce D.

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Kaolin applied as a suspension to plant canopies forms a film on leaves that increases reflection and reduces absorption of light. Photosynthesis of individual leaves is decreased while the photosynthesis of the whole canopy remains unaffected or even increases. This may result from a better distribution of light within the canopy following kaolin application, but this explanation has not been tested. The objective of this work was to study the effects of kaolin application on light distribution and absorption within tree canopies and, ultimately, on canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency. Methods Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on individual leaves within the canopy of almond (Prunus dulcis) and walnut (Juglans regia) trees was measured before and after kaolin application in order to study PAR distribution within the canopy. The PAR incident on, and reflected and transmitted by, the canopy was measured on the same day for kaolin-sprayed and control trees in order to calculate canopy PAR absorption. These data were then used to model canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency by a simple method proposed in previous work, based on the photosynthetic response to incident PAR of a top-canopy leaf. Key Results Kaolin increased incident PAR on surfaces of inner-canopy leaves, although there was an estimated 20 % loss in PAR reaching the photosynthetic apparatus, due to increased reflection. Assuming a 20 % loss of PAR, modelled photosynthesis and photosynthetic radiation use efficiency (PRUE) of kaolin-coated leaves decreased by only 6·3 %. This was due to (1) more beneficial PAR distribution within the kaolin-sprayed canopy, and (2) with decreasing PAR, leaf photosynthesis decreases less than proportionally, due to the curvature of the photosynthesis response-curve to PAR. The relatively small loss in canopy PRUE (per unit of incident PAR), coupled with the increased incident PAR on the leaf surface on

  16. Effects of kaolin application on light absorption and distribution, radiation use efficiency and photosynthesis of almond and walnut canopies.

    PubMed

    Rosati, Adolfo; Metcalf, Samuel G; Buchner, Richard P; Fulton, Allan E; Lampinen, Bruce D

    2007-02-01

    Kaolin applied as a suspension to plant canopies forms a film on leaves that increases reflection and reduces absorption of light. Photosynthesis of individual leaves is decreased while the photosynthesis of the whole canopy remains unaffected or even increases. This may result from a better distribution of light within the canopy following kaolin application, but this explanation has not been tested. The objective of this work was to study the effects of kaolin application on light distribution and absorption within tree canopies and, ultimately, on canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency. Photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) incident on individual leaves within the canopy of almond (Prunus dulcis) and walnut (Juglans regia) trees was measured before and after kaolin application in order to study PAR distribution within the canopy. The PAR incident on, and reflected and transmitted by, the canopy was measured on the same day for kaolin-sprayed and control trees in order to calculate canopy PAR absorption. These data were then used to model canopy photosynthesis and radiation use efficiency by a simple method proposed in previous work, based on the photosynthetic response to incident PAR of a top-canopy leaf. Kaolin increased incident PAR on surfaces of inner-canopy leaves, although there was an estimated 20 % loss in PAR reaching the photosynthetic apparatus, due to increased reflection. Assuming a 20 % loss of PAR, modelled photosynthesis and photosynthetic radiation use efficiency (PRUE) of kaolin-coated leaves decreased by only 6.3 %. This was due to (1) more beneficial PAR distribution within the kaolin-sprayed canopy, and (2) with decreasing PAR, leaf photosynthesis decreases less than proportionally, due to the curvature of the photosynthesis response-curve to PAR. The relatively small loss in canopy PRUE (per unit of incident PAR), coupled with the increased incident PAR on the leaf surface on inner-canopy leaves, resulted in an estimated

  17. Software LS-MIDA for efficient mass isotopomer distribution analysis in metabolic modelling.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Zeeshan; Zeeshan, Saman; Huber, Claudia; Hensel, Michael; Schomburg, Dietmar; Münch, Richard; Eisenreich, Wolfgang; Dandekar, Thomas

    2013-07-09

    The knowledge of metabolic pathways and fluxes is important to understand the adaptation of organisms to their biotic and abiotic environment. The specific distribution of stable isotope labelled precursors into metabolic products can be taken as fingerprints of the metabolic events and dynamics through the metabolic networks. An open-source software is required that easily and rapidly calculates from mass spectra of labelled metabolites, derivatives and their fragments global isotope excess and isotopomer distribution. The open-source software "Least Square Mass Isotopomer Analyzer" (LS-MIDA) is presented that processes experimental mass spectrometry (MS) data on the basis of metabolite information such as the number of atoms in the compound, mass to charge ratio (m/e or m/z) values of the compounds and fragments under study, and the experimental relative MS intensities reflecting the enrichments of isotopomers in 13C- or 15 N-labelled compounds, in comparison to the natural abundances in the unlabelled molecules. The software uses Brauman's least square method of linear regression. As a result, global isotope enrichments of the metabolite or fragment under study and the molar abundances of each isotopomer are obtained and displayed. The new software provides an open-source platform that easily and rapidly converts experimental MS patterns of labelled metabolites into isotopomer enrichments that are the basis for subsequent observation-driven analysis of pathways and fluxes, as well as for model-driven metabolic flux calculations.

  18. [THE OPTIMIZATION OF NUTRITION FUNCTION UNDER SYNDROME OF RESISTANCE TO INSULIN, DISORDER OF FATTY ACIDS' METABOLISM AND ABSORPTION OF GLUCOSE BY CELLS (A LECTURE)].

    PubMed

    Titov, V N

    2016-01-01

    The phylogenetic processes continue to proceed in Homo Sapiens. At the very early stages ofphylogenesis, the ancient Archaea that formed mitochondria under symbiotic interaction with later bacterial cells conjointly formed yet another system. In this system, there are no cells' absorption of glucose if it is possible to absorb fatty acids from intercellular medium in the form of unesterfied fatty acids or ketonic bodies--metabolites of fatty acids. This is caused by objectively existed conditions and subsequent availability of substrates at the stages ofphylogenesis: acetate, ketonic bodies, fatty acids and only later glucose. The phylogenetically late insulin used after billions years the same dependencies at formation of regulation ofmetabolism offatty acids and cells' absorption of glucose. In order that syndrome ofresistance ceased to exist as afoundation of metabolic pandemic Homo Sapiens has to understand the following. After successful function ofArchaea+bacterial cells and considered by biology action of insulin for the third time in phylogenesis and using biological function of intelligence the content ofphylogenetically earlier palmitic saturated fatty acid infood can't to exceed possibilities of phylogenetically late lipoproteins to transfer it in intercellular medium and blood and cells to absorb it. It is supposed that at early stages of phylogenesis biological function of intelligence is primarily formed to bring into line "unconformities" of regulation of metabolism against the background of seeming relative biological "perfection". These unconformities were subsequently and separately formed at the level of cells in paracrin regulated cenosises of cells and organs and at the level of organism. The prevention of resistance to insulin basically requires biological function of intelligence, principle of self-restraint, bringing into line multiple desires of Homo Sapiens with much less extensive biological possibilities. The "unconformities" of

  19. The absorption and first-pass metabolism of [14C]-1,3-dinitrobenzene in the isolated vascularly perfused rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Adams, P C; Rickert, D E

    1996-11-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the small intestine is capable of the first-pass, reductive metabolism of xenobiotics. A simplified version of the isolated vascularly perfused rat small intestine was developed to test this hypothesis with 1,3-dinitrobenzene (1,3-DNB) as a model xenobiotic. Both 3-nitroaniline (3-NA) and 3-nitroacetanilide (3-NAA) were formed and absorbed following intralumenal doses of 1,3-DNB (1.8 or 4.2 mumol) to isolated vascularly perfused rat small intestine. Dose, fasting, or antibiotic pretreatment had no effect on the absorption and metabolism of 1,3-DNB in this model system. The failure of antibiotic pretreatment to alter the metabolism of 1,3-DNA indicated that 1,3-DNB metabolism was mammalian rather than microfloral in origin. All data from experiments initiated with lumenal 1,3-DNB were fit to a pharmacokinetic model (model A). ANOVA analysis revealed that dose, fasting, or antibiotic pretreatment had no statistically significant effect on the model-dependent parameters. 3-NA (1.5 mumol) was administered to the lumen of isolated vascularly perfused rat small intestine to evaluate model A predictions for the absorption and metabolism of this metabolite. All data from experiments initiated with 3-NA were fit to a pharmacokinetic model (model B). Comparison of corresponding model-dependent pharmacokinetic parameters (i.e. those parameters which describe the same processes in models A and B) revealed quantitative differences. Evidence for significant quantitative differences in the pharmacokinetics or metabolism of formed versus preformed 3-NA in rat small intestine may require better definition of the rate constants used to describe tissue and lumenal processes or identification and incorporation of the remaining unidentified metabolites into the models.

  20. Site-specific distribution of claudin-based paracellular channels with roles in biological fluid flow and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Hiroo; Tamura, Atsushi; Suzuki, Koya; Tsukita, Sachiko

    2017-10-01

    The claudins are a family of membrane proteins with at least 27 members in humans and mice. The extracellular regions of claudin proteins play essential roles in cell-cell adhesion and the paracellular barrier functions of tight junctions (TJs) in epithelial cell sheets. Furthermore, the extracellular regions of some claudins function as paracellular channels in the paracellular barrier that allow the selective passage of water, ions, and/or small organic solutes across the TJ in the extracellular space. Structural analyses have revealed a common framework of transmembrane, cytoplasmic, and extracellular regions among the claudin-based paracellular barriers and paracellular channels; however, differences in the claudins' extracellular regions, such as their charges and conformations, determine their properties. Among the biological systems that involve fluid flow and metabolism, it is noted that hepatic bile flow, renal Na + reabsorption, and intestinal nutrient absorption are dynamically regulated via site-specific distributions of paracellular channel-forming claudins in tissue. Here, we focus on how site-specific distributions of claudin-2- and claudin-15-based paracellular channels drive their organ-specific functions in the liver, kidney, and intestine. © 2017 New York Academy of Sciences.

  1. Determination of Spatial Distribution of Air Pollution by Dye Laser Measurement of Differential Absorption of Elastic Backscatter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, S. A.; Gergely, J. S.

    1973-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analytical study of a lidar system which uses tunable organic dye lasers to accurately determine spatial distribution of molecular air pollutants. Also described will be experimental work to date on simultaneous multiwavelength output dye laser sources for this system. Basically the scheme determines the concentration of air pollutants by measuring the differential absorption of an (at least) two wavelength lidar signal elastically backscattered by the atmosphere. Only relative measurements of the backscattered intensity at each of the two wavelengths, one on and one off the resonance absorption of the pollutant in question, are required. The various parameters of the scheme are examined and the component elements required for a system of this type discussed, with emphasis on the dye laser source. Potential advantages of simultaneous multiwavelength outputs are described. The use of correlation spectroscopy in this context is examined. Comparisons are also made for the use of infrared probing wavelengths and sources instead of dye lasers. Estimates of the sensitivity and accuracy of a practical dye laser system of this type, made for specific pollutants, snow it to have inherent advantages over other schemes for determining pollutant spatial distribution.

  2. Detrimental and protective fat: body fat distribution and its relation to metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andrea; Magnuson, Aaron; Foster, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is linked to numerous comorbidities that include, but are not limited to, glucose intolerance, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and cardiovascular disease. Current evidence suggests, however, obesity itself is not an exclusive predictor of metabolic dysregulation but rather adipose tissue distribution. Obesity-related adverse health consequences occur predominately in individuals with upper body fat accumulation, the detrimental distribution, commonly associated with visceral obesity. Increased lower body subcutaneous adipose tissue, however, is associated with a reduced risk of obesity-induced metabolic dysregulation and even enhanced insulin sensitivity, thus, storage in this region is considered protective. The proposed mechanisms that causally relate the differential outcomes of adipose tissue distribution are often attributed to location and/or adipocyte regulation. Visceral adipose tissue effluent to the portal vein drains into the liver where hepatocytes are directly exposed to its metabolites and secretory products, whereas the subcutaneous adipose tissue drains systemically. Adipose depots are also inherently different in numerous ways such as adipokine release, immunity response and regulation, lipid turnover, rate of cell growth and death, and response to stress and sex hormones. Proximal extrinsic factors also play a role in the differential drive between adipose tissue depots. This review focuses on the deleterious mechanisms postulated to drive the differential metabolic response between central and lower body adipose tissue distribution.

  3. Uptake, Translocation, Metabolism, and Distribution of Glyphosate in Nontarget Tea Plant (Camellia sinensis L.).

    PubMed

    Tong, Mengmeng; Gao, Wanjun; Jiao, Weiting; Zhou, Jie; Li, Yeyun; He, Lili; Hou, Ruyan

    2017-09-06

    The uptake, translocation, metabolism, and distribution behavior of glyphosate in nontarget tea plant were investigated. The negative effects appeared to grown tea saplings when the nutrient solution contained glyphosate above 200 mg L -1 . Glyphosate was highest in the roots of the tea plant, where it was also metabolized to aminomethyl phosphonic acid (AMPA). The glyphosate and AMPA in the roots were transported through the xylem or phloem to the stems and leaves. The amount of AMPA in the entire tea plant was less than 6.0% of the amount of glyphosate. The glyphosate level in fresh tea shoots was less than that in mature leaves at each day. These results indicated that free glyphosate in the soil can be continuously absorbed by, metabolized in, and transported from the roots of the tea tree into edible leaves, and therefore, free glyphosate residues in the soil should be controlled to produce teas free of glyphosate.

  4. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-01-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9–17.2 μg/mL reached after 2–3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax, indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10–100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [14C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug–drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. PMID:24611573

  5. Absorption, distribution and excretion of the anti-tuberculosis drug delamanid in rats: Extensive tissue distribution suggests potential therapeutic value for extrapulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Masakazu; Shimokawa, Yoshihiko; Sasahara, Katsunori; Yoda, Noriaki; Sasabe, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Mitsunari; Umehara, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Delamanid (OPC-67683, Deltyba™, nitro-dihydro-imidazooxazoles derivative) is approved for the treatment of adult pulmonary multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The absorption, distribution and excretion of delamanid-derived radioactivity were investigated after a single oral administration of 14 C-delamanid at 3 mg/kg to rats. In both male and female rats, radioactivity in blood and all tissues reached peak levels by 8 or 24 h post-dose, and thereafter decreased slowly. Radioactivity levels were 3- to 5-fold higher in lung tissue at time to maximum concentration compared with plasma. In addition, radioactivity was broadly distributed in various tissues, including the central nervous system, eyeball, placenta and fetus, indicating that 14 C-delamanid permeated the brain, retinal and placental blood barriers. By 168 h post-dose, radioactivity in almost all the tissues was higher than that in the plasma. Radioactivity was also transferred into the milk of lactating rats. Approximately 6% and 92% of radioactivity was excreted in the urine and feces, respectively, indicating that the absorbed radioactivity was primarily excreted via the biliary route. No significant differences in the absorption, distribution and excretion of 14 C-delamanid were observed between male and female rats. The pharmacokinetic results suggested that delamanid was broadly distributed to the lungs and various tissues for a prolonged duration of time at concentrations expected to effectively target tuberculosis bacteria. These data indicate that delamanid, in addition to its previously demonstrated efficacy in pulmonary tuberculosis, might be an effective therapeutic approach to treating extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Glucose metabolic flux distribution of Lactobacillus amylophilus during lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jianguo; Wang, Qunhui; Zou, Hui; Liu, Yingying; Wang, Juan; Gan, Kemin; Xiang, Juan

    2013-11-01

    The (13) C isotope tracer method was used to investigate the glucose metabolic flux distribution and regulation in Lactobacillus amylophilus to improve lactic acid production using kitchen waste saccharified solution (KWSS). The results demonstrate that L. amylophilus is a homofermentative bacterium. In synthetic medium, 60.6% of the glucose entered the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas (EMP) to produce lactic acid, whereas 36.4% of the glucose entered the pentose phosphate metabolic pathway (HMP). After solid-liquid separation of the KWSS, the addition of Fe(3+) during fermentation enhanced the NADPH production efficiency and increased the NADH content. The flux to the EMP was also effectively increased. Compared with the control (60.6% flux to EMP without Fe(3+) addition), the flux to the EMP with the addition of Fe(3+) (74.3%) increased by 23.8%. In the subsequent pyruvate metabolism, Fe(3+) also increased lactate dehydrogenase activity, and inhibited alcohol dehydrogenase, pyruvate dehydrogenase and pyruvate carboxylase, thereby increasing the lactic acid production to 9.03 g l(-1) , an increase of 8% compared with the control. All other organic acid by-products were lower than in the control. However, the addition of Zn(2+) showed an opposite effect, decreasing the lactic acid production. In conclusion it is feasible and effective means using GC-MS, isotope experiment and MATLAB software to integrate research the metabolic flux distribution of lactic acid bacteria, and the results provide the theoretical foundation for similar metabolic flux distribution. © 2013 The Authors. Microbial Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Society for Applied Microbiology.

  7. Absorption and distribution kinetics of the 13C-labeled tomato carotenoid phytoene in healthy adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phytoene is a tomato carotenoid which may contribute to the apparent health benefits of tomato consumption. While phytoene is a less prominent tomato carotenoid than lycopene, it is a major carotenoid in various human tissues. Phytoene distribution to plasma lipoproteins and tissues differs from lyc...

  8. Distribution and metabolism of selenite and selenomethionine in the Japanese quail.

    PubMed

    Anan, Yasumi; Ohbo, Ai; Tani, Yuta; Hatakeyama, Yoshiko; Yawata, Ayako; Ogra, Yasumitsu

    2012-05-01

    Compared to the many studies on the physiological and toxicological effects of selenium (Se) in mammals, avian Se metabolism is still an unexplored topic. Some birds are useful as poultry for human nutrition. Moreover, birds belong to higher trophic levels in the biosphere and thus may play an important role in Se circulation in the ecosystem in the same way as mammals do. In this study, we analyzed the distribution and metabolism of Se in an experimental bird, the Japanese quail, which was fed drinking water containing sodium selenite or selenomethionine (SeMet). The highest concentration of Se was detected in the pancreas, followed by down feathers, liver, and kidneys. SeMet was more efficiently incorporated into the quail than selenite. The specific and preferable distribution of Se to the high molecular weight fraction in the serum of the quail was observed only in the SeMet-ingestion group. As in mammals, selenosugar and trimethylselenonium were the major metabolites in quail excreta. Three unknown Se metabolites were detected by HPLC-ICP-MS. Although part of the metabolic pathway of Se in the Japanese quail fed selenite and SeMet was the same as that observed in mammals, the bird also showed certain avian-specific metabolic process for Se.

  9. Toxic metals distribution in different components of Pakistani and imported cigarettes by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Kazi, T G; Jalbani, N; Arain, M B; Jamali, M K; Afridi, H I; Sarfraz, R A; Shah, A Q

    2009-04-15

    It was extensively investigated that a significant flux of toxic metals, along with other toxins, reaches the lungs through smoking. In present study toxic metals (TMs) (Al, Cd, Ni and Pb) were determined in different components of Pakistani local branded and imported cigarettes, including filler tobacco (FT), filter (before and after normal smoking by a single volunteer) and ash by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometer (ETAAS). Microwave-assisted digestion method was employed. The validity and accuracy of methodology were checked by using certified sample of Virginia tobacco leaves (ICHTJ-cta-VTL-2). The percentages (%) of TMs in different components of cigarette were calculated with respect to their total contents in FT of all branded cigarettes before smoking, while smoke concentration has been calculated by subtracting the filter and ash contents from the filler tobacco content of each branded cigarette. The highest percentage (%) of Al was observed in ash of all cigarettes, with range 97.3-99.0%, while in the case of Cd, a reverse behaviour was observed, as a range of 15.0-31.3% of total contents were left in the ash of all branded cigarettes understudy.

  10. Intracellular metabolic pathway distribution in diatoms and tools for genome-enabled experimental diatom research.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Ansgar; Kroth, Peter G

    2017-09-05

    Diatoms are important primary producers in the oceans and can also dominate other aquatic habitats. One reason for the success of this phylogenetically relatively young group of unicellular organisms could be the impressive redundancy and diversity of metabolic isoenzymes in diatoms. This redundancy is a result of the evolutionary origin of diatom plastids by a eukaryote-eukaryote endosymbiosis, a process that implies temporary redundancy of functionally complete eukaryotic genomes. During the establishment of the plastids, this redundancy was partially reduced via gene losses, and was partially retained via gene transfer to the nucleus of the respective host cell. These gene transfers required re-assignment of intracellular targeting signals, a process that simultaneously altered the intracellular distribution of metabolic enzymes compared with the ancestral cells. Genome annotation, the correct assignment of the gene products and the prediction of putative function, strongly depends on the correct prediction of the intracellular targeting of a gene product. Here again diatoms are very peculiar, because the targeting systems for organelle import are partially different to those in land plants. In this review, we describe methods of predicting intracellular enzyme locations, highlight findings of metabolic peculiarities in diatoms and present genome-enabled approaches to study their metabolism.This article is part of the themed issue 'The peculiar carbon metabolism in diatoms'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  11. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    Metabolism refers to all the physical and chemical processes in the body that convert or use energy, ... Tortora GJ, Derrickson BH. Metabolism. In: Tortora GJ, Derrickson ... Physiology . 14th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons; 2014:chap ...

  12. Metabolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... El metabolismo Metabolism Basics Our bodies get the energy they need from food through metabolism, the chemical ... that convert the fuel from food into the energy needed to do everything from moving to thinking ...

  13. Laser absorption-scattering technique applied to asymmetric evaporating fuel sprays for simultaneous measurement of vapor/liquid mass distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, J.; Nishida, K.

    2010-10-01

    This paper describes an Ultraviolet-Visible Laser Absorption-Scattering (UV-Vis LAS) imaging technique applied to asymmetric fuel sprays. Continuing from the previous studies, the detailed measurement principle was derived. It is demonstrated that, by means of this technique, cumulative masses and mass distributions of vapor/liquid phases can be quantitatively measured no matter what shape the spray is. A systematic uncertainty analysis was performed, and the measurement accuracy was also verified through a series of experiments on the completely vaporized fuel spray. The results show that the Molar Absorption Coefficient (MAC) of the test fuel, which is typically pressure and temperature dependent, is the major error source. The measurement error in the vapor determination has been shown to be approximately 18% under the assumption of constant MAC of the test fuel. Two application examples of the extended LAS technique were presented for exploring the dynamics and physical insight of the evaporating fuel sprays: diesel sprays injected by group-hole nozzles and gasoline sprays impinging on an inclined wall.

  14. Determination of exhaled nitric oxide distributions in a diverse sample population using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namjou, K.; Roller, C. B.; Reich, T. E.; Jeffers, J. D.; McMillen, G. L.; McCann, P. J.; Camp, M. A.

    2006-11-01

    A liquid-nitrogen free mid-infrared tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) system equipped with a folded-optical-path astigmatic Herriott cell was used to measure levels of exhaled nitric oxide (eNO) and exhaled carbon dioxide (eCO2) in breath. Quantification of absolute eNO concentrations was performed using NO/CO2 absorption ratios measured by the TDLAS system coupled with absolute eCO2 concentrations measured with a non-dispersive infrared sensor. This technique eliminated the need for routine calibrations using standard cylinder gases. The TDLAS system was used to measure eNO in children and adults (n=799, ages 5 to 64) over a period of more than one year as part of a field study. Volunteers for the study self-reported data including age, height, weight, and health status. The resulting data were used to assess system performance and to generate eNO and eCO2 distributions, which were found to be log-normal and Gaussian, respectively. There were statistically significant differences in mean eNO levels for males and females as well as for healthy and steroid naïve asthmatic volunteers not taking corticosteroid therapies. Ambient NO levels affected measured eNO concentrations only slightly, but this effect was not statistically significant.

  15. Stepwise inference of likely dynamic flux distributions from metabolic time series data.

    PubMed

    Faraji, Mojdeh; Voit, Eberhard O

    2017-07-15

    Most metabolic pathways contain more reactions than metabolites and therefore have a wide stoichiometric matrix that corresponds to infinitely many possible flux distributions that are perfectly compatible with the dynamics of the metabolites in a given dataset. This under-determinedness poses a challenge for the quantitative characterization of flux distributions from time series data and thus for the design of adequate, predictive models. Here we propose a method that reduces the degrees of freedom in a stepwise manner and leads to a dynamic flux distribution that is, in a statistical sense, likely to be close to the true distribution. We applied the proposed method to the lignin biosynthesis pathway in switchgrass. The system consists of 16 metabolites and 23 enzymatic reactions. It has seven degrees of freedom and therefore admits a large space of dynamic flux distributions that all fit a set of metabolic time series data equally well. The proposed method reduces this space in a systematic and biologically reasonable manner and converges to a likely dynamic flux distribution in just a few iterations. The estimated solution and the true flux distribution, which is known in this case, show excellent agreement and thereby lend support to the method. The computational model was implemented in MATLAB (version R2014a, The MathWorks, Natick, MA). The source code is available at https://github.gatech.edu/VoitLab/Stepwise-Inference-of-Likely-Dynamic-Flux-Distributions and www.bst.bme.gatech.edu/research.php . mojdeh@gatech.edu or eberhard.voit@bme.gatech.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  16. Absorption and distribution of estradiol from male seminal emissions during mating

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    Estradiol-17β (E2) plays critical roles in female maturation, sexual receptivity, ovulation and fertility. In many mammals, contact with males can similarly affect these female parameters, whereas male excretions contain significant quantities of E2. We administered radiolabeled estradiol ([3H]E2) to male mice in doses representing a small fraction of their endogenous E2. These males were paired with sexually receptive females, and radioactivity was traced into the females’ systems. In Experiment 1, males were given [3H]E2 at 24 and 1 h before mating. Male-to-female [3H]E2 transfer intensified with increasing numbers of intromissions and spiked in the uterus after insemination. In Experiment 2, sexually experienced young males received [3H]E2 at 72 and 24 h before mating, and all mated to ejaculation. The copulatory plug deposited in the female reproductive tract contained substantial levels of radioactivity. The uteri, other tissues and blood serum of females displayed radioactivity indicative of E2 transfer. In Experiment 3, radioactivity was observed 3 and 18 h after insemination in the females’ uteri and other tissues, including parts of the brain. In Experiment 4, we observed substantial levels of radioactivity in semen as well as the copulatory plugs retrieved from the females after mating. Transferred E2 could directly affect abundant estrogen receptors in the female reproductive tract without potential metabolism by the liver. Sexually transferred E2 may facilitate uterine preparation for blastocyst implantation. These data converge with several lines of evidence indicating that male-sourced E2 can transfer to proximate females in bioactive form, contributing to various mammalian pheromonal effects. PMID:27758953

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of darbepoetin alfa: absorption, distribution, and excretion after a single intravenous and subcutaneous administration to rats.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, E; Kato, K; Shindo, H; Mitsuoka, C; Kitajima, S-I; Ogata, H; Misaizu, T

    2007-01-01

    KRN321 is a hyperglycosylated analogue of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO, epoetin alfa), and its absorption, distribution, and excretion have been studied after a single intravenous and subcutaneous administration of 125I-KRN321 at a dose of 0.5 microg kg-1 to male rats. The half-lives of immunoreactive radioactivity in the terminal phase after intravenous and subcutaneous administration were 14.05 and 14.36 h, respectively, and the bioavailability rate after subcutaneous administration was 47%. The total radioactivity in tissues was lower than that in the serum in all tissues excluding the thyroid gland and skin at the injection site (subcutaneous administration). The maximum concentrations were observed in the bone marrow or skin at the injection site followed by the thyroid gland, kidneys, adrenal glands, spleen, lungs, stomach and bladder. The radioactivity found in trichloroacetic acid-precipitated fractions suggested that a high-molecular weight compound, unchanged or mixed with endogenous protein, distributed to the tissues after administration. The whole-body autoradiographic findings in both groups were in agreement with the tissue distribution mentioned above. The blood cell uptake of KRN321 was low for both groups. The excretion ratios of radioactivity into urine and faeces up to 168 h were 71.4 and 14.1% after the intravenous administration and 74.9 and 12.0% after the subcutaneous administration. There was no difference in the excretion profile of radioactivity between the two groups.

  18. Increasing the throughput and productivity of Caco-2 cell permeability assays using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry: application to resveratrol absorption and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongmei; Shin, Young Geun; Yu, Chongwoo; Kosmeder, Jerome W; Hirschelman, Wendy H; Pezzuto, John M; van Breemen, Richard B

    2003-12-01

    The Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assay has become a standard model of human intestinal absorption and transport. This paper reviews recent progress in increasing the throughput of Caco-2 cell monolayer assays and in expanding the scope of this assay to include modeling intestinal drug metabolism. The state-of-the-art in Caco-2 cell monolayer permeability assays combines multi-well plates fitted with semi-permeable inserts on which Caco-2 cells have been cultured with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) or LC-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) for the quantitative analysis of test compounds and the identification of their intestinal metabolites. After reviewing the progress in increasing the throughput of Caco-2 cell monolayer assays for both modeling human intestinal permeability or transport and the metabolism of xenobiotic compounds, we demonstrate the application of LC-MS and LC-MS-MS to the measurement of resveratrol permeability and metabolism in the Caco-2 model. trans-Resveratrol (trans-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene) is a polyphenolic compound occurring in grapes, peanuts and other food sources, that is under investigation as a cancer chemoprevention agent. The apparent permeability coefficient for apical (AP) to basolateral (BL) movement of resveratrol was 2.0 x 10(-5)cm/sec. Resveratrol was not a substrate for P-glycoprotein or the multi-drug resistance associated proteins (MRP). No phase I metabolites were observed, but the phase II conjugates resveratrol-3-glucuronide and resveratrol-3-sulfate was identified based on LC-MS and LC-MS-MS analysis and comparison with synthetic standards. Although these data indicate that resveratrol diffuses rapidly across the intestinal epithelium, extensive phase II metabolism during absorption might reduce resveratrol bioavailability.

  19. [Effects of Fulvic Acid on Absorption and Form Distribution of Heavy Metals on Sediments].

    PubMed

    Li, Yu-qing; He, Jiang; Lü, Chang-wei; Fan, Ming-de; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Rui-qing; Xie, Zhi- lei; Wang, Jing-hua; Yu, Bo; En, He; Ding, Tao

    2016-03-15

    Based on the extracted fulvic acid (FA) from Lake Wuliangsuhai sediments by sequential alkali extraction, this work studied the effects of FA on the adsorption and fraction distribution of heavy metals (HM) on sediments using original sediments and sediments treated with 30% H₂O₂ as adsorbents. The results showed both organic matter and FA had effects on the HM adsorption onto sediments; The treatments of FA-free conditions and the sediments treated by H₂O₂ showed relatively strong influence on Cu²⁺ adsorption, which decreased the Cu²⁺ adsorption by 17.85%. With the increasing FA addition, the adsorption percentage of HM on both types of sediments showed gradually decreasing trends, with the order of Cu²⁺ > Cd²⁺ > Zn²⁺ > Pb²⁺; when the FA content was more than 5% , FA became the governing factor on the decreasing adsorption percentage of HM. With increasing FA addition, forms distribution of HM showed significant changes in both types of sediments; i. e. FA additions showed significant negative and positive correlations with percentages of metals bound to carbonates and organic matter, respectively, since the FA addition increased the H⁺ concentration of the system, in which H⁺ could activate the metals bound to carbonate from the sediments. As an organophilic weak element, the fraction percentage of Cd bound to organic matter was the lowest with the minimal changes.

  20. Obesity, regional body fat distribution, and the metabolic syndrome in older men and women.

    PubMed

    Goodpaster, Bret H; Krishnaswami, Shanthi; Harris, Tamara B; Katsiaras, Andreas; Kritchevsky, Steven B; Simonsick, Eleanor M; Nevitt, Michael; Holvoet, Paul; Newman, Anne B

    2005-04-11

    The metabolic syndrome is a disorder that includes dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension and is associated with an increased risk of diabetes and cardiovascular disease. We determined whether patterns of regional fat deposition are associated with metabolic syndrome in older adults. A cross-sectional study was performed that included a random, population-based, volunteer sample of Medicare-eligible adults within the general communities of Pittsburgh, Pa, and Memphis, Tenn. The subjects consisted of 3035 men and women aged 70 to 79 years, of whom 41.7% were black. Metabolic syndrome was defined by Adult Treatment Panel III criteria, including serum triglyceride level, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol level, glucose level, blood pressure, and waist circumference. Visceral, subcutaneous abdominal, intermuscular, and subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was measured by computed tomography. Visceral adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in men who were of normal weight (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval: 2.1, 1.6-2.9), overweight (1.8, 1.5-2.1), and obese (1.2, 1.0-1.5), and in women who were of normal weight (3.3, 2.4-4.6), overweight (2.4, 2.0-3.0), and obese (1.7, 1.4-2.1), adjusting for race. Subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome only in normal-weight men (1.3, 1.1-1.7). Intermuscular adipose tissue was associated with the metabolic syndrome in normal-weight (2.3, 1.6-3.5) and overweight (1.2, 1.1-1.4) men. In contrast, subcutaneous thigh adipose tissue was inversely associated with the metabolic syndrome in obese men (0.9, 0.8-1.0) and women (0.9, 0.9-1.0). In addition to general obesity, the distribution of body fat is independently associated with the metabolic syndrome in older men and women, particularly among those of normal body weight.

  1. Dietary glutamine supplementation effects on amino acid metabolism, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity and antioxidant response of gilthead sea bream (Sparus aurata) juveniles.

    PubMed

    Coutinho, F; Castro, C; Rufino-Palomares, E; Ordóñez-Grande, B; Gallardo, M A; Oliva-Teles, A; Peres, H

    2016-01-01

    A study was undertaken to evaluate dietary glutamine supplementation effects on gilthead sea bream performance, intestinal nutrient absorption capacity, hepatic and intestinal glutamine metabolism and oxidative status. For that purpose gilthead sea bream juveniles (mean weight 13.0g) were fed four isolipidic (18% lipid) and isonitrogenous (43% protein) diets supplemented with 0, 0.5, 1 and 2% glutamine for 6weeks. Fish performance, body composition and intestinal nutrient absorption capacity were not affected by dietary glutamine levels. Hepatic and intestinal glutaminase (GlNase), glutamine synthetase (GSase), alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase and glutamate dehydrogenase activities were also unaffected by dietary glutamine supplementation. In the intestine GlNase activity was higher and GSase/GlNase ratio was two-fold lower than in the liver, suggesting a higher use of glutamine for energy production by the intestine than by the liver. The liver showed higher catalase and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase activities, while the intestine presented higher glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities and oxidised glutathione content, which seems to reveal a higher glutathione dependency of the intestinal antioxidant response. Total and reduced glutathione contents in liver and intestine and superoxide dismutase activity in the intestine were enhanced by dietary glutamine, though lipid peroxidation values were not affected. Overall, differences between liver and intestine glutamine metabolism and antioxidant response were identified and the potential of dietary glutamine supplementation to gilthead sea bream's antioxidant response was elucidated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The effects of co-administration of butter on the absorption, metabolism and excretion of catechins in rats after oral administration of tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liang; Han, Yuhui; Xu, Liwei; Liang, Yuhong; Chen, Xin; Li, Junsong; Wan, Xiaochun

    2015-07-01

    In Southwest China, tea polyphenols are usually utilized by way of butter tea. Tea polyphenols inhibit the absorption and biosynthesis of fatty acids in vivo, but the effects of butter on the pharmacokinetics of tea polyphenols have drawn less concern. A rapid UHPLC-MS/MS method was used to quantitatively determine the catechins in the plasma, feces and bile of rats after the oral administration of tea polyphenol or its combination with butter. In comparison with the single tea polyphenol treatment, the maximum plasma concentrations (Cmax) of the free EGCG, EGC, EC, GCG, GC and ECG significantly decreased after the co-administration of butter. The mean residence times (MRT) of the free EGCG, EGC, EC, GC and ECG were also significantly prolonged. When the plasma samples were treated with β-glucuronidase and arylsulfatase, the pharmacokinetic parameters of the total catechins (free and conjugated forms) were not affected by the co-administration of butter. These results indicated that the total absorption of catechins was not affected by butter, but the metabolism of catechins had been changed. Furthermore, the fecal catechins were significantly increased by butter. The total fecal amount and excretion ratio of all catechins were increased highly. The biliary excretion of EGCG, EGC, EC, GCG and GC was significantly increased by the co-administration of butter. To sum up, the butter changed the metabolism of catechins in vivo by decreasing the plasma concentration of the free catechins but increasing the conjugated catechins.

  3. Imepitoin as novel treatment option for canine idiopathic epilepsy: pharmacokinetics, distribution, and metabolism in dogs.

    PubMed

    Rundfeldt, C; Gasparic, A; Wlaź, P

    2014-10-01

    Imepitoin is a novel anti-epileptic licensed in the European Union for the treatment of canine idiopathic epilepsy. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of imepitoin in dogs and to evaluate the interaction with drug metabolizing enzymes. Upon administration of imepitoin tablets at a dose of 30 mg/kg to beagle dogs, high plasma levels were observed within 30 min following oral dosing, with maximal plasma concentrations of 14.9-17.2 μg/mL reached after 2-3 h. In a crossover study, co-administration of imepitoin tablets with food reduced the total AUC by 30%, but it did not result in significant changes in Tmax and Cmax , indicating lack of clinical relevance. No clinically relevant effects of sex and no accumulation or metabolic tolerance were observed upon twice daily dosing. Following single dose administration of 10-100 mg/kg, dose linearity was found. Administering [(14) C] imepitoin, high enteral absorption of 92% and primary fecal excretion were identified. Plasma protein binding was only 55%. At therapeutic plasma concentrations, imepitoin did not inhibit microsomal cytochrome P450 family liver enzymes in vitro. In rats, no relevant induction of liver enzymes was found. Therefore, protein binding or metabolism-derived drug-drug interactions are unlikely. Based on these data, imepitoin can be dosed twice daily, but the timing of tablet administration in relation to feeding should be kept consistent. © 2014 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Ammonia concentration distribution measurements in the exhaust of a heavy duty diesel engine based on limited data absorption tomography.

    PubMed

    Stritzke, Felix; van der Kley, Sani; Feiling, Alexander; Dreizler, Andreas; Wagner, Steven

    2017-04-03

    A multichannel tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer is used to measure absolute ammonia concentrations and their distributions in exhaust gas applications with intense CO2 and H2O background. Designed for in situ diagnostics in SCR after treatment systems with temperatures up to 800 K, the system employs a fiber coupled near-infrared distributed feedback diode laser. With the laser split into eight coplanar beams crossing the exhaust pipe, the sensor provides eight concentration measurements simultaneously. Three ammonia ro-vibrational transitions coinciding near 2200.5 nm with rather weak temperature dependency and negligible CO2/H2O interference were probed during the measurements. The line-of-sight averaged channel concentrations are transformed into 2-D ammonia distributions using limited data IR species tomography based on Tikhonov regularization. This spectrometer was successfully applied in the exhaust system of a 340 kW heavy duty diesel engine operated without oxidation catalyst or particulate filter. In this harsh environment the multi-channel sensor achieved single path ammonia detection limits of 25 to 80 ppmV with a temporal resolution of 1 Hz whereas, while operated as a single-channel sensor, these characteristics improved to 10 ppmV and 100 Hz. Spatial averaging of the reconstructed 2-D ammonia distributions shows good agreement to cross-sectional extractive measurements. In contrast to extractive methods more information about spatial inhomogeneities and transient operating conditions can be derived from the new spectrometer.

  5. Mass balance approaches for estimating the intestinal absorption and metabolism of peptides and analogues: theoretical development and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinko, P. J.; Leesman, G. D.; Amidon, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical analysis for estimating the extent of intestinal peptide and peptide analogue absorption was developed on the basis of a mass balance approach that incorporates convection, permeability, and reaction. The macroscopic mass balance analysis (MMBA) was extended to include chemical and enzymatic degradation. A microscopic mass balance analysis, a numerical approach, was also developed and the results compared to the MMBA. The mass balance equations for the fraction of a drug absorbed and reacted in the tube were derived from the general steady state mass balance in a tube: [formula: see text] where M is mass, z is the length of the tube, R is the tube radius, Pw is the intestinal wall permeability, kr is the reaction rate constant, C is the concentration of drug in the volume element over which the mass balance is taken, VL is the volume of the tube, and vz is the axial velocity of drug. The theory was first applied to the oral absorption of two tripeptide analogues, cefaclor (CCL) and cefatrizine (CZN), which degrade and dimerize in the intestine. Simulations using the mass balance equations, the experimental absorption parameters, and the literature stability rate constants yielded a mean estimated extent of CCL (250-mg dose) and CZN (1000-mg dose) absorption of 89 and 51%, respectively, which was similar to the mean extent of absorption reported in humans (90 and 50%). It was proposed previously that 15% of the CCL dose spontaneously degraded systematically; however, our simulations suggest that significant CCL degradation occurs (8 to 17%) presystemically in the intestinal lumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  6. The Metabolism Distribution and Effect of Thiamethoxam After Oral Exposure in Mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus).

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinghuan; Zhang, Yang; Xu, Peng; Guo, Baoyuan; Li, Wei

    2018-06-20

    Systematically evaluation of the metabolism, distribution and effect of thiamethoxam in mongolian racerunner (Eremias argus) were carried out after oral exposure. The HPLC equipped with Q Exactive focus was used for identification and concentration analysis of thiamethoxam and its metabolites. Percutaneous and urine excretions were the primary ways for the elimination of thiamethoxam and its metabolites, and the limiting factor was urine output. Demethylation thiamethoxam and clothianidin were the main metabolites of thiamethoxam in lizard. The CYP3A4, CYP3A7 and CYP2C9 played a crucial role in the metabolism process. Aldehyde oxidase only dominated the nitro-reduction process of demethylation thiamethoxam and clothianidin. Glutathione S-transferase might be related to the clearance process of thiamethoxam and its metabolites. The findings indicated that thiamethoxam might pose potential carcinogenic and hepatic injury risk to lizards. The results enrich and supplement the knowledge of the environmental fate of thiamethoxam in reptiles.

  7. Effects of dietary sulfur concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio on ruminal fermentation, sulfur metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid absorption in beef heifers.

    PubMed

    Amat, S; McKinnon, J J; Penner, G B; Hendrick, S

    2014-02-01

    This study evaluated the effects of dietary S concentration and forage-to-concentrate ratio (F:C) on ruminal fermentation, S metabolism, and short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption in beef heifers. Sixteen ruminally cannulated heifers (initial BW 628 ± 48 kg) were used in a randomized complete block design with a 2 × 2 factorial treatment arrangement. The main factors included F:C (4% forage vs. 51% forage, DM basis) and the S concentration, which was modified using differing sources of wheat dried distillers grains with solubles (DDGS) to achieve low- and high-S diets (LS = 0.30% vs. HS = 0.67% S on a DM basis). Elemental S was also added to increase the S content for the HS diets. Serum sulfate concentration from blood, sulfide (S(2-)), and SCFA concentrations from ruminal fluid, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) concentration from the ruminal gas cap, and urinary sulfate concentration were determined. Continuous rumen pH and SCFA (acetate, butyrate, and propionate) absorption were measured. There were no interactions between S concentration and F:C. The F:C did not affect DMI (P = 0.26) or ruminal S metabolite concentrations (P ≥ 0.19), but ruminal pH was lower (P < 0.01) and SCFA absorption was greater (P < 0.01) for low F:C diets. Heifers fed HS diets had less DMI (P < 0.01) but greater ruminal pH (P < 0.01), greater concentrations of ruminal H2S (P < 0.01) and serum sulfate (P < 0.01), and greater urinary sulfate concentration (P < 0.01) and output (P < 0.01) relative to heifers fed LS diets. Ruminal H2S was positively correlated with serum sulfate (r = 0.89; P < 0.01). Ruminal acetate concentration was not affected (P = 0.26) by dietary S concentration. Heifers fed the HS diet had lower (P = 0.01) ruminal propionate concentration and tended to have lower (P = 0.06) butyrate concentration than heifers fed the LS diet. Ruminal acetate was greater (P = 0.01) and butyrate was less (P < 0.01) with the high F:C diet than the low F:C diet. Both HS (P = 0.06) and low F

  8. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has beenmore » observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.« less

  9. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P. L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  10. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.

  11. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E.; ...

    2015-09-01

    One effective method of reducing NO x emissions while improving efficiency is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines. But, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder nonuniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. Furthermore, a sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO 2 concentration at various locationsmore » in the intake manifold. Our study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO 2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz.« less

  12. Human microsomal cyttrochrome P450-mediated reduction of oxysophocarpine, an active and highly toxic constituent derived from Sophora flavescens species, and its intestinal absorption and metabolism in rat.

    PubMed

    Wu, Lili; Zhong, Wanping; Liu, Junjin; Han, Weichao; Zhong, Shilong; Wei, Qiang; Liu, Shuwen; Tang, Lan

    2015-09-01

    Oxysophocarpine (OSC), an active and toxic quinolizidine alkaloid, is highly valued in Sophora flavescens Ait. and Subprostrate sophora Root. OSC is used to treat inflammation and hepatitis for thousands of years in China. This study aims to investigate the CYP450-mediated reduction responsible for metabolizing OSC and to evaluate the absorption and metabolism of OSC in rat in situ. Four metabolites were identified, with sophocarpine (SC) as the major metabolite. SC formation was rapid in human and rat liver microsomes (HLMs and RLMs, respectively). The reduction rates in the liver are two fold higher than in the intestine, both in humans and rats. In HLMs, inhibitors of CYP2C9, 3A4/5, 2D6, and 2B6 had strong inhibitory effects on SC formation. Meanwhile, inhibitors of CYP3A and CYP2D6 had significant inhibition on SC formation in RLMs. Human recombinant CYP3A4/5, 2B6, 2D6, and 2C9 contributed significantly to SC production. The permeability in rat intestine and the excretion rates of metabolites were highest in the duodenum (p<0.05), and the absorbed amount of OSC in duodenum and jejunum was concentration-dependent. The metabolism could be significantly decreased by CYP3A inhibitor ketoconazole. In conclusion, the liver was the main organ responsible for OSC metabolism. First-pass metabolism via CYP3A4/5, 2B6, 2D6, and 2C9 may be the main reason for the poor OSC bioavailability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Spatial Distribution of the Metabolically Active Microbiota within Italian PDO Ewes' Milk Cheeses

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Ilaria; Di Cagno, Raffaella; Buchin, Solange; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Italian PDO (Protected Designation of Origin) Fiore Sardo (FS), Pecorino Siciliano (PS) and Pecorino Toscano (PT) ewes’ milk cheeses were chosen as hard cheese model systems to investigate the spatial distribution of the metabolically active microbiota and the related effects on proteolysis and synthesis of volatile components (VOC). Cheese slices were divided in nine sub-blocks, each one separately subjected to analysis and compared to whole cheese slice (control). Gradients for moisture, and concentrations of salt, fat and protein distinguished sub-blocks, while the cell density of the main microbial groups did not differ. Secondary proteolysis differed between sub-blocks of each cheese, especially when the number and area of hydrophilic and hydrophobic peptide peaks were assessed. The concentration of free amino acids (FAA) agreed with these data. As determined through Purge and Trap (PT) coupled with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (PT-GC/MS), and regardless of the cheese variety, the profile with the lowest level of VOC was restricted to the region identified by the letter E defined as core. As shown through pyrosequencing of the 16S rRNA targeting RNA, the spatial distribution of the metabolically active microbiota agreed with the VOC distribution. Differences were highlighted between core and the rest of the cheese. Top and bottom under rind sub-blocks of all three cheeses harbored the widest biodiversity. The cheese sub-block analysis revealed the presence of a microbiota statistically correlated with secondary proteolysis events and/or synthesis of VOC. PMID:27073835

  14. Turpentine oil induced inflammation decreases absorption and increases distribution of phenacetin without altering its elimination process in rats.

    PubMed

    Prasad, V G N V; Vivek, Ch; Anand Kumar, P; Ravi Kumar, P; Rao, G S

    2015-03-01

    Plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetics of phenacetin, a CYP1A2 substrate were determined in normal and experimentally induced inflamed rats by turpentine oil to know the role of inflammation on the pharmacokinetics of phenacetin and formation of its active metabolite (paracetamol) by CYP1A2 in wistar albino rats, weighing about 200-250 g that were randomly divided into two groups consisting six in each group. Rats in group I (control) received phenacetin (150 mg kg(-1), PO) where as group II received phenacetin 12 h after induction of inflammation by turpentine oil (0.4 mL, i.m). Blood samples were collected from retro orbital plexus at pre-determined time intervals prior to and at 0.166, 0.33, 0.67, 1.5, 2, 4, 8 and 12 h post-administration of phenacetin. Plasma was separated and analyzed for phenacetin and its metabolite paracetamol by HPLC assay. Based on plasma concentrations of phenacetin and its metabolite paracetamol, the pharmacokinetic parameters were determined by compartmental methods. C(max) of phenacetin was significantly (p < 0.01) decreased to 19.50 ± 2.74 μg mL(-1) in inflamed conditions compared to 38.13 ± 2.20 μg mL(-1) obtained in normal rats. Except, for significant (p < 0.001) increase in volume of distribution at steady state (V(dss)) from 2.87 ± 0.37 to 8.03 ± 1.26 L kg(-1) and increased the rate of absorption with shorter absorption half-life (t(1/2ka)) for phenacetin in inflammation. None of the pharmacokinetic parameters of either phenacetin or its metabolite paracetamol were affected. It can be concluded that turpentine oil induced inflammation has no role on the activity of CYP1A2 in rats, as the plasma concentrations and pharmacokinetic parameters of paracetamol were found unaltered.

  15. Intramolecular stable isotope distributions detect plant metabolic responses on century time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleucher, Jürgen; Ehlers, Ina; Augusti, Angela; Betson, Tatiana

    2014-05-01

    Plants respond to environmental changes on a vast range of time scales, and plant gas exchanges constitute important feedback mechanisms in the global C cycle. Responses on time scales of decades to centuries are most important for climate models, for prediction of crop productivity, and for adaptation to climate change. Unfortunately, responses on these timescale are least understood. We argue that the knowledge gap on intermediate time scales is due to a lack of adequate methods that can bridge between short-term manipulative experiments (e.g. FACE) and paleo research. Manipulative experiments in plant ecophysiology give information on metabolism on time scales up to years. However, this information cannot be linked to results from retrospective studies in paleo research, because little metabolic information can be derived from paleo archives. Stable isotopes are prominent tools in plant ecophysiology, biogeochemistry and in paleo research, but in all applications to date, isotope ratios of whole molecules are measured. However, it is well established that stable isotope abundance varies among intramolecular groups of biochemical metabolites, that is each so-called "isotopomer" has a distinct abundance. This intramolecular variation carries information on metabolic regulation, which can even be traced to individual enzymes (Schleucher et al., Plant, Cell Environ 1999). Here, we apply intramolecular isotope distributions to study the metabolic response of plants to increasing atmospheric [CO2] during the past century. Greenhouse experiments show that the deuterium abundance among the two positions in the C6H2 group of photosynthetic glucose depends on [CO2] during growth. This is observed for all plants using C3 photosynthesis, and reflects the metabolic flux ratio between photorespiration and photosynthesis. Photorespiration is a major C flux that limits assimilation in C3 plants, which encompass the overwhelming fraction of terrestrial photosynthesis and the

  16. Spatio-temporal Model of Xenobiotic Distribution and Metabolism in an in Silico Mouse Liver Lobule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiao; Sluka, James; Clendenon, Sherry; Glazier, James; Ryan, Jennifer; Dunn, Kenneth; Wang, Zemin; Klaunig, James

    Our study aims to construct a structurally plausible in silico model of a mouse liver lobule to simulate the transport of xenobiotics and the production of their metabolites. We use a physiologically-based model to calculate blood-flow rates in a network of mouse liver sinusoids and simulate transport, uptake and biotransformation of xenobiotics within the in silico lobule. Using our base model, we then explore the effects of variations of compound-specific (diffusion, transport and metabolism) and compound-independent (temporal alteration of blood flow pattern) parameters, and examine their influence on the distribution of xenobiotics and metabolites. Our simulations show that the transport mechanism (diffusive and transporter-mediated) of xenobiotics and blood flow both impact the regional distribution of xenobiotics in a mouse hepatic lobule. Furthermore, differential expression of metabolic enzymes along each sinusoid's portal to central axis, together with differential cellular availability of xenobiotics, induce non-uniform production of metabolites. Thus, the heterogeneity of the biochemical and biophysical properties of xenobiotics, along with the complexity of blood flow, result in different exposures to xenobiotics for hepatocytes at different lobular locations. We acknowledge support from National Institute of Health GM 077138 and GM 111243.

  17. Effects of hyperglycemia and effects of ketosis on cerebral perfusion, cerebral water distribution, and cerebral metabolism.

    PubMed

    Glaser, Nicole; Ngo, Catherine; Anderson, Steven; Yuen, Natalie; Trifu, Alexandra; O'Donnell, Martha

    2012-07-01

    Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) may cause brain injuries in children. The mechanisms responsible are difficult to elucidate because DKA involves multiple metabolic derangements. We aimed to determine the independent effects of hyperglycemia and ketosis on cerebral metabolism, blood flow, and water distribution. We used magnetic resonance spectroscopy to measure ratios of cerebral metabolites (ATP to inorganic phosphate [Pi], phosphocreatine [PCr] to Pi, N-acetyl aspartate [NAA] to creatine [Cr], and lactate to Cr) and diffusion-weighted imaging and perfusion-weighted imaging to assess cerebral water distribution (apparent diffusion coefficient [ADC] values) and cerebral blood flow (CBF) in three groups of juvenile rats (hyperglycemic, ketotic, and normal control). ATP-to-Pi ratio was reduced in both hyperglycemic and ketotic rats in comparison with controls. PCr-to-Pi ratio was reduced in the ketotic group, and there was a trend toward reduction in the hyperglycemic group. No significant differences were observed in NAA-to-Cr or lactate-to-Cr ratio. Cortical ADC was reduced in both groups (indicating brain cell swelling). Cortical CBF was also reduced in both groups. We conclude that both hyperglycemia and ketosis independently cause reductions in cerebral high-energy phosphates, CBF, and cortical ADC values. These effects may play a role in the pathophysiology of DKA-related brain injury.

  18. PM2.5-bound metal metabolic distribution and coupled lipid abnormality at different developmental windows.

    PubMed

    Ku, Tingting; Zhang, Yingying; Ji, Xiaotong; Li, Guangke; Sang, Nan

    2017-09-01

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter (PM 2.5 ) is a serious threat to human health. As a toxicant constituent, metal leads to significant health risks in a population, but exposure to PM 2.5 -bound metals and their biological impacts are not fully understood. In this study, we determined the metal contents of PM 2.5 samples collected from a typical coal-burning city and then investigated the metabolic distributions of six metals (Zn, Pb, Mn, As, Cu, and Cd) following PM 2.5 inhalation in mice in different developmental windows. The results indicate that fine particles were mainly deposited in the lung, but PM 2.5 -bound metals could reach and gather in secondary off-target tissues (the lung, liver, heart and brain) with a developmental window-dependent property. Furthermore, elevations in triglycerides and cholesterol levels in sensitive developmental windows (the young and elderly stages) occurred, and significant associations between metals (Pb, Mn, As and Cd) and cholesterol in the heart, brain, liver and lung were observed. These findings suggest that PM 2.5 inhalation caused selective metal metabolic distribution in tissues with a developmental window-dependent property and that the effects were associated with lipid alterations. This provides a foundation for the underlying systemic toxicity following PM 2.5 exposure based on metal components. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Absorption, Distribution, and Excretion of 14C-APX001 after Single-Dose Administration to Rats and Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mansbach, Robert; Shaw, Karen J; Hodges, Michael R; Coleman, Samantha; Fitzsimmons, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background APX001 is a small-molecule therapeutic agent in clinical development for the treatment of invasive fungal infections (IFI). Methods The absorption, distribution and excretion profiles of [14C]APX001-derived radioactivity were determined in rats (albino and pigmented) and monkeys. Rats (some implanted with bile duct cannulae) were administered a single 100 mg/kg oral dose or a 30 mg/kg intravenous (IV) dose. Monkeys were administered a single 6 mg/kg IV dose. Samples of blood, urine, feces and bile, as well as carcasses, were collected through 168 hours after dosing. Samples were analyzed for total radioactivity content by liquid scintillation counting, and carcasses were analyzed by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. Results [14C]APX001-derived radioactivity was rapidly and extensively absorbed and extensively distributed to most tissues for both routes of administration in both species. In rats, tissues with the highest radioactivity Cmax values included bile, abdominal fat, reproductive fat, subcutaneous fat, and liver, but radioactivity was also detected in tissues associated with IFI, including lung, brain and eye. In monkeys, the highest Cmax values were in bile, urine, uveal tract, bone marrow, abdominal fat, liver, and kidney cortex. Liver and kidney were the tissues with highest radioactivity, but as in the rat, radioactivity was also detected in lung, brain and eye tissues. In pigmented rats, radiocarbon was densely distributed into pigmented tissue and more slowly cleared than from other tissues. Mean recovery of radioactivity in rats was approximately 95–100%. In bile duct-intact rats, >90% of radioactivity was recovered in feces. In cannulated rats, biliary excretion of radioactivity was the major route of elimination and accounted for 88.8% of the dose, whereas urinary and fecal excretion of radioactivity was minor and accounted for 2.56% and 5.42% of the dose, respectively. In monkeys, the overall recovery of radioactivity

  20. Determination of absorption changes from moments of distributions of times of flight of photons: optimization of measurement conditions for a two-layered tissue model.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Adam; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Elster, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy allows for depth-selective determination of absorption changes in the adult human head that facilitates separation between cerebral and extra-cerebral responses to brain activation. The aim of the present work is to analyze which combinations of moments of measured distributions of times of flight (DTOF) of photons and source-detector separations are optimal for the reconstruction of absorption changes in a two-layered tissue model corresponding to extra- and intra-cerebral compartments. To this end we calculated the standard deviations of the derived absorption changes in both layers by considering photon noise and a linear relation between the absorption changes and the DTOF moments. The results show that the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper (superficial) layer increases (decreases) with the thickness of the superficial layer. It is confirmed that for the deeper layer the use of higher moments, in particular the variance of the DTOF, leads to an improvement. For example, when measurements at four different source-detector separations between 8 and 35 mm are available and a realistic thickness of the upper layer of 12 mm is assumed, the inclusion of the change in mean time of flight, in addition to the change in attenuation, leads to a reduction of the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper tissue layer by a factor of 2.5. A reduction by another 4% can be achieved by additionally including the change in variance.

  1. Importance of the regiospecific distribution of long-chain saturated fatty acids on gut comfort, fat and calcium absorption in infants.

    PubMed

    Petit, Valérie; Sandoz, Laurence; Garcia-Rodenas, Clara L

    2017-06-01

    Gastrointestinal tolerance and fat and calcium (Ca) absorption are different between breast-fed (BF) and formula-fed (FF) infants. Certain components and/or structural particularities in human milk (HM), can contribute to favorable outcomes in BF infants. In HM, the long-chain saturated fatty acid (LCSFA) palmitic acid has a different stereospecific distribution (sn-2 position) compared to most infant formula (IF) (primarily sn-1, 3 positions), which may contribute to unfavorable outcomes. Evidence suggests palmitic acid is important in the formation of stool FA-mineral (or FA-Ca) soaps, associated with harder stools in FF infants. Partial replacement by structured palmitic acid-rich triacylglycerols (TAGs) promotes palmitic acid absorption. However, evidence for stool softening, improved fat absorption and reduced Ca excretion in stools is inconsistent. IFs with less palmitic acid can improve fat and Ca absorption, and stool consistency. The presence of other LCSFAs (myristic and stearic acids) in sn-1, 3 positions may also contribute to reduced absorption of fat and Ca, and stool hardness, in FF infants. Nevertheless, little attention has been given to modifying these other LCSFAs in IF. We review literature comparing the effect of HM and IF with different lipid compositions on stool patterns and/or fat and Ca absorption in healthy, term infants. Based on available data, we estimate a maximum level for sn-1, 3 LCSFAs of 13% of TAGs, under which fat and Ca absorption and stool consistency are improved. IF designed according to this threshold could efficiently improve nutrient absorption and stool patterns in healthy infants who cannot be breast-fed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Human Vitamin B12 Absorption and Metabolism are Measured by Accelerator Mass Spectrometry Using Specifically Labeled 14C-Cobalamin

    SciTech Connect

    Carkeet, C; Dueker, S R; Lango, J

    2006-01-26

    There is need for an improved test of human ability to assimilate dietary vitamin B{sub 12}. Assaying and understanding absorption and uptake of B{sub 12} is important because defects can lead to hematological and neurological complications. Accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) is uniquely suited for assessing absorption and kinetics of {sup 14}C-labeled substances after oral ingestion because it is more sensitive than decay counting and can measure levels of carbon-14 ({sup 14}C) in microliter volumes of biological samples, with negligible exposure of subjects to radioactivity. The test we describe employs amounts of B{sub 12} in the range of normal dietary intake.more » The B{sub 12} used was quantitatively labeled with {sup 14}C at one particular atom of the DMB moiety by exploiting idiosyncrasies of Salmonellametabolism. In order to grow aerobically on ethanolamine, S. entericamust be provided with either pre-formed B{sub 12} or two of its precursors: cobinamide and dimethylbenzimidazole (DMB). When provided with {sup 14}C-DMB specifically labeled in the C2 position, cells produced {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} of high specific activity (2.1 GBq/mmol, 58 mCi/mmol) and no detectable dilution of label from endogenous DMB synthesis. In a human kinetic study, a physiological dose (1.5 mg, 2.2 KBq/59 nCi) of purified {sup 14}C-B{sub 12} was administered and showed plasma appearance and clearance curves consistent with the predicted behavior of the pure vitamin. This method opens new avenues for study of B{sub 12} assimilation.« less

  3. Enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser integrated with an electro-absorption modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Chun-Hyung; Kim, Jongseong; Sung, Hyuk-Kee

    2016-09-01

    We report on the enhancement of the static extinction ratio by using a dual-section distributed feedback laser diode integrated with an electro-absorption modulator. A directly- modulated dual-section laser can provide improved modulation performance under a low bias level ( i.e., below the threshold level) compared with a standard directly-modulated laser. By combining the extinction ratio from a dual-section laser with that from an electro-absorption modulator section, a total extinction ratio of 49.6. dB are successfully achieved.

  4. Association of erythrocyte deformability with red blood cell distribution width in metabolic diseases and thalassemia trait.

    PubMed

    Vayá, Amparo; Alis, Rafael; Suescún, Marta; Rivera, Leonor; Murado, Julian; Romagnoli, Marco; Solá, Eva; Hernandez-Mijares, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Increased red blood distribution width (RDW) in anemia is related to disturbances in the cellular surface/volume ratio, usually accompanied by morphological alterations, while it has been shown in inflammatory diseases that the activity of pro-inflammatory cytokines disturbing erythropoiesis increases RDW. Recently it has been reported that higher RDW is related with decreased erythrocyte deformability, and that it could be related with the association of RDW and increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. In order to analyze the influence of morphological alterations and proinflammatory status on the relationship between RDW and erythrocyte deformability, we analyzed erythrocyte deformability along with RDW and other hematological and biochemical parameters in 36 α-thalassemia, 20 β-thalassemia, 20 δβ-thalassemia trait carriers, 61 metabolic syndrome patients and 76 morbidly obese patients. RDW correlated inversely with erythrocyte deformability in minor β-thalassemia (r =-0.530, p <  0.05), and directly in both metabolic syndrome and morbidly obese patients (ρ= 0.270, p <  0.05 and ρ= 0.258, p <  0.05, respectively). Minor β-thalassemia is often accompanied by more marked cell-shaped perturbations than other thalassemia traits. This could be the reason for this negative association only in this setting. Higher anisocytosis seems to be associated with greater morphologic alterations (shape/volume), which reduce erythrocyte deformability. The proinflammatory profile in metabolic patients can be related to the positive association of RDW with erythrocyte deformability found in these patients. However, further research is needed to explain the mechanisms underlying this association.

  5. Pharmacokinetics, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of the dual reuptake inhibitor [(14)C]-nefopam in rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Solon, Eric; Shen, Helen; Modi, Nishit B; Mittur, Aravind

    2016-11-01

    1. This study examined the pharmacokinetics, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of [(14)C] nefopam in rats after a single oral administration. Blood, plasma, and excreta were analyzed for total radioactivity, nefopam, and metabolites. Metabolites were profiled and identified. Radioactivity distribution was determined by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. 2. The pharmacokinetic profiles of total radioactivity and nefopam were similar in male and female rats. Radioactivity partitioned approximately equally between plasma and red blood cells. A majority of the radioactivity was excreted in urine within 24 hours and mass balance was achieved within 7 days. 3. Intact nefopam was a minor component in plasma and excreta. Numerous metabolites were identified in plasma and urine generated by multiple pathways including: hydroxylation/oxidation metabolites (M11, M22a and M22b, M16, M20), some of which were further glucuronidated (M6a to M6c, M7a to M7c, M8a and M8b, M3a to M3d); N-demethylation of nefopam to metabolite M21, which additionally undergoes single or multiple hydroxylations or sulfation (M9, M14, M23), with some of the hydroxylated metabolites further glucuronidated (M2a to M2d). 4. Total radioactivity rapidly distributed with highest concentrations found in the urinary bladder, stomach, liver, kidney medulla, small intestine, uveal tract, and kidney cortex without significant accumulation or persistence. Radioactivity reversibly associated with melanin-containing tissues.

  6. Distribution, Metabolism and Toxic Effects of Beta-Cypermethrin in Lizards (Eremias argus) Following Oral Administration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Xu, Peng; Diao, Jinling; Di, Shanshan; Li, Ruiting; Zhou, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-05

    Beta-cypermethrin (BCYP), a synthetic pyrethriod (PYR) pesticide which is a mixture of the alpha- and theta- cypermethrin, have been reported various toxicological profiles to non-target organisms. But little is known about assimilation, accumulation and toxic effects of BCYP in reptiles. The present study firstly elucidated absorption, tissue distribution, excretion of BCYP in Eremias argus . Treated group were administered orally with BCYP 20mg/kg body weight (bw) dissolved in corn oil. Neurotoxicity was observed at 24h after gavage, and the poisoning symptom ameliorated at 72h. The changes of BCYP concentration depended on degradation time and tissues. Lizards had a strong capacity to eliminate BCYP with different tissue distribution. The tissues concentration of BCYP from high to low were intestine, stomach, heart, kidney, blood, lung, liver and brain. Bimodal phenomena were observed in lung, liver and kidney. These results may be due to the activities of enzymes, circadian rhythm, and enterohepatic circulation in lizards. Based on the results of organ coefficient and histopathology analysis in liver, the liver was confirmed as the main target organ. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Enabling the Distributed Generation Market of High Temperature Fuel Cell and Absorption Chiller Systems to Support Critical and Commercial Loads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiMola, Ashley M.

    Buildings account for over 18% of the world's anthropogenic Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions. As a result, a technology that can offset GHG emissions associated with buildings has the potential to save over 9 Giga-tons of GHG emissions per year. High temperature fuel cell and absorption chiller (HTFC/AC) technology offers a relatively low-carbon option for meeting cooling and electric loads for buildings while producing almost no criteria pollutants. GHG emissions in the state of California would decrease by 7.48 million metric tons per year if every commercial building in the State used HTFC/AC technology to meet its power and cooling requirements. In order to realize the benefits of HTFC/AC technology on a wide scale, the distributed generation market needs to be exposed to the technology and informed of its economic viability and real-world potential. This work characterizes the economics associated with HTFC/AC technology using select scenarios that are representative of realistic applications. The financial impacts of various input factors are evaluated and the HTFC/AC simulations are compared to the economics of traditional building utilities. It is shown that, in addition to the emissions reductions derived from the systems, HTFC/AC technology is financially preferable in all of the scenarios evaluated. This work also presents the design of a showcase environment, centered on a beta-test application, that presents (1) system operating data gathered using a custom data acquisition module, and (2) HTFC/AC technology in a clear and approachable manner in order to serve the target audience of market stakeholders.

  8. Pharmacokinetics and metabolism of radiolabelled SNI-2011, a novel muscarinic receptor agonist, in healthy volunteers. Comprehensive understanding of absorption, metabolism and excretion using radiolabelled SNI-2011.

    PubMed

    Washio, Takuo; Kohsaka, Kazuhiro; Arisawa, Hirohiko; Masunaga, Hiroaki; Nagatsuka, Shin-ichiro; Satoh, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of SNI-2011 ((+/-)-cis-2-methylspiro[1,3-oxathiolane-5,3'-quinuclidine]monohydrochloride hemihydrate, cevimeline, CAS 153504-70-2), a novel muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist developed for the treatment of Sjögen's syndrome, were investigated in six healthy volunteers after a single oral administration of 14C-SNI-2011. After administration, plasma concentrations of the radioactivity and SNI-2011 reached to Cmax at approximately 2 h, and then decreased with t 1/2 of 9 and 4 h, respectively. Cmax and AUC0-infinity of the radioactivity in plasma were 2.2 and 5.0 times higher than those of SNI-2011, respectively. The main excretion route of the radioactivity was urine, and 97.3% of the dose excreted in urine within 168 h, indicating that 14C-SNI-2011 was completely absorbed. The mean recoveries of the metabolites in urine at 24 h after administration were 16.0% for SNI-2011, 35.8% for SNI-2011 trans-sulfoxide (SNI-t-SO), 8.7% for SNI-2011 cis-sulfoxide, 4.1% for SNI-2011 N-oxide, furthermore, two unknown metabolites, UK-1 and UK-2, were detected 14.6% and 7.7%, respectively. LC/MS analysis and hydrolysis studies revealed that UK-1 and UK-2 were glucuronic acid conjugates of SNI-2011 and SNI-t-SO, respectively.

  9. Genotypic distribution of a specialist model microorganism, Methanosaeta, along an estuarine gradient: does metabolic restriction limit niche differentiation potential?

    PubMed

    Carbonero, Franck; Oakley, Brian B; Hawkins, Robert J; Purdy, Kevin J

    2012-05-01

    A reductionist ecological approach of using a model genus was adopted in order to understand how microbial community structure is driven by metabolic properties. The distribution along an estuarine gradient of the highly specialised genus Methanosaeta was investigated and compared to the previously determined distribution of the more metabolically flexible Desulfobulbus. Methanosaeta genotypic distribution along the Colne estuary (Essex, UK) was determined by DNA- and RNA-based denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and 16S rRNA gene sequence analyses. Methanosaeta distribution was monotonic, with a consistently diverse community and no apparent niche partitioning either in DNA or RNA analyses. This distribution pattern contrasts markedly with the previously described niche partitioning and sympatric differentiation of the model generalist, Desulfobulbus. To explain this difference, it is hypothesised that Methanosaeta's strict metabolic needs limit its adaptation potential, thus populations do not partition into spatially distinct groups and so do not appear to be constrained by gross environmental factors such as salinity. Thus, at least for these two model genera, it appears that metabolic flexibility may be an important factor in spatial distribution and this may be applicable to other microbes.

  10. Effects of dietary supplementation of arginine-silicate-inositol complex on absorption and metabolism of calcium of laying hens

    PubMed Central

    Orhan, Cemal; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Hayirli, Armagan; Komorowski, James R.; Sahin, Nurhan

    2018-01-01

    The effects of supplementation of arginine-silicate-inositol complex (ASI; 49.5–8.2–25 g/kg, respectively) to laying hens were investigated with respect to eggshell quality, calcium (Ca) balance, and expression of duodenal proteins related to Ca metabolism (calbindin and tight junction proteins). A total of 360 laying hens, 25 weeks old, were divided into 3 groups consisting of 6 replicate of cages, 20 birds per cage. The groups were fed a basal diet and the basal diet supplemented with 500 or 1000 mg ASI complex per kilogram for 90 days. Data were analyzed by ANCOVA using data during the first week of the adaptation period as covariates. As the ASI complex supplementation level increased, there were increases in feed intake (P < 0.0001), egg production (P < 0.001), egg weight (P < 0.0001) and eggshell weight (P < 0.001) weight, and shell thickness (P < 0.001) and decreases in feed conversion ratio and cracked egg percentage (P < 0.0001 for both). Concentrations of serum osteocalcin (P < 0.0001), vitamin D (P < 0.0001), calcium (P < 0.001), phosphorus (P < 0.001), and alkaline phosphatase (P < 0.008) as well as amounts of calcium retention (P < 0.0001) and eggshell calcium deposition (P < 0.001), and Ca balance (P < 0.0001) increased, whereas amount of calcium excretion (P < 0.001) decreased linearly in a dose-dependent manner. The ASI complex supplementation increased expressions of calcium transporters (calbindin-D28k, N sodium-calcium exchanger, plasma membrane calcium ATPase, and vitamin D receptor) and tight junction proteins (zonula occludens-1 and occludin) in the duodenum in a linear fashion (P < 0.0001 for all). In conclusion, provision of dietary ASI complex to laying hens during the peak laying period improved eggshell quality through improving calcium utilization as reflected by upregulation of genes related to the calcium metabolism. Further studies are needed to elucidate the contribution of each of the ASI complex ingredients. PMID:29360830

  11. Measurements of axisymmetric temperature and H2O concentration distributions on a circular flat flame burner based on tunable diode laser absorption tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Huihui; Kan, Ruifeng; Xu, Zhenyu; Liu, Jianguo; He, Yabai; Yang, Chenguang; Chen, Bing; Wei, Min; Yao, Lu; Zhang, Guangle

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the reconstruction of axisymmetric temperature and H2O concentration distributions in a flat flame burner is realized by tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and filtered back-projection (FBP) algorithm. Two H2O absorption transitions (7154.354/7154.353 cm-1 and 7467.769 cm-1) are selected as line pair for temperature measurement, and time division multiplexing technology is adopted to scan this two H2O absorption transitions simultaneously at 1 kHz repetition rate. In the experiment, FBP algorithm can be used for reconstructing axisymmetric distributions of flow field parameters with only single view parallel-beam TDLAS measurements, and the same data sets from the given parallel beam are used for other virtual projection angles and beams scattered between 0° and 180°. The real-time online measurements of projection data, i.e., integrated absorbance both for pre-selected transitions on CH4/air flat flame burner are realized by Voigt on-line fitting, and the fitting residuals are less than 0.2%. By analyzing the projection data from different views based on FBP algorithm, the distributions of temperature and concentration along radial direction can be known instantly. The results demonstrate that the system and the proposed innovative FBP algorithm are capable for accurate reconstruction of axisymmetric temperature and H2O concentration distribution in combustion systems and facilities.

  12. Effects of self-absorption on simultaneous estimation of temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames using a spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guannan; Liu, Dong

    2018-06-01

    An improved inverse reconstruction model with consideration of self-absorption effect for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in nanofluid fuel flames was proposed based on the flame emission spectrometry. The effects of self-absorption on the temperature profile and concentration fields were investigated for various measurement errors, flame optical thicknesses and detecting lines numbers. The model neglecting the self-absorption caused serious reconstruction errors especially in the nanofluid fuel flames with large optical thicknesses, while the improved model was used to successfully recover the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the flames regardless of the optical thickness. Through increasing detecting lines number, the reconstruction accuracy can be greatly improved due to more flame emission information received by the spectrometer. With the adequate detecting lines number, the estimations for the temperature distribution and concentration fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles in flames with large optical thicknesses were still satisfying even from the noisy radiation intensities with signal to noise ratio (SNR) as low as 46 dB. The results showed that the improved reconstruction model was effective and robust to concurrently retrieve the temperature distribution and volume fraction fields of soot and metal-oxide nanoparticles for the exact and noisy data in nanofluid fuel sooting flames with different optical thicknesses.

  13. A three-color absorption/scattering imaging technique for simultaneous measurements on distributions of temperature and fuel concentration in a spray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Wenyuan; Zhang, Yuyin

    2018-04-01

    A three-color imaging technique was proposed for simultaneous measurements on distributions of fuel/air mixture temperature and fuel vapor/liquid concentrations in evaporating sprays. The idea is based on that the vapor concentration is proportional to the absorption of vapor to UV light, the liquid-phase concentration is related to the light extinction due to scattering of droplet to visible light, and the mixture temperature can be correlated to the absorbance ratio at two absorbing wavelengths or narrow bands. For verifying the imaging system, the molar absorption coefficients of p-xylene at the three narrow bands, which were centered respectively at 265, 289, and 532 nm with FWHM of 10 nm, were measured in a specially designed calibration chamber at different temperatures (423-606 K) and pressure of 3.6 bar. It was found that the ratio of the molar absorption coefficients of p-xylene at the two narrow bands centered at the two UV wavelengths is sensitive to the mixture temperature. On the other hand, the distributions of fuel vapor/liquid concentrations can be obtained by use of absorbance due to ultraviolet absorption of vapor and visible light scattering of droplets. Combining these two methods, a simultaneous measurement on distributions of mixture temperature and fuel vapor/liquid concentrations can be realized. In addition, the temperature field obtained from the ratio of the two absorbing narrow bands can be further used to improve the measurement accuracy of vapor/liquid concentrations, because the absorption coefficients depend on temperature. This diagnostic was applied to an evaporating spray inside a high-temperature and high-pressure constant volume chamber.

  14. Absorption and metabolization of sex hormones and their transformation into contraceptive technologies: the paths taken by medical thought in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Bonan, Claudia; Teixeira, Luiz Antonio; Nakano, Andreza Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    The article analyses knowledge assimilation and the development of clinical and research practices relating to sex hormones among Brazilian gynaecologists. It discusses the paths taken by medical thought from the reception of the hormones to their transformation into contraceptives. Our objective is to comprehend styles of introducing and disseminating medical technologies in the area of reproductive health in Brazil. It uses methods of historical analysis and takes as its source the Anais Brasileiros de Ginecologia, a journal published between 1936 and 1970. From the outset, the accompaniment of scientific breakthroughs in relation to sex hormones and their use to treat diverse female illnesses played a key role in the rapid medical acceptance of hormonal contraception. Scientific and technical questions (side effects, dosages) and the demographic issue formed part of the majority of the debates. Objections from the Catholic Church were considered but did not set the agenda of medical thought on contraceptives. The quest to consolidate gynaecology as a scientific, modern and cosmopolitan area of expertise, along with sanitary and demographic motives that allowed contraceptives to be classed as ethical drugs, are identified as processes underlying the assimilation and metabolization of sex hormones as hormonal contraceptives.

  15. Fluoride metabolism.

    PubMed

    Buzalaf, Marília Afonso Rabelo; Whitford, Gary Milton

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of all aspects of fluoride metabolism is essential for comprehending the biological effects of this ion in humans as well as to drive the prevention (and treatment) of fluoride toxicity. Several aspects of fluoride metabolism - including gastric absorption, distribution and renal excretion - are pH-dependent because the coefficient of permeability of lipid bilayer membranes to hydrogen fluoride (HF) is 1 million times higher than that of F(-). This means that fluoride readily crosses cell membranes as HF, in response to a pH gradient between adjacent body fluid compartments. After ingestion, plasma fluoride levels increase rapidly due to the rapid absorption from the stomach, an event that is pH-dependent and distinguishes fluoride from other halogens and most other substances. The majority of fluoride not absorbed from the stomach will be absorbed from the small intestine. In this case, absorption is not pH-dependent. Fluoride not absorbed will be excreted in feces. Peak plasma fluoride concentrations are reached within 20-60 min following ingestion. The levels start declining thereafter due to two main reasons: uptake in calcified tissues and excretion in urine. Plasma fluoride levels are not homeostatically regulated and vary according to the levels of intake, deposition in hard tissues and excretion of fluoride. Many factors can modify the metabolism and effects of fluoride in the organism, such as chronic and acute acid-base disturbances, hematocrit, altitude, physical activity, circadian rhythm and hormones, nutritional status, diet, and genetic predisposition. These will be discussed in detail in this review. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. [Influence of microtubule depolymerization of myocardial cells on mitochondria distribution and energy metabolism in adult rats].

    PubMed

    Dang, Yong-ming; Fang, Ya-dong; Hu, Jiong-yu; Zhang, Jia-ping; Song, Hua-pei; Zhang, Yi-ming; Zhang, Qiong; Huang, Yue-sheng

    2010-02-01

    To investigate the influence of microtubule depolymerization of myocardial cells on distribution and activity of mitochondria, and energy metabolism of cells in adult rats. Myocardial cells of SD adult rats and SD suckling rats were isolated and cultured. They were divided into adult and suckling rats control groups (AC and SC, normally cultured without any stimulating factor), adult and suckling rats microtubule depolymerization agent groups (AMDA and SMDA, cultured with 8 micromol/L colchicine containing nutrient solution for 30 minutes) according to the random number table. (1) The expression of polymerized beta tubulin in myocardial cells of adult and suckling rats was detected with Western blot. (2) Myocardial cells of rats in AC and AMDA groups were collected. The expression of cytochrome c was detected with Western blot. Distribution of voltage-dependent anion channels (VDAC) and polymerized beta tubulin in myocardial cells were observed with immunofluorescent staining. Mitochondrial inner membrane potential was determined with immunocytochemical method. Activity of myocardial cells was detected with MTT method. Contents of ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and adenosine monophosphate (AMP) and energy charge of cells were determined with high performance liquid chromatography. (1) The expression of polymerized beta tubulin:in AMDA group it was 0.52 + or - 0.07, which was obviously lower than that (1.25 + or - 0.12) in AC group (F = 31.002, P = 0.000); in SMDA group it was 0.76 + or - 0.12, which was significantly lower than that (1.11 + or - 0.24) in SC group (F = 31.002, P = 0.000), but was obviously higher than that in AMDA group (F = 31.002, P = 0.009). (2) The expression of cytochrome c in AC group was 0.26 + or - 0.03, which was obviously lower than that (1.55 + or - 0.13) in AMDA group (t = -24.056, P = 0.000). (3) Immunofluorescent staining result: in AC group, microtubules of myocardial cells were in linear tubiform, distributed in parallel with

  17. Distribution, Community Composition, and Potential Metabolic Activity of Bacterioplankton in an Urbanized Mediterranean Sea Coastal Zone.

    PubMed

    Richa, Kumari; Balestra, Cecilia; Piredda, Roberta; Benes, Vladimir; Borra, Marco; Passarelli, Augusto; Margiotta, Francesca; Saggiomo, Maria; Biffali, Elio; Sanges, Remo; Scanlan, David J; Casotti, Raffaella

    2017-09-01

    Bacterioplankton are fundamental components of marine ecosystems and influence the entire biosphere by contributing to the global biogeochemical cycles of key elements. Yet, there is a significant gap in knowledge about their diversity and specific activities, as well as environmental factors that shape their community composition and function. Here, the distribution and diversity of surface bacterioplankton along the coastline of the Gulf of Naples (GON; Italy) were investigated using flow cytometry coupled with high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Heterotrophic bacteria numerically dominated the bacterioplankton and comprised mainly Alphaproteobacteria , Gammaproteobacteria , and Bacteroidetes Distinct communities occupied river-influenced, coastal, and offshore sites, as indicated by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity, distance metric (UniFrac), linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe), and multivariate analyses. The heterogeneity in diversity and community composition was mainly due to salinity and changes in environmental conditions across sites, as defined by nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations. Bacterioplankton communities were composed of a few dominant taxa and a large proportion (92%) of rare taxa (here defined as operational taxonomic units [OTUs] accounting for <0.1% of the total sequence abundance), the majority of which were unique to each site. The relationship between 16S rRNA and the 16S rRNA gene, i.e., between potential metabolic activity and abundance, was positive for the whole community. However, analysis of individual OTUs revealed high rRNA-to-rRNA gene ratios for most (71.6% ± 16.7%) of the rare taxa, suggesting that these low-abundance organisms were potentially active and hence might be playing an important role in ecosystem diversity and functioning in the GON. IMPORTANCE The study of bacterioplankton in coastal zones is of critical importance, considering that these areas are highly productive and anthropogenically

  18. Distribution, Community Composition, and Potential Metabolic Activity of Bacterioplankton in an Urbanized Mediterranean Sea Coastal Zone

    PubMed Central

    Richa, Kumari; Balestra, Cecilia; Piredda, Roberta; Benes, Vladimir; Borra, Marco; Passarelli, Augusto; Margiotta, Francesca; Saggiomo, Maria; Biffali, Elio; Sanges, Remo; Scanlan, David J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacterioplankton are fundamental components of marine ecosystems and influence the entire biosphere by contributing to the global biogeochemical cycles of key elements. Yet, there is a significant gap in knowledge about their diversity and specific activities, as well as environmental factors that shape their community composition and function. Here, the distribution and diversity of surface bacterioplankton along the coastline of the Gulf of Naples (GON; Italy) were investigated using flow cytometry coupled with high-throughput sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene. Heterotrophic bacteria numerically dominated the bacterioplankton and comprised mainly Alphaproteobacteria, Gammaproteobacteria, and Bacteroidetes. Distinct communities occupied river-influenced, coastal, and offshore sites, as indicated by Bray-Curtis dissimilarity, distance metric (UniFrac), linear discriminant analysis effect size (LEfSe), and multivariate analyses. The heterogeneity in diversity and community composition was mainly due to salinity and changes in environmental conditions across sites, as defined by nutrient and chlorophyll a concentrations. Bacterioplankton communities were composed of a few dominant taxa and a large proportion (92%) of rare taxa (here defined as operational taxonomic units [OTUs] accounting for <0.1% of the total sequence abundance), the majority of which were unique to each site. The relationship between 16S rRNA and the 16S rRNA gene, i.e., between potential metabolic activity and abundance, was positive for the whole community. However, analysis of individual OTUs revealed high rRNA-to-rRNA gene ratios for most (71.6% ± 16.7%) of the rare taxa, suggesting that these low-abundance organisms were potentially active and hence might be playing an important role in ecosystem diversity and functioning in the GON. IMPORTANCE The study of bacterioplankton in coastal zones is of critical importance, considering that these areas are highly productive and

  19. In ovo uptake, metabolism, and tissue-specific distribution of chiral PCBs and PBDEs in developing chicken embryos

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zong-Rui; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Huang, Li-Qian; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-01-01

    Fertilized chicken eggs were injected with environmental doses of 4 chiral polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and 8 polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDEs) to investigate their uptake, metabolism in the embryo, and distribution in the neonate chicken. PCB95 uptake was the most efficient (80%) whereas BDE209 was the least (56%). Embryos metabolized approximately 52% of the PCBs absorbed. Though some degree of metabolism in the first 18 days, most of the PCBs and PBDEs was metabolized in the last three days, when BDE85, 99, 153, and 209 decrease by 11–37%. Enantioselective metabolism of the (+) enantiomers of PCB95, 149, and 132 and the (−) enantiomer of PCB91 was observed. The enantioselective reactivity was higher with the two penta-PCBs than the two tetra-PCBs. Liver, exhibited high affinity for high lipophilic chemicals, enrich all chemicals that was deflected in other tissues except for some special chemicals in a given tissues. Lipid composition, time of organ formation, and metabolism contribute to the distribution of chemicals in the neonate chicken. The result of this study will improve our understanding on the fate and potential adverse effects of PCBs and PBDEs in the neonate chicken. PMID:27819361

  20. A study of folate absorption and metabolism in man utilizing carbon-14—labeled polyglutamates synthesized by the solid phase method

    PubMed Central

    Butterworth, C. E.; Baugh, C. M.; Krumdieck, Carlos

    1969-01-01

    The absorption and metabolism of synthetic polyglutamates of folic acid have been compared with free pteroylglutamic acid in four subjects having chronic lymphatic leukemia and one with Hodgkin's granuloma. Pteroylpolyglutamates containing either three or seven glutamate residues were prepared by the solid-phase method permitting placement of carbon-14 labels in either the pteridine ring or in a selected glutamate unit of the gamma peptide chain. Complete dissociation was observed between biological folate activity and radioactivity of plasma after ingestion of pteroyltriglutamate labeled in the middle glutamate. This indicates cleavage to the monoglutamate form at the time of absorption from the intestine or very soon thereafter. A large portion of radioactivity liberated from the middle glutamate is recoverable as carbon dioxide in the exhaled air. Fecal losses of folate tended to be greater with increasing length of the poly-γ-glutamyl chain. Higher blood levels and greater urinary losses of folate tended to occur after ingestion of mono- and triglutamates than with the heptaglutamate. Calculations based on radioactivity determinations in feces plus urinary folate losses, judged by either radioactivity or microbiological assays, indicated net retention of 37-67% of the dose irrespective of chain length ingested and major avenue of loss. During the peak of absorption the folate circulating in plasma was active for both Streptococcus fecalis and Lactobacillus casei and carried specific radioactivity which was virtually identical with that of the administered dose. This suggests that neither methylation, conjugation, nor displacement of nonradioactive folate occurred to any significant extent during the 1st 2 hr. The specific radioactivity of 24-hr urine specimens as measured with L. casei corresponded closely with that of the administered dose. Evidence exists that methylation of the radioactive folate may occur, but significant displacement of nonradioactive

  1. Depth distribution of secondary phases in kesterite Cu 2ZnSnS 4 by angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Just, J.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, O.

    The depth distribution of secondary phases in the solar cell absorber material Cu 2ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) is quantitatively investigated using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis at the K-edge of sulfur at varying incidence angles. Varying information depths from several nanometers up to the full thickness is achieved. A quantitative profile of the phase distribution is obtained by a self-consistent fit of a multilayer model to the XANES spectra for different angles. Single step co-evaporated CZTS thin-films are found to exhibit zinc and copper sulfide secondary phases preferentially at the front or back interfaces of the film.

  2. Depth distribution of secondary phases in kesterite Cu 2ZnSnS 4 by angle-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Just, J.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Müller, O.; ...

    2017-12-12

    The depth distribution of secondary phases in the solar cell absorber material Cu 2ZnSnS 4 (CZTS) is quantitatively investigated using X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis at the K-edge of sulfur at varying incidence angles. Varying information depths from several nanometers up to the full thickness is achieved. A quantitative profile of the phase distribution is obtained by a self-consistent fit of a multilayer model to the XANES spectra for different angles. Single step co-evaporated CZTS thin-films are found to exhibit zinc and copper sulfide secondary phases preferentially at the front or back interfaces of the film.

  3. The rapid alveolar absorption of diesel soot-adsorbed benzo[a]pyrene: bioavailability, metabolism and dosimetry of an inhaled particle-borne carcinogen.

    PubMed

    Gerde, P; Muggenburg, B A; Lundborg, M; Dahl, A R

    2001-05-01

    Exposure to diesel exhaust may contribute to lung cancer in humans. It remains unclear whether the carbonaceous core of the soot particle or its coat of adsorbed/condensed organics contributes most to cancer risk. Equally unclear are the extent and rate at which organic procarcinogens desorb from soot particles in the lungs following inhalation exposure and the extent of their metabolic activation in the lungs. To explore the basic relationship between a model polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) and a typical carrier particle, we investigated the rate and extent of release and metabolic fate of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) adsorbed on the carbonaceous core of diesel soot. The native organic content of the soot had been denuded by toluene extraction. Exogenous BaP was adsorbed onto the denuded soot as a surface coating corresponding to 25% of a monomolecular layer. Dogs were exposed by inhalation to an aerosol bolus of the soot-adsorbed BAP: Following deposition in the alveolar region a fraction of BaP was rapidly desorbed from the soot and quickly absorbed into the circulation. Release rates then decreased drastically. When coatings reached approximately 16% of a monolayer the remaining BaP was not bioavailable and was retained on the particles after 5.6 months in the lung. However, the bioavailability of particles transported to the lymph nodes was markedly higher; after 5.6 months the surface coating of BaP was reduced to 10%. BaP that remained adsorbed on the soot surface after this period was approximately 30% parent compound. In contrast, the rapidly released pulse of BaP, which was quickly absorbed through the alveolar epithelium after inhalation, appeared mostly unmetabolized in the circulation, along with low concentrations of phase I and phase II BaP metabolites. However, within approximately 1 h this rapidly absorbed fraction of BaP was systemically metabolized into mostly conjugated phase II metabolites. The results indicate that absorption through the

  4. Effect of rye bread enriched with tomato pomace on fat absorption and lipid metabolism in rats fed a high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Bajerska, Joanna; Chmurzynska, Agata; Mildner-Szkudlarz, Sylwia; Drzymała-Czyż, Sławomira

    2015-07-01

    Tomato pomace (TP), obtained as a residue of tomato processing, was used to enrich rye bread (RB). The sensory profile of this functional bread (RB+TP) was characterised, and its fat absorption and lipid metabolism properties in high-fat-fed rats were studied. Intake of the HF diet containing RB, RB+TP, or TP alone increased faecal energy and fat excretion, but did not affect animal growth or visceral fat weight. Both RB and RB+TP diminished the negative impact of the HF diet, lowering the atherogenic index of plasma (AIP) and the total liver lipid contents by 31.6% and 24%, respectively. The experimental diets had no effect on liver S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) concentrations or on the S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) to SAH ratio, though the lowest SAM levels were observed in the HF+TP group. No significant differences were detected in blood homocysteine, triglycerides, glucose or insulin levels. Although RB+TP incorporated into a HF diet may lead to a decrease in AIP and total liver lipid content, this effect does not depend on the components of TP, but rather on the RB ingredients. However, pure TP, in the doses used in this study, may potentially play a role in the energy balance via faecal loss of lipids. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Evaluation of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties of mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine, and mitraphylline

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mitragyna speciosa (Kratom) is a popular herb in Southeast Asia which is traditionally used to treat withdrawal symptoms associated with opiate addiction. Mitragynine, 7-hydroxymitragynine and mitraphylline are reported to be the central nervous system (CNS) active alkaloids which bind to the opiat...

  6. Identification of Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion (ADME) Genes Relevant to Steatosis Using a Systems Biology Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ensuring chemical safety and sustainability form a main priority of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. This entails efforts on multiple fronts to characterize the potential hazard posed by chemicals currently in use and those to be commercialized in the future. The use of ...

  7. Estimating the geographical distribution of the prevalence of the metabolic syndrome in young Mexicans.

    PubMed

    Murguía-Romero, Miguel; Jiménez-Flores, Rafael; Villalobos-Molina, Rafael; Méndez-Cruz, Adolfo René

    2012-09-01

    The geographical distribution of the metabolic syndrome (MetS) prevalence in young Mexicans (aged 17-24 years) was estimated stepwise starting from its prevalence based on the body mass index (BMI) in a study of 3,176 undergraduate students of this age group from Mexico City. To estimate the number of people with MetS by state, we multiplied its prevalence derived from the BMI range found in the Mexico City sample by the BMI proportions (range and state) obtained from the Mexico 2006 national survey on health and nutrition. Finally, to estimate the total number of young people with MetS in Mexico, its prevalence by state was multiplied by the share of young population in each state according to the National Population and Housing Census 2010. Based on these figures, we estimated the national prevalence of MetS at 15.8%, the average BMI at 24.1 (standard deviation = 4.2), and the prevalence of overweight people (BMI ≥25) of that age group at 39.0%. These results imply that 2,588,414 young Mexicans suffered from MetS in 2010. The Yucatan peninsula in the south and the Sonora state in the north showed the highest rates of MetS prevalence. The calculation of the MetS prevalence by BMI range in a sample of the population, and extrapolating it using the BMI proportions by range of the total population, was found to be a useful approach. We conclude that the BMI is a valuable public health tool to estimate MetS prevalence in the whole country, including its geographical distribution.

  8. Pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of nitrofurantoin in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Plakas, S.M.

    1993-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of the drug nitrofurantoin were examined in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) after intravascular or oral dosing. Mean plasma concentrations of nitrofurantoin after intravascular administration at 1 and 10 mg/kg of body weight were best fit to two- and three-compartment pharmacokinetic models, respectively. Nitrofurantoin was rapidly eliminated from the plasma after intravascular dosing; at 1 and 10 mg/kg, the terminal half-lives were 23 and 46 min, respectively. After oral dosing at 1 mg/kg, peak plasma concentrations (0.06 mu g/ml) occurred at 2 h; the bioavailability was 17%. Residues of nitrofurantoin and its metabolites in the tissues were initially eliminated rapidly but persisted at the later sampling times. Residue concentrations were highest in the plasma and excretory tissues. Approximately 21% and 4% of the oral dose were eliminated in the urine and bile, respectively. Parent nitrofurantoin was the major radiolabelled compound found in the urine; however, the percentage of total residues composed of metabolites increased with time. Biliary residues consisted mostly of nitrofurantoin metabolites. High-performance liquid chromatography revealed the presence of at least five metabolites in the urine and bile.

  9. Uptake, tissue distribution, and metabolism of malachite green in the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Plakas, S.M.; El Said, K. R.; Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.; Allen, J.L.

    1996-01-01

    The disposition of malachite green was determined in channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) after intravascular dosing (0.8 mg . Kg-1) or waterborne exposure (0.8 mg . L-1 for 1 h). After intravascular dosing, mean plasma concentrations of the parent compound exhibited a triphasic decline with a terminal elimination half-life of 6.2 h. Malachite green was rapidly absorbed and concentrated in the tissues during waterborne exposure. The rate of accumulation was directly related to pH of the exposure water. After waterborne exposure, elimination of the parent compound from plasma also was triphasic with a terminal half-life of 4.7 h. In muscle, the half-life of the parent compound was approximately 67 h. Malachite green and its metabolites were widely distributed in all tissues. In fish exposed to C-14-labeled malachite green, total drug equivalent concentrations were highest in abdominal fat and lowest in plasma. Malachite green was rapidly and extensively metabolized to its reduced form, leucomalachite green, which was slowly eliminated from the tissues. Leucomalachite green is an appropriate target analyte for monitoring exposure of channel catfish to this drug.

  10. The in vivo pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution and excretion investigation of mesaconine in rats and its in vitro intestinal absorption study using UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiuxiu; Tang, Minghai; Liu, Taohong; Wang, Chunyan; Tang, Qiaoxin; Xiao, Yaxin; Yang, Ruixin; Chao, Ruobing

    2017-12-27

    1. Mesaconine, an ingredient from Aconitum carmichaelii Debx., has been proven to have cardiac effect. For further development and better pharmacological elucidation, the in vivo process and intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine should be investigated comprehensively. 2. An ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) method was developed and validated for the quantitation of mesaconine in rat plasma, tissue homogenates, urine and feces to investigate the in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles, tissue distribution and excretion. The intestinal absorptive behavior of mesaconine was investigated using in vitro everted rat gut sac model. 3. Mesaconine was well distributed in tissues and a mass of unchanged form was detected in feces. It was difficultly absorbed into blood circulatory system after oral administration. The insufficient oral bioavailability of mesaconine may be mainly attributed to its low intestinal permeability due to a lack of lipophilicity. The absorption of mesaconine in rat's intestine is a first-order process with the passive diffusion mechanism.

  11. Association mapping of starch chain length distribution and amylose content in pea (Pisum sativum L.) using carbohydrate metabolism candidate genes.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, Margaret A; Shaw, Martin; Cooper, Rebecca D; Frew, Tonya J; Butler, Ruth C; Murray, Sarah R; Moya, Leire; Coyne, Clarice J; Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail M

    2017-08-01

    Although starch consists of large macromolecules composed of glucose units linked by α-1,4-glycosidic linkages with α-1,6-glycosidic branchpoints, variation in starch structural and functional properties is found both within and between species. Interest in starch genetics is based on the importance of starch in food and industrial processes, with the potential of genetics to provide novel starches. The starch metabolic pathway is complex but has been characterized in diverse plant species, including pea. To understand how allelic variation in the pea starch metabolic pathway affects starch structure and percent amylose, partial sequences of 25 candidate genes were characterized for polymorphisms using a panel of 92 diverse pea lines. Variation in the percent amylose composition of extracted seed starch and (amylopectin) chain length distribution, one measure of starch structure, were characterized for these lines. Association mapping was undertaken to identify polymorphisms associated with the variation in starch chain length distribution and percent amylose, using a mixed linear model that incorporated population structure and kinship. Associations were found for polymorphisms in seven candidate genes plus Mendel's r locus (which conditions the round versus wrinkled seed phenotype). The genes with associated polymorphisms are involved in the substrate supply, chain elongation and branching stages of the pea carbohydrate and starch metabolic pathways. The association of polymorphisms in carbohydrate and starch metabolic genes with variation in amylopectin chain length distribution and percent amylose may help to guide manipulation of pea seed starch structural and functional properties through plant breeding.

  12. Development of formulae for estimating amylose content, amylopectin chain length distribution, and resistant starch content based on the iodine absorption curve of rice starch.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Sumiko; Satoh, Hikaru; Ohtsubo, Ken'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Not only amylose but also amylopectin greatly affects the gelatinization properties of rice starch and the quality of cooked rice grains. We here characterized the starches of 32 rice cultivars and evaluated the relationship between their iodine absorption curve, apparent amylose content (AAC), pasting property, resistant starch (RS) content, and chain length distribution of amylopectin. We found that the iodine absorption curve differed among the various sample rice cultivars. Using the wavelength at which absorbance becomes maximum on iodine staining of starch (λmax), we propose a novel index, "new λmax" (AAC/(λmax of sample rice starches-λmax of glutinous rice starch)). We developed the novel estimation formulae for AAC, RS contents, and amylopectin fractions with the use of λmax and "new λmax." These formulae would lead to the improved method for estimating starch properties using an easy and rapid iodine colorimetric method.

  13. Intensity-Stabilized Fast-Scanned Direct Absorption Spectroscopy Instrumentation Based on a Distributed Feedback Laser with Detection Sensitivity down to 4 × 10−6

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Gang; Tan, Wei; Jia, Mengyuan; Hou, Jiajuan; Ma, Weiguang; Dong, Lei; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Xiaoxia; Wu, Xuechun; Yin, Wangbao; Xiao, Liantuan; Axner, Ove; Jia, Suotang

    2016-01-01

    A novel, intensity-stabilized, fast-scanned, direct absorption spectroscopy (IS-FS-DAS) instrumentation, based on a distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser, is developed. A fiber-coupled polarization rotator and a fiber-coupled polarizer are used to stabilize the intensity of the laser, which significantly reduces its relative intensity noise (RIN). The influence of white noise is reduced by fast scanning over the spectral feature (at 1 kHz), followed by averaging. By combining these two noise-reducing techniques, it is demonstrated that direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) can be swiftly performed down to a limit of detection (LOD) (1σ) of 4 × 10−6, which opens up a number of new applications. PMID:27657082

  14. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+64. 3.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km s(exp -1) spectrum of the mini broad absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III (lambda)977, Ly(beta), O VI (lambda)(lambda)1032,1038, Ly(alpha), N V (lambda)(lambda)1238,1242, Si IV (lambda)(lambda)1393,1402, and C IV (lambda)(lambda)1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km s(exp -1) with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly(alpha) flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV (ultraviolet) continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  15. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+641. 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; hide

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km/s) spectrum of the broad-absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 angstroms, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III lambda977, Ly-beta, O VI lambda-lambda-1032,1038, Ly-alpha, N V lambda-lambda-1238,1242, Si IV lambda-lambda-1393,1402, and C IV lambda-lambda-1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly-alpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The ultraviolet continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 angstroms in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21)/s, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  16. Pharmacokinetics, Distribution, Metabolism, and Excretion of Omadacycline following a Single Intravenous or Oral Dose of 14C-Omadacycline in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Wen; Flarakos, Jimmy; Du, Yancy; Hu, Wenyu; He, Handan; Mangold, James; Tanaka, S. Ken

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) of omadacycline, a first-in-class aminomethylcycline antibiotic with a broad spectrum of activity against Gram-positive, Gram-negative, anaerobic, and atypical bacteria, were evaluated in rats. Tissue distribution was investigated by quantitative whole-body autoradiography in male Long-Evans Hooded (LEH) rats. Following an intravenous (i.v.) dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight, radioactivity widely and rapidly distributed into most tissues. The highest tissue-to-blood concentration ratios (t/b) were observed in bone mineral, thyroid gland, and Harderian gland at 24 h post-i.v. dose. There was no evidence of stable accumulation in uveal tract tissue, suggesting the absence of a stable binding interaction with melanin. Following a 90 mg/kg oral dose in LEH rats, the highest t/b were observed in bone mineral, Harderian gland, liver, spleen, and salivary gland. The plasma protein binding levels were 26% in the rat and 15% to 21% in other species. Omadacycline plasma clearance was 1.2 liters/h/kg, and its half-life was 4.6 h; the steady-state volume of distribution (Vss) was 6.89 liters/kg. Major circulating components in plasma were intact omadacycline and its epimer. Consistent with observations in human, approximately 80% of the dose was excreted into the feces as unchanged omadacycline after i.v. administration. Fecal excretion was primarily the result of biliary excretion (∼40%) and direct gastrointestinal secretion (∼30%). However, urinary excretion (∼30%) was equally prominent after i.v. dosing. PMID:27821446

  17. [Effects of different NO3--N/NH4+-N ratios on cucumber seedlings growth, nitrogen absorption and metabolism under suboptimal temperature and light intensity].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao Cui; Liu, Yu Mei; Bai, Long Qiang; He, Chao Xing; Yu, Xian Chang; Li, Yan Su

    2016-08-01

    Cucumber (cv. Zhongnong 26) was used as material, the effects of NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N ratios on growth and physiological characteristics of cucumber seedlings under suboptimal temperature and light intensity (18 ℃/10 ℃,180 ± 20 μmol·m -2 ·s -1 ) were studied. Total nitrogen in the nutrient solution was equal and three NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N ratios, 26:2, 21:7 and 14:14, were applied as treatments. The results showed that cucumber treated by NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N=21:7 had the longest total root length, the biggest root volume and root surface area, and the maximum number of root tips. H + -ATPase activity and relative expression of genes encoding nitrate transporter (NRT) and ammonium transporter (AMT) in cucumber roots were increased significantly by the treatment of NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N=21:7. In addition, nitrate reductase (NR), glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate synthase (GOGAT) in cucumber leaves under the treatment of NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N=21:7 were higher. As a result, the nitrogen content and biomass of cucumber were significantly increased. Compared with the plants under the treatment of NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N=26:2 or 14:14, cucumber seedlings under the treatment of NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N=21:7 had the highest biomass and total dry mass (DM) which were increased by 14.0% and 19.3% respectively under suboptimal temperature and light intensity. In conclusion, under suboptimal environmental conditions, NO 3 - -N/NH 4 + -N ratio could be adjusted to increase nitrogen absorption and metabolism of cucumber and alleviate the de-trimental effects caused by suboptimal conditions and promoted the cucumber growth.

  18. Tissue distribution, metabolism and excretion of 3, 3′-dichloro-4′-sulfooxy-biphenyl in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, Fabian A.; He, Xianran; Teesch, Lynn M.; Lehmler, Hans-Joachim; Robertson, Larry W.; Duffel, Michael W.

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) with lower numbers of chlorine atoms exhibit a greater susceptibility to metabolism than their higher-chlorinated counterparts. Following initial hydroxylation of these lower chlorinated PCBs, metabolic sulfation to form PCB sulfates is increasingly recognized as an important component of their toxicology. Since procedures for the quantitative analysis of PCB sulfates in tissue samples have not been previously available, we have now developed an efficient, LC-ESI-MS/MS based, protocol for the quantitative analysis of 4-PCB 11 sulfate in biological samples. This procedure was used to determine the distribution of 4-PCB 11 sulfate in liver, kidney, lung, and brain, as well as its excretion profile, following its intravenous administration to male Sprague-Dawley rats. Following initial uptake of 4-PCB 11 sulfate, its concentration in these tissues and serum declined within the first hour following injection. Although biliary secretion was detected, analysis of 24 hour collections of urine and feces revealed recovery of less than 4% of the administered 4-PCB 11 sulfate. High-resolution LC-MS analysis of bile, urine, and feces showed metabolic products derived from 4-PCB 11 sulfate. Thus, 4-PCB 11 sulfate at this dose was not directly excreted in the urine, but was, instead, re-distributed to tissues and/or subjected to further metabolism. PMID:26046945

  19. Combined effects of the drug distribution and mucus diffusion properties of self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems on the oral absorption of fenofibrate.

    PubMed

    Sunazuka, Yushi; Ueda, Keisuke; Higashi, Kenjirou; Tanaka, Yusuke; Moribe, Kunikazu

    2018-05-24

    We present the absorption improvement mechanism of fenofibrate (FFB), a Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) class II drug, from self-microemulsifying drug delivery systems (SMEDDS), centered on improving the diffusion of FFB through the unstirred water layer (UWL). Four SMEDDS formulations containing Labrafac™ lipophile WL 1349 (WL1349) or Labrafil ® M 1944CS (M1944) oils and NIKKOL HCO-40 (HCO40) or NIKKOL HCO-60 (HCO60) surfactants were prepared. Every SMEDDS formulation formed microemulsion droplets of approximately 30 nm. In vitro tests showed that the microemulsion droplets containing M1944 had relatively small FFB solubilization capacities, causing larger amounts of FFB to be dissolved in the bulk water phase, compared to the droplets containing WL1349. The diffusivity of the microemulsion droplets through the mucin solution layer was enhanced when using HCO40 compared to HCO60. The oral absorption in rats was the highest when using the SMEDDS formulation containing M1944 and HCO40. High FFB distribution in the bulk water phase and fast diffusion of microemulsion droplets through the mucus layer contributed to the efficient delivery of FFB molecules through the UWL to the epithelial cells, leading to enhanced FFB absorption. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Correlation between octanol/water and liposome/water distribution coefficients and drug absorption of a set of pharmacologically active compounds.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Freddy; Moutinho, Carla; Matos, Carla

    2013-06-01

    Absorption and consequent therapeutic action are key issues in the development of new drugs by the pharmaceutical industry. In this sense, different models can be used to simulate biological membranes to predict the absorption of a drug. This work compared the octanol/water and the liposome/water models. The parameters used to relate the two models were the distribution coefficients between liposomes and water and octanol and water and the fraction of drug orally absorbed. For this study, 66 drugs were collected from literature sources and divided into four groups according to charge and ionization degree: neutral; positively charged; negatively charged; and partially ionized/zwitterionic. The results show a satisfactory linear correlation between the octanol and liposome systems for the neutral (R²= 0.9324) and partially ionized compounds (R²= 0.9367), contrary to the positive (R²= 0.4684) and negatively charged compounds (R²= 0.1487). In the case of neutral drugs, results were similar in both models because of the high fraction orally absorbed. However, for the charged drugs (positively, negatively, and partially ionized/zwitterionic), the liposomal model has a more-appropriate correlation with absorption than the octanol model. These results show that the neutral compounds only interact with membranes through hydrophobic bonds, whereas charged drugs favor electrostatic interactions established with the liposomes. With this work, we concluded that liposomes may be a more-appropriate biomembrane model than octanol for charged compounds.

  1. Including metabolite concentrations into flux balance analysis: thermodynamic realizability as a constraint on flux distributions in metabolic networks

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Andreas; Hoffmann, Sabrina; Holzhütter, Hermann-Georg

    2007-01-01

    Background In recent years, constrained optimization – usually referred to as flux balance analysis (FBA) – has become a widely applied method for the computation of stationary fluxes in large-scale metabolic networks. The striking advantage of FBA as compared to kinetic modeling is that it basically requires only knowledge of the stoichiometry of the network. On the other hand, results of FBA are to a large degree hypothetical because the method relies on plausible but hardly provable optimality principles that are thought to govern metabolic flux distributions. Results To augment the reliability of FBA-based flux calculations we propose an additional side constraint which assures thermodynamic realizability, i.e. that the flux directions are consistent with the corresponding changes of Gibb's free energies. The latter depend on metabolite levels for which plausible ranges can be inferred from experimental data. Computationally, our method results in the solution of a mixed integer linear optimization problem with quadratic scoring function. An optimal flux distribution together with a metabolite profile is determined which assures thermodynamic realizability with minimal deviations of metabolite levels from their expected values. We applied our novel approach to two exemplary metabolic networks of different complexity, the metabolic core network of erythrocytes (30 reactions) and the metabolic network iJR904 of Escherichia coli (931 reactions). Our calculations show that increasing network complexity entails increasing sensitivity of predicted flux distributions to variations of standard Gibb's free energy changes and metabolite concentration ranges. We demonstrate the usefulness of our method for assessing critical concentrations of external metabolites preventing attainment of a metabolic steady state. Conclusion Our method incorporates the thermodynamic link between flux directions and metabolite concentrations into a practical computational algorithm. The

  2. Uncertainty quantification in flux balance analysis of spatially lumped and distributed models of neuron-astrocyte metabolism.

    PubMed

    Calvetti, Daniela; Cheng, Yougan; Somersalo, Erkki

    2016-12-01

    Identifying feasible steady state solutions of a brain energy metabolism model is an inverse problem that allows infinitely many solutions. The characterization of the non-uniqueness, or the uncertainty quantification of the flux balance analysis, is tantamount to identifying the degrees of freedom of the solution. The degrees of freedom of multi-compartment mathematical models for energy metabolism of a neuron-astrocyte complex may offer a key to understand the different ways in which the energetic needs of the brain are met. In this paper we study the uncertainty in the solution, using techniques of linear algebra to identify the degrees of freedom in a lumped model, and Markov chain Monte Carlo methods in its extension to a spatially distributed case. The interpretation of the degrees of freedom in metabolic terms, more specifically, glucose and oxygen partitioning, is then leveraged to derive constraints on the free parameters to guarantee that the model is energetically feasible. We demonstrate how the model can be used to estimate the stoichiometric energy needs of the cells as well as the household energy based on the measured oxidative cerebral metabolic rate of glucose and glutamate cycling. Moreover, our analysis shows that in the lumped model the net direction of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in the cells can be deduced from the glucose partitioning between the compartments. The extension of the lumped model to a spatially distributed multi-compartment setting that includes diffusion fluxes from capillary to tissue increases the number of degrees of freedom, requiring the use of statistical sampling techniques. The analysis of the distributed model reveals that some of the conclusions valid for the spatially lumped model, e.g., concerning the LDH activity and glucose partitioning, may no longer hold.

  3. Distribution, metabolism and excretion of a synthetic androgen 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone, a potential male-contraceptive.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Pramod Vishwanath; Arumugam, Ramamani; Willman, Mark; Ge, Ren-Shan; Sitruk-Ware, Regine; Kumar, Narender

    2009-01-01

    A synthetic androgen 7alpha-Methyl-19-nortestosterone (MENT) has a potential for therapeutic use in 'androgen replacement therapy' for hypogonadal men or as a hormonal male-contraceptive in normal men. Its tissue distribution, excretion and metabolic enzyme(s) have not been reported. Therefore, the present study tested the distribution and excretion of MENT in Sprague-Dawley rats castrated 24h prior to the injection of tritium-labeled MENT ((3)H-MENT). Rats were euthanized at different time intervals after dosing, and the amount of radioactivity in various tissues/organs was measured following combustion in a Packard oxidizer. The radioactivity (% injected dose) was highest in the duodenal contents in the first 30min of injection. Specific uptake of the steroid was observed in target tissues such as ventral prostate and seminal vesicles at 6h, while in other tissues radioactivity equilibrated with blood. Liver and duodenum maintained high radioactivity throughout, as these organs were actively involved in the metabolism and excretion of most drugs. The excretion of (3)H-MENT was investigated after subcutaneous injection of (3)H-MENT into male rats housed in metabolic cages. Urine and feces were collected at different time intervals (up to 72h) following injection. Results showed that the radioactivity was excreted via feces and urine in equal amounts by 30h. Aiming to identify enzyme(s) involved in the MENT metabolism, we performed in vitro metabolism of (3)H-MENT using rat and human liver microsomes, cytosol and recombinant cytochrome P(450) (CYP) isozymes. The metabolites were separated by thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Three putative metabolites (in accordance with the report of Agarwal and Monder [Agarwal AK, Monder C. In vitro metabolism of 7alpha-methyl-19-nortestosterone by rat liver, prostate, and epididymis. Endocrinology 1988;123:2187-93]), [i] 3-hydroxylated MENT by both rat and human liver cytosol; [ii] 16alpha-hydroxylated MENT (a polar metabolite

  4. Photodissociation dynamics in the first absorption band of pyrrole. II. Photofragment distributions for the 1A2(π σ* ) ←X˜ 1A1(π π ) transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2018-03-01

    The analysis of the total kinetic energy release (TKER) of the photofragments pyrrolyl + H-atom formed in the photodissociation of pyrrole in the low-lying state 1A2(πσ*) is presented. The TKER distributions contain complementary and often more precise information on the fragmentation process than the broad diffuse absorption spectra. The distributions are calculated quantum mechanically for the diabatic state 1A2(πσ*) either isolated or coupled to the ground electronic state at an exit channel conical intersection. The calculations use the novel ab initio quasi-diabatic potential energy matrix constructed in the work of Picconi and Grebenshchikov [J. Chem. Phys. 148, 104103 (2018)]. The approximate overlap integral-based adiabatic mapping approach is introduced with which the quantum mechanical TKER distributions can be efficiently and accurately reproduced. Finally, the calculated TKERs are compared with the experimental results. The main features of the measured vibrationally resolved distributions are reproduced, and the spectral peaks are assigned and interpreted in detail.

  5. Dietary macronutrient distribution influences post-exercise substrate utilization in women: A cross-sectional evaluation of metabolic flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Trexler, Eric T.; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E.; Wingfield, Hailee L.; Blue, Malia N. M.; Roelofs, Erica J.; Hirsch, Katie R.

    2016-01-01

    AIM Metabolic flexibility is the ability to alter substrate utilization in response to substrate availability, which may influence health and performance. The current study evaluated the effects of habitual macronutrient distribution on energy expenditure (EE) and metabolic flexibility in physically active women. METHODS Participants (n=20) completed a 3-day food log and a standardized bout of high-intensity interval training to determine EE and respiratory exchange ratio (RER). EE and RER were measured via indirect calorimetry at rest (PRE) and immediately (IP), 30 minutes (30min), and 60 minutes post-exercise (60min). To evaluate metabolic flexibility, RER changes were calculated from PRE to IP, IP to 30min, and IP to 60min. For each macronutrient, participants were categorized into high- and low-intake groups using a median split. RESULTS No significant correlations were observed between macronutrient distribution and EE when covaried for lean mass (all p≥0.232), and ANCOVAs revealed no significant group × time interactions (all p≥0.241). Fat intake was not associated with ΔRER (all p≥0.477). Correlations between PRO intake and ΔRER approached significance (r=0.373–0.411; p=0.079–0.115), as did inverse associations between CHO and ΔRER (r= −0.404 – −0.409; p=0.084–0.087). Lower RER values were observed in the low-CHO group at 30min and 60min (p=0.030) compared to high-CHO. Higher RER values were observed in the high-PRO group at IP (p=0.042) compared to low-PRO. Estradiol was not correlated with RER at any time point, or different between diet groups (all p>0.401). CONCLUSION Results suggest that high PRO and low CHO intakes are associated with greater metabolic flexibility in women. PMID:26959874

  6. Conservation of high-flux backbone in alternate optimal and near-optimal flux distributions of metabolic networks.

    PubMed

    Samal, Areejit

    2008-12-01

    Constraint-based flux balance analysis (FBA) has proven successful in predicting the flux distribution of metabolic networks in diverse environmental conditions. FBA finds one of the alternate optimal solutions that maximizes the biomass production rate. Almaas et al. have shown that the flux distribution follows a power law, and it is possible to associate with most metabolites two reactions which maximally produce and consume a given metabolite, respectively. This observation led to the concept of high-flux backbone (HFB) in metabolic networks. In previous work, the HFB has been computed using a particular optima obtained using FBA. In this paper, we investigate the conservation of HFB of a particular solution for a given medium across different alternate optima and near-optima in metabolic networks of E. coli and S. cerevisiae. Using flux variability analysis (FVA), we propose a method to determine reactions that are guaranteed to be in HFB regardless of alternate solutions. We find that the HFB of a particular optima is largely conserved across alternate optima in E. coli, while it is only moderately conserved in S. cerevisiae. However, the HFB of a particular near-optima shows a large variation across alternate near-optima in both organisms. We show that the conserved set of reactions in HFB across alternate near-optima has a large overlap with essential reactions and reactions which are both uniquely consuming (UC) and uniquely producing (UP). Our findings suggest that the structure of the metabolic network admits a high degree of redundancy and plasticity in near-optimal flow patterns enhancing system robustness for a given environmental condition.

  7. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  8. Decomposition of Spectral Signatures of Coloured Dissolved Organic Matter Absorption and its Spatial Distribution Along Southeastern Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamed Ashraf, P.; Souda, V. P.; Minu, P.

    2016-02-01

    The process of photosynthesis involves the conversion of inorganic carbon into organic carbon and the light availability is the crucial factor affecting photosynthesis in case 2 waters. Coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is a major competitor for light apart from suspended sediments and phytoplankton. The objective was 1) to understand the spatial, vertical and seasonal variability of CDOM by decomposing spectral signatures of absorption in the UV region and to identify the source of CDOM in the study area. The study was carried out for the period 2013 May to 2014 December on monthly basis. Samples from 9 spatial stations, covering estuarine, barmouth and marine region were collected along coastal waters off Kochi, Southeastern Arabian Sea. Two spectral range from 200nm to 400nm were selected for the study, ie. between 275-295 and 350-400. Slope between 275-295nm (S275-295) showed no variation spatially and seasonally except for estuarine station. But slope between 350-400nm (S350-400) exhibited considerable variations spatially, seasonally and vertically. Lower values of ratio between S275-295 and S350-400 in surface waters during monsoon season indicated presence of CDOM with heavy molecular weight of terrigenous origin. Premonsoon and postmonsoon seasons had higher ratio indicating presence of CDOM with lighter molecular weight. Autocthonous origin and degradation of terrigenous matter produces CDOM with light molecular weight. The ratio is found to be increasing from estuary to offshore stations. Hence it is inferred that, the chemical nature of CDOM is affected by both physical and biological components in dynamically unstable case 2 coastal waters. The results presented here shows difference in spectral slope to estimate optical properties of CDOM which is relevant for the description of underwater optics and to the development of ocean colour remote sensing algorithms in the region.

  9. Dynamics of 17alpha-ethynylestradiol exposure in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss): absorption, tissue distribution, and hepatic gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Ann D; Nagler, James J; Hook, Sharon E; Small, Jack A; Schultz, Irvin R

    2006-11-01

    17alpha-Ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen identified in sewage effluents. To understand better the absorption kinetics of EE2 and the induction of vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) mRNA, we subjected male rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) to continuous water exposures of 125 ng/L of EE2 for up to 61 d. Trout were either repetitively sampled for blood plasma or serially killed at selected time intervals. Vitellogenin, ERalpha mRNA, and EE2 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, respectively. In separate experiments, trout were exposed to EE2 for 7 d, and hepatic gene expression was assessed using a low- and high-density cDNA microarray. The EE2 was rapidly absorbed by the trout, with an apparent equilibrium at 16 h in plasma and liver. The ERalpha mRNA levels also increased rapidly, reaching near-peak levels by 48 h. In contrast, plasma levels of VTG continuously increased for 19 d. After 61 d, tissues with the highest levels of VTG were the liver, kidney, and testes. Microarray-based gene expression studies provided unexpected results. In some cases, known estrogen-responsive genes (e.g., ERalpha) were unresponsive, whereas many of the genes that have no apparent link to estrogen function or EE2 toxicity were significantly altered in expression. Of the two microarray approaches tested in the present study, the high-density array appeared to be superior because of the improved quality of the hybridization signal and the robustness of the response in terms of the number of genes identified as being EE2 responsive.

  10. DYNAMICS OF 17α-ETHYNYLESTRADIOL EXPOSURE IN RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS): ABSORPTION, TISSUE DISTRIBUTION, AND HEPATIC GENE EXPRESSION PATTERN

    PubMed Central

    Skillman, Ann D.; Nagler, James J.; Hook, Sharon E.; Small, Jack A.; Schultz, Irvin R.

    2008-01-01

    17α-Ethynylestradiol (EE2) is a synthetic estrogen identified in sewage effluents. To understand better the absorption kinetics of EE2 and the induction of vitellogenin (VTG) and estrogen receptor α (ERα) mRNA, we subjected male rainbow trout (Onchorynchus mykiss) to continuous water exposures of 125 ng/L of EE2 for up to 61 d. Trout were either repetitively sampled for blood plasma or serially killed at selected time intervals. Vitellogenin, ERα mRNA, and EE2 were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, respectively. In separate experiments, trout were exposed to EE2 for 7 d, and hepatic gene expression was assessed using a low- and high-density cDNA microarray. The EE2 was rapidly absorbed by the trout, with an apparent equilibrium at 16 h in plasma and liver. The ERα mRNA levels also increased rapidly, reaching near-peak levels by 48 h. In contrast, plasma levels of VTG continuously increased for 19 d. After 61 d, tissues with the highest levels of VTG were the liver, kidney, and testes. Microarray-based gene expression studies provided unexpected results. In some cases, known estrogen-responsive genes (e.g., ERα) were unresponsive, whereas many of the genes that have no apparent link to estrogen function or EE2 toxicity were significantly altered in expression. Of the two microarray approaches tested in the present study, the high-density array appeared to be superior because of the improved quality of the hybridization signal and the robustness of the response in terms of the number of genes identified as being EE2 responsive. PMID:17089724

  11. Enhanced absorption and inhibited metabolism of emodin by 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside: Possible mechanisms for Polygoni Multiflori Radix-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qiong; Jiang, Li-Long; Luo, Na; Fan, Ya-Xi; Ma, Jiang; Li, Ping; Li, Hui-Jun

    2017-06-01

    Polygoni Multiflori Radix (PMR) has been commonly used as a tonic in China for centuries. However, PMR-associated hepatotoxicity is becoming a safety issue. In our previous in vivo study, an interaction between stilbenes and anthraquinones has been discovered and a hypothesis is proposed that the interaction between stilbene glucoside-enriching fraction and emodin may contribute to the side effects of PMR. To further support our previous in vivo results in rats, the present in vitro study was designed to evaluate the effects of 2, 3, 5, 4'-tetrahydroxystilbene-2-O-β-D-glucopyranoside (TSG) on the cellular absorption and human liver microsome metabolism of emodin. The obtained results indicated that the absorption of emodin in Caco-2 cells was enhanced and the metabolism of emodin in human liver microsomes was inhibited after TSG treatment. The effects of the transport inhibitors on the cellular emodin accumulation were also examined. Western blot assay suggested that the depressed metabolism of emodin could be attributed to the down-regulation of UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGTs) 1A8, 1A10, and 2B7. These findings definitively demonstrated the existence of interaction between TSG and emodin, which provide a basis for a better understanding of the underlying mechanism for PMR-induced liver injury. Copyright © 2017 China Pharmaceutical University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Nonlinear Color–Metallicity Relations of Globular Clusters. VII. Nonlinear Absorption-line Index versus Metallicity Relations and Bimodal Index Distributions of NGC 5128 Globular Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin, E-mail: sjyoon0691@yonsei.ac.kr

    Spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of NGC 5128 revealed bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of its old GCs. GC division is a widely observed and studied phenomenon whose interpretation has depicted host galaxy formation and evolution such that it harbors two distinct metallicity groups. Such a conventional view of GC bimodality has mainly been based on photometry. The recent GC photometric data, however, presented an alternative perspective in which the nonlinear metallicity-to-color transformation is responsible for color bimodality of GC systems. Here we apply the same line of analysis to the spectral indices and examine the absorption-line indexmore » versus metallicity relations for the NGC 5128 GC system. NGC 5128 GCs display nonlinearity in the metallicity-index planes, most prominently for the Balmer lines and by a non-negligible degree for the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line. We demonstrate that the observed spectroscopic division of NGC 5128 GCs can be caused by the nonlinear nature of the metallicity-to-index conversions and thus one does not need to resort to two separate GC subgroups. Our analysis incorporating this nonlinearity provides a new perspective on the structure of NGC 5128's GC system, and a further piece to the global picture of the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.« less

  13. Improved spectral absorption coefficient grouping strategy of wide band k-distribution model used for calculation of infrared remote sensing signal of hot exhaust systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haiyang; Wang, Qiang

    2018-07-01

    A new strategy for grouping spectral absorption coefficients, considering the influences of both temperature and species mole ratio inhomogeneities on correlated-k characteristics of the spectra of gas mixtures, has been deduced to match the calculation method of spectral overlap parameter used in multiscale multigroup wide band k-distribution model. By comparison with current spectral absorption coefficient grouping strategies, for which only the influence of temperature inhomogeneity on the correlated-k characteristics of spectra of single species was considered, the improvements in calculation accuracies resulting from the new grouping strategy were evaluated using a series of 0D cases in which radiance under 3-5-μm wave band emitted by hot combustion gas of hydrocarbon fuel was attenuated by atmosphere with quite different temperature and mole ratios of water vapor and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide. Finally, evaluations are presented on the calculation of remote sensing thermal images of transonic hot jet exhausted from a chevron ejecting nozzle with solid wall cooling system.

  14. E-Flux2 and SPOT: Validated Methods for Inferring Intracellular Metabolic Flux Distributions from Transcriptomic Data.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Kyung; Lane, Anatoliy; Kelley, James J; Lun, Desmond S

    2016-01-01

    Several methods have been developed to predict system-wide and condition-specific intracellular metabolic fluxes by integrating transcriptomic data with genome-scale metabolic models. While powerful in many settings, existing methods have several shortcomings, and it is unclear which method has the best accuracy in general because of limited validation against experimentally measured intracellular fluxes. We present a general optimization strategy for inferring intracellular metabolic flux distributions from transcriptomic data coupled with genome-scale metabolic reconstructions. It consists of two different template models called DC (determined carbon source model) and AC (all possible carbon sources model) and two different new methods called E-Flux2 (E-Flux method combined with minimization of l2 norm) and SPOT (Simplified Pearson cOrrelation with Transcriptomic data), which can be chosen and combined depending on the availability of knowledge on carbon source or objective function. This enables us to simulate a broad range of experimental conditions. We examined E. coli and S. cerevisiae as representative prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms respectively. The predictive accuracy of our algorithm was validated by calculating the uncentered Pearson correlation between predicted fluxes and measured fluxes. To this end, we compiled 20 experimental conditions (11 in E. coli and 9 in S. cerevisiae), of transcriptome measurements coupled with corresponding central carbon metabolism intracellular flux measurements determined by 13C metabolic flux analysis (13C-MFA), which is the largest dataset assembled to date for the purpose of validating inference methods for predicting intracellular fluxes. In both organisms, our method achieves an average correlation coefficient ranging from 0.59 to 0.87, outperforming a representative sample of competing methods. Easy-to-use implementations of E-Flux2 and SPOT are available as part of the open-source package MOST (http

  15. Metabolic Flexibility as a Major Predictor of Spatial Distribution in Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Carbonero, Franck; Oakley, Brian B.; Purdy, Kevin J.

    2014-01-01

    A better understand the ecology of microbes and their role in the global ecosystem could be achieved if traditional ecological theories can be applied to microbes. In ecology organisms are defined as specialists or generalists according to the breadth of their niche. Spatial distribution is often used as a proxy measure of niche breadth; generalists have broad niches and a wide spatial distribution and specialists a narrow niche and spatial distribution. Previous studies suggest that microbial distribution patterns are contrary to this idea; a microbial generalist genus (Desulfobulbus) has a limited spatial distribution while a specialist genus (Methanosaeta) has a cosmopolitan distribution. Therefore, we hypothesise that this counter-intuitive distribution within generalist and specialist microbial genera is a common microbial characteristic. Using molecular fingerprinting the distribution of four microbial genera, two generalists, Desulfobulbus and the methanogenic archaea Methanosarcina, and two specialists, Methanosaeta and the sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfobacter were analysed in sediment samples from along a UK estuary. Detected genotypes of both generalist genera showed a distinct spatial distribution, significantly correlated with geographic distance between sites. Genotypes of both specialist genera showed no significant differential spatial distribution. These data support the hypothesis that the spatial distribution of specialist and generalist microbes does not match that seen with specialist and generalist large organisms. It may be that generalist microbes, while having a wider potential niche, are constrained, possibly by intrageneric competition, to exploit only a small part of that potential niche while specialists, with far fewer constraints to their niche, are more capable of filling their potential niche more effectively, perhaps by avoiding intrageneric competition. We suggest that these counter-intuitive distribution patterns may be a

  16. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy ofmore » M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.« less

  17. Kinetin increases chromium absorption, modulates its distribution, and changes the activity of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Mexican Palo Verde

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Peralta-Videa, Jose R.; Lopez-Moreno, Martha L.; Ren, Minghua; Saupe, Geoffrey; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2015-01-01

    This report shows, for the first time, the effectiveness of the phytohormone kinetin (KN) in increasing Cr translocation from roots to stems in Mexican Palo Verde. Fifteen-day-old seedlings, germinated in soil spiked with Cr(III) and (VI) at 60 and 10 mg kg−1, respectively, were watered every other day for 30 days with a KN solution at 250 μM. Samples were analyzed for catalase (CAT) and ascorbate peroxidase (APOX) activities, Cr concentration, and Cr distribution in tissues. Results showed that KN reduced CAT but increased APOX in the roots of Cr(VI)-treated plants. In the leaves, KN reduced both CAT and APOX in Cr(III) but not in Cr(VI)-treated plants. However, KN increased total Cr concentration in roots, stems, and leaves by 45%, 103%, and 72%, respectively, compared to Cr(III) alone. For Cr(VI), KN increased Cr concentrations in roots, stems, and leaves, respectively, by 53%, 129%, and 168%, compared to Cr(VI) alone. The electron probe microanalyzer results showed that Cr was mainly located at the cortex section in the root, and Cr distribution was essentially homogenous in stems. However, proven through X-ray images, Cr(VI)-treated roots and stems had more Cr accumulation than Cr(III) counterparts. KN increased the Cr translocation from roots to stems. PMID:21174467

  18. Compartmental and noncompartmental modeling of ¹³C-lycopene absorption, isomerization, and distribution kinetics in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Kenneth M; Grainger, Elizabeth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Novotny, Janet A; Erdman, John W; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-12-01

    Lycopene, which is a red carotenoid in tomatoes, has been hypothesized to mediate disease-preventive effects associated with tomato consumption. Lycopene is consumed primarily as the all-trans geometric isomer in foods, whereas human plasma and tissues show greater proportions of cis isomers. With the use of compartmental modeling and stable isotope technology, we determined whether endogenous all-trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization or isomeric-bioavailability differences underlie the greater proportion of lycopene cis isomers in human tissues than in tomato foods. Healthy men (n = 4) and women (n = 4) consumed (13)C-lycopene (10.2 mg; 82% all-trans and 18% cis), and plasma was collected over 28 d. Unlabeled and (13)C-labeled total lycopene and lycopene-isomer plasma concentrations, which were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, were fit to a 7-compartment model. Subjects absorbed a mean ± SEM of 23% ± 6% of the lycopene. The proportion of plasma cis-(13)C-lycopene isomers increased over time, and all-trans had a shorter half-life than that of cis isomers (5.3 ± 0.3 and 8.8 ± 0.6 d, respectively; P < 0.001) and an earlier time to reach maximal plasma concentration than that of cis isomers (28 ± 7 and 48 ± 9 h, respectively). A compartmental model that allowed for interindividual differences in cis- and all-trans-lycopene bioavailability and endogenous trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization was predictive of plasma (13)C and unlabeled cis- and all-trans-lycopene concentrations. Although the bioavailability of cis (24.5% ± 6%) and all-trans (23.2% ± 8%) isomers did not differ, endogenous isomerization (0.97 ± 0.25 μmol/d in the fast-turnover tissue lycopene pool) drove tissue and plasma isomeric profiles. (13)C-Lycopene combined with physiologic compartmental modeling provides a strategy for following complex in vivo metabolic processes in humans and reveals that postabsorptive trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization

  19. Compartmental and noncompartmental modeling of 13C-lycopene absorption, isomerization, and distribution kinetics in healthy adults123

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Nancy E; Cichon, Morgan J; Riedl, Kenneth M; Grainger, Elizabeth M; Schwartz, Steven J; Novotny, Janet A; Erdman, John W; Clinton, Steven K

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lycopene, which is a red carotenoid in tomatoes, has been hypothesized to mediate disease-preventive effects associated with tomato consumption. Lycopene is consumed primarily as the all-trans geometric isomer in foods, whereas human plasma and tissues show greater proportions of cis isomers. Objective: With the use of compartmental modeling and stable isotope technology, we determined whether endogenous all-trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization or isomeric-bioavailability differences underlie the greater proportion of lycopene cis isomers in human tissues than in tomato foods. Design: Healthy men (n = 4) and women (n = 4) consumed 13C-lycopene (10.2 mg; 82% all-trans and 18% cis), and plasma was collected over 28 d. Unlabeled and 13C-labeled total lycopene and lycopene-isomer plasma concentrations, which were measured with the use of high-performance liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry, were fit to a 7-compartment model. Results: Subjects absorbed a mean ± SEM of 23% ± 6% of the lycopene. The proportion of plasma cis-13C-lycopene isomers increased over time, and all-trans had a shorter half-life than that of cis isomers (5.3 ± 0.3 and 8.8 ± 0.6 d, respectively; P < 0.001) and an earlier time to reach maximal plasma concentration than that of cis isomers (28 ± 7 and 48 ± 9 h, respectively). A compartmental model that allowed for interindividual differences in cis- and all-trans-lycopene bioavailability and endogenous trans-to-cis-lycopene isomerization was predictive of plasma 13C and unlabeled cis- and all-trans-lycopene concentrations. Although the bioavailability of cis (24.5% ± 6%) and all-trans (23.2% ± 8%) isomers did not differ, endogenous isomerization (0.97 ± 0.25 μmol/d in the fast-turnover tissue lycopene pool) drove tissue and plasma isomeric profiles. Conclusion: 13C-Lycopene combined with physiologic compartmental modeling provides a strategy for following complex in vivo metabolic processes in humans and reveals that

  20. Can non-cholesterol sterols and lipoprotein subclasses distribution predict different patterns of cholesterol metabolism and statin therapy response?

    PubMed

    Gojkovic, Tamara; Vladimirov, Sandra; Spasojevic-Kalimanovska, Vesna; Zeljkovic, Aleksandra; Vekic, Jelena; Kalimanovska-Ostric, Dimitra; Djuricic, Ivana; Sobajic, Sladjana; Jelic-Ivanovic, Zorana

    2017-03-01

    Cholesterol homeostasis disorders may cause dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis progression and coronary artery disease (CAD) development. Evaluation of non-cholesterol sterols (NCSs) as synthesis and absorption markers, and lipoprotein particles quality may indicate the dyslipidemia early development. This study investigates associations of different cholesterol homeostasis patterns with low-density (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL) subclasses distribution in statin-treated and statin-untreated CAD patients, and potential use of aforementioned markers for CAD treatment optimization. The study included 78 CAD patients (47 statin-untreated and 31 statin-treated) and 31 controls (CG). NCSs concentrations were quantified using gas chromatography- flame ionization detection (GC-FID). Lipoprotein subclasses were separated by gradient gel electrophoresis. In patients, cholesterol-synthesis markers were significantly higher comparing to CG. Cholesterol-synthesis markers were inversely associated with LDL size in all groups. For cholesterol homeostasis estimation, each group was divided to good and/or poor synthetizers and/or absorbers according to desmosterol and β-sitosterol median values. In CG, participants with reduced cholesterol absorption, the relative proportion of small, dense LDL was higher in those with increased cholesterol synthesis compared to those with reduced synthesis (p<0.01). LDL I fraction was significantly higher in poor synthetizers/poor absorbers subgroup compared to poor synthetizers/good absorbers (p<0.01), and good synthetizers/poor absorbers (p<0.01). Statin-treated patients with increased cholesterol absorption had increased proportion of LDL IVB (p<0.05). The results suggest the existence of different lipoprotein abnormalities according to various patterns of cholesterol homeostasis. Desmosterol/β-sitosterol ratio could be used for estimating individual propensity toward dyslipidemia development and direct the future treatment.

  1. [Interactions of food and drug metabolism].

    PubMed

    Delzenne, N M; Verbeeck, R K

    2001-01-01

    The nutritional state, and/or the ingestion of specific nutrients, is/are able to modify drug disposition, by interfering with drug absorption, distribution, storage, and metabolism. Recent data report that nutrients interfere with drug metabolism either by modifying key enzymes of phase I (cytochromeP450 dependent mixed function oxidase) and II (glucuronosyl, sulfonyl- ... transferases), or by modulating coenzymes availability (NADPH, UDPglucuronic acid...). Food components involved in drug metabolism modifications are either macro-nutrients (carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, ethanol), micronutriments (vitamins, minerals), or phytochemicals. Drug-nutrients interactions may be beneficials, and thus could constitute, i.e. a way to improve drug therapeutic index, or generate adverse effects.

  2. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang; Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H2O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm(-1) (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm(-1) (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  3. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Lijun; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang; Cao, Zhang; Xue, Xin; Lin, Yuzhen

    2016-01-01

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H2O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm-1 (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm-1 (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographic sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H2O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.

  4. Metabolic Costs of Feeding Predictively Alter the Spatial Distribution of Individuals in Fish Schools.

    PubMed

    McLean, Stephanie; Persson, Anna; Norin, Tommy; Killen, Shaun S

    2018-04-02

    Group living is ubiquitous among animals [1, 2], but the exact benefits of group living experienced by individual groupmates is related to their spatial location within the overall group [3-5]. Individual variation in behavioral traits and nutritional state is known to affect interactions between individuals and their social group [6, 7], but physiological mechanisms underpinning collective animal behavior remain largely unexplored [8]. Here, we show that while fish at the front of moving groups are most successful at capturing food items, these individuals then show a systematic, post-feeding movement toward the rear of groups. Using observations of fish feeding in groups coupled with estimates of metabolic rate in fish consuming different meal sizes, we demonstrate that the magnitude of this shift in spatial position is directly related to the aerobic metabolic scope remaining after accounting for energetic costs of digestion. While previous work has shown that hungry individuals occupy anterior positions in moving groups [9, 10], our results show that the metabolic demand of food processing reduces the aerobic capacity available for locomotion in individuals that eat most, thus preventing them from maintaining leading positions. This basic trade-off between feeding and locomotor capacity could fundamentally dictate the spatial position of individuals within groups, perhaps obviating the role of individual traits in determining spatial preferences over shorter timescales (e.g., hours to days). This may be a general constraint for individuals within animal collectives, representing a key, yet overlooked, mediator of group functioning that could affect leadership, social information transfer, and group decision making. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Supplementing healthy rats with a high-niacin dose has no effect on muscle fiber distribution and muscle metabolic phenotype.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Kristen; Kynast, Anna Marie; Couturier, Aline; Mooren, Frank-Christoph; Krüger, Karsten; Most, Erika; Eder, Klaus; Ringseis, Robert

    2014-08-01

    It was recently shown that niacin prevents the obesity-induced type I to type II fiber switching in skeletal muscle of obese rats and favors the development of a more oxidative metabolic phenotype and thereby increases whole body utilization of fatty acids. Whether niacin also causes type II to type I fiber switching in skeletal muscle of healthy rats has not been investigated yet. Thus, the present study aimed to investigate whether niacin supplementation influences fiber distribution and metabolic phenotype of different skeletal muscles with a distinct type I-to-type II fiber ratio in healthy rats. Twenty-four male, 10-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned into two groups of 12 rats each and fed either a control diet with 30 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet (control group) or a high-niacin diet with 780 mg supplemented niacin/kg diet (high-niacin group). After 27 days of treatment, the percentage number of type I fibers in rectus femoris, gastrocnemius, and tibialis anterior muscles was 5-10% greater in the niacin group than in the control group, but did not differ between groups in soleus and vastus intermedius muscles. Transcript levels of genes encoding transcription factors regulating fiber switching, fiber-specific myosin heavy chain isoforms, and proteins involved in fatty acid utilization, oxidative phosphorylation, and angiogenesis did not differ between groups. The results show that niacin has only negligible effects on fiber distribution and its regulation as well as the metabolic phenotype of skeletal muscle in healthy rats.

  6. Retrieval of Vertical Aerosol and Trace Gas Distributions from Polarization Sensitive Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirpitz, Jan-Lukas; Friess, Udo; Platt, Ulrich

    2017-04-01

    An accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of trace gases and aerosols is crucial for our understanding of the chemical and dynamical processes in the lower troposphere. Their accurate determination is typically only possible by means of laborious and expensive airborne in-situ measurements but in the recent decades, numerous promising ground-based remote sensing approaches have been developed. One of them is to infer vertical distributions from "Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy" (DOAS) measurements. DOAS is a technique to analyze UV- and visible radiation spectra of direct or scattered sunlight, which delivers information on different atmospheric parameters, integrated over the light path from space to the instrument. An appropriate set of DOAS measurements, recorded under different viewing directions (Multi-Axis DOAS) and thus different light path geometries, provides information on the atmospheric state. The vertical profiles of aerosol properties and trace gas concentrations can be retrieved from such a set by numerical inversion techniques, incorporating radiative transfer models. The information content of measured data is rarely sufficient for a well-constrained retrieval, particularly for atmospheric layers above 1 km. We showed in first simulations that, apart from spectral properties, the polarization state of skylight is likely to provide a significant amount of additional information on the atmospheric state and thus to enhance retrieval quality. We present first simulations, expectations and ideas on how to implement and characterize a polarization sensitive Multi-Axis DOAS instrument and a corresponding profile retrieval algorithm.

  7. Metabolic mechanisms of drug-nutrient interactions.

    PubMed

    Hathcock, J N

    1985-01-01

    Metabolic mechanisms of nutrition and drug interactions include 1) the effects of diet on drug metabolism and action and 2) the effects of drugs on nutritional processes. The type, amount, and timing of foods consumed influence drug dissolution, absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion. High-fat meals enhance the absorption of griseofulvin and some other drugs. Milk and other sources of calcium inhibit absorption of tetracycline. High-fat meals increase plasma concentrations of free fatty acids and thereby displace many drugs from binding sites on plasma albumin. High-protein diets increase the activity of the mixed-function oxidase system and enhance the metabolism of numerous drugs. High-electrolyte intakes increase excretion of lithium and also diminish the action of diuretic agents. Bile acid sequestrants and some laxatives decrease lipid digestion and absorption, as well as absorption of the fat-soluble vitamins. Numerous drugs, including tetracycline and cholestyramine, bind iron and decrease its absorption. Coumarins inhibit the function of vitamin K. Phenobarbital and other anticonvulsants are inducers of cytochrome P-450 and the mixed-function oxidase system. Long-term treatment with these inducers can cause excessive metabolism and deficiency of vitamin D. Prooxidant drugs such as chloroquine, drugs detoxified by conjugation with glutathione, and alcohol can deplete reduced glutathione with consequent effects on amino acid transport and the redox status of cells. Acid-forming foods acidify the urine and increase the loss of alkaline drugs such as the amphetamines. Base-forming drugs increase the loss of acidic drugs such as barbiturates. The range of metabolic interactions of drugs and nutrients includes the full scope of physiological processes to which drugs and nutrients are subject.

  8. Spectroscopic analysis of autofluorescence distribution in digestive organ for unstained metabolism-based tumor detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimoto, Hidenobu; Iwata, Atsushi; Kagawa, Keiichiro; Sanomura, Yoji; Yoshida, Shigeto; Kawahito, Shoji; Tanaka, Shinji

    2017-02-01

    Auto fluorescence distribution of coenzymes NADH and FAD is investigated for the unstained tumor detection using an [?] originally designed confocal spectroscope. The tumor region in digestive organ can be determined by evaluating the redox index which is defined as the raio of NADH and FAD concentration. However, the redox index is largely influenced by the presence of collagen in the submucosal layer because its auto fluorescence spectrum overlaps considerably with that of NADH. Therefore, it is necessary to know in advance the distribution of NADH, FAD, and collagen in the mucosal layer. The purpose of our study is to investigate the vertical distribution of the redox index in tissue using depth-sensitive auto fluorescence spectroscopy. The experimental procedure and the results are presented.

  9. The evolution of high summit metabolism and cold tolerance in birds and its impact on present-day distributions.

    PubMed

    Swanson, David L; Garland, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Summit metabolic rate (M(sum), maximum cold-induced metabolic rate) is positively correlated with cold tolerance in birds, suggesting that high M(sum) is important for residency in cold climates. However, the phylogenetic distribution of high M(sum) among birds and the impact of its evolution on current distributions are not well understood. Two potential adaptive hypotheses might explain the phylogenetic distribution of high M(sum) among birds. The cold adaptation hypothesis contends that species wintering in cold climates should have higher M(sum) than species wintering in warmer climates. The flight adaptation hypothesis suggests that volant birds might be capable of generating high M(sum) as a byproduct of their muscular capacity for flight; thus, variation in M(sum) should be associated with capacity for sustained flight, one indicator of which is migration. We collected M(sum) data from the literature for 44 bird species and conducted both conventional and phylogenetically informed statistical analyses to examine the predictors of M(sum) variation. Significant phylogenetic signal was present for log body mass, log mass-adjusted M(sum), and average temperature in the winter range. In multiple regression models, log body mass, winter temperature, and clade were significant predictors of log M(sum). These results are consistent with a role for climate in determining M(sum) in birds, but also indicate that phylogenetic signal remains even after accounting for associations indicative of adaptation to winter temperature. Migratory strategy was never a significant predictor of log M(sum) in multiple regressions, a result that is not consistent with the flight adaptation hypothesis.

  10. Tissue distribution, metabolism and hepatic tissue injury in Chinese lizards (Eremias argus) after a single oral administration of lambda-cyhalothrin.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jing; Li, Jitong; Wang, Huili; Wang, Yinghuan; Guo, Baoyuan; Yin, Jing; Hao, Weiyu; Li, Wei; Li, Jianzhong; Xu, Peng

    2016-11-01

    Lambda-cyhalothrin (LCT) is a widely used pyrethroid with neurotoxicity. However, little is known about the toxicokinetics of LCT in reptiles. In this study, the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of LCT in Chinese lizards (Eremias Argus) were determined following a single dose (10 mg kg -1 ) treatment. In the liver, brain, gonads and skin, LCT levels peaked within several hours and then decreased rapidly. However, the concentration of LCT gradually increased in the fat tissue. More than 90% of the LCT dose was excreted in the faeces. One LCT metabolite, 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (PBA), was detected in lizard plasma and tissues. PBA preferentially accumulates in the brain and plasma. The half-life of PBA in the brain was 3.2 days, which was 35.4-fold greater than that of LCT. In the plasma, the concentration of PBA was significantly higher than that of LCT. The bioaccumulation of LCT in tissues was enantioselective, and the enantiomeric fractions (EF) ranged from 0.72 to 0.26. The preferential accumulation of enantiomers changed according to exposure time, but the reasons behind this phenomenon were not clear. For pathological analysis, vacuolation of the cytoplasm and large areas of necrosis were observed in the liver sections after 168 h of dosing. The liver tissues exhibited both decreases in the hepatosomatic index and histopathological lesions during the exposure period. In this study, the effect concentration of LCT in lizards was 200-fold lower than its LD 50 value used in risk assessments for birds. These results may provide additional information for the risk assessment of LCT for reptiles and indicate that birds may not be an ideal surrogate for reptile toxicity evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The effects of thiamin on lead metabolism: organ distribution of lead 203.

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J S; Hamilton, D L; Blakley, B R; Rousseaux, C G

    1992-01-01

    The effect of thiamin on the organ distribution of lead was evaluated in CD-1 mice exposed intragastrically or intraperitoneally to a single dose of lead acetate (100 micrograms) containing 100 microCi lead 203. They were treated with either thiamin (25 or 50 mg/kg body weight), calcium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (CaEDTA) (50 mg/kg body weight), or combinations of thiamin and CaEDTA. The whole body retention and the organ distribution of lead 203 varied depending upon the route of lead administration, dose of thiamin and the specific treatment combination. Thiamin (25 or 50 mg/kg) treatment increased the whole body retention of both intragastric and intraperitoneal lead by approximately 10% in each instance. Calcium ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid, either alone or in combination with thiamin (50 mg/kg) reduced the whole body retention of lead by as much as 14% regardless of route of lead exposure. The relative retention of lead by the liver, kidney and spleen was greater in mice exposed to lead by the intragastric route. Regardless of route, CaEDTA in the combined treatment reduced the relative retention of lead in both the liver and kidney, whereas thiamin alone only reduced the retention of lead in the kidney. The results of this study indicate that thiamin in combination with CaEDTA alters the distribution and retention of lead in a manner which may have therapeutic application as it relates to chelation therapy. PMID:1423063

  12. Distribution of bacterioplankton with active metabolism in waters of the St. Anna Trough, Kara Sea, in autumn 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosharova, I. V.; Mosharov, S. A.; Ilinskiy, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of bacterioplankton with active electron transport chains, as well as bacteria with intact cell membranes, was investigated for the first time in the region of St. Anna Trough in the Kara Sea. The average number of bacteria with active electron transport chains in the waters of the St. Anna Trough was 15.55 × 103 cells mL-1 (the limits of variation were 1.06-92.17 × 103 cells mL-1). The average number of bacteria with intact membranes was 33.46 × 103 cells mL-1 (the limits of variation were 6.78 to 103.18 × 103 cells mL-1). Almost all bacterioplankton microorganisms in the studied area were potentially viable, and the average share of bacteria with intact membranes was 92.1% of the total number of bacterioplankton (TNB) (the limits of variation were 76.2 to 98.4%). The share of bacteria with active metabolisms was 38.2% of the TNB (the limits of variation were 5.6-93.4%). The shares of the bacteria with active metabolisms were maximum in areas with the most stable environmental conditions (on the shelf and in deep water), whereas on the slope, where the gradients of water temperature and salinity were maximum, these values were lower.

  13. Subcellular Distribution of NAD+ between Cytosol and Mitochondria Determines the Metabolic Profile of Human Cells.

    PubMed

    VanLinden, Magali R; Dölle, Christian; Pettersen, Ina K N; Kulikova, Veronika A; Niere, Marc; Agrimi, Gennaro; Dyrstad, Sissel E; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Nikiforov, Andrey A; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-11-13

    The mitochondrial NAD pool is particularly important for the maintenance of vital cellular functions. Although at least in some fungi and plants, mitochondrial NAD is imported from the cytosol by carrier proteins, in mammals, the mechanism of how this organellar pool is generated has remained obscure. A transporter mediating NAD import into mammalian mitochondria has not been identified. In contrast, human recombinant NMNAT3 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and is able to catalyze NAD(+) biosynthesis in vitro. However, whether the endogenous NMNAT3 protein is functionally effective at generating NAD(+) in mitochondria of intact human cells still remains to be demonstrated. To modulate mitochondrial NAD(+) content, we have expressed plant and yeast mitochondrial NAD(+) carriers in human cells and observed a profound increase in mitochondrial NAD(+). None of the closest human homologs of these carriers had any detectable effect on mitochondrial NAD(+) content. Surprisingly, constitutive redistribution of NAD(+) from the cytosol to the mitochondria by stable expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter NDT2 in HEK293 cells resulted in dramatic growth retardation and a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, despite the elevated mitochondrial NAD(+) levels. These results suggest that a mitochondrial NAD(+) transporter, similar to the known one from A. thaliana, is likely absent and could even be harmful in human cells. We provide further support for the alternative possibility, namely intramitochondrial NAD(+) synthesis, by demonstrating the presence of endogenous NMNAT3 in the mitochondria of human cells. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. Subcellular Distribution of NAD+ between Cytosol and Mitochondria Determines the Metabolic Profile of Human Cells*

    PubMed Central

    VanLinden, Magali R.; Dölle, Christian; Pettersen, Ina K. N.; Kulikova, Veronika A.; Niere, Marc; Agrimi, Gennaro; Dyrstad, Sissel E.; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Nikiforov, Andrey A.; Tronstad, Karl Johan; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The mitochondrial NAD pool is particularly important for the maintenance of vital cellular functions. Although at least in some fungi and plants, mitochondrial NAD is imported from the cytosol by carrier proteins, in mammals, the mechanism of how this organellar pool is generated has remained obscure. A transporter mediating NAD import into mammalian mitochondria has not been identified. In contrast, human recombinant NMNAT3 localizes to the mitochondrial matrix and is able to catalyze NAD+ biosynthesis in vitro. However, whether the endogenous NMNAT3 protein is functionally effective at generating NAD+ in mitochondria of intact human cells still remains to be demonstrated. To modulate mitochondrial NAD+ content, we have expressed plant and yeast mitochondrial NAD+ carriers in human cells and observed a profound increase in mitochondrial NAD+. None of the closest human homologs of these carriers had any detectable effect on mitochondrial NAD+ content. Surprisingly, constitutive redistribution of NAD+ from the cytosol to the mitochondria by stable expression of the Arabidopsis thaliana mitochondrial NAD+ transporter NDT2 in HEK293 cells resulted in dramatic growth retardation and a metabolic shift from oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, despite the elevated mitochondrial NAD+ levels. These results suggest that a mitochondrial NAD+ transporter, similar to the known one from A. thaliana, is likely absent and could even be harmful in human cells. We provide further support for the alternative possibility, namely intramitochondrial NAD+ synthesis, by demonstrating the presence of endogenous NMNAT3 in the mitochondria of human cells. PMID:26432643

  15. Erythritol reduces small intestinal glucose absorption, increases muscle glucose uptake, improves glucose metabolic enzymes activities and increases expression of Glut-4 and IRS-1 in type 2 diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Chukwuma, Chika Ifeanyi; Mopuri, Ramgopal; Nagiah, Savania; Chuturgoon, Anil Amichund; Islam, Md Shahidul

    2017-08-02

    Studies have reported that erythritol, a low or non-glycemic sugar alcohol possesses anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials but the underlying mode of actions is not clear. This study investigated the underlying mode of actions behind the anti-hyperglycemic and anti-diabetic potentials of erythritol using different experimental models (experiment 1, 2 and 3). Experiment 1 examined the effects of increasing concentrations (2.5-20%) of erythritol on glucose absorption and uptake in isolated rat jejunum and psoas muscle, respectively. Experiments 2 and 3 examined the effects of a single oral dose of erythritol (1 g/kg bw) on intestinal glucose absorption, gastric emptying and postprandial blood glucose increase, glucose tolerance, serum insulin level, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, liver and muscle glycogen contents and mRNA and protein expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in normal and type 2 diabetic animals. Experiment 1 revealed that erythritol dose dependently enhanced muscle glucose ex vivo. Experiment 2 demonstrated that erythritol feeding delayed gastric emptying and reduced small intestinal glucose absorption as well as postprandial blood glucose rise, especially in diabetic animals. Experiment 3 showed that erythritol feeding improved glucose tolerance, muscle/liver hexokinase and liver glucose-6 phosphatase activities, glycogen storage and also modulated expression of muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 in diabetic animals. Data suggest that erythritol may exert anti-hyperglycemic effects not only via reducing small intestinal glucose absorption, but also by increasing muscle glucose uptake, improving glucose metabolic enzymes activity and modulating muscle Glut-4 and IRS-1 mRNA and protein expression. Hence, erythritol may be a useful dietary supplement for managing hyperglycemia, particularly for T2D.

  16. Choline distribution and metabolism in pregnant rats and fetuses are influenced by the choline content of the maternal diet.

    PubMed

    Garner, S C; Mar, M H; Zeisel, S H

    1995-11-01

    Choline supplementation of pregnant rats between d 12 and 17 of pregnancy permanently enhances the spatial memory of offspring; however, the mechanism is unknown. We examined the effect of choline supplementation on metabolism of orally ingested choline by nonmated rats and pregnant rats and their fetuses. We studied the metabolism of an acute oral dose of 14C-choline chloride in pregnant and nonmated rats with and without choline supplementation (25 mmol/L choline chloride in water) on d 12-17 of pregnancy. During the first 2 h after oral dosing, plasma radiolabeled choline was detectable, whereas plasma choline metabolites contributed little to total radioactivity at any time. The pattern of accumulation of label in placentas was similar in all groups. Fetal tissues (i.e., brain, liver and carcass remnant) contained primarily 14C-phosphatidylcholine and 14C-phosphorylcholine. Also, we examined the fetal tissue distribution of isotopically labeled (deuterated) choline derived from the diet and from the dietary choline supplement. The distribution patterns for radiolabeled choline metabolites in fetuses of supplemented dams accumulated significantly (P < 0.01) more of their total choline and its metabolites than fetuses of control dams during d 12-17 of gestation (50 vs. 20%). In fetuses from supplemented dams, betaine concentrations were greater than in fetuses from control dams in all organs assayed (by 36-57%). Phosphorylcholine concentrations in brain of fetuses from supplemented dams were also greater. These experiments identify potential metabolites of choline that might mediate the observed effects on brain development in the rats.

  17. Absorption and Metabolism of Phenolics from Digests of Polyphenol-Rich Potato Extracts Using the Caco-2/HepG2 Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi Ekbatan, Shima; Iskandar, Michele M.; Sleno, Lekha; Sabally, Kebba; Khairallah, Joelle; Prakash, Satya

    2018-01-01

    The bioactivity of dietary polyphenols depends upon gastrointestinal and hepatic metabolism of secondary microbial phenolic metabolites generated via colonic microbiota-mediated biotransformation. A polyphenol-rich potato extract (PRPE) containing chlorogenic, caffeic, and ferulic acids and rutin was digested in a dynamic multi-reactor gastrointestinal simulator of the human intestinal microbial ecosystem (GI model). Simulated digestion showed extensive degradation of the parent compounds and the generation of microbial phenolic metabolites. To characterize the transport and metabolism of microbial phenolic metabolites following digestion, a co-culture of intestinal Caco-2 and hepatic HepG2 cells was exposed to the PRPE-derived digests obtained from the colonic vessels. Following a 2 h incubation of the digesta with the Caco-2/HepG2 co-cultures, approximately 10–15% of ferulic, dihydrocaffeic, and dihydroferulic acids and 3–5% of 3-hydroxybenzoic, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, and coumaric acids were observed in the basolateral side, whereas 3-hydroxyphenylacetic acid, phenylpropanoic acid, and cinnamic acid were not detected. Subsequent HepG2 cellular metabolism led to major increases in ferulic, dihydrocaffeic, 3-hydroxyphenylpropionic, and coumaric acids ranging from 160–370%. These findings highlight the importance of hepatic metabolism towards the generation of secondary metabolites of polyphenols despite low selective Caco-2 cellular uptake of microbial phenolic metabolites. PMID:29329242

  18. An open-label, single-dose, phase 1 study of the absorption, metabolism and excretion of quizartinib, a highly selective and potent FLT3 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, in healthy male subjects, for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sanga, Madhu; James, Joyce; Marini, Joseph; Gammon, Guy; Hale, Christine; Li, Jianke

    2017-10-01

    1. Quizartinib absorption, metabolism and excretion were characterized in six healthy men receiving a single oral dose of 60 mg (≈100 μCi) of [ 14 C]-quizartinib. Blood, plasma, urine and faeces were collected ≤336 h postdose. 2. Four hours postdose, maximum mean ± SD blood radioactivity concentrations were 296 ± 67.4 ng equivalents/g. A mean ± SD of 1.64 ± 0.482% and 76.3 ± 6.23% of the dose was recovered in urine and faeces, respectively, within 336 h postdose. 3. Radio-detector high-performance liquid chromatography (radio-HPLC) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) showed two main radioactive peaks in plasma, unchanged quizartinib and mono-oxidative metabolite, AC886. Five additional metabolites in plasma were identified by LC-MS, but low levels prevented radio-HPLC detection. Although unchanged quizartinib was the main radioactive component in faeces (mean, 4.0% of administered dose), 15 metabolites representing a mean of 1.0-3.5% of administered dose were found. Quizartinib was predominantly metabolized by phase I biotransformations (oxidation, reduction, dealkylation, deamination, hydrolysis and combinations thereof). 4. This study indicated that quizartinib was rapidly and orally bioavailable, extensively metabolized, with AC886 as the major circulating metabolite, and predominantly eliminated in faeces. Quizartinib was well tolerated in the subjects.

  19. Comparative study on intestinal metabolism and absorption in vivo of ginsenosides in sulphur-fumigated and non-fumigated ginseng by ultra performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry based chemical profiling approach.

    PubMed

    Zhu, He; Shen, Hong; Xu, Jun; Xu, Jin-Di; Zhu, Ling-Ying; Wu, Jie; Chen, Hu-Biao; Li, Song-Lin

    2015-04-01

    Our previous study indicated that sulphur-fumigation of ginseng in post-harvest handling processes could induce chemical transformation of ginsenosides to generate multiple ginsenoside sulphur derivatives. In this study, the influence of sulphur-fumigation on intestinal metabolism and absorption in vivo of ginsenosides in ginseng was sequentially studied. The intestinal metabolic and absorbed profiles of ginsenosides in rats after intra-gastric (i.g.) administration of sulphur-fumigated ginseng (SFG) and non-fumigated ginseng (NFG) were comparatively characterized by a newly established ultra performance liquid chromatography quadruple time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization negative (ESI-) mode. A novel strategy based on the characteristic product ions and fragmentation pathways of different types of aglycones (saponin skeletons) and glycosyl moieties was proposed and successfully applied to rapid structural identification of ginsenoside sulphur derivatives and relevant metabolites. In total, 18 ginsenoside sulphur derivatives and 26 ginsenoside sulphur derivative metabolites in the faeces together with six ginsenoside sulphur derivatives in the plasma were identified in the SFG-administrated group but not in the NFG-administrated group. The results clearly demonstrated that the intestinal metabolic and absorbed profiles of ginsenosides in sulphur-fumigated and non-fumigated ginseng were quite different, which inspired that sulphur-fumigation of ginseng should not be recommended before the bioactivity and toxicity of the ginsenoside sulphur derivatives were systematically evaluated. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Reversible effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol distribution and metabolism in fibroblasts and transformed neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Pörn, M I; Slotte, J P

    1990-01-01

    Plasma-membrane sphingomyelin appears to be one of the major determinants of the preferential allocation of cell cholesterol into the plasma-membrane compartment, since removal of sphingomyelin leads to a dramatic redistribution of cholesterol within the cell [Slotte & Bierman (1988) Biochem. J. 250, 653-658]. In the present study we examined the long-term effects of sphingomyelin degradation on cholesterol redistribution in cells and determined the reversibility of the process. In a human lung fibroblast-cell line, removal of 80% of the sphingomyelin led to a rapid and transient up-regulation (3-fold) of acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity, and also, within 30 h, to the translocation of about 50% of the cell non-esterified cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase-susceptible compartment (i.e. the cell surface) to oxidase-resistant compartments. At 49 h after the initial sphingomyelin degradation, the cell sphingomyelin level was back to 45% of the control level, and the direction of cell cholesterol flow was toward the cell surface, although the original distribution was not achieved. In a transformed neuroblastoma cell line (SH-SY5Y), the depletion of sphingomyelin led to a similarly rapid and transient up-regulation of ACAT activity, and to the translocation of about 25% of cell-surface cholesterol into internal membranes (within 3 h). The flow of cholesterol back to the cholesterol oxidase-susceptible pool was rapid, and a pretreatment cholesterol distribution was reached within 20-49 h. Also, the resynthesis of sphingomyelin was faster in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells and reached control levels within 24 h. The findings of the present study show that the cellular redistribution of cholesterol, as induced by sphingomyelin degradation, is reversible and suggest that the normalization of cellular cholesterol distribution is linked to the re-synthesis of sphingomyelin. PMID:2222406

  1. The Interplay Between Fat Mass and Fat Distribution as Determinants of the Metabolic Syndrome Is Sex-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Lind, Lars; Ärnlöv, Johan; Lampa, Erik

    2017-09-01

    Fat mass and fat distribution are major determinants of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the interplay between them has not been thoroughly investigated. In addition, fat mass and fat distribution are generally different in men than in women. We aimed to determine whether the interplay between fat mass and fat distribution regarding MetS and its components is sex-dependent using data from the large-scale population-based sample EpiHealth. Occurrence of MetS and its components was determined together with fat mass by bioimpedance in 19,094 participants in the EpiHealth sample [mean age 61 years (SD 8.5), 56% females]. MetS was defined by the NCEP/ATPIII-criteria. MetS prevalence was 23.0%. Fat mass (percent of body weight) was more strongly related to MetS (and the number of MetS components) in men than in women (P < 0.0001 for interaction term) and in those with a high compared with those with a low waist/hip ratio (WHR). This modulating effect of WHR on the fat mass versus MetS-relationship was more pronounced in women than in men (P < 0.0001 for interaction term). When analyzing the MetS components one by one, fat mass was more closely related to all the individual MetS criteria in men than in women, except for the glucose criteria. Fat mass is more closely related to prevalent MetS in men than in women, but the modulating effect of an abdominal type of fat distribution on the fat mass versus MetS-relationship is stronger in women.

  2. Isothiocyanate metabolism, distribution, and interconversion in mice following consumption of thermally processed broccoli sprouts or purified sulforaphane.

    PubMed

    Bricker, Gregory V; Riedl, Kenneth M; Ralston, Robin A; Tober, Kathleen L; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2014-10-01

    Broccoli sprouts are a rich source of glucosinolates, a group of phytochemicals that when hydrolyzed, are associated with cancer prevention. Our objectives were to investigate the metabolism, distribution, and interconversion of isothiocyanates (ITCs) in mice fed thermally processed broccoli sprout powders (BSPs) or the purified ITC sulforaphane. For 1 wk, mice were fed a control diet (n = 20) or one of four treatment diets (n = 10 each) containing nonheated BSP, 60°C mildly heated BSP, 5-min steamed BSP, or 3 mmol purified sulforaphane. Sulforaphane and erucin metabolite concentrations in skin, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, and plasma were quantified using HPLC-MS/MS. Thermal intensity of BSP processing had disparate effects on ITC metabolite concentrations upon consumption. Mild heating generally resulted in the greatest ITC metabolite concentrations in vivo, followed by the nonheated and steamed BSP diets. We observed interconversion between sulforaphane and erucin species or metabolites, and report that erucin is the favored form in liver, kidney, and bladder, even when only sulforaphane is consumed. ITC metabolites were distributed to all tissues analyzed, suggesting the potential for systemic benefits. We report for the first time tissue-dependent ratio of sulforaphane and erucin, though further investigation is warranted to assess biological activity of individual forms. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Isothiocyanate metabolism, distribution, and interconversion in mice following consumption of thermally processed broccoli sprouts or purified sulforaphane

    PubMed Central

    Bricker, Gregory V.; Riedl, Kenneth M.; Ralston, Robin A.; Tober, Kathleen L.; Oberyszyn, Tatiana M.; Schwartz, Steven J.

    2014-01-01

    Scope Broccoli sprouts are a rich source of glucosinolates, a group of phytochemicals that when hydrolyzed, are associated with cancer prevention. Our objectives were to investigate the metabolism, distribution, and interconversion of isothiocyanates (ITCs) in mice fed thermally processed broccoli sprout powders (BSPs) or the purified ITC sulforaphane. Methods and results For 1 wk, mice were fed a control diet (n = 20) or one of four treatment diets (n = 10 each) containing nonheated BSP, 60°C mildly heated BSP, 5-min steamed BSP, or 3 mmol purified sulforaphane. Sulforaphane and erucin metabolite concentrations in skin, liver, kidney, bladder, lung, and plasma were quantified using HPLC-MS/MS. Thermal intensity of BSP processing had disparate effects on ITC metabolite concentrations upon consumption. Mild heating generally resulted in the greatest ITC metabolite concentrations in vivo, followed by the nonheated and steamed BSP diets. We observed interconversion between sulforaphane and erucin species or metabolites, and report that erucin is the favored form in liver, kidney, and bladder, even when only sulforaphane is consumed. Conclusion ITC metabolites were distributed to all tissues analyzed, suggesting the potential for systemic benefits. We report for the first time tissue-dependent ratio of sulforaphane and erucin, though further investigation is warranted to assess biological activity of individual forms. PMID:24975513

  4. Distribution of elements in individual blood cells in metabolic disorders at the cellular level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, Erland; Lindh, Ulf

    1985-08-01

    In comparison with controls neutrophil granulocytes from Rheumatoid arthritis (RA), Infantile Neuronal Ceroid Lipofuscinosis (INCL), Chronic Lymphatic Leukemia (L) and Aplastic Anemia (AA) displayed significant alterations in essential and non-essential elements which might be interpreted as fingerprints of these deseases. The neutrophils from RA patients displayed alterations in the concentrations of iron, calcium, strontium, manganese, zinc and copper. INCL displayed alterations in the concentrations of iron and copper but in the INCL disease the iron concentration was about 2 times higher than in RA. In leukemia, aluminium was observed but not in the controls (< 0.5 μg/ g). The zinc concentration was lowered in leukemia. Aplastic anemia displayed alterations in zirconium, arsenic, molybdenum, iron and zinc. The platelets from RA, INCL, L and AA patients also displayed alterations in the elemental profiles. The platelets from AA patients displayed a unique elemental distribution of arsenic, zirconium and molybdenum. The elemental profiles of the thrombocytes and neutrophils might be used as a complement in the diagnosis of the examined diseases and in therapy the elemental profile might be used to monitor drugs at the cellular level.

  5. Tissue Distribution and Metabolism of Aflatoxin B1-14C in Broiler Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Mabee, Michael S.; Chipley, John R.

    1973-01-01

    The effects of administering low levels of aflatoxin B1-14C by crop intubation daily for 14 days to broiler chickens were determined. Studies on the distribution of 14C in the blood, selected organs, tissues, and excreta were conducted. No toxic effects were observed in broiler chickens during the 14 days of the experiment. The broiler chickens excreted 90.64% of the 14C administered. Of the 14C retained, 11.04, 9.83, 4.30, 12.52, 31.66, and 30.63% were detected in the blood, liver, heart, gizzard, breast, and leg, respectively. Chemical assay of those samples demonstrating radioactivity revealed that 81.2% of the radioactivity in these substrates was not extractable by classical extraction procedures while approximately 10% was extractable. Treatment of aqueous extracts for conjugated steroids by treatments with beta-glucuronidase revealed that 31.5% of the 14C detected in the aqueous extract was a liberated glucuronide conjugate of aflatoxin M1-14C. PMID:4715554

  6. The distribution and metabolism of urea in the eastern Canadian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, W. G.; Head, E. J. H.; Conover, R. J.; Longhurst, A. R.; Sameoto, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    Urea concentrations, uptake, and excretion were measured at various locations in northern Baffin Bay and surrounding waters during the summer of 1980. Concentrations were variable (<0.03 to > 2.00 mg-at. N m -3) but followed patterns of decreasing concentration with depth in the euphotic zone and with distance from land. Urea accounted for > 50% of the total dissolved nitrogen in the upper mixed layer at most stations. Urea uptake rates showed generally the same distributional patterns as did concentrations and on the average accounted for 32% of the total nitrogen (NO 3- + NH 4+ + urea) productivity in the eupholic zone. Ammonium, and frequently NO 3-, were utilized in preference to urea. Dual isotope ( 14C and 15N-urea) labelling experiments suggested that most urea-C was respired as CO 2 while 50 to 80% of the urea-N was incorporated by the phytoplankton. Excretion measurements suggested that the four dominant macrozooplankton species ( Calanus hyperboreus, C. finmarchicus, C. glacialis, and Metridia sp.) supplied only -3% of the urea-N but -40% of the NH 4+-N requirements of the primary producers.

  7. Studies on distribution and metabolism of para-methoxymethamphetamine (PMMA) in rats after subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Rohanova, Miroslava; Balikova, Marie

    2009-05-02

    p-Methoxymethamphetamine (PMMA) is an illegal psychedelic drug of abuse derived from an amphetamine structure with a risk to health and reports of several cases of intoxications and fatalities caused by its ingestion. However, its pharmacokinetics based on a controlled study is unknown and only partial information on its biotransformation in animal models is available. Our experimental design aimed to study the disposition and kinetic profile of PMMA and its metabolites in rat plasma and selected tissues after the bolus subcutaneous dose of 40mg/kg, using a GC-MS method. Prior to this, we performed a qualitative verification of its metabolites appearing in excreted urine fractions. PMMA maximum plasma concentration of 4014+/-1122ng/mL was reached 30min after dosing, whereas the appearance of metabolites was rather delayed. The disposition of PMMA was characterized by its approximate half-life of 1.0h, volume of distribution of 6.4L/kg and plasma clearance of 4.4L/h. PMMA tissue concentration exceeded plasma and the highest one was found in the lungs (c(max) 42,988+/-10,223ng/g). Penetration through the blood/brain barrier was more efficient considering PMMA and its N-desmethylated metabolite PMA (para-methoxyamphetamine) than hydroxylated metabolites. The maximum brain/plasma ratio value of PMMA (15.8) and PMA (11.8) was reached after 8h of observation. The experimental results ascertained could be useful for subsequent evaluation of the psychotropic or neurotoxic effects of PMMA and for diagnostic concern of intoxication.

  8. A substantial fraction of phytoplankton-derived DON is resistant to degradation by a metabolically versatile, widely distributed marine bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Kimmance, Susan; McCormack, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria for degrading dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and remineralising ammonium is of importance for marine ecosystems, as nitrogen availability frequently limits productivity. Here, we assess the capacity of a widely distributed and metabolically versatile marine bacterium to degrade phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen. To achieve this, we lysed exponentially growing diatoms and used the derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) to support an axenic culture of Alteromonas sp.. Bacterial biomass (as particulate carbon and nitrogen) was monitored for 70 days while growth dynamics (cell count), DOM (DOC, DON) and dissolved nutrient concentrations were monitored for up to 208 days. Bacterial biomass increased rapidly within the first 7 days prior to a period of growth/death cycles potentially linked to rapid nutrient recycling. We found that ≈75% of the initial DOC and ≈35% of the initial DON were consumed by bacteria within 40 and 4 days respectively, leaving a significant fraction of DOM resilient to degradation by this bacterial species. The different rates and extents to which DOC and DON were accessed resulted in changes in DOM stoichiometry and the iterative relationship between DOM quality and bacterial growth over time influenced bacterial cell C:N molar ratio. C:N values increased to 10 during the growth phase before decreasing to values of ≈5, indicating a change from relative N-limitation/C-sufficiency to relative C-limitation/N-sufficiency. Consequently, despite its reported metabolic versatility, we demonstrate that Alteromonas sp. was unable to access all phytoplankton derived DOM and that a bacterial community is likely to be required. By making the relatively simple assumption that an experimentally derived fraction of DOM remains resilient to bacterial degradation, these experimental results were corroborated by numerical simulations using a previously published model describing the interaction

  9. Community genomic analyses constrain the distribution of metabolic traits across the Chloroflexi phylum and indicate roles in sediment carbon cycling

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Sediments are massive reservoirs of carbon compounds and host a large fraction of microbial life. Microorganisms within terrestrial aquifer sediments control buried organic carbon turnover, degrade organic contaminants, and impact drinking water quality. Recent 16S rRNA gene profiling indicates that members of the bacterial phylum Chloroflexi are common in sediment. Only the role of the class Dehalococcoidia, which degrade halogenated solvents, is well understood. Genomic sampling is available for only six of the approximate 30 Chloroflexi classes, so little is known about the phylogenetic distribution of reductive dehalogenation or about the broader metabolic characteristics of Chloroflexi in sediment. Results We used metagenomics to directly evaluate the metabolic potential and diversity of Chloroflexi in aquifer sediments. We sampled genomic sequence from 86 Chloroflexi representing 15 distinct lineages, including members of eight classes previously characterized only by 16S rRNA sequences. Unlike in the Dehalococcoidia, genes for organohalide respiration are rare within the Chloroflexi genomes sampled here. Near-complete genomes were reconstructed for three Chloroflexi. One, a member of an unsequenced lineage in the Anaerolinea, is an aerobe with the potential for respiring diverse carbon compounds. The others represent two genomically unsampled classes sibling to the Dehalococcoidia, and are anaerobes likely involved in sugar and plant-derived-compound degradation to acetate. Both fix CO2 via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway, a pathway not previously documented in Chloroflexi. The genomes each encode unique traits apparently acquired from Archaea, including mechanisms of motility and ATP synthesis. Conclusions Chloroflexi in the aquifer sediments are abundant and highly diverse. Genomic analyses provide new evolutionary boundaries for obligate organohalide respiration. We expand the potential roles of Chloroflexi in sediment carbon cycling beyond

  10. A substantial fraction of phytoplankton-derived DON is resistant to degradation by a metabolically versatile, widely distributed marine bacterium.

    PubMed

    Polimene, Luca; Clark, Darren; Kimmance, Susan; McCormack, Paul

    2017-01-01

    The capacity of bacteria for degrading dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) and remineralising ammonium is of importance for marine ecosystems, as nitrogen availability frequently limits productivity. Here, we assess the capacity of a widely distributed and metabolically versatile marine bacterium to degrade phytoplankton-derived dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and nitrogen. To achieve this, we lysed exponentially growing diatoms and used the derived dissolved organic matter (DOM) to support an axenic culture of Alteromonas sp.. Bacterial biomass (as particulate carbon and nitrogen) was monitored for 70 days while growth dynamics (cell count), DOM (DOC, DON) and dissolved nutrient concentrations were monitored for up to 208 days. Bacterial biomass increased rapidly within the first 7 days prior to a period of growth/death cycles potentially linked to rapid nutrient recycling. We found that ≈75% of the initial DOC and ≈35% of the initial DON were consumed by bacteria within 40 and 4 days respectively, leaving a significant fraction of DOM resilient to degradation by this bacterial species. The different rates and extents to which DOC and DON were accessed resulted in changes in DOM stoichiometry and the iterative relationship between DOM quality and bacterial growth over time influenced bacterial cell C:N molar ratio. C:N values increased to 10 during the growth phase before decreasing to values of ≈5, indicating a change from relative N-limitation/C-sufficiency to relative C-limitation/N-sufficiency. Consequently, despite its reported metabolic versatility, we demonstrate that Alteromonas sp. was unable to access all phytoplankton derived DOM and that a bacterial community is likely to be required. By making the relatively simple assumption that an experimentally derived fraction of DOM remains resilient to bacterial degradation, these experimental results were corroborated by numerical simulations using a previously published model describing the interaction

  11. Effects of a gel forming dietary fiber, guar gum, on the absorption of glibenclamide and metabolic control and serum lipids in patients with non-insulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes.

    PubMed

    Uusitupa, M; Södervik, H; Silvasti, M; Karttunen, P

    1990-04-01

    Nine patients with non-insulin-dependent diabetes (NIDDM) treated with glibenclamide (3.5 mg b.i.d.) participated in this randomized double-blind placebo controlled crossover study to evaluate the effects of granulated guar gum (5 g t.i.d. with meals) on the absorption of glibenclamide and metabolic control and serum lipids. Each treatment period lasted for 4 weeks, and there was a wash-out period of one week between the treatments. The fasting blood glucose (10.5 +/- 3.4 mmol/l on guar gum vs 11.3 +/- 3.7 mmol/l on placebo, p less than 0.05) and serum total cholesterol (5.9 +/- 1.4 mmol/l on guar gum vs 6.6 +/- 1.6 mmol/l on placebo; p less than 0.05) levels were lower after the treatment with guar gum than placebo. No significant differences were observed in serum triglycerides or HDL cholesterol between guar gum and placebo treatments. The administration of guar gum together with glibenclamide did not change significantly the maximum concentration (223 +/- 196 ng/ml on guar gum vs 184 +/- 138 ng/ml on placebo; n = 7, NS) or area under the curve (AUC0-6) [729 +/- 813 (ng/ml) X h on guar gum vs 560 +/- 513 (ng/ml) X h on placebo; NS] of glibenclamide. The fasting serum glibenclamide concentrations were similar at the end of the 4-week treatment period with guar gum and placebo. In conclusion, guar gum improved the metabolic control and decreased serum lipids of patients with NIDDM. In addition, guar gum ingested with glibenclamide did not interfere with the absorption of glibenclamide.

  12. Absorption fluids data survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macriss, R. A.; Zawacki, T. S.

    Development of improved data for the thermodynamic, transport and physical properties of absorption fluids were studied. A specific objective of this phase of the study is to compile, catalog and coarse screen the available US data of known absorption fluid systems and publish it as a first edition document to be distributed to manufacturers, researchers and others active in absorption heat pump activities. The methodology and findings of the compilation, cataloguing and coarse screening of the available US data on absorption fluid properties and presents current status and future work on this project are summarized. Both in house file and literature searches were undertaken to obtain available US publications with pertinent physical, thermodynamic and transport properties data for absorption fluids. Cross checks of literature searches were also made, using available published bibliographies and literature review articles, to eliminate secondary sources for the data and include only original sources and manuscripts. The properties of these fluids relate to the liquid and/or vapor state, as encountered in normal operation of absorption equipment employing such fluids, and to the crystallization boundary of the liquid phase, where applicable. The actual data were systematically classified according to the type of fluid and property, as well as temperature, pressure and concentration ranges over which data were available. Data were sought for 14 different properties: Vapor-Liquid Equilibria, Crystallization Temperature, Corrosion Characteristics, Heat of Mixing, Liquid-Phase-Densities, Vapor-Liquid-Phase Enthalpies, Specific Heat, Stability, Viscosity, Mass Transfer Rate, Heat Transfer Rate, Thermal Conductivity, Flammability, and Toxicity.

  13. The uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether inhaled alone and in combination with gasoline vapor.

    PubMed

    Benson, Janet M; Tibbetts, Brad M; Barr, Edward B

    2003-06-13

    The purpose of these studies was to evaluate the tissue uptake, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of methyl tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) in rats and to determine the effects of coinhalation of the volatile fraction of unleaded gasoline on these parameters. Male F344 rats were exposed nose-only once for 4 h to 4, 40, or 400 ppm 14C-MTBE and to 20 and 200 ppm of the light fraction of unleaded gasoline (LFG) containing 4 and 40 ppm 14C-MTBE, respectively. To evaluate the effects of repeated inhalation of LFG on the fate of inhaled MTBE, rats were exposed for 7 consecutive days to 20 and 200 ppm LFG followed on d 8 by exposure to LFG containing 14C-MTBE. Three subgroups of rats were included for evaluation of respiratory parameters, rates and routes of excretion, and tissue distribution and elimination. MTBE and its chief metabolite, tertiary-butyl alcohol, were quantitated in blood and kidney (immediately after exposure), and the major urinary metabolites, 2-hydroxyisobutyric acid and 2-methyl-1,2- propanediol, were identified and quantified in urine. Inhalation of MTBE alone or as a component of LFG had no concentration-dependent effect on respiratory minute volume. The initial body burdens (IBBs) of MTBE equivalents achieved after 4 h of exposure to MTBE did not increase linearly with exposure concentration. MTBE equivalents rapidly distributed to all tissues examined, with the largest percentages distributed to liver. Between 40 and 400 ppm, there was a significant reduction in percentage of the IBB present in the major organs examined, both immediately and 72 h after exposure. At 400 ppm, the elimination rates of MTBE equivalents from tissues changed significantly. Furthermore, at 400 ppm there was a significant decrease in the elimination half-time of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in breath and a significant increase in the percentage of the IBB of MTBE equivalents eliminated as VOCs in breath. LFG coexposure significantly decreased the percentage of the

  14. Metabolism, distribution and elimination of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate: open-label, single-centre, phase I study in healthy adult volunteers.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Suma M; Pennick, Michael; Stark, Jeffrey G

    2008-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children often persists into adulthood and is potentially associated with significant social and occupational impairments. It is important to understand the effects of pharmacological treatments of ADHD in adults. This study aimed to assess the absorption, metabolism and elimination of lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in normal, healthy adult subjects following a single oral dose. A secondary objective was to assess the safety and tolerability of treatment. In an open-label, single-centre study, six healthy adult volunteers aged 22-52 years received a single oral 70 mg dose of (14)C-radiolabelled lisdexamfetamine dimesylate in solution following a 10-hour fast. Blood samples drawn pre-dose and at time points up to 120 hours post-dose were used for plasma pharmacokinetic analysis of the active d-amphetamine and the intact parent compound lisdexamfetamine dimesylate. Recovery of radioactivity was determined by liquid scintillation counting of blood samples (whole blood and plasma), urine samples and faecal samples collected pre-dose and at designated time points up to 120 hours post-dose. Urine samples were also analysed for the presence of amphetamine-derived metabolites. Safety was assessed by adverse event reporting, changes in physical findings, vital sign measurements, ECG measurements, and clinical laboratory test results. For intact lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, the median time to reach maximum plasma drug concentration (t(max)) was 1.00 hour, and the mean maximum plasma drug concentration (C(max)) was 58.2 +/- 28.1 ng/mL. Intact lisdexamfetamine dimesylate exhibited modest systemic exposure (area under the drug concentration-time curve from time 0 to infinity [AUC(infinity)] 67.04 +/- 18.94 ng . h/mL), and rapid elimination (mean apparent terminal elimination half-life [t((1/2)beta)] 0.47 hours). For d-amphetamine, the median t(max) was 3.00 hours, and the mean C(max) was 80.3 +/- 11.8 ng/mL. The AUC(infinity) of d

  15. Epicardial fat thickness: distribution and association with diabetes mellitus, hypertension and the metabolic syndrome in the ELSA-Brasil study.

    PubMed

    Graeff, Daniela Bertol; Foppa, Murilo; Pires, Julio Cesar Gall; Vigo, Alvaro; Schmidt, Maria Ines; Lotufo, Paulo Andrade; Mill, Jose Geraldo; Duncan, Bruce Bartholow

    2016-04-01

    Epicardial fat thickness (EFT) has emerged as a marker of cardiometabolic risk, but its clinical use warrants proper knowledge of its distribution and associations in populations. We aimed to describe the distribution of EFT, its demographic correlates and independent associations with diabetes, hypertension and metabolic syndrome (MS) in free-living Brazilian adults. From the baseline echocardiography of the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Adult Health (ELSA-Brasil)-a cohort study of civil servants aged 35-74 years-EFT was measured from a randomly selected sample of 998 participants as the mean of two paraesternal windows obtained at end systole (EFTsyst) and end diastole (EFTdiast). From the 421 individuals free of diabetes, hypertension and MS, we defined EFT reference values and the EFTsyst 75th percentile cut-off. Median EFTsyst was 1.5 (IQR 0-2.6) mm; a large proportion (84 %) had EFTdiast = 0. EFT was higher in women and lower in blacks, and increased with age and BMI. Although EFT was higher in those with diabetes, hypertension, and MS, EFT associations were reduced when adjusted for age, sex and ethnicity, and were non-significant after adjusting for obesity measures. In conclusion, the amount of EFT in this large multiethnic population is smaller than reported in other populations. EFT reference values varied across demographic and clinical variables, EFT associations with cardiometabolic variables being largely explained by age, sex, ethnicity and central obesity. Although EFT can help identify individuals at increased cardiometabolic risk, it will likely have a limited additional role compared to current risk stratification strategies.

  16. The Human Carbon Budget: An Estimate of the Spatial Distribution of Metabolic Carbon Consumption and Release in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    West, Tristram O.; Singh, Nagendra; Marland, Gregg

    Carbon dioxide is taken up by agricultural crops and released soon after during the consumption of agricultural commodities. The global net impact of this process on carbon flux to the atmosphere is negligible, but impact on the spatial distribution of carbon dioxide uptake and release across regions and continents is significant. To estimate the consumption and release of carbon by humans over the landscape, we developed a carbon budget for humans in the United States. The budget was derived from food commodity intake data for the US and from algorithms representing the metabolic processing of carbon by humans. Data onmore » consumption, respiration, and waste of carbon by humans were distributed over the US using geospatial population data with a resolution of approximately 450 x 450 m. The average adult in the US contains about 21 kg C and consumes about 67 kg C yr-1 which is balanced by the annual release of about 59 kg C as expired CO2, 7 kg C as feces and urine, and less than 1 kg C as flatus, sweat, and aromatic compounds. In 2000, an estimated 17.2 Tg C were consumed by the US population and 15.2 Tg C were expired to the atmosphere as CO2. Historically, carbon stock in the US human population has increased between 1790-2006 from 0.06 Tg to 5.37 Tg. Displacement and release of total harvested carbon per capita in the US is nearly 12% of per capita fossil fuel emissions. Humans are using, storing, and transporting carbon about the Earth s surface. Inclusion of these carbon dynamics in regional carbon budgets can improve our understanding of carbon sources and sinks.« less

  17. Regional differences of the contractile responses to acetylcholine and neurokinin A in rabbit airway: heterogeneous distribution of the metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Goroumaru-Shinkai, M; Yamamoto, R; Funayama, N; Takayanagi, I

    1992-11-01

    1. Experiments were designed to determine whether differences exist in the sensitivity to muscarinic and tachykinin agonists in rabbit airways. 2. The rank order of sensitivity (pD2 value) to acetylcholine was: trachea > proximal bronchus > distal bronchus, whereas no regional difference was observed in the sensitivity to carbamylcholine which is resistant to acetylcholinesterase. 3. Acetylcholinesterase activity was greater in the distal than in the proximal airway. 4. In the absence of the peptidase inhibitor, phosphoramidon, the pD2 values of neurokinin A (NKA) and substance P (SP) in trachea were significantly greater than that in bronchus, whereas no regional difference was observed in the NK1 selective agonist, substance P methyl ester (SPOMe). 5. Application of phosphoramidon (10 microM) to avoid peptide degradation abolished the regional difference of the pD2 values of SP. 6. In conclusion, regional differences in sensitivities to acetylcholine and NKA in the rabbit airway were suggested to be due to distribution to the metabolic enzymes of these drugs.

  18. Bile Acid Metabolism and Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bile acids are important physiological agents for intestinal nutrient absorption and biliary secretion of lipids, toxic metabolites, and xenobiotics. Bile acids also are signaling molecules and metabolic regulators that activate nuclear receptors and G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling to regulate hepatic lipid, glucose, and energy homeostasis and maintain metabolic homeostasis. Conversion of cholesterol to bile acids is critical for maintaining cholesterol homeostasis and preventing accumulation of cholesterol, triglycerides, and toxic metabolites, and injury in the liver and other organs. Enterohepatic circulation of bile acids from the liver to intestine and back to the liver plays a central role in nutrient absorption and distribution, and metabolic regulation and homeostasis. This physiological process is regulated by a complex membrane transport system in the liver and intestine regulated by nuclear receptors. Toxic bile acids may cause inflammation, apoptosis, and cell death. On the other hand, bile acid-activated nuclear and GPCR signaling protects against inflammation in liver, intestine, and macrophages. Disorders in bile acid metabolism cause cholestatic liver diseases, dyslipidemia, fatty liver diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and diabetes. Bile acids, bile acid derivatives, and bile acid sequestrants are therapeutic agents for treating chronic liver diseases, obesity, and diabetes in humans. PMID:23897684

  19. Intestinal Lymphatic Transport: an Overlooked Pathway for Understanding Absorption of Plant Secondary Compounds in Vertebrate Herbivores.

    PubMed

    Kohl, Kevin D; Dearing, M Denise

    2017-03-01

    Herbivores employ numerous strategies to reduce their exposure to toxic plant secondary chemicals (PSCs). However, the physiological mechanisms of PSC absorption have not been extensively explored. In particular, the absorption of PSCs via intestinal lymphatic absorption has been largely overlooked in herbivores, even though this pathway is well recognized for pharmaceutical uptake. Here, we investigated for the first time whether PSCs might be absorbed by lymphatic transport. We fed woodrats (Neotoma albigula) diets with increasing concentrations of terpene-rich juniper (Juniperus monosperma) either with or without a compound that blocks intestinal lymphatic absorption (Pluronic L-81). Woodrats consuming diets that contained the intestinal lymphatic absorption blocker exhibited increased food intakes and maintained higher body masses on juniper diets. Our study represents the first demonstration that PSCs may be absorbed by intestinal lymphatic absorption. This absorption pathway has numerous implications for the metabolism and distribution of PSCs in the systemic circulation, given that compounds absorbed via lymphatic transport bypass first-pass hepatic metabolism. The area of lymphatic transport of PSCs represents an understudied physiological pathway in plant-herbivore interactions.

  20. Sclerostin distribution in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus and correlation with bone metabolism and bone mineral density.

    PubMed

    Tsentidis, Charalampos; Gourgiotis, Dimitrios; Kossiva, Lydia; Marmarinos, Antonios; Doulgeraki, Artemis; Karavanaki, Kyriaki

    2016-06-01

    Sclerostin is an inhibitor of the Wnt/beta-catenin bone metabolic pathway. Increased sclerostin levels and reduced bone mineral density (BMD) have been documented in adult patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), predominantly in those with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). No relative data exist on childhood type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Our objective was to study plasma sclerostin in T1DM children and adolescents and controls and its correlations with metabolic bone markers and BMD. This was a cross-sectional study that was conducted at an outpatient clinical center. Forty T1DM children and adolescents were evaluated (mean ± SD age: 13.04 ± 3.53 yr, T1DM duration: 5.15 ± 3.33 yr), along with 40 healthy matched controls (age 12.99 ± 3.3 yr). Sclerostin, soluble receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (s-RANKL), osteoprotegerin, osteocalcin, C-telopeptide crosslinks, electrolytes, parathyroid hormone (PTH), and total 25(OH)D were measured. Lumbar and subcranial total body BMD were evaluated with dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Sclerostin levels demonstrated a Gaussian distribution, with no significant difference between patients and controls (51.56 ± 12.05 vs. 50.98 ± 13.55 pmol/L, p = 0.84). Significantly lower values were found in girls and prepubertal children. Sclerostin values were significantly and gradually increased in children through pubertal Tanner stages 1-3, were reduced at stage 4 and increased again at pubertal stage 5. Sclerostin levels were positively correlated with logCTX (logarithm of C-terminal telopeptide crosslinks of type I collagen), logOsteocalcin (logarithm of Osteocalcin), magnesium, total body, and L1-L4 BMD z-score. T1DM patients had similar levels of sclerostin with controls. Sclerostin correlated with bone resorption and formation markers and also with bone mass indices, gender, and pubertal stage. The decrease in sclerostin values observed in pubertal stage 4 adolescents coincides with the concurrent growth

  1. Continuous and batch cultures of Escherichia coli KJ134 for succinic acid fermentation: metabolic flux distributions and production characteristics.

    PubMed

    van Heerden, Carel D; Nicol, Willie

    2013-09-17

    Succinic acid (SA) has become a prominent biobased platform chemical with global production quantities increasing annually. Numerous genetically modified E. coli strains have been developed with the main aim of increasing the SA yield of the organic carbon source. In this study, a promising SA-producing strain, E. coli KJ134 [Biotechnol. Bioeng. 101:881-893, 2008], from the Department of Microbiology and Cell Science of the University of Florida was evaluated under continuous and batch conditions using D-glucose and CO2 in a mineral salt medium. Production characteristics entailing growth and maintenance rates, growth termination points and metabolic flux distributions under growth and non-growth conditions were determined. The culture remained stable for weeks under continuous conditions. Under growth conditions the redox requirements of the reductive tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was solely balanced by acetic acid (AcA) production via the pyruvate dehydrogenase route resulting in a molar ratio of SA:AcA of two. A maximum growth rate of 0.22 h(-1) was obtained, while complete growth inhibition occurred at a SA concentration of 18 g L(-1). Batch culture revealed that high-yield succinate production (via oxidative TCA or glyoxylate redox balancing) occurred under non-growth conditions where a SA:AcA molar ratio of up to five was attained, with a final SA yield of 0.94 g g(-1). Growth termination of the batch culture was in agreement with that of the continuous culture. The maximum maintenance production rate of SA under batch conditions was found to be 0.6 g g(-1) h(-1). This is twice the maintenance rate observed in the continuous runs. The study revealed that the metabolic flux of E. coli KJ134 differs significantly for growth and non-growth conditions, with non-growth conditions resulting in higher SA:AcA ratios and SA yields. Bioreaction characteristics entailing growth and maintenance rates, as well as growth termination markers will guide future fermentor

  2. Percutaneous absorption

    PubMed Central

    Brisson, Paul

    1974-01-01

    Clinical effectiveness of topically applied medications depends on the ability of the active ingredient to leave its vehicle and penetrate into the epidermis. The stratum corneum is that layer of the epidermis which functionally is the most important in limiting percutaneous absorption, showing the characteristics of a composite semipermeable membrane. A mathematical expression of transepidermal diffusion may be derived from Fick's Law of mass transport; factors altering the rate of diffusion are discussed. PMID:4597976

  3. Design and development of a probe-based multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor for characterizing transient gas-parameter distributions in the intake systems of I.C. engines

    DOE PAGES

    Jatana, Gurneesh; Geckler, Sam; Koeberlein, David; ...

    2016-09-01

    We designed and developed a 4-probe multiplexed multi-species absorption spectroscopy sensor system for gas property measurements on the intake side of commercial multi-cylinder internal-combustion (I.C.) engines; the resulting cycle- and cylinder-resolved concentration, temperature and pressure measurements are applicable for assessing spatial and temporal variations in the recirculated exhaust gas (EGR) distribution at various locations along the intake gas path, which in turn is relevant to assessing cylinder charge uniformity, control strategies, and CFD models. Furthermore, the diagnostic is based on absorption spectroscopy and includes an H 2O absorption system (utilizing a 1.39 m distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser) for measuringmore » gas temperature, pressure, and H 2O concentration, and a CO 2 absorption system (utilizing a 2.7 m DFB laser) for measuring CO 2 concentration. The various lasers, optical components and detectors were housed in an instrument box, and the 1.39- m and 2.7- m lasers were guided to and from the engine-mounted probes via optical fibers and hollow waveguides, respectively. The 5kHz measurement bandwidth allows for near-crank angle resolved measurements, with a resolution of 1.2 crank angle degrees at 1000 RPM. Our use of compact stainless steel measurement probes enables simultaneous multi-point measurements at various locations on the engine with minimal changes to the base engine hardware; in addition to resolving large-scale spatial variations via simultaneous multi-probe measurements, local spatial gradients can be resolved by translating individual probes. Along with details of various sensor design features and performance, we also demonstrate validation of the spectral parameters of the associated CO 2 absorption transitions using both a multi-pass heated cell and the sensor probes.« less

  4. Absorption and metabolism of bioactive molecules after oral consumption of cooked edible heads of Cynara scolymus L. (cultivar Violetto di Provenza) in human subjects: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Azzini, E; Bugianesi, R; Romano, F; Di Venere, D; Miccadei, S; Durazzo, A; Foddai, M S; Catasta, G; Linsalata, V; Maiani, G

    2007-05-01

    The current growing interest for natural antioxidants has led to a renewed scientific attention for artichoke, due not only to its nutritional value, but, overall, to its polyphenolic content, showing strong antioxidant properties. The major constituents of artichoke extracts are hydroxycinnamic acids such as chlorogenic acid, dicaffeoylquinic acids caffeic acid and ferulic acid, and flavonoids such as luteolin and apigenin glycosides. In vitro studies, using cultured rat hepatocytes, have shown its hepatoprotective functions and in vivo studies have shown the inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis in human subjects. Several studies have shown the effect on animal models of artichoke extracts, while information on human bioavailability and metabolism of hydroxycinnamates derivatives is still lacking. Results showed a plasma maximum concentration of 6.4 (SD 1.8) ng/ml for chlorogenic acid after 1 h and its disappearance within 2 h (P< 0.05). Peak plasma concentrations of 19.5 (SD 6.9) ng/ml for total caffeic acid were reached within 1 h, while ferulic acid plasma concentrations showed a biphasic profile with 6.4 (SD1.5) ng/ml and 8.4 (SD4.6) ng/ml within 1 h and after 8 h respectively. We observed a significant increase of dihydrocaffeic acid and dihydroferulic acid total levels after 8 h (P<0.05). No circulating plasma levels of luteolin and apigenin were present. Our study confirms the bioavailability of metabolites of hydroxycinnamic acids after ingestion of cooked edible Cynara scolymus L. (cultivar Violetto di Provenza).

  5. Prevalence and distribution of metabolic syndrome in a southern Chinese population. Relation to exercise, smoking, and educational level.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong-Qiang; Zhao, Li-Qin; Liu, Xin-Yu; Wang, Hong-Lei; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Li, Bin; Deng, Kang-Ping; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Qin; Holthofer, Harry; Zou, He-Qun

    2013-09-01

    To investigate the prevalence and distribution of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and the impact of exercise, smoking, and educational level on the risk of MetS in a southern Chinese population. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Zhuhai City, China from June to August 2012. Data on exercise, smoking, and educational level, anthropometric parameters, blood pressure, lipid, and glucose levels were collected. The prevalence of MetS (as defined by the International Diabetes Federation) was determined. Data necessary to evaluate MetS, the socio-economic characteristics, and lifestyle were obtained for 4645 subjects aged 18-75 years old. A total of 19.8% of the participants had MetS. The adjusted odds of having MetS were lower among males (adjusted odds: 0.75; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-1.01) compared with females. Those participants who currently smoked had a higher risk of developing MetS compared with non-smokers (adjusted odds: 1.61; 95% CI: 1.13-2.50). Those who had no physical exercise had a higher risk of developing MetS compared with those who physically exercised more than 60 minutes/day (adjusted odds: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.12-2.23;). Compared with those with no education, every category of attained educational level had a lower risk of developing MetS (p<0.001). The findings in this study revealed that current smokers had a greater risk of developing MetS compared with non-smokers. Increased physical activity and higher levels of education attained served as protective factors for the population.

  6. Metabolic pathway analysis of Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis: effect of oxygen availability on ethanol synthesis and flux distributions.

    PubMed

    Unrean, Pornkamol; Nguyen, Nhung H A

    2012-06-01

    Elementary mode analysis (EMA) identifies all possible metabolic states of the cell metabolic network. Investigation of these states can provide a detailed insight into the underlying metabolism in the cell. In this study, the flux states of Scheffersomyces (Pichia) stipitis metabolism were examined. It was shown that increasing oxygen levels led to a decrease of ethanol synthesis. This trend was confirmed by experimental evaluation of S. stipitis in glucose-xylose fermentation. The oxygen transfer rate for an optimal ethanol production was 1.8 mmol/l/h, which gave the ethanol yield of 0.40 g/g and the ethanol productivity of 0.25 g/l/h. For a better understanding of the cell's regulatory mechanism in response to oxygenation levels, EMA was used to examine metabolic flux patterns under different oxygen levels. Up- and downregulation of enzymes in the network during the change of culturing condition from oxygen limitation to oxygen sufficiency were identified. The results indicated the flexibility of S. stipitis metabolism to cope with oxygen availability. In addition, relevant genetic targets towards improved ethanol-producing strains under all oxygenation levels were identified. These targeted genes limited the metabolic functionality of the cell to function according to the most efficient ethanol synthesis pathways. The presented approach is promising and can contribute to the development of culture optimization and strain engineers for improved lignocellulosic ethanol production by S. stipitis.

  7. Distribution and correlates of the metabolic syndrome in adults living in the San Juan Metropolitan Area of Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Cynthia M; Ortiz, Ana P; Guzmán, Manuel; Suárez, Erick

    2012-09-01

    This study evaluated correlates of the metabolic syndrome among adults living in Puerto Rico, a Hispanic subpopulation disproportionately affected by diabetes. A probability cluster design was used to select a sample of households of the San Juan Metropolitan Area in Puerto Rico. A total of 858 persons aged 21-79 years completed a face-to-face interview, blood pressure and anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and spot urine. Logistic regression was employed to assess correlates of the metabolic syndrome. Of 368 (42.9%) of adults who met the criteria for metabolic syndrome, elevated fasting glucose (49.8%), abdominal obesity (48.6%), and reduced HDL cholesterol (45.8%) were the most prevalent diagnostic criteria. In a multivariable logistic model that simultaneously adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics and health behaviors, older age, high school educational attainment or less, no alcohol intake, and lack of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity remained significantly (p < 0.05) associated to the metabolic syndrome. However, the associations for male gender, some college education, and current smoking > or = 20 cigarettes/day had borderline significance. Further controlling for inflammatory markers slightly attenuated the strength of most of these associations but remained significantly (p < 0.05) associated to the metabolic syndrome with only a few exceptions. Middle and upper tertiles of hs-CRP, fibrinogen, and PLl-1 and an elevated albumin-to-creatinine ratio were also associated (p < 0.05) with the metabolic syndrome. Enhancing public education regarding modifiable risk factors for the metabolic syndrome and providing optimal medical management of individual metabolic disturbances among those at risk through preventive lifestyle changes should be placed as a public health priority for Puerto Rico.

  8. Micro-pulse, differential absorption lidar (dial) network for measuring the spatial and temporal distribution of water vapor in the lower atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2018-04-01

    The National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and Montana State Univeristy (MSU) are developing a test network of five micro-pulse differential absorption lidars to continuously measure high-vertical-resolution water vapor in the lower atmosphere. The instruments are accurate, yet low-cost; operate unattended, and eye-safe - all key features to enable the larger network needed to characterize atmospheric moisture variability which influences important processes related to weather and climate.

  9. Absorption of Manganese and Iron in a Mouse Model of Hemochromatosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jonghan; Buckett, Peter D.; Wessling-Resnick, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary hemochromatosis, an iron overload disease associated with excessive intestinal iron absorption, is commonly caused by loss of HFE gene function. Both iron and manganese absorption are regulated by iron status, but the relationships between the transport pathways of these metals and how they are affected by HFE-associated hemochromatosis remain poorly understood. Loss of HFE function is known to alter the intestinal expression of DMT1 (divalent metal transporter-1) and Fpn (ferroportin), transporters that have been implicated in absorption of both iron and manganese. Although the influence of HFE deficiency on dietary iron absorption has been characterized, potential effects on manganese metabolism have yet to be explored. To investigate the role of HFE in manganese absorption, we characterized the uptake and distribution of the metal in Hfe −/− knockout mice after intravenous, intragastric, and intranasal administration of 54Mn. These values were compared to intravenous and intragastric administration of 59Fe. Intestinal absorption of 59Fe was increased and clearance of injected 59Fe was also increased in Hfe−/− mice compared to controls. Hfe −/− mice displayed greater intestinal absorption of 54Mn compared to wild-type Hfe+/+ control mice. After intravenous injection, the distribution of 59Fe to heart and liver was greater in Hfe −/− mice but no remarkable differences were observed for 54Mn. Although olfactory absorption of 54Mn into blood was unchanged in Hfe −/− mice, higher levels of intranasally-instilled 54Mn were associated with Hfe−/− brain compared to controls. These results show that manganese transport and metabolism can be modified by HFE deficiency. PMID:23705020

  10. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  11. Differences in primary cellular factors influencing the metabolism and distribution of 3,5,3′-L-triiodothyronine and L-thyroxine

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Jack H.; Schwartz, Harold L.; Shapiro, Harvey C.; Bernstein, Gerald; Surks, Martin I.

    1970-01-01

    Administration of phenobarbital, which acts exclusively on cellular sites, results in an augmentation of the liver/plasma concentration ratio of L-thyroxine (T4) in rats but no change in the liver/plasma concentration ratio of L-triiodothyronine (T3). Whereas phenobarbital stimulates the fecal clearance rate both of T3 and T4, it increases the deiodinative clearance rate of T4 only. These findings suggest basic differences in the cellular metabolism of T3 and T4. Further evidence pointing to cellular differences was obtained from a comparison of the distribution and metabolism of these hormones with appropriate corrections for the effect of differential plasma binding. The percentage of total exchangeable cellular T4 within the liver (28.5) is significantly greater than the corresponding percentage of exchangeable cellular T3 within this organ (12.3). Extrahepatic tissues bind T3 twice as firmly as T4. The cellular metabolic clearance rate (= free hormone clearance rate) of T3 exceeds that of T4 by a factor 1.8 in the rat. The corresponding ratio in man, 2.4, was determined by noncompartmental analysis of turnover studies in four individuals after the simultaneous injection of T4-125I and T3-131I. The greater cellular metabolic clearance rate of T3 both in rat and man may be related to the higher specific hormonal potency of this iodothyronine. PMID:5441537

  12. Inducible variation in anaerobic energy metabolism reflects hypoxia tolerance across the intertidal and subtidal distribution of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas).

    PubMed

    Meng, Jie; Wang, Ting; Li, Li; Zhang, Guofan

    2018-07-01

    Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) distribute a steep gradient of environmental stress between intertidal and subtidal habits and provide insight into population-scale patterns and underlying processes of variation in physiological tolerance. In this study, 1-year-old-F 1 oysters, collected from subtidal and intertidal habitats, were obtained after common garden experiment. Genetic differentiation and physiological responses under air exposure were examined to determine whether they had evolved into local adapted subpopulations. Mortality rate, anaerobic glycolysis metabolism, and energy status indicated that oyster had initiated metabolism depression and anaerobic glycolysis metabolism in both intertidal and subtidal oysters under air exposure. However, the subtidal oysters displayed the larger energy metabolism depressions and the earlier anaerobic glycolysis responses. This may indicate that subtidal oysters were more sensitives to hypoxia stress, which may lead the higher mortality rate under long term of air exposure. Based on a common garden experimental design, we propose that this diversification may have a genetic background. Overall, the clear differences between intertidal and subtidal oysters under air exposure have provided an important reference for their aquaculture and transportation used in commercial production. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  13. [Distribution and speciation of Pb in Arabidopsis thaliana shoot and rhizosphere soil by in situ synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption near edge structure].

    PubMed

    Shen, Ya-Ting

    2014-03-01

    In order to investigate plant reacting mechanism with heavy metal stress in organ and tissue level, synchrotron radiation micro X-ray fluorescence (micro-SRXRF) was used to determine element distribution characteristics of K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb in an Arabidopsis thaliana seedling grown in tailing dam soil taken from a lead-zinc mine exploration area. The results showed a regular distribution characters of K, Ca, Fe, Cu and Zn, while Pb appeared not only in root, but also in a leaf bud which was beyond previously understanding that Pb mainly appeared in plant root. Pb competed with Mn in the distribution of the whole seedling. Pb may cause the increase of oxidative stress in root and leaf bud, and restrict Mn absorption and utilization which explained the phenomenon of seedling death in this tailing damp soil. Speciation of Pb in Arabidopsis thaliana and tailing damp rhizosphere soil were also presented after using PbL3 micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (micro-XANES). By comparison of PbL3 XANES peak shape and peak position between standard samples and rhizosphere soil sample, it was demonstrated that the tailing damp soil was mainly formed by amorphous forms like PbO (64.2%), Pb (OH)2 (28.8%) and Pb3O4 (6.3%) rather than mineral or organic Pb speciations. The low plant bioavailability of Pb demonstrated a further research focusing on Pb absorption and speciation conversion is needed, especially the role of dissolve organic matter in soil which may enhance Pb bioavailability.

  14. Species and gender differences in the metabolism and distribution of tertiary amyl methyl ether in male and female rats and mice after inhalation exposure or gavage administration.

    PubMed

    Sumner, Susan C J; Janszen, Derek B; Asgharian, Bahman; Moore, Timothy A; Parkinson, Horace D; Fennell, Timothy R

    2003-01-01

    Tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) is a gasoline fuel additive used to reduce emissions. Understanding the metabolism and distribution of TAME is needed to assess potential human health issues. The effect of dose level, duration of exposure and route of administration on the metabolism and distribution of TAME were investigated in male and female F344 rats and CD-1 mice following inhalation or gavage administration. By 48 h after exposure, >96% of the administered radioactivity was expired in air (16-71%) or eliminated in urine and feces (28-72%). Following inhalation exposure, mice had a two- to threefold greater relative uptake of [14C]TAME compared with rats. Metabolites were excreted in urine of rats and mice that are formed by glucuronide conjugation of tertiary amyl alcohol (TAA), oxidation of TAA to 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methylbutane and glucuronide conjugation of 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methylbutane. A saturation in the uptake and metabolism of TAME with increased exposure concentration was indicated by a decreased relative uptake of total [14C]TAME equivalents and an increase in the percentage expired as volatiles. A saturation of P-450 oxidation of TAA was indicated by a disproportional decrease of 2,3-dihydroxy-2-methylbutane and its glucuronide conjugate with increased exposure concentration. Copyright 2003 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Distribution

    Treesearch

    John R. Jones

    1985-01-01

    Quaking aspen is the most widely distributed native North American tree species (Little 1971, Sargent 1890). It grows in a great diversity of regions, environments, and communities (Harshberger 1911). Only one deciduous tree species in the world, the closely related Eurasian aspen (Populus tremula), has a wider range (Weigle and Frothingham 1911)....

  16. Ambient salinity modifies the action of triiodothyronine in the air-breathing fish Anabas testudineus Bloch: effects on mitochondria-rich cell distribution, osmotic and metabolic regulations.

    PubMed

    Peter, M C Subhash; Leji, J; Peter, Valsa S

    2011-04-01

    The hydromineral and metabolic actions of thyroid hormone on osmotic acclimation in fish is less understood. We, therefore, studied the short-term action of triiodothyronine (T(3)), the potent thyroid hormone, on the distribution and the function of gill mitochondria-rich (MR) cells and on the whole body hydromineral and metabolic regulations of air-breathing fish (Anabas testudineus) adapted to either freshwater (FW) or acclimated to seawater (SA; 30 g L(-1)). As expected, 24 h T(3) injection (100 ng g(-1)) elevated (P<0.05) plasma T(3) but classically reduced (P<0.05) plasma T(4). The higher Na(+), K(+)-ATPase immunoreactivity and the varied distribution pattern of MR cells in the gills of T(3)-treated FW and SA fish, suggest an action of T(3) on gill MR cell migration, though the density of these cells remained unchanged after T(3) treatment. The ouabain-sensitive Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity, a measure of hydromineral competence, showed increases (P<0.05) in the gills of both FW and SA fish after T(3) administration, but inhibited (P<0.05) in the kidney of the FW fish and not in the SA fish. Exogenous T(3) reduced glucose (P<0.05) and urea (P<0.05) in the plasma of FW fish, whereas these metabolites were elevated (P<0.05) in the SA fish, suggesting a modulatory effect of ambient salinity on the T(3)-driven metabolic actions. Our data identify gill MR cell as a target for T(3) action as it promotes the spatial distribution and the osmotic function of these cells in both fresh water and in seawater. The results besides confirming the metabolic and osmotic actions of T(3) in fish support the hypothesis that the differential actions of T(3) may be due to the direct influence of ambient salinity, a major environmental determinant that alters the osmotic and metabolic strategies of fish. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Promises of Machine Learning Approaches in Prediction of Absorption of Compounds.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2018-01-01

    The Machine Learning (ML) is one of the fastest developing techniques in the prediction and evaluation of important pharmacokinetic properties such as absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. The availability of a large number of robust validation techniques for prediction models devoted to pharmacokinetics has significantly enhanced the trust and authenticity in ML approaches. There is a series of prediction models generated and used for rapid screening of compounds on the basis of absorption in last one decade. Prediction of absorption of compounds using ML models has great potential across the pharmaceutical industry as a non-animal alternative to predict absorption. However, these prediction models still have to go far ahead to develop the confidence similar to conventional experimental methods for estimation of drug absorption. Some of the general concerns are selection of appropriate ML methods and validation techniques in addition to selecting relevant descriptors and authentic data sets for the generation of prediction models. The current review explores published models of ML for the prediction of absorption using physicochemical properties as descriptors and their important conclusions. In addition, some critical challenges in acceptance of ML models for absorption are also discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. [Mutation in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene (Trp64Arg) does not influence insulin resistence, energy metabolism, fat distribution and lipid spectrum in young people. Pilot study].

    PubMed

    Bendlová, B; Mazura, I; Vcelák, J; Pelikánová, T; Kunesová, M; Hainer, V; Obenberger, J; Palyzová, D

    1999-05-01

    A missence mutation Trp64Arg in the beta3-adrenergic receptor gene is associated with obesity, insulin resistance, a lower metabolic rate and the earlier onset of NIDDM but the published results are controversial. We investigated the effect of this mutation on insulin resistance (euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp), on fat mass and fat distribution (anthropometry, bioimpedance, CT) and resting metabolic rate (indirect calorimetry), lipid spectrum and other metabolic disturbances in Czech juveniles recruited from juvenile hypertensives (H, n = 68) and controls (C, n = 81). The frequency of this mutation (determined by digestion of 210 bp PCR product with MvaI) was double in H than in C (14.7%, vs. 7.4%) and the carriers of Arg64 allele had sig. higher fasting glucose (H: p = 0.002. C: p = 0.025). Four Trp64/Arg64 and six Trp64/Trp64 men (age 23 +/- 4.2, vs. 22.5 +/- 1.9 y, BMI 26 +/- 5.5, vs. 22.9 +/- 5.1 kg/m2) took part in a detailed pilot study. But no signif. differences (Horn's method) in fasting glucose (4.6 +/- 0.6, vs. 4.9 +/- 0.4 mmol/l), in parameters of insulin resistance (M-value150-180 min. 9.1 +/- 1.1, vs. 8.9 +/- 1.5 mg glucose/kg.min(-1)), resting metabolic rate/lean body mass (RMR/kg LBM: 78.6 +/- 4.6, vs. 85.6 +/- 23.2 kJ/kg), lipid spectrum and other screened parameters were found. The lowest resting metabolic rate (RMR/kg LBM 55.4; 62.6 kJ/kg) was found in brothers (both C, Trp64/Trp64) who highly differ in body constitution (BMI 19.0 resp. 32.4 kg/m2). We suppose that in this case the energy metabolism is probably determined by other genetic loci and does not correlate with body fat mass. Our pilot study does not confirm the influence of Trp64Arg mutation in heterozygous carriers on insulin resistance, energy metabolism and lipid spectrum.

  19. Electronic structure, bonding, charge distribution, and x-ray absorption spectra of the (001) surfaces of fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite from first principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rulis, Paul; Yao, Hongzhi; Ouyang, Lizhi; Ching, W. Y.

    2007-12-01

    Fluorapatite (FAP) and hydroxyapatite (HAP) are two very important bioceramic crystals. The (001) surfaces of FAP and HAP crystals are studied by ab initio density functional calculations using a supercell slab geometry. It is shown that in both crystals, the O-terminated (001) surface is more stable with calculated surface energies of 0.865 and 0.871J/m2 for FAP and HAP, respectively. In FAP, the two surfaces are symmetric. In HAP, the orientation of the OH group along the c axis reduces the symmetry such that the top and bottom surfaces are no longer symmetric. It is revealed that the atoms near the surface and subsurface are significantly relaxed especially in the case of HAP. The largest relaxations occurred via the lateral movements of the O ions at the subsurface level. The electronic structures of the surface models in the form of layer-by-layer resolved partial density of states for all the atoms show systematic variation from the surface region toward the bulk region. The calculated Mulliken effective charge on each type of atom and the bond order values between cations (Ca, P) and anions (O, F) show different charge transfers and bond strength variations from the bulk crystal values. Electron charge density calculations show that the surfaces of both FAP and HAP crystals are mostly positively charged due to the presence of Ca ions at the surface. The positively charged surfaces have implications for the absorption on apatite surfaces of water and other organic molecules in an aqueous environment which are an important part of its bioactivity. The x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra ( Ca-K , O-K , F-K , P-K , and P-L3 edges) of both the surface models and the bulk crystals are calculated and compared. The calculations use a supercell approach which takes into account the electron-core-hole interaction. It is shown that the site-specific XANES spectra show significant differences between atoms near the surface and in the bulk and are very

  20. Drug metabolism and ageing.

    PubMed

    Wynne, Hilary

    2005-06-01

    Older people are major consumers of drugs and because of this, as well as co-morbidity and age-related changes in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, are at risk of associated adverse drug reactions. While age does not alter drug absorption in a clinically significant way, and age-related changes in volume of drug distribution and protein binding are not of concern in chronic therapy, reduction in hepatic drug clearance is clinically important. Liver blood flow falls by about 35% between young adulthood and old age, and liver size by about 24-35% over the same period. First-pass metabolism of oral drugs avidly cleared by the liver and clearance of capacity-limited hepatically metabolized drugs fall in parallel with the fall in liver size, and clearance of drugs with a high hepatic extraction ratio falls in parallel with the fall in hepatic blood flow. In normal ageing, in general, activity of the cytochrome P450 enzymes is preserved, although a decline in frail older people has been noted, as well as in association with liver disease, cancer, trauma, sepsis, critical illness and renal failure. As the contribution of age, co-morbidity and concurrent drug therapy to altered drug clearance is impossible to predict in an individual older patient, it is wise to start any drug at a low dose and increase this slowly, monitoring carefully for beneficial and adverse effects.

  1. The Nitrogen Moieties of Dietary Nonessential Amino Acids Are Distinctively Metabolized in the Gut and Distributed to the Circulation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Hidehiro; Kawamata, Yasuko; Kuwahara, Tomomi; Sakai, Ryosei

    2017-08-01

    Background: Although previous growth studies in rodents have indicated the importance of dietary nonessential amino acids (NEAAs) as nitrogen sources, individual NEAAs have different growth-promoting activities. This phenomenon might be attributable to differences in the nitrogen metabolism of individual NEAAs. Objective: The aim of this study was to compare nitrogen metabolism across dietary NEAAs with the use of their 15 N isotopologues. Methods: Male Fischer rats (8 wk old) were given 1.0 g amino acid-defined diets containing either 15 N-labeled glutamate, glutamine (amino or amide), aspartate, alanine, proline, glycine, or serine hourly for 5-6 h. Then, steady-state amino acid concentrations and their 15 N enrichments in the gut and in portal and arterial plasma were measured by an amino acid analyzer and LC tandem mass spectrometry, respectively. Results: The intestinal 15 N distribution and portal-arterial balance of 15 N metabolites indicated that most dietary glutamate nitrogen (>90% of dietary input) was incorporated into various amino acids, including alanine, proline, and citrulline, in the gut. Dietary aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to other amino acids both in the gut and in the circulation. In contrast, incorporation of the nitrogen moieties of dietary proline, serine, and glycine into other amino acids was less than that of other NEAAs, although interconversion between serine and glycine was very active. Cluster analysis of 15 N enrichment data also indicated that dietary glutamate nitrogen, aspartate nitrogen, alanine nitrogen, and the amino nitrogen of glutamine were distributed similarly to intestinal and circulating amino acids. Further, the analysis revealed close relations between intestinal and arterial 15 N enrichment for each amino acid. The steady-state 15 N enrichment of arterial amino acids indicated that substantial amounts of circulating amino acid nitrogen are derived

  2. Absorption of Orally Administered Hyaluronan.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mamoru; Maeshima, Takuya; Kubota, Takumi; Kurihara, Hitoshi; Masuda, Yasunobu; Nomura, Yoshihiro

    2016-12-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) has been utilized as a supplement. However, the absorption of orally administrated HA remains controversial. The degradation and absorption of HA in the intestine were investigated in this study. HA excretion into the feces, degradation in the intestinal tract, absorption through the large intestine, and translocation to the blood and skin were examined. HA administered orally was not detected in rat feces. HA was degraded by cecal content, but not by artificial gastric juice and intestinal juice. Oligosaccharide HA passed through excised large intestine sacs. Furthermore, disaccharides, tetrasaccharides, and polysaccharides HA were distributed to the skin of rats following oral administration of high molecular weight HA (300 kDa). The results of the study suggest that orally administered HA is degraded to oligosaccharides by intestinal bacteria, and oligosaccharide HA is absorbed in the large intestine and is subsequently distributed throughout the tissues, including the skin.

  3. Tissue distribution, excretion, and the metabolic pathway of 2,2',4,4',5-penta-chlorinated diphenylsulfide (CDPS-99) in ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaolan; Zhang, Xuesheng; Qin, Li; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-09-15

    The tissue distribution, excretion, and metabolic pathway of 2,2',4,4',5-penta-chlorinated diphenylsulfide (CDPS-99) in ICR mice were investigated after oral perfusion at 10mg/kg body weight (b.w.). Biological samples were extracted and separated and, for the first time, were determined by a novel, sensitive, and specific GC-MS method under the full scan and selected ion monitoring (SIM) modes. The results showed that the concentrations of CDPS-99 in the liver, kidneys, and serum reached a maximum after a one-day exposure and that the CDPS-99 concentration in the liver was the highest (3.43μg/g). The increase in the concentration of CDPS-99 in muscle, skin, and adipose tissue was slower, and the concentrations of CDPS-99 achieved their highest levels after 3 days of exposure. It was observed that the CDPS-99 concentration in adipose tissue was still very high (0.71μg/g) after 21 days of exposure, which suggested that CDPS-99 was able to accumulate in adipose tissue. In addition, mouse feces accounted for approximately 75% of the total gavage dose, indicating that CDPS-99 was mainly excreted via mouse feces. Metabolism analysis demonstrated that there were three possible metabolic pathways of CDPS-99 in mice: dechlorination reactions with the formation of tetra-CDPS and hydroxylation and oxidation reactions with the formation of OH-CDPS-99 and chlorinated diphenylsulfone. The present study will help to develop a better understanding of mammalian metabolism of CDPS-99. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Water Distribution Controlled by Transmembrane Potentials in the Cytochrome c-Cardiolipin Interaction: Revealing from Surface-Enhanced Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Li; Wu, Lie; Liu, Li; Jiang, Xiue

    2017-11-02

    The interaction of cytochrome c (cyt c) with cardiolipin (CL) plays a crucial role in apoptotic functions, however, the changes of the transmembrane potential in governing the protein behavior at the membrane-water interface have not been studied due to the difficulties in simultaneously monitoring the interaction and regulating the electric field. Herein, surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) spectroelectrochemistry is employed to study the mechanism of how the transmembrane potentials control the interaction of cyt c with CL membranes by regulating the electrode potentials of an Au film. When the transmembrane potential decreases, the water content at the interface of the membranes can be increased to slow down protein adsorption through decreasing the hydrogen-bond and hydrophobic interactions, but regulates the redox behavior of CL-bound cyt c through a possible water-facilitated proton-coupled electron transfer process. Our results suggest that the potential drop-induced restructure of the CL conformation and the hydration state could modify the structure and function of CL-bound cyt c on the lipid membrane. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Biotransformation and tissue distribution of protopine and allocryptopine and effects of Plume Poppy Total Alkaloid on liver drug-metabolizing enzymes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Jun; Cheng, Pi; Zhang, Zhuo-Yi; Tian, Shi-Jie; Sun, Zhi-Liang; Zeng, Jian-Guo; Liu, Zhao-Ying

    2018-01-11

    In this study, the biotransformation in the plasma, urine and feces of rats following oral administration of protopine (PRO) and allocryptopine (ALL)were explored using HPLC-QqTOF MS. An HPLC-MS/MS method for the determination of tissues was developed and applied to the tissue distribution study in rats following intragastric administration of Plume Poppy Total Alkaloid for 3 weeks. A total of ten PRO metabolites and ten ALL metabolites were characterized in rats in vivo. Among these metabolites, six PRO metabolites and five ALL metabolites were reported for the first time. The predicated metabolic pathways including ring cleavage, demethylation following ring cleavage, and glucuronidation were proposed. The low-concentration residue of PRO and ALL in various tissues was detected at 24 h and 48 h after dosing, which indicated that both compounds could be widely distributed in tissues and exist as low levels of residue. The activities of erythromycin N-demethylase, aminopyrine N-demethylase and NAD (P)H quinone oxidoreductase in female rats can be induced post-dose, but these activities were inhibited in male rats. The proposed biotransformation and residues of PRO and ALL and their effects on enzymes may provide a basis for clarifying the metabolism and interpreting pharmacokinetics.

  6. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  7. VISUALIZATION OF TISSUE DISTRIBUTION AND METABOLISM OF BENZO[A]PYRENE IN EARLY EMBRYONIC MEDAKA (ORYZIAS LATIPES)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fish early life stages are highly sensitive to exposure to persistent bioaccumulative toxicants (PBTs). The factors that contribute to this are unknown, but may include the distribution of PBTs to sensitive tissues during critical stages of development. Multiphoton laser scannin...

  8. Iron metabolism: current facts and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Tandara, Leida; Salamunic, Ilza

    2012-01-01

    Iron metabolism has been intensively examined over the last decade and there are many new players in this field which are worth to be introduced. Since its discovery many studies confirmed role of liver hormone hepcidin as key regulator of iron metabolism and pointed out liver as the central organ of system iron homeostasis. Liver cells receive multiple signals related to iron balance and respond by transcriptional regulation of hepcidin expression. This liver hormone is negative regulator of iron metabolism that represses iron efflux from macrophages, hepatocytes and enterocytes by its binding to iron export protein ferroportin. Ferroportin degradation leads to cellular iron retention and decreased iron availability. At level of a cell IRE/IRP (iron responsive elements/iron responsive proteins) system allows tight regulation of iron assimilation that prevents an excess of free intracellular iron which could lead to oxidative stress and damage of DNA, proteins and lipid membranes by ROS (reactive oxygen species). At the same time IRE/IRP system provides sufficient iron in order to meet the metabolic needs. Recently a significant progress in understanding of iron metabolism has been made and new molecular participants have been characterized. Article gives an overview of the current understanding of iron metabolism: absorption, distribution, cellular uptake, release, and storage. We also discuss mechanisms underlying systemic and cellular iron regulation with emphasis on central regulatory hormone hepcidin. PMID:23092063

  9. Body fat distribution, metabolic and inflammatory markers and retinal microvasculature in school-age children. The Generation R Study.

    PubMed

    Gishti, O; Jaddoe, V W V; Hofman, A; Wong, T Y; Ikram, M K; Gaillard, R

    2015-10-01

    To examine the associations of body fatness, metabolic and inflammatory markers with retinal vessel calibers among children. We performed a population-based cohort study among 4145 school-age children. At the median age of 6.0 years (95% range 5.8, 8.0 years), we measured body mass index, total and abdominal fat mass, metabolic and inflammatory markers (blood levels of lipids, insulin and C-peptide and C-reactive protein) and retinal vascular calibers from retinal photographs. We observed that compared with normal weight children, obese children had narrower retinal arteriolar caliber (difference -0.21 s.d. score (SDS; 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.35, -0.06)), but not venular caliber. Continuous analyses showed that higher body mass index and total body fat mass, but not android/gynoid fat mass ratio and pre-peritoneal fat mass, were associated with narrower retinal arteriolar caliber (P<0.05 for body mass index and total body fat mass), but not with retinal venular caliber. Lipid and insulin levels were not associated with retinal vessel calibers. Higher C-reactive protein was associated with only wider retinal venular caliber (difference 0.10 SDS (95% CI 0.06, 0.14) per SDS increase in C-reactive protein). This latter association was not influenced by body mass index. Higher body fatness is associated with narrower retinal arteriolar caliber, whereas increased C-reactive protein levels are associated with wider retinal venular caliber. Increased fat mass and inflammation correlate with microvascular development from school-age onwards.

  10. Distribution of the coenzyme M pathway of epoxide metabolism among ethene- and vinyl chloride-degrading Mycobacterium strains.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Nicholas V; Spain, Jim C

    2003-10-01

    An epoxyalkane:coenzyme M (CoM) transferase (EaCoMT) enzyme was recently found to be active in the aerobic vinyl chloride (VC) and ethene assimilation pathways of Mycobacterium strain JS60. In the present study, EaCoMT activity and genes were investigated in 10 different mycobacteria isolated on VC or ethene from diverse environmental samples. In all cases, epoxyethane metabolism in cell extracts was dependent on CoM, with average specific activities of EaCoMT between 380 and 2,910 nmol/min/mg of protein. PCR with primers based on conserved regions of EaCoMT genes from Mycobacterium strain JS60 and the propene oxidizers Xanthobacter strain Py2 and Rhodococcus strain B-276 yielded fragments (834 bp) of EaCoMT genes from all of the VC- and ethene-assimilating isolates. The Mycobacterium EaCoMT genes form a distinct cluster and are more closely related to the EaCoMT of Rhodococcus strain B-276 than that of Xanthobacter strain Py2. The incongruence of the EaCoMT and 16S rRNA gene trees and the fact that isolates from geographically distant locations possessed almost identical EaCoMT genes suggest that lateral transfer of EaCoMT among the Mycobacterium strains has occurred. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed large linear plasmids (110 to 330 kb) in all of the VC-degrading strains. In Southern blotting experiments, the strain JS60 EaCoMT gene hybridized to many of the plasmids. The CoM-mediated pathway of epoxide metabolism appears to be universal in alkene-assimilating mycobacteria, possibly because of plasmid-mediated lateral gene transfer.

  11. Prediction of Human Intestinal Absorption of Compounds Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajnish; Sharma, Anju; Siddiqui, Mohammed Haris; Tiwari, Rajesh Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Information about Pharmacokinetics of compounds is an essential component of drug design and development. Modeling the pharmacokinetic properties require identification of the factors effecting absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of compounds. There have been continuous attempts in the prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds using various Artificial intelligence methods in the effort to reduce the attrition rate of drug candidates entering to preclinical and clinical trials. Currently, there are large numbers of individual predictive models available for absorption using machine learning approaches. Six Artificial intelligence methods namely, Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis were used for prediction of absorption of compounds. Prediction accuracy of Support vector machine, k- nearest neighbor, Probabilistic neural network, Artificial neural network, Partial least square and Linear discriminant analysis for prediction of intestinal absorption of compounds was found to be 91.54%, 88.33%, 84.30%, 86.51%, 79.07% and 80.08% respectively. Comparative analysis of all the six prediction models suggested that Support vector machine with Radial basis function based kernel is comparatively better for binary classification of compounds using human intestinal absorption and may be useful at preliminary stages of drug design and development. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. Methodology for detection of carbon monoxide in hot, humid media by telecommunication distributed feedback laser-based tunable diode laser absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lathdavong, Lemthong; Shao, Jie; Kluczynski, Pawel; Lundqvist, Stefan; Axner, Ove

    2011-06-10

    Detection of carbon monoxide (CO) in combustion gases by tunable diode laser spectrometry is often hampered by spectral interferences from H2O and CO2. A methodology for assessment of CO in hot, humid media using telecommunication distributed feedback lasers is presented. By addressing the R14 line at 6395.4  cm(-1), and by using a dual-species-fitting technique that incorporates the fitting of both a previously measured water background reference spectrum and a 2f-wavelength modulation lineshape function, percent-level concentrations of CO can be detected in media with tens of percent of water (c(H2O)≤40%) at T≤1000 °C with an accuracy of a few percent by the use of a single reference water spectrum for background correction.

  13. AERONET derived (BC) aerosol absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinne, S.

    2015-12-01

    AERONET is a ground-based sun-/sky-photometer network with good annual statistics at more than 400 sites worldwide. Inversion methods applied to these data define all relevant column aerosol optical properties and reveal even microphysical detail. The extracted data include estimates for aerosol size-distributions and for aerosol refractive indices at four different solar wavelengths. Hereby, the imaginary parts of the refractive indices define the aerosol column absorption. For regional and global averages and radiative impact assessment with off-line radiative transfer, these local data have been extended with distribution patterns offered by AeroCom modeling experiments. Annual and seasonal absorption distributions for total aerosol and estimates for component contributions (such as BC) are presented and associated direct forcing impacts are quantified.

  14. RADIOACTIVE IRON ABSORPTION BY GASTRO-INTESTINAL TRACT

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Bale, W. F.; Ross, J. F.; Balfour, W. M.; Whipple, G. H.

    1943-01-01

    Iron absorption is a function of the gastro-intestinal mucosal epithelium. The normal non-anemic dog absorbs little iron but chronic anemia due to blood loss brings about considerable absorption—perhaps 5 to 15 times normal. In general the same differences are observed in man (1). Sudden change from normal to severe anemia within 24 hours does not significantly increase iron absorption. As the days pass new hemoglobin is formed. The body iron stores are depleted and within 7 days iron absorption is active, even when the red cell hematocrit is rising. Anoxemia of 50 per cent normal oxygen concentration for 48 hours does not significantly enhance iron absorption. In this respect it resembles acute anemia. Ordinary doses of iron given 1 to 6 hours before radio-iron will cause some "mucosa block"—that is an intake of radio-iron less than anticipated. Many variables which modify peristalsis come into this reaction. Iron given by vein some days before the dose of radio-iron does not appear to inhibit iron absorption. Plasma radio-iron absorption curves vary greatly. The curves may show sharp peaks in 1 to 2 hours when the iron is given in an empty stomach but after 6 hours when the radio-iron is given with food. Duration time of curves also varies widely, the plasma iron returning to normal in 6 to 12 hours. Gastric, duodenal, or jejunal pouches all show very active absorption of iron. The plasma concentration peak may reach a maximum before the solution of iron is removed from the gastric pouch—another example of "mucosa block." Absorption and distribution of radio-iron in the body of growing pups give very suggestive experimental data. The spleen, heart, upper gastro-intestinal tract, marrow, and pancreas show more radio-iron than was expected. The term "physiological saturation" with iron may be applied to the gastro-intestinal mucosal epithelium and explain one phase of acceptance or refusal of ingested iron. Desaturation is a matter of days not hours, whereas

  15. Studies of nontarget-mediated distribution of human full-length IgG1 antibody and its FAb fragment in cardiovascular and metabolic-related tissues.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Pia; Söderling, Ann-Sofi; Svensson, Lena; Ahnmark, Andrea; Flodin, Christine; Wanag, Ewa; Screpanti-Sundqvist, Valentina; Gennemark, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Tissue distribution and pharmacokinetics (PK) of full-length nontargeted antibody and its antigen-binding fragment (FAb) were evaluated for a range of tissues primarily of interest for cardiovascular and metabolic diseases. Mice were intravenously injected with a dose of 10 mg/kg of either human IgG1or its FAb fragment; perfused tissues were collected at a range of time points over 3 weeks for the human IgG1 antibody and 1 week for the human FAb antibody. Tissues were homogenized and antibody concentrations were measured by specific immunoassays on the Gyros system. Exposure in terms of maximum concentration (Cmax ) and area under the curve was assessed for all nine tissues. Tissue exposure of full-length antibody relative to plasma exposure was found to be between 1% and 10%, except for brain (0.2%). Relative concentrations of FAb antibody were the same, except for kidney tissue, where the antibody concentration was found to be ten times higher than in plasma. However, the absolute tissue uptake of full-length IgG was significantly higher than the absolute tissue uptake of the FAb antibody. This study provides a reference PK state for full-length whole and FAb antibodies in tissues related to cardiovascular and metabolic diseases that do not include antigen or antibody binding. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Uptake, Distribution, and Metabolism of 1-Naphthaleneacetic Acid and Indole-3-Acetic Acid During Callus Initiation From Actinidia deliciosa Tissues.

    PubMed

    Centeno; Fernández; Feito; Rodríguez

    1999-10-01

    1-Naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 6-benzyladenine (BA) were required for in vitro callus formation at the basal edge of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa [A. Chev] Liang and Ferguson, cv. Hayward) petioles. The uptake, metabolism, and concentration of NAA and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) content were examined in the explants during the callus initiation period. After 1, 6, 12, 24, 48, and 96 h of culture in the presence of [H(3)]NAA, petioles were divided into apical, middle, and basal portions and analyzed. Except for a high IAA level measured at 12 h, IAA content decreased in tissues during a culture period of 96 h. NAA uptake was higher in petiolar edges than in the middle portion, and NAA was rapidly conjugated with sugars and aspartic acid inside the tissues. The amide conjugation was triggered in apical and basal portions from 12 h and in the middle part from 48 h, with alpha-naphthylacetylaspartic acid being the major metabolite. Free-NAA concentration in cultured petioles achieved an equilibrium with the exogenously applied NAA (0.27 µm) from 12 h, and it remained constant thereafter. The relationships between the role attributed to NAA and BA in the initiation and the maintenance of disorganized growth of callus in kiwifruit cultures are discussed.

  17. Efficient simultaneous reverse Monte Carlo modeling of pair-distribution functions and extended x-ray-absorption fine structure spectra of crystalline disordered materials.

    PubMed

    Németh, Károly; Chapman, Karena W; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Shyam, Badri; Chupas, Peter J; Heald, Steve M; Newville, Matt; Klingler, Robert J; Winans, Randall E; Almer, Jonathan D; Sandi, Giselle; Srajer, George

    2012-02-21

    An efficient implementation of simultaneous reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modeling of pair distribution function (PDF) and EXAFS spectra is reported. This implementation is an extension of the technique established by Krayzman et al. [J. Appl. Cryst. 42, 867 (2009)] in the sense that it enables simultaneous real-space fitting of x-ray PDF with accurate treatment of Q-dependence of the scattering cross-sections and EXAFS with multiple photoelectron scattering included. The extension also allows for atom swaps during EXAFS fits thereby enabling modeling the effects of chemical disorder, such as migrating atoms and vacancies. Significant acceleration of EXAFS computation is achieved via discretization of effective path lengths and subsequent reduction of operation counts. The validity and accuracy of the approach is illustrated on small atomic clusters and on 5500-9000 atom models of bcc-Fe and α-Fe(2)O(3). The accuracy gains of combined simultaneous EXAFS and PDF fits are pointed out against PDF-only and EXAFS-only RMC fits. Our modeling approach may be widely used in PDF and EXAFS based investigations of disordered materials. © 2012 American Institute of Physics

  18. Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy-based tomography system for on-line monitoring of two-dimensional distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Lijun, E-mail: lijunxu@buaa.edu.cn; Liu, Chang; Jing, Wenyang

    2016-01-15

    To monitor two-dimensional (2D) distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction, an on-line tomography system based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) was developed. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first report on a multi-view TDLAS-based system for simultaneous tomographic visualization of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction in real time. The system consists of two distributed feedback (DFB) laser diodes, a tomographic sensor, electronic circuits, and a computer. The central frequencies of the two DFB laser diodes are at 7444.36 cm{sup −1} (1343.3 nm) and 7185.6 cm{sup −1} (1391.67 nm), respectively. The tomographicmore » sensor is used to generate fan-beam illumination from five views and to produce 60 ray measurements. The electronic circuits not only provide stable temperature and precise current controlling signals for the laser diodes but also can accurately sample the transmitted laser intensities and extract integrated absorbances in real time. Finally, the integrated absorbances are transferred to the computer, in which the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction are reconstructed by using a modified Landweber algorithm. In the experiments, the TDLAS-based tomography system was validated by using asymmetric premixed flames with fixed and time-varying equivalent ratios, respectively. The results demonstrate that the system is able to reconstruct the profiles of the 2D distributions of temperature and H{sub 2}O mole fraction of the flame and effectively capture the dynamics of the combustion process, which exhibits good potential for flame monitoring and on-line combustion diagnosis.« less

  19. Conjugation of metronidazole with dextran: a potential pharmaceutical strategy to control colonic distribution of the anti-amebic drug susceptible to metabolism by colonic microbes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wooseong; Yang, Yejin; Kim, Dohoon; Jeong, Seongkeun; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Jung, Yunjin

    2017-01-01

    Metronidazole (MTDZ), the drug of choice for the treatment of protozoal infections such as luminal amebiasis, is highly susceptible to colonic metabolism, which may hinder its conversion from a colon-specific prodrug to an effective anti-amebic agent targeting the entire large intestine. Thus, in an attempt to control the colonic distribution of the drug, a polymeric colon-specific prodrug, MTDZ conjugated to dextran via a succinate linker (Dex-SA-MTDZ), was designed. Upon treatment with dextranase for 8 h, the degree of Dex-SA-MTDZ depolymerization (%) with a degree of substitution (mg of MTDZ bound in 100 mg of Dex-SA-MTDZ) of 7, 17, and 30 was 72, 38, and 8, respectively, while that of dextran was 85. Depolymerization of Dex-SA-MTDZ was found to be necessary for the release of MTDZ, because dextranase pretreatment ensures that de-esterification occurs between MTDZ and the dextran backbone. In parallel, Dex-SA-MTDZ with a degree of substitution of 17 was found not to release MTDZ upon incubation with the contents of the small intestine and stomach of rats, but it released MTDZ when incubated with rat cecal contents (including microbial dextranases). Moreover, Dex-SA-MTDZ exhibited prolonged release of MTDZ, which contrasts with drug release by small molecular colon-specific prodrugs, MTDZ sulfate and N-nicotinoyl-2-{2-(2-methyl-5-nitroimidazol-1-yl)ethyloxy}-d,l-glycine. These prodrugs were eliminated very rapidly, and no MTDZ was detected in the cecal contents. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that oral gavage of Dex-SA-MTDZ delivered MTDZ (as MTDZ conjugated to [depolymerized] dextran) to the distal colon. However, upon oral gavage of the small molecular prodrugs, no prodrugs were detected in the distal colon. Collectively, these data suggest that dextran conjugation is a potential pharmaceutical strategy to control the colonic distribution of drugs susceptible to colonic microbial metabolism. PMID:28243064

  20. Conjugation of metronidazole with dextran: a potential pharmaceutical strategy to control colonic distribution of the anti-amebic drug susceptible to metabolism by colonic microbes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wooseong; Yang, Yejin; Kim, Dohoon; Jeong, Seongkeun; Yoo, Jin-Wook; Yoon, Jeong-Hyun; Jung, Yunjin

    2017-01-01

    Metronidazole (MTDZ), the drug of choice for the treatment of protozoal infections such as luminal amebiasis, is highly susceptible to colonic metabolism, which may hinder its conversion from a colon-specific prodrug to an effective anti-amebic agent targeting the entire large intestine. Thus, in an attempt to control the colonic distribution of the drug, a polymeric colon-specific prodrug, MTDZ conjugated to dextran via a succinate linker (Dex-SA-MTDZ), was designed. Upon treatment with dextranase for 8 h, the degree of Dex-SA-MTDZ depolymerization (%) with a degree of substitution (mg of MTDZ bound in 100 mg of Dex-SA-MTDZ) of 7, 17, and 30 was 72, 38, and 8, respectively, while that of dextran was 85. Depolymerization of Dex-SA-MTDZ was found to be necessary for the release of MTDZ, because dextranase pretreatment ensures that de-esterification occurs between MTDZ and the dextran backbone. In parallel, Dex-SA-MTDZ with a degree of substitution of 17 was found not to release MTDZ upon incubation with the contents of the small intestine and stomach of rats, but it released MTDZ when incubated with rat cecal contents (including microbial dextranases). Moreover, Dex-SA-MTDZ exhibited prolonged release of MTDZ, which contrasts with drug release by small molecular colon-specific prodrugs, MTDZ sulfate and N -nicotinoyl-2-{2-(2-methyl-5-nitroimidazol-1-yl)ethyloxy}-d,l-glycine. These prodrugs were eliminated very rapidly, and no MTDZ was detected in the cecal contents. Consistent with these in vitro results, we found that oral gavage of Dex-SA-MTDZ delivered MTDZ (as MTDZ conjugated to [depolymerized] dextran) to the distal colon. However, upon oral gavage of the small molecular prodrugs, no prodrugs were detected in the distal colon. Collectively, these data suggest that dextran conjugation is a potential pharmaceutical strategy to control the colonic distribution of drugs susceptible to colonic microbial metabolism.

  1. Omics Approaches To Probe Microbiota and Drug Metabolism Interactions.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Robert G; Hume, Nicole E; Smith, Philip B; Peters, Jeffrey M; Patterson, Andrew D

    2016-12-19

    The drug metabolism field has long recognized the beneficial and sometimes deleterious influence of microbiota in the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion of drugs. Early pioneering work with the sulfanilamide precursor prontosil pointed toward the necessity not only to better understand the metabolic capabilities of the microbiota but also, importantly, to identify the specific microbiota involved in the generation and metabolism of drugs. However, technological limitations important for cataloging the microbiota community as well as for understanding and/or predicting their metabolic capabilities hindered progress. Current advances including mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling as well as culture-independent sequence-based identification and functional analysis of microbiota have begun to shed light on microbial metabolism. In this review, case studies will be presented to highlight key aspects (e.g., microbiota identification, metabolic function and prediction, metabolite identification, and profiling) that have helped to clarify how the microbiota might impact or be impacted by drug metabolism. Lastly, a perspective of the future of this field is presented that takes into account what important knowledge is lacking and how to tackle these problems.

  2. Effects of a 3 strain -based direct-fed microbial and dietary fiber concentration on growth performance and expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of volatile fatty acids in weanling pigs.

    PubMed

    Jaworski, N W; Owusu-Asiedu, A; Walsh, M C; McCann, J C; Loor, J J; Stein, H H

    2017-01-01

    Effects of a -based direct-fed microbial (DFM) on growth performance, plasma tumor necrosis factor ɑ (TNFɑ), relative gene expression, and intestinal VFA concentrations in weanling pigs fed low- or high-fiber diets were evaluated. Two hundred pigs (initial BW: 6.31 ± 0.73 kg) were allotted to 1 of 4 dietary treatments (5 pigs per pen and 10 pens per treatment). Treatments were arranged in a 2 × 2 factorial design with 2 diet types [low-fiber (LF) or high-fiber (HF)] and 2 concentrations of DFM (0 or 60 g DFM/t of feed). The DFM contained 1.5 × 10 cfu/g and was obtained from Danisco Animal Nutrition-DuPont Industrial Biosciences, Marlborough, UK. Phase 1 diets were fed for 2 wk post-weaning and phase 2 diets were fed over the following 29 d. Low fiber diets contained corn and soybean meal as main ingredients and HF diets contained corn, soybean meal, corn distillers dried grains with solubles (7.5 and 15.0% in phase 1 and 2, respectively), and wheat middlings (10.0%). Pigs and feed were weighed at the start and at the end of each phase, and ADG, ADFI, and G:F were calculated. At the conclusion of phase 2, blood was collected from 1 pig per pen and 1 pig per pen was sacrificed. Cecum and rectum contents were analyzed for VFA, and tissue samples were collected from the ileum, cecum, rectum, and liver to determine expression of genes related to absorption and metabolism of VFA using quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. Results indicated that feeding HF diets reduced ( ≤ 0.05) ADFI and ADG of pigs compared with feeding LF diets. Pigs fed DFM diets had improved ( ≤ 0.05) G:F compared with pigs fed non-DFM diets. Pigs fed LF diets had greater ( ≤ 0.05) BW at the end of phase 2 compared with pigs fed HF diets. The concentration of VFA in rectum contents was greater ( ≤ 0.05) in pigs fed LF diets than in pigs fed HF diets. The expression of in the rectum of pigs fed HF diets was greater ( ≤ 0.05) than for pigs fed LF diets, and pigs fed DFM

  3. Distribution and Metabolism of Lipocurc™ (Liposomal Curcumin) in Dog and Human Blood Cells: Species Selectivity and Pharmacokinetic Relevance.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Gordon T; Licollari, Albert; Tan, Aimin; Greil, Richard; Vcelar, Brigitta; Majeed, Muhammad; Helson, Lawrence

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the distribution of curcumin (in the form of Lipocurc™) and its major metabolite tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) in Beagle dog and human red blood cells, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and hepatocytes. Lipocurc™ was used as the source of curcumin for the cell distribution assays. In vitro findings with red blood cells were also compared to in vivo pharmacokinetic data available from preclinical studies in dogs and phase I clinical studies in humans. High levels of curcumin were measured in PBMCs (625.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7,297 pg/10 6 cells in dog and 353.7 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 6,809 pg/10 6 cells in human) and in hepatocytes (414.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 14,005 pg/10 6 cells in dog and 813.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 13,780 pg/10 6 cells in human). Lower curcumin levels were measured in red blood cells (dog: 78.4 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 7.2 pg/10 6 cells, human: 201.5 ng/g w.w. cell pellet or 18.6 pg/10 6 cells). A decrease in the medium concentration of curcumin was observed in red blood cells and hepatocytes, but not in PBMCs. Red blood cell levels of THC were ~5-fold higher in dog compared to human and similar between dog and human for hepatocytes and PBMCs. The ratio of THC to curcumin found in the red blood cell medium following incubation was 6.3 for dog compared to 0.006 for human, while for PBMCs and hepatocytes the ratio of THC to curcumin in the medium did not display such marked species differences. There was an excellent correlation between the in vitro disposition of curcumin and THC following incubation with red blood cells and in vivo plasma levels of curcumin and THC in dog and human following intravenous infusion. The disposition of curcumin in blood cells is, therefore, species-dependent and of pharmacokinetic relevance. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  4. Accumulation and distribution of trivalent chromium and effects on hybrid willow (Salix matsudana Koidz x alba L.) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, X-Z; Gu, J-D

    2007-05-01

    The metabolic response of plants to exogenous supply and bioaccumulation of trivalent chromium (Cr(3+) ) was investigated. Pre-rooted young hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x alba L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with CrCl(3) at 24.0 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C for 192 hours. Various physiologic parameters of the plants were monitored to determine toxicity from Cr exposure. The transpiration rate of willows exposed to 2.5 mg Cr/L was 49% higher than that of the untreated control plants, but it was decreased by 17% when exposed to 30.0 mg Cr/L. Significant decrease (> or =20%) of soluble protein in young leaves of willows was detected in the treatment group with > or =7.5 mg Cr/L. The measured chlorophyll contents in leaves of treated plants varied with the dose of Cr, but a linear correlation could not be established. The contents of chlorophyll in leaves of willows exposed to > or =7.5 mg Cr/L were higher than that of the untreated plants but lower at 30.0 mg Cr/L. Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in leaves between the treated and untreated willows did not show any significant difference, but activities of both catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf cells of all treated plants were higher than those in the untreated willows. The correlation between the concentration of Cr and CAT activity in leaf cells was the highest of all toxicity assays (R ( 2 ) = 0.9096), indicating that CAT activity was most sensitive to the change in Cr(3+) doses compared with the other selected parameters. Results from the Cr uptake study showed that significant removal of Cr from hydroponic solution was observed in the presence of hybrid willows without showing detectable phytotoxicity, even at high does of Cr. More than 90% of the applied Cr(3+) was removed from the aqueous solution by willows at concentrations up to 7.5 mg Cr/L. Approximately 70% of the initial Cr was recovered in the plant materials. At the low-Cr(3+) treatment (2.5 mg Cr/L), Cr accumulation by

  5. L-carnitine and cancer cachexia. I. L-carnitine distribution and metabolic disorders in cancer cachexia.

    PubMed

    Szefel, Jarosław; Kruszewski, Wiesław Janusz; Ciesielski, Maciej; Szajewski, Mariusz; Kawecki, Krzysztof; Aleksandrowicz-Wrona, Ewa; Jankun, Jerzy; Lysiak-Szydłowska, Wiesława

    2012-07-01

    Cancer cachexia (CC), a progressive loss of body mass, is associated with decreased energy production. Abnormally low levels of L-carnitine (LC) in skeletal muscle means that mitochondrial β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids (LCFA) does not occur efficiently in patients with CC. We assessed the influence of CC on LC distribution and the effects of parenteral lipid emulsions on plasma LC levels and urinary excretion. Fifty patients with CC were randomly assigned to total parenteral nutrition (TPN) with long-chain triglycerides (LCTs), or LCTs plus medium-chain triglycerides (MCTs) as 50/50. Patients were further separated into those with body-mass index (BMI) ≤ 19 kg/m(2) and BMI >19 kg/m(2). Plasma concentrations of total LC (TC) and free LC (FC) and their urinary excretion were measured, along with skeletal muscle LC levels. On average, plasma FC and TC were higher than reference values in all patients. Patients with BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) had lower plasma FC and TC than those with BMI >19 kg/m(2). Skeletal muscle FC in the BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2) group was lower than reference value, but within the normal range in others. LC and FC urinary excretion was higher than reference values. Plasma LC and its urinary excretion were higher in patients administered pure LCTs relative to those given MCTs/LCTs. A decrease in skeletal muscle LC in cancer patients with CC (BMI ≤ 19 kg/m(2)) correlates with an increase in its plasma levels and increased renal excretion. A diet of MCTs/LCTs reduces LC release from muscle to plasma and urine more effectively than LCTs.

  6. Long-Term Impacts of Foetal Malnutrition Followed by Early Postnatal Obesity on Fat Distribution Pattern and Metabolic Adaptability in Adult Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Prabhat; Johnsen, Lærke; Axel, Anne Marie Dixen; Hansen, Pernille Willert; Kongsted, Anna Hauntoft; Lyckegaard, Nette Brinch; Nielsen, Mette Olaf

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to investigate whether over- versus undernutrition in late foetal life combined with obesity development in early postnatal life have differential implications for fat distribution and metabolic adaptability in adulthood. Twin-pregnant ewes were fed NORM (100% of daily energy and protein requirements), LOW (50% of NORM) or HIGH (150%/110% of energy/protein requirements) diets during the last trimester. Postnatally, twin-lambs received obesogenic (HCHF) or moderate (CONV) diets until 6 months of age, and a moderate (obesity correcting) diet thereafter. At 2½ years of age (adulthood), plasma metabolite profiles during fasting, glucose, insulin and propionate (in fed and fasted states) tolerance tests were examined. Organ weights were determined at autopsy. Early obesity development was associated with lack of expansion of perirenal, but not other adipose tissues from adolescence to adulthood, resulting in 10% unit increased proportion of mesenteric of intra-abdominal fat. Prenatal undernutrition had a similar but much less pronounced effect. Across tolerance tests, LOW-HCHF sheep had highest plasma levels of cholesterol, urea-nitrogen, creatinine, and lactate. Sex specific differences were observed, particularly with respect to fat deposition, but direction of responses to early nutrition impacts were similar. However, prenatal undernutrition induced greater metabolic alterations in adult females than males. Foetal undernutrition, but not overnutrition, predisposed for adult hypercholesterolaemia, hyperureaemia, hypercreatinaemia and hyperlactataemia, which became manifested only in combination with early obesity development. Perirenal expandability may play a special role in this context. Differential nutrition recommendations may be advisable for individuals with low versus high birth weights. PMID:27257993

  7. Characterization of the microbial community composition and the distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria in a creek contaminated by acid mine drainage.

    PubMed

    Sun, Weimin; Xiao, Enzong; Krumins, Valdis; Dong, Yiran; Xiao, Tangfu; Ning, Zengping; Chen, Haiyan; Xiao, Qingxiang

    2016-10-01

    A small watershed heavily contaminated by long-term acid mine drainage (AMD) from an upstream abandoned coal mine was selected to study the microbial community developed in such extreme system. The watershed consists of AMD-contaminated creek, adjacent contaminated soils, and a small cascade aeration unit constructed downstream, which provide an excellent contaminated site to study the microbial response in diverse extreme AMD-polluted environments. The results showed that the innate microbial communities were dominated by acidophilic bacteria, especially acidophilic Fe-metabolizing bacteria, suggesting that Fe and pH are the primary environmental factors in governing the indigenous microbial communities. The distribution of Fe-metabolizing bacteria showed distinct site-specific patterns. A pronounced shift from diverse communities in the upstream to Proteobacteria-dominated communities in the downstream was observed in the ecosystem. This location-specific trend was more apparent at genus level. In the upstream samples (sampling sites just below the coal mining adit), a number of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria such as Alicyclobacillus spp., Metallibacterium spp., and Acidithrix spp. were dominant, while Halomonas spp. were the major Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria observed in downstream samples. Additionally, Acidiphilium, an Fe(III)-reducing bacterium, was enriched in the upstream samples, while Shewanella spp. were the dominant Fe(III)-reducing bacteria in downstream samples. Further investigation using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) effect size (LEfSe), principal coordinate analysis (PCoA), and unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean (UPGMA) clustering confirmed the difference of microbial communities between upstream and downstream samples. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) and Spearman's rank correlation indicate that total organic carbon (TOC) content is the primary environmental parameter in structuring the indigenous microbial communities

  8. Efficacy, pharmacokinetics, tisssue distribution, and metabolism of the Myc-Max disruptor, 10058-F4 [Z,E]-5-[4-ethylbenzylidine]-2-thioxothiazolidin-4-one, in mice.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jianxia; Parise, Robert A; Joseph, Erin; Egorin, Merrill J; Lazo, John S; Prochownik, Edward V; Eiseman, Julie L

    2009-03-01

    c-Myc is commonly activated in many human tumors and is functionally important in cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cell cycle progression. The activity of c-Myc requires noncovalent interaction with its client protein Max. In vitro studies indicate the thioxothiazolidinone, 10058-F4, inhibits c-Myc/Max dimerization. In this study, we report the efficacy, pharmacokinetics and metabolism of this novel protein-protein disruptor in mice. SCID mice bearing DU145 or PC-3 human prostate cancer xenografts were treated with either 20 or 30 mg/kg 10058-F4 on a qdx5 schedule for 2 weeks for efficacy studies. For pharmacokinetics and metabolism studies, mice bearing PC-3 or DU145 xenografts were treated with 20 mg/kg of 10058-F4 i.v. Plasma and tissues were collected 5-1440 min after dosing. The concentration of 10058-F4 in plasma and tissues was determined by HPLC, and metabolites were characterized by LC-MS/MS. Following a single iv dose, peak plasma 10058-F4 concentrations of approximately 300 muM were seen at 5 min and declined to below the detection limit at 360 min. Plasma concentration versus time data were best approximated by a two-compartment, open, linear model. The highest tissue concentrations of 10058-F4 were found in fat, lung, liver, and kidney. Peak tumor concentrations of 10058-F4 were at least tenfold lower than peak plasma concentrations. Eight metabolites of 10058-F4 were identified in plasma, liver, and kidney. The terminal half-life of 10058-F4 was approximately 1 h, and the volume of distribution was >200 ml/kg. No significant inhibition of tumor growth was seen after i.v. treatment of mice with either 20 or 30 mg/kg 10058-F4. The lack of significant antitumor activity of 10058-F4 in tumor-bearing mice may have resulted from its rapid metabolism and low concentration in tumors.

  9. Distribution of CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 Polymorphisms Associated with Poor Metabolizer Phenotype in Five Amerindian Groups and Western Mestizos from Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Salazar-Flores, Joel; Torres-Reyes, Luis A.; Martínez-Cortés, Gabriela; Rubi-Castellanos, Rodrigo; Sosa-Macías, Martha; Muñoz-Valle, José F.; González-González, César; Ramírez, Angélica; Román, Raquel; Méndez, José L.; Barrera, Andrés; Torres, Alfredo; Medina, Rafael

    2012-01-01

    Background: The distribution of polymorphisms in the CYP2D6 and CYP2C19 genes allows inferring the potential risk for specific adverse drug reactions and lack of therapeutic effects in humans. This variability shows differences among human populations. The aim of this study was to analyze single-nucleotide polymorphisms related to a poor metabolizer (PM) phenotype in nonpreviously studied Amerindian groups and Mestizos (general admixed population) from Mexico. Methods: We detected by SNaPshot® different polymorphisms located in CYP2D6 (*3, *4, *6, *7, and *8) and CYP2C19 (*2, *3, *4 and *5) in western Mestizos (n=145) and five Amerindian groups from Mexico: Tarahumaras from the North (n=88); Purépechas from the Center (n=101); and Tojolabales (n=68), Tzotziles (n=88), and Tzeltales (n=20) from the Southeast. Genotypes were observed by capillary electrophoresis. The genetic relationships among these populations were estimated based on these genes. Results and Discussion: The wild-type allele (*1) of both genes was predominant in the Mexican populations studied. The most widely observed alleles were CYP2C19*2 (range, 0%–31%) and CYP2D6*4 (range, 1.2%–7.3%), whereas CYP2D6*3 was exclusively detected in Mestizos. Conversely, CYP2C19*4 and *5, as well as CYP2D6*3, *6, *7, and *8, were not observed in the majority of the Mexican populations. The Tarahumaras presented a high frequency of the allele CYP2C19*2 (31%) and of homozygotes *2/*2 (10.7%), which represent a high frequency of potentially PM phenotypes in this Amerindian group. The genetic distances showed high differentiation of Tarahumaras (principally for CYP2C19 gene). In general, a relative proximity was observed between most of the Amerindian, Mexican-Mestizo, and Latin-American populations. Conclusion: In general, the wild-type allele (*1) predominates in Mexican populations, outlining a relatively homogeneous distribution for CYP2C19 and CYP2D6. The exception is the Tarahumara group that displays a

  10. Calculations of B1 Distribution, Specific Energy Absorption Rate, and Intrinsic Signal-to-Noise Ratio for a Body-Size Birdcage Coil Loaded with Different Human Subjects at 64 and 128 MHz.

    PubMed

    Liu, W; Collins, C M; Smith, M B

    2005-03-01

    A numerical model of a female body is developed to study the effects of different body types with different coil drive methods on radio-frequency magnetic ( B 1 ) field distribution, specific energy absorption rate (SAR), and intrinsic signal-to-noise ratio (ISNR) for a body-size birdcage coil at 64 and 128 MHz. The coil is loaded with either a larger, more muscular male body model (subject 1) or a newly developed female body model (subject 2), and driven with two-port (quadrature), four-port, or many (ideal) sources. Loading the coil with subject 1 results in significantly less homogeneous B 1 field, higher SAR, and lower ISNR than those for subject 2 at both frequencies. This dependence of MR performance and safety measures on body type indicates a need for a variety of numerical models representative of a diverse population for future calculations. The different drive methods result in similar B 1 field patterns, SAR, and ISNR in all cases.

  11. In silico prediction of cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Chen, Qi; Li, Li; Liu, Limin Angela; Wei, Dong-Qing

    2011-06-01

    The application of combinatorial chemistry and high-throughput screening technique enables the large number of chemicals to be generated and tested simultaneously, which will facilitate the drug development and discovery. At the same time, it brings about a challenge of how to efficiently identify the potential drug candidates from thousands of compounds. A way used to deal with the challenge is to consider the drug pharmacokinetic properties, such as absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME), in the early stage of drug development. Among ADME properties, metabolism is of importance due to the strong association with efficacy and safety of drug. The review will focus on in silico approaches for prediction of Cytochrome P450-mediated drug metabolism. We will describe these predictive methods from two aspects, structure-based and data-based. Moreover, the applications and limitations of various methods will be discussed. Finally, we provide further direction toward improving the predictive accuracy of these in silico methods.

  12. [Study on lead absorption in pumpkin by atomic absorption spectrophotometry].

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen-Xia; Sun, Yong-Dong; Chen, Bi-Hua; Li, Xin-Zheng

    2008-07-01

    A study was carried out on the characteristic of lead absorption in pumpkin via atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The results showed that lead absorption amount in pumpkin increased with time, but the absorption rate decreased with time; And the lead absorption amount reached the peak in pH 7. Lead and cadmium have similar characteristic of absorption in pumpkin.

  13. Cation Ordering in Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2-Layered Cathode Materials: A Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR), Pair Distribution Function, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy, and Electrochemical Study

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng,D.; Cabana, J.; Breger, J.

    2007-01-01

    Several members of the compositional series Li[NixMnxCo(1-2x)]O2 (0.01 = x = 1/3) were synthesized and characterized. X-ray diffraction results confirm the presence of the layered a-NaFeO2-type structure, while X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy experiments verify the presence of Ni2+, Mn4+, and Co3+. Their local environment and short-range ordering were investigated by using a combination of 6Li magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and neutron pair distribution function (PDF) analysis, associated with reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) calculations. The 6Li MAS NMR spectra of compounds with low Ni/Mn contents (x = 0.10) show several well-resolved resonances, which start to mergemore » when the amount of Ni and Mn increases, finally forming a broad resonance at high Ni/Mn contents. Analysis of the 6Li MAS NMR 6Li[Ni0.02Mn0.02Co0.96]O2 spectrum, is consistent with the formation of Ni2+ and Mn4+ clusters within the transition-metal layers, even at these low-doping levels. The oxidation state of Ni in this high Co content sample strongly depends upon the Li/transition metal ratio of the starting materials. Neutron PDF analysis of the highest Ni/Mn content sample Li[Ni1/3Mn1/3Co1/3]O2 shows a tendency for Ni cations to be close to Mn cations in the first coordination shell; however, the Co3+ ions are randomly distributed. Analysis of the intensity of the 'LiCoO2' resonance, arising from Li surrounded by Co3+ in its first two cation coordination shells, for the whole series provides further evidence for a nonrandom distribution of the transition-metal cations. The presence of the insulator-to-metal transition seen in the electrochemical profiles of these materials upon charging correlates strongly with the concentration of the 'LiCoO2' resonance.« less

  14. Experiment K-7-21: Effect of Microgravity on 1: Metabolic Enzymes of Type 1 and Type 2 Muscle Fibers, and on 2: Metabolic Enzymes, Neurotransmitter Amino Acids, and Neurotransmitter Associated Enzymes in Selected Regions of the Central Nervous System. Part 2; The Distribution of Selected Enzymes and Amino Acids in the Hippocampal Formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, O. H.; Krasnov, I.; Ilyina-Kakueva, E. I.; Nemeth, P. M.; McDougal, D. B., Jr.; Choksi, R.; Carter, J. G.; Chi, M. M. Y.; Manchester, J. K.; Pusateri, M. E.

    1994-01-01

    Six key metabolic enzymes plus glutaminase and glutamate decarboxylase, as well as glutamate, aspartate and GABA, were measured in 11 regions of the hippocampal formation of synchronous, flight and tail suspension rats. Major differences were observed in the normal distribution patterns of each enzyme and amino acid, but no substantive effects of either microgravity or tail suspension on these patterns were clearly demonstrated.

  15. Effects of complementary and excess diet supplementation with selected minerals on their metabolism and distribution in the body: a model study.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Mariola; Podlaszewska, Grażyna; Pokorska-Niewiada, Kamila

    2015-01-01

    n. The study was aimed at determining, on an animal model, effects of supplementing a diet, modified by substituting whole wheat and corn grains with white flour and sucrose, with calcium, magnesium, zinc, and chromium on metabolism of the minerals and their distribution in the body. The study involved 4 groups of Wistar rat females (n = 11) fed: a standard feed (group I) containing, i.a., whole wheat and corn grains; modified feed (84% and 50% of whole wheat and corn grains, respectively, in the standard feed substituted with Type 500 wheat flour and sucrose, respectively) (group II); modified feed with complementary supplementation (elimination of Ca, Mg, Zn, and Cr deficiencies resulting from diet modification) (group III); and modified feed with excess supplementation (the same minerals applied in excess, i.e., amounts from 0.5 to 3 times higher than the deficiencies produced by diet modification) (group IV). The replacement of whole grains with white flour and sucrose, as well as the mineral  supplementation could, to some extent, imitate the contemporary eating habits and supplementation applied in food technology. The excess supplementation is, on the other hand, typical of current behaviours of various social groups. Both types of supplementation resulted in a significant increase in the perivisceral adipose tissue content, but did not affect the fat tissue content in muscles. The supplementation applied did not change the content of calcium, magnesium, and zinc in muscles, nor did it significantly change calcium and magnesium excretion with urine. However, changes in the ALP activity and calcitonin concentration did not suggest the deposition of the minerals in bones. Analysis of the results allowed to conclude that: 1) except for chromium, contents of the selected minerals in the tissues examined and urea, as well as concentrations of calcitonin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities did not point to any significant effect of the supplementation

  16. Aerosol Absorption and Radiative Forcing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stier, Philip; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kinne, Stefan; Boucher, Olivier

    2007-01-01

    We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol absorption with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol absorption to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol absorption optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006) significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol absorption optical depth. In the global annual-mean, absorption acts to reduce the shortwave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing clear-sky from -0.79 to -0.53 W m(sup -2) (33%) and all-sky from -0.47 to -0.13W m(sup -2 (72%). Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive index play a key role for aerosol absorption and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19W m(sup -2) (36%) clear-sky and of 0.12W m(sup -2) (92%) all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky absorption of 0.05W m(sup -2) and a positive TOA forcing perturbation of 0

  17. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  18. Focus on nutrition: the role of iodine in nutrition and metabolism.

    PubMed

    Zicker, Steve; Schoenherr, Bill

    2012-10-01

    Iodine, which forms part of thyroid hormone, is essential for sustaining life in vertebrate animals. An absolute iodine requirement is difficult to determine because of adaptive responses to varying iodine intake. Excess or deficient iodine intake may result in altered thyroid metabolism. The magnitude and direction of the response to changes in dietary intake may also depend on previous iodine intake. Therefore, an understanding of the distribution, absorption, and metabolic fate of iodine is integral to the investigation of the role of iodine in disease states.

  19. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  20. Metabolism and Tissue Distribution of Orally Administered Trichloroethylene in Male and Female Rats: Identification of Glutathione- and Cytochrome P450-Derived Metabolites in Liver, Kidney, Blood and Urine

    PubMed Central

    Lash, Lawrence H.; Putt, David A.; Parker, Jean C.

    2006-01-01

    Male and female Fischer 344 rats were administered trichloroethylene (TRI) (2, 5, or 15 mmol/kg body weight) in corn oil by oral gavage and TRI and its metabolites were measured at times up to 48 hr in liver, kidney, blood, and urine. We tested the hypothesis that sex-dependent differences in distribution and metabolism of TRI could help explain differences in toxicity. Higher levels of TRI were generally observed in tissues of males. A biphasic pattern of TRI concentration was observed in liver, kidney, and blood of both males and females, consistent with enterohepatic recirculation. Higher concentrations of cytochrome P450 (P450)-derived metabolites (chloral hydrate, trichloroacetate, trichloroethanol) were observed in livers of males than in livers of females whereas the opposite pattern was observed in kidneys. Chloral hydrate was the primary P450-derived metabolite in blood and urine of males whereas trichloroacetate was the primary P450-derived metabolite in blood and urine of females. S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)glutathione (DCVG) was recovered in liver and kidney of female rats only and in blood of both male and female rats, with generally higher amounts found in females. S-(1,2-Dichlorovinyl)-l-cysteine (DCVC), the penultimate nephrotoxic metabolite, was recovered in male and female liver, female kidney, male blood, and in urine of both males and females. The results demonstrate sex-dependent differences in recovery of key metabolites of TRI that may help explain differences in susceptibility to TRI-induced toxicity with both the liver and kidney as target organs. PMID:16754541

  1. Metabolism and tissue distribution of trace elements in broiler chickens' fed diets containing deficient and plethoric levels of copper, manganese, and zinc.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Sovik; Haldar, Sudipto; Saha, Pinaki; Ghosh, Tapan Kumar

    2010-11-01

    Supplementation of broiler diets with copper, manganese, and zinc at levels higher than that stipulated by the National Research Council 1994 reportedly improved live weight, feed conversion, and cured leg abnormality supposedly caused by inadequate intake of Mn and Zn. The objective of the study was to ascertain the effects of plethoric supplementation of copper (Cu), manganese (Mn), and zinc (Zn) on performance and metabolic responses in broiler chickens. The study also aimed to discriminate the responses of the birds when the mineral elements were supplemented either in an inorganic or in an organic form. Cobb 400 broiler chickens (1-day old, n = 300) were assigned to three dietary treatments each containing nine replicates with ten birds for 39 days. The treatments included a control in which the diet was devoid of supplemental trace elements and treatments supplemented with an inorganic trace element premix (ITM) and supplemented with a combination of the inorganic and an organic trace element premix (OTM). The ITM contained (per kilogram) copper, 15 g; iron, 90 g; manganese, 90 g; zinc, 80 g (all as sulfated salts); iodine (as potassium iodide), 2 g; and selenium (as sodium selenite), 0.3 g. The OTM on the other hand, contained copper, 2.5 g; iron, 15 g; manganese, 15 g; zinc, 13.33 g; and chromium, 0.226 g (all as protein chelates). Plethoric supplementation of trace elements improved live weight gain and feed/gain ratio (p < 0.05). Leg abnormality developed in the 16% of the control group of birds but not in the supplemented group. Metabolizability of dry matter, organic matter, and protein was higher (p < 0.01) in the ITM and OTM groups. Excretion of Cu, Fe, and Zn decreased (p < 0.1) due to supplementation of the trace elements leading to increased apparent absorption of the said mineral elements (p < 0.01). Concentration of the concerned trace elements in serum, liver, and composite muscle samples was higher (p < 0.05) in the ITM and OTM dietary groups

  2. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  3. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor); Hua, Duy H. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  4. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  5. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  6. Biological effects of 2-oxoglutarate with particular emphasis on the regulation of protein, mineral and lipid absorption/metabolism, muscle performance, kidney function, bone formation and cancerogenesis, all viewed from a healthy ageing perspective state of the art--review article.

    PubMed

    Harrison, A P; Pierzynowski, S G

    2008-08-01

    The fact that men and women are living longer than they have ever done before is something in which we can all rejoice. However, the process of ageing is associated with changes in skeletal, muscular, gastrointestinal, neural hormonal and metabolic processes that seriously affect an individual's performance and quality of life. Indeed, such changes can be contributory to a loss of independence in the elderly. This state-of-the art address highlights the main changes found to occur with ageing whilst simultaneously reporting findings of in vivo and in vitro studies designed to elucidate the potential of the Krebs cycle intermediate - alpha-ketoglutaric acid (AKG) in protecting elderly body systems from failing and degradation. The topics of paramount importance include impaired bone structure and strength, amino acid and mineral absorption, muscle performance, as well as highlighting the role of Krebs cycle intermediates in the debilitating changes that occur with end-stage renal failure and the regulation of the lipid metabolism. Finally, focus will be given to the role of 2-oxoglutarate as a potent protective factor in connection with the development of malignant cells in the body.

  7. Laser Atmospheric Absorption Studies.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    A. Modification of Commercial C09 Laser 50 B. CW HF/DF Laser System * 53 C. Microcomputer Data Link 55 D . Fourier Transform...improved accuracy are used [5]. c. The absorption coefficient is listed for each absorbing species separately which some codes require. d . A super...series of water vapor absorption measurements was planned. The results of the first four lines studied are presented here in Figures 33a- d . Figure

  8. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  9. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R [Albuquerque, NM; Reed, Scott T [Albuquerque, NM; Ashley, Carol S [Albuquerque, NM; Martinez, F Edward [Horseheads, NY

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  10. The Effects of Pharmaceutical Excipients on Gastrointestinal Tract Metabolic Enzymes and Transporters-an Update.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenpeng; Li, Yanyan; Zou, Peng; Wu, Man; Zhang, Zhenqing; Zhang, Tao

    2016-07-01

    Accumulating evidence from the last decade has shown that many pharmaceutical excipients are not pharmacologically inert but instead have effects on metabolic enzymes and/or drug transporters. Hence, the absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination (ADME) of active pharmaceutical ingredients (APIs) may be altered due to the modulation of their metabolism and transport by excipients. The impact of excipients is a potential concern for Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS)-based biowaivers, particularly as the BCS-based biowaivers have been extended to class 3 drugs in certain dosage forms. The presence of different excipients or varying amounts of excipients between formulations may result in bio-inequivalence. The excipient impact may lead to significant variations in clinical outcomes as well. The aim of this paper is to review the recent findings of excipient effects on gastrointestinal (GI) absorption, focusing on their interactions with the metabolic enzymes and transporters in the GI tract. A wide range of commonly used excipients such as binders, diluents, fillers, solvents, and surfactants are discussed here. We summarized the reported effects of those excipients on GI tract phase I and phase II enzymes, uptake and efflux transporters, and relevant clinical significance. This information can enhance our understanding of excipient influence on drug absorption and is useful in designing pharmacokinetic studies and evaluating the resultant data.

  11. Methionine metabolism in piglets Fed DL-methionine or its hydroxy analogue was affected by distribution of enzymes oxidizing these sources to keto-methionine.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhengfeng; Luo, Hefeng; Wei, Hongkui; Huang, Feiruo; Qi, Zhili; Jiang, Siwen; Peng, Jian

    2010-02-10

    Previous evidence shows that the extensive catabolism of dietary essential amino acids (AA) by the intestine results in decreased availability of these AA for protein synthesis in extraintestinal tissues. This raises the possibility that extraintestinal availability of AA may be improved by supplying the animal with an AA source more of which can bypass the intestine. To test this hypothesis, six barrows (35-day-old, 8.6 +/- 1.4 kg), implanted with arterial, portal, and mesenteric catheters, were fed a DL-methionine (DL-MET) or DL-2-hydroxy-4-methylthiobutyrate (DL-HMTB) diet once hourly and infused intramesenterically with 1% p-amino hippurate. Although the directly available L-MET in DL-MET diet was about 1.2-fold that in DL-HMTB diet, the net portal appearance of L-MET was not different between the two diets. Compared with the low mRNA abundance and low activity of D-2-hydroxy acid dehydrogenase (D-HADH) and l-2-hydroxy acid oxidase (L-HAOX) in the intestine, the high mRNA abundance and high activity of D-AA oxidase (D-AAOX) indicated that the intestine had a relatively higher capacity of D-MET utilization than of dl-HMTB utilization to L-MET synthesis and its subsequent metabolism. However, in contrast to the much lower D-AAOX activity (nmol/g tissue) in the stomach than in the liver and kidney, both d-HADH and L-HAOX activity in the stomach was comparable with those in the liver and/or kidney, indicating the substantial capacity of the stomach to convert DL-HMTB to L-MET. Collectively, the difference in distribution of activity and mRNA abundance of D-AAOX, D-HADH, and L-HAOX in the piglets may offer a biological basis for the similar portal appearance of L-MET between DL-MET and DL-HMTB diets, and thus may provide new important insights into nutritional efficiency of different L-MET sources.

  12. Diabetes regulates fructose absorption through thioredoxin-interacting protein.

    PubMed

    Dotimas, James R; Lee, Austin W; Schmider, Angela B; Carroll, Shannon H; Shah, Anu; Bilen, Julide; Elliott, Kayla R; Myers, Ronald B; Soberman, Roy J; Yoshioka, Jun; Lee, Richard T

    2016-10-11

    Metabolic studies suggest that the absorptive capacity of the small intestine for fructose is limited, though the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), which regulates glucose homeostasis in mammals, binds to fructose transporters and promotes fructose absorption by the small intestine. Deletion of Txnip in mice reduced fructose transport into the peripheral bloodstream and liver, as well as the severity of adverse metabolic outcomes resulting from long-term fructose consumption. We also demonstrate that fructose consumption induces expression of Txnip in the small intestine. Diabetic mice had increased expression of Txnip in the small intestine as well as enhanced fructose uptake and transport into the hepatic portal circulation. The deletion of Txnip in mice abolished the diabetes-induced increase in fructose absorption. Our results indicate that Txnip is a critical regulator of fructose metabolism and suggest that a diabetic state can promote fructose uptake.

  13. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  14. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  15. Correlation and Comparison of Various Anthropometric Measurements of Body Fat Distribution and Sagittal Abdominal Diameter as a Screening Tool for Cardio Metabolic Risk Factors and Ischaemic Heart Disease in Elderly Population.

    PubMed

    Sharda, Meenaxi; Jain, Pankaj; Gupta, Atul; Nagar, Deepti; Soni, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Primary objective of this study was to assess utility of sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) as a cardio vascular risk predictor and compare various anthropometric measurement of body fat distribution in elderly patients. Four hundred patients were enrolled in study. Elderly patients more than 60 year of age attending medical OPD, geriatric OPD and suitable indoor patients who were willing to participate in the study were included. SAD was significantly higher in patient with ischaemic heart disease (group 1) than patient without ischaemic heart disease (Group 2) (P < 0.001 for male and female). SAD was better than WC to ascertain individual cardio metabolic risk factors in male, especially FBS (Pearson correlation .33 vs. .29), total cholesterol (Pearson correlation .24 vs. .20) as well as LDL cholesterol (Pearson correlation .13 vs. .05), while in female WC and SAD showed equal correlation with individual cardio metabolic risk factors. In patient with metabolic syndrome IHD group showed considerably higher mean SAD values. SAD also showed very good correlation with individual cardio metabolic risk factors especially in elderly male, while in female both SAD and.WC were almost equivalent.

  16. Potentiation of intraocular absorption and drug metabolism of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops: drug interaction with sight threatening lipid peroxides in the treatment for age-related eye diseases.

    PubMed

    Babizhayev, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    lenses obtained from patients with senile and complicated cataracts as compared to normal donors. Utilizing the pharmacokinetic studies and the specific purity N-acetylcarnosine (NAC) ingredient as a source of pharmacological principal L-carnosine, we have created an ophthalmic time-release prodrug form combined with a muco-adhesive lubricant compound carboxymethylcellulose and other essential corneal absorption promoter excipients tailoring the increased intraocular absorption of L-carnosine in the aqueous humor and optimizing its specific effect in producing the basic antioxidant activity in vivo and reducing toxic effects of lipid peroxides to the crystalline lens. L-Carnosine that finds its way into the aqueous humor can accumulate in the lens tissue for a reasonable period of time. However, administration of pure L-carnosine (1% solution) to the rabbit eye (instillation, subconjunctival injection) does not lead to accumulation of this natural compound in the aqueous humor over 30 min in concentration exceeding that in the placebo-treated matched eyes, and its effective concentration is exhausted more rapidly. The NAC prodrug eye drops optimize the clinical effects for the treatment of ophthalmic disorders (such as prevention and reversal of cataracts in human and animal [canine] eyes). The data provided predict a particular NAC ophthalmic prodrug's clinical effect; the suitable magnitude and duration of this effect suggest dose-related bioavailability of L-camosine released from NAC in the aqueous humor of the anterior eye segment. The ophthalmic NAC drug shows promise in the treatment of a range of ophthalmic disorders which have a component of oxidative stress in their genesis (including cataract and after-cataract, glaucoma, dry eye, vitreous floaters, inflammatory disorders, corneal, retinal and systemic diseases [such as diabetes mellitus and its ophthalmic complications]). The clinical efficacy of N-acetylcarnosine lubricant eye drops in ripe cataracts and

  17. Absorption Spectra of Gold Nanoparticle Suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anan'eva, M. V.; Nurmukhametov, D. R.; Zverev, A. S.; Nelyubina, N. V.; Zvekov, A. A.; Russakov, D. M.; Kalenskii, A. V.; Eremenko, A. N.

    2018-02-01

    Three gold nanoparticle suspensions are obtained, and mean radii in distributions - (6.1 ± 0.2), (11.9 ± 0.3), and (17.3 ± 0.7) nm - are determined by the transmission electron microscopy method. The optical absorption spectra of suspensions are obtained and studied. Calculation of spectral dependences of the absorption index of suspensions at values of the gold complex refractive index taken from the literature showed a significant deviation of experimental and calculated data in the region of 450-800 nm. Spectral dependences of the absorption of suspensions are simulated within the framework of the Mie-Drude theory taking into account the interband absorption in the form of an additional term in the imaginary part of the dielectric permittivity of the Gaussian type. It is shown that to quantify the spectral dependences in the region of the plasmon absorption band of nanoparticles, correction of the parameters of the interband absorption is necessary in addition to the increase of the relaxation parameter of the Drude theory. Spectral dependences of the dielectric permittivity of gold in nanodimensional state are refined from the solution of the inverse problem. The results of the present work are important for predicting the special features of operation of photonic devices and optical detonators based on gold nanoparticles.

  18. A search for intervening HI absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Sarah N.; Sadler, Elaine M.; Allison, James R.; Koribalski, Baerbel S.; Curran, Stephen J.

    2013-03-01

    HI absorption-line studies provide a unique probe of the gas distribution and kinematics in galaxies well beyond the local universe (z ≳ 0.3). HI absorption-line surveys with next-generation radio telescopes will provide the first large-scale studies of HI in a redshift regime which is poorly understood. However, we currently lack the understanding to infer galaxy properties from absorption-line observations alone. To address this issue, we are conducting a search for intervening HI absorption in a sample of 20 nearby galaxies. Our aim is to investigate how the detection rate varies with distance from the galaxy. We target sight-lines to bright continuum sources, which intercept known gas-rich galaxies, selected from the HIPASS Bright Galaxy Catalogue (Koribalski et al. 2004). In our pilot sample, six galaxies with impact parameters < 20 kpc, we do not detect any absorption lines - although all are detected in 21cm emission. This indicates that an absorption non-detection cannot simply be interpreted as an absence of neutral gas - see Fig. 1. Our detection rate is low compared to previous surveys e.g. Gupta et al. (2010). This is, at least partially, due to the high resolution of the observations reducing the flux of the background source, which will also be an issue in future surveys, such as ASKAP-FLASH.

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  20. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  1. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  2. The New MODIS-Terra, and the Proposed COBRA Mission: First Global Aerosol Distribution and Properties Over Land and Ocean, and Plans to Measure Global Black Carbon Absorption Over the Ocean Glint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Remer, Lorraine; Martins, Vanderlei; Schoeberl, Mark; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODIS instrument was launched on the NASA Terra satellite in Dec. 1999. Since last Oct, the sensor and the aerosol algorithm reached maturity and provide global daily retrievals of aerosol optical thickness and properties. MODIS has 36 spectral channels in the visible to IR with resolution down to 250 m. This allows accurate cloud screening and multi-spectral aerosol retrievals. We derive the aerosol optical thickness over the ocean and most of the land areas, distinguishing between fine (mainly man-made aerosol) and coarse (mainly natural) aerosol particles. New methods to derive the aerosol absorption of sunlight are also being developed. These measurements are use to track different aerosol sources, transport and the radiative forcing at the top and bottom of the atmosphere. However MODIS or any present satellite sensor cannot measure absorption by Black Carbon over the oceans, a critical component in studying climate change and human health. For this purpose we propose the COBRA mission that observes the ocean at glint and off glint simultaneously measuring the spectral polarized light and deriving precisely the aerosol absorption.

  3. The role of depressed metabolism in increased radio resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musacchia, X. J.

    1972-01-01

    Studies are presented of the physiology of depressed metabolism, radio-resistance in depressed metabolic states, comparative aspects of depressed metabolism, and gastrointestinal responses to ionizing radiation. Specific data cover helium-cold induced hypothermia in white rats and hamsters, and radiation responses and intestinal absorption in the gerbil.

  4. Plasma pharmacokinetics, whole-body distribution, metabolism, and radiation dosimetry of 68Ga bombesin antagonist BAY 86-7548 in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Roivainen, Anne; Kähkönen, Esa; Luoto, Pauliina; Borkowski, Sandra; Hofmann, Birte; Jambor, Ivan; Lehtiö, Kaisa; Rantala, Tuija; Rottmann, Antje; Sipilä, Henri; Sparks, Rick; Suilamo, Sami; Tolvanen, Tuula; Valencia, Ray; Minn, Heikki

    2013-06-01

    This first-in-human study investigated the safety, tolerability, metabolism, pharmacokinetics, biodistribution, and radiation dosimetry of (68)Ga-bombesin antagonist (68)Ga-DOTA-4-amino-1-carboxymethylpiperidine-d-Phe-Gln-Trp-Ala-Val-Gly-His-Sta-Leu-NH2 (BAY 86-7548). Five healthy men underwent dynamic whole-body PET/CT after an intravenous injection of BAY 86-7548 (138 ± 5 MBq). Besides total radioactivity, plasma samples were analyzed by radio-high-performance liquid chromatography for metabolism of the tracer. Dosimetry was calculated using the OLINDA/EXM software. Three radioactive plasma metabolites were detected. The proportion of unchanged BAY 86-7548 decreased from 92% ± 9% at 1 min after injection to 19% ± 2% at 65 min. The organs with the highest absorbed doses were the urinary bladder wall (0.62 mSv/MBq) and the pancreas (0.51 mSv/MBq). The mean effective dose was 0.051 mSv/MBq. BAY 86-7548 was well tolerated by all subjects. Intravenously injected BAY 86-7548 is safe, and rapid metabolism is demonstrated. A 150-MBq injection of BAY 86-7548 results in an effective dose of 7.7 mSv, which could be reduced to 5.7 mSv with frequent bladder voids.

  5. Haplotype frequency distribution for 7 microsatellites in chromosome 8 and 11 in relation to the metabolic syndrome in four ethnic groups: Tehran Lipid and Glucose Study.

    PubMed

    Daneshpour, Maryam Sadat; Hosseinzadeh, Nima; Zarkesh, Maryam; Azizi, Fereidoun

    2012-03-01

    Different variants of haplotype frequencies may lead to various frequencies of the same variants in individuals with drug resistance and disease susceptibility at the population level. In this study, the haplotype frequencies of 4 STR loci including the D8S1132, D8S1779, D8S514 and D8S1743, and 3 STR loci including D11S1304, D11S1998 and D11S934 were investigated in 563 individuals of four Iranian ethnic groups in the capital city of Iran, Tehran. One hundred thirty subjects had the metabolic syndrome. Haplotype frequencies of all markers were calculated. There were significant differences in the haplotype frequencies in short and long alleles between the metabolic affected subjects and controls. In addition, haplotype frequencies were significant in the four ethnic groups in both chromosomes 8 and 11. Our findings show a relation between the short allele of D8S1743 in all related haplotype frequencies of subjects with metabolic syndrome. These findings may require more studies of some candidate genes, including the lipoprotein lipase gene, in this chromosomal region. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Beyond triglyceride synthesis: the dynamic functional roles of MGAT and DGAT enzymes in energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yuguang; Cheng, Dong

    2009-07-01

    Monoacyglycerol acyltransferases (MGATs) and diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) catalyze two consecutive steps of enzyme reactions in the synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs). The metabolic complexity of TAG synthesis is reflected by the presence of multiple isoforms of MGAT and DGAT enzymes that differ in catalytic properties, subcellular localization, tissue distribution, and physiological functions. MGAT and DGAT enzymes play fundamental roles in the metabolism of monoacylglycerol (MAG), diacylglycerol (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) that are involved in many aspects of physiological functions, such as intestinal fat absorption, lipoprotein assembly, adipose tissue formation, signal transduction, satiety, and lactation. The recent progress in the phenotypic characterization of mice deficient in MGAT and DGAT enzymes and the development of chemical inhibitors have revealed important roles of these enzymes in the regulation of energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Consequently, selective inhibition of MGAT or DGAT enzymes by synthetic compounds may provide novel treatment for obesity and its related metabolic complications.

  7. Beyond triglyceride synthesis: the dynamic functional roles of MGAT and DGAT enzymes in energy metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yuguang; Cheng, Dong

    2009-01-01

    Monoacyglycerol acyltransferases (MGATs) and diacylglycerol acyltransferases (DGATs) catalyze two consecutive steps of enzyme reactions in the synthesis of triacylglycerols (TAGs). The metabolic complexity of TAG synthesis is reflected by the presence of multiple isoforms of MGAT and DGAT enzymes that differ in catalytic properties, subcellular localization, tissue distribution, and physiological functions. MGAT and DGAT enzymes play fundamental roles in the metabolism of monoacylglycerol (MAG), diacylglycerol (DAG), and triacylglycerol (TAG) that are involved in many aspects of physiological functions, such as intestinal fat absorption, lipoprotein assembly, adipose tissue formation, signal transduction, satiety, and lactation. The recent progress in the phenotypic characterization of mice deficient in MGAT and DGAT enzymes and the development of chemical inhibitors have revealed important roles of these enzymes in the regulation of energy homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. Consequently, selective inhibition of MGAT or DGAT enzymes by synthetic compounds may provide novel treatment for obesity and its related metabolic complications. PMID:19116371

  8. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  9. Linear absorptive dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tip, A.

    1998-06-01

    Starting from Maxwell's equations for a linear, nonconducting, absorptive, and dispersive medium, characterized by the constitutive equations D(x,t)=ɛ1(x)E(x,t)+∫t-∞dsχ(x,t-s)E(x,s) and H(x,t)=B(x,t), a unitary time evolution and canonical formalism is obtained. Given the complex, coordinate, and frequency-dependent, electric permeability ɛ(x,ω), no further assumptions are made. The procedure leads to a proper definition of band gaps in the periodic case and a new continuity equation for energy flow. An S-matrix formalism for scattering from lossy objects is presented in full detail. A quantized version of the formalism is derived and applied to the generation of Čerenkov and transition radiation as well as atomic decay. The last case suggests a useful generalization of the density of states to the absorptive situation.

  10. Metabolic stability for drug discovery and development: pharmacokinetic and biochemical challenges.

    PubMed

    Masimirembwa, Collen M; Bredberg, Ulf; Andersson, Tommy B

    2003-01-01

    Metabolic stability refers to the susceptibility of compounds to biotransformation in the context of selecting and/or designing drugs with favourable pharmacokinetic properties. Metabolic stability results are usually reported as measures of intrinsic clearance, from which secondary pharmacokinetic parameters such as bioavailability and half-life can be calculated when other data on volume of distribution and fraction absorbed are available. Since these parameters are very important in defining the pharmacological and toxicological profile of drugs as well as patient compliance, the pharmaceutical industry has a particular interest in optimising for metabolic stability during the drug discovery and development process. In the early phases of drug discovery, new chemical entities cannot be administered to humans; hence, predictions of these properties have to be made from in vivo animal, in vitro cellular/subcellular and computational systems. The utility of these systems to define the metabolic stability of compounds that is predictive of the human situation will be reviewed here. The timing of performing the studies in the discovery process and the impact of recent advances in research on drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) will be evaluated with respect to the scope and depth of metabolic stability issues. Quantitative prediction of in vivo clearance from in vitro metabolism data has, for many compounds, been shown to be poor in retrospective studies. One explanation for this may be that there are components used in the equations for scaling that are missing or uncertain and should be an area of more research. For example, as a result of increased biochemical understanding of drug metabolism, old assumptions (e.g. that the liver is the principal site of first-pass metabolism) need revision and new knowledge (e.g. the relationship between transporters and drug metabolising enzymes) needs to be incorporated into in vitro-in vivo

  11. STUDIES ON THE INFLUENCE OF X-RAY IRRADIATION IN VIT. B$sub 2$ METABOLISM. I. INFLUENCE OF VIT. B$sub 2$ DISTRIBUTION IN ORGANS OF RATS

    SciTech Connect

    Yokoyama, K.; Kusumoto, T.; Nakamura, J.

    X rays were directed to the liver region of albino rats. The distribution of vitamin B/sub 2/ in the liver, kidney, intestine, heart, spleen, and blood was investigated 6, 12, 18, and 24 hr after the irradiation. Total vitamin B/sub 2/ increased in these organs except in the blood; flavin mononucleotide (FMN) and free riboflavin (FR) increased without exception, and flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) decreased except in the spleen, that is, abnormal distribution of vitamin B/sub 2/ fractions was significant except in the spleen. Successive estimations of the fractions suggest that the metabolic disturbances by irradiation occur in the reactionmore » FMN - FAD initially, then in FR - FMN and FR - FAD. (Absts. Japan. Med., 1: No. 7, 1960.)« less

  12. Controlling enhanced absorption in graphene metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Qihui; Liu, Peiguo; Bian, Li-an; Liu, Hanqing; Liu, Chenxi; Chen, Genghui

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, a controllable terahertz (THz) metamaterial absorber (MA) is designed with the circuit analog method. Taking advantage of the patterned graphene on SiO2/doped Si/polyimide substrates with a gold reflector, the controllable MA achieves perfect absorption at 0.75 THz. The chemical potential of graphene is regulated by controlling the voltage between graphene and doped Si layers. As the chemical potential varies from 0 eV to 0.5 eV, the MA is changed from reflection (<0.37) to absorption (>0.99). The distributions of surface current and electric field are illustrated to analyze the resonant characteristic of patterned graphene. According to the resonant characteristic, we introduce patterned graphene elements with different dimension in a unit cell, which effectively extends the effective absorption bandwidth (absorption > 0 . 9) from 0.67-0.93 THz to 0.52-0.95 THz. Moreover, replacing part of the graphene structure with gold, the switchable MA is turned into a frequency tunable MA. The absorption peak moves from 0.62 THz to 0.92 THz as the chemical potential increases from 0.1 eV to 0.5 eV. These designs overcome limitation of traditional absorbers and exhibit great potentials in many practical applications.

  13. Nonlinear intestinal absorption kinetics of cefuroxime axetil in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Balaguer, N; Nacher, A; Casabo, V G; Merino, M

    1997-01-01

    Cefuroxime is commercially available for parenteral administration as a sodium salt and for oral administration as cefuroxime axetil, the 1-(acetoxy)ethyl ester of the drug. Cefuroxime axetil is a prodrug of cefuroxime and has little, if any, antibacterial activity until hydrolyzed in vivo to cefuroxime. In this study, the absorption of cefuroxime axetil in the small intestines of anesthetized rats was investigated in situ, by perfusion at four concentrations (11.8, 5, 118 and 200 microM). Oral absorption of cefuroxime axetil can apparently be described as a specialized transport mechanism which obeys Michaelis-Menten kinetics. Parameters characterizing absorption of prodrug in free solution were obtained: maximum rate of absorption (Vmax) = 289.08 +/- 46.26 microM h-1, and Km = 162.77 +/- 31.17 microM. Cefuroxime axetil transport was significantly reduced in the presence of the enzymatic inhibitor sodium azide. On the other hand, the prodrug was metabolized in the gut wall through contact with membrane-bound enzymes in the brush border membrane before absorption occurred. This process reduces the prodrug fraction directly available for absorption. From a bioavailability point of view, therefore, the effects mentioned above can explain the variable and poor bioavailability following oral administration of cefuroxime axetil. Thus, future strategies in oral cefuroxime axetil absorption should focus on increasing the stability of the prodrug in the intestine by modifying the prodrug structure and/or targeting the compound to the absorption site. PMID:9021205

  14. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  15. Distribution of the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase complex E1α subunit and glutamate dehydrogenase in the human brain and their role in neuro-metabolism.

    PubMed

    Hull, Jonathon; Usmari Moraes, Marcela; Brookes, Emma; Love, Seth; Conway, Myra E

    2018-01-01

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter of the central nervous system, with the branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs) acting as key nitrogen donors for de novo glutamate synthesis. Despite the importance of these major metabolites, their metabolic pathway in the human brain is still not well characterised. The metabolic pathways that influence the metabolism of BCAAs have been well characterised in rat models. However, the expression of key proteins such as the branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex and glutamate dehydrogenase isozymes (GDH) in the human brain is still not well characterised. We have used specific antibodies to these proteins to analyse their distribution within the human brain and report, for the first time, that the E1α subunit of the BCKD is located in both neurons and vascular endothelial cells. We also demonstrate that GDH is localised to astrocytes, although vascular immunolabelling does occur. The labelling of GDH was most intense in astrocytes adjacent to the hippocampus, in keeping with glutamatergic neurotransmission in this region. GDH was also present in astrocyte processes abutting vascular endothelial cells. Previously, we demonstrated that the branched-chain aminotransferase (hBCAT) proteins were most abundant in vascular cells (hBCATm) and neurons (hBCATc). Present findings are further evidence that BCAAs are metabolised within both the vasculature and neurons in the human brain. We suggest that GDH, hBCAT and the BCKD proteins operate in conjunction with astrocytic glutamate transporters and glutamine synthetase to regulate the availability of glutamate. This has important implications given that the dysregulation of glutamate metabolism, leading to glutamate excitotoxicity, is an important contributor to the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative conditions such as Alzheimer's disease. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. [Interaction between CYP450 enzymes and metabolism of traditional Chinese medicine as well as enzyme activity assay].

    PubMed

    Lu, Tu-lin; Su, Lian-lin; Ji, De; Gu, Wei; Mao, Chun-qin

    2015-09-01

    Drugs are exogenous compounds for human bodies, and will be metabolized by many enzymes after administration. CYP450 enzyme, as a major metabolic enzyme, is an important phase I drug metabolizing enzyme. In human bodies, about 75% of drug metabolism is conducted by CYP450 enzymes, and CYP450 enzymes is the key factor for drug interactions between traditional Chinese medicine( TCM) -TCM, TCM-medicine and other drug combination. In order to make clear the interaction between metabolic enzymes and TCM metabolism, we generally chose the enzymatic activity as an evaluation index. That is to say, the enhancement or reduction of CYP450 enzyme activity was used to infer the inducing or inhibitory effect of active ingredients and extracts of traditional Chinese medicine on enzymes. At present, the common method for measuring metabolic enzyme activity is Cocktail probe drugs, and it is the key to select the suitable probe substrates. This is of great significance for study drug's absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion (ADME) process in organisms. The study focuses on the interaction between TCMs, active ingredients, herbal extracts, cocktail probe substrates as well as CYP450 enzymes, in order to guide future studies.

  17. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  18. Cell-based medicinal chemistry optimization of high-throughput screening (HTS) hits for orally active antimalarials. Part 1: challenges in potency and absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion/pharmacokinetics (ADME/PK).

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Arnab K

    2013-10-24

    Malaria represents a significant health issue, and novel and effective drugs are needed to address parasite resistance that has emerged to the current drug arsenal. Antimalarial drug discovery has historically benefited from a whole-cell (phenotypic) screening approach to identify lead molecules. This approach has been utilized by several groups to optimize weakly active antimalarial pharmacophores, such as the quinolone scaffold, to yield potent and highly efficacious compounds that are now poised to enter clinical trials. More recently, GNF/Novartis, GSK, and others have employed the same approach in high-throughput screening (HTS) of large compound libraries to find novel scaffolds that have also been optimized to clinical candidates by GNF/Novartis. This perspective outlines some of the inherent challenges in cell-based medicinal chemistry optimization, including optimization of oral exposure and hERG activity.

  19. Effective absorption correction for energy dispersive X-ray mapping in a scanning transmission electron microscope: analysing the local indium distribution in rough samples of InGaN alloy layers.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Chauvat, M-P; Ruterana, P; Walther, T

    2017-12-01

    We have applied our previous method of self-consistent k*-factors for absorption correction in energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to quantify the indium content in X-ray maps of thick compound InGaN layers. The method allows us to quantify the indium concentration without measuring the sample thickness, density or beam current, and works even if there is a drastic local thickness change due to sample roughness or preferential thinning. The method is shown to select, point-by-point in a two-dimensional spectrum image or map, the k*-factor from the local Ga K/L intensity ratio that is most appropriate for the corresponding sample geometry, demonstrating it is not the sample thickness measured along the electron beam direction but the optical path length the X-rays have to travel through the sample that is relevant for the absorption correction. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  20. Metabolic myopathies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, A.; Haller, R. G.; Barohn, R.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Metabolic myopathies are disorders of muscle energy production that result in skeletal muscle dysfunction. Cardiac and systemic metabolic dysfunction may coexist. Symptoms are often intermittent and provoked by exercise or changes in supply of lipid and carbohydrate fuels. Specific disorders of lipid and carbohydrate metabolism in muscle are reviewed. Evaluation often requires provocative exercise testing. These tests may include ischemic forearm exercise, aerobic cycle exercise, and 31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy with exercise.

  1. Nuclear receptors in bile acid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tiangang; Chiang, John Y. L.

    2013-01-01

    Bile acids are signaling molecules that activate nuclear receptors, such as farnesoid X receptor, pregnane X receptor, constitutive androstane receptor, and vitamin D receptor, and play a critical role in the regulation of lipid, glucose, energy, and drug metabolism. These xenobiotic/endobiotic-sensing nuclear receptors regulate phase I oxidation, phase II conjugation, and phase III transport in bile acid and drug metabolism in the digestive system. Integration of bile acid metabolism with drug metabolism controls absorption, transport, and metabolism of nutrients and drugs to maintain metabolic homeostasis and also protects against liver injury, inflammation, and related metabolic diseases, such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, diabetes, and obesity. Bile-acid–based drugs targeting nuclear receptors are in clinical trials for treating cholestatic liver diseases and fatty liver disease. PMID:23330546

  2. The metabolism of structured triacylglycerols.

    PubMed

    Mu, Huiling; Porsgaard, Trine

    2005-11-01

    The triacylglycerol (TAG) structure in addition to the overall fatty acid profile is of importance when considering the nutritional effect of a dietary fat. This review aims at summarizing our current knowledge of the digestion, absorption, uptake, and transport of structured TAGs, with particular emphasis on the following aspects: gastric emptying, specificity of pancreatic lipase, lymphatic transport and clearance of chylomicrons, effects of lipid structure on tissue lipid compositions and the fecal loss of fats. So an overview will be provided for how the structure and fatty acid composition of TAGs affect their absorption and the distribution of the fatty acids in the body following digestion and absorption.

  3. Rapidly variable relatvistic absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, M.; Pinto, C.; Fabian, A.; Lohfink, A.; Buisson, D.; Alston, W.; Jiang, J.

    2017-10-01

    I will present results from the 1.5Ms XMM-Newton observing campaign on the most X-ray variable AGN, IRAS 13224-3809. We find a series of nine absorption lines with a velocity of 0.24c from an ultra-fast outflow. For the first time, we are able to see extremely rapid variability of the UFO features, and can link this to the X-ray variability from the inner accretion disk. We find a clear flux dependence of the outflow features, suggesting that the wind is ionized by increasing X-ray emission.

  4. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  5. Absorption of ferulic acid from low-alcohol beer.

    PubMed

    Bourne, L; Paganga, G; Baxter, D; Hughes, P; Rice-Evans, C

    2000-03-01

    Flavonoids and monophenolic compounds have been well-described over recent years for their properties as antioxidants and scavengers of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species. A number of epidemiological studies implicate a role for flavonoids in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease. In particular, the focus has been on flavonol-rich fruit and vegetables and flavonoid-rich beverages, especially tea and red wine. Mechanisms of protection are unclear since the absorption, distribution, metabolism and elimination of dietary phenolics have not yet been extensively investigated. Here we report the bioavailability of ferulic acid, 4-hydroxy-3-methoxy-cinnamic acid, the major hydroxycinnamate in beer. Studies of the pharmacokinetics of urinary excretion of ferulic acid from low alcohol beer consumption in humans have been undertaken. The results show that ferulic acid is absorbed with a peak time for maximal excretion of ca. 8 h and the mean cumulative amount excreted is 5.8 +/- 3.2 mg. These findings are consistent with the uptake of ferulic acid from dietary sources, such as tomatoes, and suggest that ferulic acid is more bioavailable than individual dietary flavonoids and phenolics so far studied.

  6. New formulation of chemical peeling agent: 30% salicylic acid in polyethylene glycol. Absorption and distribution of 14C-salicylic acid in polyethylene glycol applied topically to skin of hairless mice.

    PubMed

    Ueda, Setsuko; Mitsugi, Koichi; Ichige, Kazumi; Yoshida, Kenji; Sakuma, Tomoko; Ninomiya, Shin-ichi; Sudou, Tetsuji

    2002-04-01

    Salicylic acid is used in chemical peeling procedures. However, they have caused many side effects, even salicylism. To achieve a salicylic acid peeling that would be safer for topical use, we recently developed a new formulation consisting of 30% salicylic acid in polyethylene glycol (PEG) vehicle. In an extension of our previous research, we studied the absorption of 30% salicylic acid labeled with 14C in PEG vehicle applied topically to the intact and damaged skin of male hairless mice. An ointment containing 3 mg salicylic acid in 10 mg vehicle was applied to both groups. In animals with intact skin, 1 h after application the plasma concentration of radioactivity was 1665.1 ng eq/ml, significantly lower than the 21437.6 ng eq/ml observed in mice with damaged skin. Microautoradiograms of intact skin showed that the level of radioactivity in the cornified cell layer was similar at 6 h after application. However, in damaged skin, the overall level of radioactivity showed a decrease by 3 h after application. In the carcasses remaining after the treated intact and damaged skin had been removed, 0.09 and 11.38% of the applied radioactivity remained, respectively. These findings confirm that 30% salicylic acid in PEG vehicle is little absorbed through the intact skin of hairless mice, and suggest that salicylism related to absorption through the skin of quantities of topically applied salicylic acid is not likely to occur in humans with intact skin during chemical peeling with this preparation. This new preparation of 30% salicylic acid in PEG vehicle is believed to be safe for application as a chemical peeling agent.

  7. Metabolism of anxiolytics and hypnotics: benzodiazepines, buspirone, zoplicone, and zolpidem.

    PubMed

    Chouinard, G; Lefko-Singh, K; Teboul, E

    1999-08-01

    1. The benzodiazepines are among the most frequently prescribed of all drugs and have been used for their anxiolytic, anticonvulsant, and sedative/hypnotic properties. Since absorption rates, volumes of distribution, and elimination rates differ greatly among the benzodiazepine derivatives, each benzodiazepine has a unique plasma concentration curve. Although the time to peak plasma levels provides a rough guide, it is not equivalent to the time to clinical onset of effect. The importance of alpha and beta half-lives in the actions of benzodiazepines is discussed. 2. The role of cytochrome P450 isozymes in the metabolism of benzodiazepines and in potential pharmacokinetic interactions between the benzodiazepines and other coadministered drugs is discussed. 3. Buspirone, an anxiolytic with minimal sedative effects, undergoes extensive metabolism, with hydroxylation and dealkylation being the major pathways. Pharmacokinetic interactions of buspirone with other coadministered drugs seem to be minimal. 4. Zopiclone and zolpidem are used primarily as hypnotics. Both are extensively metabolized; N-demethylation, N-oxidation, and decarboxylation of zopiclone occur, and zolpidem undergoes oxidation of methyl groups and hydroxylation of a position on the imidazolepyridine ring system. Zopiclone has a chiral centre, and demonstrates stereoselective pharmacokinetics. Metabolic drug-drug interactions have been reported with zopiclone and erythromycin, trimipramine, and carbamazepine. Reports to date indicate minimal interactions of zolpidem with coadministered drugs; however, it has been reported to affect the Cmax and clearance of chlorpromazepine and to decrease metabolism of the antiviral agent ritonavin. Since CYP3A4 has been reported to play an important role in metabolism of zolpidem, possible interactions with drugs which are substrates and/or inhibitors of that CYP isozyme should be considered.

  8. [Metabolic fate of carteolol hydrochloride (OPC-1085), a new beta-adrenergic agent. (3) Autoradiographic total body distribution studies in mice].

    PubMed

    Kohri, H; Morita, S; Nakagawa, K; Nishino, H

    1976-04-01

    Distribution of a new beta-adrenergic blocking agent, 3H-carteolol in mice was studied by whole body autoradiography. The distribution of radioactivity was observed in all organs except the eyes and brain, with particularly high specific activities in the kidneys, liver, gall bladder and content in the intestines within a short time after either oral or intravenous administration. The radioactivity was then promptly eliminated from all tissues and organs, and excreted almost entirely in the urine and bile. Propranolol is known to be distributed at a high concentration in the brain, whereas the concentration of (3H-) carteolol detectable in the brain was slight. In the adrenal gland, the radioactivity was localized in the medulla. Radioactivity was detected also in the stomach contents after the intravenous administration. The distribution of radioactivity in the fetus through the placenta was less than that in the major organs of the mother mouse, and the elimination of the activity was more rapid in the fetus than in mother. These findings indicate that carteolol and its metabolites do to some extent pass through the blood-brain barrier and placenta.

  9. Humanizing the zebrafish liver shifts drug metabolic profiles and improves pharmacokinetics of CYP3A4 substrates.

    PubMed

    Poon, Kar Lai; Wang, Xingang; Ng, Ashley S; Goh, Wei Huang; McGinnis, Claudia; Fowler, Stephen; Carney, Tom J; Wang, Haishan; Ingham, Phillip W

    2017-03-01

    Understanding and predicting whether new drug candidates will be safe in the clinic is a critical hurdle in pharmaceutical development, that relies in part on absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicology studies in vivo. Zebrafish is a relatively new model system for drug metabolism and toxicity studies, offering whole organism screening coupled with small size and potential for high-throughput screening. Through toxicity and absorption analyses of a number of drugs, we find that zebrafish is generally predictive of drug toxicity, although assay outcomes are influenced by drug lipophilicity which alters drug uptake. In addition, liver microsome assays reveal specific differences in metabolism of compounds between human and zebrafish livers, likely resulting from the divergence of the cytochrome P450 superfamily between species. To reflect human metabolism more accurately, we generated a transgenic "humanized" zebrafish line that expresses the major human phase I detoxifying enzyme, CYP3A4, in the liver. Here, we show that this humanized line shows an elevated metabolism of CYP3A4-specific substrates compared to wild-type zebrafish. The generation of this first described humanized zebrafish liver suggests such approaches can enhance the accuracy of the zebrafish model for toxicity prediction.

  10. [Amalgam. IV. Metabolism of mercury].

    PubMed

    Gladys, S; van Meerbeek, B; Vanherle, G; Lambrechts, P

    1993-04-01

    After absorption in the body by four ways, each type of mercury undergoes a specific metabolism. Elementary mercury as mercury vapour becomes rapidly oxidized to Hg2+ and, afterwards, is metabolized as an inorganic mercurial compound. From the blood circulation mercury reaches target organs like the kidneys, the central nervous system, the liver and the hypophysis, in which mercury accumulates. The retention time varies by organ and is longest in the brain. Mercury is mainly eliminated with urine and faeces, to a lesser degree with transpiration and mother's milk and sometimes by respiration.

  11. Bicarbonate secretion and solute absorption in forestomach of the llama.

    PubMed

    Rübsamen, K; Engelhardt, W V

    1978-07-01

    Bicarbonate appearance in the lumen and its relationship to solute absorption were studied in a Pavlov pouch in the cardiac region of the first compartment of the llama forestomach. HCO3- appearance showed no diurnal variation. HCO3- accumulation was highly dependent on the pH of the solution used. The HCO3- ion probably is formed from CO2 diffusing into the lumen from the serosal side, as a result of cell metabolism and of OH- ions. HCO3- accumulation was closely related to volatile fatty acid (VFA) absorption. The ratio of HCO3- appearance to VFA absorption depended on the pH of the solution. At a pH of 6.6, about 0.1 mol HCO3- and, at a pH of 7.8, 0.9 mol HCO3- appeared per mole absorbed VFA, indicating that at slightly alkaline pH nearly all H+ ions required for the nonionic absorption of VFA appeared to be delivered from the dissociation of H2CO3. Bicarbonate gain and VFA absorption were increased when animals were not fed for 48 h. Sodium absorption was related to VFA as well as water absorption.

  12. Absorption sites of orally administered drugs in the small intestine.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Teruo

    2017-12-01

    In pharmacotherapy, drugs are mostly taken orally to be absorbed systemically from the small intestine, and some drugs are known to have preferential absorption sites in the small intestine. It would therefore be valuable to know the absorption sites of orally administered drugs and the influencing factors. Areas covered:In this review, the author summarizes the reported absorption sites of orally administered drugs, as well as, influencing factors and experimental techniques. Information on the main absorption sites and influencing factors can help to develop ideal drug delivery systems and more effective pharmacotherapies. Expert opinion: Various factors including: the solubility, lipophilicity, luminal concentration, pKa value, transporter substrate specificity, transporter expression, luminal fluid pH, gastrointestinal transit time, and intestinal metabolism determine the site-dependent intestinal absorption. However, most of the dissolved fraction of orally administered drugs including substrates for ABC and SLC transporters, except for some weakly basic drugs with higher pKa values, are considered to be absorbed sequentially from the proximal small intestine. Securing the solubility and stability of drugs prior to reaching to the main absorption sites and appropriate delivery rates of drugs at absorption sites are important goals for achieving effective pharmacotherapy.

  13. Aberrant Expression and Distribution of Enzymes of the Urea Cycle and Other Ammonia Metabolizing Pathways in Dogs with Congenital Portosystemic Shunts

    PubMed Central

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G.; Grinwis, Guy C. M.; Favier, Robert P.; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H.; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J. A.; Holstege, Frank C. P.; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase. PMID:24945279

  14. Aberrant expression and distribution of enzymes of the urea cycle and other ammonia metabolizing pathways in dogs with congenital portosystemic shunts.

    PubMed

    van Straten, Giora; van Steenbeek, Frank G; Grinwis, Guy C M; Favier, Robert P; Kummeling, Anne; van Gils, Ingrid H; Fieten, Hille; Groot Koerkamp, Marian J A; Holstege, Frank C P; Rothuizen, Jan; Spee, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The detoxification of ammonia occurs mainly through conversion of ammonia to urea in the liver via the urea cycle and glutamine synthesis. Congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) in dogs cause hyperammonemia eventually leading to hepatic encephalopathy. In this study, the gene expression of urea cycle enzymes (carbamoylphosphate synthetase (CPS1), ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OTC), argininosuccinate synthetase (ASS1), argininosuccinate lyase (ASL), and arginase (ARG1)), N-acetylglutamate synthase (NAGS), Glutamate dehydrogenase (GLUD1), and glutamate-ammonia ligase (GLUL) was evaluated in dogs with CPSS before and after surgical closure of the shunt. Additionally, immunohistochemistry was performed on urea cycle enzymes and GLUL on liver samples of healthy dogs and dogs with CPSS to investigate a possible zonal distribution of these enzymes within the liver lobule and to investigate possible differences in distribution in dogs with CPSS compared to healthy dogs. Furthermore, the effect of increasing ammonia concentrations on the expression of the urea cycle enzymes was investigated in primary hepatocytes in vitro. Gene-expression of CPS1, OTC, ASL, GLUD1 and NAGS was down regulated in dogs with CPSS and did not normalize after surgical closure of the shunt. In all dogs GLUL distribution was localized pericentrally. CPS1, OTC and ASS1 were localized periportally in healthy dogs, whereas in CPSS dogs, these enzymes lacked a clear zonal distribution. In primary hepatocytes higher ammonia concentrations induced mRNA levels of CPS1. We hypothesize that the reduction in expression of urea cycle enzymes, NAGS and GLUD1 as well as the alterations in zonal distribution in dogs with CPSS may be caused by a developmental arrest of these enzymes during the embryonic or early postnatal phase.

  15. Peculiarities of light absorption by spherical microcapsules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geints, Yurii E.; Panina, Ekaterina K.; Zemlyanov, Alexander A.

    2018-04-01

    Optical radiation absorption in the poly-layer spherical microparticles simulating the inorganic/organic polyshell absorbing microcapsules is considered. With the aim of the finite-difference time-domain technique, the spatial distribution of the absorbed light power in microcapsules of various sizes and internal structure is numerically calculated. For the purpose of light absorption enhancement, we have engineered the optimal structure of a capsule consisting of a strong-refracting transparent outer coating and an absorbing layer which covers a liquid core. The proposed microcapsule prototype provides for a manifold increase in the absorbed light power density in comparison with the usual single-layer absorbing capsule. We show that for light-wavelengths-scaled microcapsules it is optimal to use a material with the refractive index larger than two as an outer shell, for example, titanium dioxide (TiO2). The highest values of the absorbed power density can be obtained in microcapsules with absorbing shell thickness of approximately a tenth of a laser wavelength. When laser radiation is scattered by a dimer constituted by two identical absorbing microcapsules the absorbed power density can be maximized by the choosing of proper dimer spatial configuration. In the case of strongly absorbing particles, the absorption maximum corresponds to a shift of the capsules to a distance of about their diameter, and in the case of weakly absorbing particles the absorption is maximal when particles are in geometrical shades of each other.

  16. Hepatic Concentration and Distribution of Coenzyme A and Carnitine during a Streptococcus pneumoniae Infection in the Rat: Possible Implications on Fatty Acid Metabolism and Ketogenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-01-09

    subcellular distribution of carnitine and coenzyme A (CoA). Compared to fasted control ILJ rats, fasted-infected rats have a decreased ketogenic capacity...decreased ketogenic capacity that is associated with an accumulation of total hepatic carnitine and a decrease in total hepatic coenzyme A. The...cholesterol. IiA .Ii INTRODUCTION Rats infected with Streptococcus pneumoniae have a decreased hep-tic ketogenic capacity which is associated with an

  17. Comparative metabolism as a key driver of wildlife species sensitivity to human and veterinary pharmaceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Hutchinson, Thomas H.; Madden, Judith C.; Naidoo, Vinny; Walker, Colin H.

    2014-01-01

    Human and veterinary drug development addresses absorption, distribution, metabolism, elimination and toxicology (ADMET) of the Active Pharmaceutical Ingredient (API) in the target species. Metabolism is an important factor in controlling circulating plasma and target tissue API concentrations and in generating metabolites which are more easily eliminated in bile, faeces and urine. The essential purpose of xenobiotic metabolism is to convert lipid-soluble, non-polar and non-excretable chemicals into water soluble, polar molecules that are readily excreted. Xenobiotic metabolism is classified into Phase I enzymatic reactions (which add or expose reactive functional groups on xenobiotic molecules), Phase II reactions (resulting in xenobiotic conjugation with large water-soluble, polar molecules) and Phase III cellular efflux transport processes. The human–fish plasma model provides a useful approach to understanding the pharmacokinetics of APIs (e.g. diclofenac, ibuprofen and propranolol) in freshwater fish, where gill and liver metabolism of APIs have been shown to be of importance. By contrast, wildlife species with low metabolic competency may exhibit zero-order metabolic (pharmacokinetic) profiles and thus high API toxicity, as in the case of diclofenac and the dramatic decline of vulture populations across the Indian subcontinent. A similar threat looms for African Cape Griffon vultures exposed to ketoprofen and meloxicam, recent studies indicating toxicity relates to zero-order metabolism (suggesting P450 Phase I enzyme system or Phase II glucuronidation deficiencies). While all aspects of ADMET are important in toxicity evaluations, these observations demonstrate the importance of methods for predicting API comparative metabolism as a central part of environmental risk assessment. PMID:25405970

  18. Tripartite counterfactual entanglement distribution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Gu, Xuemei; Jiang, Dong; Xie, Ling; Chen, Lijun

    2015-08-10

    We propose two counterfactual schemes for tripartite entanglement distribution without any physical particles travelling through the quantum channel. One scheme arranges three participators to connect with the absorption object by using switch. Using the "chained" quantum Zeno effect, three participators can accomplish the task of entanglement distribution with unique counterfactual interference probability. Another scheme uses Michelson-type interferometer to swap two entanglement pairs such that the photons of three participators are entangled. Moreover, the distance of entanglement distribution is doubled as two distant absorption objects are used. We also discuss the implementation issues to show that the proposed schemes can be realized with current technology.

  19. MULTIMAGNON ABSORPTION IN MNF2-OPTICAL ABSORPTION SPECTRUM.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The absorption spectrum of MnF2 at 4.2K in the 3900A region was measured in zero external fields and in high fields. Exciton lines with magnon ...sidebands are observed, accompanied by a large number of weak satellite lines. Results on the exciton and magnon absorptions are similar to those of...McClure et al. The satellite lines are interpreted as being multi- magnon absorptions, and it is possible to fit the energy of all the absorptions with

  20. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  1. Triple effect absorption cycles

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, D.C.; Potnis, S.V.; Tang, J.

    1996-12-31

    Triple effect absorption chillers can achieve 50% COP improvement over double-effect systems. However, to translate this potential into cost-effective hardware, the most promising embodiments must be identified. In this study, 12 generic triple effect cycles and 76 possible hermetic loop arrangements of those 12 generic cycles were identified. The generic triple effect cycles were screened based on their pressure and solubility field requirements, generic COPs, risk involved in the component design, and number of components in a high corrosive environment. This screening identified four promising arrangements: Alkitrate Topping cycle, Pressure Staged Envelope cycle, High Pressure Overlap cycle, and Dual Loopmore » cycle. All of these arrangements have a very high COP ({approximately} 1.8), however the development risk and cost involved is different for each arrangement. Therefore, the selection of a particular arrangement will depend upon the specific situation under consideration.« less

  2. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  3. Nonequilibrium quantum absorption refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Jian-Ying; Zhang, Fu-Lin

    2018-06-01

    We study a quantum absorption refrigerator, in which a target qubit is cooled by two machine qubits in a nonequilibrium steady-state. It is realized by a strong internal coupling in the two-qubit fridge and a vanishing tripartite interaction among the whole system. The coherence of a machine virtual qubit is investigated as quantumness of the fridge. A necessary condition for cooling shows that the quantum coherence is beneficial to the nonequilibrium fridge, while it is detrimental as far as the maximum coefficient of performance (COP) and the COP at maximum power are concerned. Here, the COP is defined only in terms of heat currents caused by the tripartite interaction, with the one maintaining the two-qubit nonequilibrium state being excluded. The later can be considered to have no direct involvement in extracting heat from the target, as it is not affected by the tripartite interaction.

  4. RIP1 Inhibition Rescues from LPS-Induced RIP3-Mediated Programmed Cell Death, Distributed Energy Metabolism and Spatial Memory Impairment.

    PubMed

    Nikseresht, Sara; Khodagholi, Fariba; Nategh, Mohsen; Dargahi, Leila

    2015-10-01

    Receptor interacting protein 1 (RIP1) has a critical role in initiation of programmed necrosis or necroptosis. RIP1 in a close collaboration with RIP3 not only mediates necroptosis but also is involved in apoptosis and inflammatory signaling. However, the interpretation of the distinct function of RIP1 and RIP3 is complicated. Herein, we demonstrated that RIP1 inhibition in the context of LPS-induced neuroinflammation decreases RIP3 expression. Concomitant administration of Nec-1, specific inhibitor of RIP1, with LPS also attenuated the activating effect of RIP3 on metabolic enzymes, glutamate-ammonia ligase and glutamate dehydrogenase as bioenergetic determinants, in hippocampal and cortical cells. RIP1 inhibition possessed an anti-inflammatory effect and improved the antioxidant capacity against LPS. Interestingly, and opposed to some reports that necroptosis inhibition sensitizes cells to apoptosis, our results showed that RIP1 inhibition attenuates apoptotic cell death in response to LPS. The survival of neuronal function was also confirmed by measuring spontaneous alternations of rats in Y-maze. In conclusion, effects of RIP1 inhibition on RIP3 and cell death provide new approaches to ameliorate neuroinflammation and relative disorders.

  5. Absorption Kinetics and Subcellular Fractionation of Zinc in Winter Wheat in Response to Nitrogen Supply.

    PubMed

    Nie, Zhaojun; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Jia; Li, Jinfeng; Liu, Hongen

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is critical for zinc (Zn) absorption into plant roots; this in turn allows for Zn accumulation and biofortification of grain in winter wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.), an important food crop. However, little is known about root morphology and subcellular Zn distribution in response to N treatment at different levels of Zn supply. In this study, two nutrient solution culture experiments were conducted to examine Zn accumulation, Zn absorption kinetics, root morphology, and Zn subcellular distribution in wheat seedlings pre-cultured with different N concentrations. The results showed positive correlations between N and Zn concentrations, and N and Zn accumulation, respectively. The findings suggested that an increase in N supply enhanced root absorption and the root-to-shoot transport of Zn. Nitrogen combined with the high Zn (Zn 10 ) treatment increased the Zn concentration and consequently its accumulation in both shoots and roots. The maximum influx rate ( V max ), root length, surface area, and volume of 14-d-old seedlings, and root growth from 7 to 14 d in the medium N (N 7.5 ) treatment were higher, but the Michaelis constant ( K m ) and minimum equilibrium concentrations ( C min ) in this treatment were lower than those in the low (N 0.05 ) and high (N 15 ) N treatments, when Zn was supplied at a high level (Zn 10 ). Meanwhile, there were no pronounced differences in the above root traits between the N 0.05 Zn 0 and N 7.5 Zn 10 treatments. An increase in N supply decreased Zn in cell walls and cell organelles, while it increased Zn in the root soluble fraction. In leaves, an increase in N supply significantly decreased Zn in cell walls and the soluble fraction, while it increased Zn in cell organelles under Zn deficiency, but increased Zn distribution in the soluble fraction under medium and high Zn treatments. Therefore, a combination of medium N and high Zn treatments enhanced Zn absorption, apparently by enhancing Zn membrane transport and

  6. Absorption Kinetics and Subcellular Fractionation of Zinc in Winter Wheat in Response to Nitrogen Supply

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Zhaojun; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Jia; Li, Jinfeng; Liu, Hongen

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen (N) is critical for zinc (Zn) absorption into plant roots; this in turn allows for Zn accumulation and biofortification of grain in winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.), an important food crop. However, little is known about root morphology and subcellular Zn distribution in response to N treatment at different levels of Zn supply. In this study, two nutrient solution culture experiments were conducted to examine Zn accumulation, Zn absorption kinetics, root morphology, and Zn subcellular distribution in wheat seedlings pre-cultured with different N concentrations. The results showed positive correlations between N and Zn concentrations, and N and Zn accumulation, respectively. The findings suggested that an increase in N supply enhanced root absorption and the root-to-shoot transport of Zn. Nitrogen combined with the high Zn (Zn10) treatment increased the Zn concentration and consequently its accumulation in both shoots and roots. The maximum influx rate (Vmax), root length, surface area, and volume of 14-d-old seedlings, and root growth from 7 to 14 d in the medium N (N7.5) treatment were higher, but the Michaelis constant (Km) and minimum equilibrium concentrations (Cmin) in this treatment were lower than those in the low (N0.05) and high (N15) N treatments, when Zn was supplied at a high level (Zn10). Meanwhile, there were no pronounced differences in the above root traits between the N0.05Zn0 and N7.5Zn10 treatments. An increase in N supply decreased Zn in cell walls and cell organelles, while it increased Zn in the root soluble fraction. In leaves, an increase in N supply significantly decreased Zn in cell walls and the soluble fraction, while it increased Zn in cell organelles under Zn deficiency, but increased Zn distribution in the soluble fraction under medium and high Zn treatments. Therefore, a combination of medium N and high Zn treatments enhanced Zn absorption, apparently by enhancing Zn membrane transport and stimulating root development in

  7. Vps15p regulates the distribution of cup-shaped organelles containing the major eisosome protein Pil1p to the extracellular fraction required for endocytosis of extracellular vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Kathryn; Winters, Chelsea; Chiang, Hui-Ling

    2017-05-01

    Exosomes are small vesicles secreted from virtually every cell from bacteria to humans. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model system to study trafficking of small vesicles in response to changes in the environment. When yeast cells are grown in low glucose, vesicles carrying gluconeogenic enzymes are present as free vesicles and aggregated clusters in the cytoplasm. These vesicles are also secreted into the periplasm and account for more than 90% of total extracellular organelles, while less than 10% are larger 100-300 nm structures with unknown functions. When glucose is added to glucose-starved cells, secreted vesicles are endocytosed and then targeted to the vacuole. Recent secretomic studies indicated that more than 300 proteins involved in diverse biological functions are secreted during glucose starvation and endocytosed during glucose re-feeding. We hypothesised that extracellular vesicles are internalised using novel mechanisms independent of clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Our results showed that vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes were endocytosed at a fast rate, whereas vesicles carrying the heat shock protein Ssa1p were endocytosed at a slow rate. The PI3K regulator Vps15p is critical for the fast internalisation of extracellular vesicles. VPS15 regulates the distribution of the 100-300 nm organelles that contain the major eisosome protein Pil1p to the extracellular fraction. These Pil1p-containing structures were purified and showed unique cup-shape with their centres deeper than the peripheries. In the absence of VPS15, PIL1 or when PIL1 was mutated, the 100-300 nm structures were not observed in the extracellular fraction and the rapid internalisation of vesicles was impaired. We conclude that VPS15 regulates the distribution of the 100-300 nm Pil1p-containing organelles to the extracellular fraction required for fast endocytosis of vesicles carrying metabolic enzymes. This work provides the first evidence showing that Pil1p displayed unique

  8. [Metabolic acidosis].

    PubMed

    Regolisti, Giuseppe; Fani, Filippo; Antoniotti, Riccardo; Castellano, Giuseppe; Cremaschi, Elena; Greco, Paolo; Parenti, Elisabetta; Morabito, Santo; Sabatino, Alice; Fiaccadori, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is frequently observed in clinical practice, especially among critically ill patients and/or in the course of renal failure. Complex mechanisms are involved, in most cases identifiable by medical history, pathophysiology-based diagnostic reasoning and measure of some key acid-base parameters that are easily available or calculable. On this basis the bedside differential diagnosis of metabolic acidosis should be started from the identification of the two main subtypes of metabolic acidosis: the high anion gap metabolic acidosis and the normal anion gap (or hyperchloremic) metabolic acidosis. Metabolic acidosis, especially in its acute forms with elevated anion gap such as is the case of lactic acidosis, diabetic and acute intoxications, may significantly affect metabolic body homeostasis and patients hemodynamic status, setting the stage for true medical emergencies. The therapeutic approach should be first aimed at early correction of concurrent clinical problems (e.g. fluids and hemodynamic optimization in case of shock, mechanical ventilation in case of concomitant respiratory failure, hemodialysis for acute intoxications etc.), in parallel to the formulation of a diagnosis. In case of severe acidosis, the administration of alkalizing agents should be carefully evaluated, taking into account the risk of side effects, as well as the potential need of renal replacement therapy.

  9. Withdrawal from high-carbohydrate, high-saturated-fat diet changes saturated fat distribution and improves hepatic low-density-lipoprotein receptor expression to ameliorate metabolic syndrome in rats.

    PubMed

    Hazarika, Ankita; Kalita, Himadri; Kalita, Mohan Chandra; Devi, Rajlakshmi

    2017-06-01

    The "lipid hypothesis" determined that saturated fatty acid (SFA) raises low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, thereby increasing the risk for metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of subchronic withdrawal from a high-carbohydrate, high-saturated fat (HCHF) diet during MetS with reference to changes in deleterious SFA (C12:0, lauric acid; C14:0, myristic acid; C16:0, palmitic acid; C18:0, stearic acid) distribution in liver, white adipose tissue (WAT), and feces. MetS induced by prolonged feeding of an HCHF diet in Wistar albino rat is used as a model of human MetS. The MetS-induced rats were withdrawn from the HCHF diet and changed to a basal diet for final 4 wk of the total experimental duration of 16 wk. SFA distribution in target tissues and hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) expression were analyzed. Analyses of changes in SFA concentration of target tissues indicate that C16:0 and C18:0 reduced in WAT and liver after withdrawal of the HCHF diet. There was a significant (P < 0.001) decrease in fecal C12:0 with HCHF feeding, which significantly (P < 0.01) increased after withdrawal of this diet. Also, an improvement in expression of hepatic LDLr was observed after withdrawal of HCHF diet. The prolonged consumption of an HCHF diet leads to increased SFA accumulation in liver and WAT, decreased SFA excretion, and reduced hepatic LDLr expression during MetS, which is prominently reversed after subchronic withdrawal of the HCHF diet. This can contribute to better understanding of the metabolic fate of dietary SFA during MetS and may apply to the potential reversal of complications by the simple approach of nutritional modification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the links between social metabolism and biodiversity distribution across landscape gradients: A regional-scale contribution to the land-sharing versus land-sparing debate.

    PubMed

    Marull, Joan; Tello, Enric; Bagaria, Guillem; Font, Xavier; Cattaneo, Claudio; Pino, Joan

    2018-04-01

    The debate about the relative merits of the 'land-sparing' and 'land-sharing' approaches to biodiversity conservation is usually addressed at local scale. Here, however, we undertake a regional-scale approach to this issue by exploring the association between the Human Appropriation of Net Primary Production (HANPP) and biodiversity components (plants, amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals) across a gradient of human-transformed landscapes in Catalonia, Spain. We propose an Intermediate Disturbance Complexity (IDC) model to assess how human disturbance of the photosynthetic capacity affects the landscape patterns and processes that host biodiversity. This model enables us to explore the association between social metabolism (HANPP), landscape structure (composition and spatial configuration) and biodiversity (species richness) by using Negative Binomial Regression (NBR), Exploratory Factor Analysis (EFA) and Structural Equation Modelling (SEM). The empirical association between IDC and landscape complexity and HANPP in Catalonia confirms the expected values of the intermediate disturbance hypothesis. There is some increase in biodiversity when high IDC values correspond to landscape mosaics. NBR and EFA show positive associations between species richness and increasing values of IDC and forest cover for all biodiversity groups except birds. SEM shows that total biodiversity is positively determined by forest cover and, to a lesser extent, by HANPP, and that both factors are negatively associated with each other. The results suggest that 'natural' landscapes (i.e. those dominated by forests) and agroforestry mosaics (i.e. heterogeneous landscapes characterized by a set of land uses possessing contrasting disturbances) provide a synergetic contribution to biodiversity conservation. This 'virtuous triangle' consisting of forest cover, HANPP and biodiversity illustrates the complex human-nature relationships that exist across landscape gradients of human

  11. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  12. Optical Absorption in Liquid Semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Florian Gene

    An infrared absorption cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have absorptions in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical absorption edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The absorption was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The absorption increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the absorption (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured absorption in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess absorption defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the absorption associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as absorption on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an absorption tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of absorption in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess absorption at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation

  13. METABOLISM OF IRON STORES

    PubMed Central

    SAITO, HIROSHI

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Remarkable progress was recently achieved in the studies on molecular regulators of iron metabolism. Among the main regulators, storage iron, iron absorption, erythropoiesis and hepcidin interact in keeping iron homeostasis. Diseases with gene-mutations resulting in iron overload, iron deficiency, and local iron deposition have been introduced in relation to the regulators of storage iron metabolism. On the other hand, the research on storage iron metabolism has not advanced since the pioneering research by Shoden in 1953. However, we recently developed a new method for determining ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron by computer-assisted serum ferritin kinetics. Serum ferritin increase or decrease curves were measured in patients with normal storage iron levels (chronic hepatitis C and iron deficiency anemia treated by intravenous iron injection), and iron overload (hereditary hemochromatosis and transfusion dependent anemia). We thereby confirmed the existence of two iron pathways where iron flows followed the numbered order (1) labile iron, (2) ferritin and (3) hemosiderin in iron deposition and mobilization among many previously proposed but mostly unproven routes. We also demonstrated the increasing and decreasing phases of ferritin iron and hemosiderin iron in iron deposition and mobilization. The author first demonstrated here the change in proportion between pre-existing ferritin iron and new ferritin iron synthesized by removing iron from hemosiderin in the course of iron removal. In addition, the author disclosed the cause of underestimation of storage iron turnover rate which had been reported by previous investigators in estimating storage iron turnover rate of normal subjects. PMID:25741033

  14. Flameless atomic-absorption determination of gold in geological materials

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meier, A.L.

    1980-01-01

    Gold in geologic material is dissolved using a solution of hydrobromic acid and bromine, extracted with methyl isobutyl ketone, and determined using an atomic-absorption spectrophotometer equipped with a graphite furnace atomizer. A comparison of results obtained by this flameless atomic-absorption method on U.S. Geological Survey reference rocks and geochemical samples with reported values and with results obtained by flame atomic-absorption shows that reasonable accuracy is achieved with improved precision. The sensitivity, accuracy, and precision of the method allows acquisition of data on the distribution of gold at or below its crustal abundance. ?? 1980.

  15. Distribution of genetic variants of oxidative stress metabolism genes: Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and Glutathione S-transferase (GSTM1/GSTT1) in a population from Southeastern Mexico.

    PubMed

    García-González, I; Mendoza-Alcocer, R; Pérez-Mendoza, G J; Rubí-Castellanos, R; González-Herrera, L

    2016-11-01

    Paraoxonase 1 (PON1) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics. Variation in the enzyme concentration and activity suggests individual differences for the degree of protection against oxidative stress. This study analysed the distribution of SNPs Q192R, L55M (PON1) and variants in GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes in a population from Southeastern Mexico. One hundred and fifty-one Mexican Mestizo healthy volunteers were included. PON1 polymorphisms were determined by Taqman allele discrimination real time-PCR, whereas GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes were determined with a multiplex PCR-based method. All genotypes were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, except for GSTM1. The genotypic distributions of Q192R and L55M were 22% QQ, 48% QR, 30% RR, 62% LL, 34% LM and 4% MM, respectively, whereas the allele frequencies were 0.46 (Q), 0.54 (R), 0.79 (L) and 0.21 (M). The most frequent haplotype was R/L (46.7%). It was found that 31% and 9% of the individuals had the GSTM1 and GSTT1 null genotype, respectively. The frequency of the combined null genotype GSTM1*0/GSTT1*0 was 4.64%. The results showed that the frequencies of polymorphisms of PON1, GSTM1 and GSTT1 in the Yucatán population differ to those observed in other ethnic groups and provide useful data for epidemiological studies.

  16. Iron absorption from beans with different contents of iron, evaluated by stable isotopes.

    PubMed

    Junqueira-Franco, Márcia Varella Morandi; Dutra de Oliveira, José Eduardo; Nutti, Marilia Regini; Pereira, Helton Santos; Carvalho, José Luiz Vianna de; Abrams, Steven A; Brandão, Camila Fernanda Cunha; Marchini, Júlio Sérgio

    2018-06-01

    The introduction of biofortified foods such as beans with higher iron content may be a useful tool in preventing iron deficiency. The biofortification aims to reach the root of the problem of malnutrition, targets the neediest population, uses embedded distribution mechanisms, is scientifically feasible and effective in terms of cost, and complements other ongoing interventions to control micronutrient deficiency. However, to ensure effectiveness, measurement of the absorption of minerals is essential. The objective of this study was to evaluate the iron bioavailability of common bean BRS Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification, compared with common bean BRS Estilo in man through reliable techniques that have not been previously used in Brazil. The study included 29 young adult volunteers divided into 2 groups: Group CB (13 subjects) received 100 g of common beans (BRS-Estilo) cooked labeled with iron-58 ( 58 Fe) and Group TBB (16 patients) received 100 g common bean target for iron biofortification (BRS-Pontal), cooked and labeled with iron58 ( 58 Fe). The next day they received the reference dose of ferrous sulfate enriched iron-57 ( 57 Fe). Isotopic evaluation of iron for measurement of iron incorporation into erythrocytes was performed 14 days after consumption. The beans used, were produced, through conventional breeding program, by EMBRAPA/Rice and Beans. The iron absorption was evaluated by assessing the isotopic enrichment of the stable isotope. Mean iron absorption from the meal with common beans was 0.409% (±0.040%) and mean iron incorporation from the meal with target beans for biofortification 0.407% (±0.038%) and did not differ between the groups. This study tested the iron absorption from a single bean meal in healthy volunteers or non anemics, In the present study the iron absorption ratio from common bean Pontal (PO), targeted for biofortification and compared with common bean BRS Estilo was not significantly different. The iron concentration

  17. Importance of the green color, absorption gradient, and spectral absorption of chloroplasts for the radiative energy balance of leaves.

    PubMed

    Kume, Atsushi

    2017-05-01

    Terrestrial green plants absorb photosynthetically active radiation (PAR; 400-700 nm) but do not absorb photons evenly across the PAR waveband. The spectral absorbance of photosystems and chloroplasts is lowest for green light, which occurs within the highest irradiance waveband of direct solar radiation. We demonstrate a close relationship between this phenomenon and the safe and efficient utilization of direct solar radiation in simple biophysiological models. The effects of spectral absorptance on the photon and irradiance absorption processes are evaluated using the spectra of direct and diffuse solar radiation. The radiation absorption of a leaf arises as a consequence of the absorption of chloroplasts. The photon absorption of chloroplasts is strongly dependent on the distribution of pigment concentrations and their absorbance spectra. While chloroplast movements in response to light are important mechanisms controlling PAR absorption, they are not effective for green light because chloroplasts have the lowest spectral absorptance in the waveband. With the development of palisade tissue, the incident photons per total palisade cell surface area and the absorbed photons per chloroplast decrease. The spectral absorbance of carotenoids is effective in eliminating shortwave PAR (<520 nm), which contains much of the surplus energy that is not used for photosynthesis and is dissipated as heat. The PAR absorptance of a whole leaf shows no substantial difference based on the spectra of direct or diffuse solar radiation. However, most of the near infrared radiation is unabsorbed and heat stress is greatly reduced. The incident solar radiation is too strong to be utilized for photosynthesis under the current CO 2 concentration in the terrestrial environment. Therefore, the photon absorption of a whole leaf is efficiently regulated by photosynthetic pigments with low spectral absorptance in the highest irradiance waveband and through a combination of pigment density

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  19. Determination of gold nanoparticle shape from absorption spectroscopy and ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battie, Yann; Izquierdo-Lorenzo, Irene; Resano-Garcia, Amandine; Naciri, Aotmane En; Akil, Suzanna; Adam, Pierre Michel; Jradi, Safi

    2017-11-01

    A new methodology is developed to determine the shape distribution of gold nanoparticles (NPs) from optical spectroscopic measurements. Indeed, the morphology of Au colloids is deduced by fitting their absorption spectra with an effective medium theory which takes into account the nanoparticle shape distribution. The same procedure is applied to ellipsometric measurements recorded on photoresist films which contain Au NPs. Three spaces (L2, r2, P2) are introduced to interpret the NPs shape distribution. In the P2 space, the sphericity, the prolacity and the oblacity estimators are proposed to quantify the shape of NPs. The r2 space enables the determination of the NP aspect ratio distribution. The distributions determined from optical spectroscopy were found to be in very good agreement with the shape distributions obtained by transmission electron microscopy. We found that fitting absorption or ellipsometric spectra with an adequate effective medium theory, provides a robust tool for measuring the shape and concentration of metallic NPs.

  20. Differential-optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1977-01-01

    Two-cell spectrophone detects trace amounts of atmospheric pollutants by measuring absorption coefficients of gases with various laser sources. Device measures pressure difference between two tapered cells with differential manometer. Background signal is reduced by balanced window heating and balanced carrier gas absorption in two cells.

  1. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  2. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  3. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  4. The influence of age on the distribution, metabolism and excretion of methoxyflurane in Fischer 344 rats: a possible relationship to nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Bell, L E; Hitt, B A; Mazze, R I

    1975-10-01

    Age as a factor in methoxyflurane nephrotoxicity was evaluated in Fischer 344 rats of various ages by determination of: 1) serum inorganic fluoride and methoxyflurane concentrations, and urinary inorganic fluoride excretion in methoxyflurane-exposed rats; 2) liver microsomal methoxyflurane defluorinase activity; and 3) distribution of injected sodium fluoride. Only rats in the youngest age group (6 weeks) did not develop nephrotoxicity after anesthesia. Older rats had a biphasic rather than a monophasic decay in serum methoxyflurane concentration and also had increased serum inorganic fluoride concentration and urinary inorganic fluoride excretion. Older rats also excreted a greater proportion of an injected dose of sodium fluoride compared to young rats. Microsomal methoxyflurane defluorinase specific activity was similar among rats of all ages. It is likely that increased availability of methoxyflurane due to its greater storage in fat led to more inorganic fluoride production in older compared to younger rats. Bone sequestration of inorganic fluoride in younger rats probably accounts for decreased serum inorganic fluoride levels in that group. Both factors cause significant differences in renal exposure to inorganic fluoride; thus the risk of nephrotoxicity is less in younger animals.

  5. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  6. Diabetes regulates fructose absorption through thioredoxin-interacting protein

    PubMed Central

    Dotimas, James R; Lee, Austin W; Schmider, Angela B; Carroll, Shannon H; Shah, Anu; Bilen, Julide; Elliott, Kayla R; Myers, Ronald B; Soberman, Roy J; Yoshioka, Jun; Lee, Richard T

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic studies suggest that the absorptive capacity of the small intestine for fructose is limited, though the molecular mechanisms controlling this process remain unknown. Here we demonstrate that thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip), which regulates glucose homeostasis in mammals, binds to fructose transporters and promotes fructose absorption by the small intestine. Deletion of Txnip in mice reduced fructose transport into the peripheral bloodstream and liver, as well as the severity of adverse metabolic outcomes resulting from long-term fructose consumption. We also demonstrate that fructose consumption induces expression of Txnip in the small intestine. Diabetic mice had increased expression of Txnip in the small intestine as well as enhanced fructose uptake and transport into the hepatic portal circulation. The deletion of Txnip in mice abolished the diabetes-induced increase in fructose absorption. Our results indicate that Txnip is a critical regulator of fructose metabolism and suggest that a diabetic state can promote fructose uptake. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18313.001 PMID:27725089

  7. Glucose Absorption by the Bacillary Band of Trichuris muris

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Michael; Nejsum, Peter; Mejer, Helena; Denwood, Matthew; Thamsborg, Stig M.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common characteristic of Trichuris spp. infections in humans and animals is the variable but low efficacy of single-dose benzimidazoles currently used in mass drug administration programmes against human trichuriasis. The bacillary band, a specialised morphological structure of Trichuris spp., as well as the unique partly intracellular habitat of adult Trichuris spp. may affect drug absorption and perhaps contribute to the low drug accumulation in the worm. However, the exact function of the bacillary band is still unknown. Methodology We studied the dependency of adult Trichuris muris on glucose and/or amino acids for survival in vitro and the absorptive function of the bacillary band. The viability of the worms was evaluated using a motility scale from 0 to 3, and the colorimetric assay Alamar Blue was utilised to measure the metabolic activity. The absorptive function of the bacillary band in living worms was explored using a fluorescent glucose analogue (6-NBDG) and confocal microscopy. To study the absorptive function of the bacillary band in relation to 6-NBDG, the oral uptake was minimised or excluded by sealing the oral cavity with glue and agarose. Principal Findings Glucose had a positive effect on both the motility (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) of T. muris in vitro, whereas this was not the case for amino acids. The 6-NBDG was observed in the pores of the bacillary band and within the stichocytes of the living worms, independent of oral sealing. Conclusions/Significance Trichuris muris is dependent on glucose for viability in vitro, and the bacillary band has an absorptive function in relation to 6-NBDG, which accumulates within the stichocytes. The absorptive function of the bacillary band calls for an exploration of its possible role in the uptake of anthelmintics, and as a potential anthelmintic target relevant for future drug development. PMID:27588682

  8. Glucose Absorption by the Bacillary Band of Trichuris muris.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Tina V A; Hansen, Michael; Nejsum, Peter; Mejer, Helena; Denwood, Matthew; Thamsborg, Stig M

    2016-09-01

    A common characteristic of Trichuris spp. infections in humans and animals is the variable but low efficacy of single-dose benzimidazoles currently used in mass drug administration programmes against human trichuriasis. The bacillary band, a specialised morphological structure of Trichuris spp., as well as the unique partly intracellular habitat of adult Trichuris spp. may affect drug absorption and perhaps contribute to the low drug accumulation in the worm. However, the exact function of the bacillary band is still unknown. We studied the dependency of adult Trichuris muris on glucose and/or amino acids for survival in vitro and the absorptive function of the bacillary band. The viability of the worms was evaluated using a motility scale from 0 to 3, and the colorimetric assay Alamar Blue was utilised to measure the metabolic activity. The absorptive function of the bacillary band in living worms was explored using a fluorescent glucose analogue (6-NBDG) and confocal microscopy. To study the absorptive function of the bacillary band in relation to 6-NBDG, the oral uptake was minimised or excluded by sealing the oral cavity with glue and agarose. Glucose had a positive effect on both the motility (p < 0.001) and metabolic activity (p < 0.001) of T. muris in vitro, whereas this was not the case for amino acids. The 6-NBDG was observed in the pores of the bacillary band and within the stichocytes of the living worms, independent of oral sealing. Trichuris muris is dependent on glucose for viability in vitro, and the bacillary band has an absorptive function in relation to 6-NBDG, which accumulates within the stichocytes. The absorptive function of the bacillary band calls for an exploration of its possible role in the uptake of anthelmintics, and as a potential anthelmintic target relevant for future drug development.

  9. Metabolism-Activated Multitargeting (MAMUT): An Innovative Multitargeting Approach to Drug Design and Development.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Péter; Chai, Christina L L

    2016-06-20

    Multitargeting is a valuable concept in drug design for the development of effective drugs for the treatment of multifactorial diseases. This concept has most frequently been realized by incorporating two or more pharmacophores into a single hybrid molecule. Many such hybrids, due to the increased molecular size, exhibit unfavorable physicochemical properties leading to adverse effects and/or an inappropriate ADME (absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion) profile. To avoid this limitation and achieve additional therapeutic benefits, here we describe a novel multitargeting strategy based on the synergistic effects of a parent drug and its active metabolite(s). The concept of metabolism-activated multitargeting (MAMUT) is illustrated using a number of examples. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  11. Optical absorption in disordered monolayer molybdenum disulfide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekuma, C. E.; Gunlycke, D.

    2018-05-01

    We explore the combined impact of sulfur vacancies and electronic interactions on the optical properties of monolayer MoS2. First, we present a generalized Anderson-Hubbard Hamiltonian that accounts for both randomly distributed sulfur vacancies and the presence of dielectric screening within the material. Second, we parametrize this energy-dependent Hamiltonian from first-principles calculations based on density functional theory and the Green's function and screened Coulomb (GW) method. Third, we apply a first-principles-based many-body typical medium method to determine the single-particle electronic structure. Fourth, we solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation to obtain the charge susceptibility χ with its imaginary part being related to the absorbance A . Our results show that an increased vacancy concentration leads to decreased absorption both in the band continuum and from exciton states within the band gap. We also observe increased absorption below the band-gap threshold and present an expression, which describes Lifshitz tails, in excellent qualitative agreement with our numerical calculations. This latter increased absorption in the 1.0 -2.5 eV range makes defect engineering of potential interest for solar cell applications.

  12. Reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of an object spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its digital image: the challenge of algal colours.

    PubMed

    Coltelli, Primo; Barsanti, Laura; Evangelista, Valter; Frassanito, Anna Maria; Gualtieri, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    A novel procedure for deriving the absorption spectrum of an object spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its image is presented. Any digital image acquired by a microscope can be used; typical applications are the analysis of cellular/subcellular metabolic processes under physiological conditions and in response to environmental stressors (e.g. heavy metals), and the measurement of chromophore composition, distribution and concentration in cells. In this paper, we challenged the procedure with images of algae, acquired by means of a CCD camera mounted onto a microscope. The many colours algae display result from the combinations of chromophores whose spectroscopic information is limited to organic solvents extracts that suffers from displacements, amplifications, and contraction/dilatation respect to spectra recorded inside the cell. Hence, preliminary processing is necessary, which consists of in vivo measurement of the absorption spectra of photosynthetic compartments of algal cells and determination of spectra of the single chromophores inside the cell. The final step of the procedure consists in the reconstruction of the absorption spectrum of the cell spot from the colour values of the corresponding pixel(s) in its digital image by minimization of a system of transcendental equations based on the absorption spectra of the chromophores under physiological conditions. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  13. FISSION PRODUCT METABOLISM AND RESPONSE IN LABORATORY AND DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND PLANNING STUDY FOR EVALUATION OF RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION OF THE FOOD CHAIN. Progress Report April 1, 1961-January 31, 1962

    SciTech Connect

    Comar, C.L.; Wasserman, R.H.; Lengemann, F.W.

    Studies are reported of the absorption, transport, and movement of Ca and Sr across membranes and intestinal tissue, and of the skeletal uptake and urinary excretion of these two elements. The behavior of lactose-1-C/sup 14/ within the mucosal epithelium of the ileum is described. Radioiodine metabolism is studied. The distribution of Cs and Sr in milk products is investigated. Factors sffecting the retention and metabolism of Cs/sup 137/ are analyzed. The construction and description of a whole-body counting facility is given. Examinations of radioactive contamination of the food chain are outlined. (T.F.H.)

  14. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  15. Enhanced broadband absorption in nanowire arrays with integrated Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Pettersson, Håkan

    2018-05-01

    A near-unity unselective absorption spectrum is desirable for high-performance photovoltaics. Nanowire (NW) arrays are promising candidates for efficient solar cells due to nanophotonic absorption resonances in the solar spectrum. The absorption spectra, however, display undesired dips between the resonance peaks. To achieve improved unselective broadband absorption, we propose to enclose distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) in the bottom and top parts of indium phosphide (InP) NWs, respectively. We theoretically show that by enclosing only two periods of In0.56Ga0.44As/InP DBRs, an unselective 78% absorption efficiency (72% for NWs without DBRs) is obtained at normal incidence in the spectral range from 300 nm to 920 nm. Under oblique light incidence, the absorption efficiency is enhanced up to about 85% at an incidence angle of 50°. By increasing the number of DBR periods from two to five, the absorption efficiency is further enhanced up to 95% at normal incidence. In this work, we calculated optical spectra for InP NWs, but the results are expected to be valid for other direct band gap III-V semiconductor materials. We believe that our proposed idea of integrating DBRs in NWs offers great potential for high-performance photovoltaic applications.

  16. Metabolic Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolstikov, Vladimir V.

    Analysis of the metabolome with coverage of all of the possibly detectable components in the sample, rather than analysis of each individual metabolite at a given time, can be accomplished by metabolic analysis. Targeted and/or nontargeted approaches are applied as needed for particular experiments. Monitoring hundreds or more metabolites at a given time requires high-throughput and high-end techniques that enable screening for relative changes in, rather than absolute concentrations of, compounds within a wide dynamic range. Most of the analytical techniques useful for these purposes use GC or HPLC/UPLC separation modules coupled to a fast and accurate mass spectrometer. GC separations require chemical modification (derivatization) before analysis, and work efficiently for the small molecules. HPLC separations are better suited for the analysis of labile and nonvolatile polar and nonpolar compounds in their native form. Direct infusion and NMR-based techniques are mostly used for fingerprinting and snap phenotyping, where applicable. Discovery and validation of metabolic biomarkers are exciting and promising opportunities offered by metabolic analysis applied to biological and biomedical experiments. We have demonstrated that GC-TOF-MS, HPLC/UPLC-RP-MS and HILIC-LC-MS techniques used for metabolic analysis offer sufficient metabolome mapping providing researchers with confident data for subsequent multivariate analysis and data mining.

  17. Exercise Metabolism.

    PubMed

    2017-05-02

    As a preview of the upcoming Cell Symposium on Exercise Metabolism in Gothenburg, Sweden, May 21-23 (http://cell-symposia.com/exercisemetabolism-2017/), several of our speakers and other Cell Press exercise enthusiasts share a wide range of experiences from bench pressing goals to bench research insights. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Translational value of liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry-based quantitative proteomics for in vitro-in vivo extrapolation of drug metabolism and transport and considerations in selecting appropriate techniques.

    PubMed

    Al Feteisi, Hajar; Achour, Brahim; Rostami-Hodjegan, Amin; Barber, Jill

    2015-01-01

    Drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters play an important role in drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and, consequently, they influence drug efficacy and toxicity. Quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in various tissues is therefore essential for comprehensive elucidation of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion. Recent advances in liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) have improved the quantification of pharmacologically relevant proteins. This report presents an overview of mass spectrometry-based methods currently used for the quantification of drug-metabolizing enzymes and drug transporters, mainly focusing on applications and cost associated with various quantitative strategies based on stable isotope-labeled standards (absolute quantification peptide standards, quantification concatemers, protein standards for absolute quantification) and label-free analysis. In mass spectrometry, there is no simple relationship between signal intensity and analyte concentration. Proteomic strategies are therefore complex and several factors need to be considered when selecting the most appropriate method for an intended application, including the number of proteins and samples. Quantitative strategies require appropriate mass spectrometry platforms, yet choice is often limited by the availability of appropriate instrumentation. Quantitative proteomics research requires specialist practical skills and there is a pressing need to dedicate more effort and investment to training personnel in this area. Large-scale multicenter collaborations are also needed to standardize quantitative strategies in order to improve physiologically based pharmacokinetic models.

  19. Capacity for absorption of water-soluble secondary metabolites greater in birds than in rodents.

    PubMed

    Karasov, William H; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique; Bakken, Bradley Hartman; Izhaki, Ido; Samuni-Blank, Michal; Arad, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites (SMs) are pervasive in animal foods and potentially influence feeding behavior, interspecies interactions, and the distribution and abundance of animals. Some of the major classes of naturally occurring SMs in plants include many water-soluble compounds in the molecular size range that could cross the intestinal epithelium via the paracellular space by diffusion or solvent drag. There are differences among species in paracellular permeability. Using Middle Eastern rodent and avian consumers of fruits containing SMs, we tested the hypothesis that avian species would have significantly higher paracellular permeability than rodent species. Permeability in intact animals was assessed using standard pharmacological methodology to measure absorption of two radiolabeled, inert, neutral water-soluble probes that do not interact with intestinal nutrient transporters, L-arabinose (M(r) = 150.1 Da) and lactulose (M(r) = 342.3 Da). We also measured absorption of labeled 3-O-methyl-D-glucose (3OMD-glucose; M(r) = 194.2 Da), which is a nonmetabolized analogue of D-glucose that is passively absorbed through the paracellular space but also transported across the enterocyte membranes. Most glucose was absorbed by all species, but arabinose fractional absorption (f) was nearly three times higher in birds (1.03±0.17, n = 15 in two species) compared to rodents (0.37±0.06, n = 10 in two species) (P<0.001). Surprisingly, the apparent rates of absorption in birds of arabinose exceeded those of 3OMD-glucose. Our findings are in agreement with previous work showing that the paracellular pathway is more prominent in birds relative to nonflying mammals, and suggests that birds may be challenged by greater absorption of water-soluble, dietary SMs. The increased expression of the paracellular pathway in birds hints at a tradeoff: the free energy birds gain by absorbing water-soluble nutrients passively may be offset by the metabolic demands

  20. Broadband absorption with gradient metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hoyeong; Chalabi, Hamidreza; Alù, Andrea

    2018-03-01

    A metasurface with appropriately designed transverse spatial inhomogeneities can provide the desired phase redistribution in response to an incident wave with arbitrary incident angle. This property of gradient metasurfaces has been used to modify light propagation in unusual manners, to transform the impinging optical wavefront with large flexibility. In this work, we show how gradient metasurfaces can be tailored to offer high absorption in thin absorptive layers, and how to design realistic metasurfaces for this purpose using dielectric materials.

  1. Neutron absorption constraints on the composition of 4 Vesta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Beck, Andrew W.; Feldman, William C.; Hendricks, John S.; Lawrence, David J.; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Peplowski, Patrick N.; Reedy, Robert C.; Toplis, Michael J.; Corre, Lucille; Mizzon, Hugau; Reddy, Vishnu; Titus, Timothy N.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-11-01

    Global maps of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section of Vesta's regolith by the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) on board the NASA Dawn spacecraft provide constraints on the abundance and distribution of Fe, Ca, Al, Mg, and other rock-forming elements. From a circular, polar low-altitude mapping orbit, GRaND sampled the regolith to decimeter depths with a spatial resolution of about 300 km. At this spatial scale, the variation in neutron absorption is about seven times lower than that of the Moon. The observed variation is consistent with the range of absorption for howardite whole-rock compositions, which further supports the connection between Vesta and the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite meteorites. We find a strong correlation between neutron absorption and the percentage of eucritic materials in howardites and polymict breccias, which enables petrologic mapping of Vesta's surface. The distribution of basaltic eucrite and diogenite determined from neutron absorption measurements is qualitatively similar to that indicated by visible and near infrared spectroscopy. The Rheasilvia basin and ejecta blanket has relatively low absorption, consistent with Mg-rich orthopyroxene. Based on a combination of Fe and neutron absorption measurements, olivine-rich lithologies are not detected on the spatial scales sampled by GRaND. The sensitivity of GRaND to the presence of mantle material is described and implications for the absence of an olivine signature are discussed. High absorption values found in Vesta's "dark" hemisphere, where exogenic hydrogen has accumulated, indicate that this region is richer in basaltic eucrite, representative of Vesta's ancient upper crust.

  2. Neutron absorption constraints on the composition of 4 Vesta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Prettyman, Thomas H.; Mittlefehldt, David W.; Yamashita, Naoyuki; Beck, Andrew W.; Feldman, William C.; Hendricks, John S.; Lawrence, David J.; McCoy, Timothy J.; McSween, Harry Y.; Paplowski, Patrick N.; Reedy, Robert C.; Toplis, Michael J.; Le Corre, Lucille; Mizzon, Hugau; Reddy, Vishnu; Titus, Timothy N.; Raymond, Carol A.; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Global maps of the macroscopic thermal neutron absorption cross section of Vesta's regolith by the Gamma Ray and Neutron Detector (GRaND) on board the NASA Dawn spacecraft provide constraints on the abundance and distribution of Fe, Ca, Al, Mg, and other rock-forming elements. From a circular, polar low-altitude mapping orbit, GRaND sampled the regolith to decimeter depths with a spatial resolution of about 300 km. At this spatial scale, the variation in neutron absorption is about seven times lower than that of the Moon. The observed variation is consistent with the range of absorption for howardite whole-rock compositions, which further supports the connection between Vesta and the howardite, eucrite, and diogenite meteorites. We find a strong correlation between neutron absorption and the percentage of eucritic materials in howardites and polymict breccias, which enables petrologic mapping of Vesta's surface. The distribution of basaltic eucrite and diogenite determined from neutron absorption measurements is qualitatively similar to that indicated by visible and near infrared spectroscopy. The Rheasilvia basin and ejecta blanket has relatively low absorption, consistent with Mg-rich orthopyroxene. Based on a combination of Fe and neutron absorption measurements, olivine-rich lithologies are not detected on the spatial scales sampled by GRaND. The sensitivity of GRaND to the presence of mantle material is described and implications for the absence of an olivine signature are discussed. High absorption values found in Vesta's “dark” hemisphere, where exogenic hydrogen has accumulated, indicate that this region is richer in basaltic eucrite, representative of Vesta's ancient upper crust.

  3. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-11-21

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal "superorganism" seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host's immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of "metabolic endotoxemia", leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use.

  4. Gut microbiota and metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Festi, Davide; Schiumerini, Ramona; Eusebi, Leonardo Henry; Marasco, Giovanni; Taddia, Martina; Colecchia, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Gut microbiota exerts a significant role in the pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome, as confirmed by studies conducted both on humans and animal models. Gut microbial composition and functions are strongly influenced by diet. This complex intestinal “superorganism” seems to affect host metabolic balance modulating energy absorption, gut motility, appetite, glucose and lipid metabolism, as well as hepatic fatty storage. An impairment of the fine balance between gut microbes and host’s immune system could culminate in the intestinal translocation of bacterial fragments and the development of “metabolic endotoxemia”, leading to systemic inflammation and insulin resistance. Diet induced weight-loss and bariatric surgery promote significant changes of gut microbial composition, that seem to affect the success, or the inefficacy, of treatment strategies. Manipulation of gut microbiota through the administration of prebiotics or probiotics could reduce intestinal low grade inflammation and improve gut barrier integrity, thus, ameliorating metabolic balance and promoting weight loss. However, further evidence is needed to better understand their clinical impact and therapeutic use. PMID:25473159

  5. Absorption and Transport of Sea Cucumber Saponins from Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuai; Wang, Yuanhong; Jiang, Tingfu; Wang, Han; Yang, Shuang; Lv, Zhihua

    2016-06-17

    The present study is focused on the intestinal absorption of sea cucumber saponins. We determined the pharmacokinetic characteristics and bioavailability of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁; the findings indicated that the bioavailability of Holotoxin A₁ was lower than Echinoside A. We inferred that the differences in chemical structure between compounds was a factor that explained their different characteristics of transport across the intestine. In order to confirm the absorption characteristics of Echinoside A and Holotoxin A₁, we examined their transport across Caco-2 cell monolayer and effective permeability by single-pass intestinal perfusion. The results of Caco-2 cell model indicate that Echinoside A is transported by passive diffusion, and not influenced by the exocytosis of P-glycoprotein (P-gp, expressed in the apical side of Caco-2 monolayers as the classic inhibitor). The intestinal perfusion also demonstrated well the absorption of Echinoside A and poor absorption of Holotoxin A₁, which matched up with the result of the Caco-2 cell model. The results demonstrated our conjecture and provides fundamental information on the relationship between the chemical structure of these sea cucumber saponins and their absorption characteristics, and we believe that our findings build a foundation for the further metabolism study of sea cucumber saponins and contribute to the further clinical research of saponins.

  6. Effect of tumor properties on energy absorption, temperature mapping, and thermal dose in 13.56-MHz radiofrequency hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Bibin; Kim, Subin; Cho, Woong; Kim, Suzy; Kim, Jung Kyung

    2018-05-01

    Computational techniques can enhance personalized hyperthermia-treatment planning by calculating tissue energy absorption and temperature distribution. This study determined the effect of tumor properties on energy absorption, temperature mapping, and thermal dose distribution in mild radiofrequency hyperthermia using a mouse xenograft model. We used a capacitive-heating radiofrequency hyperthermia system with an operating frequency of 13.56 MHz for in vivo mouse experiments and performed simulations on a computed tomography mouse model. Additionally, we measured the dielectric properties of the tumors and considered temperature dependence for thermal properties, metabolic heat generation, and perfusion. Our results showed that dielectric property variations were more dominant than thermal properties and other parameters, and that the measured dielectric properties provided improved temperature-mapping results relative to the property values taken from previous study. Furthermore, consideration of temperature dependency in the bio heat-transfer model allowed elucidation of precise thermal-dose calculations. These results suggested that this method might contribute to effective thermoradiotherapy planning in clinics. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Fructose metabolism and metabolic disease

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Increased sugar consumption is increasingly considered a contributor to the worldwide epidemics of obesity and diabetes and their associated cardiometabolic risks. As a result of its unique metabolic properties, the fructose component of sugar may be particularly harmful. Diets high in fructose can ...

  8. Bile Acid Metabolism in Liver Pathobiology

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, John Y. L.; Ferrell, Jessica M.

    2018-01-01

    Bile acids facilitate intestinal