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Sample records for absorption features centered

  1. Molecular absorption features in translucent clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krelowski, Jacek

    2007-12-01

    Interstellar clouds, composed of neutral hydrogen, consist about 90% of the total mass of interstellar medium. Their absorption spectra contain: continuous extinction, atomic lines, molecular features and the unidentified diffuse interstellar bands (DIBs). The latter are also believed to be carried by some, rather complex molecules. A vast majority of DIBs is characterized by small central depths. This is why they became observable only since the solid state detectors are widely applied in astrophysics. It is to be emphasized that interstellar absorptions, seen along the same line of sight, may be in fact originated in several, different environments (clouds). The extensive database of echelle spectra allowed to prove that the CaII column density evidently correlates with parallaxes of OB-3 stars in contrast to other interstellar species. Thus CaII is quite evenly distributed in the interstellar medium while other species (NaI, KI, CaI, CH, CN, DIB carriers) are not. This fact is of basic importance as the ob- served spectra cannot be physically interpreted if they mix features originated in different clouds, i.e. in different environments. The abundance ratios of interstellar molecules (identified and DIB carriers) differ from cloud to cloud due to different physical processes which govern their formation. High resolution, high S/N spectra, prove that also profiles of diffuse bands vary from cloud to cloud - this fact strongly supports a molecular origin of these, still nidentified, features and motivates investigation of their relations to other molecules; they can reveal physical conditions which facilitate formation of the DIB carriers and lead to their identification.

  2. A study of the absorption features of Makemake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarez-Candal, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Ortiz, J.; Duffard, R.; Carvano, J.; de Pra, M.

    2014-07-01

    Most transneptunian objects do not show prominent absorption features due to the size and location [1]. Nevertheless, absorption due to water ice and volatile ices do appear on a few large objects, particularly those that have good signal-to-noise-ratio spectra. In particular, methane appears in three dwarf planets (Pluto, Eris, and Makemake), as well as in some smaller objects, such as Quaoar and probably Sedna, and in Neptune's satellite Triton. Methane has such intense absorption features that even small amounts of methane on the surface dominate the reflectance spectra in the visible and near-infrared range, making it a great tool to probe surfaces, especially, considering that the depth of the bands could be used as a proxy for physical depths and that shifts in the bands with respect to laboratory measurements could point to possible dilutions (as seen in Pluto and Eris; for instance [3] and references therein). Aiming at gaining a deeper insight into Makemake's surface through its methane absorption bands, we have observed it with X-Shooter at the VLT with a medium spectral resolution in the range of 0.4--1.8 microns. In this work, we present the results of comparing these features with those of methane in the laboratory and the same features in Eris and Pluto, within the context of methane-dominated spectra of dwarf planets.

  3. Absorption Features in Spectra of Magnetized Neutron Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Suleimanov, V.; Hambaryan, V.; Neuhaeuser, R.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Pavlov, G. G.; Adelsberg, M. van; Werner, K.

    2011-09-21

    The X-ray spectra of some magnetized isolated neutron stars (NSs) show absorption features with equivalent widths (EWs) of 50-200 eV, whose nature is not yet well known.To explain the prominent absorption features in the soft X-ray spectra of the highly magnetized (B{approx}10{sup 14} G) X-ray dim isolated NSs (XDINSs), we theoretically investigate different NS local surface models, including naked condensed iron surfaces and partially ionized hydrogen model atmospheres, with semi-infinite and thin atmospheres above the condensed surface. We also developed a code for computing light curves and integral emergent spectra of magnetized neutron stars with various temperature and magnetic field distributions over the NS surface. We compare the general properties of the computed and observed light curves and integral spectra for XDINS RBS 1223 and conclude that the observations can be explained by a thin hydrogen atmosphere above the condensed iron surface, while the presence of a strong toroidal magnetic field component on the XDINS surface is unlikely.We suggest that the harmonically spaced absorption features in the soft X-ray spectrum of the central compact object (CCO) 1E 1207.4-5209 (hereafter 1E 1207) correspond to peaks in the energy dependence of the free-free opacity in a quantizing magnetic field, known as quantum oscillations. To explore observable properties of these quantum oscillations, we calculate models of hydrogen NS atmospheres with B{approx}10{sup 10}-10{sup 11} G(i.e., electron cyclotron energy E{sub c,e}{approx}0.1-1 keV) and T{sub eff} = 1-3 MK. Such conditions are thought to be typical for 1E 1207. We show that observable features at the electron cyclotron harmonics with EWs {approx_equal}100-200 eV can arise due to these quantum oscillations.

  4. Absorption of UV radiation by DNA: spatial and temporal features.

    PubMed

    Markovitsi, Dimitra; Gustavsson, Thomas; Banyasz, Akos

    2010-01-01

    The present review focuses on studies carried out by our group on the interaction of UV radiation with DNA. In particular, we examine the way that the energy acquired by DNA helices following direct absorption of UVC radiation is extended spatially and how its effects evolve during the time. These effects depend on the base sequence and can be revealed by the study of model helices. The experimental results were obtained by optical spectroscopy, used in a refined way which allows detection of very weak absorbance changes (10(-3)) as well as of intrinsic emission from DNA components whose fluorescence quantum yields are as low as 10(-4). Measurements were performed both under continuous irradiation and using pulsed excitation which permitted us to follow early events, occurring from 10(-14) to 10(-1)s. The experiments were guided by theoretical calculations. The spatial features concern the extent of the excited states formed immediately upon UV absorption; these were shown to be delocalized over several bases under the effect of electronic coupling. Moreover, thanks to the spectral fingerprints governed by the electronic coupling; we probed local denaturation induced on a double helix following formation of cyclobutane dimers. Regarding the temporal features, three different topics are presented: (i) ultrafast excitation energy transfer occurring among the bases in less than 100 fs, (ii) electron ejection from DNA upon absorption of one photon at 266 nm and (iii) formation of (6-4) photo-adducts involving a reaction intermediate. The most important message emerging from these studies is that DNA bases may adopt a collective behaviour versus UV radiation. Furthermore, time-resolved studies unravel processes which are undetectable by investigations using continuous irradiation. All these pieces of information change our understanding of how DNA damage occurs upon absorption of UV radiation.

  5. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K.

    2015-12-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic Csbnd H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the spectral influences

  6. Investigations on the 1.7 micron residual absorption feature in the vegetation reflection spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verdebout, J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Andreoli, G.; Hosgood, B.; Sieber, A.

    1993-01-01

    The detection and interpretation of the weak absorption features associated with the biochemical components of vegetation is of great potential interest to a variety of applications ranging from classification to global change studies. This recent subject is also challenging because the spectral signature of the biochemicals is only detectable as a small distortion of the infrared spectrum which is mainly governed by water. Furthermore, the interpretation is complicated by complexity of the molecules (lignin, cellulose, starch, proteins) which contain a large number of different and common chemical bonds. In this paper, we present investigations on the absorption feature centered at 1.7 micron; these were conducted both on AVIRIS data and laboratory reflectance spectra of leaves.

  7. Wavelength Locking to CO2 Absorption Line-Center for 2-Micron Pulsed IPDA Lidar Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-01-01

    An airborne 2-micron triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-micron CW (Continuous Wave) laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nanometers, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  8. Plant phenolics and absorption features in vegetation reflectance spectra near 1.66 μm

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, Raymond F.; Skidmore, Andrew K

    2015-01-01

    Past laboratory and field studies have quantified phenolic substances in vegetative matter from reflectance measurements for understanding plant response to herbivores and insect predation. Past remote sensing studies on phenolics have evaluated crop quality and vegetation patterns caused by bedrock geology and associated variations in soil geochemistry. We examined spectra of pure phenolic compounds, common plant biochemical constituents, dry leaves, fresh leaves, and plant canopies for direct evidence of absorption features attributable to plant phenolics. Using spectral feature analysis with continuum removal, we observed that a narrow feature at 1.66 μm is persistent in spectra of manzanita, sumac, red maple, sugar maple, tea, and other species. This feature was consistent with absorption caused by aromatic C-H bonds in the chemical structure of phenolic compounds and non-hydroxylated aromatics. Because of overlapping absorption by water, the feature was weaker in fresh leaf and canopy spectra compared to dry leaf measurements. Simple linear regressions of feature depth and feature area with polyphenol concentration in tea resulted in high correlations and low errors (% phenol by dry weight) at the dry leaf (r2 = 0.95, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 56), fresh leaf (r2 = 0.79, RMSE = 2.1%, n = 56), and canopy (r2 = 0.78, RMSE = 1.0%, n = 13) levels of measurement. Spectra of leaves, needles, and canopies of big sagebrush and evergreens exhibited a weak absorption feature centered near 1.63 μm, short ward of the phenolic compounds, possibly consistent with terpenes. This study demonstrates that subtle variation in vegetation spectra in the shortwave infrared can directly indicate biochemical constituents and be used to quantify them. Phenolics are of lesser abundance compared to the major plant constituents but, nonetheless, have important plant functions and ecological significance. Additional research is needed to advance our understanding of the

  9. On the nature of absorption features toward nearby stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohl, S.; Czesla, S.; Schmitt, J. H. M. M.

    2016-06-01

    Context. Diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs) of largely unknown chemical origin are regularly observed primarily in distant early-type stars. More recently, detections in nearby late-type stars have also been claimed. These stars' spectra are dominated by stellar absorption lines. Specifically, strong interstellar atomic and DIB absorption has been reported in τ Boo. Aims: We test these claims by studying the strength of interstellar absorption in high-resolution TIGRE spectra of the nearby stars τ Boo, HD 33608, and α CrB. Methods: We focus our analysis on a strong DIB located at 5780.61 Å and on the absorption of interstellar Na. First, we carry out a differential analysis by comparing the spectra of the highly similar F-stars, τ Boo and HD 33608, whose light, however, samples different lines of sight. To obtain absolute values for the DIB absorption, we compare the observed spectra of τ Boo, HD 33608, and α CrB to PHOENIX models and carry out basic spectral modeling based on Voigt line profiles. Results: The intercomparison between τ Boo and HD 33608 reveals that the difference in the line depth is 6.85 ± 1.48 mÅ at the DIB location which is, however, unlikely to be caused by DIB absorption. The comparison between PHOENIX models and observed spectra yields an upper limit of 34.0 ± 0.3 mÅ for any additional interstellar absorption in τ Boo; similar results are obtained for HD 33608 and α CrB. For all objects we derive unrealistically large values for the radial velocity of any presumed interstellar clouds. In τ Boo we find Na D absorption with an equivalent width of 0.65 ± 0.07 mÅ and 2.3 ± 0.1 mÅ in the D2 and D1 lines. For the other Na, absorption of the same magnitude could only be detected in the D2 line. Our comparisons between model and data show that the interstellar absorption toward τ Boo is not abnormally high. Conclusions: We find no significant DIB absorption in any of our target stars. Any differences between modeled and

  10. Empathic Features and Absorption in Fantasy Role-Playing.

    PubMed

    Rivers, Anissa; Wickramasekera, Ian E; Pekala, Ronald J; Rivers, Jennifer A

    2016-01-01

    This study examined the levels of empathy and absorption of individuals who regularly play fantasy and science fiction role-playing games. A hypothesis was developed that higher levels of empathy would be found in individuals who fantasy role-play based upon previous research in hypnosis such as J. R. Hilgard's (1970) imaginative involvement hypothesis, research into the "fantasy prone" personality type (Wilson & Barber, 1981), and the empathic involvement hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003). The participants in the current study were 127 fantasy role-players who volunteered and completed the Davis Interpersonal Reactivity Index (empathy) and the Tellegen Absorption Scale (absorption). The results demonstrated that those who play fantasy role-playing games scored significantly higher than the comparison group on the IRI scale of empathy, confirming the hypothesis that fantasy role-players report experiencing higher levels of empathic involvement with others. Correlational analysis between the measures demonstrated a significant positive correlation between empathy and absorption (r = .43, p < .001). These results collectively suggest that fantasy role-players have a uniquely empathically-imaginative style. The results also confirm and extend previous findings on the relationship between empathy and absorption as predicted by the Empathic Involvement Hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003).

  11. A new class of absorption feature in Io's near-infrared spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trafton, L. M.; Lester, D. F.; Ramseyer, T. F.; Salama, F.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively weak IR absorption feature detected at 1200 resolving power in Io at 2.1253 microns does not correspond to any gas- or solid-phase absorption expected on the basis of previously identified Io surface constituents. The source material of the feature appears to be stable and more uniformly distributed in longitude than Io's hot spots. These characteristics imply the feature's participation in a class different from those of other Io absorption spectrum features, thereby potentially serving as a major indicator of Io's atmosphere-surface composition and interactions. Results of laboratory experiments with plausible surface ices are compared with these observations.

  12. Atmospheric-water absorption features near 2.2 micrometers and their importance in high spectral resolution remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, F. A.; Clark, R. N.

    1986-01-01

    Selective absorption of electromagnetic radiation by atmospheric gases and water vapor is an accepted fact in terrestrial remote sensing. Until recently, only a general knowledge of atmospheric effects was required for analysis of remote sensing data; however, with the advent of high spectral resolution imaging devices, detailed knowledge of atmospheric absorption bands has become increasingly important for accurate analysis. Detailed study of high spectral resolution aircraft data at the U.S. Geological Survey has disclosed narrow absorption features centered at approximately 2.17 and 2.20 micrometers not caused by surface mineralogy. Published atmospheric transmission spectra and atmospheric spectra derived using the LOWTRAN-5 computer model indicate that these absorption features are probably water vapor. Spectral modeling indicates that the effects of atmospheric absorption in this region are most pronounced in spectrally flat materials with only weak absorption bands. Without correction and detailed knowledge of the atmospheric effects, accurate mapping of surface mineralogy (particularly at low mineral concentrations) is not possible.

  13. [High-order derivative spectroscopy of infrared absorption spectra of the reaction centers from Rhodobacter sphaeroides].

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    The infrared absorption spectra of reduced and chemically oxidized reaction center preparations from the purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides were investigated by means of high-order derivative spectroscopy. The model Gaussian band with a maximum at 810 nm and a half-band of 15 nm found in the absorption spectrum of the reduced reaction center preparation is eliminated after the oxidation of photoactive bacteriochlorophyll dimer (P). This band was related to the absorption of the P(+)y excitonic band of P. On the basis of experimental results, it was concluded that the bleaching of the P(+)y absorption band at 810 nm in the oxidized reaction center preparations gives the main contribution to the blue shift of the 800 nm absorption band of Rb. sphaeroides reaction centers.

  14. Relating water absorption features to soil moisture characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jia; Philpot, William D.

    2015-09-01

    The spectral reflectance of a sample of quartz sand was monitored as the sample progressed from air-dry to fully saturated, and then back to air-dry. Wetting was accomplished by spraying small amounts of water on the surface of the sample, and collecting spectra whenever change occurred. Drying was passive, driven by evaporation from the sand surface, with spectra collected every 5 minutes until the sample was air dry. Water content was determined by monitoring the weight of the sample through both wetting and drying. There was a pronounced difference in the pattern of change in reflectance during wetting and drying, with the differences being apparent both in spectral details (i.e., the depth of absorption bands) and in the magnitude of the reflectance for a particular water content. The differences are attributable to the disposition of water in the sample. During wetting, water initially occurred only on the surface, primarily as water adsorbed onto sand particles. With increased wetting the water infiltrated deeper into the sample, gradually covering all particles and filling the pore spaces. During drying, water and air were distributed throughout the sample for most of the drying period. The differences in water distribution are assumed to be the cause of the differences in reflectance and to the differences in the depths of four strong water absorption bands.

  15. Using high spectral resolution spectrophotometry to study broad mineral absorption features on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blaney, D. L.; Crisp, D.

    1993-01-01

    Traditionally telescopic measurements of mineralogic absorption features have been made using relatively low to moderate (R=30-300) spectral resolution. Mineralogic absorption features tend to be broad so high resolution spectroscopy (R greater than 10,000) does not provide significant additional compositional information. Low to moderate resolution spectroscopy allows an observer to obtain data over a wide wavelength range (hundreds to thousands of wavenumbers) compared to the several wavenumber intervals that are collected using high resolution spectrometers. However, spectrophotometry at high resolution has major advantages over lower resolution spectroscopy in situations that are applicable to studies of the Martian surface, i.e., at wavelengths where relatively weak surface absorption features and atmospheric gas absorption features both occur.

  16. Comparison of the THz absorption feature in lactose to related saccharides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bjarnason, Jon E.; Brown, Elliott R.; Korter, Timothy M.

    2007-04-01

    Solid-state organic compounds such as α-lactose-monohydrate and biotin have been shown to have narrow and intense THz absorption features at room temperature. Interest in lineshapes in the THz region is justified not only for practical reasons, since they are of crucial importance to spectroscopy-based identification of materials, but also because of the information the line-widths contain about the solid-state physics of the materials. The line-width of THz absorption features (generally from lattice vibrations) in solids is excepted to be inversely proportional to the scattering time of optical phonons. The line-width of absorption features might thus have implications on the solid-state physics of the material, in particular, the interaction of phonons and the phonon density of states. We use a continuous wave THz photomixing system to obtain a high resolution spectrum of α-lactose-mohohydrate and analyze two of its lowest-frequency absorption lines. For comparison we measure the transmission spectra of 5 chemically related saccharides: melecitose, trehalose, maltose, cellobiose, and raffinose. Since α-lactose-monohydrate has a stronger and narrower absorption feature than any of its related saccharides, this comparison study is an important step in understanding the mechanism of THz radiation absorption by organic solids and what line-widths to expect in THz spectroscopy.

  17. Wavelength locking to CO2 absorption line-center for 2-μm pulsed IPDA lidar application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Refaat, Tamer F.; Petros, Mulugeta; Antill, Charles W.; Singh, Upendra N.; Yu, Jirong

    2016-05-01

    An airborne 2-m triple-pulse integrated path differential absorption (IPDA) lidar is currently under development at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). This IPDA lidar system targets both atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) column measurements. Independent wavelength control of each of the transmitted laser pulses is a key feature for the success of this instrument. The wavelength control unit provides switching, tuning and locking for each pulse in reference to a 2-μm CW laser source locked to CO2 line-center. Targeting the CO2 R30 line center, at 2050.967 nm, a wavelength locking unit has been integrated using semiconductor laser diode. The CO2 center-line locking unit includes a laser diode current driver, temperature controller, center-line locking controller and CO2 absorption cell. This paper presents the CO2 center-line locking unit architecture, characterization procedure and results. Assessment of wavelength jitter on the IPDA measurement error will also be addressed by comparison to the system design.

  18. Spatially Resolved HCN Absorption Features in the Circumnuclear Region of NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Roh, Duk-Gyoo; Oh, Se-Jin; Lee, Sang-Sung; Byun, Do-Young; Kameno, Seiji; Yeom, Jae-Hwan; Jung, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Hyo-Ryoung; Hwang, Ju-Yeon

    2016-10-01

    We present the first VLBI detection of HCN molecular absorption in the nearby active galactic nucleus NGC 1052. Utilizing the 1 mas resolution achieved by the Korean VLBI Network, we have spatially resolved the HCN absorption against a double-sided nuclear jet structure. Two velocity features of HCN absorption are detected significantly at the radial velocity of 1656 and 1719 km s-1, redshifted by 149 and 212 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity of the galaxy. The column density of the HCN molecule is estimated to be 1015-1016 cm-2, assuming an excitation temperature of 100-230 K. The absorption features show high optical depth localized on the receding jet side, where the free-free absorption occurred due to the circumnuclear torus. The size of the foreground absorbing molecular gas is estimated to be on approximately one-parsec scales, which agrees well with the approximate size of the circumnuclear torus. HCN absorbing gas is likely to be several clumps smaller than 0.1 pc inside the circumnuclear torus. The redshifted velocities of the HCN absorption features imply that HCN absorbing gas traces ongoing infall motion inside the circumnuclear torus onto the central engine.

  19. Derivative Analysis of Absorption Features in Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Data of Carbonate Sediments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-30

    reflectance of carbonate sediments and application to shallow water benthic habitat classification,” Doctoral Dissertation, University of Miami. Chap.3...resolve overlapping features. A primary application has been to analyze pigment and chemical composition of leaves in order to track physiological...final absorption feature was observed at 630 nm, in a region associated with the biliprotein, phycocyanin [16,17]. As biliproteins are water soluble

  20. Performance characteristics of single effect lithium bromide/ water absorption chiller for small data centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mysore, Abhishek Arun Babu

    A medium data center consists of servers performing operations such as file sharing, collaboration and email. There are a large number of small and medium data centers across the world which consume more energy and are less efficient when compared to large data center facilities of companies such as GOOGLE, APPLE and FACEBOOK. Such companies are making their data center facilities more environmental friendly by employing renewable energy solutions such as wind and solar to power the data center or in data center cooling. This not only reduces the carbon footprint significantly but also decreases the costs incurred over a period of time. Cooling of data center play a vital role in proper functioning of the servers. It is found that cooling consumes about 50% of the total power consumed by the data center. Traditional method of cooling includes the use of mechanical compression chillers which consume lot of power and is not desirable. In order to eliminate the use of mechanical compressor chillers renewable energy resources such as solar and wind should be employed. One such technology is solar thermal cooling by means of absorption chiller which is powered by solar energy. The absorption chiller unit can be coupled with either flat plate or evacuated tube collectors in order to achieve the required inlet temperature for the generator of the absorption chiller unit. In this study a modular data center is considered having a cooling load requirement of 23kw. The performance characteristics of a single stage Lithium Bromide/ water refrigeration is presented in this study considering the cooling load of 23kw. Performance characteristics of each of the 4 heat exchangers within the unit is discussed which helps in customizing the unit according to the users' specific needs. This analysis helps in studying the importance of different properties such as the effect of inlet temperatures of hot water for generator, inlet temperatures of cooling water for absorber and

  1. Correlation analysis of hyperspectral absorption features with the water status of coast live oak leaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Ruiliang; Ge, Shaokui; Kelly, Nina M.; Gong, Peng

    2002-01-01

    A total of 139 reflectance spectra (between 350 and 2500 nm) from coast live oak (Quercus Agrifolia) leaves were measured in the laboratory with a spectrometer FieldSpec½Pro FR. Correlation analysis was conducted between absorption features, three-band ratio indices derived from the spectra and corresponding relative water content (RWC, %) of oak leaves. The experimental results indicate that there exist linear relationships between the RWC of oak leaves and absorption feature parameters: wavelength position (WAVE), absorption feature depth (DEP), width (WID) and the multiplication of DEP and WID (AREA) at the 975 nm, 1200 nm and 1750 nm positions and two three-band ratio indices: RATIO975 and RATIO1200, derived at 975 nm and 1200 nm. AREA has a higher and more stable correlation with RWC compared to other features. It is worthy of noting that the two three-band ratio indices, RATIO975 and RATIO1200, may have potential application in assessing water status in vegetation.

  2. Understanding the features in the ultrafast transient absorption spectra of CdSe quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Do, Thanh Nhut; Ong, Xuanwei; Chan, Yinthai; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2016-12-01

    We describe a model to explain the features of the ultrafast transient absorption (TA) spectra of CdSe core type quantum dots (QDs). The measured TA spectrum consists of contributions by the ground state bleach (GSB), stimulated emission (SE) and excited state absorption (ESA) processes associated with the three lowest energy transition of the QDs. We model the shapes of the GSB, SE and ESA spectral components after fits to the linear absorption. The spectral positions of the ESA components take into account the biexcitonic binding energy. In order to obtain the correct weightage of the GSB, SE and ESA components to the TA spectrum, we enumerate the set of coherence transfer pathways associated with these processes. From our fits of the experimental TA spectra of 65 Å diameter QDs, biexcitonic binding energies for the three lowest energy transitions are obtained.

  3. Iron K Features in the Quasar E 1821+643: Evidence for Gravitationally Redshifted Absorption?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yaqoob, Tahir; Serlemitsos, Peter

    2005-01-01

    We report a Chandra high-energy grating detection of a narrow, redshifted absorption line superimposed on the red wing of a broad Fe K line in the z = 0.297 quasar E 1821+643. The absorption line is detected at a confidence level, estimated by two different methods, in the range approx. 2 - 3 sigma. Although the detection significance is not high enough to exclude a non-astrophysical origin, accounting for the absorption feature when modeling the X-ray spectrum implies that the Fe-K emission line is broad, and consistent with an origin in a relativistic accretion disk. Ignoring the apparent absorption feature leads to the conclusion that the Fe-K emission line is narrower, and also affects the inferred peak energy of the line (and hence the inferred ionization state of Fe). If the absorption line (at approx. 6.2 keV in the quasar frame) is real, we argue that it could be due to gravitationally redshifted Fe XXV or Fe XXVI resonance absorption within approx. 10 - 20 gravitational radii of the putative central black hole. The absorption line is not detected in earlier ASCA and Chandra low-energy grating observations, but the absorption line is not unequivocally ruled out by these data. The Chandra high-energy grating Fe-K emission line is consistent with an origin predominantly in Fe I-XVII or so. In an ASCA observation eight years earlier, the Fe-K line peaked at approx. 6.6 keV, closer to the energies of He-like Fe triplet lines. Further, in a Chandra low-energy grating observation the Fe-K line profile was double-peaked, one peak corresponding to Fe I-XVII or so, the other peak to Fe XXVI Ly alpha. Such a wide range in ionization state of Fe is not ruled out by the HEG and ASCA data either, and is suggestive of a complex structure for the line-emitter.

  4. Detection of Variable Gaseous Absorption Features in the Debris Disks Around Young A-type Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery, Sharon L.; Welsh, Barry Y.

    2012-10-01

    We present medium resolution (R = 60,000) absorption measurements of the interstellar Ca II K line observed towards five nearby A-type stars (49 Ceti, 5 Vul, ι Cyg, 2 And, and HD 223884) suspected of possessing circumstellar gas debris disks. The stars were observed on a nightly basis during a six night observing run on the 2.1-meter Otto Struve telescope at the McDonald Observatory, Texas. We have detected nightly changes in the absorption strength of the Ca II K line observed near the stellar radial velocity in three of the stars (49 Ceti, i Cyg and HD 223884). Such changes in absorption suggest the presence of a circumstellar (atomic) gas disk around these stars. In addition to the absorption changes in the main Ca II K line profile, we have also observed weak transient absorption features that randomly appear at redshifted velocities in the spectra of 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And. These absorption features are most probably associated with the presence of falling evaporated bodies (exo-comets) that liberate evaporating gas on their approach to the central star. This now brings the total number of systems in which exocomet activity has been observed at Ca II or Na I wavelengths on a nightly basis to seven (β Pic, HR 10, HD 85905, β Car, 49 Ceti, 5 Vul, and 2 And), with 2 And exhibiting weaker and less frequent changes. All of the disk systems presently known to exhibit either type of short-term variability in Ca II K line absorption are rapidly rotating A-type stars (V sin i > 120 km s-1). Most exhibit mid-IR excesses, and many of them are very young (< 20 Myr), thus supporting the argument that many of them are transitional objects between Herbig Ae and “Vega-like” A-type stars with more tenuous circumstellar disks. No mid-IR excess (due to the presence of a dust disk) has yet been detected around either 2 And or HD 223884, both of which have been classified as λ Boötis-type stars. This may indicate that the observed changes in gas absorption for these

  5. The Role of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Dense Cloud Absorption Features: The Last Major Unanswered Question in Interstellar Ice Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiar, Jean

    identified in a small handful of dense cloud sources (solely high-mass YSOs), there have been no comprehensive comparisons of experimental or computational spectra to the observed "unidentified" dense cloud absorption features, centered at 6.0 and 6.8 micron, which fall in the range of fundamental PAH vibrational modes. From the Spitzer IRS archive, we have selected 42 lines of sight through dense clouds and 34 lines of sight through colder less turbulent dense cores in order to best characterize PAHs in the most quiescent regions of the dense ISM. Since the 6.0 and 6.8 micron features in these sources show profiles which are different than those observed for YSOs, we have also selected 35 low-mass YSO spectra in order to assess the role the physical and/or chemical characteristics of the PAHs play in the observed features. For all our targets, ground-based 2 to 5 micron spectroscopy has been acquired by us or is available in the literature to aid in the analysis. We have at our disposal the NASA Ames Astrochemistry PAH database and proven techniques for determining continua to extract the dust and ice absorption features. The Ames PAH database is the largest of its kind and includes the spectra of theoretically calculated and experimentally measured IR absorption spectra of both neutral and ionized PAHs and nitrogen-substituted PAHs in inert gas matrices and water-ice. Our team includes the expertise of astronomers with over 2 decades of combined experience in observations of dust and ice in dense clouds and the properties of PAH emission in star-forming regions with the expertise of experimental and computational chemists whose specialty is the study of PAHs. Our proposed research will place tight constraints on the PAH concentrations and forms that could be present in interstellar ices which will, in turn, guide future astrochemistry model development and fuel new observations with future NASA facilities such as SOFIA and JWST.

  6. Detection of the 2175 Å Dust Feature in Mg II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, Sangeeta

    1997-10-01

    The broad absorption bump at 2175 Å due to dust, which is ubiquitous in the Galaxy and is seen in the Magellanic clouds, is also seen in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts, we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra as well as small features in the flat-fielding of the spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 Å (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 μm-1, and the central wavelength is 2240 Å. These are somewhat different from the central wavelength of 2176 Å and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 μm-1 found in the Galaxy. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 Å feature in Mg II absorbers and the Galactic interstellar medium can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them.

  7. Absorption Features in the X-ray Spectrum of an Ordinary Radio Pulsar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G.

    2012-08-01

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far.

  8. Absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary radio pulsar.

    PubMed

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Durant, Martin; Misanovic, Zdenka; Pavlov, George G

    2012-08-24

    The vast majority of known nonaccreting neutron stars (NSs) are rotation-powered radio and/or γ-ray pulsars. So far, their multiwavelength spectra have all been described satisfactorily by thermal and nonthermal continuum models, with no spectral lines. Spectral features have, however, been found in a handful of exotic NSs and were thought to be a manifestation of their unique traits. Here, we report the detection of absorption features in the x-ray spectrum of an ordinary rotation-powered radio pulsar, J1740+1000. Our findings bridge the gap between the spectra of pulsars and other, more exotic, NSs, suggesting that the features are more common in the NS spectra than they have been thought so far.

  9. Changes on image texture features of breakfast flakes cereals during water absorption.

    PubMed

    Medina, Wenceslao T; Quevedo, Roberto A; Aguilera, José M

    2013-02-01

    Normally breakfast cereal flakes are consumed by pouring them into a bowl and covering them with fresh or cold milk. During this process the liquid uptake causes changes in the surface and internal matrix of breakfast cereals that influence texture and integrity. Some breakfast cereal as flakes have a translucent structure that could provide information about the solid matrix and air cells and how they change during liquid absorption. The objective of the study was to assess the image texture changes of corn flakes and frosted flakes during water absorption at 5, 15 and 25 °C, employing 11 image feature textures extracted from grey-level co-occurrence matrix and grey-level run length matrix (at three directions) and to relate the fractal dimension (FD) of images with rupture force (RF) reduction during soaking of both flakes at 5 °C. The most relevant result from principal component analysis calculated with a matrix of 54 (soaking times) × 22 (texture features), shows that it was possible to distinguish an isolated group consisting of different soaking times at the same water temperature in each breakfast cereal flakes evaluated, corroborating that superficial liquid imbibition is important during the liquid absorption process when flakes are soaked. Furthermore, standardized FD could be related to RF in the period when samples tend to search for an equilibrium state.

  10. Radial Trends in IMF-sensitive Absorption Features in Two Early-type Galaxies: Evidence for Abundance-driven Gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, Nicholas J.; Lu, Jessica R.; Mann, Andrew W.

    2016-04-01

    Samples of early-type galaxies show a correlation between stellar velocity dispersion and the stellar initial mass function (IMF) as inferred from gravity-sensitive absorption lines in the galaxies’ central regions. To search for spatial variations in the IMF, we have observed two early-type galaxies with Keck/LRIS and measured radial gradients in the strengths of absorption features from 4000-5500 Å and 8000-10000 Å. We present spatially resolved measurements of the dwarf-sensitive spectral indices {Na} {{I}} (8190 Å) and Wing-Ford {{FeH}} (9915 Å), as well as indices for species of H, C2, CN, Mg, Ca, {{TiO}}, and Fe. Our measurements show a metallicity gradient in both objects, and Mg/Fe consistent with a shallow gradient in α-enhancement, matching widely observed trends for massive early-type galaxies. The {Na} {{I}} index and the CN1 index at 4160 Å exhibit significantly steeper gradients, with a break at r˜ 0.1 {r}{{eff}} (r˜ 300 pc). Inside this radius, {Na} {{I}} strength increases sharply toward the galaxy center, consistent with a rapid central rise in [Na/Fe]. In contrast, the ratio of the {{FeH}} to Fe index strength decreases toward the galaxy center. This behavior cannot be reproduced by a steepening IMF inside of 0.1 {r}{{eff}} if the IMF is a single power law. While gradients in the mass function above ˜ 0.4 {M}⊙ may occur, exceptional care is required to disentangle these IMF variations from the extreme variations in individual element abundances near the galaxies’ centers.

  11. High-Velocity Absorption Features in FUSE Spectra of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, G.; Iping, R. C.; Gull, T. R.; Vieira, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous broad (200 to 1000 km/sec) features in the FUSE spectrum (905-1187 A) of eta Carinae are identified as absorption by a forest of high-velocity narrow lines formed in the expanding circumstellar envelope. These features were previously thought to be P-Cygni lines arising in the wind of the central star. The features span a heliocentric velocity range of -140 to -580 km/sec and are seen prominently in low-ionization ground-state transitions (e.g. N I 1134-35, Fe II 1145-42, 1133, 1127- 22, P II 1153, C I 1158) in addition to C III] 1176 A. The high-velocity components of the FUSE transitions have depths about 50% below the continuum. The identifications are consistent with the complex velocity structures seen in ground- and excited-state transitions of Mg I, Mg 11, Fe II, V II, etc observed in STIS/E230H spectra. The origin of other broad features of similar width and depth in the FUSE spectrum, but without low-velocity ISM absorption, are unidentified. However, they are suspected of being absorption of singly-ionized iron-peak elements (e.g. Fe II, V II, Cr II) out of excited levels 1,000 to 20,000 cmE-l above the ground state. The high-velocity features seen in Fe II 1145 are also present in Fe II 1608 (STIS/E140M), but are highly saturated in the latter. Since these transitions have nearly identical log (flambda) (1.998 vs. 2.080), the differences in the profiles are attributable to the different aperture sizes used (30 x 30 arcsec for FUSE, 0.2 x 0.2 arcsec for STIS/E140M). The high-velocity gas appears to be very patchy or has a small covering factor near the central star. Eta Carinae has been observed several times by FUSE over the past three years. The FUSE flux levels and spectral features in eta Car are essentially unchanged over the 2000 March to June 2002 period, establishing a baseline far-UV spectrum in advance of the predicted spectroscopic minimum in 2003.

  12. A ubiquitous absorption feature in the X-ray spectra of BL Lacertae objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madejski, Greg M.; Mushotzky, Richard F.; Weaver, Kimberly A.; Arnaud, Keith A.; Urry, C. Megan

    1991-01-01

    The paper presents the broadband (0.5-20-keV) X-ray spectra of five X-ray bright BL Lac objects observed with the Einstein Observatory Solid State Spectrometer (SSS) and Monitor Proportional Counter (MPC) detectors. The combination of moderate energy resolution and broad spectral coverage makes it possible to confirm the presence of an absorption feature at an energy of 650 eV in the BL Lac object PKS 2155-304, originally reported by Canizares and Kruper (1984) based on higher resolution Einstein Objective Grating Spectrometer (OGS) data.

  13. Electron Spin Resonance and optical absorption spectroscopic studies of manganese centers in aluminium lead borate glasses.

    PubMed

    SivaRamaiah, G; LakshmanaRao, J

    2012-12-01

    Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) and optical absorption studies of 5Al(2)O(3)+75H(3)BO(3)+(20-x)PbO+xMnSO(4) (where x=0.5, 1,1.5 and 2 mol% of MnSO(4)) glasses at room temperature have been studied. The ESR spectrum of all the glasses exhibits resonance signals with effective isotropic g values at ≈2.0, 3.3 and 4.3. The ESR resonance signal at isotropic g≈2.0 has been attributed to Mn(2+) centers in an octahedral symmetry. The ESR resonance signals at isotropic g≈3.3 and 4.3 have been attributed to the rhombic symmetry of the Mn(2+) ions. The zero-field splitting parameter (zfs) has been calculated from the intensities of the allowed hyperfine lines. The optical absorption spectrum exhibits an intense band in the visible region and it has been attributed to (5)E(g)→(5)T(2g) transition of Mn(3+)centers in an octahedral environment. The optical band gap and the Urbach energies have been calculated from the ultraviolet absorption edges.

  14. Ultraviolet spectra of quenched carbonaceous composite derivatives: Comparison to the '217 nanometer' interstellar absorption feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakata, Akira; Wada, Setsuko; Tokunaga, Alan T.; Narisawa, Takatoshi; Nakagawa, Hidehiro; Ono, Hiroshi

    1994-01-01

    QCCs (quenched carbonaceous composite) are amorphus carbonaceous material formed from a hydrocarbon plasma. We present the UV-visible spectra of 'filmy QCC; (obtained outside of the beam ejected from the hydrocarbon plasma) and 'dark QCC' (obtained very near to the beam) for comparison to the stellar extinction curve. When filmy QCC is heated to 500-700 C (thermally altered), the wavelength of the absorption maximum increases form 204 nm to 220-222 nm. The dark QCC has an absorption maximum at 217-222 nm. In addition, the thermally altered filmy QCC has a slope change at about 500 nm which resmbles that in the interstellar extinction curve. The resemblance of the extinction curve of the QCCs to that of the interstellar medium suggests that QCC derivatives may be representative of the type of interstellar material that produces the 217 nm interstellar medium feature. The peak extinction of the dark QCC is higher than the average interstellar extinction curve while that of the thermally altered filmy QCC is lower, so that a mixture of dark and thermally altered filmy QCC can match the peak extinction observed in the interstellar medium. It is shown from electron micrographs that most of the thermally altered flimy QCC is in the form of small grainy structure less than 4 nm in diameter. This shows that the structure unit causing the 217-222 nm feature in QCC is very small.

  15. Chemical features in the circumnuclear disk of the Galactic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, N.; Riquelme, D.; Viti, S.; Jiménez-Serra, I.; Requena-Torres, M. A.; Menten, K. M.; Martín, S.; Aladro, R.; Martin-Pintado, J.; Hochgürtel, S.

    2015-12-01

    Aims: The circumnuclear disk (CND) of the Galactic center is exposed to many energetic phenomena coming from the supermassive black hole Sgr A* and from stellar activities. These energetic activities can affect the chemical composition in the CND through interaction with UV photons, cosmic rays, X-rays, and shock waves. We aim to constrain the physical conditions present in the CND through chemical modeling of observed molecular species detected toward it. Methods: We analyzed a selected set of molecular line data taken toward a position in the southwest lobe of the CND with the IRAM 30m and APEX 12-m telescopes and derived the column density of each molecule via a large velocity gradient (LVG) analysis. The determined chemical composition is compared with a time-dependent, gas-grain chemical model based on the UCL_CHEM code,which includes the effects of shock waves with varying physical parameters. Results: We detect molecules, such as CO, HCN, HCO+, HNC, CS, SO, SiO, NO, CN, H2CO, HC3N, N2H+, and H3O+, and obtain their column densities. Total hydrogen densities obtained from LVG analysis range between 2 × 104 and 1 × 106cm-3 and most species indicate values around several × 105cm-3. These values are lower than those corresponding to the Roche limit, which shows that the CND is tidally unstable. The chemical models show good agreement with the observations in cases where the density is ~104cm-3, the cosmic-ray ionization rate is high, > 10-15s-1, or shocks with velocities > 40 km s-1 have occurred. Conclusions: Comparison of models and observations favors a scenario where the cosmic-ray ionization rate in the CND is high, but precise effects of other factors, such as shocks, density structures, UV photons, and X-rays from the Sgr A*, must be examined with higher spatial resolution data. Based on observations carried out with the IRAM 30 m Telescope. IRAM is supported by INSU/CNRS (France), MPG (Germany) and IGN (Spain).

  16. Spectroscopic determination of leaf biochemistry using band-depth analysis of absorption features and stepwise multiple linear regression

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Clark, R.N.

    1999-01-01

    We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using spectroscopy. Normalized band depths calculated from the continuum-removed reflectance spectra of dried and ground leaves were used to estimate their concentrations of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose. Stepwise multiple linear regression was used to select wavelengths in the broad absorption features centered at 1.73 ??m, 2.10 ??m, and 2.30 ??m that were highly correlated with the chemistry of samples from eastern U.S. forests. Band depths of absorption features at these wavelengths were found to also be highly correlated with the chemistry of four other sites. A subset of data from the eastern U.S. forest sites was used to derive linear equations that were applied to the remaining data to successfully estimate their nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations. Correlations were highest for nitrogen (R2 from 0.75 to 0.94). The consistent results indicate the possibility of establishing a single equation capable of estimating the chemical concentrations in a wide variety of species from the reflectance spectra of dried leaves. The extension of this method to remote sensing was investigated. The effects of leaf water content, sensor signal-to-noise and bandpass, atmospheric effects, and background soil exposure were examined. Leaf water was found to be the greatest challenge to extending this empirical method to the analysis of fresh whole leaves and complete vegetation canopies. The influence of leaf water on reflectance spectra must be removed to within 10%. Other effects were reduced by continuum removal and normalization of band depths. If the effects of leaf water can be compensated for, it might be possible to extend this method to remote sensing data acquired by imaging spectrometers to give estimates of nitrogen, lignin, and cellulose concentrations over large areas for use in ecosystem studies.We develop a new method for estimating the biochemistry of plant material using

  17. Effects of color centers absorption on the spectrum of the temperature-dependent radiation-induced attenuation in fiber.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jing; Hou, Yunxia; Liu, Chunjing

    2015-02-01

    Spectra ranging from 800 to 1650 nm of the temperature-dependent radiation-induced attenuation (RIA) in the irradiated and sufficiently annealed fiber with germanium and phosphorous dopant has been measured. These RIA spectra were investigated based on the mechanism of color centers absorption. With the configurational coordinate model, these RIA spectra were decomposed by the absorption bands of three kinds of color centers. The effects of color centers absorption on the spectrum of temperature-dependent RIA is discussed by comparing the absorption intensity of different color centers at a same wavelength. Moreover, the temperature-dependent RIA of the fiber has been measured separately at 850, 1310, and 1550 nm. The measured results agreed well with the analysis of RIA spectra.

  18. Spectroscopy of Mars form 2.04 to 2.44 micron during the 1993 opposition: Absolute calibration and atmospheric vs mineralogic origin of narrow absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Pollack, James B.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Freedman, Richard

    1994-01-01

    We present moderate-resolution (lambda/delta lambda = 300 to 370) reflectance spectral of Mars from 2.04 to 2.44 microns that were obtained at United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) during the 1993 opposition. Seven narrow absorption features were detected and found to have a Mars origin. By comparison with solar and Mars atmospheric spectra, five of these features were attributed all or in part to Mars atmospheric CO2 or CO (2.052 +/- 0.003, 2.114 +/- 0.002, 2.150 +/- 0.003, 2.331 +/- 0.001, and 2.357 +/- 0.002 microns). Two of the bands (2.331 +/- 0.001 and 2.357 +/- 0.002 micron) appear to have widths and depths that are consistent with additional, nonatmospheric absorptions, although a solar contribution cannot be entirely ruled out. Two other weak bands centered at 2.278 +/- 0.002 and 2.296 +/- 0.002 microns may be at least partially mineralogic in origin. The data provide no conclusive identification of the mineralogy responsible for these absorption features. However, examination of terrestrial spectral libraries and previous mineralogy responsible for these absorption features. However, examination of terrestrial spectral libraires and previous moderate spectral resolution mineral studies indicates that the most likely origin of these features is either (bi)carbonate or (bi)sulfate anions in framework silicates of (Fe, Mg)-OH bonds in sheet silicates. If the bands are caused by phyllosilicate minerals, then an explanation must be found for the extremely narrow widths of the cation-OH features in the Mars spectra as compared to terrestrial minerals.

  19. Spectroscopy of Mars form 2.04 to 2.44 micron during the 1993 opposition: Absolute calibration and atmospheric VS mineralogic origin of narrow absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, James F., III; Pollack, James B.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Cruikshank, Dale P.; Freedman, Richard

    1994-09-01

    We present moderate-resolution (lambda/delta lambda = 300 to 370) reflectance spectral of Mars from 2.04 to 2.44 microns that were obtained at United Kingdom Infrared Telescope (UKIRT) during the 1993 opposition. Seven narrow absorption features were detected and found to have a Mars origin. By comparison with solar and Mars atmospheric spectra, five of these features were attributed all or in part to Mars atmospheric CO2 or CO (2.052 +/- 0.003, 2.114 +/- 0.002, 2.150 +/- 0.003, 2.331 +/- 0.001, and 2.357 +/- 0.002 microns). Two of the bands (2.331 +/- 0.001 and 2.357 +/- 0.002 micron) appear to have widths and depths that are consistent with additional, nonatmospheric absorptions, although a solar contribution cannot be entirely ruled out. Two other weak bands centered at 2.278 +/- 0.002 and 2.296 +/- 0.002 microns may be at least partially mineralogic in origin. The data provide no conclusive identification of the mineralogy responsible for these absorption features. However, examination of terrestrial spectral libraries and previous mineralogy responsible for these absorption features. However, examination of terrestrial spectral libraires and previous moderate spectral resolution mineral studies indicates that the most likely origin of these features is either (bi)carbonate or (bi)sulfate anions in framework silicates of (Fe, Mg)-OH bonds in sheet silicates. If the bands are caused by phyllosilicate minerals, then an explanation must be found for the extremely narrow widths of the cation-OH features in the Mars spectra as compared to terrestrial minerals.

  20. Detection of a Deep 3-μm Absorption Feature in the Spectrum of Amalthea (JV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J.; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-01

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  1. Detection of a deep 3-microm absorption feature in the spectrum of Amalthea (JV).

    PubMed

    Takato, Naruhisa; Bus, Schelte J; Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Kobayashi, Naoto

    2004-12-24

    Near-infrared spectra of Jupiter's small inner satellites Amalthea and Thebe are similar to those of D-type asteroids in the 0.8- to 2.5-micrometer wavelength range. A deep absorption feature is detected at 3 micrometers in the spectra of the trailing side of Amalthea, which is similar to that of the non-ice components of Callisto and can be attributed to hydrous minerals. These surface materials cannot be explained if the satellite formed at its present orbit by accreting from a circumjovian nebula. Amalthea and Thebe may be the remnants of Jupiter's inflowing building blocks that formed in the outer part or outside of the circumjovian nebula.

  2. Radial gradients in initial mass function sensitive absorption features in the Coma brightest cluster galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.; Vaughan, Sam P.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we trace radial variations of initial mass function (IMF)-sensitive absorption features of three galaxies in the Coma cluster. We obtain resolved spectroscopy of the central 5 kpc for the two central brightest cluster galaxies (BCGs) NGC4889, NGC4874, and the BCG in the south-west group NGC4839, as well as unresolved data for NGC4873 as a low-σ* control. We present radial measurements of the IMF-sensitive features: sodium Na ISDSS, calcium triplet CaT, and iron-hydride FeH0.99, along with the magnesium Mg I0.88 and titanium oxide TiO0.89 features. We employ two separate methods for both telluric correction and sky subtraction around the faint FeH feature to verify our analysis. Within NGC4889 we find strong gradients of Na ISDSS and CaT but a flat FeH profile, which, from comparing to stellar population synthesis models, suggests an old, α-enhanced population with a Chabrier, or even bottom-light IMF. The age and abundance are in line with previous studies but the normal IMF is in contrast to recent results suggesting an increased IMF slope with increased velocity dispersion. We measure flat Na ISDSS and FeH profiles within NGC4874, and determine an old, possibly slightly α-enhanced and Chabrier IMF population. We find an α-enhanced, Chabrier IMF population in NGC4873. Within NGC4839 we measure both strong Na ISDSS and strong FeH, although with a large systematic uncertainty, suggesting a possible heavier IMF. The IMFs we infer for these galaxies are supported by published dynamical modelling. We stress that IMF constraints should be corroborated by further spectral coverage and independent methods on a galaxy-by-galaxy basis.

  3. The X-shooter sample of GRB afterglow spectra: Properties of the absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ugarte Postigo, Antonio

    2015-08-01

    Since its commissioning at ESO's Very Large Telescope in 2009, the X-shooter spectrograph has become the reference instrument in gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow spectroscopy. During this time our collaboration has collected more than 70 spectra of GRB afterglows, with redshifts ranging from 0.06 to 6.3. Thanks to their extreme luminosity and simple intrinsic shape, GRB spectra are optimal tools for the study of galactic environments at basically any redshift. Being produced by the death of short-lived massive stars, they are also tracers of star formation.I will present the sample of absorption spectral features identified in X-shooter's GRB spectra describing observation and analysis techniques. The different features are compared with the characteristics of the explosion (duration, spectral shape, energetics, etc.) and with the properties of the host galaxy (mass, age, etc.) to improve our understanding of the nature of the explosions and how they interact with their environments. Using the large redshift range of the spectra collection we perform studies of the evolution of GRB environments across the history of the Universe and their relation with the evolution of star formation.

  4. Dielectronic Recombination Of Iron M-shell Ions Motivated By Absorption Features In AGN Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, Dragan; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Yu, D.; Bernhardt, D.; Schippers, S.; Müller, A.; Lestinsky, M.; Orlov, D.; Sprenger, F.; Grieser, M.; Repnow, R.; Hoffmann, J.; Wolf, A.

    2006-09-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show spectra rich with X-ray absorption features. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between 15-17 Å. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling. We are also providing our data to atomic theorist to benchmark their DR calculations. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR for several iron M-shell ions and plans for future work. This work has been supported in part by NASA, the German Federal Ministry for Education and Research, and the German Research Council

  5. Revealing spectral features in two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342: a combined experimental and quantum-chemical study.

    PubMed

    Olesiak-Banska, Joanna; Matczyszyn, Katarzyna; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Ågren, Hans; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Samoc, Marek

    2013-10-10

    We present the results of wide spectral range Z-scan measurements of the two-photon absorption (2PA) spectrum of the Hoechst 33342 dye. The strongest 2PA of the dye in aqueous solution is found at 575 nm, and the associated two-photon absorption cross section is 245 GM. A weak but clearly visible 2PA band at ∼850 nm is also observed, a feature that could not be anticipated from the one-photon absorption spectrum. On the basis of the results of hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations, we put forward a notion that the long-wavelength feature observed in the two-photon absorption spectrum of Hoechst 33342 is due to the formation of dye aggregates.

  6. The origin of blueshifted absorption features in the X-ray spectrum of PG 1211+143: outflow or disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, L. C.; Fabian, A. C.

    2013-07-01

    In some radio-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGN), high-energy absorption features in the X-ray spectra have been interpreted as ultrafast outflows (UFOs) - highly ionized material (e.g. Fe XXV and Fe XXVI) ejected at mildly relativistic velocities. In some cases, these outflows can carry energy in excess of the binding energy of the host galaxy. Needless to say, these features demand our attention as they are strong signatures of AGN feedback and will influence galaxy evolution. For the same reason, alternative models need to be discussed and refuted or confirmed. Gallo and Fabian proposed that some of these features could arise from resonance absorption of the reflected spectrum in a layer of ionized material located above and corotating with the accretion disc. Therefore, the absorbing medium would be subjected to similar blurring effects as seen in the disc. A priori, the existence of such plasma above the disc is as plausible as a fast wind. In this work, we highlight the ambiguity by demonstrating that the absorption model can describe the ˜7.6 keV absorption feature (and possibly other features) in the quasar PG 1211+143, an AGN that is often described as a classic example of a UFO. In this model, the 2-10 keV spectrum would be largely reflection dominated (as opposed to power law dominated in the wind models) and the resonance absorption would be originating in a layer between about 6 and 60 gravitational radii. The studies of such features constitute a cornerstone for future X-ray observatories like Astro-H and Athena+. Should our model prove correct, or at least important in some cases, then absorption will provide another diagnostic tool with which to probe the inner accretion flow with future missions.

  7. A search for ultraviolet circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha Piscis Austrinus (Fomalhaut), a possible Beta Pictoris-like system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, K.-P.; Bruhweiler, Fred C.; Kondo, Yoji

    1994-01-01

    Archival high-dispersion International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) spectra have been used to search for circumstellar gas absorption features in alpha PsA (A3 V), a nearby (6.7 pc) proto-planetary system candidate. Recent sub-millimeter mapping observations around the region of alpha PsA indicate a spatially resolved dust disk like the one seen around Beta Pic. To determine how closely this putative disk resembles that of Beta Pic, we have searched for signatures of circumstellar gaseous absorption in all the available IUE high-dispersion data of alpha PsA. Examination of co-added IUE spectra shows weak circumstellar absorptions from excited levels in the resonance multiplet of Fe II near 2600 A. We also conclude that the sharp C I feature near 1657 A, previously identified as interstellar absorption toward alpha PsA, likely has a circumstellar origin. However, because the weakness of these absorption features, we will consider the presence of circumstellar gas as tentative and should be verified by using the Goddard High-Resolution Spectrograph aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. No corresponding circumstellar absorption is detected in higher ionization Fe III and Al III. Since the collisionally ionized nonphotospheric Al III resonance absorption seen in Beta Pic is likely formed close to the stellar surface, its absence in the UV spectra of alpha PsA could imply that, in contrast with Beta Pic, there is no active gaseous disk infall onto the central star. In the alpha PsA gaseous disk, if we assume a solar abundance for iron and all the iron is in the form of Fe II, plus a disk temperature of 5000 K, the Fe II UV1 absorption at 2611.8743 A infers a total hydrogen column density along the line of sight through the circumstellar disk of N(H) approximately equals 3.8 x 10(exp 17)/cm.

  8. Significance of ambient conditions in uranium absorption and emission features of laser ablation plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Skrodzki, P. J.; Shah, N. P.; Taylor, N.; Hartig, K. C.; LaHaye, N. L.; Brumfield, B. E.; Jovanovic, I.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    This study employs laser ablation (LA) to investigate mechanisms for U optical signal variation under various environmental conditions during laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Potential explored mechanisms for signal quenching related to ambient conditions include plasma chemistry (e.g., uranium oxide formation), ambient gas confinement effects, and other collisional interactions between plasma constituents and the ambient gas. LA-LAS studies show that the persistence of the U ground state population is significantly reduced in the presence of air ambient compared to nitrogen. LA-OES results yield congested spectra from which the U I 356.18 nm transition is prominent and serves as the basis for signal tracking. LA-OES signal and persistence vary negligibly between the test gases (air and N2), unlike the LA-LAS results. The plume hydrodynamic features and plume fundamental properties showed similar results in both air and nitrogen ambient. Investigation of U oxide formation in the laser-produced plasma suggests that low U concentration in a sample hinders consistent detection of UO molecular spectra.

  9. Significance of ambient conditions in uranium absorption and emission features of laser ablation plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrodzki, P. J.; Shah, N. P.; Taylor, N.; Hartig, K. C.; LaHaye, N. L.; Brumfield, B. E.; Jovanovic, I.; Phillips, M. C.; Harilal, S. S.

    2016-11-01

    This study employs laser ablation (LA) to investigate mechanisms for U optical signal variation under various environmental conditions during laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) and optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Potential mechanisms explored for signal quenching related to ambient conditions include plasma chemistry (e.g., uranium oxide formation), ambient gas confinement effects, and other collisional interactions between plasma constituents and the ambient gas. LA-LAS studies show that the persistence of the U ground state population is significantly reduced in the presence of air ambient compared to nitrogen. LA-OES yields congested spectra from which the U I 356.18 nm transition is prominent and serves as the basis for signal tracking. LA-OES signal and persistence vary negligibly between the test gases (air and N2), unlike the LA-LAS results. The plume hydrodynamic features and plume fundamental properties showed similar results in both air and nitrogen ambient. Investigation of U oxide formation in the laser-produced plasma suggests that low U concentration in a sample hinders consistent detection of UO molecular spectra.

  10. Many-body theory of trion absorption features in two-dimensional semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimkin, Dmitry K.; MacDonald, Allan H.

    2017-01-01

    Recent optical studies of monolayer transition-metal dichalcogenides have demonstrated that their excitonic absorption feature splits into two widely separated peaks at finite carrier densities. The additional peak is usually attributed to the presence of trions, bound states of two electrons and a hole or an electron and two holes. Here we argue that in the density range over which the trion peak is well resolved, it cannot be interpreted in terms of weakly coupled three-body systems and that the appropriate picture is instead one in which excitons are dressed by interactions with a Fermi sea of excess carriers. This coupling splits the exciton spectrum into a lower-energy attractive exciton-polaron branch, normally identified as a trion branch, and a higher-energy repulsive exciton-polaron branch, normally identified as an exciton branch. We have calculated the frequency and doping dependence of the optical conductivity and found that (i) the splitting varies linearly with the Fermi energy of the excess quasiparticles, (ii) the trion peak is dominant at high carrier densities, and (iii) the trion peak width is considerably smaller than that of the excitonic peak. Our results are in good agreement with recent experiments.

  11. A variable absorption feature in the X-ray spectrum of a magnetar.

    PubMed

    Tiengo, Andrea; Esposito, Paolo; Mereghetti, Sandro; Turolla, Roberto; Nobili, Luciano; Gastaldello, Fabio; Götz, Diego; Israel, Gian Luca; Rea, Nanda; Stella, Luigi; Zane, Silvia; Bignami, Giovanni F

    2013-08-15

    Soft-γ-ray repeaters (SGRs) and anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) are slowly rotating, isolated neutron stars that sporadically undergo episodes of long-term flux enhancement (outbursts) generally accompanied by the emission of short bursts of hard X-rays. This behaviour can be understood in the magnetar model, according to which these sources are mainly powered by their own magnetic energy. This is supported by the fact that the magnetic fields inferred from several observed properties of SGRs and AXPs are greater than-or at the high end of the range of-those of radio pulsars. In the peculiar case of SGR 0418+5729, a weak dipole magnetic moment is derived from its timing parameters, whereas a strong field has been proposed to reside in the stellar interior and in multipole components on the surface. Here we show that the X-ray spectrum of SGR 0418+5729 has an absorption line, the properties of which depend strongly on the star's rotational phase. This line is interpreted as a proton cyclotron feature and its energy implies a magnetic field ranging from 2 × 10(14) gauss to more than 10(15) gauss.

  12. The initial mass functions of M31 and M32 through far red stellar absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieleniewski, Simon; Houghton, Ryan C. W.; Thatte, Niranjan; Davies, Roger L.

    2015-09-01

    Using the Oxford Short Wavelength Integral Field specTrograph, we investigate radial variations of several initial mass function (IMF) dependent absorption features in M31 and M32. We obtain high signal-to-noise spectra at six pointings along the major axis of M31 out to ˜700 arcsec (2.7 kpc) and a single pointing of the central 10 pc for M32. In M31 the sodium Na I λ8190 index shows a flat equivalent width profile at ˜0.4 Å through the majority of the bulge, with a strong gradient up to 0.8 Å in the central 10 arcsec (38 pc); the Wing-Ford FeH λ9916 index is measured to be constant at 0.4 Å for all radii; and calcium triplet CaT λλ8498, 8542, 8662 shows a gradual increase through the bulge towards the centre. M32 displays flat profiles for all three indices, with FeH at ˜0.5 Å, very high CaT at ˜0.8 Å and low Na I at ˜0.1 Å. We analyse these data using stellar population models. We find that M31 is well described on all scales by a Chabrier IMF, with a gradient in sodium enhancement of [Na/Fe] ˜ +0.3 dex in the outer bulge, rising within the central 10 arcsec to perhaps [Na/Fe] ˜ +1.0 dex in the nuclear region. We find M32 is described by a Chabrier IMF and young stellar age in line with other studies. Models show that CaT is much more sensitive to metallicity and [α/Fe] than to IMF. We note that the centres of M31 and M32 have very high stellar densities and yet we measure Chabrier IMFs in these regions.

  13. Surface vs. atmospheric origin of 2.1-2.5 micron absorption features in the Martian spectrum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Crisp, David

    1992-01-01

    For 20 years the origin of subtle absorption features in the spectrum of Mars near 2.3 micro-m ('K' band: 1.9-2.5 micro-m) has been debated. This spectral region contains gaseous absorption features predominantly from CO2 and CO on Mars and from telluric H2O and CO2. The authors have obtained new higher spectral resolution telescopic K band spectra of 10 surface regions using the Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) at Mauna Kea during 1990. The goals were to confirm the existence of broad features seen at lower spectral resolution and to determine whether these bands are caused by atmospheric gases, surface (or airborne dust) minerals, or a combination of both.

  14. Far-IR Absorption Features of Titan Aerosol Analogs Produced from Aromatic Precursors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sebree, Joshua; Trainer, M. G.; Anderson, C. M.; Loeffler, M. J.

    2012-10-01

    The arrival of the Cassini spacecraft in orbit around Saturn has led to the discovery of benzene (C6H6) at ppm levels, as well as large positive ions in Titan’s atmosphere, tentatively identified as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).[1] The presence of aromatic molecules, which are photolytically active in the ultraviolet, may be an important part of the formation of aerosol particles in Titan’s haze layers, even at these low concentrations. To date, there have been no laboratory experiments in the literature exploring this area of study. The analysis of data from the Composite Infrared Spectrometer (CIRS) on-board Cassini has recently uncovered a broad emission feature centered at 140 cm-1 in the far-IR that is unique to the aerosol layers of Titan’s atmosphere.[2] Current optical constants from laboratory-generated aerosol analogs have been unable to reproduce this feature.[3,4] From the broadness of this feature, we speculate that the emission is a blended composite of low-energy vibrations of large molecules such as PAHs and their nitrogen containing counterparts, polycyclic aromatic nitrogen heterocycles (PANHs). We hypothesize that the inclusion of trace amounts of aromatic precursors will aid in the production of these large structures in the laboratory-generated aerosols. In this study, we perform UV irradiation of several aromatic precursors, both with and without nitrogen heteroatoms, to understand their influence on the observable characteristics of the aerosol. Measured optical and chemical properties will be compared to those formed from CH4/N2 mixtures [5,6] as well as to those from Cassini observations. [1] Waite, J. H., et al. (2007) Science 316 870-875. [2] Anderson, C.M, et al. (2011) Icarus 212 762-778. [3] Khare, B.N., et al. (1984) Icarus 60 127-137. [4] Imanaka, H., et al. (2012) Icarus 218 247-261. [5] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2006) PNAS 103 18035-18042. [6] Trainer, M.G., et al. (2012) Astrobiology 12 315-326.

  15. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2016-04-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was ~10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  16. Measurement and feature analysis of absorption spectra of four algal species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jianhua; Zhou, Hongli; Han, Bing; Li, Tongji

    2017-03-01

    Two methods for particulate pigments (i.e., quantitative filter technique, QFT, and in vivo measurement, InVivo, respectively) and two methods for dissolved pigments (i.e., Acetone Extracts, AceEx, and high-performance liquid chromatography, HPLC, respectively) were used to obtain the optical absorption coefficient spectra for cultures of four typical algal species. Through normalization and analysis of the spectra, it is shown that (1) the four methods are able to measure optical absorption spectra of particulate and/or dissolved pigments; (2) that the optical absorption spectra of particulate and dissolved pigments were consistent in terms of the peak position in the blue wavelength, and the difference of the peak position in the near infrared wavelength was 10 nm between each other; and (3) that the leveling effect of the absorption spectra of particulate pigments was significant. These four methods can all effectively measure the absorption coefficients of phytoplankton pigments, while each one has its unique advantages in different applications. Therefore, appropriate method should be carefully selected for various application due to their intrinsic difference.

  17. Ultraviolet-visible absorptive features of water extractable and humic fractions of animal manure and compost

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    UV-vis spectroscopy is a useful tool for characterizing water extractable or humic fractions of natural organic matter (WEOM). Whereas the whole UV-visible spectra of these fractions are more or less featureless, the specific UV absorptivity at 254 and 280 nm as well as spectral E2/E3 and E4/E6 rat...

  18. Multi-Center Prediction of Hemorrhagic Transformation in Acute Ischemic Stroke using Permeability Imaging Features

    PubMed Central

    Scalzo, Fabien; Alger, Jeffry R.; Hu, Xiao; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Dani, Krishna A.; Muir, Keith W.; Demchuk, Andrew M.; Coutts, Shelagh B.; Luby, Marie; Warach, Steven; Liebeskind, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Permeability images derived from magnetic resonance (MR) perfusion images are sensitive to blood-brain barrier derangement of the brain tissue and have been shown to correlate with subsequent development of hemorrhagic transformation (HT) in acute ischemic stroke. This paper presents a multi-center retrospective study that evaluates the predictive power in terms of HT of six permeability MRI measures including contrast slope (CS), final contrast (FC), maximum peak bolus concentration (MPB), peak bolus area (PB), relative recirculation (rR), and percentage recovery (%R). Dynamic T2*-weighted perfusion MR images were collected from 263 acute ischemic stroke patients from four medical centers. An essential aspect of this study is to exploit a classifier-based framework to automatically identify predictive patterns in the overall intensity distribution of the permeability maps. The model is based on normalized intensity histograms that are used as input features to the predictive model. Linear and nonlinear predictive models are evaluated using a crossvalidation to measure generalization power on new patients and a comparative analysis is provided for the different types of parameters. Results demonstrate that perfusion imaging in acute ischemic stroke can predict HT with an average accuracy of more than 85% using a predictive model based on a nonlinear regression model. Results also indicate that the permeability feature based on the percentage of recovery performs significantly better than the other features. This novel model may be used to refine treatment decisions in acute stroke. PMID:23587928

  19. Reflection features in the Galactic Center and past activity of Sagittarius A*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavel, Maïca; Terrier, Regis; Goldwurm, Andrea; Morris, Mark; Jin, Chichuan; Ponti, Gabriele; Chuard, Dimitri

    2016-07-01

    X-ray observations carried out over the past two decades have captured an increasing number of reflection features within the molecular clouds located in the inner regions of our Galaxy. The intensity of these structures along with the correlated variations which are detected over the entire central molecular zone are strong evidence that this diffuse emission is created by the past activity of the supermassive black hole at the Galactic center, Sagittarius A*. In particular, within the last centuries, Sgr A* is likely to have experienced several short outbursts during which the black hole was at least a million times brighter than today. However, the precise description of the corresponding past catastrophic events is difficult to assess, mainly because the properties of the reflection features that they create while propagating away from Sgr A* depend on the line-of-sight distance, the geometry, and the size of the reflecting clouds, all of which are poorly known. I will review the different attempts to reconstruct Sgr A*'s past activity from the constraints obtained through the observation of the reflection features in the Galactic center, including the current Chandra monitoring.

  20. Low-potential iron-sulfur centers in photosystem I: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    McDermott, A E; Yachandra, V K; Guiles, R D; Britt, R D; Dexheimer, S L; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1988-05-31

    We have measured the X-ray absorption spectra of Fe in photosystem I (PS I) preparations from spinach and a thermophilic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp., to characterize structures of the Fe complexes that function as electron acceptors in PS I. These acceptors include centers A and B, which are probably typical [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, and X. The structure of X is not known, but its electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrum has generated the suggestions that it is either a [2Fe-2S] or [4Fe-4S] ferredoxin or an Fe-quinone species. The iron X-ray absorption K-edge and iron extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra reveal that essentially all of the 11-14 Fe atoms present in the reaction center are present in the form of Fe-S centers and that not more than 1 atom out of 12 could be octahedral or oxygen-coordinated Fe. This suggests that, besides A and B, additional Fe-S clusters are present which are likely to be X. Our EXAFS spectra cannot be simulated adequately by a mixture of [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins with typical bond lengths and disorder parameters because the amplitude of Fe backscattering is small; however, excellent simulations of the data are consistent with a mixture of [2Fe-2S] ferredoxins and [4Fe-4S] ferredoxins, or with unusually distorted [4Fe-4S] clusters. We presume that the [2Fe-2S] or distorted [4Fe-4S] centers are X. The X-ray absorption spectra of PS I preparations from Synechococcus and spinach are essentially indistinguishable.

  1. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, shown here with photos of John Glenn in his historic Shuttle mission in October 1998, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, plus honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  2. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, plus an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  3. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new additions include a walk-through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater, and an International Space Station-themed ticket plaza, featuring a structure of overhanging solar panels and astronauts performing assembly tasks. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  4. Determination of the in-flight spectral calibration of AVIRIS using atmospheric absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Robert O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral calibration of the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) as data are acquired in flight is essential to quantitative analysis of the measured upwelling spectral radiance. In each spectrum measured by AVIRIS in flight, there are numerous atmospheric gas absorption bands that drive this requirement for accurate spectral calibration. If the surface and atmospheric properties are measured independently, these atmospheric absorption bands may be used to deduce the in-flight spectral calibration of an imaging spectrometer. Both the surface and atmospheric characteristics were measured for a calibration target during an in-flight calibration experiment held at Lunar Lake, Nevada on April 5, 1994. This paper uses upwelling spectral radiance predicted for the calibration target with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to validate the spectral calibration of AVIRIS in flight.

  5. Monitoring of Water Content And Frozen State by using Millimeter Wave Absorption Features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Maya; Shindo, Kenji; Ogawa, Yuichi; Otani, Chiko; Kawase, Kodo

    In this research, we built an experimental setup for measuring the water content in plants and food, and for determining the water/ice state of a sample. The setup consists of a 35 GHz Gunn oscillator producing about 10 mW of output power, two horn antennas and a power meter. We have checked that the absorption of a leaf is directly proportional to its water content, and we could show how changes of the water content depend on photosynthesis, by intermittent illumination with a white fluorescent lamp. In another direction of research, we verified that the difference in the absorption coefficients for water and ice is significant, and we could discriminate and monitor the frozen state of water and food material. All these experiments demonstrate the possibility of applying millimeter waves to fields such as botany, agriculture, and food industry.

  6. Characteristic features of optical absorption for Gd2O3 and NiO nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zatsepin, A. F.; Kuznetsova, Yu. A.; Rychkov, V. N.; Sokolov, V. I.

    2017-03-01

    The technical approach to determination of the structural and optical parameters of oxides with reduced dimensionality based on optical absorption measurements is described by example of gadolinium and nickel oxides. It was established that the temperature behavior of fundamental absorption edge for oxide nanoparticles is similar with the bulk materials with crystal structure. At the same time, the energy characteristics (band gap and effective phonon energies) for low-dimensional oxides are found to be significantly different from their bulk counterparts. The presented methodological method to obtain of qualitative and quantitative correlations of structural and optical characteristics provides novel reliable knowledge of nanoscaled 3d and 4f-metal oxide materials that is useful for development of their practical applications.

  7. Features of Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic field, auroral luminosity, and Riometer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V. B.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Samsonov, S. N.; Lorentsen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous morning Pc5 pulsations ( f ~ 3-5 mHz) in the geomagnetic field, aurora intensities (in the 557.7 and 630.0 nm oxygen emissions and the 471.0 nm nitrogen emission), and riometer absorption, were studied based on the CARISMA, CANMOS, and NORSTAR network data for the event of January 1, 2000. According to the GOES-8 satellite observations, these Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations are observed as incompressible Alfvén waves with toroidal polarization in the magnetosphere. Although the Pc5 pulsation frequencies in auroras, the geomagnetic field, and riometer absorption are close to one another, stable phase relationships are not observed between them. Far from all trains of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations are accompanied by corresponding auroral pulsations; consequently, geomagnetic pulsations are primary with respect to auroral pulsations. Both geomagnetic and auroral pulsations propagate poleward, and the frequency decreases with increasing geomagnetic latitude. When auroral Pc5 pulsations appear, the ratio of the 557.7/630.0 nm emission intensity sharply increases, which indicates that auroral pulsations result from not simply modulated particle precipitation but also an additional periodic acceleration of auroral electrons by the wave field. A high correlation is not observed between Pc5 pulsations in auroras and the riometer absorption, which indicates that these pulsations have a common source but different generation mechanisms. Auroral luminosity modulation is supposedly related to the interaction between Alfvén waves and the region with the field-aligned potential drop above the auroral ionosphere, and riometer absorption modulation is caused by the scattering of energetic electrons by VLF noise pulsations.

  8. Wavelength calibration techniques and subtle surface and atmospheric absorption features in the Mariner 6, 7 IRS reflectance data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, James F., III; Roush, T. L.; Martin, T. Z.; Pollack, James B.; Freedman, R.

    1994-01-01

    1994 marks the 25th anniversary of the Mariner 6 and 7 flyby missions to Mars. Despite its age, the Mariner 6,7 Infrared Spectrometer (IRS) data are a unique set of measurements that can provide important information about the Martian surface, atmospheric, and atmospheric aerosol composition. For certain mid-IR wavelengths, the IRS spectra are the only such spacecraft data obtained for Mars. At other wavelengths, IRS measured surface regions different from those measured by Mariner 9 or Phobos 2 and under different dust opacity conditions. We are interested in examining the IRS reflectance data in the 1.8 to 3.0 micron region because there are numerous diagnostic absorption features at these wavelengths that could be indicative of hydrated silicate minerals or of carbonate- or sulfate-bearing minerals. Groundbased telescopic data and recent Phobos ISM measurements have provided controversial and somewhat contradictory evidence for the existence of mineralogic absorption features at these wavelengths. Our goal is to determine whether any such features can be seen in the IRS data and to use their presence or absence to re-assess the quality and interpretations of previous telescopic and spacecraft measurements.

  9. Features of the electronic structure of the active center of an HbS molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novoselov, D. Yu.; Korotin, Dm. M.; Anisimov, V. I.

    2016-01-01

    Features of the electronic structure of the nonprotein part of the mutant form of the human hemoglobin molecule, HbS, are studied along with the magnetic state of the iron ion that is the "nucleus" of the active center of the molecule. It is found that the mutant form of the HbS molecule differs from a normal hemoglobin molecule by the distortion of the local environment of the iron ion, which changes the energy level splitting by a crystal field. As a result of ab initio calculations, the magnetic transition in the iron atom from the high-spin state to the low-spin state upon the addition of molecular oxygen to hemoglobin molecule is reproduced. It is established for the first time that a change in the crystal and electronic structure of the active center as a result of a mutation can lead to a substantial change in the energy of the bond between the active center of the hemoglobin molecule and an oxygen molecule.

  10. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 [Angstrom]. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 [Angstrom]. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the dinuclear iron center in methane monooxygenase and the sulfure and chlorine centers in photographic materials

    SciTech Connect

    DeWitt, Jane G.

    1992-12-01

    The dinuclear iron center of the hydroxylase component of soluble methane monooxygenase (MMO) from Methylococcus capsulatus and Methylosinus trichosporiwn has been studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Analysis of the Fe K-edge EXAFS revealed that the first shell coordination of the Fe(HI)Fe(IH) oxidized state of the hydroxylase from M. capsulatus consists of approximately 6 N and 0 atoms at an average distance of 2.04 Å. The Fe-Fe distance was determined to be 3.4 Å. No evidence for the presence of a short oxo bridge in the iron center of the oxidized hydroxylase was found, suggesting that the active site of MMO is significantly different from the active sites of the dinuclear iron proteins hemery and ribonucleotide reductase. In addition, the results of the first shell fits suggest that there are more oxygen than nitrogen donor ligands.

  12. Mapping vegetation types with the multiple spectral feature mapping algorithm in both emission and absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Koch, Christopher; Ager, Cathy

    1992-01-01

    Vegetation covers a large portion of the Earth's land surface. Remotely sensing quantitative information from vegetation has proven difficult because in a broad sense, all vegetation is similar from a chemical viewpoint, and most healthy plants are green. Plant species are generally characterized by the leaf and flower or fruit morphology, not by remote sensing spectral signatures. But to the human eye, many plants show varying shades of green, so there is direct evidence for spectral differences between plant types. Quantifying these changes in a predictable manner has not been easy. The Clark spectral features mapping algorithm was applied to mapping spectral features in vegetation species.

  13. HCO{sup +} AND HCN J = 3-2 ABSORPTION TOWARD THE CENTER OF CENTAURUS A

    SciTech Connect

    Muller, Sebastien; Dinh-V-Trung

    2009-05-01

    We have investigated the presence of dense gas toward the radio source Cen A by looking at the absorption of the HCO{sup +} and HCN (3-2) lines in front of the bright continuum source with the Submillimeter Array. We detect narrow HCO{sup +} (3-2) absorption, and tentatively HCN (3-2), close to the systemic velocity. For both molecules, the J = 3 - 2 absorption is much weaker than for the J = 1 - 0 line. From simple excitation analysis, we conclude that the gas density is of the order of a few 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} for a column density N(HCO{sup +})/{delta}V of 3 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} km{sup -1} s and a kinetic temperature of 10 K. In particular, we find no evidence for molecular gas density higher than a few 10{sup 4} cm{sup -3} on the line of sight to the continuum source. We discuss the implications of our finding on the nature of the molecular gas responsible for the absorption toward Cen A.

  14. Reconfiguration of spectral absorption features using a frequency-chirped laser pulse.

    PubMed

    Tian, Mingzhen; Chang, Tiejun; Merkel, Kristian D; Babbitt, W Randall

    2011-12-20

    A technique is proposed to manipulate atomic population in an inhomogeneously broadened medium, which can set an arbitrary absorption spectrum to a uniform transparency (erasure) or to a nearly complete inversion. These reconfigurations of atomic spectral distribution are achieved through excitation of electronic transitions using a laser pulse with chirped frequency, which precisely affects selected spectral regions while leaving the rest of the spectrum unperturbed. An erasure operation sets the final atomic population inversion to zero and the inversion operation flips the population between the ground and the excited states, regardless of the previously existing population distribution. This technique finds important applications both in optical signal processing, where fast, recursive processing and high dynamic range are desirable and in quantum memory and quantum computing, which both require high efficiency and high fidelity in quantum state preparation of atomic ensembles. Proof-of-concept demonstrations were performed in a rare-earth doped crystal.

  15. Structural, thermal and optical absorption features of heavy metal oxides doped tellurite rich glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaky, Kawa M.; Lakshminarayana, G.; Baki, S. O.; Kityk, I. V.; Taufiq-Yap, Y. H.; Mahdi, M. A.

    In order to improve tellurite glass stability to be applicable for optical fiber amplifier applications, glasses with the composition of (70 - x)TeO2. (10)ZnO. (10)WO3. (5)Na2O. (5)TiO2. (x)Bi2O3 (x = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 mol%) have been produced and characterized using the related methods. Structural properties were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) which confirms the non-crystalline structure and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs also confirm the XRD results. The energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analysis profiles show that all the mentioned elements are present in the prepared glasses. Following the IR spectra, all the tellurium bonds such as stretching vibrations of TeO4 tbp and TeO3/TeO3+1 unit are revealed. Raman spectra confirm the presence of different functional groups, actually, it shows bands mainly in four spectral regions: R1 (65-150) cm-1, R2 (280-550) cm-1, R3 (880-950) cm-1 and R4 (916-926) cm-1 and the identified bands are assigned to respective molecular groups. The thermal study was carried out using Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) which indicates good thermal stability of the synthesized glasses with increasing Bi concentration. From the optical absorption spectra, we evaluated cut-off edge wavelengths and found increasing cutoff wavelength with an increase in Bi2O3 concentration. In the UV-Visible region, optical band gap energy and allowed transitions were investigated using three methods; direct, indirect, and absorption spectrum fitting (ASF), and band gaps from indirect and ASF were matched.

  16. Magnetic feature and near-infrared absorption of a [Pt(mnt)2]--based H-bond supramolecular crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cui-Ping; Nie, Li; Pei, Wen-Bo; Li, Li; Tian, Zheng-Fang; Liu, Jian-Lan; Gao, Xu-Sheng; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2016-11-01

    A new salt [H2DABCO][Pt(mnt)2]2 (1) (mnt2-=maleonitriledithiolate and H2DABCO2+ is diprotonated 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane) has been synthesized; its crystal structure, magnetic and near-IR absorption properties have been investigated. Two different [Pt(mnt)2]- anions form the strong π-dimers, labeled as Pt(1)-dimer and Pt(2)-dimer, with quite shorter Pt…Pt and S…S distances and molecular plane-to-plane distance (<3.5 Å) within a dimer. The [Pt(mnt)2]22- π-dimers are connected through the cations in the strong H-bond manner to form three-dimensional H-bond supramolecular crystal. The salt shows weak paramagnetism in 1.99-300 K and this is due to the existence of strong antiferromagnetic coupling within a π-dimer. In addition, a small thermal hysteresis loop is observed at ca. 120 K, indicating that a phase transition probably occurs that is further confirmed by variable-temperature IR spectra. Another fascinating functionality of 1 is the intense near-IR absorption in the region of 750-2500 nm, and this near-IR absorption feature makes it to be a promising optical material.

  17. Automated extraction of absorption features from Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Geophysical and Environmental Research Imaging Spectrometer (GERIS) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kruse, Fred A.; Calvin, Wendy M.; Seznec, Olivier

    1988-01-01

    Automated techniques were developed for the extraction and characterization of absorption features from reflectance spectra. The absorption feature extraction algorithms were successfully tested on laboratory, field, and aircraft imaging spectrometer data. A suite of laboratory spectra of the most common minerals was analyzed and absorption band characteristics tabulated. A prototype expert system was designed, implemented, and successfully tested to allow identification of minerals based on the extracted absorption band characteristics. AVIRIS spectra for a site in the northern Grapevine Mountains, Nevada, have been characterized and the minerals sericite (fine grained muscovite) and dolomite were identified. The minerals kaolinite, alunite, and buddingtonite were identified and mapped for a site at Cuprite, Nevada, using the feature extraction algorithms on the new Geophysical and Environmental Research 64 channel imaging spectrometer (GERIS) data. The feature extraction routines (written in FORTRAN and C) were interfaced to the expert system (written in PROLOG) to allow both efficient processing of numerical data and logical spectrum analysis.

  18. THE 217.5 nm BAND, INFRARED ABSORPTION, AND INFRARED EMISSION FEATURES IN HYDROGENATED AMORPHOUS CARBON NANOPARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    Duley, W. W.; Hu, Anming E-mail: a2hu@uwaterloo.ca

    2012-12-20

    We report on the preparation of hydrogenated amorphous carbon nanoparticles whose spectral characteristics include an absorption band at 217.5 nm with the profile and characteristics of the interstellar 217.5 nm feature. Vibrational spectra of these particles also contain the features commonly observed in absorption and emission from dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. These materials are produced under ''slow'' deposition conditions by minimizing the flux of incident carbon atoms and by reducing surface mobility. The initial chemistry leads to the formation of carbon chains, together with a limited range of small aromatic ring molecules, and eventually results in carbon nanoparticles having an sp {sup 2}/sp {sup 3} ratio Almost-Equal-To 0.4. Spectroscopic analysis of particle composition indicates that naphthalene and naphthalene derivatives are important constituents of this material. We suggest that carbon nanoparticles with similar composition are responsible for the appearance of the interstellar 217.5 nm band and outline how these particles can form in situ under diffuse cloud conditions by deposition of carbon on the surface of silicate grains. Spectral data from carbon nanoparticles formed under these conditions accurately reproduce IR emission spectra from a number of Galactic sources. We provide the first detailed fits to observational spectra of Type A and B emission sources based entirely on measured spectra of a carbonaceous material that can be produced in the laboratory.

  19. Evidence for cyclotron absorption from spectral features in gamma-ray bursts seen with Ginga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, T.; Fujii, M.; Hayashida, K.; Itoh, M.; Nishimura, J.

    1988-01-01

    New observations by the gamma-ray burst detector on board the Ginga satellite, which has two well-calibrated detectors covering a wide energy range of 1.5 to 375 keV, are reported. The spectral features obtained are consistent with first and second cyclotron harmonics. This finding is taken as strong evidence for the magnetized neutron star model of gamma-ray bursts.

  20. Clinical features of chronic granulomatous disease: a series of 26 patients from a single center.

    PubMed

    Turul-Ozgür, Tuba; Türkkani-Asal, Gülten; Tezcan, Ilhan; Köker, M Yavuz; Metin, Ayşe; Yel, Leman; Ersoy, Fügen; Sanal, Ozden

    2010-01-01

    Chronic granulomatous disease is a genetically determined immunodeficiency disorder affecting phagocytic cells rendering them unable to kill certain bacteria and fungi. The present study is a single-center retrospective study that aimed to document the clinical course of 26 children, with a median age of 2.5 years, from 21 families diagnosed as chronic granulomatous disease from 1989-2008. A median delay of 39 months was observed between the onset of infections and age at diagnosis. Pneumonia was the most common initial manifestation of the disease followed by lymphadenitis, skin abscess and diarrhea. An AR inheritance was predominant in the study group. All patients received antibacterial and antifungal prophylaxis, resulting in a marked decrease in the incidence of infections. Overall mortality was 19.2%. These results showed that all features in our group (clinical, progression and outcome) were similar to the literature except for the predominance of autosomal recessive form.

  1. The manifestation of optical centers in UV-Vis absorption and luminescence spectra of white blood human cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terent'yeva, Yu G.; Yashchuk, V. M.; Zaika, L. A.; Snitserova, O. M.; Losytsky, M. Yu

    2016-12-01

    A white blood human cells spectral investigation is presented. The aim of this series of experiments was to obtain and analyze the absorption and luminescence (fluorescence and phosphorescence) spectra at room temperature and at 78 K of newly isolated white blood human cells and their organelles. As a result the optical centers and possible biochemical components that form the studied spectra where identified. Also the differences between the spectra of abnormal cells (B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia BCLL) and normal ones were studied for the whole cells and individual organelles.

  2. Deep imaging of absorption and scattering features by multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Maher, Jason R.; Ibrahim, Mohamed M.; Chien, Jennifer S.; Levinson, Howard; Wax, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We have developed frequency domain multispectral multiple scattering low coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) for deep imaging of absorption and scattering contrast. Using tissue-mimicking phantoms that match the full scattering phase function of human dermal tissue, we demonstrate that ms2/LCI can provide a signal/noise ratio (SNR) improvement of 15.4 dB over conventional OCT at an imaging depth of 1 mm. The enhanced SNR and penetration depth provided by ms2/LCI could be leveraged for a variety of clinical applications including the assessment of burn injuries where current clinical classification of severity only provides limited accuracy. The utility of the approach was demonstrated by imaging a tissue phantom simulating a partial-thickness burn revealing good spectroscopic contrast between healthy and injured tissue regions deep below the sample surface. Finally, healthy rat skin was imaged in vivo with both a commercial OCT instrument and our custom ms2/LCI system. The results demonstrate that ms2/LCI is capable of obtaining spectroscopic information far beyond the penetration depth provided by conventional OCT. PMID:27867703

  3. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+641. 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km/s) spectrum of the broad-absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 angstroms, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III lambda977, Ly-beta, O VI lambda-lambda-1032,1038, Ly-alpha, N V lambda-lambda-1238,1242, Si IV lambda-lambda-1393,1402, and C IV lambda-lambda-1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km/s with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly-alpha flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The ultraviolet continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 angstroms in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21)/s, unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  4. Ultraviolet Broad Absorption Features and the Spectral Energy Distribution of the QSO PG 1351+64. 3.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, W.; Kriss, G. A.; Wang, J. X.; Brotherton, M.; Oegerle, W. R.; Blair, W. P.; Davidsen, A. F.; Green, R. F.; Hutchings, J. B.; Kaiser, M. E.; Fisher, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present a moderate-resolution (approximately 20 km s(exp -1) spectrum of the mini broad absorption line QSO PG 1351+64 between 915-1180 A, obtained with the Far Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE). Additional low-resolution spectra at longer wavelengths were also obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and ground-based telescopes. Broad absorption is present on the blue wings of C III (lambda)977, Ly(beta), O VI (lambda)(lambda)1032,1038, Ly(alpha), N V (lambda)(lambda)1238,1242, Si IV (lambda)(lambda)1393,1402, and C IV (lambda)(lambda)1548,1450. The absorption profile can be fitted with five components at velocities of approximately -780, -1049, -1629, -1833, and -3054 km s(exp -1) with respect to the emission-line redshift of z = 0.088. All the absorption components cover a large fraction of the continuum source as well as the broad-line region. The O VI emission feature is very weak, and the O VI/Ly(alpha) flux ratio is 0.08, one of the lowest among low-redshift active galaxies and QSOs. The UV (ultraviolet) continuum shows a significant change in slope near 1050 A in the restframe. The steeper continuum shortward of the Lyman limit extrapolates well to the observed weak X-ray flux level. The absorbers' properties are similar to those of high-redshift broad absorption-line QSOs. The derived total column density of the UV absorbers is on the order of 10(exp 21) cm(exp -2), unlikely to produce significant opacity above 1 keV in the X-ray. Unless there is a separate, high-ionization X-ray absorber, the QSO's weak X-ray flux may be intrinsic. The ionization level of the absorbing components is comparable to that anticipated in the broad-line region, therefore the absorbers may be related to broad-line clouds along the line of sight.

  5. A High-resolution Survey of H I Absorption Toward the Central 200 pc of the Galactic Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Goss, W. M.; Cyganowski, Claudia; Clubb, Kelsey I.

    2010-12-01

    We present an H I absorption survey of the central 250 pc of the Galaxy. Very Large Array observations were made at 21 cm in the DnC and CnB configurations and have a resolution of ~15'' (0.6 pc at the Galactic center (GC) distance) and a velocity resolution of ~2.5 km s-1. This study provides H I data with high spatial resolution, comparable with the many high-resolution observations which have been made of GC sources over the past 10 years. Here we present an overview of the H I absorption toward ~40 well-known continuum sources and a detailed comparison of the ionized, atomic, and molecular components of the interstellar medium for the Sgr B, Radio Arc, and Sgr C regions. In these well-known regions, the atomic gas appears to be closely correlated in both velocity and distribution to the ionized and molecular gas, indicating that it resides in photodissociation regions related to the H II regions in the GC. Toward the majority of the radio continuum sources, H I absorption by the 3 kpc arm is detected, constraining these sources to lie beyond a 5 kpc distance in the Galaxy.

  6. A HIGH-RESOLUTION SURVEY OF H I ABSORPTION TOWARD THE CENTRAL 200 pc OF THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    Lang, Cornelia C.; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Goss, W. M.; Cyganowski, Claudia

    2010-12-15

    We present an H I absorption survey of the central 250 pc of the Galaxy. Very Large Array observations were made at 21 cm in the DnC and CnB configurations and have a resolution of {approx}15'' (0.6 pc at the Galactic center (GC) distance) and a velocity resolution of {approx}2.5 km s{sup -1}. This study provides H I data with high spatial resolution, comparable with the many high-resolution observations which have been made of GC sources over the past 10 years. Here we present an overview of the H I absorption toward {approx}40 well-known continuum sources and a detailed comparison of the ionized, atomic, and molecular components of the interstellar medium for the Sgr B, Radio Arc, and Sgr C regions. In these well-known regions, the atomic gas appears to be closely correlated in both velocity and distribution to the ionized and molecular gas, indicating that it resides in photodissociation regions related to the H II regions in the GC. Toward the majority of the radio continuum sources, H I absorption by the 3 kpc arm is detected, constraining these sources to lie beyond a 5 kpc distance in the Galaxy.

  7. Effect of radiation-induced color centers absorption in optical fibers on fiber optic gyroscope for space application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Jing; Li, Ya; Zhang, Zu-Chen; Wu, Chun-Xiao; Song, Ning-Fang

    2016-08-01

    The effects of color centers’ absorption on fibers and interferometric fiber optical gyroscopes (IFOGs) are studied in the paper. The irradiation induced attenuation (RIA) spectra of three types of polarization-maintaining fibers (PMFs), i.e., P-doped, Ge-doped, and pure silica, irradiated at 100 Gy and 1000 Gy are measured in a wavelength range from 1100 nm to 1600 nm and decomposed according to the Gaussian model. The relationship of the color centers absorption intensity with radiation dose is investigated based on a power model. Furthermore, the effects of all color centers’ absorption on RIA and mean wavelength shifts (MWS) at 1300 nm and 1550 nm are discussed respectively. Finally, the random walk coefficient (RWC) degradation induced from RIA and the scale factor error induced by MWS of the IFOG are simulated and tested at a wavelength of 1300 nm. This research will contribute to the applications of the fibers in radiation environments. Project supported by the Scientific Research Foundation for the Returned Overseas Chinese Scholars, State Education Ministry, China.

  8. Enhancement of contamination growth and damage by absorption centers under UV irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasa, I.; Hippler, M.; Schröder, H.; Jensen, L.; Gauch, M.; Ristau, D.; Riede, W.

    2014-11-01

    Contamination plays a major role in lifetime of vacuum optics. Several efforts have been made to derive suitable models for lifetime prediction in laser-induced contamination related optical breakdown. But the broad spectrum of potential contaminants present in the various applications with their very specific contamination mechanisms complicates the derivation of universal optics degradation models. As one possible contamination initiation process, the impact of optical absorption on the laser-induced contamination and resulting optical breakdown is studied in this work. A set of specifically prepared samples using nanometer sized gold particles embedded in dense IBS anti-reflecting coatings is exposed to radiation of 355nm in low pressure naphthalene atmosphere. Even though the artificial defects are not in direct contact with the contaminant, their influence on the long-term optics performance in dependence on the particle concentration in the coating is evident. In the presence of naphthalene, the artificial nano-defects cause a significantly accelerated degradation compared to reference samples without those defects or in absence of the contaminant. For this specific type of contaminant, a correlation of the optical absorption and long-term durability is derived.

  9. Analysis of absorption spectra of purple bacterial reaction centers in the near infrared region by higher order derivative spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mikhailyuk, I K; Knox, P P; Paschenko, V Z; Razjivin, A P; Lokstein, H

    2006-06-20

    Reaction centers (RCs) of purple bacteria are uniquely suited objects to study the mechanisms of the photosynthetic conversion of light energy into chemical energy. A recently introduced method of higher order derivative spectroscopy [I.K. Mikhailyuk, H. Lokstein, A.P. Razjivin, A method of spectral subband decomposition by simultaneous fitting the initial spectrum and a set of its derivatives, J. Biochem. Biophys. Methods 63 (2005) 10-23] was used to analyze the NIR absorption spectra of RC preparations from Rhodobacter (R.) sphaeroides strain 2R and Blastochloris (B.) viridis strain KH, containing bacteriochlorophyll (BChl) a and b, respectively. Q(y) bands of individual RC porphyrin components (BChls and bacteriopheophytins, BPheo) were identified. The results indicate that the upper exciton level P(y+) of the photo-active BChl dimer in RCs of R. sphaeroides has an absorption maximum of 810nm. The blue shift of a complex integral band at approximately 800nm upon oxidation of the RC is caused primarily by bleaching of P(y+), rather than by an electrochromic shift of the absorption band(s) of the monomeric BChls. Likewise, the disappearance of a band peaking at 842nm upon oxidation of RCs from B. viridis indicates that this band has to be assigned to P(y+). A blue shift of an absorption band at approximately 830nm upon oxidation of RCs of B. viridis is also essentially caused by the disappearance of P(y+), rather than by an electrochromic shift of the absorption bands of monomeric BChls. Absorption maxima of the monomeric BChls, B(B) and B(A) are at 802 and 797nm, respectively, in RCs of R. sphaeroides at room temperature. BPheo co-factors H(B) and H(A) peak at 748 and 758nm, respectively, at room temperature. For B. viridis RCs the spectral positions of H(B) and H(A) were found to be 796 and 816nm, respectively, at room temperature.

  10. Investigation of the mica x-ray absorption near-edge structure spectral features at the Al K-edge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ziyu; Marcelli, A.; Cibin, G.; Mottana, A.; Della Ventura, G.

    2003-10-01

    Near-edge features of Al x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra in aluminosilicate compounds with mixed coordination number are usually assigned to a fourfold coordinated site contribution followed by a sixfold coordinated site contribution that is displaced towards higher energy because of the increasing ligand nucleus potentials, neglecting possible contributions due to bond distance variations and local geometrical distortion. Here we present and discuss the Al K-edge XANES spectra of synthetic micas with either fourfold coordinated Al (phlogopite), or with sixfold coordinated Al (polylithionite), as well as with mixed coordination (preiswerkite). Multiple scattering simulations of XANES spectra demonstrate that octahedral contributions may overlap the tetrahedral ones so that the lower energy structures in mixed coordination compounds may be associated with the octahedral sites. This unexpected behaviour can be described as due to the effect of a significant reduction of the ligand field strength (i.e. large local distortion and Al-O bond distances).

  11. The Breast Health Center at Women & Infants Hospital: origin, philosophy, and features.

    PubMed

    Falkenberry, S S; Chung, M; Legare, R; Strenger, R; Wallace, D; Phillips, G; Morry, S; Marchant, D J; Cady, B

    2000-04-01

    The Breast Health Center, a component of the program in Women's Oncology at Women & Infants Hospital, is a multidisciplinary center devoted to the treatment and study of benign and malignant breast diseases. The philosophy, structure, and function of The Breast Health Center are described along with its specific components. The Breast Health Center's three fundamental missions of patient care, education, and research are discussed.

  12. Emission and fs/ns-TRANSIENT Absorption of Organometallic Complexes Bound to a Dinuclear Metal Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durr, Christopher B.; Brown-Xu, Samantha E.; Chisholm, Malcolm H.

    2012-06-01

    Compounds containing a MM quadruple bond (M = Mo or W) of the form M2L2L'2, where L and L' are conjugated organic ligands, show interesting photophysical properties along with a metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) band that is tunable throughout the UV-Vis-NIR spectra. Recently, our attention has shifted towards ligands that incorporate a secondary transition metal complex bound to an organic moiety. Along with allowing for a second tunable MLCT band for better coverage of the solar spectrum, these hybrid molecules show unique spectroscopic properties that were explored using fs/ns-transient absorption and UV-Vis/NIR emission. These techniques allow for the elucidation of the electronic character of the excited states as well as their lifetimes. This knowledge will be put to use in the design of new materials that could later be incorporated into next generation photovoltaic devices.

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ground and excited rhenium-carbonyl-diimine complexes: evidence for a two-center electron transfer.

    PubMed

    El Nahhas, A; van der Veen, R M; Penfold, T J; Pham, V T; Lima, F A; Abela, R; Blanco-Rodriguez, A M; Záliš, S; Vlček, A; Tavernelli, I; Rothlisberger, U; Milne, C J; Chergui, M

    2013-01-17

    Steady-state and picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to study the ground and lowest triplet states of [ReX(CO)(3)(bpy)](n+), X = Etpy (n = 1), Cl, or Br (n = 0). We demonstrate that the transient spectra at both the Re L(3)- and Br K-edges show the emergence of a pre-edge feature, absent in the ground-state spectrum, which is associated with the electron hole created in the highest occupied molecular orbital following photoexcitation. Importantly, these features have the same dynamics, confirming previous predictions that the low-lying excited states of these complexes involve a two-center charge transfer from both the Re and the ligand, X. We also demonstrate that the DFT optimized ground and excited structures allow us to reproduce the experimental XANES and EXAFS spectra. The ground-state structural refinement shows that the Br atom contributes very little to the latter, whereas the Re-C-O scattering paths are dominant due to the so-called focusing effect. For the excited-state spectrum, the Re-X bond undergoes one of the largest changes but still remains a weak contribution to the photoinduced changes of the EXAFS spectrum.

  14. Detection of interstellar sodium hydroxide in self-absorption toward the galactic center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollis, J. M.; Rhodes, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    A weak self-absorbed emission line, which is identified as the J = 4-3 transition of sodium hydroxide, has been detected in the direction of Sgr B2(OH). The correspondingly weak Sgr B2(QH) emission line U75406, previously reported as an unidentified spectral feature by other investigators, is consistent with the J = 3-2 transition of sodium hydroxide. This detection may represent the first evidence of a grain reaction formation mechanism for simple metal hydroxides. The detection of H62 Delta toward Orion A is also reported.

  15. Total Absorption Gamma-ray Spectrometer (TAGS) Intensity Distributions from INL's Gamma-Ray Spectrometry Center

    DOE Data Explorer

    Greenwood, R. E.

    A 252Cf fission-product source and the INL on-line isotope separator were used to supply isotope-separated fission-product nuclides to a total absorption -ray spectrometer. This spectrometer consisted of a large (25.4-cm diameter x 30.5-cm long) NaI(Tl) detector with a 20.3-cm deep axial well in which is placed a 300-mm2 x 1.0-mm Si detector. The spectra from the NaI(Tl) detector are collected both in the singles mode and in coincidence with the B-events detected in the Si detector. Ideally, this detector would sum all the energy of the B- rays in each cascade following the population of daughter level by B- decay, so that the event could be directly associated with a particular daughter level. However, there are losses of energy from attenuation of the rays before they reach the detector, transmission of rays through the detector, escape of secondary photons from Compton scattering, escape of rays through the detector well, internal conversion, etc., and the measured spectra are thus more complicated than the ideal case and the analysis is more complex. Analysis methods have been developed to simulate all of these processes and thus provide a direct measure of the B- intensity distribution as a function of the excitation energy in the daughter nucleus. These data yield more accurate information on the B- distribution than conventional decay-scheme studies for complex decay schemes with large decay energies, because in the latter there are generally many unobserved and observed but unplaced rays. The TAGS data have been analyzed and published [R. E. Greenwood et al., Nucl Instr. and metho. A390(1997)] for 40 fission product-nuclides to determine the B- intensity distributions. [Copied from the TAGS page at http://www.inl.gov/gammaray/spectrometry/tags.shtml]. Those values are listed on this page for quick reference.

  16. Goddard high-resolution spectrograph observations of narrow discrete stellar wind absorption features in the ultraviolet spectrum of the O7.5 III star Xi Persei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shore, Steven N.; Altner, Bruce; Bolton, C. T.; Cardelli, Jason A.; Ebbets, Dennis C.

    1993-01-01

    We report the observation of transient narrow absorption components (NACs) in the stellar wind of the O giant Xi Per. Two sets of GHRS observations of the Si IV ultraviolet resonance doublet have been obtained. These features are extremely weak, with column densities of approximately 10 exp 12/sq cm and optical depths of order 0.1. The features are narrow, less than 30 km/s, and seem to occur in groups. If the NACs are due to the 1393 A component, they represent previously undetected low-velocity discrete absorption components at V(rad) below -600 km/s. If they are high-velocity features on the 1402 A doublet component, they may represent the decay phase of the discrete absorption components at the terminal velocity. In either case, they are a new aspect of the NAC phenomenon that could not have been detected with previous ultraviolet spectrographs.

  17. The three-electron bond =Siabsorption center of pre-darkened ytterbium-doped silica.

    PubMed

    Mattsson, Kent E

    2013-05-20

    The formation and bleaching of color centers during annealing of pre-darkened ytterbium-doped silica fibers is modeled by three-electron bond (TEB) = Siabsorption centers. The nature of a center and underlying mechanism for its annealing in formation, shift and dissociation of chemical bonds is described in terms of a Markov statistical model with state change set by Bose-Einstein phonon statistics. The center hold one terminal and four active states with activation energies for transitions among these found to match bond energies of molecular oxygen in ionic character bonds of 1 and 1½ bond order. Experimentally observed in- and decrease in absorption during ramp and isothermal annealing of pre-darkened ytterbium co-doped silica fibers are hereby matched by a set of = Sicenters.

  18. Demographic and Clinical Features of Pediatric Uveitis at a Tertiary Referral Center in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Mansour; Oustad, Marjan; Ashrafi, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical features and distribution of uveitis in the pediatric age group at a referral eye care center in Shiraz, South Iran. Materials and Methods: All new cases of uveitis in patients 18-year-old or younger referred from January 2007 to December 2013 were enrolled in this study. The patient underwent a complete history of systemic and ocular diseases, comprehensive ophthalmic examination. Patients were classified according to the International Uveitis Study Group definitions. The definitive diagnosis was based on clinical manifestations and laboratory investigations. Results: Seventy-seven eyes (54 patients) comprised the study sample. The mean age at the onset of uveitis was 12.5 years. The female-to-male ratio was 1.25. Anterior uveitis was the most frequent anatomical location (40.7%), followed by intermediate uveitis (33.3%), posterior uveitis (18.5%), and panuveitis (7.5%). Seventy-four percent of patients presented with chronic uveitis. Noninfectious uveitis (81.5%) was the most frequent etiology. Thirty-seven percent of patients had a specific diagnosis for uveitis, and 63% were classified as idiopathic cases. Toxocariasis was the most common infectious cause. Associated systemic diseases were present in 14.8% of patients. The most frequent systemic disease was juvenile idiopathic arthritis in 9.2% of patients. Complications occurred in 66 (85.5%) of affected eyes. The most common complications were posterior synechia (20.7%), cataract (18.8%), and cystoid macular edema (12.9%). Conclusions: Uveitis in the majority of children had an insidious onset and was chronic. Over half the patients had a specific diagnosis. Idiopathic cases were more common in the intermediate uveitis group. PMID:27555706

  19. FE K EMISSION AND ABSORPTION FEATURES IN THE XMM-EPIC SPECTRUM OF THE SEYFERT GALAXY IC 4329A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, A.; Reeves, J. N.; Braito, V.

    2001-01-01

    We present a re-analysis of the XMM-Newton long-look of the X-ray bright Seyfert galaxy IC 4329a. The Fe K bandpass is dominated by two peaks, consistent with emission from neutral or near-neutral Fe Ka and KP. A relativistic diskline model whereby both peaks are the result of one doubly-peaked diskline profile is found to be a poor description of the data. Models using two relativistic disklines are found to describe the emission profile well. A low-inclination, moderately-relativistic dual-diskline model is possible if the contribution from narrow components, due to distant material, is small or absent. A high-inclination, moderately relativistic profile for each peak is possible if there are roughly equal contributions from both the broad and narrow components. Upper limits on Fe XXV and Fe XXVI emission and absorption at the systemic velocity of IC 4329a are obtained. We also present the results of RXTE monitoring of this source obtained so far; the combined XMM-Newton and RXTE data sets allow us to explore the time-resolved spectral behavior of this source on time scales ranging from hours to 2 years. We find no strong evidence for variability of the Fe Ka emission line on any time scale probed, likely due to the minimal level of continuum variability. We detect a narrow absorption line, at a energy of 7.68 keV in the rest frame of the source; its significance has been confirmed using Monte Carlo simulations. This feature is most likely due to absorption from Fe XXVI blueshifted to approximately 0.1c relative to the systemic velocity, making IC 4329a the lowest-redshift AGN known with a high-velocity, highly-ionized outflow component. As is often the case with similar outflows seen in high-luminosity quasars, the estimated mass outflow rate is larger than the inflow accretion rate, signaling that the outflow represents a substantial portion of the total energy budget of the AGN. The outflow could arise from a radiatively-driven disk wind, or it may be in the

  20. GSH 006-15+7: a local Galactic supershell featuring transition from H I emission to absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, V. A.; McClure-Griffiths, N. M.; Braun, R.; Hill, A. S.; Madsen, G. J.

    2012-04-01

    We report on the discovery of a new Galactic supershell, GSH 006-15+7, from the Galactic All-Sky Survey data. Observed and derived properties are presented, and we find that GSH 006-15+7 is one of the nearest physically large supershells known, with dimensions of ˜780 × 520 pc at a distance of ˜ 1.5 kpc. The shell wall appears in HI emission at b≲-6?5 and in HI self-absorption (HISA) at b≳-6?5. We use this feature along with HISA diagnostics to estimate an optical depth of τ˜ 3, a spin temperature of ˜40 K and a swept-up mass of M˜ 3 × 106 M⊙. We also investigate the origin of GSH 006-15+7, assessing the energy contribution of candidate powering sources and finding evidence in favour of a formation energy of ˜1052 erg. We find that this structure provides evidence for the transfer of mass and energy from the Galactic disc into the halo.

  1. Dielectronic recombination measurements of iron M-shell ions motivated by active galactic nuclei X-ray absorption features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukic, V. D.; Schnell, M.; Savin, D. W.; Brandau, C.; Schmidt, E. W.; Bohm, S.; Muller, A.; Schippers, S.; Lestinsky, M.; Sprenger, F.; Wolf, A.; Altun, Z.; Badnell, N. R.

    2008-07-01

    XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of active galactic nuclei (AGN) show rich spectra of X-ray absorption lines. These observations have detected a broad unresolved transition array (UTA) between 15-17 A. This is attributed to inner-shell photoexcitation of M-shell iron ions. Modeling these UTA features is currently limited by uncertainties in the low-temperature dielectronic recombination (DR) data for M-shell iron. In order to resolve this issue, and to provide reliable iron M-shell DR data for plasma modeling, we are carrying out a series of laboratory measurements using the heavy-ion Test Storage Ring (TSR) at the Max-Plank-Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg, Germany. Currently, laboratory measurements of low temperature DR can only be performed at storage rings. We use the DR data obtained at TSR, to calculate rate coefficients for plasma modeling and to benchmark theoretical DR calculations. At temperatures where these ions are predicted to form in photoionized gas, we find a significant discrepancy between our experimental results and previously recommended DR rate coefficients. Here we report our recent experimental results for DR of Mg-like Fe XV forming Al-like Fe XIV.

  2. A search for weak ultraviolet interstellar absorption features in IUE spectra of Rho Ophiuchi and Zeta Ophiuchi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welty, D. E.; Thorburn, J. A.; Hobbs, L. M.; York, D. G.

    1992-01-01

    We have applied procedures designed to reduce substantially the nonrandom, so-called 'fixed-pattern' noise present in IUE spectra to archival long-wavelength high-dispersion spectra of Rho Ophiuchi and Zeta Ophiuchi. Substantial elimination of the fixed-pattern noise via flat fielding can yield 2sigma equivalent width limits of 5-10 mA from the sum of a small number (about less than 5) of well-exposed archival spectra, and increases confidence in the reality of any weak features found. Examination of complete long-wavelength (about 2200-3250 A) spectra of these two stars has revealed, in addition to many known strong absorption lines, several lines of Fe I and Si I which had not previously been reported, as well as a small number of possible unidentified lines. We also present substantially improved upper limits to the equivalent widths of a number of other weak lines; limits an order of magnitude smaller, now achievable with the HST GHRS, should produce detections of some of these.

  3. MULTI-WAVELENGTH STUDIES OF SPECTACULAR RAM PRESSURE STRIPPING OF A GALAXY: DISCOVERY OF AN X-RAY ABSORPTION FEATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Liyi; Makishima, Kazuo; Yagi, Masafumi; Nakazawa, Kazuhiro; Yoshida, Michitoshi; Fujita, Yutaka; Hattori, Takashi; Akahori, Takuya

    2013-11-10

    We report the detection of an X-ray absorption feature near the galaxy M86 in the Virgo cluster. The absorber has a column density of 2-3 × 10{sup 20} cm{sup –2}, and its position coincides with the peak of an intracluster H I cloud which was removed from the galaxy NGC 4388 presumably by ram pressure. These results indicate that the H I cloud is located in front of M86 along the line-of-sight, and suggest that the stripping was primarily created by an interaction between NGC 4388 and the hot plasmas of the Virgo cluster, not the M86 halo. By calculating an X-ray temperature map, we further detected an X-ray counterpart of the H I cloud up to ≈3' south of M86. It has a temperature of 0.89 keV and a mass of ∼4.5 × 10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}, exceeding the estimated H I gas mass. The high hot-to-cold gas ratio in the cloud indicates a significant evaporation of the H I gas, probably by thermal conduction from the hotter cluster plasma with a sub-Spitzer rate.

  4. Environmental temperature effect on the far-infrared absorption features of aromatic-based Titan's aerosol analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautier, Thomas; Trainer, Melissa G.; Loeffler, Mark J.; Sebree, Joshua A.; Anderson, Carrie M.

    2017-01-01

    Benzene detection has been reported in Titan's atmosphere both in the stratosphere at ppb levels by remote sensing (Coustenis et al., 2007; Vinatier et al., 2007) and in the thermosphere at ppm levels by the Cassini's Ion and Neutral Mass Spectrometer (Waite et al., 2007). This detection supports the idea that aromatic and heteroaromatic reaction pathways may play an important role in Titan's atmospheric chemistry, especially in the formation of aerosols. Indeed, aromatic molecules are easily dissociated by ultraviolet radiation and can therefore contribute significantly to aerosol formation. It has been shown recently that aerosol analogs produced from a gas mixture containing a low concentration of aromatic and/or heteroaromatic molecules (benzene, naphthalene, pyridine, quinoline and isoquinoline) have spectral signatures below 500 cm-1, a first step towards reproducing the aerosol spectral features observed by Cassini's Composite InfraRed Spectrometer (CIRS) in the far infrared (Anderson and Samuelson 2011, and references therein). In this work we investigate the influence of environmental temperature on the absorption spectra of such aerosol samples, simulating the temperature range to which aerosols, once formed, are exposed during their transport through Titan's stratosphere. Our results show that environmental temperature does not have any major effect on the spectral shape of these aerosol analogs in the far-infrared, which is consistent with the CIRS observations.

  5. Harmonic and anharmonic features of IR and NIR absorption and VCD spectra of chiral 4-X-[2.2]paracyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Abbate, Sergio; Castiglioni, Ettore; Gangemi, Fabrizio; Gangemi, Roberto; Longhi, Giovanna; Ruzziconi, Renzo; Spizzichino, Sara

    2007-08-02

    The vibrational absorption spectra and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectra of both enantiomers of 4-X-[2.2]paracyclophanes (X = COOCD3, Cl, I) have been recorded for a few regions in the range of 900-12000 cm(-1). The analysis of the VCD spectra for the two IR regions, 900-1600 cm(-1) and 2800-3200 cm(-1), is conducted by comparing with DFT calculations of the corresponding spectra; the latter region reveals common motifs of vibrational modes for the three molecules for aliphatic CH stretching fundamentals, whereas in the mid-IR region, one is able to identify specific signatures arising from the substituent groups X. In the CH stretching region between 2900 and 2800 cm(-1), we identify and interpret a group of three IR VCD bands due to HCH bending overtone transitions in Fermi resonance with CH stretching fundamental transitions. The analysis of the NIR region between approximately 8000 and approximately 9000 cm(-1) for X = COOCD3 reveals important features of the aromatic CH stretching overtones that are of value since the aromatic CH stretching fundamentals are almost silent. The intensifying of such overtones is attributed to electrical anharmonicity terms, which are evaluated here by ab initio methods and compared with literature data.

  6. Analysis of the near-ultraviolet absorption and circular dichroic spectra of parsley plastocyanin for the effects of pH and copper center conformation changes.

    PubMed

    Durell, S R; Gross, E L; Draheim, J E

    1988-11-15

    The absorption and circular dichroic (CD) spectra of parsley plastocyanin (PC) were measured in order to determine the effects of changes in primary amino acid sequence on both the copper center and protein components of the PC molecule. The near-ultraviolet (uv) absorption and CD spectra of parsley PC were found to be qualitatively similar to those of spinach, poplar, and lettuce PC, except for the near-uv CD spectrum of the reduced form at low pH (ca. pH 5.0). The CD spectrum of reduced parsley PC in the 250-265 nm wavelength region changes from positive to negative ellipticity upon reduction of pH, and is characterized by a pKa value of 5.7. This pKa value is the same as that for the protonation of the histidine 87 copper ligand, observed by NMR, and the change in conformation of the copper center. Similar processes are believed to occur in the other PC species at lower pH values. Thus, the pH-dependent perturbations of the near-uv CD spectra of reduced PC are interpreted as due to transitions in the reduced copper center. The increase in the near-uv absorption spectrum of reduced PC can be divided into pH-independent and pH-dependent portions. The pH-independent portion resembles the absorption spectrum of tetrahedral Cu(I) metallothionein, suggesting the presence of Cu(I)-Cys 84 and/or Cu(I)-Met 92 charge transfer transitions in the near-uv absorption spectra of reduced PC. The pH dependence of the absorption spectrum changes and the pH difference absorption spectrum indicate that tyrosine residues may contribute to at least a part of the pH-dependent portion of the absorption increase of reduced PC.

  7. Excited-state electronic asymmetry of the special pair in photosynthetic reaction center mutants: absorption and Stark spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moore, L J; Zhou, H; Boxer, S G

    1999-09-14

    The electronic absorption line shape and Stark spectrum of the lowest energy Q(y)() transition of the special pair in bacterial reaction centers contain a wealth of information on mixing with charge transfer states and electronic asymmetry. Both vary greatly in mutants that perturb the chemical composition of the special pair, such as the heterodimer mutants, and in mutants that alter interactions between the special pair and the surrounding reaction center protein, such as those that add or remove hydrogen bonds. The conventional and higher-order Stark spectra of a series of mutants are presented with the aim of developing a systematic description of the electronic structure of the excited state of the special pair that initiates photosynthetic charge separation. The mutants L168HF, M197FH, L131LH and L131LH/M160LH/M197FH are known to have different hydrogen-bonding patterns to the special pair; however, they exhibit Stark effects that are very similar to wild type. By contrast, the addition of a hydrogen bond to the M-side keto carbonyl group of the special pair in M160LH greatly affects both the absorption and Stark spectra. The heterodimer special pairs, L173HL and M202HL, exhibit much larger Stark effects than wild type, with the greatest effect in the M-side mutant. Double mutants that combine the M-side heterodimer and a hydrogen-bond addition to the L-side of the special pair decrease the magnitude of the Stark effect. These results suggest that the electronic asymmetry of the dimer can be perturbed either by the formation of a heterodimer or by adding or deleting a hydrogen bond to a keto carbonyl group. From the pattern observed, it is concluded that the charge transfer state P(L)(+)P(M)(-) has a larger influence on the excited state of the dimer in wild type than the P(L)(-)P(M)(+)charge transfer state. Furthermore, asymmetry can be varied continuously, from extreme cases in which the heterodimer and hydrogen-bond effects work together, to cases in which

  8. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  9. Body centered cubic magnesium niobium hydride with facile room temperature absorption and four weight percent reversible capacity.

    PubMed

    Tan, XueHai; Wang, Liya; Holt, Chris M B; Zahiri, Beniamin; Eikerling, Michael H; Mitlin, David

    2012-08-21

    We have synthesized a new metastable metal hydride with promising hydrogen storage properties. Body centered cubic (bcc) magnesium niobium hydride (Mg(0.75)Nb(0.25))H(2) possesses 4.5 wt% hydrogen gravimetric density, with 4 wt% being reversible. Volumetric hydrogen absorption measurements yield an enthalpy of hydride formation of -53 kJ mol(-1) H(2), which indicates a significant thermodynamic destabilization relative to the baseline -77 kJ mol(-1) H(2) for rutile MgH(2). The hydrogenation cycling kinetics are remarkable. At room temperature and 1 bar hydrogen it takes 30 minutes to absorb a 1.5 μm thick film at sorption cycle 1, and 1 minute at cycle 5. Reversible desorption is achieved in about 60 minutes at 175 °C. Using ab initio calculations we have examined the thermodynamic stability of metallic alloys with hexagonal close packed (hcp) versus bcc crystal structure. Moreover we have analyzed the formation energies of the alloy hydrides that are bcc, rutile or fluorite.

  10. The newly expanded KSC Visitors Complex features a new ticket plaza, information center, exhibits an

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Part of the $13 million expansion to KSC's Visitor Complex, the new information center welcomes visitors to the Gateway to the Universe. The five large video walls provide an orientation video, with an introduction to the range of activities and exhibits, and honor the center's namesake, President John F. Kennedy. Other new attractions are an information center, a walk- through Robot Scouts exhibit, a wildlife exhibit, and the film Quest for Life in a new 300-seat theater. The KSC Visitor Complex was inaugurated three decades ago and is now one of the top five tourist attractions in Florida. It is located on S.R. 407, east of I-95, within the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

  11. Syntheses and some features of five new cyclohexane-1,3-dicarboxylates with multiple stereogenic centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismiyev, Arif M.; Maharramov, Abel M.; Aliyeva, Rafiga A.; Askerov, Rizvan K.; Mahmudov, Kamran T.; Kopylovich, Maximilian N.; Naïli, Houcine; Pombeiro, Armando J. L.

    2013-01-01

    The condensation of diethyl 4-hydroxy-4-methyl-6-oxo-2-(4-substitutedphenyl)-cyclohexane-1,3-dicarboxylates and N'-(2-chloropropyl)ethane-1,2-diamine leads to diethyl 1-(2-chloropropyl)-9-hydroxy-9-methyl-7-phenyl-1,4-diazaspiro[4.5]decane-6,8-dicarboxylate (2) and its para-substituted methyl (1), chloro (3), bromo (4), and nitro (5) derivatives with a new stereogenic center, which were fully characterized by elemental analysis, ESI-MS, IR, 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopies and X-ray single-crystal analysis (for 2). The condensation reaction is regioselective, only cyclohexanone carbonyl moiety undergoes the transformation, leaving the β-keto ester carbonyls unreacted. Withing the compounds 1-5, the increase in the Hammett's σp, related normal σpn, inductive σI, negative σp- and positive σp+ polar conjugation and Taft's σpo substituent constants generally leads to the corresponding drift of δOsbnd H and δNsbnd H NMR chemical shifts to lower field.

  12. Are clinical features able to predict Helicobacter pylori gastritis patterns? Evidence from tertiary centers.

    PubMed

    Carabotti, Marilia; Lahner, Edith; Porowska, Barbara; Colacci, Enzo; Trentino, Paolo; Annibale, Bruno; Severi, Carola

    2014-12-01

    Outcome of Helicobacter pylori infection is different according to gastritis extension (i.e. antrum-restricted gastritis or pangastritis). The aim of this study is to evaluate whether different gastritis patterns are associated with specific gastrointestinal symptoms or clinical signs that could be suggestive of the topography of gastritis. 236 consecutive symptomatic outpatients were recruited in two tertiary centers. They filled in a validated and self-administered Rome III modular symptomatic questionnaire, and underwent gastroscopy with histological sampling. 154 patients with Helicobacter pylori infection were included. Clinical presentation did not differ between antrum-restricted gastritis and pangastritis, gastro-esophageal reflux disease being present in 48.2 and 54.1 % of patients and dyspepsia in 51.8 and 45.9 %, respectively. However, pangastritis statistically differed from antrum-restricted gastritis in that the presence of clinical signs (p < 0.0001) was observed in 33.7 % of the patients, consisting of iron deficiency (31.6 %), iron deficiency-anemia (20.4 %) and levothyroxine malabsorption (3.1 %). Symptoms are not helpful in suggesting gastritis pattern whereas their association with signs, accurately detected, is indicative for the presence of pangastritis.

  13. Sperm-induced calcium oscillations of human oocytes show distinct features in oocyte center and periphery.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J; Sousa, M; Mendoza, C

    1995-06-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of explosive periodic increases (spikes) of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by sperm in human oocytes (Ca2+ oscillations) were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and compared to Ca2+ oscillations induced in oocytes by the thiol reagent thimerosal. During the steady-state period of sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations, each individual [Ca2+]i spike invariably began from a focus in oocyte periphery and spread throughout the entire peripheral region before propagating to the central ooplasm. This peripheral Ca2+ wave was immediately followed by an explosive [Ca2+]i increase in the central ooplasm. However, this central [Ca2+]i rise only peaked when [Ca2+]i in the peripheral ooplasm was already on the decline. Moreover, the peak [Ca2+]i values were always considerably higher in the oocyte center than in the periphery. In contrast, thimerosal-induced Ca2+ oscillations did not show this particular form of propagation. These data show that sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations have a unique pattern of spatial dynamics and suggest that the bulk of Ca2+ mobilized during each spike is released from stores that have a relatively high threshold for Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). These stores are poorly developed, if not absent, in the oocyte cortex, and CICR from them is triggered by previous CICR from another type of store with a lower threshold that are preferentially located in the oocyte cortex and act as a detonator.

  14. Clinical features of Crohn disease concomitant with ankylosing spondylitis: A preliminary single-center study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Song; Ding, Jie; Wang, Meng; Zhou, Wanqing; Feng, Min; Guan, Wenxian

    2016-07-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations (EIMs) cause increased morbidity and decreased quality of life in Crohn disease (CD). Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) belongs to EIMs. Very little is known on the clinical features of CD concomitant with AS. This study is to investigate the clinical features of CD patients with AS.We retrospectively collected all CD patients with AS in our hospital, and established a comparison group (CD without AS) with age, sex, and duration of Crohn disease matched. Clinical information was retrieved for comparison.Eight CD + AS patients were identified from 195 CD patients. Sixteen CD patients were randomly selected into comparison group. All CD + AS patients were male, HLA-B27 (+), and rheumatoid factor (-) with an average age of 40.8 ± 4.52 years. Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and AS was revealed (r = 0.857, P = 0.011). Significant correlation between disease activity of CD and functional limitation associated with AS was identified (r = 0.881, P < 0.01). C-reactive protein (CRP), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and globulin were positively correlated to Crohn disease activity index (CDAI), Bath AS disease activity index, and Bath AS functional index(BASFI) scores (r = 0.73-0.93, P < 0.05). Albumin was negatively associated with CDAI and BASFI (r = -0.73 to -0.91, P < 0.05). The ratio of albumin to globulin (Alb/Glo) was significantly related to all 3 scores (r = -0.81 to -0.91, P < 0.05).Male predominance with a 4.12% concomitant incidence of AS is observed in CD patients. Disease activity of CD correlates with disease activity of AS and functional limitation caused by AS. CRP, ESR, and Alb/Glo may serve as biomarkers for disease activity and functional limitation in CD patients concomitant with AS, although future studies are expected.

  15. Clinical and genetic features of IL12Rb1 deficiency: Single center experience of 18 patients.

    PubMed

    Tan, Çağman; Çağdaş-Ayvaz, Deniz; Metin, Ayşe; Keskin, Özlem; Tezcan, İlhan; Sanal, Özden

    2016-01-01

    Mendelian susceptibility to mycobacterial disease (MSMD) is characterized by infections with weakly virulent mycobacteria (BCG and environmental mycobacteria), M. tuberculosis, Salmonella, candida and some other intracellular microorganisms. Nine different genetic defects have been defined to cause MSMD and IL-12Rβ1 deficiency is the most common form. We present here the clinical and genetic features of 18 patients with IL12Rβ1 deficiency diagnosed by surface expression of IL-12Rβ1 and Sanger's sequencing. Seventeen patients showed classical presentation (infections with BCG, salmonella and candida) while one patient experienced recurrent leishmaniasis. In all patients the percentage of activated lymphocytes with surface expression of IL12Rβ1 was < 1% indicating that it is an effective method for the screening of these patients. Three recurrent mutations were responsible for 85% of our families. Prognosis was good in patients, in whom specific antimicrobial therapy was given before dissemination occurs, as well as prophylactic antimicrobial treatment when needed and IFN-γ therapy for severe infectious episodes.

  16. Epidemiological Features of Bronchiolitis in the Pediatric Clinic of Clinical center of Sarajevo University

    PubMed Central

    Bakalovic, Ganimeta; Dzinovic, Amra; Baljic, Rusmir; Dizdar, Selma; Selimovic, Amina

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To present the epidemiological features of bronchiolitis in a one-year period in patients of Pediatric Clinic, Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. Introduction: Bronchiolitis is the most common respiratory infection of early infant age. The disease is one the most common reason for hospitalization of children under the age of six months. The disease is characterized by occurrences in the winter season November–March. For daily diagnosing of severe forms of bronchiolitis as a clinical syndrome, often sufficient are the knowledge of the epidemiological data, age of the patient, clinical examination and insight into the risk factors. Patients and methods: The history of the disease in 155 infant patients, who were clinically treated because of bronchiolitis in the period from February 2013 to February 2014 in the Department of Pediatric Pulmonary Clinic in Sarajevo was retrospectively analyzed. Results: The majority of patients were aged less than 6 months (87.7%). The monthly distribution of bronchiolitis had a peak in January and February. Almost 50% of patients had a risk factors for the development of severe forms of bronchiolitis out of which the most common were artificial diet (53.5%), low birth weight below 2500g (17%), prematurity (16.1%), congenital heart anomalies (14.2%), bronchopulmonary dysplasia (1.9%). 46,5% of patients were on natural nutrition. 46 patients (29.6%) were serologically or by respi-strip test in nasopharyngeal lavage positive on respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). There were no patients who required mechanical ventilation. Conclusion: During the one-year period, bronchiolitis was the most common diagnose in the early infantile period up to 6 months, with a peak incidence in January and February. Risk factors such as prematurity, low birth weight, congenital heart anomalies and bronchopulmonary dysplasia have been less present in the studied period compared to the period before the introduction of RSV chemoprophylaxis. The

  17. FIRST ULTRAVIOLET REFLECTANCE SPECTRA OF PLUTO AND CHARON BY THE HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: DETECTION OF ABSORPTION FEATURES AND EVIDENCE FOR TEMPORAL CHANGE

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Shinn, A.; Cunningham, N. J.; Hain, M. J.

    2012-01-15

    We have observed the mid-UV spectra of both Pluto and its large satellite, Charon, at two rotational epochs using the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) in 2010. These are the first HST/COS measurements of Pluto and Charon. Here we describe the observations and our reduction of them, and present the albedo spectra, average mid-UV albedos, and albedo slopes we derive from these data. These data reveal evidence for a strong absorption feature in the mid-UV spectrum of Pluto; evidence for temporal change in Pluto's spectrum since the 1990s is reported, and indirect evidence for a near-UV spectral absorption on Charon is also reported.

  18. L-asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: Optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, G.; Gottfried, C.; Silva, A. M.; Caetano, E. W. S.; Sales, F. A. M.; Freire, V. N.

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p–carboxyl, C 2p–side chain, and C 2p–carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  19. Atmospheric Profiling Combining the Features of GPS ro & Mls: Satellite to Satellite Occultations Near Water & Ozone Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursinski, E. R.; Ward, D.; Otarola, A. C.; McGhee, J.; Reed, H.; Erickson, D.

    2015-12-01

    Assessing climate models & their predictions requires observations that determine the state of the real climate system precisely and unambiguously, independently from models. For this purpose, we have been developing a new orbiting remote sensing system called the Active Temperature, Ozone & Moisture Microwave Spectrometer (ATOMMS) which is a cross between GPS RO and the Microwave Limb Sounder. ATOMMS actively probes water vapor, ozone & other absorption lines at cm & mm wavelengths in a satellite to satellite occultation geometry to simultaneously profile temperature, pressure, water vapor and ozone as well as other important constituents. Individual profiles of water vapor, temperature & pressure heights will extend from near the surface into the mesosphere with ~1%, 0.4K and 10 m precision respectively and still better accuracy, with 100 m vertical resolution. Ozone profiles will extend upward from the upper troposphere. Line of sight wind profiles will extend upwards from the mid-stratosphere. ATOMMS is a doubly differential absorption system which eliminates drift and both sees clouds and sees thru them, to deliver performance in clouds within a factor of 2 of the performance in clear skies. This all-weather sampling combined with insensitivity to surface emissivity avoids sampling biases that limit most existing satellite records. ATOMMS will profile slant liquid water in clouds & rain and as well as turbulence via scintillations ("twinkling of a star"). Using prototype ATOMMS instrumentation that we developed with funding from NSF, several ATOMMS ground field campaigns precisely measured water vapor, cloud amount, rainfall, turbulence and absorption line spectroscopy. ATOMMS's dynamic range was demonstrated as water vapor was derived to 1% precision in optical depths up to 17. We are developing high altitude aircraft to aircraft instrumentation to further demonstrate ATOMMS performance, refine spectroscopy & support future field campaigns. Our vision is a

  20. L-Asparagine crystals with wide gap semiconductor features: optical absorption measurements and density functional theory computations.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, G; Gottfried, C; Silva, A M; Caetano, E W S; Sales, F A M; Freire, V N

    2014-03-28

    Results of optical absorption measurements are presented together with calculated structural, electronic, and optical properties for the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal. Density functional theory (DFT) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including dispersion effects (TS, Grimme) was employed to perform the calculations. The optical absorption measurements revealed that the anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystal is a wide band gap material with 4.95 eV main gap energy. DFT-GGA+TS simulations, on the other hand, produced structural parameters in very good agreement with X-ray data. The lattice parameter differences Δa, Δb, Δc between theory and experiment were as small as 0.020, 0.051, and 0.022 Å, respectively. The calculated band gap energy is smaller than the experimental data by about 15%, with a 4.23 eV indirect band gap corresponding to Z → Γ and Z → β transitions. Three other indirect band gaps of 4.30 eV, 4.32 eV, and 4.36 eV are assigned to α3 → Γ, α1 → Γ, and α2 → Γ transitions, respectively. Δ-sol computations, on the other hand, predict a main band gap of 5.00 eV, just 50 meV above the experimental value. Electronic wavefunctions mainly originating from O 2p-carboxyl, C 2p-side chain, and C 2p-carboxyl orbitals contribute most significantly to the highest valence and lowest conduction energy bands, respectively. By varying the lattice parameters from their converged equilibrium values, we show that the unit cell is less stiff along the b direction than for the a and c directions. Effective mass calculations suggest that hole transport behavior is more anisotropic than electron transport, but the mass values allow for some charge mobility except along a direction perpendicular to the molecular layers of L-asparagine which form the crystal, so anhydrous monoclinic L-asparagine crystals could behave as wide gap semiconductors. Finally, the calculations point to a high degree of optical

  1. Complexities in pyroxene compositions derived from absorption band centers: Examples from Apollo samples, HED meteorites, synthetic pure pyroxenes, and remote sensing data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriarty, D. P.; Pieters, C. M.

    2016-02-01

    We reexamine the relationship between pyroxene composition and near-infrared absorption bands, integrating measurements of diverse natural and synthetic samples. We test an algorithm (PLC) involving a two-part linear continuum removal and parabolic fits to the 1 and 2 μm bands—a computationally simple approach which can easily be automated and applied to remote sensing data. Employing a suite of synthetic pure pyroxenes, the PLC technique is shown to derive similar band centers to the modified Gaussian model. PLC analyses are extended to natural pyroxene-bearing materials, including (1) bulk lunar basalts and pyroxene separates, (2) diverse lunar soils, and (3) HED meteorites. For natural pyroxenes, the relationship between composition and absorption band center differs from that of synthetic pyroxenes. These differences arise from complexities inherent in natural materials such as exsolution, zoning, mixing, and space weathering. For these reasons, band center measurements of natural pyroxene-bearing materials are compositionally nonunique and could represent three distinct scenarios (1) pyroxene with a narrow compositional range, (2) complexly zoned pyroxene grains, or (3) a mixture of multiple pyroxene (or nonpyroxene) components. Therefore, a universal quantitative relationship between band centers and pyroxene composition cannot be uniquely derived for natural pyroxene-bearing materials without additional geologic context. Nevertheless, useful relative relationships between composition and band center persist in most cases. These relationships are used to interpret M3 data from the Humboldtianum Basin. Four distinct compositional units are identified (1) Mare Humboldtianum basalts, (2) distinct outer basalts, (3) low-Ca pyroxene-bearing materials, and (4) feldspathic materials.

  2. The Features of the Frequency-Modulation Method When Studying the Shapes of the Spectral Lines of Nonlinear Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubiatnikov, G. Yu.; Belov, S. P.; Lapinov, A. V.

    2017-01-01

    We briefly consider the method of the frequency (phase) modulation and signal detection at the second harmonic of the modulation frequency for recording and analyzing the spectral-line shapes. The precision sub-Doppler spectrometer in the millimeter- and submillimeter-wave ranges, which operated in the regime of nonlinear saturation of the spectral transitions in a standing wave (the Lamb-dip method), was used during the measurements. The influence of the saturation degree on the value and shape of the recorded frequency-modulated signals in the quadrature channels during the synchronous detection is demonstrated. Variation in the relationships among the signals determined by dispersion and absorption was observed. The necessity of allowance for the influence of the group-velocity dispersion and coherent effects on the shape of the recorded spectral lines is experimentally shown.

  3. Simultaneous soft and hard X-ray spectroscopy of AM Herculis with EXOSAT: Discovery of photospheric absorption features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paerels, Frits; Heise, John; Teeseling, Andre Van

    1994-01-01

    We present 0.1-10 keV spectroscopic observations of AM Herculis obtained with the Transmission Grating Spectrometers and Medium Energy experiments on EXOSAT, taken when the object was in its 'reversed X-ray mode.' The observation covers over six binary orbits without interruption, enabling us to analyze the phase and intensity dependence of both the hard and the soft spectrum simultaneously. We resolve the optically thick soft X-ray spectrum, and find definite evidence for time- and phase-dependent photospheric absorption structure arising in the white dwarf atmosphere. We present a simple empirical analysis of the combined soft and hard X-ray spectra, to examine whether the effect of a better determination of the column density of neutral absorbing material, afforded by our data, would solve the problem of the large relative soft X-ray overluminosity previously observed in AM Her. We find that a single absorbing column fits the entire spectrum, and that the column densities implied are indeed substantially lower than previously estimated. However, during half the binary orbit we still determine a strong lower limit to the soft-to-hard luminosity ratio of L(sub soft)/L(sub hard) is greater than or approximately equal to 10, in conflict with the simple radiative shock models for the accretion region. We argue that this indicates the need to reexamine the luminosity problem using explicit models for the emission spectrum based on a full solution of the atmospheric radiative transfer problem.

  4. Absorption features in the quasar HS 1603 + 3820 II. Distance to the absorber obtained from photoionisation modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Różańska, A.; Nikołajuk, M.; Czerny, B.; Dobrzycki, A.; Hryniewicz, K.; Bechtold, J.; Ebeling, H.

    2014-04-01

    We present the photoionisation modelling of the intrinsic absorber in the bright quasar HS 1603 + 3820. We constructed the broad-band spectral energy distribution using the optical/UV/X-ray observations from different instruments as inputs for the photoionisation calculations. The spectra from the Keck telescope show extremely high CIV to HI ratios, for the first absorber in system A, named A1. This value, together with high column density of CIV ion, place strong constraints on the photoionisation model. We used two photoionisation codes to derive the hydrogen number density at the cloud illuminated surface. By estimating bolometric luminosity of HS 1603 + 3820 using the typical formula for quasars, we calculated the distance to A1. We could find one photoionization solution, by assuming either a constant density cloud (which was modelled using CLOUDY), or a stratified cloud (which was modelled using TITAN), as well as the solar abundances. This model explained both the ionic column density of CIV and the high CIV to HI ratio. The location of A1 is 0.1 pc, and it is situated even closer to the nucleus than the possible location of the Broad Line Region in this object. The upper limit of the distance is sensitive to the adopted covering factor and the carbon abundance. Photoionisation modelling always prefers dense clouds with the number density n0 = 1010 - 1012 cm-3, which explains intrinsic absorption in HS 1603 + 3820. This number density is of the same order as that in the disk atmosphere at the implied distance of A1. Therefore, our results show that the disk wind that escapes from the outermost accretion disk atmosphere can build up dense absorber in quasars.

  5. Spectroscopic remote sensing of plant stress at leaf and canopy levels using the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature with continuum removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanches, Ieda Del'Arco; Souza Filho, Carlos Roberto; Kokaly, Raymond Floyd

    2014-11-01

    This paper explores the use of spectral feature analysis to detect plant stress in visible/near infrared wavelengths. A time series of close range leaf and canopy reflectance data of two plant species grown in hydrocarbon-contaminated soil was acquired with a portable spectrometer. The ProSpecTIR-VS airborne imaging spectrometer was used to obtain far range hyperspectral remote sensing data over the field experiment. Parameters describing the chlorophyll 680 nm absorption feature (depth, width, and area) were derived using continuum removal applied to the spectra. A new index, the Plant Stress Detection Index (PSDI), was calculated using continuum-removed values near the chlorophyll feature centre (680 nm) and on the green-edge (560 and 575 nm). Chlorophyll feature's depth, width and area, the PSDI and a narrow-band normalised difference vegetation index were evaluated for their ability to detect stressed plants. The objective was to analyse how the parameters/indices were affected by increasing degrees of plant stress and to examine their utility as plant stress indicators at the remote sensing level (e.g. airborne sensor). For leaf data, PSDI and the chlorophyll feature area revealed the highest percentage (67-70%) of stressed plants. The PSDI also proved to be the best constraint for detecting the stress in hydrocarbon-impacted plants with field canopy spectra and airborne imaging spectroscopy data. This was particularly true using thresholds based on the ASD canopy data and considering the combination of higher percentage of stressed plants detected (across the thresholds) and fewer false-positives.

  6. Effects of ionizable residues on the absorption spectrum and initial electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Johnson, E T; Nagarajan, V; Zazubovich, V; Riley, K; Small, G J; Parson, W W

    2003-11-25

    Effects of ionizable amino acids on spectroscopic properties and electron-transfer kinetics in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) of Rhodobacter sphaeroides are investigated by site-directed mutations designed to alter the electrostatic environment of the bacteriochlorophyll dimer that serves as the photochemical electron donor (P). Arginine residues at homologous positions in the L and M subunits (L135 and M164) are changed independently: Arg L135 is replaced by Lys, Leu, Glu, and Gln and Arg M164 by Leu and Glu. Asp L155 also is mutated to Asn, Tyr L164 to Phe, and Cys L247 to Lys and Asp. The mutations at L155, L164, and M164 have little effect on the absorption spectrum, whereas those at L135 and L247 shift the long-wavelength absorption band of P to higher energies. Fits to the ground-state absorption and hole-burned spectra indicate that the blue shift and increased width of the absorption band in the L135 mutants are due partly to changes in the distribution of energies for the zero-phonon absorption line and partly to stronger electron-phonon coupling. The initial electron-transfer kinetics are not changed significantly in most of the mutants, but the time constant increases from 3.0 +/- 0.2 in wild-type RCs to 4.7 +/- 0.2 in C(L247)D and 7.0 +/- 0.3 ps in C(L247)K. The effects of the mutations on the solvation free energies of the product of the initial electron-transfer reaction (P(+)) and the charge-transfer states that contribute to the absorption spectrum ( and ) were calculated by using a distance-dependent electrostatic screening factor. The results are qualitatively in accord with the view that electrostatic interactions of the bacteriochlorophylls with ionized residues of the protein are strongly screened and make only minor contributions to the energetics and dynamics of charge separation. However, the slowing of electron transfer in the Cys L247 mutants and the blue shift of the spectrum in some of the Arg L135 and Cys L247 mutants cannot be

  7. An Exploration of the Features and Applications of the Java NEXRAD Project at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Delgreco, S.

    2005-12-01

    NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) acquires Weather Surveillance Radar, 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) data from a national network of ~160 NWS, DOD and FAA sites. These are commonly referred to as Next-Generation Radars (NEXRAD). The NCDC archive contains over 1000 terabytes of NEXRAD volume scan (base) data, known as Level-II, and derived products, known as Level-III, dating back to 1991. The NCDC Java NEXRAD software provides tools to decode, visualize and export NEXRAD Radar data to multiple common scientific formats. This includes the NEXRAD Viewer and NEXRAD Data Exporter applications. The Viewer is a GIS-based interactive viewer while the Data Exporter creates geo-referenced vector and raster NEXRAD datasets, in formats such as Shapefile, Well-Known Text, ASCII GRID, NetCDF and GeoTIFF. By providing users with data in familiar formats, NEXRAD data is now accessible to a broader audience. Real-time data and batch processing are supported and the Java NEXRAD API allows full integration of the software into custom applications. One example application of the Java NEXRAD Tools is the NCDC Severe Weather Inventory, a geo-database containing the severe weather features (tornado, hail, mesocyclone, storm structure) for all NEXRAD data at NCDC. Other applications include the ability to create custom mosaics and composites from multiple NEXRAD products and the incorporation of NEXRAD data into a 3-dimensional GIS environment. These applications showcase the flexibility and scalability of the Java NEXRAD Tools software package.

  8. Modelling the Emission And/or Absorption Features in the High Resolution Spectra of the Southern Binary System: HH Car

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseoglu, Dogan; Bakış, Hicran

    2016-07-01

    High-resolution spectra (R=48000) of the southern close binary system, HH Car, has been analyzed with modern analysis techniques. Precise absolute parameters were derived from the simultaneous solution of the radial velocity, produced in this study and the light curves, published. According to the results of these analyses, the primary component is an O9 type main sequence star while the secondary component is a giant/subgiant star with a spectral type of B0. Hα emissions can be seen explicitly in the spectra of HH Car. These features were modelled using the absolute parameters of the components. Since components of HH Car are massive early-type stars, mass loss through stellar winds can be expected. This study revealed that the components of HH Car have stellar winds and the secondary component loses mass to the primary. Stellar winds and the gas stream between the components were modelled as a hot shell around the system. It is determined that the interaction between the winds and the gas stream leads to formation of a high temperature impact region.

  9. Lead is not off center in PbTe: the importance of r-space phase information in extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keiber, T; Bridges, F; Sales, B C

    2013-08-30

    PbTe is a well-known thermoelectric material. Recent x-ray total scattering studies suggest that Pb moves off center along 100 in PbTe, by ∼0.2  Å at 300 K, producing a split Pb-Te pair distribution. We present an extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) study of PbTe (and Tl doped PbTe) to determine if Pb or Te is off center. EXAFS provides sensitive r- or k-space phase information which can differentiate between a split peak for the Pb-Te distribution (indicative of off-center Pb) and a thermally broadened peak. We find no evidence for a split peak for Pb-Te or Te-Pb. At 300 K, the vibration amplitude for Pb-Te (or Te-Pb) is large; this thermally induced disorder is indicative of weak bonds, and the large disorder is consistent with the low thermal conductivity at 300 K. We also find evidence of an anharmonic potential for the nearest Pb-Te bonds, consistent with the overall anharmonicity found for the phonon modes. This effect is modeled by a "skew" factor (C3) which significantly improves the fit of the Pb-Te and Te-Pb peaks for the high temperature EXAFS data; C3 becomes significant above approximately 150-200 K. The consequences of these results will be discussed.

  10. Synthesis temperature effect on the structural features and optical absorption of Zn(1-x)Co(x)Al2O4 oxides.

    PubMed

    Gaudon, M; Apheceixborde, A; Ménétrier, M; Le Nestour, A; Demourgues, A

    2009-10-05

    Zinc/cobalt aluminates with spinel-type structure were prepared by a polymeric route, leading to a pure phase with controlled grain size. The prepared pigments were characterized by powder X-ray diffraction Rietveld analyses in order to determine structural features, scanning electron microscopy for morphological investigation, helium pycnometry and (27)Al MAS NMR in order to highlight the occurrence of defects inside the structure, and UV-visible-near-IR spectroscopy to identify electronic transitions responsible for the compounds' color. The green-blue coloration of these pigments is known to be dependent on the sample thermal history. Here, for the first time, the Zn(1-x)Co(x)Al(2)O(4) color is newly interpreted. The pigment is green once synthesized at low temperature (i.e., with diminution of the pigment grain size); this variation was attributed to the appearance of a new absorption band located at about 500 nm, linked to a complex network feature involving Co ions in octahedral sites as well as oxygen and cationic vacancies. Hence, this work shows the possibility of easily getting a nonstoichiometric network with an abnormal cationic distribution from "chimie douce" processes with moderate synthesis temperature, and so various colorations for the same composition.

  11. New narrow infrared absorption features in the spectrum of Io between 3600 and 3100 cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandford, Scott A.; Geballe, Thomas R.; Salama, Farid; Goorvitch, David

    1994-01-01

    We report the discovery of a series of infrared absorption bands between 3600 and 3100/cm (2.8-3.2 micrometers) in the spectrum of Io. Individual narrow bands are detected at 3553, 3514.5, 3438, 3423, 3411.5, and 3401/cm (2.815, 2.845, 2.909, 2.921, 2.931, and 2.940 micrometers, respectively). The positions and relative strengths of these bands, and the difference of their absolute strengths between the leading and trailing faces of Io, indicate that they are due to SO2. The band at 3438/cm (2.909 micrometers) could potentially have a contribution from an additional molecular species. The existence of these bands in the spectrum of Io indicates that a substantial fraction of the SO2 on Io must reside in transparent ices having relatively large crystal sizes. The decrease in the continuum observed at the high frequency ends of the spectra is probably due to the low frequency side of the recently detected, strong 3590/cm (2.79 micrometer) feature. This band is likely due to the combination of a moderately strong SO2 band and an additional absorption from another molecular species, perhaps H2O isolated in SO2 at low concentrations. A broad (FWHM approximately = 40-60/cm), weak band is seen near 3160/cm (3.16 micrometers) and is consistent with the presence of small quantities of H2O isolated in SO2-rich ices. There is no evidence in the spectra for the presence of H2O vapor on Io. Thus, the spectra presented here neither provide unequivocal evidence for the presence of H2O on Io nor preclude it at the low concentrations suggested by past studies.

  12. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M; Hunter, C Neil; Blankenship, Robert E

    2016-11-03

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation-bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes.

  13. Evaluating the Nature of So-Called S*-State Feature in Transient Absorption of Carotenoids in Light-Harvesting Complex 2 (LH2) from Purple Photosynthetic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Carotenoids are a class of natural pigments present in all phototrophic organisms, mainly in their light-harvesting proteins in which they play roles of accessory light absorbers and photoprotectors. Extensive time-resolved spectroscopic studies of these pigments have revealed unexpectedly complex photophysical properties, particularly for carotenoids in light-harvesting LH2 complexes from purple bacteria. An ambiguous, optically forbidden electronic excited state designated as S* has been postulated to be involved in carotenoid excitation relaxation and in an alternative carotenoid-to-bacteriochlorophyll energy transfer pathway, as well as being a precursor of the carotenoid triplet state. However, no definitive and satisfactory origin of the carotenoid S* state in these complexes has been established, despite a wide-ranging series of studies. Here, we resolve the ambiguous origin of the carotenoid S* state in LH2 complex from Rba. sphaeroides by showing that the S* feature can be seen as a combination of ground state absorption bleaching of the carotenoid pool converted to cations and the Stark spectrum of neighbor neutral carotenoids, induced by temporal electric field brought by the carotenoid cation–bacteriochlorophyll anion pair. These findings remove the need to assign an S* state, and thereby significantly simplify the photochemistry of carotenoids in these photosynthetic antenna complexes. PMID:27726397

  14. An accelerated line-by-line option for MODTRAN combining on-the-fly generation of line center absorption within 0.1 cm-1 bins and pre-computed line tails

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Alexander; Conforti, Patrick; Hawes, Fred

    2015-05-01

    A Line-By-Line (LBL) option is being developed for MODTRAN6. The motivation for this development is two-fold. Firstly, when MODTRAN is validated against an independent LBL model, it is difficult to isolate the source of discrepancies. One must verify consistency between pressure, temperature and density profiles, between column density calculations, between continuum and particulate data, between spectral convolution methods, and more. Introducing a LBL option directly within MODTRAN will insure common elements for all calculations other than those used to compute molecular transmittances. The second motivation for the LBL upgrade is that it will enable users to compute high spectral resolution transmittances and radiances for the full range of current MODTRAN applications. In particular, introducing the LBL feature into MODTRAN will enable first-principle calculations of scattered radiances, an option that is often not readily available with LBL models. MODTRAN will compute LBL transmittances within one 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin at a time, marching through the full requested band pass. The LBL algorithm will use the highly accurate, pressure- and temperature-dependent MODTRAN Padé approximant fits of the contribution from line tails to define the absorption from all molecular transitions centered more than 0.05 cm-1 from each 0.1 cm-1 spectral bin. The beauty of this approach is that the on-the-fly computations for each 0.1 cm-1 bin will only require explicit LBL summing of transitions centered within a 0.2 cm-1 spectral region. That is, the contribution from the more distant lines will be pre-computed via the Padé approximants. The status of the LBL effort will be presented. This will include initial thermal and solar radiance calculations, validation calculations, and self-validations of the MODTRAN band model against its own LBL calculations.

  15. Llano Grande Center's Oral History Project Sparks Cultural and Economic Renewal in Texas's Rio Grande Valley. Rural Trust Featured Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Null, Elizabeth Higgins

    The Llano Grande Center for Research and Development started as an oral history experiment in two of Texas's poorest school districts. Since the 1920s, when this arid region in the southernmost tip of Texas was first transformed into the orchards and farmlands of the "Magic Valley," workers of Mexican descent have worked the land. Over…

  16. Genetic and Clinical Features of Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma: The Experience of a Single Center in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Torrealba, Gabriel; Sáenz, Adriana; Santamaría, Carlos; Morera, Estela; Alvarado, Silvia; Roa, Yolanda; González, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    Background. Activating mutations in the RET gene leads to medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). Guidelines encourage performing RET analysis in subjects with hereditary and sporadic disease. Materials and Methods. Design. Observational, case series report study. Patients. Subjects diagnosed with MTC, with a thyroidectomy performed in a single center in Costa Rica between the years 2006 and 2015. Diagnosis and Follow-Up. Pre- and postoperative calcitonin, RET mutation, and neck ultrasound and tomography were obtained. Results. 21 subjects with histological diagnosis of MTC were followed up. The average age at diagnosis was 52.0 ± 15.7 years. The preoperative mean value of calcitonin was 1340 ± 665 pg/mL. Evidence of RET mutation was found in 26.3% of the patients, with only 2 of them grouped in the same kindred. We found statistically significant differences in mean ages between mutated (38.4 ± 20.2 y) versus nonmutated RET gene (54.6 ± 11.8 y, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences regarding tumor size, metastases, and surgical reintervention. Conclusions. We report the results of RET mutation analysis in subjects with MTC in a single center of Costa Rica. The availability of this tool increases the probability of identifying familial MTC, with the benefit of detecting affected subjects and their relatives at an earlier age. PMID:28018431

  17. Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura - analysis of clinical features, laboratory characteristics and therapeutic outcome of 24 patients treated at a Tertiary Care Center in Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Shahid; Zaidi, Syed Z. A.; Motabi, Ibraheem H; Alshehry, Nawal Faiez; AlGhamdi, Mubarak S.; Tailor, Imran Khan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) is a life-threatening disease. The primary aim was overall response rate (ORR) assessment in the treated patients Methods: This retrospective study included 24 patients treated during 2006-2015. TTP patients with microangiopathic hemolysis (MAHA) and thrombocytopenia were included. We analyzed clinical features, laboratory characteristics and treatment outcomes of 24 TTP patients treated at our tertiary care center (KFMC). Results: Twenty-four TTP patients (18 females; 6 males) had a mean age of 33.5±13.9 years; 22(91%) had neurologic features, 7(29%) fever, 10(42%) renal impairment; 4(20.83%) cardiac manifestations; 22(91.7%) had triad with additional neurologic abnormalities; only 2(8.2%) had pentad of TTP. Majority (54.16%) had idiopathic TTP. All patients received therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE); 23(95.8%) received adjunctive corticosteroids and 13(54.2%) received rituximab either due to refractoriness to TPE on ~day7, or earlier. Twenty-one out of 24 (87.5%) achieved complete remission (CR) without any subsequent relapse. At 22 months (median, range 1-113), 20 patients (83.3%) are alive at the time of report. Three patients died during acute episode because of sever disease or delayed treatment and one died in CR. Conclusion: TPE, steroids and or rituximab was very effective in preventing high risk of mortality and achieving durable CR in 87.5% of patients. More awareness is needed for early diagnosis and early referral to centers with appropriate tertiary care facilities.. PMID:28083052

  18. Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) for the Learner-Centered Information-Age Paradigm of Education: A Study to Improve the Design of the Functions and Features of PIES

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dutta, Pratima

    2013-01-01

    The Personalized Integrated Educational System (PIES) design theory is a design recommendation regarding the function and features of Learning Managements Systems (LMS) that can support the information-age learner-centered paradigm of education. The purpose of this study was to improve the proposed functions and features of the PIES design theory…

  19. Clinical features, mutations and treatment of 104 patients of Diamond-Blackfan anemia in China: a single-center retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yang; Chen, Xiaojuan; An, Wenbin; Ruan, Min; Zhang, Jingliao; Chang, Lixian; Zhang, Ranran; Zhu, Shuai; Zhang, Yingchi; Yang, Wenyu; Guo, Ye; Yuan, Weiping; Zou, Yao; Chen, Yumei; Zhu, Xiaofan

    2016-10-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia (DBA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome characterized by a paucity of erythroid progenitors. We summarized the clinical and genetic features of 104 DBA patients in a single-center retrospective study in China. Data of DBA patients who received consultations at our center from 2003 to 2015 were analyzed retrospectively. Genes encoding 10 ribosomal proteins (RPs) and GATA1 were sequenced for mutation detection. Our cohort was composed of 65 males and 39 females. Congenital malformations were observed in 19 patients. Mutations of the RP genes were detected in 58.3 % patients. Twenty different mutations were first reported. Thirty-four patients received prednisone combined with CsA therapy, and improvement was observed in 20 cases. During follow-up for a median 39 months, 33.7 % of the patients achieved remission, 41.3 % of the patients were persistently transfusion independent, 21.7 % of the patients were transfusion dependent, and three patients died. The patient group with detected mutations had a younger age of disease onset, a higher malformation rate, and tended to have a lower remission rate and a higher transfusion-dependence rate. Prednisone in combination with cyclosporine A can be a second-line choice for DBA patients. Differences were detected between DBA patients with and without detectable mutations in the genes studied.

  20. Detailed Spectral Analysis of the 260 ks XMM-Newton Data of 1E 1207.4-5209 and Significance of a 2.1 keV Absorption Feature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Kaya; Chonko, James C.; Hailey, Charles J.

    2005-10-01

    We have reanalyzed the 260 ks XMM-Newton observation of 1E 1207.4-5209. There are several significant improvements over previous work. First, a much broader range of physically plausible spectral models was used. Second, we have used a more rigorous statistical analysis. The standard F-distribution was not employed, but rather the exact finite statistics F-distribution was determined by Monte Carlo simulations. This approach was motivated by the recent work of Protassov and coworkers and Freeman and coworkers. They demonstrated that the standard F-distribution is not even asymptotically correct when applied to assess the significance of additional absorption features in a spectrum. With our improved analysis we do not find a third and fourth spectral feature in 1E 1207.4-5209 but only the two broad absorption features previously reported. Two additional statistical tests, one line model dependent and the other line model independent, confirmed our modified F-test analysis. For all physically plausible continuum models in which the weak residuals are strong enough to fit, the residuals occur at the instrument Au M edge. As a sanity check we confirmed that the residuals are consistent in strength and position with the instrument Au M residuals observed in 3C 273.

  1. CAN GROUND-BASED TELESCOPES DETECT THE OXYGEN 1.27 {mu}m ABSORPTION FEATURE AS A BIOMARKER IN EXOPLANETS?

    SciTech Connect

    Kawahara, Hajime; Matsuo, Taro; Takami, Michihiro; Fujii, Yuka; Kotani, Takayuki; Tamura, Motohide; Murakami, Naoshi; Guyon, Olivier

    2012-10-10

    The oxygen absorption line imprinted in the scattered light from Earth-like planets has been considered the most promising metabolic biomarker for exolife. We examine the feasibility of the detection of the 1.27 {mu}m oxygen band from habitable exoplanets, in particular, around late-type stars observed with a future instrument on a 30 m class ground-based telescope. We analyzed the night airglow around 1.27 {mu}m with the IRCS/echelle spectrometer on Subaru and found that the strong telluric emission from atmospheric oxygen molecules declines by an order of magnitude by midnight. By compiling nearby star catalogs combined with the sky background model, we estimate the detectability of the oxygen absorption band from an Earth twin, if it exists, around nearby stars. We find that the most dominant source of photon noise for the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m band detection comes from the night airglow if the contribution of the stellar point-spread function (PSF) halo is suppressed enough to detect the planet. We conclude that the future detectors, for which the detection contrast is limited by photon noise, can detect the oxygen 1.27 {mu}m absorption band of Earth twins for {approx}50 candidates of the late-type star. This paper demonstrates the importance of deploying a small inner working angle as an efficient coronagraph and extreme adaptive optics on extremely large telescopes, and clearly shows that doing so will enable the study of potentially habitable planets.

  2. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  3. Variation of the 3-μm absorption feature on Mars: observations over eastern Valles Marineris by the mariner 6 infrared spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvin, Wendy M.

    1997-01-01

    A new approach for calibration of the shortest wavelength channel (1.8 to 6.0 μm) of the Mariner 6 infrared spectrometer was derived. This calibration provides a new description of the instrument response function from 1.8 to 3.7 μm and accounts for the thermal contribution to the signal at longer wavelengths. This allows the two segments from 1.8 to 6 μm to be merged into a single spectrum. The broad water of hydration absorption spans these two segments and is examined in these merged spectra using a method of band integration. Unlike previous analyses which rely on ratios at two wavelengths, the integration method can assess the band strength independently from the albedo in the near infrared. Spectra taken over the eastern end of the Valles Marineris are examined for variations of the band-integrated value, and three distinct clusters are found. Within the estimated uncertainty, two clusters (both low and high albedo) have approximately the same integrated band depth. The third cluster (medium albedo) has an integrated band depth about 10% higher. This difference cannot be systematically attributed to either surface or atmospheric parameters and suggests variation in the amount of water either chemically or physically bound in surface materials. Approximately one-half of the high integrated band depth cluster is associated with chaotic terrain at the source of outflow channels, the other half occurs over lower inertia plains adjacent to chasmata. This suggests both surface physical properties and mineralogy as well as water in exchange with the atmosphere contribute to the 3-μm bound water absorption.

  4. Cytogenetic and Clinical Features in Children Suspected With Congenital Abnormalities in 1 Medical Center of Zhejiang Province From 2011 to 2014

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shujiong; Sun, Liying; Tu, Miaoying; Zou, Chaochun; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to investigate the detection rate of chromosome abnormalities in children suspected with congenital disorders in 1 single center, identify any differences according to different classification criteria, and try to enlighten the medical professionals what clinical features should be transferred for cytogenetic analysis. From January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014, children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders were included. All the cytogenetic analyses were performed in the Medical Biology and Genetic Department Laboratory in Zhejiang DIAN Diagnostics. We evaluated the variants of clinical indications, and incidence and types of chromosomal abnormalities among groups. During the study period, 4129 samples were collected and analyzed. Among them, 769 children were detected with chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 18.62% of all referral cases. The ratio of sex-linked chromosomal abnormalities to autosomal ones was 1:3.2. The detection rates were 19.66% (365/1857) for boys and 17.78% (404/2272) for girls. Most of trisomy 21 were found before the age of 1 year old, while most of children with Turner syndrome were found after 6 years old. The group presenting with specific clinical stigmata had highest detection rate of 59.1%. We demonstrated the detection rates of chromosome abnormalities in children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders. Combined with previous report, we established a database of common chromosomal anomalies and the clinical features that could be useful for genetic counseling and remind the medical professionals what kind of patients should be transferred to genetic analysis. PMID:26496335

  5. Cytogenetic and Clinical Features in Children Suspected With Congenital Abnormalities in 1 Medical Center of Zhejiang Province From 2011 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Mao, Shujiong; Sun, Liying; Tu, Miaoying; Zou, Chaochun; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the detection rate of chromosome abnormalities in children suspected with congenital disorders in 1 single center, identify any differences according to different classification criteria, and try to enlighten the medical professionals what clinical features should be transferred for cytogenetic analysis.From January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2014, children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders were included. All the cytogenetic analyses were performed in the Medical Biology and Genetic Department Laboratory in Zhejiang DIAN Diagnostics. We evaluated the variants of clinical indications, and incidence and types of chromosomal abnormalities among groups.During the study period, 4129 samples were collected and analyzed. Among them, 769 children were detected with chromosome abnormalities, accounting for 18.62% of all referral cases. The ratio of sex-linked chromosomal abnormalities to autosomal ones was 1:3.2. The detection rates were 19.66% (365/1857) for boys and 17.78% (404/2272) for girls. Most of trisomy 21 were found before the age of 1 year old, while most of children with Turner syndrome were found after 6 years old. The group presenting with specific clinical stigmata had highest detection rate of 59.1%.We demonstrated the detection rates of chromosome abnormalities in children who were suspected with chromosomal disorders. Combined with previous report, we established a database of common chromosomal anomalies and the clinical features that could be useful for genetic counseling and remind the medical professionals what kind of patients should be transferred to genetic analysis.

  6. Geometric structure, electronic structure and optical absorption properties of one-dimensional thiolate-protected gold clusters containing a quasi-face-centered-cubic (quasi-fcc) Au-core: a density-functional theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Ma, Zhongyun; Wang, Pu; Pei, Yong

    2016-09-29

    Based on the recently reported atomic structures of thiolate-protected Au28(SR)20, Au36(SR)24, Au44(SR)28, and Au52(SR)32 clusters, a family of homogeneous, linear, thiolate-protected gold superstructures containing novel quasi-face-centered-cubic (quasi-fcc) Au-cores is theoretically envisioned, denoted as the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N cluster. By means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) calculations, a unified view of the geometric structure, electronic structure, magic stable size and size-dependent NIR absorption properties of Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters is provided. We find that the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters demonstrate oscillating transformation energies dependent on N. The odd-N clusters show more favorable (negative) reaction energies than the even-N clusters. The magic stability of recently reported Au28(SR)20, Au36(SR)24, Au44(SR)28, Au52(SR)32 and Au76(SR)44 clusters can be addressed from the relative reaction energies and geometric distortion of Au-cores. A novel 4N + 4 magic electron-number is suggested for the Au20+8N(SR)16+4N cluster. Using the polyhedral skeletal electron pair theory (PSEPT) and the extended Hückel molecular orbital (EHMO) calculations, we suggest that the magic 4N + 4 electron number is correlated with the quasi-fcc Au-cores, which can be viewed as double helical tetrahedron-Au4 chains. The size-dependent optical absorption properties of Au20+8N(SR)16+4N clusters are revealed based on TD-DFT calculations. We propose that these clusters are potential candidates for the experimental synthesis of atomically precise one-dimensional ligand protected gold superstructures with tunable NIR absorption properties.

  7. A time-resolved iron-specific X-ray absorption experiment yields no evidence for an Fe2+ --> Fe3+ transition during QA- --> QB electron transfer in the photosynthetic reaction center.

    PubMed

    Hermes, Sabine; Bremm, Oliver; Garczarek, Florian; Derrien, Valerie; Liebisch, Peter; Loja, Paola; Sebban, Pierre; Gerwert, Klaus; Haumann, Michael

    2006-01-17

    Previous time-resolved FTIR measurements suggested the involvement of an intermediary component in the electron transfer step Q(A)- --> Q(B) in the photosynthetic reaction center (RC) from Rhodobacter sphaeroides [Remy and Gerwert (2003) Nat. Struct. Biol. 10, 637]. By a kinetic X-ray absorption experiment at the Fe K-edge we investigated whether oxidation occurs at the ferric non-heme iron located between the two quinones. In isolated reaction centers with a high content of functional Q(B), at a time resolution of 30 micros and at room temperature, no evidence for transient oxidation of Fe was obtained. However, small X-ray transients occurred, in a similar micro- to millisecond time range as in the IR experiments, which may point to changes in the Fe ligand environment due to the charges on Q(A)- and Q(B)-. In addition, VIS measurements agree with the IR data and do not exclude an intermediate in the Q(A)- --> Q(B) transition.

  8. The Stellar Initial Mass Function in Early-type Galaxies from Absorption Line Spectroscopy. IV. A Super-Salpeter IMF in the Center of NGC 1407 from Non-parametric Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Charlie; van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Villaume, Alexa

    2017-03-01

    It is now well-established that the stellar initial mass function (IMF) can be determined from the absorption line spectra of old stellar systems, and this has been used to measure the IMF and its variation across the early-type galaxy population. Previous work focused on measuring the slope of the IMF over one or more stellar mass intervals, implicitly assuming that this is a good description of the IMF and that the IMF has a universal low-mass cutoff. In this work we consider more flexible IMFs, including two-component power laws with a variable low-mass cutoff and a general non-parametric model. We demonstrate with mock spectra that the detailed shape of the IMF can be accurately recovered as long as the data quality is high (S/N ≳ 300 Å‑1) and cover a wide wavelength range (0.4–1.0 μm). We apply these flexible IMF models to a high S/N spectrum of the center of the massive elliptical galaxy NGC 1407. Fitting the spectrum with non-parametric IMFs, we find that the IMF in the center shows a continuous rise extending toward the hydrogen-burning limit, with a behavior that is well-approximated by a power law with an index of ‑2.7. These results provide strong evidence for the existence of extreme (super-Salpeter) IMFs in the cores of massive galaxies.

  9. Student Success Center Toolkit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jobs For the Future, 2014

    2014-01-01

    "Student Success Center Toolkit" is a compilation of materials organized to assist Student Success Center directors as they staff, launch, operate, and sustain Centers. The toolkit features materials created and used by existing Centers, such as staffing and budgeting templates, launch materials, sample meeting agendas, and fundraising…

  10. The binuclear nickel center in the A-cluster of acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) and two biomimetic dinickel complexes studied by X-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrapers, P.; Mebs, S.; Ilina, Y.; Warner, D. S.; Wörmann, C.; Schuth, N.; Kositzki, R.; Dau, H.; Limberg, C.; Dobbek, H.; Haumann, M.

    2016-05-01

    Acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) is involved in the bacterial carbon oxide conversion pathway. The binuclear nickel sites in ACS enzyme and two biomimetic synthetic compounds containing a Ni(II)Ni(II) unit (1 and 2) were compared using XAS/XES. EXAFS analysis of ACS proteins revealed similar Ni-N/O/S bond lengths and Ni-Ni/Fe distances as in the crystal structure in oxidized ACS, but elongated Ni-ligand bonds in reduced ACS, suggesting more reduced nickel species. The XANES spectra of ACS and the dinickel complexes showed overall similar shapes, but less resolved pre-edge and edge features in ACS, attributed to more distorted square-planar nickel sites in particular in reduced ACS. DFT calculation of pre-edge absorption and Kβ2,5 emission features reproduced the experimental spectra of the synthetic complexes, was sensitive even to the small geometry differences in 1 and 2, and indicated low-spin Ni(II) sites. Comparison of nickel sites in proteins and biomimetic compounds is valuable for deducing structural and electronic differences in response to ligation and redox changes.

  11. Bioacoustic Absorption Spectroscopy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-07

    seas in co-operation with fisheries biologists. The first planned experiment will be in the seas off California in co-operation with the Southwest... Fisheries Science Center of NOAA’s National Marine Fisheries Service. These experiments will be designed to investigate the “signatures” of the two major...formulating environmental adaptation strategies for tactical sonars. Fisheries applications: These results suggest that bioacoustic absorptivity can be used to

  12. Caring for people with dementia in residential aged care: successes with a composite person-centered care model featuring Montessori-based activities.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Gail; Morley, Catherine; Walters, Wendy; Malta, Sue; Doyle, Colleen

    2015-01-01

    Person-centered models of dementia care commonly merge aspects of existing models with additional influences from published and unpublished evidence and existing government policy. This study reports on the development and evaluation of one such composite model of person-centered dementia care, the ABLE model. The model was based on building the capacity and ability of residents living with dementia, using environmental changes, staff education and organizational and community engagement. Montessori principles were also used. The evaluation of the model employed mixed methods. Significant behavior changes were evident among residents of the dementia care Unit after the model was introduced, as were reductions in anti-psychotic and sedative medication. Staff reported increased knowledge about meeting the needs of people with dementia, and experienced organizational culture change that supported the ABLE model of care. Families were very satisfied with the changes.

  13. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  14. Nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C

    2004-03-01

    Our understanding of nutrient absorption continues to grow, from the development of unique animal models and from studies in which cutting-edge molecular and cellular biologic approaches have been used to analyze the structure and function of relevant molecules. Studies of the molecular genetics of inherited disorders have also provided many new insights into these processes. A major advance in lipid absorption has been the cloning and characterization of several intestinal acyl CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferases; these may provide new targets for antiobesity drug therapy. Studies of intestinal cholesterol absorption and reverse cholesterol transport have encouraged the development of novel potential treatments for hyperlipidemia. Observations in genetically modified mice and in humans with mutations in glucose transporter 2 suggest the importance of a separate microsomal membrane transport pathway for glucose transport. The study of iron metabolism has advanced greatly with the identification of the hemochromatosis gene and the continued examination of the genetic regulation of iron absorptive pathways. Several human thiamine transporters have been identified, and their specific roles in different tissues are being explored.

  15. Structural consequences of ammonia binding to the manganese center of the photosynthetic oxygen-evolving complex: an X-ray absorption spectroscopy study of isotropic and oriented photosystem II particles.

    PubMed

    Dau, H; Andrews, J C; Roelofs, T A; Latimer, M J; Liang, W; Yachandra, V K; Sauer, K; Klein, M P

    1995-04-18

    The structure and orientation of the manganese complex in NH3-treated photosystem II (PS II) membrane particles of spinach are being studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. On the basis of earlier work by our group, a structure for the tetranuclear manganese complex of PS II, which consists of two di-mu-oxo-bridged binuclear Mn units linked by a mono-mu-oxo group, has been proposed [Yachandra, V. K., et al. (1993) Science 260, 675-679]. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of the complex modified by NH3 binding in the S2-state is suggestive of an increase in the Mn-Mn distance of one of these units from 2.72 +/- 0.02 to 2.87 +/- 0.02 A, whereas the Mn-Mn distance of the second unit seems to be unaffected by NH3 treatment. The elongation of one binuclear center could result from the replacement of one bridging mu-oxo by an amido group. The lengthening of one Mn-Mn distance means that, by NH3 treatment, the distance degeneracy of the 2.7 A Mn-Mn EXAFS interaction is removed. Consequently, the orientation of individual binuclear units with respect to the membrane normal becomes resolvable by EXAFS spectroscopy of partially oriented PS II membrane particles. The angle between the normal of the PS II-containing membrane and the Mn-Mn vector is determined to be 67 degrees +/- 3 degrees for the 2.87 A distance and 55 degrees +/- 4 degrees for the 2.72 A distance. Only small effects on position, shape, and orientation dependence of Mn K-edge spectra result from NH3 treatment, indicating that the Mn oxidation state, the symmetry of the Mn ligand environment, and the orientation of the complex remain essentially unaffected in the annealed NH3 S2-state. Therefore, it seems likely that the angles determined for the ammonia-modified manganese complex are similar to the respective angles of the untreated complex. The structure of the manganese complex and its orientation in the membrane are discussed.

  16. Acoustic absorption by sunspots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, D. C.; Labonte, B. J.; Duvall, T. L., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The paper presents the initial results of a series of observations designed to probe the nature of sunspots by detecting their influence on high-degree p-mode oscillations in the surrounding photosphere. The analysis decomposes the observed oscillations into radially propagating waves described by Hankel functions in a cylindrical coordinate system centered on the sunspot. From measurements of the differences in power between waves traveling outward and inward, it is demonstrated that sunspots appear to absorb as much as 50 percent of the incoming acoustic waves. It is found that for all three sunspots observed, the amount of absorption increases linearly with horizontal wavenumber. The effect is present in p-mode oscillations with wavelengths both significantly larger and smaller than the diameter of the sunspot umbrae. Actual absorption of acoustic energy of the magnitude observed may produce measurable decreases in the power and lifetimes of high-degree p-mode oscillations during periods of high solar activity.

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy to analyze nuclear geometry and electronic structure of biological metal centers--potential and questions examined with special focus on the tetra-nuclear manganese complex of oxygenic photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Dau, Holger; Liebisch, Peter; Haumann, Michael

    2003-07-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has become a prominent tool for the element-specific analysis of transition metals at the catalytic center of metalloenzymes. In the present study the information content of X-ray spectra with respect to the nuclear geometry and, in particular, to the electronic structure of the protein-bound metal ions is explored using the manganese complex of photosystem II (PSIII) as a model system. The EXAFS range carries direct information on the number and distances of ligands as well as on the chemical type of the ligand donor function. For first-sphere ligands and second-sphere metals (in multinuclear complexes), the determination of precise distances is mostly straightforward, whereas the determination of coordination numbers clearly requires more effort. The EXAFS section starts with an exemplifying discussion of a PSII spectrum data set with focus on the coordination number problem. Subsequently, the method of linear dichroism EXAFS spectroscopy is introduced and it is shown how the EXAFS data leads to an atomic resolution model for the tetra-manganese complex of PSII. In the XANES section the following aspects are considered: (1) Alternative approaches are evaluated for determination of the metal-oxidation state by comparison with a series of model compounds. (2) The interpretation of XANES spectra in terms of molecular orbitals (MOs) is approached by comparative multiple-scattering calculations and MO calculations. (3) The underlying reasons for the oxidation-state dependence of the XANES spectra are explored. Furthermore, the potential of modern XANES theory is demonstrated by presenting first simulations of the dichroism in the XANES spectra of the PSII manganese complex.

  18. Clinicopathologic and genetic features of primary bronchopulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma: the MD Anderson Cancer Center experience and comprehensive review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Salem, Alireza; Bell, Diana; Sepesi, Boris; Papadimitrakopoulou, Vassiliki; El-Naggar, Adel; Moran, Cesar A; Kalhor, Neda

    2017-03-25

    Primary bronchopulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma (BPMEC) is a rare tumor. The fusion protein MECT1-MAML2 has been implicated as a causative genetic event in salivary and BPMECs. Several studies have shown the impact of MECT1-MAML2 on the diagnosis and prognosis of salivary gland mucoepidermoid carcinoma; however, few studies have been published regarding MECT1-MAML2 in the context of primary BPMEC. We describe the clinicopathologic, genetic, and outcome data of 16 patients with BPMEC. Clinicopathologic features were recorded from the electronic medical records. All tumors were reviewed by two expert pulmonary pathologists and graded according to previously established criteria. The presence of MECT1-MAML2 was evaluated with reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction using RNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumor tissue. Patients included 9 women and 7 men with a median age of 50 years (range, 7 to 82 years). Tumors exhibited low (n = 14, 88%), and high (n = 2, 12%) grade histologic features. Eight of nine tested tumors (89%) were positive for MECT1-MAML2. The median follow-up time was 40.8 months (range, 1.8-120). Median overall survival for patients with high-grade tumors was 12 months, which was significantly (p = 0.002) shorter than that for patients with low-grade tumors (survival undefined). We also provide a comprehensive review of literature of cases of primary bronchopulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma and summarize our findings in this context. MECT1-MAML2 fusion transcript is a driver genetic event in the pathogenesis of primary BPMEC. Histologic grade continues to play a pivotal role in the survival of patients with primary bronchopulmonary mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

  19. Near-infrared absorption spectroscopy of interstellar hydrocarbon grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pendleton, Y. J.; Sandford, S. A.; Allamandola, L. J.; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Sellgren, K.

    1994-01-01

    We present new 3600 - 2700/cm (2.8 - 3.7 micrometer) spectra of objects whose extinction is dominated by dust in the diffuse interstellar medium. The observations presented here augment an ongoing study of the organic component of the diffuse interstellar medium. These spectra contain a broad feature centered near 3300/cm (3.0 micrometers) and/or a feature with a more complex profile near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers), the latter of which is attributed to saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons in interstellar grains and is the primary interest of this paper. As in our earlier work, the similarity of the absorption bands near 2950/cm (3.4 micrometers) along different lines of sight and the correlation of these features with interstellar extinction reveal that the carrier of this band lies in the dust in the diffuse interstellar medium (DISM). At least 2.5% of the cosmic carbon in the local interstellar medium and 4% toward the Galactic center is tied up in the carrier of the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) band. The spectral structure of the diffuse dust hydrocarbon C-H stretch absorption features is reasonably similar to UV photolyzed laboratory ice residues and is quite similar to the carbonaceous component of the Murchison meteorite. The similarity between the DISM and the meteoritic spectrum suggests that some of the interstellar material originally incorporated into the solar nebula may have survived relatively untouched in primitive solar system bodies. Comparisons of the DISM spectrum to hydrogenated amorphous carbon and quenched carbonaceous composite are also presented. The A(sub V)/tau ratio for the 2950/cm (3.4 micrometer) feature is lower toward the Galactic center than toward sources in the local solar neighborhood (approximately 150 for the Galactic center sources vs. approximately 250 for the local ISM sources). A similar trend has been observed previously for silicates in the diffuse medium by Roche & Aitken, suggesting that (1) the silicate and carbonaceous

  20. Prospective Evaluation of Infection Episodes in Cancer Patients in a Tertiary Care Academic Center: Microbiological Features and Risk Factors for Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Çalık Başaran, Nursel; Karaağaoğlu, Ergun; Hasçelik, Gülşen; Durusu Tanrıöver, Mine; Akova, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We aimed to determine the frequency, type, and etiology of infections and the risk factors for infections and mortality in hospitalized cancer patients. Materials and Methods: We prospectively enrolled adult cancer patients hospitalized in the internal medicine wards of a tertiary care academic center between January and August 2004. Patients were followed during their hospitalization periods for neutropenia, infections, culture results, and mortality. Results: We followed 473 cancer patients with 818 hospitalization episodes and 384 infection episodes in total. Seventy-nine percent of the infections were nosocomial, and febrile neutropenia (FN) was observed in 196 (51%) of the infection episodes. Bacteremia was found in 29% of FN episodes and in 8% of nonneutropenic patients. Gram-positive bacteria were the leading cause of bacteremia in both neutropenic and nonneutropenic cases (70% and 58%, respectively). Presence of an indwelling central catheter increased bacteremia risk by 3-fold. The overall mortality rate was 17%, whereas 34% of the patients with bloodstream infections died. Presence of bacteremia and advanced disease stage increased overall mortality by 6.1-fold and 3.7-fold, respectively. Conclusion: Nearly half of the cancer patients developed an infection during their hospital stays, with gram-positive bacteria being the predominant etiologic microorganisms. This demonstrates the changing trends in infections considering that, until 2004, gram-negative bacteria were the most predominant microorganisms among cancer patients in our institute. PMID:27095391

  1. Clinical Features and Genetic Background of the Periodic Fever Syndrome with Aphthous Stomatitis, Pharyngitis, and Adenitis: A Single Center Longitudinal Study of 81 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Perko, Daša; Debeljak, Maruša; Toplak, Nataša; Avčin, Tadej

    2015-01-01

    PFAPA syndrome is the most common autoinflammatory disorder in childhood with unknown etiology. The aim of our study was clinical evaluation of PFAPA patients from a single tertiary care center and to determine whether variations of AIM2, MEFV, NLRP3, and MVK genes are involved in PFAPA pathogenesis. Clinical and laboratory data of consecutive patients with PFAPA syndrome followed up at the University Children's Hospital, Ljubljana, were collected from 2008 to 2014. All four genes were PCR amplified and directly sequenced. Eighty-one patients fulfilled criteria for PFAPA syndrome, 50 (63%) boys and 31 (37%) girls, with mean age at disease onset of 2.1 ± 1.5 years. Adenitis, pharyngitis, and aphthae were present in 94%, 98%, and 56%, respectively. Family history of recurrent fevers in childhood was positive in 78%. Nineteen variants were found in 17/62 (27%) patients, 4 different variants in NLRP3 gene in 13 patients, and 6 different variants in MEFV gene in 5 patients, and 2 patients had 2 different variants. No variants of clinical significance were found in MVK and AIM2 genes. Our data suggest that PFAPA could be the result of multiple low-penetrant variants in different genes in combination with epigenetic and environmental factors leading to uniform clinical picture. PMID:25821352

  2. First Spectroscopic Identification of Massive Young Stellar Objects in the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    An, Deokkeun; Ramirez, V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Boogert, A. C.; Schultheis, Mathias; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A.

    2009-01-01

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically-selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO2 (15.0 microns), C2H2 (13.7 microns) and HCN (14.0 microns). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 microns CO2 ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH3OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observa.tions demonstra.te the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  3. Light-induced polaronic absorption at low temperature in pure and (Fe, Ce, Cr) doped SrxBa1-xNb2O6 or Ba1-yCayTiO3 crystals and photodissociation of VIS centers into small polarons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapphan, S. E.; Kislova, I.; Wierschem, M.; Lindemann, T.; Gao, M.; Pankrath, R.; Vikhnin, V. S.; Kutsenko, A. B.

    2003-01-01

    Congruent SBN and BCT crystals doped with Fe, Cr, Ce to enhance photorefractive properties, are investigated at low temperature (T>1 K) under illumination with Ar+- and Kr+-laser light. Light-induced absorption changes in a wide spectral range from UV to IR indicate photoinduced charge transfer processes from impurities to polaronic centers. Broad NIR absorptions (at about 0,7 eV) associated with Ti3+ polarons in BCT or with Nb4+ polarons in SBN are observed and their non-linear behaviour with illumination intensity, polarization and temperature is described on the basis of the simple model for the photo charge transport (in SBN: Ce3+ +Nb5+ <----> Ce4++ Nb4+). A broad visible absorption VIS (at about 2 eV) appearing together with the NIR polarons, is shown by photodissociation (with a Kr+-laser) to consist at least partly of small polarons (in BCT and SBN).

  4. Using Methane Absorption to Probe Jupiter's Atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Mosaics of a belt-zone boundary near Jupiter's equator in near-infrared light moderately absorbed by atmospheric methane (top panel), and strongly absorbed by atmospheric methane (bottom panel). The four images that make up each of these mosaics were taken within a few minutes of each other. Methane in Jupiter's atmosphere absorbs light at specific wavelengths called absorption bands. By detecting light close and far from these absorption bands, Galileo can probe to different depths in Jupiter's atmosphere. Sunlight near 732 nanometers (top panel) is moderately absorbed by methane. Some of the light reflected from clouds deep in Jupiter's troposphere is absorbed, enhancing the higher features. Sunlight at 886 nanometers (bottom panel) is strongly absorbed by methane. Most of the light reflected from the deeper clouds is absorbed, making these clouds invisible. Features in the diffuse cloud layer higher in Jupiter's atmosphere are greatly enhanced.

    North is at the top. The mosaic covers latitudes -13 to +3 degrees and is centered at longitude 282 degrees West. The smallest resolved features are tens of kilometers in size. These images were taken on November 5th, 1996, at a range of 1.2 million kilometers by the Solid State Imaging system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  5. Science Center Goes Underground

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    A unique underground science center at Bluffton College, designed to save energy and preserve trees, rolling landscape, and other environmental features of the campus, is under construction in Bluffton, Ohio. (Author)

  6. Facility Focus: Athletic Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the designs of the Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at Ohio State University and the fitness center of Scottsdale Community College in Arizona. Discusses design goals and unique features and includes photographs. (EV)

  7. Analyzing Water's Optical Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical absorption of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.

  8. Infrared spectroscopy of hydrated alkali metal cations: Evidence of multiple photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jordan P.; Lisy, James M.

    2011-07-01

    Infrared predissociation spectra of M+(H2O)4-7, where M = alkali metal, are presented. Hydrogen bonding O-H stretching features are strongly dependent on which fragmentation channel is monitored. Spectra recorded by monitoring the loss of multiple waters show a preference for one absorption feature in the hydrogen-bonded region centered at ˜3430-3500 cm-1, which is assigned to linear-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches. Cyclic- and bent-type hydrogen bonded OH stretches have diminished photodissociation cross sections in the multiple ligand loss channels. Evidence from Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus-evaporative ensemble calculations and laser fluence dependence experiments indicates that the multiple water loss channels are primarily the result of multiple photon absorption which we propose could be due to multiple, independent oscillators within a cluster ion each absorbing a photon during a single, 10 ns laser pulse.

  9. Comparison of x-ray absorption spectra between water and ice: New ice data with low pre-edge absorption cross-section

    SciTech Connect

    Sellberg, Jonas A.; Nilsson, Anders; Kaya, Sarp; Segtnan, Vegard H.; Chen, Chen; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Ogasawara, Hirohito; Nordlund, Dennis; Pettersson, Lars G. M.

    2014-07-21

    The effect of crystal growth conditions on the O K-edge x-ray absorption spectra of ice is investigated through detailed analysis of the spectral features. The amount of ice defects is found to be minimized on hydrophobic surfaces, such as BaF{sub 2}(111), with low concentration of nucleation centers. This is manifested through a reduction of the absorption cross-section at 535 eV, which is associated with distorted hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, a connection is made between the observed increase in spectral intensity between 544 and 548 eV and high-symmetry points in the electronic band structure, suggesting a more extended hydrogen-bond network as compared to ices prepared differently. The spectral differences for various ice preparations are compared to the temperature dependence of spectra of liquid water upon supercooling. A double-peak feature in the absorption cross-section between 540 and 543 eV is identified as a characteristic of the crystalline phase. The connection to the interpretation of the liquid phase O K-edge x-ray absorption spectrum is extensively discussed.

  10. Kinetics of light-induced polaron- and VIS-centers in SBN:Ce single crystals at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubaev, A.; Kapphan, S.; Kislova, I.; Kutsenko, A.; Pankrath, R.; Vikhnin, V.

    2005-01-01

    The promising photorefractive crystal SrxBa1-xNb2O6 (SBN, congruent composition x = 0.61) can be doped with polyvalent ions like Ce to enhance photorefractive properties. Illumination with blue Ar+-laser light at low temperature creates light-induced NIR and VIS absorption bands. The NIR absorption has been identified as being due to Nb4+ electron polarons and their properties have been investigated in some detail. The VIS-Centers are less well understood and their nature is still under discussion. It has been shown by our previous measurements that illumination with red Kr+-laser light (647 nm) or red laser diodes (673 nm) leads to a dissociation of the VIS-Centers and a simultaneous build-up of a transient NIR-polaron absorption. We report here some new facts important for the simplified charge transfer model needed to describe quantitatively the equilibrium values and the dynamics of the NIR-polaron and VIS-center absorption. These features give new insight into the dynamic nature of these VIS-centers, which are currently being discussed as either bipolarons (in analogy to LiNbO3) or polarons trapped at charged centers, or charge transfer vibronic exitons (CTVEs) being trapped at charged centers.

  11. Center Size and Center Performance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helburn, Suzanne; Morris, John

    1996-01-01

    Examined the impact of child care center size on cost, quality, and profits per child. Examined centers ranging from 40 to 80 children and found total cost and revenue per child were similar for small, medium, and large centers. Found profits per child were highest in large centers and that there was no relationship between center quality and…

  12. AAFES Shopping Center Environmental Assessment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-08-01

    AFB, Montana. February. _________. 2006c. Malmstrom Air Force Base Runoff Curve Numbers, Time of Concentration, Peak Discharge. Report Prepared...The existing Base Exchange was constructed in 1957 and the building suffers from dated design features that limit retail merchandising...proposes to construct a new Shopping Center at Malmstrom Air Force Base (AFB), Montana. The Shopping Center would feature retail and food

  13. Clinical features from the history and physical examination that predict the presence or absence of pulmonary embolism in symptomatic emergency department patients: results of a prospective, multi-center study

    PubMed Central

    Courtney, D. Mark; Kline, Jeffrey A.; Kabrhel, Christopher; Moore, Christopher L.; Smithline, Howard A; Nordenholz, Kristen E.; Richman, Peter B.; Plewa, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective Prediction rules for pulmonary embolism (PE) employ variables explicitly shown to estimate the probability of PE. However, clinicians often use variables that have not been similarly validated, yet are implicitly believed to modify probability of PE. The objective of this study was to measure the predictive value of 13 implicit variables. Methods Patients were enrolled in a prospective cohort study from 12 centers in the United States; all had an objective test for PE (D-dimer, CT angiography, or V/Q scan). Clinical features including 12 predefined previously validated (explicit) variables and 13 variables not part of existing prediction rules (implicit) were prospectively recorded at presentation. The primary outcome was VTE (venous thromboembolism: PE or deep venous thrombosis), diagnosed by imaging up to 45 days after enrollment. Variables with adjusted odds ratios from logistic regression with 95% confidence intervals not crossing unity were considered significant. Results 7,940 patients (7.2% VTE+) were enrolled. Mean age was 49±17 years and 67% were female. Eight of 13 implicit variables were significantly associated with VTE; those with an adjusted OR >1.5 included non-cancer related thrombophilia (1.99), pleuritic chest pain (1.53), and family history of VTE (1.51). Implicit variables that predicted no VTE outcome included: substernal chest pain, female gender, and smoking. Nine of 12 explicit variables predicted a positive outcome of VTE, including unilateral leg swelling, recent surgery, estrogen, hypoxemia and active malignancy. Conclusions In symptomatic outpatients being considered for possible PE, non-cancer related thrombophilia, pleuritic chest pain, and family history of VTE increase probability of PE or DVT. Other variables that are part of existing pretest probability systems were validated as important predictors in this diverse sample of US Emergency department patients. PMID:20045580

  14. Neural regulation of intestinal nutrient absorption.

    PubMed

    Mourad, Fadi H; Saadé, Nayef E

    2011-10-01

    The nervous system and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract share several common features including reciprocal interconnections and several neurotransmitters and peptides known as gut peptides, neuropeptides or hormones. The processes of digestion, secretion of digestive enzymes and then absorption are regulated by the neuro-endocrine system. Luminal glucose enhances its own absorption through a neuronal reflex that involves capsaicin sensitive primary afferent (CSPA) fibres. Absorbed glucose stimulates insulin release that activates hepatoenteric neural pathways leading to an increase in the expression of glucose transporters. Adrenergic innervation increases glucose absorption through α1 and β receptors and decreases absorption through activation of α2 receptors. The vagus nerve plays an important role in the regulation of diurnal variation in transporter expression and in anticipation to food intake. Vagal CSPAs exert tonic inhibitory effects on amino acid absorption. It also plays an important role in the mediation of the inhibitory effect of intestinal amino acids on their own absorption at the level of proximal or distal segment. However, chronic extrinsic denervation leads to a decrease in intestinal amino acid absorption. Conversely, adrenergic agonists as well as activation of CSPA fibres enhance peptides uptake through the peptide transporter PEPT1. Finally, intestinal innervation plays a minimal role in the absorption of fat digestion products. Intestinal absorption of nutrients is a basic vital mechanism that depends essentially on the function of intestinal mucosa. However, intrinsic and extrinsic neural mechanisms that rely on several redundant loops are involved in immediate and long-term control of the outcome of intestinal function.

  15. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorption systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.

  16. Dust in MG II Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malhotra, S.

    The dust absorption feature at 2175 AA is detected in a composite spectrum of Mg II absorbers. The composite absorber spectrum is obtained by taking the geometric mean of 92 quasar spectra after aligning them in the rest-frame of 96 absorbers. By aligning the spectra according to absorber redshifts we reinforce the spectral features of the absorbers, and smooth over possible bumps and wiggles in the emission spectra. The width of the observed absorption feature is 200-300 AA (FWHM), or 0.4-0.6 microns^{-1} and the central wavelength is 2240 AA. The Galactic dust feature has a central wavelength of 2176 AA and FWHM = 0.8-1.25 microns^{-1}. Simulations show that this discrepancy between the properties of the 2175 AA feature in Mg II absorbers and Galactic ISM can be mostly explained by the different methods used to measure them (cf. Malhotra 1997).

  17. Universal rules for visible-light absorption in hybrid perovskite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masato; Fujiseki, Takemasa; Miyadera, Tetsuhiko; Sugita, Takeshi; Fujimoto, Shohei; Tamakoshi, Masato; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Fujiwara, Hiroyuki

    2017-03-01

    A variety of organic-inorganic hybrid perovskites (APbX3) consisting of mixed center cations [A = CH3NH3+, HC(NH2)2+, and Cs+] with different PbX3- cages (X = I, Br, and Cl) have been developed to realize high-efficiency solar cells. Nevertheless, clear understanding of the effects of A and X on the optical transition has been lacking. Here, we present universal rules that allow the unified interpretation of the optical absorption in various hybrid perovskites. In particular, we find that the influence of the A-site cation on the light absorption is rather significant and the absorption coefficient (α) reduces to half when CH3NH3+ is replaced with HC(NH2)2+ in the APbI3 system. Our density functional theory calculations reproduce all of the fine absorption features observed in HC(NH2)2PbI3 and CH3NH3PbBr3, allowing the unique assignment of the interband transitions in the Brillouin zone. In contrast to general understanding that the A-site cation involves weakly in the optical process, our theoretical calculations reveal that the center cation plays a critical role in the interband transition and the absorption strength in the visible region is modified by the strong A-X interaction. Furthermore, our systematic analyses show that the variation of the absorption spectrum with X can be described simply by the well-known sum rule. The universal rules established in this study explain the large reduction of α in HC(NH2)2PbI3 and predict CsPbI3 as the highest α material.

  18. Atmospheric Solar Heating in Minor Absorption Bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chou, Ming-Dah

    1998-01-01

    Solar radiation is the primary source of energy driving atmospheric and oceanic circulations. Concerned with the huge computing time required for computing radiative transfer in weather and climate models, solar heating in minor absorption bands has often been neglected. The individual contributions of these minor bands to the atmospheric heating is small, but collectively they are not negligible. The solar heating in minor bands includes the absorption due to water vapor in the photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) spectral region from 14284/cm to 25000/cm, the ozone absorption and Rayleigh scattering in the near infrared, as well as the O2 and CO2 absorption in a number of weak bands. Detailed high spectral- and angular-resolution calculations show that the total effect of these minor absorption is to enhance the atmospheric solar heating by approximately 10%. Depending upon the strength of the absorption and the overlapping among gaseous absorption, different approaches are applied to parameterize these minor absorption. The parameterizations are accurate and require little extra time for computing radiative fluxes. They have been efficiently implemented in the various atmospheric models at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, including cloud ensemble, mesoscale, and climate models.

  19. Laser modulation of optical absorption in ZnSe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The possibility of producing and detecting laser induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) in ZnSe crystals using a moderate laser intensity of about 6 mw output was investigated. The modulation is smaller than that previously obtained with higher laser photon flux, but is not too difficult to detect. Modulation of the order of a few parts in 10 to the 5th power, up to one part in 10 to the 4th power appears typical at the present. LIMA pulse shapes were recorded with varying system resolutions at a half dozen wavelengths in the visible, from 4800 A to 6000 A. Detailed data were taken, particularly at 5000 A, for a range of time intervals following laser pulse turn-on. Quantitative study of the excitation and decay kinetics of these is underway, though analysis is not complete. Major features are discussed with attention centered upon the detailed measurements made most recently at 5000 A.

  20. Atmospheric absorption cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-06-01

    The measurement capability of the Avionics Laboratory IR Facility was used to evaluate an absorption cell that will be used to simulate atmospheric absorption over horizontal paths of 1 - 10 km in length. Band models were used to characterize the transmittance of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrogen (N2), and nitrous oxide (N2O) in the cell. The measured transmittance was compared to the calculated values. Nitrous oxide is important in the 4 - 4.5 micron range in shaping the weak line absorption of carbon dioxide. The absorption cell is adequate for simulating atmospheric absorption over these paths.

  1. The second derivative electronic absorption spectrum of cytochrome c oxidase in the Soret region.

    PubMed

    Horvath, M P; Copeland, R A; Makinen, M W

    1999-09-01

    The electronic absorption spectrum of solubilized beef heart cytochrome c oxidase was analyzed in the 400-500 nm region to identify the origin of doublet features appearing in the second derivative spectrum associated with ferrocytochrome a. This doublet, centered near 22,600 cm(-1), was observed in the direct absorption spectrum of the a(2+)a(3)(3+).HCOO(-) form of the enzyme at cryogenic temperatures. Since evidence for this doublet at room temperature is obtained only on the basis of the second derivative spectrum, a novel mathematical approach was developed to analyze the resolving power of second derivative spectroscopy as a function of parameterization of spectral data. Within the mathematical limits defined for resolving spectral features, it was demonstrated that the integrated intensity of the doublet feature near 450 nm associated with ferrocytochrome a is independent of the ligand and oxidation state of cytochrome a(3). Furthermore, the doublet features, also observed in cytochrome c oxidase from Paracoccus denitrificans, were similarly associated with the heme A component and were correspondingly independent of the ligand and oxidation state of the heme A(3) chromophore. The doublet features are attributed to lifting of the degeneracy of the x and y polarized components of the B state of the heme A chromophore associated with the Soret transition.

  2. AN OFF-CENTERED ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS IN NGC 3115

    SciTech Connect

    Menezes, R. B.; Steiner, J. E.; Ricci, T. V.

    2014-11-20

    NGC 3115 is an S0 galaxy that has always been considered to have a pure absorption-line spectrum. Some recent studies have detected a compact radio-emitting nucleus in this object, coinciding with the photometric center and with a candidate for the X-ray nucleus. This is evidence of the existence of a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus (AGN) in the galaxy, although no emission line has ever been observed. We report the detection of an emission-line spectrum of a type 1 AGN in NGC 3115, with an Hα luminosity of L {sub Hα} = (4.2 ± 0.4) × 10{sup 37} erg s{sup –1}. Our analysis revealed that this AGN is located at a projected distance of ∼0.''29 ± 0.''05 (corresponding to ∼14.3 ± 2.5 pc) from the stellar bulge center, which is coincident with the kinematic center of this object's stellar velocity map. The black hole corresponding to the observed off-centered AGN may form a binary system with a black hole located at the stellar bulge center. However, it is also possible that the displaced black hole is the merged remnant of the binary system coalescence, after the ''kick'' caused by the asymmetric emission of gravitational waves. We propose that certain features in the stellar velocity dispersion map are the result of perturbations caused by the off-centered AGN.

  3. Europa's ultraviolet absorption band (260 to 320 nm) - Temporal and spatial evidence from IUE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ockert, Maureen E.; Nelson, Robert M.; Lane, Arthur L.; Matson, Dennis L.

    1987-01-01

    An analysis of 33 IUE UV spectra of Europa, obtained from 1978 to 1982 for orbital phase angles of 21 to 343 deg, confirms that the Lane et al. (1981) absorption feature, centered at 280 nm, is most clearly revealed when 223-333 deg orbital phase angle spectra are ratioed to those nearest 90 deg. The feature's strength is noted to have persisted over the 5-year period studied, suggesting that no large endogenically or exogenically generated changes in surface sulfur dioxide concentration have occurred. These results further substantiate the Lane et al. hypothesis that the feature is due to the implantation of Io plasma torus-derived sulfur ions on the Europa trailing side's water-ice surface.

  4. Emergency Operations Center at Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caylor, Gary C.

    1997-01-01

    In June 1966, at the start of the Gulf Coast hurricane season, the Johnson Space Center (JSC) celebrated the opening of its new 4,000-square foot, state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center (EOC). The new EOC has been upgraded and enhanced to support a wide spectrum of emergencies affecting JSC and neighboring communities. One of the main features of the EOC is its premier computerized dispatch center. The new system unites many of JSC's critical emergency functions into one integrated network. It automatically monitors fire alarms, security entrances, and external cameras. It contains the JSC inventory of hazardous materials, by building and room, and can call up Material Safety Data Sheets for most of the generic hazardous materials used on-site. The EOC is available for community use during area emergencies such as hurricanes and is a welcome addition to the Clear Lake/Galveston Bay Area communities' emergency response resources.

  5. Optical absorptions of polyfluorene transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yvonne Y.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2005-07-01

    Conjugated polymers are a promising class of materials for organic electronics. While the progress in device performance is impressive, the basics of charge transport still pose many open questions. Specifically, conduction at the comparatively rough polymer-polymer interface in an all-polymer field-effect transistor is expected to be different from a sharp interface with an inorganic dielectric, such as silicon dioxide. In this work, charge modulation spectroscopy (CMS) is used to study the optical absorptions in the presence of charges in situ in the transistor structure. This allows direct observation of the charge carriers in the operational device via their spectroscopic signature; the technique is by design very sensitive to the properties of the semiconductor-dielectric interface. The semiconducting copolymer poly( 9,9' -dioctyl-fluorene-co-bithiophene) (F8T2) is incorporated into a top-gate thin-film transistor structure with a polymer dielectric layer deposited by spin coating and inkjet-printed polymer electrodes. A prominent charge-induced absorption at 1.65eV is observed as well as a shoulder at 1.3eV and a tail extending toward the absorption edge. The bias dependence of the CMS signature confirms that intermixing of the polymer layers is minimal, as expected from the excellent transistor characteristics. Polarization-dependent CMS measurements on aligned transistors show that the main feature at 1.65eV is strongly polarized whereas the shoulder is unpolarized. This observation, as well as further experimental evidence, lead to the conclusion that while the main absorption is attributable to the intrinsic, polaronic absorption in F8T2, the shoulder is likely to originate from a defect state.

  6. Laser-absorption sensing of gas composition of products from coal gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Sur, Ritobrata; Sun, Kai; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2014-06-01

    A prototype in-situ laser-absorption sensor for the real-time composition measurement (CO, CH4, H2O and CO2) of synthesis gas products of coal gasification (called here syngas) was designed, tested in the laboratory, and demonstrated during field-measurement campaigns in a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier at the University of Utah and in an engineering-scale, fluidized-bed transport gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The prototype design and operation were improved by the lessons learned from each field test. Laser-absorption measurements are problematic in syngas flows because efficient gasifiers operate at elevated pressures (10-50 atm) where absorption transitions are collision broadened and absorption transitions that are isolated at 1 atm become blended into complex features, and because syngas product streams can contain significant particulate, producing significant non-absorption scattering losses of the transmission of laser light. Thus, the prototype sensor used a new wavelength-scanned, wavelength-modulation spectroscopy strategy with 2f-detection and 1f-normalization (WMS-2f/1f) that can provide sensitive absorption measurements of species with spectra blended by collision broadening even in the presence of large non-absorption laser transmission losses (e.g., particulate scattering, beam steering, etc.). The design of the sensor for detection of CO, CH4, H2O and CO2 was optimized for the specific application of syngas monitoring at the output of large-scale gasifiers. Sensor strategies, results and lessons learned from these field measurement campaigns are discussed.

  7. Absorption-Line Studies of Seyfert Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael

    We propose to undertake a "reverberation analysis" of the variable absorption lines ill two Seyfert Galaxies (NGC 4051 and Mrk 279) to help understand the origin of intrinsic absorption lines in AGNs. Stich an analysis is a powerful tool for elucidating the radial distribution of absorbing gas in the broad-line region (BLR) and narrow-line region (NLR). Only two Seyferts have previously been studied with this technique: NGC 4151 (Bromage el al. 1985; Clavel et al. 1987) and NGC 3516 (Voit, Shull, and Begelman 1987). The absorption features have been interpreted as an outflow of ionized clouds from the nuclear region or from an accretion disk affected by UV/X-ray heating. Neither the source of the absorbing gas in these Seyferts nor the "gene" which distingishes them from other Seyferts is known. Until the 1984 onset of absorption in Mrk 279, broad self-absorbed. lines had been observed only in Seyferts of low intrinsic luminosity, such as NGC 4051. Mrk 279 is intrinsically much brighter, and therefore more quasar-like, than the other three absorptionline Seyfert I's in the CfA sample. Thus, it may show how the absorption phenomenon changes at higher luminosity and could bridge the gap between the low luminosity absorption-line Seyferts and the well-studied broad absorption-line (BAL) QSO's. In addition, Mrk 279's significant redshift will allow us to study, for the first time, the Ly-alpha line in an absorption-line Seyfert. With 3 US-1 shifts for each of these two underobserved Seyferts, we can double the number of objects in which absorption-line variability has been studied and investigate why the absorption-line strengths correlate or anti-correlate with the UV continuum.

  8. Solar absorption surface panel

    DOEpatents

    Santala, Teuvo J.

    1978-01-01

    A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar absorption surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high absorptance and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.

  9. Rectal absorption of propylthiouracil.

    PubMed

    Bartle, W R; Walker, S E; Silverberg, J D

    1988-06-01

    The rectal absorption of propylthiouracil (PTU) was studied and compared to oral absorption in normal volunteers. Plasma levels of PTU after administration of suppositories of PTU base and PTU diethanolamine were significantly lower compared to the oral route. Elevated plasma reverse T3 levels were demonstrated after each treatment, however, suggesting a desirable therapeutic effect at this dosage level for all preparations.

  10. Patient-centered healthcare design.

    PubMed

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2011-12-01

    Patient-centered care focuses on the patient's and family's experience in the hospital, and the design of the healthcare environment should support the patient-centered care concept. The purpose of this facility design department is to expand nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enable them to take leadership roles in design efforts. This article focuses on healthcare design guiding principles and features to support organizational cultural initiatives such as patient- and family-centered care and Planetree.

  11. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  12. Circumstellar material in type Ia supernovae via sodium absorption features.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, A; Gal-Yam, A; Simon, J D; Leonard, D C; Quimby, R M; Phillips, M M; Morrell, N; Thompson, I B; Ivans, I; Marshall, J L; Filippenko, A V; Marcy, G W; Bloom, J S; Patat, F; Foley, R J; Yong, D; Penprase, B E; Beeler, D J; Allende Prieto, C; Stringfellow, G S

    2011-08-12

    Type Ia supernovae are key tools for measuring distances on a cosmic scale. They are generally thought to be the thermonuclear explosion of an accreting white dwarf in a close binary system. The nature of the mass donor is still uncertain. In the single-degenerate model it is a main-sequence star or an evolved star, whereas in the double-degenerate model it is another white dwarf. We show that the velocity structure of absorbing material along the line of sight to 35 type Ia supernovae tends to be blueshifted. These structures are likely signatures of gas outflows from the supernova progenitor systems. Thus, many type Ia supernovae in nearby spiral galaxies may originate in single-degenerate systems.

  13. General features

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    The San Andreas fault system, a complex of faults that display predominantly large-scale strike slip, is part of an even more complex system of faults, isolated segments of the East Pacific Rise, and scraps of plates lying east of the East Pacific Rise that collectively separate the North American plate from the Pacific plate. This chapter briefly describes the San Andreas fault system, its setting along the Pacific Ocean margin of North America, its extent, and the patterns of faulting. Only selected characteristics are described, and many features are left for depictions on maps and figures.

  14. Quasar Absorption Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin

    2004-01-01

    The aim of the proposal is to investigate the absorption properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between absorption and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray absorption and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) absorption at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening absorption. The evidences in favour of intrinsic absorption are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the absorption is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.

  15. Identification of Gas Phase PAHs in Absorption Towards Protostellar Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The infrared emission bands (also known as the UIR bands.) have recently been observed in absorption at 3.25 micrometers in the ices surrounding a few proto-stellar objects at 11.2 micrometers in MonR2, and at 6.2 micrometers towards two sources near the galactic center. The UIR bands have been observed in emission for many years, but identifying these bands has proven to be both difficult and contentious as no one has yet found a single material that provides a good match to the features. However, most investigators agree that some form of carbon-based material with aromatic bonds is the most likely candidate, and many arguments favor free molecules (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAHs) as the carriers of at least the narrow emission bands. Since the emission arises not from a single molecule but from a family of molecules, identifying which PAHs are contributing to the infrared emission bands is difficult. The identification is further complicated by the fact that the emission at short wavelengths is dominated by small molecules while at long wavelengths it is dominated by large molecules. Thus, for example, the emission at 3.3 micrometers is from a different mix of molecules than those which produce the 11.2 micrometer band. To complicate matters further, the molecular mix includes both neutral and ionic species. In absorption, the same mixture of molecules contributes at all wavelengths and the molecules should be neutral, potentially simplifying comparisons with lab data. Also, absorption strengths measured in the lab are directly applicable to interstellar absorption bands without the need to model an emission spectrum of an unknown mixture of ionized and neutral PAHs. In this paper we show that a mixture of argon matrix isolated PAH molecules can reproduce the 3.25 micrometers absorption band seen in the ISO SWS spectra of four embedded Infrared sources, S140 IRS1, AFGL 2591, Elias 29, and AFGL 989. In section 2 we describe the ISO SWS data analysis and

  16. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.

    1982-06-16

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  17. Compounds affecting cholesterol absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic absorption of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.

  18. Soliton absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Kalashnikov, V. L.; Sorokin, E.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze optical soliton propagation in the presence of weak absorption lines with much narrower linewidths as compared to the soliton spectrum width using the novel perturbation analysis technique based on an integral representation in the spectral domain. The stable soliton acquires spectral modulation that follows the associated index of refraction of the absorber. The model can be applied to ordinary soliton propagation and to an absorber inside a passively modelocked laser. In the latter case, a comparison with water vapor absorption in a femtosecond Cr:ZnSe laser yields a very good agreement with experiment. Compared to the conventional absorption measurement in a cell of the same length, the signal is increased by an order of magnitude. The obtained analytical expressions allow further improving of the sensitivity and spectroscopic accuracy making the soliton absorption spectroscopy a promising novel measurement technique. PMID:21151755

  19. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon

    1984-01-01

    The efficiency of an absorption heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.

  20. Optical absorption measurement system

    DOEpatents

    Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.

    1989-01-01

    The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the absorption coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the absorption of the optical element from the temperature.

  1. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2003-10-14

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  2. Solar selective absorption coatings

    DOEpatents

    Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward

    2004-08-31

    A new class of solar selective absorption coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective absorption coatings are also disclosed.

  3. Intranasal absorption of oxymorphone.

    PubMed

    Hussain, M A; Aungst, B J

    1997-08-01

    The nasal bioavailability of oxymorphone HCI was determined. Rats were surgically prepared to isolate the nasal cavity, into which a solution of oxymorphone was administered. A reference group of rats was administered oxymorphone HCl intravenously. Plasma oxymorphone concentrations were determined by HPLC. Nasal absorption was rapid, nasal bioavailability was 43%, and the iv and nasal elimination profiles were similar. Oxymorphone HCI appears to have the solubility, potency, and absorption properties required for efficient nasal delivery, which is an alternative to injections.

  4. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.

    1989-05-09

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit. 1 fig.

  5. Seven-effect absorption refrigeration

    DOEpatents

    DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.

    1989-01-01

    A seven-effect absorption refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three absorption circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium absorption circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium absorption circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high absorption circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high absorption circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low absorption circuit.

  6. Anomalous absorption in CO2-laser-target interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offenberger, A. A.; Ng, A.

    1980-10-01

    Efficient absorption of long-pulse CO2-laser radiation is observed to follow a transient phase of stimulated Brillouin backscatter in critical density, laminar oxygen gas target irradiation experiments. Nearly complete energy absorption occurs for not more than 10 nsec following stimulated Brillouin backscatter after which target burnthrough and refraction dominate. Inverse bremsstrahlung and resonance absorption cannot account for the general features observed. Anomalous collisions due to strong ion turbulence produced by the incident laser radiation are postulated to account for the efficient absorption.

  7. HI absorption in nearby compact radio galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glowacki, M.; Allison, J. R.; Sadler, E. M.; Moss, V. A.; Curran, S. J.; Musaeva, A.; Deng, C.; Parry, R.; Sligo, M. C.

    2017-01-01

    HI absorption studies yield information on both AGN feeding and feedback processes. This AGN activity interacts with the neutral gas in compact radio sources, which are believed to represent the young or recently re-triggered AGN population. We present the results of a survey for HI absorption in a sample of 66 compact radio sources at 0.040 < z < 0.096 with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. In total, we obtained seven detections, five of which are new, with a large range of peak optical depths (3% to 87%). Of the detections, 71% exhibit asymmetric, broad (ΔvFWHM > 100 km s-1) features, indicative of disturbed gas kinematics. Such broad, shallow and offset features are also found within low-excitation radio galaxies which is attributed to disturbed circumnuclear gas, consistent with early-type galaxies typically devoid of a gas-rich disk. Comparing mid-infrared colours of our galaxies with HI detections indicates that narrow and deep absorption features are preferentially found in late-type and high-excitation radio galaxies in our sample. These features are attributed to gas in galactic disks. By combining XMM-Newton archival data with 21-cm data, we find support that absorbed X-ray sources may be good tracers of HI content within the host galaxy. This sample extends previous HI surveys in compact radio galaxies to lower radio luminosities and provides a basis for future work exploring the higher redshift universe.

  8. FIRST SPECTROSCOPIC IDENTIFICATION OF MASSIVE YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect

    An, Deokkeun; Boogert, A. C. Adwin; RamIrez, Solange V.; Sellgren, Kris; Arendt, Richard G.; Stolovy, Susan R.; Cotera, Angela S.; Robitaille, Thomas P.; Smith, Howard A. E-mail: sellgren@astronomy.ohio-state.edu

    2009-09-10

    We report the detection of several molecular gas-phase and ice absorption features in three photometrically selected young stellar object (YSO) candidates in the central 280 pc of the Milky Way. Our spectra, obtained with the Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) onboard the Spitzer Space Telescope, reveal gas-phase absorption from CO{sub 2} (15.0 {mu}m), C{sub 2}H{sub 2} (13.7 {mu}m), and HCN (14.0 {mu}m). We attribute this absorption to warm, dense gas in massive YSOs. We also detect strong and broad 15 {mu}m CO{sub 2} ice absorption features, with a remarkable double-peaked structure. The prominent long-wavelength peak is due to CH{sub 3}OH-rich ice grains, and is similar to those found in other known massive YSOs. Our IRS observations demonstrate the youth of these objects, and provide the first spectroscopic identification of massive YSOs in the Galactic Center.

  9. Hastings Center

    MedlinePlus

    ... on, and advocacy for, wiser health care and science policy. In addition to her leadership role at The Hastings Center, she is a professor at Harvard Medical School, where she directs the school’s Fellowship in Bioethics, a program that ...

  10. Nebular Hydrogen Absorption in the Ejecta of Eta Carinae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gull, Theodore R.; Ishibashi, K.; Davidson, K.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) observations of Eta Carinae and immediate ejecta reveal narrow Balmer absorption lines in addition to the nebular-scattered broad P-Cygni absorptions. The narrow absorption correlates with apparent disk structure that separates the two Homunculus lobes. We trace these features about half way up the Northern lobe until the scattered stellar Balmer line doppler-shifts redward beyond the nebular absorption feature. Three-dimensional data cubes, made by mapping the Homunculus at Balmer alpha and Balmer beta with the 52 x 0.1 arcsecond aperture and about 5000 spectral resolving power, demonstrate that the absorption feature changes slowly in velocity with nebular position. We have monitored the stellar Balmer alpha line profile of the central source over the past four years. The equivalent width of the nebular absorption feature changes considerably between observations. The changes do not correlate with measured brightness of Eta Carinae. Likely clumps of neutral hydrogen with a scale size comparable to the stellar disk diameter are passing through the intervening light path on the timescales less than several months. The excitation mechanism involves Lyman alpha radiation (possibly the Lyman series plus Lyman continuum) and collisions leading to populating the 2S metastable state. Before the electron can jump to the ground state by two photon emission (lifetime about 1/8 second), a stellar Balmer photon is absorbed and the electron shifts to an NP level. We see the absorption feature in higher Balmer lines, and but not in Paschen lines. Indeed we see narrow nebular Paschen emission lines. At present, we do not completely understand the details of the absorption. Better understanding should lead to improved insight of the unique conditions around Eta Carinae that leads to these absorptions.

  11. Development of Updated ABsorption SIMulation Software (ABSIM)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhiyao; Tang, Xin; Qu, Ming; Abdelaziz, Omar; Gluesenkamp, Kyle R

    2014-01-01

    ABsorption SIMulation, ABSIM, was developed for the simulation of absorption systems by The Oak Ridge National Laboratory during 1980s and 1990s. ABSIM provides a platform for users to investigate various cycle configurations and working fluids, to calculate their operating parameters, to predict their performance, and to compare them with each other on a uniform basis. ABSIM is indeed a very useful and accurate tool for researchers to investigate various absorption systems. However, it has not been well maintained: it is incompatible with recent operating systems; the interface needs improved user-friendliness, and the system needs better parameter setting and debugging tools to help achieve convergence. Therefore, it is highly needed to update and improve ABSIM. The paper presents recent efforts to improve ABSIM s compatibility with current operating systems, user interface, and analysis capabilities. The paper details the features and functions of the newly updated ABSIM software. The new ABSIM still uses the previously validated calculation engine of the old ABSIM. The new graphic user interfaces (GUI) were developed in Qt, which is an open source license GUI software based on C++. XML was used as the database for data storage in the new ABSIM. The new ABSIM has been designed to be easily learned and used. It has enhanced editing and construction functions, plus enhanced analysis features including parametric tables, plotting, property plots, and master panels for debugging. A single effect water/LiBr absorption system is used as a case study in this paper to illustrate the features, capabilities, and functions of the new ABSIM. This case study was actually an example system available in the old ABSIM. The new version of ABSIM will be continuously developed to include additional subroutines for the components in liquid desiccant systems. The new ABSIM will be available to public for free. The ultimate goal of the new ABSIM is to allow it to become a simulation

  12. Absorption heat pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio

    1984-01-01

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  13. Absorption Heat Pump Cycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunugi, Yoshifumi; Kashiwagi, Takao

    Various advanced absorption cycles are studied, developed and invented. In this paper, their cycles are classified and arranged using the three categories: effect, stage and loop, then an outline of the cycles are explained on the Duehring diagram. Their cycles include high COP cycles for refrigerations and heat pumps, high temperature lift cycles for heat transformer, absorption-compression hybrid cycles and heat pump transformer cycle. The highest COPi is attained by the seven effect cycle. In addition, the cycles for low temperature are invented and explained. Furthermore the power generation • refrigeration cycles are illustrated.

  14. Influence of the local atomic structure in the X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy of neptunium oxo ions.

    PubMed

    Lozano, Janeth M; Clark, David L; Conradson, Steven D; Den Auwer, Christophe; Fillaux, Clara; Guilaumont, Dominique; Keogh, D Webster; Mustre de Leon, Jose; Palmer, Phillip D; Simoni, Eric

    2009-11-28

    Experimental L(III) X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra of the distorted octahedral neptunium oxo ions NpO(2)(OH)(4)(2-), NpO(4)(OH)(2)(3-), and NpO(6)(6-) are interpreted using relativistic full multiple scattering calculations of the X-ray absorption process. In this series of compounds, the neptunium cation exhibits two different oxidation states, VI and VII, with coordination spheres from di- to tetra oxo for the first two compounds. The comparison between calculated XANES spectra using the feff code and experimental ones shows that the main features in the spectra are determined by the local coordination around the actinide metal center. Furthermore, the projected density of electronic states (DOS) calculated from the XANES simulations using the feff code are compared to calculations using ADF code. They are both discussed in terms of molecular orbitals and qualitative evolution of bonding within this series of compounds.

  15. Laser Absorption by Over-Critical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Absorption of high intensity laser light by matter has important applications to emerging sciences and technology, such as Fast Ignition ICF and ion acceleration. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of this absorption is key to developing these technologies. Critical features which distinguish the interaction of high intensity light - defined here as a laser field having a normalized vector potential greater than unity - are that the reaction of the material to the fields results in sharp high-density interfaces; and that the movement of the electrons is in general relativistic, both in a fluid and a thermal sense. The results of these features are that the absorption mechanisms are qualitatively distinct from those at lower intensities. We will review previous work, by our group and others, on the absorption mechanisms, and highlight current research. We will show that the standing wave structure of the reflected laser light is key to particle dynamics for normally incident lasers. The authors acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy under contract DE-NA 0001833 and the National Science Foundation under contract ACI 1339893.

  16. Molecular absorption in transition region spectral lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, D. J.; Innes, D.; Ayres, T.; Peter, H.; Curdt, W.; Jaeggli, S.

    2014-09-01

    Aims: We present observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of absorption features from a multitude of cool atomic and molecular lines within the profiles of Si IV transition region lines. Many of these spectral lines have not previously been detected in solar spectra. Methods: We examined spectra taken from deep exposures of plage on 12 October 2013. We observed unique absorption spectra over a magnetic element which is bright in transition region line emission and the ultraviolet continuum. We compared the absorption spectra with emission spectra that is likely related to fluorescence. Results: The absorption features require a population of sub-5000 K plasma to exist above the transition region. This peculiar stratification is an extreme deviation from the canonical structure of the chromosphere-corona boundary. The cool material is not associated with a filament or discernible coronal rain. This suggests that molecules may form in the upper solar atmosphere on small spatial scales and introduces a new complexity into our understanding of solar thermal structure. It lends credence to previous numerical studies that found evidence for elevated pockets of cool gas in the chromosphere. Movies associated to Figs. 1 and 2 are available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  17. Ceraunius Tholus Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    11 December 2004 Today's Mars Picture of the Day features two images. The top picture is a mosaic of Viking orbiter images acquired in the late 1970s. The lower image is a high resolution picture from the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC). The Viking mosaic shows Ceraunius Tholus, a volcano in the Tharsis region that was first viewed in images obtained by Mariner 9 in 1972. Several channels run down the slope of the Ceraunius Tholus volcano. The deepest of those channels ends in an elliptical crater. The elliptical crater was formed by a very oblique meteor impact. Where the channel meets the floor of the elliptical crater, there is a small mound of material. Presumably, this material was deposited in the elliptical crater after running down through the channel on the volcano's northwest flank.

    Near the top/center of the mound in the elliptical crater is a small, circular depression. Some have speculated for years that this depression is related to volcanism, others thought that it may be an impact crater. The MGS MOC image (lower of the two images) shows that crater. It is not the source of lava flows or any other volcanic features. Most likely, it is an old impact crater. This feature is located near 25.2oN, 97.7oW. The MOC image covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  18. Zinc absorption in inflammatory bowel disease

    SciTech Connect

    Valberg, L.S.; Flanagan, P.R.; Kertesz, A.; Bondy, D.C.

    1986-07-01

    Zinc absorption was measured in 29 patients with inflammatory bowel disease and a wide spectrum of disease activity to determine its relationship to disease activity, general nutritional state, and zinc status. Patients with severe disease requiring either supplementary oral or parenteral nutrition were excluded. The mean 65ZnCl2 absorption, in the patients, determined using a 65Zn and 51Cr stool-counting test, 45 +/- 17% (SD), was significantly lower than the values, 54 +/- 16%, in 30 healthy controls, P less than 0.05. Low 65ZnCl2 absorption was related to undernutrition, but not to disease activity in the absence of undernutrition or to zinc status estimated by leukocyte zinc measurements. Mean plasma zinc or leukocyte zinc concentrations in patients did not differ significantly from controls, and only two patients with moderate disease had leukocyte zinc values below the 5th percentile of normal. In another group of nine patients with inflammatory bowel disease of mild-to-moderate severity and minimal nutritional impairment, 65Zn absorption from an extrinsically labeled turkey test meal was 31 +/- 10% compared to 33 +/- 7% in 17 healthy controls, P greater than 0.1. Thus, impairment in 65ZnCl2 absorption in the patients selected for this study was only evident in undernourished persons with moderate or severe disease activity, but biochemical evidence of zinc deficiency was uncommon, and clinical features of zinc depletion were not encountered.

  19. Absorption mode FTICR mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Smith, Donald F; Kilgour, David P A; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B; Heeren, Ron M A

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here, we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image, and then, these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode "Datacubes" for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  20. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  1. Two-Phonon Absorption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, M. W.

    2007-01-01

    A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon absorption is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…

  2. Water-related absorption in fibrous diamonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zedgenizov, D. A.; Shiryaev, A. A.; Kagi, H.; Navon, O.

    2003-04-01

    Cubic and coated diamonds from several localities (Brasil, Canada, Yakutia) were investigated using spectroscopic techniques. Special emphasis was put on investigation of water-related features of transmission Infra-red and Raman spectra. Presence of molecular water is inferred from broad absorption bands in IR at 3420 and 1640 cm-1. These bands were observed in many of the investigated samples. It is likely that molecular water is present in microinclusions in liquid state, since no clear indications of solid H_2O (ice VI-VII, Kagi et al., 2000) were found. Comparison of absorption by HOH and OH vibrations shows that diamonds can be separated into two principal groups: those containing liquid water (direct proportionality of OH and HOH absorption) and those with stronger absorption by OH group. Fraction of diamonds in every group depends on their provenance. There might be positive correlation between internal pressure in microinclusions (determined using quartz barometer, Navon et al., 1988) and affiliation with diamonds containing liquid water. In many cases absorption by HOH vibration is considerably lower than absorption by hydroxyl (OH) group. This may be explained if OH groups are partially present in mineral and/or melt inclusions. This hypothesis is supported by following fact: in diamonds with strong absorption by silicates and other minerals shape and position of the OH band differs from that in diamonds with low absorption by minerals. Moreover, in Raman spectra of individual inclusions sometimes the broad band at 3100 cm-1 is observed. This band is OH-related. In some samples water distribution is not homogeneous. Central part of the diamond usually contains more water than outer parts, but this is not a general rule for all the samples. Water absorption usually correlated with absorption of other components (carbonates, silicates and others). At that fibrous diamonds with relatively high content of silicates are characterized by molecular water. OH

  3. Examination of center of pressure displacement and muscle activity of the hip girdle muscles on lateral movement in the sitting position, focusing on kinematic features before and after the start of exercise

    PubMed Central

    Ikeda, Kouji; Suehiro, Kenji; Kizu, Akito; Kunieda, Hideki; Takasaki, Hirokazu; Suzuki, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to evaluate the kinematic characteristics at the start of lateral movement in the sitting position, for application in physical therapy. [Subjects and Methods] Eleven healthy male subjects (mean age, 24.8 ± 3.7 years) were included in the study after they provided informed consent. The electromyographic activities of the tensor fascia lata, gluteus medius, and rectus femoris, and the center of pressure (COP) displacement during lateral reach in the sitting position were measured. The task was recorded on video for analysis. [Results] In almost all subjects, before the beginning of the task, the electromyographic activity in the opposite side of each studied muscle was recorded, and the opposite and anterior displacement of the COP was observed. The video analysis revealed that all subjects showed lateral displacement of the thoracic part of the trunk after the start of the task. However, the lumbar region and pelvis maintained their starting positions. [Conclusion] COP displacement occurred in the reverse reaction before the task, and this involved the hip girdle muscles of the opposite side. A reverse reaction displaced the pelvis to the opposite side to ensure instability of posture through side tilting of the trunk at the beginning of the task. PMID:28356627

  4. Clinical Features and Genetic Analysis of 48 Patients with Chronic Granulomatous Disease in a Single Center Study from Shanghai, China (2005–2015): New Studies and a Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Wei-Fan; Zhang, Yi-Dan

    2017-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD) is a rare inherited primary immunodeficiency, which is characterized by recurrent infections due to defective phagocyte NADPH oxidase enzyme. Nowadays, little is known about Chinese CGD patients. Here we report 48 CGD patients in our single center study, which is the largest cohort study from Mainland China. The ratio of male to female was 11 : 1. The mean onset age was 0.29 years old, and 52% patients had an onset within the 1st month of life. The mean diagnosis age was 2.24 years old. 11 patients (23%) had died with an average age of 2.91 years old. 13 patients (28%) had positive family histories. The most prevalent infectious sites were the lungs (77%), followed by gastrointestinal tract (54%), lymph nodes (50%), and skin (46%). In addition, septicopyemia, thrush, and hepatosplenomegaly were also commonly observed, accounting for 23%, 23%, and 40% of the cases. Lesions due to BCG vaccination occurred in more than half of the patients. X-linked CGD due to CYBB gene mutations accounted for 75% of the cases, and 11 of them were novel mutations. Autosomal recessive inheritance accounted for 6% patients, including 1 patient with CYBA, 1 with NCF1, and 1 with NCF2 gene mutations. PMID:28251166

  5. Optical Absorption of Alkali Metal Vapors at High Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdman, Paul Stephen

    High pressure, high temperature lithium vapors are of interest to both basic and applied research. Lithium vapors at extreme temperatures may contain new species of molecules and molecular ions which have not been previously observed or well studied. The strong optical absorption properties of alkali metals in the visible and infrared make them desirable as solar absorbing materials for many applications. In particular, lithium is being considered as a candidate for absorption of solar energy in solar plasma propulsion. Studies of lithium vapors under high pressure and at high temperatures would simulate the rocket thruster environment in which they are expected to perform as solar absorbers. Optical absorption experiments were performed on high temperature, high pressure lithium vapors. The Plasma Spectroscopy Cell (PSC), a unique device constructed just for such experiments, was used to heat lithium vapors to a maximum temperature of 2100 K at 1 atmosphere pressure. The PSC has the potential to reach 3000 K and 100 atmospheres. Absorption spectra contain features of several well understood molecular transitions of lithium. Remaining spectral features require modeling of all possible transitions in order to identify the molecule contributing to overall absorption. Modeling of lithium optical absorption is performed here for several transitions of diatomic lithium. Several interesting features of the PSC absorption spectra have been explained by the modeling. Additional experiments and modeling are possible for future research.

  6. Interstellar Absorption Lines in the Spectrum of the Starburst Galaxy NGC 1705

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, M. S.

    1998-09-01

    A Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph archival study of the interstellar absorption lines in the line of sight to the H i-rich, starburst dwarf galaxy NGC 1705 in the 1170 to 1740 Å range at ~120 km s^-1 resolution is presented. The absorption features arising because of photospheric lines are distinctly different from the interstellar lines: the photospheric lines are weak, broad (equivalent widths >1 Å), asymmetric, and centered around the systemic LSR velocity of NGC 1705 (~610 km s^-1). The interstellar lines consist of three relatively narrow components at LSR velocities of -20, 260, and 540 km s^-1, and include absorption by neutral atoms (N i lambda1200 triplet and O i lambda1302), singly ionized atoms (Si ii lambdalambda1190, 1193, 1260, 1304, and 1526, S ii lambda1253, C ii lambda1334, C ii^* lambda1336, Fe ii lambda1608, and Al ii lambda1670), and atoms in higher ionization states (Si iii lambda1206, Si iv lambdalambda1393, 1402, and C iv lambdalambda1548, 1550). The Si iv and C iv absorption features have both interstellar and photospheric contributions. In an earlier study, Sahu & Blades identified the absorption system at -20 km s^-1 with Milky Way disk/halo gas, and the 260 km s^-1 system with a small, isolated high-velocity cloud HVC 487, which is probably associated with Magellanic Stream gas. The 540 km s^-1 absorption system is associated with a kiloparsec-scale expanding, ionized supershell centered on the super-star cluster NGC 1705-1. The analysis presented in this paper consists of (1) a list of all interstellar absorption features with greater than 3 sigma significance and their measured equivalent widths, (2) plots of the lines in the various atomic species together with the results of nonlinear least-squares fit profiles to the observed data, and (3) unpublished 21 cm maps from the Wakker & van Woerden survey showing the large-scale H i distribution in the region near the NGC 1705 sight line and HVC 487. Furthermore, weak N i lambda1200

  7. 69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE ABSORPTION TOWER BUILDING, ABSORPTION TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL

  8. Grasp admittance center. A concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimoga, K. B.; Goldenberg, A. A.

    1991-05-01

    The ultimate goal of the research on articulated hands in general is to use them to do tasks in a way similar to that of humans. A systematic analysis reveals that the day-to-day tasks of humans include some common task primitives such as twist, turn, insert, pullout, push, pull, lift, and place. During each of these operations, the grasp dynamic behavior plays an important role and more so in tasks involving manipulation of delicate objects. Introduced in this paper is the concept of the grasp admittance center, a notion that aims to make an articulated grasp exhibit a directionally decoupled dynamic behavior. An admittance center is conceptualized as the superposition of compliance, accommodation, and mobility centers in a desired coordinate frame. A grasp with an admittance center will have three useful features: stability, decoupled force motion relation, and decoupled time-response. These features are also useful to other closed kinematic chain robotic devices such as the cooperating multiarms and multilegged mobile robots engaged in non-quasistatic (dynamic) manipulation tasks. As a preparation to demonstrate the concept experimentally, a method of synthesizing articulated grasps so as to achieve an admittance center has been developed as well as a method of choosing appropriate location and related parameters for the center. The sensitivity of the center to its parameter imprecision has also been analyzed.

  9. Quantum absorption refrigerator.

    PubMed

    Levy, Amikam; Kosloff, Ronnie

    2012-02-17

    A quantum absorption refrigerator driven by noise is studied with the purpose of determining the limitations of cooling to absolute zero. The model consists of a working medium coupled simultaneously to hot, cold, and noise baths. Explicit expressions for the cooling power are obtained for Gaussian and Poisson white noise. The quantum model is consistent with the first and second laws of thermodynamics. The third law is quantified; the cooling power J(c) vanishes as J(c) ∝ T(c)(α), when T(c)→0, where α=d+1 for dissipation by emission and absorption of quanta described by a linear coupling to a thermal bosonic field, where d is the dimension of the bath.

  10. Vehicular impact absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knoell, A. C.; Wilson, A. H. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An improved vehicular impact absorption system characterized by a plurality of aligned crash cushions of substantially cubic configuration is described. Each consists of a plurality of voided aluminum beverage cans arranged in substantial parallelism within a plurality of superimposed tiers and a covering envelope formed of metal hardware cloth. A plurality of cables is extended through the cushions in substantial parallelism with an axis of alignment for the cushions adapted to be anchored at each of the opposite end thereof.

  11. Hydrogen Absorption by Niobium.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-13

    incorporate an independent means for ascertaining surface cleanliness (e.g. AES). The form of the absorption curve in Fig. 7 appears to agree with that...very interesting study and is well within the capabilities of the systen designed, if the surface cleanliness can be assured. Wire specimens have a...assessing surface cleanliness would be an important supporting technique for understanding the results of these measurements. The simple kinetic

  12. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  13. Relic Neutrino Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Eberle, b

    2004-01-28

    Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable absorption dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these absorption dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino absorption spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.

  14. Magnetic circular dichroism investigation on chromophores in reaction centers of photosystem I and II of green plant photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Tsunenori; Kobayashi, Masayuki; Wang, Zheng-Yu; Itoh, Shigeru; Iwaki, Masayo; Mimuro, Mamoru; Satoh, Kimiyuki

    1995-01-01

    Magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) of chlorophylls (Chl) in P700-enriched (12 Chl/P700) photosystem (PS) I particles and D1-D2-cyt b559 (PSII reaction center) particles isolated from spinach are measured in the wavelength region between 450 and 750 nm. The relative magnitude of MCD to absorption intensity ([MCD]/[Abs]) is found to be a good measure to estimate the interaction of chromophores (dimer or monomer). The difference spectrum between reduced and oxidized state for the 12 Chl/P700 particles can be interpreted to be composed of a positive MCD from P700 and a negative MCD for P700 +. MCD signals for the primary acceptor Chl a monomer (A 0) and the reduced cytochrome f are also observed. The MCD signal from pheophytin a in the PSII reaction center is remarkably in the Qx, region as strong as the signal from the reaction center chlorophylls (P680 and accessory) and other attached chlorophylls. Based on the data, the MCD bands, as well as the absorption bands in the Qy region, are deconvoluted into the contribution from reaction center chlorophylls and the other chlorophylls. The [MCD]/[Abs] ratio of P680 or P700 is small and similar to that of special pair bacteriochlorophylls in the reaction center of purple bacteria, indicating the specific feature of MCD signals that originate from a dimer-type interaction.

  15. CO2 Capture from Flue Gas by Phase Transitional Absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Liang Hu

    2009-06-30

    A novel absorption process called Phase Transitional Absorption was invented. What is the Phase Transitional Absorption? Phase Transitional Absorption is a two or multi phase absorption system, CO{sub 2} rich phase and CO{sub 2} lean phase. During Absorption, CO{sub 2} is accumulated in CO{sub 2} rich phase. After separating the two phases, CO{sub 2} rich phase is forward to regeneration. After regeneration, the regenerated CO{sub 2} rich phase combines CO{sub 2} lean phase to form absorbent again to complete the cycle. The advantage for Phase Transitional Absorption is obvious, significantly saving on regeneration energy. Because CO{sub 2} lean phase was separated before regeneration, only CO{sub 2} rich phase was forward to regeneration. The absorption system we developed has the features of high absorption rate, high loading and working capacity, low corrosion, low regeneration heat, no toxic to environment, etc. The process evaluation shows that our process is able to save 80% energy cost by comparing with MEA process.

  16. Enhanced absorption cycle computer model. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.

    1993-09-01

    Absorption heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered absorption chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperatures boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The absorption heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working absorptions systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of absorption systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system`s components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H{sub 2}O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H{sub 2}O solar-powered open absorption cycles, and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the User`s Manual.

  17. Corrosion Problems in Absorption Chillers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stetson, Bruce

    1978-01-01

    Absorption chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of absorption and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)

  18. Intensity dependent absorption/transparency of a reducing BaTiO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, J. Y.; Garrett, M. H.; Jenssen, H. P.; Warde, C.

    1993-12-01

    We report intensity dependent absorption and transparency as a function of wavelength for barium titanate. The BaTiO3 crystal examined has an as-grown, light-blue color due to an absorption centered at 690 nm, and when reduced in a partial pressure of 10-15 atm of oxygen it has a yellow-orange color due to an absorption centered at 470 nm. Both energy levels are active in the reduced sample as revealed in the spectrum of the intensity dependent changes in absorption.

  19. The emission/absorption FE 2 spectrum of HD 45677

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stalio, R.; Selvelli, P. L.

    1981-01-01

    The complex behavior of the emission/absorption spectrum of Fe II is analyzed. The far UV spectrum is characterized almost solely by absorption lines, while, in the near UV, strong emissions are predominant. Radiative excitation from the ground to the highest levels (chi is approximately 10 eV) with re-emission in the near UV, visible and I.R. seems to be the main mechanism capable of explaining the observed spectral features.

  20. [Infrared absorption spectrum analysis and its application to blood].

    PubMed

    Wang, Le-xin; Zhao, Zhi-min; Yao, Hong-bing; Chen, Yu-ming; Shi, Lei; Gao, Yong

    2002-12-01

    The technology of infrared absorption spectrum is a branch of optical ment measurement technology, and the research on the application of infrared spectrum plays an important role in the development of technology of optical measurement. In this paper, the analysis technology of blood infrared absorption spectrum is presented. By comparison, the difference of the spectra between normal and abnormal blood samples was obtained. The infrared absorption spectra of normal blood sample and abnormal blood sample were detected, and the differences between the spectra are presented. And the analysis results of the infrared absorption spectra of normal whole blood, serum and hyperglycemia are presented also. All of these provide an experimental basis for the diagnosis of diseases, which is valuable for application. This technology features easy operation, convenient analysis and suitability for advanced experiment. The work offers a new way in the research on the application of infrared absorption spectrum.

  1. Mapping vegetation in Yellowstone National Park using spectral feature analysis of AVIRIS data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kokaly, R.F.; Despain, D.G.; Clark, R.N.; Livo, K.E.

    2003-01-01

    Knowledge of the distribution of vegetation on the landscape can be used to investigate ecosystem functioning. The sizes and movements of animal populations can be linked to resources provided by different plant species. This paper demonstrates the application of imaging spectroscopy to the study of vegetation in Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) using spectral feature analysis of data from the Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS). AVIRIS data, acquired on August 7, 1996, were calibrated to surface reflectance using a radiative transfer model and field reflectance measurements of a ground calibration site. A spectral library of canopy reflectance signatures was created by averaging pixels of the calibrated AVIRIS data over areas of known forest and nonforest vegetation cover types in Yellowstone. Using continuum removal and least squares fitting algorithms in the US Geological Survey's Tetracorder expert system, the distributions of these vegetation types were determined by comparing the absorption features of vegetation in the spectral library with the spectra from the AVIRIS data. The 0.68 ??m chlorophyll absorption feature and leaf water absorption features, centered near 0.98 and 1.20 ??m, were analyzed. Nonforest cover types of sagebrush, grasslands, willows, sedges, and other wetland vegetation were mapped in the Lamar Valley of Yellowstone. Conifer cover types of lodgepole pine, whitebark pine, Douglas fir, and mixed Engelmann spruce/subalpine fir forests were spectrally discriminated and their distributions mapped in the AVIRIS images. In the Mount Washburn area of Yellowstone, a comparison of the AVIRIS map of forest cover types to a map derived from air photos resulted in an overall agreement of 74.1% (kappa statistic = 0.62).

  2. Community Learning Centers: Design Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Designs for Learning, Inc., St. Paul, MN.

    If fundamental change in education is to be lasting and effective, it must be a systemic transformation that pervades all aspects of the organization. The New American Schools Development Corporation (NASDC) mission requires rapid, comprehensive change. The Community Learning Centers program described in this document features systemic change with…

  3. Acoustic Absorption Characteristics of People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.

    1968-01-01

    The acoustic absorption characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. Absorption data, expressed as sabins per person or absorption coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…

  4. Online feature selection with streaming features.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xindong; Yu, Kui; Ding, Wei; Wang, Hao; Zhu, Xingquan

    2013-05-01

    We propose a new online feature selection framework for applications with streaming features where the knowledge of the full feature space is unknown in advance. We define streaming features as features that flow in one by one over time whereas the number of training examples remains fixed. This is in contrast with traditional online learning methods that only deal with sequentially added observations, with little attention being paid to streaming features. The critical challenges for Online Streaming Feature Selection (OSFS) include 1) the continuous growth of feature volumes over time, 2) a large feature space, possibly of unknown or infinite size, and 3) the unavailability of the entire feature set before learning starts. In the paper, we present a novel Online Streaming Feature Selection method to select strongly relevant and nonredundant features on the fly. An efficient Fast-OSFS algorithm is proposed to improve feature selection performance. The proposed algorithms are evaluated extensively on high-dimensional datasets and also with a real-world case study on impact crater detection. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithms achieve better compactness and higher prediction accuracy than existing streaming feature selection algorithms.

  5. The 16-45 micron observations of the Galactic Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Kin-Wing; Moseley, S. Harvey; Casey, Sean; Dwek, E.; Loewenstein, Robert F.; Glaccum, W.

    1995-01-01

    Existing observations of the Galactic Center at infrared and radio wavelengths challenge our understanding of the detailed morphology and energy balance of the inner few parsec, including the Galactic Center and the infrared torus. The distribution and nature of the sources heating this region are still not well understood; existing determinations of dust temperature and ionization do not provide us with consistent pictures of the relative important of the central source and the embedded stars in this dusty region. The composite IR emission of the Galactic Center can be crudely divided into three categories: (1) hot dust heated directly by an incident UV field along the inner region of the Galactic Center torus; (2) warm dust heated by te non-ionizing radiation of the embedded stars and re-radiated NIR dust emission; (3) cooler absorbing dust located along the galactic line of sight. The apparent inconsistencies between the observations and theoretical expectations may stem from the interplay of various physical process and source-cloud geometries. Observations with increased spatial and spectral resolution are clearly needed to provide the information necessary to address the various problems. Therefore, we made 15-45 micron spectrophotometric observations of the inner 80 min (3 pc) regions surrounding the Galactic Center with the 20 min aperture of Goddard Cryogenic Grating Spectrometer No. 2 in May 1994 from the KAO. We measured nine points, including the 50 and 90 micron peaks of Davidson et al. and points between them and SgrA,. The wavelength coverage of our instrument ensures sensitivity to the hot dust component, silicate emission and/or absorption features, and cooler dust at longer wavelengths. Our observations will be used to set limits on the luminosity of any central sources, or give an independent estimate of central luminosity, and to set limits on the range of acceptable dust parameters for this region.

  6. Acetaminophen (paracetamol) oral absorption and clinical influences.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Pergolizzi, Joseph V; Taylor, Robert; Decker, John F; Patrick, Jeffrey T

    2014-09-01

    Acetaminophen (paracetamol) is a widely used nonopioid, non-NSAID analgesic that is effective against a variety of pain types, but the consequences of overdose can be severe. Because acetaminophen is so widely available as a single agent and is increasingly being formulated in fixed-ratio combination analgesic products for the potential additive or synergistic analgesic effect and/or reduced adverse effects, accidental cumulative overdose is an emergent concern. This has rekindled interest in the sites, processes, and pharmacokinetics of acetaminophen oral absorption and the clinical factors that can influence these. The absorption of oral acetaminophen occurs primarily along the small intestine by passive diffusion. Therefore, the rate-limiting step is the rate of gastric emptying into the intestines. Several clinical factors can affect absorption per se or the rate of gastric emptying, such as diet, concomitant medication, surgery, pregnancy, and others. Although acetaminophen does not have the abuse potential of opioids or the gastrointestinal bleeding or organ adverse effects of NSAIDs, excess amounts can produce serious hepatic injury. Thus, an understanding of the sites and features of acetaminophen absorption--and how they might be influenced by factors encountered in clinical practice--is important for pain management using this agent. It can also provide insight for design of formulations that would be less susceptible to clinical variables.

  7. Visible Light Absorption of Binuclear TiOCoII Charge-Transfer UnitAssembled in Mesoporous Silica

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Hongxian; Frei, Heinz

    2007-01-30

    Grafting of CoII(NCCH3)2Cl2 onto mesoporous Ti-MCM-41 silicain acetonitrile solution affords binuclear Ti-O-CoII sites on the poresurface under complete replacement of the precursor ligands byinteractions with anchored Ti centers and the silica surface. The CoIIligand field spectrum signals that the Co centers are anchored on thepore surface in tetrahedral coordination. FT-infrared action spectroscopyusing ammonia gas adsorption reveals Co-O-Si bond modes at 831 and 762cm-1. No Co oxide clusters are observed in the as-synthesized material.The bimetallic moieties feature an absorption extending from the UV intothe visible to about 600 nm which is attributed to the TiIV-O-CoII?3TiIII-O-CoIII metal-to-metal charge-transfer (MMCT) transition. Thechromophore is absent in MCM-41 containing Ti and Co centers isolatedfrom each other; this material was synthesized by grafting CoII onto aTi-MCM-41 sample with the Ti centers protected by a cyclopentadienylligand. The result indicates that the appearance of the charge-transferabsorption requires that the metal centers are linked by an oxo bridge,which is additionally supported by XANES spectroscopy. The MMCTchromophore of Ti-O-CoII units has sufficient oxidation power to serve asvisible light electron pump for driving multi-electron transfer catalystsof demanding uphill reactions such as water oxidation.

  8. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.

    1986-01-01

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.

  9. Ultraviolet absorption hygrometer

    DOEpatents

    Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.

    1986-12-09

    An ultraviolet absorption hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.

  10. Modular total absorption spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karny, M.; Rykaczewski, K. P.; Fijałkowska, A.; Rasco, B. C.; Wolińska-Cichocka, M.; Grzywacz, R. K.; Goetz, K. C.; Miller, D.; Zganjar, E. F.

    2016-11-01

    The design and performance of the Modular Total Absorption Spectrometer built and commissioned at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is presented. The active volume of the detector is approximately one ton of NaI(Tl), which results in very high full γ energy peak efficiency of 71% at 6 MeV and nearly flat efficiency of around 81.5% for low energy γ-rays between 300 keV and 1 MeV. In addition to the high peak efficiency, the modular construction of the detector permits the use of a γ-coincidence technique in data analysis as well as β-delayed neutron observation.

  11. Connecting the Silicate Dust and Gas Properties of Distant Galaxies Using Quasar Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, Monique C.; Kulkarni, Varsha P.; York, Donald G.; Welty, Daniel E.; Vladilo, Giovanni; Som, Debopam; Lackey, Kyle; Dwek, Eli; Beiranvand, Nassim; Morrison, Sean

    2016-01-01

    We present recent results from our program investigating the silicate dust properties in distant galaxies using quasar absorption systems. The dust and gas properties of distant galaxies can be characterized by studying the absorption features produced by them along the sightlines to luminous background quasars. Based on our prior finding that silicate dust absorption in z<1.5 quasar absorption systems exhibits a range of optical depths and absorption feature substructures, suggestive of silicate grain property variations, we are investigating silicate dust absorption in quasar absorption systems toward quasars with archival Spitzer Space Telescope Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) spectra. We present our measurements of the 10 and/or 18 micron silicate dust absorption feature(s) in these systems, and discuss constraints on the grain properties, such as composition and crystallinity, based on the shape and substructure present in these features. We also investigate the correlations between the silicate dust properties and the reddening. Connections between the silicate dust and gas phase metal absorption properties can also be probed for some of our targets with archival ground-based spectra. These relationships will yield valuable insights into the star formation history and evolution of metals and dust. This work is supported by NASA through ADAP grant NNX14AG74G and by an award issued by JPL/Caltech, and from US-NSF grant AST-1108830 to the University of South Carolina.

  12. Spectrophotometry of six broad absorption line QSOs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Junkkarinen, Vesa T.; Burbidge, E. Margaret; Smith, Harding E.

    1987-01-01

    Spectrophotometric observations of six broad absorption-line QSOs (BALQSOs) are presented. The continua and emission lines are compared with those in the spectra of QSOs without BALs. A statistically significant difference is found in the emission-line intensity ratio for (N V 1240-A)/(C IV 1549-A). The median value of (N V)/(C IV) for the BALQSOs is two to three times the median for QSOs without BALs. The absorption features of the BALQSOs are described, and the column densities and limits on the ionization structure of the BAL region are discussed. If the dominant ionization mechanism is photoionization, then it is likely that either the ionizing spectrum is steep or the abundances are considerably different from solar. Collisional ionization may be a significant factor, but it cannot totally dominate the ionization rate.

  13. Feature-based attention modulates surround suppression

    PubMed Central

    Flevaris, Anastasia V.; Murray, Scott O.

    2015-01-01

    Stimuli appearing in the surround of the classical receptive field (CRF) can reduce neuronal firing and perceived contrast of a preferred stimulus in the CRF, a phenomenon referred to as surround suppression. Suppression is greatest when the surrounding stimulus has the same orientation and spatial frequency (SF) as the central target. Although spatial attention has been shown to influence surround suppression, the effects of feature-based attention have yet to be characterized. Using behavioral contrast adaptation in humans, we examined center-surround interactions between SF and orientation, and asked whether attending to one feature dimension versus the other influenced suppression. A center-surround triplet comprised of a central target Gabor and two flanking Gabors were used for adaptation. The flankers could have the same SF and orientation as the target, or differ in one or both of the feature dimensions. Contrast thresholds were measured for the target before and after adapting to center-surround triplets, and postadaptation thresholds were taken as an indirect measure of surround suppression. Both feature dimensions contributed to surround suppression and did not summate. Moreover, when center and surround had the same feature value in one dimension (e.g., same orientation) but had different values in the other dimension (e.g., different SF), there was more suppression when attention was directed to the feature dimension that matched between center and surround than when attention was directed to the feature dimension that differed. These results demonstrate that feature-based attention can influence center-surround interactions by enhancing the effects of the attended dimension. PMID:25630380

  14. The HI absorption "Zoo"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.

    2015-03-01

    We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm absorption in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I absorption in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the absorption spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I absorption spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1absorption (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1

  15. Calcium absorption and vitamin D status in school age children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increasing serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-D) in adults may enhance calcium absorption (Ca-Abs). There are few similar pediatric data. We evaluated the relationship between 25-D and Ca-Abs by pooling data from 439 Ca-Abs measurements over a 15-yr period at our center in 251 healthy children 4.9 to 16....

  16. An Integrated Model of Care: A Visit to The SPARK Center, a Program of Boston Medical Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griest, Christa

    2010-01-01

    This article features The SPARK Center, a program of Boston Medical Center, located in Mattapan, Massachusetts. The Center has pioneered a whole-child approach to address the multi-dimensional needs of Boston's most at-risk children, recognizing that vulnerable children need more than educational supports to flourish. The Center's integrated model…

  17. Mississippi Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    The Mississippi Technology Transfer Center at the John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., was officially dedicated in 1987. The center is home to several state agencies as well as the Center For Higher Learning.

  18. Using multiple spectral feature analysis for quantitative pH mapping in a mining environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopačková, Veronika

    2014-05-01

    The pH is one of the major chemical parameters affecting the results of remediation programs carried out at abandoned mines and dumps and one of the major parameters controlling heavy metal mobilization and speciation. This study is concerned with testing the feasibility of estimating surface pH on the basis of airborne hyperspectral (HS) data (HyMap). The work was carried on the Sokolov lignite mine, as it represents a site with extreme material heterogeneity and high pH gradients. First, a geochemical conceptual model of the site was defined. Pyrite, jarosite or lignite were the diagnostic minerals of very low pH (<3.0), jarosite in association with goethite indicated increased pH (3.0-6.5) and goethite alone characterized nearly neutral or higher pH (>6.5). It was found that these minerals have absorption feature parameters which are common for both forms, individual minerals as well as parts of the mixtures, while the shift to longer wavelengths of the absorption maximum centered between 0.90 and 1.00 μm is the main parameter that allows differentiation among the ferric minerals. The multi range spectral feature fitting (MRSFF) technique was employed to map the defined end-members indicating certain pH ranges in the HS image datasets. This technique was found to be sensitive enough to assess differences in the desired spectral parameters (e.g., absorption shape, depth and indirectly maximum absorption wavelength position). Furthermore, the regression model using the fit images, the results of MRSFF, as inputs was constructed (R2 = 0.61, Rv2 = 0.76) to estimate the surface pH. This study represents one of the few approaches employing image spectroscopy for quantitative pH modeling in a mining environment and the achieved results demonstrate the potential application of hyperspectral remote sensing as an efficient method for environmental monitoring.

  19. The infrared spectrum of the Galactic center and the composition of interstellar dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tielens, A. G.; Wooden, D. H.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bregman, J.; Witteborn, F. C.

    1996-01-01

    We have obtained 5-8 micrometers spectra of the Galactic center from the Kuiper Airborne Observatory at resolving powers of approximately 50, approximately 150, and approximately 300. These spectra show absorption features at 5.5, 5.8, 6.1, and 6.8 micrometers. Together with previously observed features in the 3 micrometers region, these features are compared with laboratory spectra of candidate materials. The 3.0 and 6.1 micrometers features are due to the OH stretching and bending variations of H2O and are well fitted by water of hydration in silicates (e.g., talc). The 3.0 micrometer band is equally well fitted by ice mixtures containing 30% H2O, but such mixtures do not provide a good fit to the observed 6.1 micrometer band. The 3.4 and 6.8 micrometers features are identified with the CH stretching and deformation modes in CH2 and CH3 groups in saturated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The 6.1 micrometer band shows a short wavelength shoulder centered on 5.8 micrometer, attributed to carbonyl (C double bond O) groups in this interstellar hydrocarbon dust component. Finally, the narrow 5.5 micrometer feature is also attributed to carbonyl groups, but in the form of metal carbonyls [e.g., Fe(CO)4]. We have derived column densities and abundances along the line of sight toward the Galactic center for the various identified dust components. This analysis shows that hydrocarbon grains contain only 0.08 of the elemental abundance of C and contribute only a relatively minor fraction (0.1) of the total dust volume. Most of the interstellar dust volume is made up of silicates (approximately 0.6). Small graphite grains, responsible for the 2200 angstroms bump, account for 0.07 of the total dust volume. The remaining one-quarter of the interstellar dust volume consists of a material(s) without strong IR absorption features. Likely candidates include large graphite grains, diamonds, or amorphous carbon grains, which all have weak or no IR active modes. Finally, various models for

  20. Facilities and Equpment for Day Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Sheila D.

    This guide provides assistance in selecting and designing the day care center's building and grounds and in planning and arranging the center's playroom. In regard to the building and grounds, discussion considers program and support service functions, highly desirable features of buildings and grounds, playroom space, outdoor space, and…

  1. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  2. Differential optoacoustic absorption detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A differential optoacoustic absorption detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.

  3. Two absorption furosemide prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Mombrú, A W; Mariezcurrena, R A; Suescun, L; Pardo, H; Manta, E; Prandi, C

    1999-03-15

    The structures of two absorption furosemide prodrugs, hexanoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoyl-anthranilate (C19H23CIN2O7S), (I), and benzoyloxymethyl 4-chloro-N-furfuryl-5-sulfamoylanthranilate (C20H17CIN2O7S), (II), are described in this paper and compared with furosemide and four other prodrugs. The molecular conformations of both compounds are similar to those of the other prodrugs; the packing and the crystal system are the primary differences. Compound (I) crystallizes in the trigonal space group R3 and compound (II) in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n. The packing of both structures is stabilized by a three-dimensional hydrogen-bond network.

  4. Differential absorption lidar measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.

    1981-01-01

    The theory and methodology of using differential absorption lidar techniques for the remote measurement of atmospheric pressure profiles, surface pressure, and temperature profiles from ground, air, and space-based platforms are presented. Pressure measurements are effected by means of high resolution measurement of absorption at the edges of the oxygen A band lines where absorption is pressure dependent due to collisional line broadening. Temperature is assessed using measurements of the absorption at the center of the oxygen A band line originating from a quantum state with high ground state energy. The population of the state is temperature dependent, allowing determination of the temperature through the Boltzmann term. The results of simulations of the techniques using Voigt profile and variational analysis are reported for ground-based, airborne, and Shuttle-based systems. Accuracies in the 0.5-1.0 K and 0.1-0.3% range are projected.

  5. Microwave spectrometer for saturated absorption experiments.

    PubMed

    Legrand, J; Ségard, B; Krosta, A; Macke, B

    1978-04-01

    A spectrometer has been built to perform Doppler-free saturated absorption experiments in the millimeter range (30-300 GHz); a plane-cylindrical resonator between Stark plates has been used. With that device, inverted Lamb-dips have been observed at 115 GHz with a width 25 times below the Doppler width. However, the essential feature of this apparatus is to allow the application of Stark field typically of 2500 V/cm, leading to such specific uses as the Stark tuned Lamb-dip, level-crossing, and mode-crossing experiments. Typical examples are given and other applications are proposed.

  6. KINEMATIC DISTANCE ASSIGNMENTS WITH H I ABSORPTION

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, Courtney; Dickey, John M.

    2012-07-01

    Using H I absorption spectra from the International Galactic Plane Survey, a new method is implemented to resolve the kinematic distance ambiguity for 75 H II regions with known systemic velocities from radio recombination lines. A further 40 kinematic distance determinations are made for H II region candidates without known systemic velocities through an investigation of the presence of H I absorption around the terminal velocity. New kinematic distance determinations can be used to further constrain spiral arm parameters and the location and extent of other structures in the Milky Way disk. H I absorption toward continuum sources beyond the solar circle is also investigated. Follow-up studies of H I at higher resolution than the 1' to 2' of existing Galactic Plane Surveys will provide kinematic distances to many more H II regions on the far side of the Galactic center. On the basis of the velocity channel summation technique developed in this paper, a much larger sample of H II regions will be analyzed in a future paper to remove the near-far distance ambiguity.

  7. Color-center production and recovery in electron-irradiated magnesium aluminate spinel and ceria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Lelong, Gérald; Guillaumet, Maxime; Weber, William J.; Takaki, Seiya; Yasuda, Kazuhiro

    2016-08-01

    Single crystals of magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with (1 0 0) or (1 1 0) orientations and cerium dioxide or ceria (CeO2) were irradiated by 1.0 MeV and 2.5 MeV electrons in a high-fluence range. Point-defect production was studied by off-line UV-visible optical spectroscopy after irradiation. For spinel, regardless of both crystal orientation and electron energy, two characteristic broad bands centered at photon energies of 5.4 eV and 4.9 eV were assigned to F and F+ centers (neutral and singly ionized oxygen vacancies), respectively, on the basis of available literature data. No clear differences in color-center formation were observed for the two crystal orientations. Using calculations from displacement cross sections by elastic collisions, these results are consistent with a very large threshold displacement energy (200 eV) for oxygen atoms at room temperature. A third very broad band centered at 3.7 eV might be attributed either to an oxygen hole center (V-type center) or an F2 dimer center (oxygen di-vacancy). The onset of recovery of these color centers took place at 200 °C with almost full bleaching at 600 °C. Activation energies (~0.3-0.4 eV) for defect recovery were deduced from the isochronal annealing data by using a first-order kinetics analysis. For ceria, a sub-band-gap absorption feature, which peaked at ~3.1 eV, was recorded for 2.5 MeV electron irradiation only. Assuming a ballistic process, we suggest that the latter defect might result from cerium atom displacement on the basis of computed cross sections.

  8. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  9. BASIC STUDIES IN PERCUTANEOUS ABSORPTION.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FATTY ACIDS, *SKIN(ANATOMY), ABSORPTION, ALKYL RADICALS, AMIDES, DIFFUSION, ELECTRON MICROSCOPY, HUMIDITY, LABORATORY ANIMALS, LIPIDS, ORGANIC SOLVENTS, PENETRATION, PRIVATION, PROTEINS, RATS, TEMPERATURE, WATER

  10. The Variable Ca II Absorption in β Pictoris during 1998

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, S. I.; Tobin, William; Pollard, K. R.

    2000-12-01

    Variable absorption features were observed in the visible and ultraviolet spectrum of β Pictoris soon after this star gained attention in the early 1980s due to its large IRAS infrared excess and the discovery, from optical imaging, of an edge-on dust disk. The absorption has been attributed to the evaporation of infalling planetesimals or comet-like bodies (the falling evaporating bodies, or FEB, hypothesis). With a view to confronting this hypothesis with fuller observations, we monitored the Ca II H and K lines in β Pictoris simultaneously during 1998, obtaining sequences of spectra on 50 nights. Variable absorption was usually present. The different oscillator strengths of the H and K lines permit the determination of covering factors, but detailed modelling is required to test whether all features can be explained by the FEB hypothesis. The blend of Ca II H with Balmer H ɛ means that the H and K photospheric profiles are different, and that the variable absorption features do not evolve in parallel. The behaviour of the variable absorption on November 27 is evocative of a body passing in front of the stellar disk in a prograde equatorial orbit.

  11. Light absorption and emission in nanowire array solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kupec, Jan; Stoop, Ralph L; Witzigmann, Bernd

    2010-12-20

    Inorganic nanowires are under intense research for large scale solar power generation intended to ultimately contribute a substantial fraction to the overall power mix. Their unique feature is to allow different pathways for the light absorption and carrier transport. In this publication we investigate the properties of a nanowire array acting as a photonic device governed by wave-optical phenomena. We solve the Maxwell equations and calculate the light absorption efficiency for the AM1.5d spectrum and give recommendations on the design. Due to concentration of the incident sunlight at a microscopic level the absorptivity of nanowire solar cells can exceed the absorptivity of an equal amount of material used in thin-film devices. We compute the local density of photon states to assess the effect of emission enhancement, which influences the radiative lifetime of excess carriers. This allows us to compute the efficiency limit within the framework of detailed balance. The efficiency is highly sensitive with respect to the diameter and distance of the nanowires. Designs featuring nanowires below a certain diameter will intrinsically feature low short-circuit current that cannot be compensated even by increasing the nanowire density. Optimum efficiency is not achieved in densely packed arrays, in fact spacing the nanowires further apart (simultaneously decreasing the material use) can even improve efficiency in certain scenarios. We observe absorption enhancement reducing the material use. In terms of carrier generation per material use, nanowire devices can outperform thin-film devices by far.

  12. [Plant Spectral Discrimination Based on Phenological Features].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Zhao, Jian-long; Jia, Kun; Li, Xiao-song

    2015-10-01

    Spectral analysis plays a significant role onplant characteristic identification and mechanism recognition, there were many papers published on the aspects of absorption features in the spectra of chlorophyll and moisture, spectral analysis onvegetation red edge effect, spectra profile feature extraction, spectra profile conversion, vegetation leaf structure and chemical composition impacts on the spectra in past years. However, fewer researches issued on spectral changes caused by plant seasonal changes of life form, chlorophyll, leaf area index. This paper studied on spectral observation of 11 plants of various life form, plant leaf structure and its size, phenological characteristics, they include deciduous forest with broad vertical leaf, needle leaf evergreen forest, needle leaf deciduous forest, deciduous forest with broadflat leaf, high shrub with big leaf, high shrub with little leaf, deciduous forest with broad little leaf, short shrub, meadow, steppe and grass. Field spectral data were observed with SVC-HR768 (Spectra Vista company, USA), the band width covers 350-2 500 nm, spectral resolution reaches 1-4 nm. The features of NDVI, spectral maximum absorption depth in green band, and spectral maximum absorption depth in red band were measured after continuum removal processing, the mean, amplitude and gradient of these features on seasonal change profile were analyzed, meanwhile, separability research on plant spectral feature of growth period and maturation period were compared. The paper presents a calculation method of separability of vegetation spectra which consider feature spatial distances. This index is carried on analysis of the vegetation discrimination. The results show that: the spectral features during plant growth period are easier to distinguish than them during maturation period. With the same features comparison, plant separability of growth period is 3 points higher than it during maturation period. The overall separabilityof vegetation

  13. H I absorption toward cooling flows in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcnamara, Brian R.; O'Connell, Robert W.; Bregman, Joel N.

    1990-01-01

    An H I survey of 14 cooling flow clusters and two noncooling flow clusters was conducted, and H I absorption features were detected against the nuclear radio continuum sources of two cooling flow dominant (CFD) galaxies, 2A 0335 + 096 and MKW3s. The absorption features are broad and redshifted with respect to the stellar absorption-line velocity of the CFDs by 90-225 km/s. This indicates that the H I is falling onto, and is probably gravitationally bound to, the CFDs. The kinematics of the H I clouds suggest a possible kinematic link between the warm and cold phases of the intracluster medium. The clouds are orders of magnitude smaller in radius and mass and larger in density than Galactic H I clouds. The detected CFDs have mass-accretion rates that are about 2.5 times larger than the CFDs that were not detected.

  14. "Stirred, Not Shaken": Vibrational Coherence Can Speed Up Electronic Absorption.

    PubMed

    Chang, Bo Y; Shin, Seokmin; Sola, Ignacio R

    2015-08-27

    We have recently proposed a laser control scheme for ultrafast absorption in multilevel systems by parallel transfer (J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 2015, 6, 1724). In this work we develop an analytical model that better takes into account the main features of electronic absorption in molecules. We show that the initial vibrational coherence in the ground electronic state can be used to greatly enhance the rate and yield of absorption when ultrashort pulses are used, provided that the phases of the coherences are taken into account. On the contrary, the initial coherence plays no role in the opposite limit, when a single long pulse drives the optical transition. The theory is tested by numerical simulations in the first absorption band of Na2.

  15. Theory of strong-field attosecond transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Mengxi; Chen, Shaohao; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    Attosecond transient absorption is one of the promising new techniques being developed to exploit the availability of sub-femtosecond extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses to study the dynamics of the electron on its natural time scale. The temporal resolution in a transient absorption setup comes from the control of the relative delay and coherence between pump and probe pulses, while the spectral resolution comes from the characteristic width of the features that are being probed. In this review we focus on transient absorption scenarios where an attosecond pulse of XUV radiation creates a broadband excitation that is subsequently probed by a few cycle infrared (IR) laser. Because the attosecond XUV pulses are locked to the IR field cycle, the exchange of energy in the laser-matter interaction can be studied with unprecedented precision. We focus on the transient absorption by helium atoms of XUV radiation around the first ionization threshold, where we can simultaneoulsy solve the time-dependent Schrödinger equation for the single atom response and the Maxwell wave equation for the collective response of the nonlinear medium. We use a time-domain method that allows us to treat on an equal footing all the different linear and nonlinear processes by which the medium can exchange energy with the fields. We present several simple models, based on a few-level system interacting with a strong IR field, to explain many of the novel features found in attosecond transient absorption spectrograms. These include the presence of light-induced states, which demonstrate the ability to probe the dressed states of the atom. We also present a time-domain interpretation of the resonant pulse propagation features that appear in absorption spectra in dense, macroscopic media. We close by reviewing several recent experimental results that can be explained in terms of the models we discuss. Our aim is to present a road map for understanding future attosecond transient absorption

  16. X-ray absorption spectroscopic studies of the active sites of nickel- and copper-containing metalloproteins

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, G.O.

    1993-06-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a useful tool for obtaining structural and chemical information about the active sites of metalloproteins and metalloenzymes. Information may be obtained from both the edge region and the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) or post-edge region of the K-edge X-ray absorption spectrum of a metal center in a compound. The edge contains information about the valence electronic structure of the atom that absorbs the X-rays. It is possible in some systems to infer the redox state of the metal atom in question, as well as the geometry and nature of ligands connected to it, from the features in the edge in a straightforward manner. The EXAFS modulations, being produced by the backscattering of the ejected photoelectron from the atoms surrounding the metal atom, provide, when analyzed, information about the number and type of neighbouring atoms, and the distances at which they occur. In this thesis, analysis of both the edge and EXAFS regions has been used to gain information about the active sites of various metalloproteins. The metalloproteins studied were plastocyanin (Pc), laccase and nickel carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (Ni CODH). Studies of Cu(I)-imidazole compounds, related to the protein hemocyanin, are also reported here.

  17. Solar Absorption in Cloudy Atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical computations used to compute spectral absorption of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud absorption problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.

  18. Atmospheric absorption of sound - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.

    1990-01-01

    Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total absorption. The resulting graphs of total absorption as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).

  19. Subgap Absorption in Conjugated Polymers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.

    1991-01-01

    Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical absorption in the transparent window below the principal absorption edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an absorptance sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the absorption coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical absorption spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the absorption edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest absorption edge. The minimum absorption coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.

  20. Designing using manufacturing features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szecsi, T.; Hoque, A. S. M.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents a design system that enables the composition of a part using manufacturing features. Features are selected from feature libraries. Upon insertion, the system ensures that the feature does not contradict the design-for-manufacture rules. This helps eliminating costly manufacturing problems. The system is developed as an extension to a commercial CAD/CAM system Pro/Engineer.

  1. Optical absorption of silicon nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.

    2012-08-01

    We report on simulations and measurements of the optical absorption of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical absorption based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and absorption properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the absorption is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the absorption onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.

  2. Ultraviolet absorption spectrum of HOCl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burkholder, James B.

    1993-01-01

    The room temperature UV absorption spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The absorption spectrum was identified from UV absorption spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured absorption cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV absorption cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.

  3. Gas-absorption process

    DOEpatents

    Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is an improved gas-absorption process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.

  4. Feature Identification and Location Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivertson, W. E., Jr.; Wilson, R. G.; Bullock, G. F.; Schappell, R. T.

    1982-01-01

    The Feature Identification and Location Experiment (FILE), which was flown on the second Space Shuttle flight to test a technique for real-time, autonomous classification of water, vegetation and bare land as well as clouds, snow and ice, senses earth radiation in spectral bands centered at 0.65 and 0.85 microns. The radiance ratio classification algorithm has successfully made automatic data selection decisions. A classification image obtained on the mission is providing data needed to evaluate the FILE algorithm and overall system performance.

  5. 2. VIEW OF ROOT CELLAR (Feature 11) IN FOREGROUND, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF ROOT CELLAR (Feature 11) IN FOREGROUND, WITH REAR ROOF OF HOUSE (Feature 10) AT LEFT, AND ROOF OF BUTCHER SHOP/FREIGHT DEPOT (Feature 9) IN CENTER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST - Leesburg Townsite, Root Cellar, Napias Creek, Salmon, Lemhi County, ID

  6. Children's cancer centers

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric cancer center; Pediatric oncology center; Comprehensive cancer center ... Treating childhood cancer is not the same as treating adult cancer. The cancers are different. So are the treatments and the ...

  7. The Watergate Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Training in Business and Industry, 1971

    1971-01-01

    The Watergate Learning Center, recently opened by Sterling Learning Center in Washington, D. C., blueprints the plan established by Sterling and Marriott Hotels for a national chain of learning centers with much the same facilities. (EB)

  8. Io's Thermal Regions and Non-SO2 Spectral Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Soderblom, L. A.; Lopes, R. M. C.

    2003-01-01

    Several absorptions have been identified in the Galileo NIMS spectra of Io that are not related to SO2. [1,2]. These absorptions have band centers at 2.97, 3.15, 3.85, and 3.91 microns. There are also broad absorptions in the regions 1-1.3 and 3- 3.4 microns. Patterning noise in wavelength registration, arising from the pushbroom imaging and grating motion of the NIMS instrument have previously inhibited reliable mapping of weak absorptions. Recent improvements in techniques to remove the coherent pattern noise from the NIMS dataset have been made by Soderblom. This greatly improves the signal to noise ratio and enables mapping of weak spectral signatures such as the 3.15 micron absorption on Io.

  9. Color-Center Production and Formation in Electron-Irradiated Magnesium Aluminate Spinel and Ceria

    DOE PAGES

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Lelong, Gerald; Guillaumet, Maxime; ...

    2016-06-20

    Single crystals of magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with (100) or (110) orientations and cerium dioxide or ceria (CeO2) were irradiated by 1.0-MeV and 2.5-MeV electrons in a high fluence range. Point-defect production was studied by off-line UV-visible optical spectroscopy after irradiation. For spinel, regardless of both crystal orientation and electron energy, two characteristic broad bands centered at photon energies of 5.4 eV and 4.9 eV were assigned to F and F+ centers (neutral and singly-ionized oxygen vacancies), respectively, on the basis of available literature data. No clear differences in colour-centre formation were observed for the two crystal orientations. Using calculationsmore » of displacement cross sections by elastic collisions, these results are consistent with a very large threshold displacement energy (200 eV) for oxygen atoms at RT. A third very broad band centered at 3.7 eV might be attributed either to an oxygen hole center (V-type center) or an F2 dimer center (oxygen di-vacancy). The onset of recovery of these color centers took place at 200°C with almost full bleaching at 600°C. Activation energies (~0.3-0.4 eV) for defect recovery were deduced from the isochronal annealing data by using a first-order kinetics analysis. For ceria, a sub band-gap absorption feature peaked at ~3.1 eV was recorded for 2.5-MeV electron irradiation only. Assuming a ballistic process, we suggest that the latter defect might result from cerium atom displacement on the basis of computed cross sections.« less

  10. Color-Center Production and Formation in Electron-Irradiated Magnesium Aluminate Spinel and Ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Jean-Marc; Lelong, Gerald; Guillaumet, Maxime; Weber, William J.; Takaki, Seiya; Yasuda, Kazuhiro

    2016-06-20

    Single crystals of magnesium aluminate spinel (MgAl2O4) with (100) or (110) orientations and cerium dioxide or ceria (CeO2) were irradiated by 1.0-MeV and 2.5-MeV electrons in a high fluence range. Point-defect production was studied by off-line UV-visible optical spectroscopy after irradiation. For spinel, regardless of both crystal orientation and electron energy, two characteristic broad bands centered at photon energies of 5.4 eV and 4.9 eV were assigned to F and F+ centers (neutral and singly-ionized oxygen vacancies), respectively, on the basis of available literature data. No clear differences in colour-centre formation were observed for the two crystal orientations. Using calculations of displacement cross sections by elastic collisions, these results are consistent with a very large threshold displacement energy (200 eV) for oxygen atoms at RT. A third very broad band centered at 3.7 eV might be attributed either to an oxygen hole center (V-type center) or an F2 dimer center (oxygen di-vacancy). The onset of recovery of these color centers took place at 200°C with almost full bleaching at 600°C. Activation energies (~0.3-0.4 eV) for defect recovery were deduced from the isochronal annealing data by using a first-order kinetics analysis. For ceria, a sub band-gap absorption feature peaked at ~3.1 eV was recorded for 2.5-MeV electron irradiation only. Assuming a ballistic process, we suggest that the latter defect might result from cerium atom displacement on the basis of computed cross sections.

  11. Gastrointestinal citrate absorption in nephrolithiasis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.

    1992-01-01

    Gastrointestinal absorption of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate absorption was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate absorption, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate absorption was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The absorption of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate absorption from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal absorption of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.

  12. Excitonic effects from geometric order and disorder explain broadband optical absorption in eumelanin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chun-Teh; Chuang, Chern; Cao, Jianshu; Ball, Vincent; Ruch, David; Buehler, Markus J

    2014-05-22

    Eumelanin is a ubiquitous biological pigment, and the origin of its broadband absorption spectrum has long been a topic of scientific debate. Here, we report a first-principles computational investigation to explain its broadband absorption feature. These computations are complemented by experimental results showing a broadening of the absorption spectra of dopamine solutions upon their oxidation. We consider a variety of eumelanin molecular structures supported by experiments or theoretical studies, and calculate the absorption spectra with proper account of the excitonic couplings based on the Frenkel exciton model. The interplay of geometric order and disorder of eumelanin aggregate structures broadens the absorption spectrum and gives rise to a relative enhancement of absorption intensity at the higher-energy end, proportional to the cube of absorption energy. These findings show that the geometric disorder model is as able as the chemical disorder model, and complements this model, to describe the optical properties of eumelanin.

  13. Feature space analysis of MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soltanian-Zadeh, Hamid; Windham, Joe P.; Peck, Donald J.

    1997-04-01

    This paper presents development and performance evaluation of an MRI feature space method. The method is useful for: identification of tissue types; segmentation of tissues; and quantitative measurements on tissues, to obtain information that can be used in decision making (diagnosis, treatment planning, and evaluation of treatment). The steps of the work accomplished are as follows: (1) Four T2-weighted and two T1-weighted images (before and after injection of Gadolinium) were acquired for ten tumor patients. (2) Images were analyed by two image analysts according to the following algorithm. The intracranial brain tissues were segmented from the scalp and background. The additive noise was suppressed using a multi-dimensional non-linear edge- preserving filter which preserves partial volume information on average. Image nonuniformities were corrected using a modified lowpass filtering approach. The resulting images were used to generate and visualize an optimal feature space. Cluster centers were identified on the feature space. Then images were segmented into normal tissues and different zones of the tumor. (3) Biopsy samples were extracted from each patient and were subsequently analyzed by the pathology laboratory. (4) Image analysis results were compared to each other and to the biopsy results. Pre- and post-surgery feature spaces were also compared. The proposed algorithm made it possible to visualize the MRI feature space and to segment the image. In all cases, the operators were able to find clusters for normal and abnormal tissues. Also, clusters for different zones of the tumor were found. Based on the clusters marked for each zone, the method successfully segmented the image into normal tissues (white matter, gray matter, and CSF) and different zones of the lesion (tumor, cyst, edema, radiation necrosis, necrotic core, and infiltrated tumor). The results agreed with those obtained from the biopsy samples. Comparison of pre- to post-surgery and radiation

  14. Atmospheric pressure and temperature profiling using near IR differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korb, C. L.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Dombrowski, M.; Weng, C. Y.

    1983-01-01

    The present investigation is concerned with differential absorption lidar techniques for remotely measuring the atmospheric temperature and pressure profile, surface pressure, and cloud top pressure-height. The procedure used in determining the pressure is based on the conduction of high-resolution measurements of absorption in the wings of lines in the oxygen A band. Absorption with respect to these areas is highly pressure sensitive in connection with the mechanism of collisional line broadening. The method of temperature measurement utilizes a determination of the absorption at the center of a selected line in the oxygen A band which originates from a quantum state with high ground state energy.

  15. [Terahertz Absorption Spectra Simulation of Glutamine Based on Quantum-Chemical Calculation].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tian-yao; Zhang, Zhao-hui; Zhao, Xiao-yan; Zhang, Han; Yan, Fang; Qian, Ping

    2015-08-01

    With simulation of absorption spectra in THz region based on quantum-chemical calculation, the THz absorption features of target materials can be assigned with theoretical normal vibration modes. This is necessary for deeply understanding the origin of THz absorption spectra. The reliabilities of simulation results mainly depend on the initial structures and theoretical methods used throughout the calculation. In our study, we utilized THz-TDS to obtain the THz absorption spectrum of solid-state L-glutamine. Then three quantum-chemical calculation schemes with different initial structures commonly used in previous studies were proposed to study the inter-molecular interactions' contribution to the THz absorption of glutamine, containing monomer structure, dimer structure and crystal unit cell structure. After structure optimization and vibration modes' calculation based on density functional theory, the calculation results were converted to absorption spectra by Lorentzian line shape function for visual comparison with experimental spectra. The result of dimmer structure is better than monomer structure in number of absorption features while worse than crystal unit cell structure in position of absorption peaks. With the most reliable simulation result from crystal unit cell calculation, we successfully assigned all three experimental absorption peaks of glutamine ranged from 0.3 to 2.6 THz with overall vibration modes. Our study reveals that the crystal unit cell should be used as initial structure during theoretical simulation of solid-state samples' THz absorption spectrum which comprehensively considers not only the intra-molecular interactions but also inter-molecular interactions.

  16. PHASE ANGLE EFFECTS ON 3 μm ABSORPTION BAND ON CERES: IMPLICATIONS FOR DAWN MISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Takir, D.; Reddy, V.; Sanchez, J. A.; Corre, L. Le; Hardersen, P. S.; Nathues, A.

    2015-05-01

    Phase angle-induced spectral effects are important to characterize since they affect spectral band parameters such as band depth and band center, and therefore skew mineralogical interpretations of planetary bodies via reflectance spectroscopy. Dwarf planet (1) Ceres is the next target of NASA’s Dawn mission, which is expected to arrive in 2015 March. The visible and near-infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) on board Dawn has the spatial and spectral range to characterize the surface between 0.25–5.0 μm. Ceres has an absorption feature at 3.0 μm due to hydroxyl- and/or water-bearing minerals. We analyzed phase angle-induced spectral effects on the 3 μm absorption band on Ceres using spectra measured with the long-wavelength cross-dispersed (LXD: 1.9–4.2 μm) mode of the SpeX spectrograph/imager at the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility. Ceres LXD spectra were measured at different phase angles ranging from 0.°7 to 22°. We found that the band center slightly increases from 3.06 μm at lower phase angles (0.°7 and 6°) to 3.07 μm at higher phase angles (11° and 22°), the band depth decreases by ∼20% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles, and the band area decreases by ∼25% from lower phase angles to higher phase angles. Our results will have implications for constraining the abundance of OH on the surface of Ceres from VIR spectral data, which will be acquired by Dawn starting spring 2015.

  17. Photosynthetic reaction center complexes from heliobacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, J. T.; Vermaas, W. F. J.; Blankenship, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    The goal of this project is to understand the early evolutionary development of photosynthesis by examining the properties of reaction centers isolated from certain contemporary organisms that appear to contain the simplest photosynthetic reaction centers. The major focus of this project is the family of newly discovered strictly anaerobic photosynthetic organisms known as Heliobacteria. These organisms are the only known photosynthetic organisms that are grouped with the gram-positive phylum of bacteria. The properties of these reaction centers suggest that they might be the decendants of an ancestor that also gave rise to Photosystem 1 found in oxygen-evolving photosynthetic organisms. Photoactive reaction center-core antenna complexes have been isolated from the photosynthetic bacteria Heliobacillus mobilis and Heliobacterium gestii. The absorption and fluorescence properties of membranes and reaction centers are almost identical, suggesting that a single pigment-protein complex serves as both antenna and reaction center. Experiments in progress include sequence determination of the 48,000 Mr reaction center protein, and evolutionary comparisons with other reaction center proteins.

  18. VNIR spectral features observed by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity in hematite-bearing materials at Meridiani Planum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrand, W. H.; Bell, J. F.; Morris, R. V.; Joliff, B. L.; Squyres, S. W.; Souza, P. A.

    2004-12-01

    The Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity was sent to Meridiani Planum based largely on MGS TES spectroscopic evidence of a large surface exposure of coarse grained gray hematite. The presence of hematite at Meridiani Planum has been confirmed through thermal infrared spectroscopy by the rover's Mini-TES instrument and by in-situ measurements by its Moessbauer (MB) spectrometer. Several types of hematite, as expressed by differences in MB spectral parameters, have been associated with various rocks and soils examined in Eagle crater and on the surrounding plains. The host materials include the small spherules (informally known as "blueberries") littering the floor of Eagle crater and the plains of Meridiani, the outcrop rock itself, specific types of soils, and two measurements on unique rocks in the Shoemaker's Patio area of Eagle crater. At the visible to near infrared (VNIR) wavelengths covered by the rover's multispectral Panoramic camera (Pancam), gray hematite is spectrally neutral. However, multispectral observations by Pancam of some of these hematite-bearing materials show discernable spectral features. Specifically, portions of the outcrop visible in the walls of Eagle crater display a strong 535 nm absorption feature. This feature resembles a similar feature in laboratory spectra of red hematite, but the characteristic 860 nm absorption of red hematite is either absent or is instead replaced by a longer wavelength absorption centered on Pancam's 900 nm channel. The blueberries display a deep and broad absorption centered on 900 nm and as well as an increase in reflectance in the 1009 nm band. The shape of the absorption feature in the blueberries is consistent with that seen in red hematite, but again the band minimum is displaced to a longer wavelength than would be expected for red hematite. The blueberries also lack the prominent absorption at the shortest wavelengths that would be expected of red hematite. The unique hematite-bearing (or coated) rocks

  19. Clustering granulometric features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brun, Marcel; Balagurunathan, Yoganand; Barrera, Junior; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2002-05-01

    Granulometric features have been widely used for classification, segmentation and recently in estimation of parameters in shape models. In this paper we study the inference of clustering based on granulometric features for a collection of structuring probes in the context of random models. We use random Boolean models to represent grains of different shapes and structure. It is known that granulometric features are excellent descriptors of shape and structure of grains. Inference based on clustering these features helps to analyze the consistency of these features and clustering algorithms. This greatly aids in classifier design and feature selection. Features and the order of their addition play a role in reducing the inference errors. We study four different types of feature addition methods and the effect of replication in reducing the inference errors.

  20. SELF-ABSORPTION IN THE SOLAR TRANSITION REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Limei; He, Jiansen; Wang, Linghua; Tu, Chuanyi; Zhang, Lei; Peter, Hardi; Chen, Feng; Barczynski, Krzysztof; Tian, Hui; Xia, Lidong

    2015-09-20

    Transient brightenings in the transition region of the Sun have been studied for decades and are usually related to magnetic reconnection. Recently, absorption features due to chromospheric lines have been identified in transition region emission lines raising the question of the thermal stratification during such reconnection events. We analyze data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph in an emerging active region. Here the spectral profiles show clear self-absorption features in the transition region lines of Si iv. While some indications existed that opacity effects might play some role in strong transition region lines, self-absorption has not been observed before. We show why previous instruments could not observe such self-absorption features, and discuss some implications of this observation for the corresponding structure of reconnection events in the atmosphere. Based on this we speculate that a range of phenomena, such as explosive events, blinkers or Ellerman bombs, are just different aspects of the same reconnection event occurring at different heights in the atmosphere.

  1. A SURVEY OF ALKALI LINE ABSORPTION IN EXOPLANETARY ATMOSPHERES

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Adam G.; Redfield, Seth; Endl, Michael; Cochran, William D.; Koesterke, Lars; Barman, Travis S. E-mail: sredfield@wesleyan.edu E-mail: wdc@astro.as.utexas.edu E-mail: barman@lowell.edu

    2011-12-20

    We obtained over 90 hr of spectroscopic observations of four exoplanetary systems with the Hobby-Eberly Telescope. Observations were taken in transit and out of transit, and we analyzed the differenced spectra-i.e., the transmission spectra-to inspect it for absorption at the wavelengths of the neutral sodium (Na I) doublet at {lambda}{lambda}5889, 5895 and neutral potassium (K I) at {lambda}7698. We used the transmission spectrum at Ca I {lambda}6122-which shows strong stellar absorption but is not an alkali metal resonance line that we expect to show significant absorption in these atmospheres-as a control line to examine our measurements for systematic errors. We use an empirical Monte Carlo method to quantify these systematic errors. In a reanalysis of the same data set using a reduction and analysis pipeline that was derived independently, we confirm the previously seen Na I absorption in HD 189733b at a level of (- 5.26 {+-} 1.69) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} (the average value over a 12 A integration band to be consistent with previous authors). Additionally, we tentatively confirm the Na I absorption seen in HD 209458b (independently by multiple authors) at a level of (- 2.63 {+-} 0.81) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4}, though the interpretation is less clear. Furthermore, we find Na I absorption of (- 3.16 {+-} 2.06) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} at <3{sigma} in HD 149026b; features apparent in the transmission spectrum are consistent with real absorption and indicate this may be a good target for future observations to confirm. No other results (Na I in HD 147506b and Ca I and K I in all four targets) are significant to {>=}3{sigma}, although we observe some features that we argue are primarily artifacts.

  2. Scramjet Performance Assessment Using Water Absorption Diagnostics (U)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavolowsky, John A.; Loomis, Mark P.; Deiwert, George

    1995-01-01

    Simultaneous multiple path measurements of temperature and H2O concentration will be presented for the AIMHYE test entries in the NASA Ames 16-Inch Shock Tunnel. Monitoring the progress of high temperature chemical reactions that define scramjet combustor efficiencies is a task uniquely suited to nonintrusive optical diagnostics. One application strategy to overcome the many challenges and limitations of nonintrusive measurements is to use laser absorption spectroscopy coupled with optical fibers. Absorption spectroscopic techniques with rapidly tunable lasers are capable of making simultaneous measurements of mole fraction, temperature, pressure, and velocity. The scramjet water absorption diagnostic was used to measure combustor efficiency and was compared to thrust measurements using a nozzle force balance and integrated nozzle pressures to develop a direct technique for evaluating integrated scramjet performance. Tests were initially performed with a diode laser tuning over a water absorption feature at 1391.7 nm. A second diode laser later became available at a wavelength near 1343.3 nm covering an additional water absorption feature and was incorporated in the system for a two-wavelength technique. Both temperature and mole fraction can be inferred from the lineshape analysis using this approach. Additional high temperature spectroscopy research was conducted to reduce uncertainties in the scramjet application. The lasers are optical fiber coupled to ports at the combustor exit and in the nozzle region. The output from the two diode lasers were combined in a single fiber, and the resultant two-wavelength beam was subsequently split into four legs. Each leg was directed through 60 meters of optical fiber to four combustor exit locations for measurement of beam intensity after absorption by the water within the flow. Absorption results will be compared to 1D combustor analysis using RJPA and nozzle CFD computations as well as to data from a nozzle metric

  3. Microwave radiation absorption: behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, J A

    1991-07-01

    The literature contains much evidence that absorption of microwave energy will lead to behavioral changes in man and laboratory animals. The changes include simple perturbations or outright stoppage of ongoing behavior. On one extreme, intense microwave absorption can result in seizures followed by death. On the other extreme, man and animals can hear microwave pulses at very low rates of absorption. Under certain conditions of exposure, animals will avoid microwaves, while under other conditions, they will actively work to obtain warmth produced by microwaves. Some research has shown behavioral effects during chronic exposure to low-level microwaves. The specific absorption rates that produce behavioral effects seem to depend on microwave frequency, but controversy exists over thresholds and mechanism of action. In all cases, however, the behavioral disruptions cease when chronic microwave exposure is terminated. Thermal changes in man and animals during microwave exposure appear to account for all reported behavioral effects.

  4. Energy 101: Energy Efficient Data Centers

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Data centers provide mission-critical computing functions vital to the daily operation of top U.S. economic, scientific, and technological organizations. These data centers consume large amounts of energy to run and maintain their computer systems, servers, and associated high-performance components—up to 3% of all U.S. electricity powers data centers. And as more information comes online, data centers will consume even more energy. Data centers can become more energy efficient by incorporating features like power-saving "stand-by" modes, energy monitoring software, and efficient cooling systems instead of energy-intensive air conditioners. These and other efficiency improvements to data centers can produce significant energy savings, reduce the load on the electric grid, and help protect the nation by increasing the reliability of critical computer operations.

  5. Vaginal absorption of hexachlorophene during labor.

    PubMed

    Strickland, D M; Leonard, R G; Stavchansky, S; Benoit, T; Wilson, R T

    1983-12-01

    Surgical soap that contains hexachlorophene is used as an antiseptic lubricant for vaginal examinations during labor in some centers. Theoretically, hexachlorophene can be absorbed from the vaginal mucosa and be potentially toxic to the fetus and neonate. To evaluate vaginal absorption and placental transfer of hexachlorophene, we measured levels in mixed arterial/venous cord serum and postpartum maternal serum in 28 women whose vaginal examinations were lubricated with pHisoHex during labor. The serum of 12 women had detectable levels of hexachlorophene, with a high level of 942 ng/ml. Cord serum had detectable levels in nine neonates, with a high level of 617 ng/ml. The conclusion is that hexachlorophene from vaginal lubricants is variably absorbed from the vaginal mucosa, and appreciable amounts can be detected in maternal and cord serum. Because of the potential for neonatal hexachlorophene toxicity, we recommend the use of alternative lubricants for pelvic examinations during labor.

  6. Solar Absorptance of Cermet Coatings Evaluated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.

    2004-01-01

    Cermet coatings, molecular mixtures of metal and ceramic, are being considered for the heat inlet surface of solar Stirling convertors. In this application, the key role of the cermet coating is to absorb as much of the incident solar energy as possible. To achieve this objective, the cermet coating has a high solar absorptance value. Cermet coatings are manufactured utilizing sputter deposition, and many different metal and ceramic combinations can be created. The ability to mix metal and ceramic at the atomic level offers the opportunity to tailor the composition, and hence, the optical properties of these coatings. The NASA Glenn Research Center has prepared and characterized a wide variety of cermet coatings utilizing different metals deposited in an aluminum oxide ceramic matrix. In addition, the atomic oxygen durability of these coatings has been evaluated.

  7. Dryden Flight Research Center: Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ratnayake, Nalin

    2009-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes a general overview of Dryden Flight Research Center. Strategic partnerships, Dryden's mission activity, exploration systems and aeronautics research programs are also described.

  8. Stratospheric infrared continuum absorptions observed by the ATMOS instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinsland, C. P.; Zander, R.; Namkung, J. S.; Farmer, C. B.; Norton, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    A quantitative analysis of infrared continuum absorption features observed in ATMOS/Spacelab 3 (1985) spectra of the lower stratosphere is reported. Continuous absorption produced primarily by the collision-induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of O2 and to a lesser extent by the superposition of H2O far line wings has been observed in the 1400 to 1800/cm interval below tangent heights of about 25 km. Continuum optical depths measured in microwindows nearly free of atmospheric line absorption are 0.78 + or - 0.06 times those calculated with the O2 absorption coefficients of Timofeyev and Tonkov (1978). Transmittance measurements in microwindows between 2395 and 2535/cm have been used to study continuous absorption from the collision induced fundamental vibration-rotation band of N2 and the far wings of strong CO2 lines. The measured transmittances have been analyzed to derive best fit absorption coefficients for the N2 pressure-induced band at lower stratospheric temperatures (about 210 K).

  9. Polarized x-ray-absorption spectroscopy of the uranyl ion: Comparison of experiment and theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, E.A.; Allen, P.G.; Terminello, L.J.; Denecke, M.A.; Reich, T.

    1996-07-01

    The x-ray linear dichroism of the uranyl ion (UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}) in uranium {ital L}{sub 3}-edge extended x-ray-absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and {ital L}{sub 1}- and {ital L}{sub 3}-edge x-ray-absorption near-edge structure (XANES), has been investigated both by experiment and theory. A striking polarization dependence is observed in the experimental XANES and EXAFS for an oriented single crystal of uranyl acetate dihydrate [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}{center_dot}2H{sub 2}O], with the x-ray polarization vector aligned either parallel or perpendicular to the bond axis of the linear uranyl cation (O-U-O). Single-crystal results are compared to experimental spectra for a polycrystalline uranyl acetate sample and to calculations using the {ital ab} {ital initio} multiple-scattering (MS) code FEFF 6. Theoretical XANES spectra for uranyl fluoride (UO{sub 2}F{sub 2}) reproduce all the features of the measured uranyl acetate spectra. By identifying scattering paths which contribute to individual features in the calculated spectrum, a detailed understanding of the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES is obtained. MS paths within the uranyl cation have a notable influence upon the XANES. The measured {ital L}{sub 3}-edge EXAFS is also influenced by MS, especially when the x-ray polarization is parallel to the uranyl species. These MS contributions are extracted from the total EXAFS and compared to calculations. The best agreement with the isolated MS signal is obtained by using nonoverlapped muffin-tin spheres in the FEFF 6 calculation. This contrasts the {ital L}{sub 1}-edge XANES calculations, in which overlapping was required for the best agreement with experiment. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  10. ac Magnetization transport and power absorption in nonitinerant spin chains.

    PubMed

    Trauzettel, Björn; Simon, Pascal; Loss, Daniel

    2008-07-04

    We investigate the ac transport of magnetization in nonitinerant quantum systems such as spin chains described by the XXZ Hamiltonian. Using linear response theory, we calculate the ac magnetization current and the power absorption of such magnetic systems. Remarkably, the difference in the exchange interaction of the spin chain itself and the bulk magnets (i.e., the magnetization reservoirs), to which the spin chain is coupled, strongly influences the absorbed power of the system. This feature can be used in future spintronic devices to control power dissipation. Our analysis allows us to make quantitative predictions about the power absorption, and we show that magnetic systems are superior to their electronic counterparts.

  11. Plasma absorption evidence via chirped pulse spectral transmission measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Jedrkiewicz, Ottavia; Minardi, Stefano; Couairon, Arnaud; Jukna, Vytautas; Selva, Marco; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2015-06-08

    This work aims at highlighting the plasma generation dynamics and absorption when a Bessel beam propagates in glass. We developed a simple diagnostics allowing us to retrieve clear indications of the formation of the plasma in the material, thanks to transmission measurements in the angular and wavelength domains. This technique featured by the use of a single chirped pulse having the role of pump and probe simultaneously leads to results showing the plasma nonlinear absorption effect on the trailing part of the pulse, thanks to the spectral-temporal correspondence in the measured signal, which is also confirmed by numerical simulations.

  12. Incomplete intestinal absorption of fructose.

    PubMed Central

    Kneepkens, C M; Vonk, R J; Fernandes, J

    1984-01-01

    Intestinal D-fructose absorption in 31 children was investigated using measurements of breath hydrogen. Twenty five children had no abdominal symptoms and six had functional bowel disorders. After ingestion of fructose (2 g/kg bodyweight), 22 children (71%) showed a breath hydrogen increase of more than 10 ppm over basal values, indicating incomplete absorption: the increase averaged 53 ppm, range 12 to 250 ppm. Four of these children experienced abdominal symptoms. Three of the six children with bowel disorders showed incomplete absorption. Seven children were tested again with an equal amount of glucose, and in three of them also of galactose, added to the fructose. The mean maximum breath hydrogen increases were 5 and 10 ppm, respectively, compared with 103 ppm after fructose alone. In one boy several tests were performed with various sugars; fructose was the only sugar incompletely absorbed, and the effect of glucose on fructose absorption was shown to be dependent on the amount added. It is concluded that children have a limited absorptive capacity for fructose. We speculate that the enhancing effect of glucose and galactose on fructose absorption may be due to activation of the fructose carrier. Apple juice in particular contains fructose in excess of glucose and could lead to abdominal symptoms in susceptible children. PMID:6476870

  13. Reflective-tube absorption meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Bartz, Robert; Kitchen, James C.

    1990-09-01

    The design and calibration of a proposed in situ spectral absorption meter is evaluated using a laboratory prototype. The design includes a silver coated (second-surface) glass tube, a tungsten light source (stabilized by means of optical feedback), a monochromator, and a solid state detector. The device measures the absorption coefficient plus a portion of the volume scattering function. Theoretical analyses and laboratory experiments which explore the magnitude and variation of the errors due to scattering and internal reflections are described. Similar analyses are performed on the Cary 1 18 Spectrophotometer to allow cross calibration. Algorithms to yield the abscrption coefficient and the zenith-sun diffuse attenuation coefficient are presented and evaluated. Simultaneous measurement of the beam attenuation or backscattering coefficient allows use of algoriThms with much narrower error bands. The various methods of obtaining absorption and diffuse attenuation values are compared. Procedures for using reverse osmosis filtration to produce a clean water calibration standard are described. An absorption spectrum for pure water is obtained. Development of the absorption meter is proceeding along two lines: 1) a two-wavelength side-by-side LED is being fabricated to allow an in situ chlorophyll a absorption meter to be constructed, and 2) scientific projects using a shipboard or laboratory flow.-through pumping system are being planned.

  14. Characterization of selective binding of alkali cations with carboxylate by x-ray absorption spectroscopy of liquid microjets

    SciTech Connect

    Saykally, Richard J; Uejio, Janel S.; Schwartz, Craig P.; Duffin, Andrew M.; Drisdell, Walter S.; Cohen, Ronald C.; Saykally, Richard J.

    2008-01-08

    We describe an approach for characterizing selective binding between oppositely charged ionic functional groups under biologically relevant conditions. Relative shifts in K-shell x-ray absorption spectra of aqueous cations and carboxylate anions indicate the corresponding binding strengths via perturbations of carbonyl antibonding orbitals. XAS spectra measured for aqueous formate and acetate solutions containing lithium, sodium, and potassium cations reveal monotonically stronger binding of the lighter metals, supporting recent results from simulations and other experiments. The carbon K-edge spectra of the acetate carbonyl feature centered near 290 eV clearly indicate a preferential interaction of sodium versus potassium, which was less apparent with formate. These results are in accord with the Law of Matching Water Affinities, relating relative hydration strengths of ions to their respective tendencies to form contact ion pairs. Density functional theory calculations of K-shell spectra support the experimental findings.

  15. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  16. [Spectral calibration of hyperspectral imager based on spectral absorption target].

    PubMed

    Gou, Zhi-Yang; Yan, Lei; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong-Ying; Yin, Zhong-Yi; Duan, Yi-Ni

    2013-02-01

    Retrieval of center wavelength and bandwidth is a key step for quantitative analysis of hyperspectral data. The present paper proposes a spectral calibration method of hyperspectral imager, whose spectrum covers visible and near-infrared band, using spectral absorption target. Ground calibration experiment was designed for a hyperspectral imager with a bandwidth of 6 nm. Hyperspectral imager and ASD spectrometer measured the same spectral absorption target synchronously. Reflectance spectrum was derived from the different data set. Center wavelength and bandwidth were retrieved by matching the reflectance data from hyperspectral imager and ASD spectrometer. The experiment result shows that this method can be applied in spectral calibration of hyperspectral imagers to improve the quantitative studies on hyperspectral imagery.

  17. Terminal Velocity Infall in QSO Absorption Line Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benjamin, Robert A.

    We explore the hypothesis that clouds detected in quasar absorption line systems are falling at a terminal velocity toward the center of high redshift gaseous galactic halos. Since both the ionization level and terminal velocity of halo clouds increase with increasing distance from the central galaxy, velocity resolved profiles of highly ionized gas are predicted to have a greater width than low ionization gas. A line of sight passing through the center of gaseous halo (an idealized damped Ly alpha system), yields low ionization absorption at the velocity of the galaxy, flanked by high ionization on either side. Reasonable halo parameters yield total velocity extents for C IV of Delta v_{C IV}=100-200 km s^{-1}, in agreement with many systems observed by Lu et al (1997). The remaining systems may better described by the rotating disk model of Prochaska & Wolfe (1998). Finally, observational tests are suggested for verifying or falsifying the terminal velocity hypothesis for these systems.

  18. Feature-aided tracking using invariant features of HRR signatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, David C.; Oppenheimer, Michael W.; Schmitz, James L.; Sturtz, Kirk

    2001-08-01

    The present era of limited warfare demands that warfighters have the capability for timely acquisition and precision strikes against enemy ground targets with minimum collateral damage. As a result, automatic target recognition (ATR) and Feature Aided Tracking (FAT) of moving ground vehicles using High Range Resolution (HRR) radar has received increased interest in the community. HRR radar is an excellent sensor for potentially identifying moving targets under all-weather, day/night, long-standoff conditions. This paper presents preliminary results of a Veridian Engineering Internal Research and Development effort to determine the feasibility of using invariant HRR signature features to assist a FAT algorithm. The presented method of invariant analysis makes use of Lie mathematics to determine geometric and system invariants contained within an Object/Image (O/I) relationship. The fundamental O/I relationship expresses a geometric relationship (constraint) between a 3-D object (scattering center) and its image (a 1-D HRR profile). The HRR radar sensor model is defined, and then the O/I relationship for invariant features is derived. Although constructing invariants is not a trivial task, once an invariant is determined, it is computationally simple to implement into a FAT algorithm.

  19. Anisotropy in electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of superhard body-centered tetragonal C4 phase of carbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, P. Y.; Sun, Y.; Chen, X.-Q.; Li, D. Z.; Li, Y. Y.

    2010-08-01

    By hybrid density functional theory, we have investigated anisotropies in the electronic, optical, and mechanical properties of the body centered tetragonal C4 phase of carbon. We predict a strong electronic anisotropy associated with the in-plane carbon-carbon covalent bonds and the zigzag carbon chains along the c-direction (out-of-plane), which results in a state-resolved directional distribution of valence electrons at the top of the valence band. The calculated adsorption spectra display highly anisotropic features which are already manifested at ambient pressure by a substantial difference (2 eV) for the absorption edges between the in-plane and out-of-plane components of the tetragonal cell. Similar anisotropic features in the elastic compressibility are also discussed.

  20. Fat-soluble vitamin intestinal absorption: absorption sites in the intestine and interactions for absorption.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Aurélie; Roi, Stéphanie; Nowicki, Marion; Dhaussy, Amélie; Huertas, Alain; Amiot, Marie-Josèphe; Reboul, Emmanuelle

    2015-04-01

    The interactions occurring at the intestinal level between the fat-soluble vitamins A, D, E and K (FSVs) are poorly documented. We first determined each FSV absorption profile along the duodenal-colonic axis of mouse intestine to clarify their respective absorption sites. We then investigated the interactions between FSVs during their uptake by Caco-2 cells. Our data show that vitamin A was mostly absorbed in the mouse proximal intestine, while vitamin D was absorbed in the median intestine, and vitamin E and K in the distal intestine. Significant competitive interactions for uptake were then elucidated among vitamin D, E and K, supporting the hypothesis of common absorption pathways. Vitamin A also significantly decreased the uptake of the other FSVs but, conversely, its uptake was not impaired by vitamins D and K and even promoted by vitamin E. These results should be taken into account, especially for supplement formulation, to optimise FSV absorption.

  1. Presence of terrestrial atmospheric gas absorption bands in standard extraterrestrial solar irradiance curves in the near-infrared spectral region.

    PubMed

    Gao, B C; Green, R O

    1995-09-20

    The solar irradiance curves compiled by Wehrli [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Publ. 615 (World Radiation Center, Davosdorf, Switzerland, 1985)] and by Neckel and Labs [Sol. Phys. 90, 205 (1984)] are widely used. These curves were obtained based on measurements of solar radiation from the ground and from aircraft platforms. Contaminations in these curves by atmospheric gaseous absorptions were inevitable. A technique for deriving the transmittance spectrum of the Sun's atmosphere from high-resolution (0.01 cm(-1)) solar occultation spectra measured above the Earth's atmosphere by the use of atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) aboard the space shuttle is described. The comparisons of the derived ATMOS solar transmittance spectrum with the two solar irradiance curves show that he curve derived by Wehrli contains many absorption features in the 2.0-2.5-µm region that are not of solar origin, whereas the curve obtained by Neckel and Labs is completely devoid of weak solar absorption features that should be there. An Earth atmospheric oxygen band at 1.268 µm and a water-vapor band near 0.94 µm are likely present in the curve obtained by Wehrli. It is shown that the solar irradiance measurement errors in some narrow spectral intervals can be as large as 20%. An improved solar irradiance spectrum is formed by the incorporation of the solar transmittance spectrum derived from the ATMOS data into the solar irradiance spectrum from Neckel and Labs. The availability of a new solar spectrum from 50 to 50 000 cm(-1) from the U.S. Air Force Phillips Laboratory is also discussed.

  2. Synergistic Two-Photon Absorption Enhancement in Photosynthetic Light Harvesting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuo-Mei; Chen, Yu-Wei; Gao, Ting-Fong

    2012-06-01

    The grand scale fixation of solar energies into chemical substances by photosynthetic reactions of light-harvesting organisms provides Earth's other life forms a thriving environment. Scientific explorations in the past decades have unraveled the fundamental photophysical and photochemical processes in photosynthesis. Higher plants, green algae, and light-harvesting bacteria utilize organized pigment-protein complexes to harvest solar power efficiently and the resultant electronic excitations are funneled into a reaction center, where the first charge separation process takes place. Here we show experimental evidences that green algae (Chlorella vulgaris) in vivo display a synergistic two-photon absorption enhancement in their photosynthetic light harvesting. Their absorption coefficients at various wavelengths display dramatic dependence on the photon flux. This newly found phenomenon is attributed to a coherence-electronic-energy-transfer-mediated (CEETRAM) photon absorption process of light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green algae. Under the ambient light level, algae and higher plants can utilize this quantum mechanical mechanism to create two entangled electronic excitations adjacently in their light-harvesting networks. Concerted multiple electron transfer reactions in the reaction centers and oxygen evolving complexes can be implemented efficiently by the coherent motion of two entangled excitons from antennae to the charge separation reaction sites. To fabricate nanostructured, synthetic light-harvesting apparatus, the paramount role of the CEETRAM photon absorption mechanism should be seriously considered in the strategic guidelines.

  3. Pressure dependence of Se absorption lines in AlSb

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L. |; Haller, E.E.; Ramdas, A.K.

    1996-09-01

    Using far infrared absorption spectroscopy, the authors have investigated electronic transition spectra of Se donors in AlSb as a function of hydrostatic pressure. At least two distinct ground to bound excited state transition lines, which depend quadratically on the pressure, can be seen. At pressures between 30 and 50 kbar, evidence of an anti-crossing between one of the electronic transitions and a peak which they attribute to the 2 zone center LO phonon mode can be seen.

  4. Anomalous absorption line in the magneto-optical response of graphene.

    PubMed

    Gusynin, V P; Sharapov, S G; Carbotte, J P

    2007-04-13

    The intensity as well as position in energy of the absorption lines in the infrared conductivity of graphene, both exhibit features that are directly related to the Dirac nature of its quasiparticles. We show that the evolution of the pattern of absorption lines as the chemical potential is varied encodes the information about the presence of the anomalous lowest Landau level. The first absorption line related to this level always appears with full intensity or is entirely missing, while all other lines disappear in two steps. We demonstrate that if a gap develops, the main absorption line splits into two provided that the chemical potential is greater than or equal to the gap.

  5. The temperature dependence of collision-induced absorption by oxygen near 6 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, John J.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Nickerson, Karen E.; Calvert, Jack G.

    1991-01-01

    Coefficients for oxygen absorption in the infrared induced by collisions with O2 and N2 are reported over the range 1400-1800/cm and 225-356 K. These coefficients are used to calculate the absorption for O2 in air as a function of temperature and wavenumber, and comparisons are made with previous determinations. In addition, structured absorption features superimposed on the broad collision-induced absorption band, which were observed at all temperatures studied, are interpreted in terms of the presence of (O2)2 and O2-N2 van der Waals molecules.

  6. From Teacher Centered to Student Centered Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lockemy, M. J.; Summers, Sylvia

    In 1991, staff at the Business Resource Center (BRC) at Tacoma Community College, in Washington, began to reevaluate their approach to serving students. Up to that point, the BRC had been teacher centered, with staff operating under the assumptions that only the students who succeeded were actually "college material," that students would cheat if…

  7. Diode laser absorption tomography using data compression techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindstrom, Chad; Tam, Chung-Jen; Givens, Ryan; Davis, Doug; Williams, Skip

    2008-02-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) shows promise for in situ monitoring in high-speed flows. However, the dynamic nature of typical flows of supersonic combustors, gas turbine engines and augmenters can also lead to inhomogenities that cannot be captured by a single line-of-sight TDLAS measurement. Instead, multiple measurements varied over several spatial locations need to be made. In the current study, shock train structure in the isolator section of the Research Cell 18 supersonic combustion facility at Wright-Patterson AFB is measured. Although only two view angles are available for measurement, multiple absorption features along with a priori computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations enable estimates of two dimensional flow features to be formed. Vector quantization/kmeans data clustering is used to identify key flow features from the temporal history of the raw sinograms. Through the use of multiple absorption features that are measured nearly simultaneously, an approximate two-dimensional image can be formed. This image can be further refined through the use of an optimal set of basis functions that can be derived from a set of CFD simulations that describes the flow shapes.

  8. Estimation of phytoplankton size fractions based on spectral features of remote sensing ocean color data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zuchuan; Li, Lin; Song, Kaishan; Cassar, Nicolas

    2013-03-01

    Through its influence on the structure of pelagic ecosystems, phytoplankton size distribution (pico-, nano-, and micro-plankton) is believed to play a key role in "the biological pump." In this paper, an algorithm is proposed to estimate phytoplankton size fractions (PSF) for micro-, nano-, and pico-plankton (fm, fn, and fp, respectively) from the spectral features of remote-sensing data. From remote-sensing reflectance spectrum (Rrs(λ)), the algorithm constructs four types of spectral features: a normalized Rrs(λ), band ratios, continuum-removed spectra, and spectral curvatures. Using support vector machine recursive feature elimination, the algorithm ranks the constructed spectral features and Rrs(λ) according to their sensitivities to PSF which is then regressed against the sensitive spectral features through support vector regression. The algorithm is validated with (1) simulated Rrs(λ) and PSF, and (2) Rrs(λ) obtained by Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and PSF determined from High-Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC) pigments. The validation results show the overall effectiveness of the algorithm in estimating PSF, with R2 of (1) 0.938 (fm) for the simulated SeaWiFS data set; and (2) 0.617 (fm), 0.475 (fn), and 0.587 (fp) for the SeaWiFS satellite data set. The validation results also indicate that continuum-removed spectra and spectral curvatures are the dominant spectral features sensitive to PSF with their wavelengths mainly centered on the pigment-absorption domain. Global spatial distributions of fm, fn, and fp were mapped with monthly SeaWiFS images. Overall, their biogeographical distributions are consistent with our current understanding that pico-plankton account for a large proportion of total phytoplankton biomass in oligotrophic regions, nano-plankton in transitional areas, and micro-plankton in high-productivity regions.

  9. [Analysis of UV-visible absorption spectrum on the decolorization of industrial wastewater by disinfection].

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Long-Yong; Gao, Nai-Yun; Li, Wei-Guo

    2012-10-01

    The UV-Visible absorption spectrum of industrial wastewater was explored to introduce a substituting method determining the color of water, and to compare the decolorization efficacy of different disinfectants. The results show that the visible absorption spectrum(350-600 nm), instead of ultraviolet absorption spectrum, should be applied to characterize the color of wastewater. There is a good correlation between the features of visible absorption spectrum and the true color of wastewater. Both ozone and chlorine dioxide has a better decolorization performance than chlorine. However, the color of chlorine dioxide itself has a negative effect on decolorization. The changes in the features of visible absorption spectrum effectively reflect the variations in the color of wastewater after disinfection.

  10. Absorption band Q model for the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. L.; Given, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Attenuation in solids and liquids, as measured by the quality factor Q, is typically frequency dependent. In seismology, however, Q is usually assumed to be independent of frequency. Body wave, surface wave, and normal mode data are used to place constraints on the frequency dependence of Q in the mantle. Specific features of the absorption band model are: low-Q in the seismic band at both the top and the base of the mantle, low-Q for long-period body waves in the outer core, an inner core Q sub s that increases with period, and low Q sub p/Q sub s at short periods in the middle mantle.

  11. Monitoring Telluric Water Absorption with CAMAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Ashley; Blake, Cullen; Sliski, David

    2017-01-01

    Ground-based observations are severely limited by telluric water vapor absorption features, which are highly variable in time and significantly complicate both spectroscopy and photometry in the near-infrared (NIR). To achieve the stability required to study Earth-sized exoplanets, monitoring the precipitable water vapor (PWV) becomes necessary to mitigate the impact of telluric lines on radial velocity measurements and transit light curves. To address this issue, we present the Camera for the Automatic Monitoring of Atmospheric Lines (CAMAL), a stand-alone, inexpensive 6-inch aperture telescope dedicated to measuring PWV at the Whipple Observatory. CAMAL utilizes three NIR narrowband filters to trace the amount of atmospheric water vapor affecting simultaneous observations with the MINiature Exoplanet Radial Velocity Array (MINERVA) and MINERVA-Red telescopes. We present the current design of CAMAL, discuss our calibration methods, and show PWV measurements taken with CAMAL compared to those of a nearby GPS water vapor monitor.

  12. Absorption and Metabolism of Xanthophylls

    PubMed Central

    Kotake-Nara, Eiichi; Nagao, Akihiko

    2011-01-01

    Dietary carotenoids, especially xanthophylls, have attracted significant attention because of their characteristic biological activities, including anti-allergic, anti-cancer, and anti-obese actions. Although no less than forty carotenoids are ingested under usual dietary habits, only six carotenoids and their metabolites have been found in human tissues, suggesting selectivity in the intestinal absorption of carotenoids. Recently, facilitated diffusion in addition to simple diffusion has been reported to mediate the intestinal absorption of carotenoids in mammals. The selective absorption of carotenoids may be caused by uptake to the intestinal epithelia by the facilitated diffusion and an unknown excretion to intestinal lumen. It is well known that β-carotene can be metabolized to vitamin A after intestinal absorption of carotenoids, but little is known about the metabolic transformation of non provitamin A xanthophylls. The enzymatic oxidation of the secondary hydroxyl group leading to keto-carotenoids would occur as a common pathway of xanthophyll metabolism in mammals. This paper reviews the absorption and metabolism of xanthophylls by introducing recent advances in this field. PMID:21747746

  13. Intensity-modulating graphene metamaterial for multiband terahertz absorption.

    PubMed

    Gao, Run-Mei; Xu, Zong-Cheng; Ding, Chun-Feng; Yao, Jian-Quan

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, we design a tunable strength multiband absorber consisting of a graphene metamaterial structure and a thick dielectric interlayer deposited on a metal ground plane. We investigate the tunable conductivity properties of the graphene metamaterial and demonstrate multiband absorbers with three absorption bands using a polyimide interlayer in the 0-2.25 THz range by numerical simulation. The results show that the mix absorptivity reached 99.8% at 1.99 THz, and the absorptive strength can be tuned with the modulation depth up to 84.2%. We present a theoretical interpretation based on a standing wave field, which shows that the field energy is localized inside the thicker spacer and then dissipated, effectively trapping the light in the metamaterial absorbers with negligible near-field interactions. The standing wave field theory developed here explains all the features of the multiband metamaterial absorbers and provides a profound understanding of the underlying physics.

  14. Excellent microwave absorption property of Graphene-coated Fe nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Xingchen; Zhang, Zhengming; Wang, Liaoyu; Xi, Kai; Cao, Qingqi; Wang, Dunhui; Yang, Yi; Du, Youwei

    2013-01-01

    Graphene has evoked extensive interests for its abundant physical properties and potential applications. It is reported that the interfacial electronic interaction between metal and graphene would give rise to charge transfer and change the electronic properties of graphene, leading to some novel electrical and magnetic properties in metal-graphene heterostructure. In addition, large specific surface area, low density and high chemical stability make graphene act as an ideal coating material. Taking full advantage of the aforementioned features of graphene, we synthesized graphene-coated Fe nanocomposites for the first time and investigated their microwave absorption properties. Due to the charge transfer at Fe-graphene interface in Fe/G, the nanocomposites show distinct dielectric properties, which result in excellent microwave absorption performance in a wide frequency range. This work provides a novel approach for exploring high-performance microwave absorption material as well as expands the application field of graphene-based materials. PMID:24305606

  15. X-ray absorption variability in NGC 4507

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinucci, Andrea; Risaliti, Guido; Wang, Junfeng; Bianchi, Stefano; Elvis, Martin; Matt, Giorgio; Nardini, Emanuele; Braito, Valentina

    2013-03-01

    We present a complete spectral analysis of an XMM-Newton and Chandra campaign of the obscured AGN in NGC 4507, consisting of six observations spanning a period of six months, ranging from 2010 June to December. We detect strong absorption variability on time-scales between 1.5 and 4 months, suggesting that the obscuring material consists of gas clouds at parsec-scale distance. The lack of significant variability on shorter time-scales suggests that this event is not due to absorption by broad-line region (BLR) clouds, which was instead found in other studies of similar sources. This shows that a single, universal structure of the absorber (either BLR clouds, or the parsec-scale torus) is not enough to reproduce the observed complexity of the X-ray absorption features of this AGN.

  16. A method for normalization of X-ray absorption spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Weng, T.-C.; Waldo, G.S.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.

    2010-07-20

    Accurate normalization of X-ray absorption data is essential for quantitative analysis of near-edge features. A method, implemented as the program MBACK, to normalize X-ray absorption data to tabulated mass absorption coefficients is described. Comparison of conventional normalization methods with MBACK demonstrates that the new normalization method is not sensitive to the shape of the background function, thus allowing accurate comparison of data collected in transmission mode with data collected using fluorescence ion chambers or solid-state fluorescence detectors. The new method is shown to have better reliability and consistency and smaller errors than conventional normalization methods. The sensitivity of the new normalization method is illustrated by analysis of data collected during an equilibrium titration.

  17. Probing the Southern Fermi Bubble in Ultraviolet Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karim, Md. Tanveer; Fox, Andrew; Jenkins, Edward B.

    2017-01-01

    The Fermi Bubbles are two giant gamma-ray emitting lobes, extending 55° below and above the Galactic Center, that were discovered in 2010. While the Northern Bubble has been extensively studied in ultraviolet (UV) absorption, little is known about the UV properties of the Southern Bubble. We use UV absorption-line spectra from the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (HST/COS) to probe the Southern Fermi Bubble using two sightlines to background AGN, one passing inside the Bubble (RBS 1768) and one passing just outside (RBS 2000). We used VPFIT, a Voigt profile fitting program to detect the existence of high-velocity absorption components and to measure the column density of different metal ions. We detected two high-velocity absorption components in both sightlines; one at vLSR = -150 km s-1 and one at vLSR = 160 km s-1. We determined that the component at vLSR = 160 km s-1 is due to the Magellanic Stream. Absorption is seen in ions of silicon, carbon and aluminium. The discovery that the high-velocity component is present in both sightlines shows that cool gas can extend further from the Galactic plane than the gamma-ray emitting regions. This could indicate past outflow activity prior to the creation of the Southern Bubble. This project was supported in part by the NSF REU grant AST-1358980 and by the Nantucket Maria Mitchell Association.

  18. The Vertical Structure of Major Meteorological Features on Jupiter: The Great Red Spot and White Ovals BC and DE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baines, Kevin H.; Carlson, Robert W.

    1999-01-01

    Multi-spectral imagery of Jupiter's Great Red Spot (GRS) and two White ovals acquired by the Galileo/NIMS are used to constrain the spatial variability of the vertical aerosol structure and the distribution of ammonia in and around these most-prominent anti-cyclonic features. All three features exhibit a high-altitude core spanning about 3/4 of their visual size when viewed with moderate absorption wavelengths, indicating a bulk elliptical, "wedding cake" shape in their overall three-dimensional cloud structure. A distinctive spiral pattern within the GRS core is seen in moderate methane and hydrogen absorption bandpasses. This pattern - which has been modelled to show a 2 km variation in cloudtop pressure within the GRS - is inconsistent with a different spiral-shaped pattern observed in ammonia-sensitive wavelengths, thus indicating spatial variability not only in the column abundance of ammonia within the GRS, but in its mixing ratio as well. White Ovals BC and DE were observed in February 1997, just a year before their unusual merger into a single feature. At the time of these observations, the centers of the two anti-cyclones were about 16 degrees apart, separated by a complex cyclonic feature which exhibited unusual spatial variability in its appearance in images acquired at ammonia-sensitive wavelengths. In particular, the northern half of this feature has the largest ammonia column abundance seen within the environs around the white ovals, indicating unusual variability in either cloud structure/altitude and/or ammonia humidity within the cyclone.

  19. ITMO Photonics: center of excellence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voznesenskaya, Anna; Bougrov, Vladislav; Kozlov, Sergey; Vasilev, Vladimir

    2016-09-01

    ITMO University, the leading Russian center in photonics research and education, has the mission to train highlyqualified competitive professionals able to act in conditions of fast-changing world. This paradigm is implemented through creation of a strategic academic unit ITMO Photonics, the center of excellence concentrating organizational, scientific, educational, financial, laboratory and human resources. This Center has the following features: dissemination of breakthrough scientific results in photonics such as advanced photonic materials, ultrafast optical and quantum information, laser physics, engineering and technologies, into undergraduate and graduate educational programs through including special modules into the curricula and considerable student's research and internships; transformation of the educational process in accordance with the best international educational practices, presence in the global education market in the form of joint educational programs with leading universities, i.e. those being included in the network programs of international scientific cooperation, and international accreditation of educational programs; development of mechanisms for the commercialization of innovative products - results of scientific research; securing financial sustainability of research in the field of photonics of informationcommunication systems via funding increase and the diversification of funding sources. Along with focusing on the research promotion, the Center is involved in science popularization through such projects as career guidance for high school students; interaction between student's chapters of international optical societies; invited lectures of World-famous experts in photonics; short educational programs in optics, photonics and light engineering for international students; contests, Olympics and grants for talented young researchers; social events; interactive demonstrations.

  20. Absorption-heat-pump system

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.

    1983-06-16

    An improvement in an absorption heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic absorption and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.

  1. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  2. BKG Data Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thorandt, Volkmar; Wojdziak, Reiner

    2013-01-01

    This report summarizes the activities and background information of the IVS Data Center for the year 2012. Included is information about functions, structure, technical equipment, and staff members of the BKG Data Center.

  3. Regional Instrumentation Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cromie, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Focuses on the activities of regional instrumentation centers that utilize the state-of-the-art instruments and methodology in basic scientific research. The emphasis is on the centers involved in mass spectroscopy, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, lasers, and accelerators. (SA)

  4. Automating the Media Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Mary A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the need to develop more efficient information retrieval skills by the use of new technology. Lists four stages used in automating the media center. Describes North Carolina's pilot programs. Proposes benefits and looks at the media center's future. (MVL)

  5. Accredited Birth Centers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Midwifery Services and Birth Center Accredited 351 N. Water Street Black River Falls, WI 54615 715-284- ... 795-9912 Accredited Since December 1991 42 Del Mar Birth Center Accredited 1416 El Centro Street, Suite ...

  6. Nonschool Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Doris B.

    1972-01-01

    Describes a privately financed science center, museum and planetarium - observatory in Twin Falls, Idaho. Centers three hour program includes a lecture on archaeology, time to look at displays, a lunch break, and a planetarium lecture. (RB)

  7. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  8. ACTS data center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Syed, Ali; Vogel, Wolfhard J.

    1993-01-01

    Viewgraphs on ACTS Data Center status report are included. Topics covered include: ACTS Data Center Functions; data flow overview; PPD flow; RAW data flow; data compression; PPD distribution; RAW Data Archival; PPD Audit; and data analysis.

  9. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  10. Aerosol Absorption Measurements in MILAGRO.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.

    2007-12-01

    During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the absorption characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol absorption measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol absorption was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol absorption by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The absorption can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The absorption is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for absorption. Indeed, enhanced absorption is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol absorption. This is likely due

  11. Fishing for Features

    ScienceCinema

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cort, John; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-08-24

    The Fishing for Features Signature Discovery project developed a framework for discovering signature features in challenging environments involving large and complex data sets or where phenomena may be poorly characterized or understood. Researchers at PNNL have applied the framework to the optimization of biofuels blending and to discover signatures of climate change on microbial soil communities.

  12. Fishing for Features

    SciTech Connect

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Cort, John; Bailey, Vanessa

    2016-07-21

    The Fishing for Features Signature Discovery project developed a framework for discovering signature features in challenging environments involving large and complex data sets or where phenomena may be poorly characterized or understood. Researchers at PNNL have applied the framework to the optimization of biofuels blending and to discover signatures of climate change on microbial soil communities.

  13. Data center cooling method

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Dang, Hien P.; Parida, Pritish R.; Schultz, Mark D.; Sharma, Arun

    2015-08-11

    A method aspect for removing heat from a data center may use liquid coolant cooled without vapor compression refrigeration on a liquid cooled information technology equipment rack. The method may also include regulating liquid coolant flow to the data center through a range of liquid coolant flow values with a controller-apparatus based upon information technology equipment temperature threshold of the data center.

  14. Metal powder absorptivity: Modeling and experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Boley, C. D.; Mitchell, S. C.; Rubenchik, A. M.; ...

    2016-08-10

    Here, we present results of numerical modeling and direct calorimetric measurements of the powder absorptivity for a number of metals. The modeling results generally correlate well with experiment. We show that the powder absorptivity is determined, to a great extent, by the absorptivity of a flat surface at normal incidence. Our results allow the prediction of the powder absorptivity from normal flat-surface absorptivity measurements.

  15. Infrared Laser Therapy using IR absorption of biomolecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awazu, K.; Ishii, K.; Hazama, H.

    2011-02-01

    Since numerous characteristic absorption lines caused by molecular vibration exist in the mid-infrared (MIR) wavelength region, selective excitation or selective dissociation of molecules is possible by tuning the laser wavelength to the characteristic absorption lines of target molecules. By applying this feature to the medical fields, less-invasive treatment and non-destructive diagnosis with absorption spectroscopy are possible using tunable MIR lasers. A high-energy nanosecond pulsed MIR tunable laser was obtained with difference-frequency generation (DFG) between a Nd:YAG and a tunable Cr:forsterite lasers. The MIR-DFG laser was tunable in a wavelength range of 5.5-10 μm and generated a laser pulses with an energy of up to 1.4 mJ, a pulse width of 5 ns, and a pulse repetition rate of 10 Hz. Selective removal of atherosclerotic lesion was successfully demonstrated with the MIR-DFG laser tuned at a wavelength of 5.75 μm, which corresponds to the characteristic absorption of the ester bond in cholesterol esters in the atherosclerotic lesions. We have developed a non-destructive diagnostic probe with an attenuated total reflection (ATR) prism and two hollow optical fibres. An absorption spectrum of cholesterol was measured with the ATR probe by scanning the wavelength of the MIR-DFG laser, and the spectrum was in good agreement with that measured with a commercial Fourier transform infrared spectrometer.

  16. Active Galactic Nuclei Probed by QSO Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru

    2007-07-01

    Quasars are the extremely bright nuclei found in about 10% of galaxies. A variety of absorption features (known collectively as quasar absorption lines) are detected in the rest-frame UV spectra of these objects. While absorption lines that have very broad widths originate in gas that is probably physocally related to the quasars, narrow absorption lines (NALs) were thought to arise in galaxies and/or in the intter-alacttic medium between the quasars and us. Using high-resolution spectra of quasars, it is found that a substantial fraction of NALs arise in gas in the immediate vicinity of the quasars. A dramatically variable, moderately-broad absorption line in the spectrum of the quasar HS 1603+3820l is also found. The variability of this line is monitored in a campaign with Subaru telescope. These observational results are compared to models for outflows from the quasars, specifically, models for accretion disk winds and evaporating obscuring tori. It is quite important to determine the mechanism of outflow because of its cosmological implications. The outflow could expel angular momentum from the accretion disk and enable quasars to accrete and shine. In addition, the outflow may also regulate star formation in the early stages of the assembly of the host galaxy and enrich the interstellar and intergalactic medium with metals.

  17. Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

    2013-12-03

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

  18. Powerful laser pulse absorption in partly homogenized foam plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, M.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The internal volume structure of a porous medium of light elements determines unique features of the absorption mechanism of laser radiation; the characteristics of relaxation and transport processes in the produced plasma are affected as well. Porous materials with an average density larger than the critical density have a central role in enhancing the pressure produced during the ablation by the laser pulse; this pressure can exceed the one produced by target direct irradiation. The problem of the absorption of powerful laser radiation in a porous material is examined both analytically and numerically. The behavior of the medium during the process of pore filling in the heated region is described by a model of viscous homogenization. An expression describing the time and space dependence of the absorption coefficient of laser radiation is therefore obtained from the model. A numerical investigation of the absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse is performed within the present model. In the context of numerical calculations, porous media with an average density larger than the critical density of the laser-produced plasma are considered. Preliminary results about the inclusion of the developed absorption model into an hydrodynamic code are presented.

  19. ESTIMATING THE CHROMOSPHERIC ABSORPTION OF TRANSITION REGION MOSS EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    De Pontieu, Bart; Hansteen, Viggo H.; McIntosh, Scott W.; Patsourakos, Spiros

    2009-09-10

    Many models for coronal loops have difficulty explaining the observed EUV brightness of the transition region, which is often significantly less than theoretical models predict. This discrepancy has been addressed by a variety of approaches including filling factors and time-dependent heating, with varying degrees of success. Here, we focus on an effect that has been ignored so far: the absorption of EUV light with wavelengths below 912 A by the resonance continua of neutral hydrogen and helium. Such absorption is expected to occur in the low-lying transition region of hot, active region loops that is colocated with cool chromospheric features and called 'moss' as a result of the reticulated appearance resulting from the absorption. We use cotemporal and cospatial spectroheliograms obtained with the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/SUMER and Hinode/EIS of Fe XII 1242 A, 195 A, and 186.88 A, and compare the density determination from the 186/195 A line ratio to that resulting from the 195/1242 A line ratio. We find that while coronal loops have compatible density values from these two line pairs, upper transition region moss has conflicting density determinations. This discrepancy can be resolved by taking into account significant absorption of 195 A emission caused by the chromospheric inclusions in the moss. We find that the amount of absorption is generally of the order of a factor of 2. We compare to numerical models and show that the observed effect is well reproduced by three-dimensional radiative MHD models of the transition region and corona. We use STEREO A/B data of the same active region and find that increased angles between line of sight and local vertical cause additional absorption. Our determination of the amount of chromospheric absorption of TR emission can be used to better constrain coronal heating models.

  20. Optical absorption in semiconductor quantum dots coupling to dispersive phonons of infinite modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Zhiwen; Wang, Qin; Zheng, Hang

    2012-10-01

    Optical absorption spectrum of semiconductor quantum dot is investigated by means of an analytical approach based on the Green's function for different forms of coupling strength in an unified method by using the standard model with valence and conduction band levels coupled to dispersive quantum phonons of infinite modes. The analytical expression of the optical absorption coefficient in semiconductor quantum dots is obtained and by this expression the line shape and the peak position of the absorption spectrum are procured. The relation between the properties of absorption spectrum and the forms of coupling strength is clarified, which can be referenced for choosing the proper form of the coupling strength or spectral density to control the features of absorption spectrum of quantum dot. The coupling and confinement induced energy shift and intensity decrease in the absorption spectrum are determined precisely for a wide range of parameters. The results show that the activation energy of the optical absorption is reduced by the effect of exciton-phonon coupling and photons with lower frequencies could also be absorbed in absorption process. With increase of the coupling constant, the line shape of optical absorption spectrum broadens and the peak position moves to lower photon energy with a rapid decrease in intensity at the same time. Both the coupling induced red shift and the confinement induced blue shift conduce to decrease in the intensity of absorption spectrum. Furthermore, this method may have application potential to other confined quantum systems.

  1. Defeating feature fatigue.

    PubMed

    Rust, Roland T; Thompson, Debora Viana; Hamilton, Rebecca W

    2006-02-01

    Consider a coffeemaker that offers 12 drink options, a car with more than 700 features on the dashboard, and a mouse pad that's also a clock, calculator, and FM radio. All are examples of "feature bloat", or "featuritis", the result of an almost irresistible temptation to load products with lots of bells and whistles. The problem is that the more features a product boasts, the harder it is to use. Manufacturers that increase a product's capability--the number of useful functions it can perform--at the expense of its usability are exposing their customers to feature fatigue. The authors have conducted three studies to gain a better understanding of how consumers weigh a product's capability relative to its usability. They found that even though consumers know that products with more features are harder to use, they initially choose high-feature models. They also pile on more features when given the chance to customize a product for their needs. Once consumers have actually worked with a product, however, usability starts to matter more to them than capability. For managers in consumer products companies, these findings present a dilemma: Should they maximize initial sales by designing high-feature models, which consumers consistently choose, or should they limit the number of features in order to enhance the lifetime value of their customers? The authors' analytical model guides companies toward a happy middle ground: maximizing the net present value of the typical customer's profit stream. The authors also advise companies to build simpler products, help consumers learn which products suit their needs, develop products that do one thing very well, and design market research in which consumers use actual products or prototypes.

  2. Theory of graphene saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marini, A.; Cox, J. D.; García de Abajo, F. J.

    2017-03-01

    Saturable absorption is a nonperturbative nonlinear optical phenomenon that plays a pivotal role in the generation of ultrafast light pulses. Here we show that this effect emerges in graphene at unprecedentedly low light intensities, thus opening avenues to new nonlinear physics and applications in optical technology. Specifically, we theoretically investigate saturable absorption in extended graphene by developing a semianalytical nonperturbative single-particle approach, describing electron dynamics in the atomically-thin material using the two-dimensional Dirac equation for massless Dirac fermions, which is recast in the form of generalized Bloch equations. By solving the electron dynamics nonperturbatively, we account for both interband and intraband contributions to the intensity-dependent saturated conductivity and conclude that the former dominates regardless of the intrinsic doping state of the material. We obtain results in qualitative agreement with atomistic quantum-mechanical simulations of graphene nanoribbons including electron-electron interactions, finite-size, and higher-band effects. Remarkably, such effects are found to affect mainly the linear absorption, while the predicted saturation intensities are in good quantitative agreement in the limit of extended graphene. Additionally, we find that the modulation depth of saturable absorption in graphene can be electrically manipulated through an externally applied gate voltage. Our results are relevant for the development of graphene-based optoelectronic devices, as well as for applications in mode-locking and random lasers.

  3. Migrant labor absorption in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Nayagam, J

    1992-01-01

    The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and absorption of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process."

  4. Quasistellar Objects: Intervening Absorption Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, J.; Churchill, C.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Every parcel of gas along the line of sight to a distant QUASAR will selectively absorb certain wavelengths of continuum light of the quasar due to the presence of the various chemical elements in the gas. Through the analysis of these quasar absorption lines we can study the spatial distributions, motions, chemical enrichment and ionization histories of gaseous structures from REDSHIFT five unti...

  5. Oxygen Absorption in Cooling Flows.

    PubMed

    Buote

    2000-04-01

    The inhomogeneous cooling flow scenario predicts the existence of large quantities of gas in massive elliptical galaxies, groups, and clusters that have cooled and dropped out of the flow. Using spatially resolved, deprojected X-ray spectra from the ROSAT PSPC, we have detected strong absorption over energies approximately 0.4-0.8 keV intrinsic to the central approximately 1&arcmin; of the galaxy NGC 1399, the group NGC 5044, and the cluster A1795. These systems have among the largest nearby cooling flows in their respective classes and low Galactic columns. Since no excess absorption is indicated for energies below approximately 0.4 keV, the most reasonable model for the absorber is warm, collisionally ionized gas with T=105-106 K in which ionized states of oxygen provide most of the absorption. Attributing the absorption only to ionized gas reconciles the large columns of cold H and He inferred from Einstein and ASCA with the lack of such columns inferred from ROSAT and also is consistent with the negligible atomic and molecular H inferred from H i and CO observations of cooling flows. The prediction of warm ionized gas as the product of mass dropout in these and other cooling flows can be verified by Chandra and X-Ray Multimirror Mission.

  6. Neutron Absorption in Geological Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Løvhøiden, G.; Andersen, E.

    1990-01-01

    Thermal neutron absorption cross section of geological samples is determined with the steady state neutron source method. Cross section measurements of North Sea sediments demonstrate that also materials with high contents of clay minerals may be investigated with the steady state method.

  7. Ultraviolet and Light Absorption Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.

    1984-01-01

    Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light absorption spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…

  8. Slow light and saturable absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selden, A. C.

    2009-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear absorption. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable absorption are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable absorption (RSA) may be similarly explained.

  9. JCE Feature Columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Jon L.

    1999-05-01

    The Features area of JCE Online is now readily accessible through a single click from our home page. In the Features area each column is linked to its own home page. These column home pages also have links to them from the online Journal Table of Contents pages or from any article published as part of that feature column. Using these links you can easily find abstracts of additional articles that are related by topic. Of course, JCE Online+ subscribers are then just one click away from the entire article. Finding related articles is easy because each feature column "site" contains links to the online abstracts of all the articles that have appeared in the column. In addition, you can find the mission statement for the column and the email link to the column editor that I mentioned above. At the discretion of its editor, a feature column site may contain additional resources. As an example, the Chemical Information Instructor column edited by Arleen Somerville will have a periodically updated bibliography of resources for teaching and using chemical information. Due to the increase in the number of these resources available on the WWW, it only makes sense to publish this information online so that you can get to these resources with a simple click of the mouse. We expect that there will soon be additional information and resources at several other feature column sites. Following in the footsteps of the Chemical Information Instructor, up-to-date bibliographies and links to related online resources can be made available. We hope to extend the online component of our feature columns with moderated online discussion forums. If you have a suggestion for an online resource you would like to see included, let the feature editor or JCE Online (jceonline@chem.wisc.edu) know about it. JCE Internet Features JCE Internet also has several feature columns: Chemical Education Resource Shelf, Conceptual Questions and Challenge Problems, Equipment Buyers Guide, Hal's Picks, Mathcad

  10. Time Varying Feature Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echterhoff, J.; Simonis, I.; Atkinson, R.

    2012-04-01

    The infrastructure to gather, store and access information about our environment is improving and growing rapidly. The increasing amount of information allows us to get a better understanding of the current state of our environment, historical processes and to simulate and predict the future state of the environment. Finer grained spatial and temporal data and more reliable communications make it easier to model dynamic states and ephemeral features. The exchange of information within and across geospatial domains is facilitated through the use of harmonized information models. The Observations & Measurements (O&M) developed through OGC and standardised by ISO is an example of such a cross-domain information model. It is used in many domains, including meteorology, hydrology as well as the emergency management. O&M enables harmonized representation of common metadata that belong to the act of determining the state of a feature property, whether by sensors, simulations or humans. In addition to the resulting feature property value, information such as the result quality but especially the time that the result applies to the feature property can be represented. Temporal metadata is critical to modelling past and future states of a feature. The features, and the semantics of each property, are defined in domain specific Application Schema using the General Feature Model (GFM) from ISO 19109 and usually encoded following ISO 19136. However, at the moment these standards provide only limited support for the representation and handling of time varying feature data. Features like rivers, wildfires or gas plumes have a defined state - for example geographic extent - at any given point in time. To keep track of changes, a more complex model for example using time-series coverages is required. Furthermore, the representation and management of feature property value changes via the service interfaces defined by OGC and ISO - namely: WFS and WCS - would be rather complex

  11. Structural features and stability of an RNA triple helix in solution.

    PubMed Central

    Holland, J A; Hoffman, D W

    1996-01-01

    A 30 nt RNA with a sequence designed to form an intramolecular triple helix was analyzed by one-and two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy and UV absorption measurements. NMR data show that the RNA contains seven pyrimidine-purine-pyrimidine base triples stabilized by Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen interactions. The temperature dependence of the imino proton resonances, as well as UV absorption data, indicate that the triple helix is highly stable at acidic pH, melting in a single sharp transition centered at 62 degrees C at pH 4.3. The Watson-Crick and Hoogsteen pairings are disrupted simultaneously upon melting. The NMR data are consistent with a structural model where the Watson-Crick paired strands form an A-helix. Results of model building, guided by NMR data, suggest a possible hydrogen bond between the 2' hydroxyl proton of the Hoogsteen strand and a phosphate oxygen of the purine strand. The structural model is discussed in terms of its ability to account for some of the differences in stability reported for RNA and DNA triple helices and provides insight into features that are likely to be important in the design of RNA binding compounds. PMID:8759020

  12. Light Absorption By Coated Soot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedlacek, A. J.; Lee, J.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Cross, E. S.

    2009-12-01

    The contribution of aerosol absorption on direct radiative forcing is still an active area of research, in part, because aerosol extinction is dominated by light scattering and, in part, because the primary absorbing aerosol of interest, soot, exhibits complex aging behavior that alters its optical properties. The consequences of this can be evidenced by the work of Ramanathan and Carmichael (2008) who suggest that incorporating the atmospheric heating due to brown clouds will increase black carbon (BC) radiative forcing from the IPCC best estimate of 0.34 Wm-2 (±0.25 Wm-2) (IPCC 2007) to 0.9 Wm-2. This noteworthy degree of the uncertainty is due largely to the interdependence of BC optical properties on particle mixing state and aggregate morphology, each of which changes as the particle ages in the atmosphere and becomes encapsulated within a coating of inorganic and/or organic substances. With the advent of techniques that can directly measure aerosol light absorption without influences due to collection substrate or light scattering (e.g., photoacoustic spectroscopy (Arnott et al., 2005; Lack et al., 2006) and photothermal interferometry (Sedlacek and Lee 2007)) the potential exists for quantifying this interdependence. In July 2008, a laboratory-based measurement campaign, led by Boston College and Aerodyne, was initiated to begin addressing this interdependence. To achieve this objective measurements of both the optical and physical properties of flame-generated soot under nascent, coated and denuded conditions were conducted. In this paper, light absorption by dioctyl sebacate (DOS) encapsulated soot and sulfuric acid coated soot using the technique of photothermal interferometry will be presented. In the case of DOS-coated soot, a monotonic increase in light absorption as a function DOS coating thickness to nearly 100% is observed. This observation is consistent with a coating-induced amplification in particle light absorption. (Bond et al. 2006) However

  13. A call center primer.

    PubMed

    Durr, W

    1998-01-01

    Call centers are strategically and tactically important to many industries, including the healthcare industry. Call centers play a key role in acquiring and retaining customers. The ability to deliver high-quality and timely customer service without much expense is the basis for the proliferation and expansion of call centers. Call centers are unique blends of people and technology, where performance indicates combining appropriate technology tools with sound management practices built on key operational data. While the technology is fascinating, the people working in call centers and the skill of the management team ultimately make a difference to their companies.

  14. New features in MEDM.

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, K., Jr.

    1999-04-13

    MEDM, which is derived from Motif Editor and Display Manager, is the primary graphical interface to the EPICS control system. This paper describes new features that have been added to MEDM in the last two years. These features include new editing capabilities, a PV Info dialog box, a means of specifying limits and precision, a new implementation of the Cartesian Plot, new features for several objects, new capability for the Related Display, help, a user-configurable Execute Menu, reconfigured start-up options, and availability for Windows 95/98/NT. Over one hundred bugs have been fixed, and the program is quite stable and in extensive use.

  15. Journey to Centers in the Core

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groth, Randall E.; Kent, Kristen D.; Hitch, Ebony D.

    2015-01-01

    Considerable discrepancies between the mean and median often occur in data sets that are skewed left, skewed right, or have other unusual features. In such cases, it is important to analyze the data and context carefully to decide how best to describe centers of distributions. The importance of this type of statistical thinking is acknowledged in…

  16. Propagation-invariant classification of sounds in channels with dispersion and absorption.

    PubMed

    Okopal, Greg; Loughlin, Patrick J

    2010-11-01

    In a previous paper [G. Okopal et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 123, 832-841 (2008)], a method to obtain features of a wave that are unaffected by dispersion, per mode, was developed for improving classification of underwater sounds (e.g., sonar backscatter). The current paper builds on this work and presents additional contributions. First, it is shown that the dispersion-invariant moments developed previously are not invariant to frequency-dependent attenuation (absorption); consequently, their classification performance degrades in such channels. Second, a feature extraction method is developed to obtain features that are invariant to dispersion, and to two forms of absorption (known a priori): namely, absorption that yields spectral magnitude attenuation (in dB) that is linear with frequency, and linear with log-frequency. Third, the relationship of these absorption- and dispersion-invariant moment (ADIM) features to the cepstrum of the wave is examined, and it is shown that cepstral moments are also invariant to dispersion, and to the first form of absorption for odd-order moments. Finally, simulations are conducted to illustrate the performance of the ADIMs and cepstral moments on classifying the backscatter from steel shells in a dispersive channel with absorption. Receiver operator characteristic curves quantify the superior discriminability of the ADIMs and cepstral moments compared to ordinary moments.

  17. A light-emitting diode- (LED-) based absorption sensor for simultaneous detection of carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide

    DOE PAGES

    Thurmond, Kyle; Loparo, Zachary; Partridge, Jr., William P.; ...

    2016-04-18

    Here, a sensor was developed for simultaneous measurements of carbon monoxide (CO) and carbon dioxide (CO2) fluctuations in internal combustion engine exhaust gases. This sensor utilizes low-cost and compact light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that emit in the 3–5 µm wavelength range. An affordable, fast response sensor that can measure these gases has a broad application that can lead to more efficient, fuel-flexible engines and regulation of harmful emissions. Light emission from LEDs is spectrally broader and more spatially divergent when compared to that of lasers, which presented many design challenges. Optical design studies addressed some of the non-ideal characteristics of themore » LED emissions. Measurements of CO and CO2 were conducted using their fundamental absorption bands centered at 4.7 µm and 4.3 µm, respectively, while a 3.6 µm reference LED was used to account for scattering losses (due to soot, window deposits, etc.) common to the three measurement LEDs. Instrument validation and calibration was performed using a laboratory flow cell and bottled-gas mixtures. The sensor was able to detect CO2 and CO concentration changes as small as 30 ppm and 400 ppm, respectively. Because of the many control and monitor species with infra-red absorption features, which can be measured using the strategy described, this work demonstrates proof of concept for a wider range of fast (250 Hz) and low-cost sensors for gas measurement and process monitoring.« less

  18. 6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF CRUSHING PLANT (FEATURE 19), GROUND LEVEL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. INTERIOR DETAIL OF CRUSHING PLANT (FEATURE 19), GROUND LEVEL, FACING SOUTH. REMAINS OF CONVEYOR BELT BETWEEN CRUSHING PLANT AND FINE ORE MILL (FEATURE 20) SHOWN IN CENTER OF PHOTOGRAPH. - Copper Canyon Camp of the International Smelting & Refining Company, Crushing Plant, Copper Canyon, Battle Mountain, Lander County, NV

  19. Unidentified features in the spectrum of Triton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rieke, G. H.; Lebofsky, L. A.; Lebofsky, M. J.; Montgomery, E. F.

    1981-01-01

    Photometry at 3.5 microns was taken with the Infrared Telescope Facility of the Multiple Mirror Telescope to obtain an improved IR spectrum of Triton. The observations show features that are not in detailed agreeement with previous identifications of methane or methane frost, although the general spectral behavior leading to such identifications has been confirmed. It is believed that a combination of surface and atmospheric absorptions may resolve some discrepancies; for instance, many hydrated minerals and frosts which are dark between 3.0 and 4.0 microns may combine with a carbon monoxide atmosphere to yield the data in question.

  20. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. AQUATOX Features and Tools

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Numerous features have been included to facilitate the modeling process, from model setup and data input, presentation and analysis of results, to easy export of results to spreadsheet programs for additional analysis.

  2. Feature Leads That Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konkle, Bruce E.

    1999-01-01

    Presents advice to scholastic journalists on writing leads for feature stories. Discusses using a summary, a question, a direct quote, a first-person account, alliteration, a shocking statement, contrast, historical reference, descriptions, narratives, metaphors, and similes. (RS)

  3. High Resolution Spectra of Low Redshift Damped Lyalpha Absorption Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. D.; Beaver, E. A.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.; Smith, H. E.

    1998-05-01

    We have been able to form a fairly complete picture of the galaxy responsible for the z_a=0.395 absorption line system in PKS 1229--021 by combining Keck HIRES and LRIS spectroscopy with observations taken with the Hubble Space Telescope. The image of the absorber is consistent with the inclined disk of a moderately luminous spiral galaxy. We have not been able to detect the continuum from this galaxy spectroscopically, but our LRIS spectra show emission from [O II] lambda3727 which can be interpreted to be indicative of star formation at the rate of a few M_⊙ per year. The HIRES spectra clearly show an ``edge--leading'' absorption profile. Prochaska and Wolfe have predicted that the velocity of the center of mass of the absorbing galaxy should fall near one edge of the absorption profile if the damped Lyalpha systems are due to the rotating disks of spiral galaxies. The [O II] emission velocity is consistent with this, but there is some ambiguity due to the doublet nature of the [O II] emission. Although the absorption lines of the abundant elements are saturated in the components which correspond to the H I absorption, we have been able to measure accurate column densities for Ca II, Ti II, and Mn II for comparison with the H I column density determined from low resolution HST/FOS spectra. The abundances are compatible with approximately 0.1 of solar, with little or no dust, but they are also consistent with lines of sight toward zeta Oph through warm interstellar clouds. HIRES observations of the z_a=0.692 absorption line system in 3CR 286 will also be discussed, after the data are fully analyzed. This work is part of the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph Guaranteed Time Observations and is supported by NASA grant NAG5--1858 and the NSF.

  4. Observational Evidence Linking Interstellar UV Absorption to PAH Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blasberger, Avi; Behar, Ehud; Perets, Hagai B.; Brosch, Noah; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.

    2017-02-01

    The 2175 Å UV extinction feature was discovered in the mid-1960s, yet its physical origin remains poorly understood. One suggestion is absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecules, which is supported by theoretical molecular structure computations and by laboratory experiments. PAHs are positively detected by their 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, 11.3, and 12.7 μm IR emission bands, which are specified by their modes of vibration. A definitive empirical link between the 2175 Å UV extinction and the IR PAH emission bands, however, is still missing. We present a new sample of hot stars that have both 2175 Å absorption and IR PAH emission. We find significant shifts of the central wavelength of the UV absorption feature, up to 2350 Å, but predominantly in stars that also have IR PAH emission. These UV shifts depend on stellar temperature in a fashion that is similar to the shifts of the 6.2 and 7.7 μm IR PAH bands, that is, the features are increasingly more redshifted as the stellar temperature decreases, but only below ∼15 kK. Above 15 kK both UV and IR features retain their nominal values. Moreover, we find a suggestive correlation between the UV and IR shifts. We hypothesize that these similar dependences of both the UV and IR features on stellar temperature hint at a common origin of the two in PAH molecules and may establish the missing link between the UV and IR observations. We further suggest that the shifts depend on molecular size, and that the critical temperature of ∼15 kK above which no shifts are observed is related to the onset of UV-driven hot-star winds and their associated shocks.

  5. Infrasound absorption by atmospheric clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baudoin, Michael; Coulouvrat, Francois; Thomas, Jean-Louis

    2010-05-01

    A model is developed for the absorption of infrasound by atmospheric clouds made of a suspension of liquid water droplets within a gaseous mixture of water vapor and air. The model is based on the work of D.A. Gubaidullin and R.I. Nigmatulin [Int. J. Multiphase Flow, 26, 207-228, 2000], which is applied to atmospheric clouds. Three physical mechanisms are included : unsteady viscous drag associated with momentum transfers due to the translation of water droplets, unsteady thermal transfers between the liquid and gaseous phases, and mass transfers due to the evaporation or condensation of the water phase. For clouds, in the infrasonic frequency range, phase changes are the dominant mechanisms (around 1 Hz), while viscous and heat transfers become significant only around 100 Hz. Mass transfers involve two physical effects : evaporation and condensation of the water phase at the droplet surface, and diffusion of the water vapor within the gaseous phase. The first one is described through the Hertz-Knudsen-Langmuir theory based on kinetic theory. It involves a little known coefficient known as coefficient of accommodation. The second one is the classical Fick diffusion. For clouds, and unless the coefficient of accommodation is very small (far from the generally recommended value is close to one), diffusion is the main limiting effects for mass transfers. In a second stage, the sound and infrasound absorption is evaluated for various typical clouds up to about 4 km altitude. Above this altitude, the ice content of clouds is dominant compared to their water content, and the present model is not applicable. Cloud thickness, water content, and droplets size distribution are shown to be the major factors influencing the infrasound absorption. A variety of clouds have been analyzed. In most cases, it is shown that infrasound absorption within clouds is several orders larger than classical absorption (due to molecular relaxation of nitrogen and oxygen molecules in presence

  6. Feature Characterization Library

    SciTech Connect

    Doyle, Wendy; Gentile, Ann; McCoy, Renata

    2006-08-03

    FCLib is a data analysis toolkit constructed to meet the needs of data discovery in large-scale, spatio-temporal data such as finite element simulation data. FCLib is a C library toolkit of building blocks that can be assembled into complex analyses. Important features of FCLib include the following: (1) Support of feature-based analysis, (2) minimization of low-oevel processing, (3) ease of use, and (4) applicable to the wide variety of science domains.

  7. Feature matching algorithm based on spatial similarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wenjing; Hao, Yanling; Zhao, Yuxin; Li, Ning

    2008-10-01

    The disparities of features that represent the same real world entities from disparate sources usually occur, thus the identification or matching of features is crutial to the map conflation. Motivated by the idea of identifying the same entities through integrating known information by eyes, the feature matching algorithm based on spatial similarity is proposed in this paper. Total similarity is obtained by integrating positional similarity, shape similarity and size similarity with a weighted average algorithm, then the matching entities is achieved according to the maximum total similarity. The matching of areal features is analyzed in detail. Regarding the areal feature as a whole, the proposed algorithm identifies the same areal features by their shape-center points in order to calculate their positional similarity, and shape similarity is given by the function of describing the shape, which ensures its precision not be affected by interferes and avoids the loss of shape information, furthermore the size of areal features is measured by their covered areas. Test results show the stability and reliability of the proposed algorithm, and its precision and recall are higher than other matching algorithm.

  8. Crowding with conjunctions of simple features.

    PubMed

    Põder, Endel; Wagemans, Johan

    2007-11-20

    Several recent studies have related crowding with the feature integration stage in visual processing. In order to understand the mechanisms involved in this stage, it is important to use stimuli that have several features to integrate, and these features should be clearly defined and measurable. In this study, Gabor patches were used as target and distractor stimuli. The stimuli differed in three dimensions: spatial frequency, orientation, and color. A group of 3, 5, or 7 objects was presented briefly at 4 deg eccentricity of the visual field. The observers' task was to identify the object located in the center of the group. A strong effect of the number of distractors was observed, consistent with various spatial pooling models. The analysis of incorrect responses revealed that these were a mix of feature errors and mislocalizations of the target object. Feature errors were not purely random, but biased by the features of distractors. We propose a simple feature integration model that predicts most of the observed regularities.

  9. Tunable diode laser absorption sensor for temperature and velocity measurements of O2 in air flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philippe, L. C.; Hanson, R. K.

    1991-01-01

    A fast and nonintrusive velocity and temperature diagnostic based on oxygen absorption is presented. The system uses a GaAlAs tunable diode laser, ramped and modulated in wavelength at high frequency. Detection is performed at twice the modulating frequency, leading to second harmonic absorption lineshapes. Velocity is inferred from the wavelength shift of the absorption line center due to the Doppler effect. Temperature is determined by comparing experimental and calculated lineshapes. Capabilities of the technique for studies of transient high-speed flows are demonstrated in shock tube experiments. Good agreement is obtained with predicted temperatures and velocities when pressure-induced shifts are accounted for.

  10. Measuring CT scanner variability of radiomics features

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Dennis; Fave, Xenia; Zhang, Lifei; Fried, David; Yang, Jinzhong; Taylor, Brian; Rodriguez-Rivera, Edgardo; Dodge, Cristina; Jones, A. Kyle; Court, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of inter-scanner variability in CT image radiomics studies. Materials and Methods We compared the radiomics features calculated for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors from 20 patients with those calculated for 17 scans of a specially designed radiomics phantom. The phantom comprised 10 cartridges, each filled with different materials to produce a wide range of radiomics feature values. The scans were acquired using General Electric, Philips, Siemens, and Toshiba scanners from four medical centers using their routine thoracic imaging protocol. The radiomics feature studied included the mean and standard deviations of the CT numbers as well as textures derived from the neighborhood gray-tone difference matrix. To quantify the significance of the inter-scanner variability, we introduced the metric feature noise. To look for patterns in the scans, we performed hierarchical clustering for each cartridge. Results The mean CT numbers for the 17 CT scans of the phantom cartridges spanned from -864 to 652 Hounsfield units compared with a span of -186 to 35 Hounsfield units for the CT scans of the NSCLC tumors, showing that the phantom’s dynamic range includes that of the tumors. The inter-scanner variability of the feature values depended on both the cartridge material and the feature, and the variability was large relative to the inter-patient variability in the NSCLC tumors for some features. The feature inter-scanner noise was greatest for busyness and least for texture strength. Hierarchical clustering produced different clusters of the phantom scans for each cartridge, although there was some consistent clustering by scanner manufacturer. Conclusions The variability in the values of radiomics features calculated on CT images from different CT scanners can be comparable to the variability in these features found in CT images of NSCLC tumors. These inter-scanner differences should be

  11. Computing the Absorption of Sound by the Atmosphere and its Applicability to Aircraft Noise Certification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rickley, E. J.

    1998-08-01

    The United States Department of Transportation, John A. Volpe National Transportation Systems Center (Volpe Center), Acoustics Facility, in support of the Federal Aviation Administration's Office of Environment and Energy (AEE), has recently completed a study of a new method for computing atmospheric absorption. This letter report presents the results of the study. Section 1 presents an introduction to the topic of atmospheric absorption as it relates to aircraft noise certification, along with the objective of the study. Section 2 discusses the evaluation procedure. Section 3 discusses the results of the evaluation. Section 4 and 5 present conclusions and recommendations, respectively.

  12. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing.

    PubMed

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-06

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions' spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches).

  13. Landing gear energy absorption system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Christopher P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A landing pad system is described for absorbing horizontal and vertical impact forces upon engagement with a landing surface where circumferentially arranged landing struts respectively have a clevis which receives a slidable rod member and where the upper portion of a slidable rod member is coupled to the clevis by friction washers which are force fit onto the rod member to provide for controlled constant force energy absorption when the rod member moves relative to the clevis. The lower end of the friction rod is pivotally attached by a ball and socket to a support plate where the support plate is arranged to slide in a transverse direction relative to a housing which contains an energy absorption material for absorbing energy in a transverse direction.

  14. The Intestinal Absorption of Folates

    PubMed Central

    Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David

    2014-01-01

    The properties of intestinal folate absorption were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate absorption in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081

  15. Optical absorption in trilayer graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Niu, Qian

    2013-03-01

    We use a low energy effective model to analyze the optical responses of trilayer graphene samples. We first show that optical absorption of the ABA-stacked trilayer has strong dependence on both the Fermi energy and optical frequency, which is in sharp contrast to that of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. Secondly, we are able to determine the possible existence of trigonal warping effects in the bandstructure of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene by a divergence in the absorption spectra at around 10 meV. In addition, we can partially distinguish the vairious broken symmetry states driven by electron-electron interactions in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. In particular, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is sensitive to the polarization of the incident light, giving a way to detect its possible existence.

  16. Instructor Support Feature Guidelines. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-01

    Laboratory. Polzella , D.J. (1983). Aircrew training devices: utility and utilization of advanced instructional features (Phase I - Tactical Air Command...Technical Equiment Conference Proceedings (NAVTRAEQUIPCEN IH-316). Orlando, FL: Naval Training Equipment Center. Polzella , D.J. (1983). Aircrew...Force Human Resources Laboratory. (AD-A135 052) Polzella , D.J. (1984). Aircrew training devices: Utility and utilization of advanced instructional

  17. A purple cupredoxin from Nitrosopumilus maritimus containing a mononuclear type 1 copper center with an open binding site

    DOE PAGES

    Hosseinzadeh, Parisa; Tian, Shiliang; Marshall, Nicholas M.; ...

    2016-04-27

    Mononuclear cupredoxin proteins usually contain a coordinately saturated type 1 copper (T1Cu) center and function exclusively as electron carriers. Here we report a cupredoxin isolated from the nitrifying archaeon Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, called Nmar1307, that contains a T1Cu center with an open binding site containing water. It displays a deep purple color due to strong absorptions around 413 nm (1880 M–1 cm–1) and 558 nm (2290 M–1 cm–1) in the UV–vis electronic spectrum. EPR studies suggest the protein contains two Cu(II) species of nearly equal population, one nearly axial, with hyperfine constant A∥ = 98 × 10–4 cm–1, and anothermore » more rhombic, with a smaller A∥ value of 69 × 10–4 cm–1. The X-ray crystal structure at 1.6 Å resolution confirms that it contains a Cu atom coordinated by two His and one Cys in a trigonal plane, with an axial H2O at 2.25 Å. Both UV–vis absorption and EPR spectroscopic studies suggest that the Nmar1307 can oxidize NO to nitrite, an activity that is attributable to the high reduction potential (354 mV vs SHE) of the copper site. Lastly, these results suggest that mononuclear cupredoxins can have a wide range of structural features, including an open binding site containing water, making this class of proteins even more versatile.« less

  18. Photoabsorption of ag (n = 6 - 6000) Clusters in he Droplets: a Transition from - to Multi-Centered Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez, Luis F.; Loginov, Evgeny; Sliter, Russell; Vilesov, Andrey F.; Halder, Avik; Chiang, Naihao; Guggemos, Nicholas; Kresin, Vitaly V.

    2012-06-01

    Ag clusters with up to thousands of atoms were grown in large He droplets and studied by optical spectroscopy. For clusters smaller than about 103 the spectra are dominated by a surface plasmon resonance near 3.8 eV and a broad feature in the UV, consistent with the absorption of individual metallic particles. Larger Ag clusters reveal an unexpectedly strong, broad absorption extending to lower frequencies down to approximately 0.5 eV. This suggests a transition from single-center to multi-center formation, in agreement with estimates of the kinetics of Ag cluster growth in He droplets. Moreover, the spectra of large clusters develop a characteristic dispersion profile at 3.5-4.5 eV, indicative of the coexistence of localized and delocalized electronic excitations in composite clusters, as predicted theoretically. We also report on the characterization of He droplet beams, obtained in the supercritical expansion regime, comprised of large droplets of up to 1011 atoms.

  19. EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1980-01-01

    The Earth Resources Observation Systems (EROS) Data Center, located in Sioux Falls, SD, is a data management, systems development, and research field center of the U.S. Geological Survey's National Mapping Division. The Center was established in the early 1970's to receive, process, and distribute data from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Landsat satellites. The Center holds the world's largest collection of space and aircraft acquired imagery of the Earth. These holdings include over 2 million images acquired from satellites and over 8 million aerial photographs. The Center is also a major focal point for information concerning the holdings of foreign Landsat ground reception stations and data acquired by other countries' Earth observing satellites. The central U.S. location provides the Center with a unique capability to receive real-time electronic signals from Earth orbiting satellites, used for developing data sets of most of the North American continent.

  20. Optical Absorption Characteristics of Aerosols.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-11

    properties of the powder as well as the thickness of the layer. For a layer that is thick enough so that no light is transmitted, the Kubelka -- Munk theory...which is a two stream radiative transfer model, relates the reflectance to the ratio of the absorption to the scattering. The Kubelka - Munk theory has...of the aerosol material is known. Under the assumptions of the Kubelka - Munk . theory, the imaginary component of the refractive index is deter- mined

  1. Photodetector with enhanced light absorption

    DOEpatents

    Kane, James

    1985-01-01

    A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the absorption of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.

  2. Geometrical interpretation of optical absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.

    2011-08-15

    We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of absorption appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.

  3. Test Control Center exhibit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Have you ever wondered how the engineers at John C. Stennis Space Center in Hancock County, Miss., test fire a Space Shuttle Main Engine? The Test Control Center exhibit at StenniSphere can answer your questions by simulating the test firing of a Space Shuttle Main Engine. A recreation of one of NASA's test control centers, the exhibit explains and portrays the 'shake, rattle and roar' that happens during a real test firing.

  4. Relativistic Guiding Center Equations

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gobbin, M.

    2014-10-01

    In toroidal fusion devices it is relatively easy that electrons achieve relativistic velocities, so to simulate runaway electrons and other high energy phenomena a nonrelativistic guiding center formalism is not sufficient. Relativistic guiding center equations including flute mode time dependent field perturbations are derived. The same variables as used in a previous nonrelativistic guiding center code are adopted, so that a straightforward modifications of those equations can produce a relativistic version.

  5. 13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. SAC command center, weather center, underground structure, building 501, undated - Offutt Air Force Base, Strategic Air Command Headquarters & Command Center, Command Center, 901 SAC Boulevard, Bellevue, Sarpy County, NE

  6. Autism Center First to Study Minimally Verbal Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... on. Feature: Taste, Smell, Hearing, Language, Voice, Balance Autism Center First to Study Minimally Verbal Children Past ... research exploring the causes, diagnosis, and treatment of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a complex developmental disorder that ...

  7. Data Center at NICT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichikawa, Ryuichi; Sekido, Mamoru

    2013-01-01

    The Data Center at the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) archives and releases the databases and analysis results processed at the Correlator and the Analysis Center at NICT. Regular VLBI sessions of the Key Stone Project VLBI Network were the primary objective of the Data Center. These regular sessions continued until the end of November 2001. In addition to the Key Stone Project VLBI sessions, NICT has been conducting geodetic VLBI sessions for various purposes, and these data are also archived and released by the Data Center.

  8. Forensic Science Center

    SciTech Connect

    Andresen, B.; Grant, P.M.

    1994-03-01

    Since 1991, the Laboratory's Forensic Science Center has focused a comprehensive range of analytical expertise on issues related to non proliferation, counterterrorism, and domestic law enforcement. During this short period, LLNL's singular combination of human and technological resources has made the Center among the best of its kind in the world. The Forensic Science Center houses a variety of state-of-the-art analytical tools ranging from gas chromatograph/mass spectrometers to ultratrace DNA detection techniques. The Center's multidisciplinary staff provides expertise in organic and inorganic analytical chemistry, nuclear science, biochemistry, and genetics useful for supporting law enforcement and for verifying compliance with international treaties and agreements.

  9. Detectability of cold streams into high-redshift galaxies by absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goerdt, Tobias; Dekel, Avishai; Sternberg, Amiel; Gnat, Orly; Ceverino, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Cold gas streaming along the dark matter filaments of the cosmic web is predicted to be the major source of fuel for disc buildup, violent disc instability and star formation in massive galaxies at high redshift. We investigate to what extent such cold gas is detectable in the extended circumgalactic environment of galaxies via Lyα absorption and selected low-ionization metal absorption lines. We model the expected absorption signatures using high-resolution zoom-in adaptive mesh refinement cosmological simulations. In the post-processing, we distinguish between self-shielded gas and unshielded gas. In the self-shielded gas, which is optically thick to Lyman continuum radiation, we assume pure collisional ionization for species with an ionization potential greater than 13.6 eV. In the optically-thin, unshielded gas, these species are also photoionized by the metagalactic radiation. In addition to absorption of radiation from background quasars, we compute the absorption line profiles of radiation emitted by the galaxy at the centre of the same halo. We predict the strength of the absorption signal for individual galaxies without stacking. We find that the Lyα absorption profiles produced by the streams are consistent with observations of absorption and emission Lyα profiles in high-redshift galaxies. Due to the low metallicities in the streams, and their low covering factors, the metal absorption features are weak and difficult to detect.

  10. The widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} ABSORPTION SPECTRUM OF 2-NITROOXYBUTYL PEROXY RADICAL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddingsaas, Nathan; Takematsu, Kana; Okumura, Mitchio

    2009-06-01

    The nitrate radical is an important atmospheric oxidant in the nighttime sky. Nitrate radicals react by addition to alkenes, and in the presence of oxygen form nitrooxyalkyl peroxy radicals. The peroxy radical formed from the reaction of 2-butene, nitrate radical, and oxygen was detected by cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) via its widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} electronic absorption spectrum. The widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} electronic transition is a bound-bound transition with enough structure to distinguish between different peroxy radicals as well as different conformers of the same peroxy radical. Two conformers of the nitrooxybutyl peroxy radical have been observed; the absorption features are red shifted from the same absorption features of sec-butyl peroxy radical. Calculations on the structure of nitrooxyalkyl peroxy radicals and general trends of the position of the widetilde{A}←widetilde{X} absorption transitions have also been performed and compared to those of unsubstituted peroxy radicals.

  11. An Investigation of the 3-μm Feature in M-Type Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landsman, Zoe A.; Campins, H.; Hargrove, K.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Emery, J.; Ziffer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The M-type asteroids had originally been interpreted as the disrupted iron cores of differentiated bodies by spectral analogy with the NiFe meteorites. More detailed studies have since indicated a range of compositions. In particular, the presence of a 3-µm feature, diagnostic of hydration, detected in more than 35% of surveyed M-type asteroids (Jones et al. 1990, Rivkin et al. 1995, 2000) has challenged the notion that these bodies are all metallic. Spectroscopy in the 0.8 - 2.5 µm region has revealed absorption features due to mafic silicates and hydroxides or phyllosilicates (Fornasier et al. 2010, Hardersen et al. 2006, 2010, Ockert-Bell et al. 2010). Radar studies have shown that most M-types are not likely to be iron cores, but they typically have a higher metal content than average (Shepard et al. 2010). Taken together, these results paint a fairly confounding picture of the M-type asteroids. While several interpretations have been suggested, more work is needed to clarify the mineralogy of these bodies. We have started a new spectroscopic study of the M asteroids in the 2 - 4 µm region. We seek to characterize the shape, band center, and band depth of the 3-µm feature where it is present, as these measures are indicative of the type and extent of hydration present on asteroids (Lebofsky et al. 1985, Rivkin et al. 2002, Takir & Emery 2012, Volguardsen et al. 2007). With this work, we hope to shed new light on the origin of hydration on M asteroids and its context within their mineralogy and thermal evolution. In July 2013, we obtained 2 - 4 µm spectra for 69 Hesperia, 136 Austria, and 261 Prymno with the SpeX at NASA’s IRTF, and are in the process of reducing the data. We have also obtained 0.8 - 2.0 µm data for 261 Prymno using the NICS at the TNG in February 2013. We report the presence of an absorption feature near 0.9 µm in Prymno’s spectrum, indicating a partially silicate composition. Based on spectral, physical and orbital similarities to

  12. Radiation-Induced Centers in Lead Silicate Glasses Irradiated by Stationary and Pulsed Electron Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhidkov, I. S.; Zatsepin, A. F.; Konev, S. F.; Cholakh, S. O.

    2015-08-01

    Radiation-induced centers formed in heavy flint glasses irradiated by electron beams are investigated by the methods of optical and EPR spectroscopy. It is revealed that stable and short-living optical absorption centers of close natures are formed under irradiation by fast electrons. A correlation is established between the stable optical absorption bands and the EPR signals interpreted as signals of the (Pb2+)/h+ hole centers. The shortliving color centers are formed due to short-term distortion of the O-Pb bonds, and the stable centers are formed due to the spatial separation, thermalization, and subsequent stabilization of excited electrons and holes in tails of the localized states. Irradiation by electron beams leads to a change in the spectral characteristics of the fundamental absorption edge and, in particular, of the Urbach energy that determines the degree of structural disorder.

  13. Energy absorption ability of buckyball C720 at low impact speed: a numerical study based on molecular dynamics

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The dynamic impact response of giant buckyball C720 is investigated by using molecular dynamics simulations. The non-recoverable deformation of C720 makes it an ideal candidate for high-performance energy absorption. Firstly, mechanical behaviors under dynamic impact and low-speed crushing are simulated and modeled, which clarifies the buckling-related energy absorption mechanism. One-dimensional C720 arrays (both vertical and horizontal alignments) are studied at various impact speeds, which show that the energy absorption ability is dominated by the impact energy per buckyball and less sensitive to the number and arrangement direction of buckyballs. Three-dimensional stacking of buckyballs in simple cubic, body-centered cubic, hexagonal, and face-centered cubic forms are investigated. Stacking form with higher occupation density yields higher energy absorption. The present study may shed lights on employing C720 assembly as an advanced energy absorption system against low-speed impacts. PMID:23360618

  14. Absorption Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.

    1983-01-01

    Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of absorption spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on absorption spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)

  15. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved.

  16. Three featured plenary sessions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2012-07-01

    The conference included three plenary sessions. The plenary on Governance, Security, Economy, and the Ecosystem of the Changing Arctic featured Vera Alexander, president, Arctic Research Consortium of the U.S.; Alan Thornhill, chief environmental officer, U.S. Department of the Interior's Bureau of Ocean Energy Management; and Fran Ulmer, chair, U.S. Arctic Research Commission. A plenary on the U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea featured Ambassador David Balton, deputy assistant secretary for oceans and fisheries, U.S. Department of State; and Rear Admiral Frederick Kenney Jr., judge advocate general and chief counsel, U.S. Coast Guard. The plenary on Science and the 21st Century featured Phil Keslin, chief technology officer, small lab within Google.

  17. Dynamics of light-induced NIR-absorption of Nb4 polarons in SBN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ming; Vikhnin, V.; Kapphan, S.

    The dynamics of light-induced (Kr+-, Ar+-laser) electronic polarons (Nb4+ centers with broad absorption band around 0.8 eV) and light-induced centers of other types were investigated in SrxBa1-xNb2O6: Cr (SBN:Cr) and in SBN: Ce using FTIR absorption measurements at low temperature. A theoretical model involving Cr3+/Cr4+, Ce3+/Ce4+, Nb4+ electronic polarons and trapping X-centers is proposed. The trapping of polarons at Cr4+/Ce4+ centers with subsequent recharging is shown to play an important role in the polaron dynamics. The predictions of the model are in very good agreement with the experimental results.

  18. Absorption of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses by metal nanospheres in a dielectric medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astapenko, V. A.; Svita, S. Yu

    2015-02-01

    The absorption of ultrashort electromagnetic pulses on silver nanosphere embedded into glass in vicinity of plasmon resonance is studied theoretically in the frame of perturbation theory. The calculations are made for corrected Gaussian shape of incident pulse which enables us to consider both the short duration and the long duration regimes. Analysis based on numerical calculations reveals the specific features of considered process so as the change of absorption spectra for different pulse length and nonlinear dependence of absorbed energy upon pulse duration.

  19. Spatial k-dispersion engineering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons for customized absorption

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Feng, Mingde; Li, Yongfeng; Xu, Zhuo; Xia, Song; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-01-01

    Absorption of electromagnetic waves in a medium is generally manipulated by controlling the frequency dispersion of constitutive parameters. However, it is still challenging to gain the desired constitutive parameters for customized absorption over a broad frequency range. Here, by virtue of spoof surface plasmonic polaritons (SPPs), we demonstrate capabilities of the spatial k-dispersion engineering for producing the customized broadband absorption. Incident waves can be efficiently converted to the spoof SPPs by plasmonic arrays, and their propagation and/or absorption can be controlled by engineering the spatial dispersion of k-vector. Based on this feature, we show how such concept is employed to achieve broadband as well as frequency-selective broadband absorptions as examples. It is expected that the proposed concept can be extended to other manipulations of propagating electromagnetic waves over a broad frequency range. PMID:27389309

  20. Optimal design of laterally assembled hexagonal silicon nanowires for broadband absorption enhancement in ultrathin solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahraki, Mojtaba; Salehi, Mohammad Reza; Abiri, Ebrahim

    2015-11-01

    Design approaches to carry out broadband absorption in laterally assembled hexagonal silicon nanowire (NW) solar cells are investigated. Two different methods are proposed to improve the current density of silicon NW solar cells. It is observed that the key to the broadband absorption is disorder and irregularity. The first approach to reach the broadband absorption is using multiple NWs with different geometries. Nevertheless, the maximum enhancement is obtained by introducing irregular NWs. They can support more cavity modes, while scattering by NWs leads to broadening of the absorption spectra. An array of optimized irregular NWs also has preferable features compared to other broadband structures. Using irregular NW arrays, it is possible to improve the absorption enhancement of solar cells without introducing more absorbing material.

  1. Search for correlated UV and x ray absorption of NGC 3516

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Christopher; Halpern, Jules P.; Kolman, Michiel

    1991-01-01

    NGC 3516, a low-luminosity Seyfert galaxy, is one of a small fraction of Seyfert galaxies that exhibit broad absorption in a resonance line. In order to determine whether the UV and x ray absorption in NGC 3516 are related, 5 IUE observations were obtained, quasi-simultaneously with 4 Ginga observations. The results are presented and discussed. The following subject areas are covered: short-term UV variability; emission lines; galactic absorption lines; the C IV, N V, and Si IV absorption features; lower limit on the carbon column density; estimate of the distance from the absorber to the continuum source; variability in the continuum and absorption; a comparison with BAL QSO's; and the x ray-UV connection.

  2. Spatial k-dispersion engineering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons for customized absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Yongqiang; Wang, Jiafu; Ma, Hua; Feng, Mingde; Li, Yongfeng; Xu, Zhuo; Xia, Song; Qu, Shaobo

    2016-07-01

    Absorption of electromagnetic waves in a medium is generally manipulated by controlling the frequency dispersion of constitutive parameters. However, it is still challenging to gain the desired constitutive parameters for customized absorption over a broad frequency range. Here, by virtue of spoof surface plasmonic polaritons (SPPs), we demonstrate capabilities of the spatial k-dispersion engineering for producing the customized broadband absorption. Incident waves can be efficiently converted to the spoof SPPs by plasmonic arrays, and their propagation and/or absorption can be controlled by engineering the spatial dispersion of k-vector. Based on this feature, we show how such concept is employed to achieve broadband as well as frequency-selective broadband absorptions as examples. It is expected that the proposed concept can be extended to other manipulations of propagating electromagnetic waves over a broad frequency range.

  3. Funding Opportunity: Genomic Data Centers

    Cancer.gov

    Funding Opportunity CCG, Funding Opportunity Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG, Center for Cancer Genomics, CCG RFA, Center for cancer genomics rfa, genomic data analysis network, genomic data analysis network centers,

  4. IUE's View of Callisto: Detection of an SO2 Absorption Correlated to Possible Torus Neutral Wind Alterations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, Arthur L.; Domingue, Deborah L.

    1997-01-01

    Observations taken with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) detected a 0.28 micron absorption feature on Callisto's leading and Jupiter-facing hemispheres. This feature is similar to Europa's 0.28 micron feature, however it shows no correlation with magnetospheric ion bombardment. The strongest 0.28 micron signature is seen in the region containing the Valhalla impact. This absorption feature also shows some spatial correlation to possible neutral wind interactions, suggestive of S implantation (rather than S(sub x)) into Callisto's water ice surface, Indications of possible temporal variations (on the 10% level) are seen at other wavelengths between the 1984-1986 and the 1996 observations.

  5. Escalator design features evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, W. F.; Deshpande, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Escalators are available with design features such as dual speed (90 and 120 fpm), mat operation and flat steps. These design features were evaluated based on the impact of each on capital and operating costs, traffic flow, and safety. A human factors engineering model was developed to analyze the need for flat steps at various speeds. Mat operation of escalators was found to be cost effective in terms of energy savings. Dual speed operation of escalators with the higher speed used during peak hours allows for efficient operation. A minimum number of flat steps required as a function of escalator speed was developed to ensure safety for the elderly.

  6. Absorption, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others

    Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of absorption may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the absorption-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's Absorption Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…

  7. [Near infrared Cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy study of NO2O].

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhi-wei; Dong, Yan-ting; Zhou, Wei-dong

    2014-08-01

    Using a tunable near infrared external cavity diode laser and a 650 mm long high finesse optical cavity consisting of two highly reflective (R=99.97% at 6561.39 cm(-1)) plan-concave mirrors of curvature radius approximately 1000 mm, a cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy (CEAS) system was made. The absorption spectra centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) of pure N2O gas and gas mixtures of N2O and N2 were recorded. According to the absorption of N2O at 6561.39 cm(-1) in the cavity, the measured effective absorption path was about 1460 km. The spectra line intensity and line-width of N2O centered at 6561.39 cm(-1) were carefully studied. The relationship between the line-width of absorption spectra and the gas pressure was derived. The pressure broadening parameter of N2 gas for NO2O line centered at 6 561. 39 cm(-1) was deduced and given a value of approximately (0.114 +/- 0.004) cm(-1) x atm(-1). The possibility to detect trace N2O gas in mixture using this CEAS system was investigated. By recording the ab- sorption spectra of N2O gas mixtures at different concentration, the relationship between the line intensity and gas concentration was derived. The minimum detectable absorption was found to be 2.34 x 10(-7) cm(-1) using this cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system. And te measurement precision in terms of relative standard deviation (RSD) for N2O is approximately 1.73%, indicating the possibility of using the cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy system for micro gas N2O analysis in the future.

  8. GSFC VLBI Analysis center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Petrov, Leonid; Baver, Karen

    2005-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2004. The GSFC Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development activities aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  9. World Saver Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Theresa; And Others

    Conservation is a concern for all cultures, and children are familiar with this concept because of recycling in their homes and home towns. The World Saver Center, an example of the thematic approach to learning, is designed to allow children to experiment with concepts of conservation in a familiar setting. The center, designed to resemble an…

  10. One Stop Career Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Patricia

    With the aid of a U.S. Department of Labor grant, a number of one-stop career centers are being developed or have been implemented in California. A one-stop career center is a physical and electronic site where comprehensive services to job seekers and employers are available. These services include the following: assessment and eligibility…

  11. The Revitalized Tutoring Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koselak, Jeremy

    2017-01-01

    One high-leverage strategy rooted in a strong research base--the revitalized tutoring center--provides a wealth of opportunity to students who may be otherwise underserved. This embedded, open-all-day tutoring center supports collaborative teacher teams by using peer tutors and community volunteers. By centralizing resources and providing supports…

  12. GSFC VLBI Analysis Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, David; Ma, Chopo; MacMillan, Dan; Gipson, John; Bolotin, Sergei; Le Bail, Karine; Baver, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This report presents the activities of the GSFC VLBI Analysis Center during 2012. The GSFC VLBI Analysis Center analyzes all IVS sessions, makes regular IVS submissions of data and analysis products, and performs research and software development aimed at improving the VLBI technique.

  13. Early Childhood Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butin, Dan; Woolums, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Early childhood centers have become a common and necessary part of millions of Americans' lives. More women in the workforce, longer workweeks, and educational research supporting the importance of early education have all contributed to the rise of early childhood centers throughout the United States. Today, more than 30 percent of children under…

  14. Handbook for Learning Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norwalk Board of Education, CT.

    The handbook for learning centers contains guidelines, forms, and supplementary information to be used with all children identified as having a learning disability, mild retardation, or sensory deprivation in the Norwalk, Connecticut public schools. It is stressed that the learning center should provide supportive services for at least 35 minutes…

  15. Assessing the Assessment Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaRue, James

    1989-01-01

    Describes the historical use of assessment centers as staff development and promotional tools and their current use in personnel selection. The elements that constitute a true assessment center are outlined, and a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages for employers and applicants focuses on positions in library administration. (10…

  16. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  17. Science Center and Attitude

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daneshamooz, Saeed; Alamolhodaei, Hassan; Darvishian, Saeed; Daneshamooz, Soniya

    2013-01-01

    The project team gathered data with the assistance of Recreational and Cultural Organization of Mashhad Municipality, Organization of Mashhad Municipality and Science and Astronomy Science Center of Mashhad Municipality, Khorasan Razavi, Islamic Republic of Iran. This paper discusses the effect of science center on attitude of students who visit…

  18. Tribal Business Assistance Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansdowne, Michele

    The Salish Kootenai College Tribal Business Assistance Center was established in 1994 to provide technical assistance to individuals who are pursuing a small business. The center assists the entrepreneur by way of individual consultation with business advisors, small business workshops, and business administration courses that have been created…

  19. Outfitting Campus Fitness Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    1999-01-01

    Explains how universities and colleges, both private and public, are including fitness centers as ways of increasing their student enrollment levels. Comments are provided on school experiences in fitness-center design, equipment purchasing, and maintenance and operating-costs issues. (GR)

  20. Simple Machine Science Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chessin, Debby

    2007-01-01

    Science centers can engage students; accommodate different learning styles and individual interests; help students become independent and confident learners; and encourage social skills among students. In this article, the author worked with third-grade students as they completed activities at learning centers during a week-long unit on simple…

  1. National Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, Lee W.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) are provided. The NTTC mission is to serve as a hub for the nationwide technology-transfer network to expedite the movement of federally developed technology into the stream of commerce. A description of the Center is provided.

  2. Identification of THz absorption spectra of chemicals using neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jingling; Jia, Yan; Liang, Meiyan; Chen, Sijia

    2007-09-01

    Absorption spectra in the range from 0.2 to 2.6 THz of chemicals such as illicit drugs and antibiotics obtaining from Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy technique were identified successfully by artificial neural networks. Back Propagation (BP) and Self-Organizing Feature Map (SOM) were investigated to do the identification or classification, respectively. Three-layer BP neural networks were employed to identify absorption spectra of nine illicit drugs and six antibiotics. The spectra of the chemicals were used to train a BP neural network and then the absorption spectra measured in different times were identified by the trained BP neural network. The average identification rate of 76% was achieved. SOM neural networks, another important neural network which sorts input vectors by their similarity, was used to sort 60 absorption spectra from 6 illicit drugs. The whole network was trained by setting a 20×20 and a 16×16 grid, and both of them had given satisfied clustering results. These results indicate that it is feasible to apply BP and SOM neural networks model in the field of THz spectra identification.

  3. Absorption of ac fields in amorphous indium-oxide films

    SciTech Connect

    Ovadyahu, Z.

    2014-08-20

    Absorption data from applied ac fields in Anderson-localized amorphous indium-oxide (In{sub x}O) films are shown to be frequency and disorder dependent. The absorption shows a roll-off at a frequency which is much lower than the electron-electron scattering rate of the material when it is in the diffusive regime. This is interpreted as evidence for discreteness of the energy spectrum of the deeply localized regime. This is consistent with recent many-body localization scenarios. As the metal-insulator transition is approached, the absorption shifts to higher frequencies. Comparing with the previously obtained results on the crystalline version of indium-oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3−x}) implies a considerably higher inelastic electron-phonon scattering rate in the amorphous material. The range over which the absorption versus frequency decreases may indicate that a wide distribution of localization length is a common feature in these systems.

  4. Water-lithium bromide double-effect absorption cooling analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vliet, G. C.; Lawson, M. B.; Lithgow, R. A.

    1980-12-01

    A numerical model was developed for the transient simulation of the double-effect, water-lithium bromide absorption cooling machine and was used to determine the effect of the various design and input variables on the absorption unit performance. The performance parameters considered were coefficient of performance and cooling capacity. The variables considered include source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water temperatures; source hot water, cooling water, and chilled water flow rates; solution circulation rate; heat exchanger areas; pressure drop between evaporator and absorber; solution pump characteristics; and refrigerant flow control methods. The performance sensitivity study indicates that the distribution of heat exchanger area among the various (seven) heat exchange components is a very important design consideration. Moreover, it indicated that the method of flow control of the first effect refrigerant vapor through the second effect is a critical design feature when absorption units operate over a significant range of cooling capacity. The model was used to predict the performance of the Trane absorption unit with fairly good accuracy.

  5. Hollow-fiber membrane-based rapid pressure swing absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Bhaumik, S.; Majumdar, S.; Sirkar, K.K.

    1996-02-01

    A novel gas purification technique called rapid pressure swing absorption (RAPSAB) was developed by integrating the best features of membrane contacting, gas-liquid absorption, and pressure swing adsorption (PSA). In this cyclic separation process, a well-packed microporous hydrophobic hollow-fiber module was used to achieve nondispersive gas absorption from a high-pressure feed gas into a stationary absorbent liquid on the module shell side during a certain part of the cycle followed by desorption of absorbed gases from the liquid in the rest of the cycle. The total cycle time varies between 20 s and upwards. Separation of mixtures of N{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} (around 10%) where CO{sub 2} is the impurity to be removed was studied using absorbent liquids such as pure water and a 19.5% aqueous solution of diethanolamine (DEA). Three RAPSAB cycles studied differ in the absorption part. Virtually pure N{sub 2} streams were obtained with DEA as absorbent demonstrating the capability of bulk separation to very high levels of purification. Numerical models developed predict the extent of purification for pure water and the DEA solution for one of the simpler cycles. Model simulations describe the observed behavior well.

  6. In situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy of flames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Jonathan H.; Shavorskiy, Andrey; Bluhm, Hendrik; Coriton, Bruno; Huang, Erxiong; Osborn, David L.

    2014-10-01

    The feasibility of in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy for imaging carbonaceous species in hydrocarbon flames is demonstrated using synchrotron radiation. Soft X-rays are absorbed by core level electrons in all carbon atoms regardless of their molecular structure. Core electron spectroscopy affords distinct advantages over valence spectroscopy, which forms the basis of traditional laser diagnostic techniques for combustion. In core level spectroscopy, the transition linewidths are predominantly determined by the instrument response function and the decay time of the core-hole, which is on the order of a femtosecond. As a result, soft X-ray absorption measurements can be performed in flames with negligible Doppler and collisional broadening. Core level spectroscopy has the further advantage of measuring all carbonaceous species regardless of molecular structure in the far-edge region, whereas near-edge features are molecule specific. Interferences from non-carbon flame species are unstructured and can be subtracted. In the present study, absorption measurements in the carbon K-edge region are demonstrated in low-pressure ( P total = 20-30 Torr) methane jet flames. Two-dimensional imaging of the major carbonaceous species, CH4, CO2, and CO, is accomplished by tuning the synchrotron radiation to the respective carbon K-edge, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) transitions and scanning the burner.

  7. X-Ray Absorption Toward the Einstein Ring Source PKS 1830-211

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathur, Smita; Nair, Sunita

    1997-01-01

    PKS 1830-211 is an unusually radio-loud gravitationally lensed quasar. In the radio spectrum, the system appears as two compact, dominant features surrounded by relatively extended radio emission that forms an Einstein ring. As the line of sight to it passes close to our Galactic center, PKS 1830-211 has not been detected in wave bands other than the radio and X-ray so far. Here we present X-ray data of PKS 1830-211 observed with ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter. The X-ray spectrum shows that absorption in excess of the Galactic contribution is highly likely, which at the redshift of the lensing galaxy (z(sub t)=0.886) corresponds to N(sub H)=3.5((sup 0.6)(sub -0.5))x10(exp 22) atoms sq cm. The effective optical extinction is large, A(sub V)(observed) is greater than or approximately 5.8. When corrected for this additional extinction, the two-point optical to X-ray slope alpha(sub ox) of PKS 1830-211 lies just within the observed range of quasars. It is argued here that both compact images must be covered by the X-ray absorber(s) that we infer to be the lensing galaxy (galaxies). The dust-to-gas ratio along the line of sight within the lensing galaxy is likely to be somewhat larger than for our Galaxy.

  8. Highly sensitive fiber grating chemical sensors: An effective alternative to atomic absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laxmeshwar, Lata. S.; Jadhav, Mangesh S.; Akki, Jyoti. F.; Raikar, Prasad; Kumar, Jitendra; prakash, Om; Raikar, U. S.

    2017-06-01

    Accuracy in quantitative determination of trace elements like Zinc, present in drinking water in ppm level, is a big challenge and optical fiber gratings as chemical sensors may provide a promising solution to overcome the same. This paper presents design of two simple chemical sensors based on the principle of shift in characteristic wavelength of gratings with change in their effective refractive index, to measure the concentration of Zinc in drinking water using etched short period grating (FBG) and Long period grating (LPG) respectively. Three samples of drinking water from different places have been examined for presence of Zinc. Further, the results obtained by our sensors have also been verified with the results obtained by a standard method, Atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). The whole experiment has been performed by fixing the fibers in a horizontal position with the sensor regions at the center of the fibers, making it less prone to disturbance and breaking. The sensitivity of LPG sensor is about 205 times that of the FBG sensor. A few advantages of Fiber grating sensors, besides their regular features, over AAS have also been discussed, that make our sensors potential alternatives for existing techniques in determination of trace elements in drinking water.

  9. Center for beam physics 1996-1997

    SciTech Connect

    1997-02-01

    The Center for Beam Physics (CBP) is a multidisciplinary research and development unit in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory of the University of California. At the heart of the Center`s mission is the fundamental quest for mechanisms of acceleration, radiation, transport, and focusing of energy and information. Special features of the Center`s program include addressing R&D issues needing long development time and providing a platform for conception, initiation, and support of institutional projects based on beams. The Center brings to bear a significant amount of diverse, complementary, and self-sufficient expertise in accelerator physics, synchrotron radiation, advanced microwave techniques, plasma physics, optics, and lasers on the forefront R&D issues in particle and photon beam research. In addition to functioning as a clearinghouse for novel ideas and concepts and related R&D (e.g., various theoretical and experimental studies in beam physics such as nonlinear dynamics, phase space control, laser-beam-plasma interaction, free-electron lasers, optics, and instrumentation), the Center provides significant support to Laboratory facilities and initiatives. This roster and annual report provides a glimpse of the scientists, engineers, technical support, students, and administrative staff that make up the CBP`s outstanding team and gives a flavor of their multifaceted activities during 1996 and 1997.

  10. How to Create a Learning-Centered ESL Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bista, Krishna

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the major features of learning-centered community colleges that offer educational programs and experiences for learners, based on individual need. By citing some exemplary learning colleges, the author examines the concepts and ideas of learning-centered colleges in teaching English as a Second Language (ESL) programs. An…

  11. Sports Center Is a Lab for Learning about Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Dickinson College (Pennsylvania) has a new sports center featuring a clear span roof system and an "earth sink" that stores excess heat for later use. The relationship between sports and the liberal arts is the basis for courses taught in the center. (Author/MLF)

  12. Basic Skills Education: Pasadena City College's Teaching and Learning Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mills, Kay

    2009-01-01

    This article features Pasadena City College's (PCC) Teaching and Learning Center (TLC), an eight-year-old holistic approach to guiding underprepared students through math, English, and other challenges of college. TLC aims to revolutionize the way faculty look at their students and teach them. The center's approach is one that is spreading through…

  13. X-ray absorption spectroscopy on layered photosystem II membrane particles suggests manganese-centered oxidation of the oxygen-evolving complex for the S0-S1, S1-S2, and S2-S3 transitions of the water oxidation cycle.

    PubMed

    Iuzzolino, L; Dittmer, J; Dörner, W; Meyer-Klaucke, W; Dau, H

    1998-12-08

    By application of microsecond light flashes the oxygen-evolving complex (OEC) was driven through its functional cycle, the S-state cycle. The S-state population distribution obtained by the application of n flashes (n = 0. 6) was determined by analysis of EPR spectra; Mn K-edge X-ray absorption spectra were collected. Taking into consideration the likely statistical error in the data and the variability stemming from the use of three different approaches for the determination of edge positions, we obtained an upshift of the edge position by 0.8-1.5, 0.5-0.9, and 0.6-1.3 eV for the S0-S1, S1-S2, and S2-S3 transitions, respectively, and a downshift by 2.3-3.1 eV for the S3-S0 transition. These results are highly suggestive of Mn oxidation state changes for all four S-state transitions. In the S0-state spectrum, a clearly resolved shoulder in the X-ray spectrum around 6555 eV points toward the presence of Mn(II). We propose that photosynthetic oxygen evolution involves cycling of the photosystem II manganese complex through four distinct oxidation states of this tetranuclear complex: Mn(II)-Mn(III)-Mn(IV)2 in the S0-state, Mn(III)2-Mn(IV)2 in the S1-state, Mn(III)1-Mn(IV)3 in the S2-state, and Mn(IV)4 in the S3-state.

  14. Glucagon receptor antagonism induces increased cholesterol absorption[S

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Hong-Ping; Yang, Xiaodong; Lu, Ku; Wang, Sheng-Ping; Castro-Perez, Jose M.; Previs, Stephen; Wright, Michael; Shah, Vinit; Herath, Kithsiri; Xie, Dan; Szeto, Daphne; Forrest, Gail; Xiao, Jing Chen; Palyha, Oksana; Sun, Li-Ping; Andryuk, Paula J.; Engel, Samuel S.; Xiong, Yusheng; Lin, Songnian; Kelley, David E.; Erion, Mark D.; Davis, Harry R.; Wang, Liangsu

    2015-01-01

    Glucagon and insulin have opposing action in governing glucose homeostasis. In type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), plasma glucagon is characteristically elevated, contributing to increased gluconeogenesis and hyperglycemia. Therefore, glucagon receptor (GCGR) antagonism has been proposed as a pharmacologic approach to treat T2DM. In support of this concept, a potent small-molecule GCGR antagonist (GRA), MK-0893, demonstrated dose-dependent efficacy to reduce hyperglycemia, with an HbA1c reduction of 1.5% at the 80 mg dose for 12 weeks in T2DM. However, GRA treatment was associated with dose-dependent elevation of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c). The current studies investigated the cause for increased LDL-c. We report findings that link MK-0893 with increased glucagon-like peptide 2 and cholesterol absorption. There was not, however, a GRA-related modulation of cholesterol synthesis. These findings were replicated using structurally diverse GRAs. To examine potential pharmacologic mitigation, coadministration of ezetimibe (a potent inhibitor of cholesterol absorption) in mice abrogated the GRA-associated increase of LDL-c. Although the molecular mechanism is unknown, our results provide a novel finding by which glucagon and, hence, GCGR antagonism govern cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26373568

  15. Atmospheric absorption of high frequency noise and application to fractional-octave bands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shields, F. D.; Bass, H. E.

    1977-01-01

    Pure tone sound absorption coefficients were measured at 1/12 octave intervals from 4 to 100 KHz at 5.5K temperature intervals between 255.4 and 310.9 K and at 10 percent relative humidity increments between 0 percent and saturation in a large cylindrical tube (i.d., 25.4 cm; length, 4.8 m). Special solid-dielectric capacitance transducers, one to generate bursts of sound waves and one to terminate the sound path and detect the tone bursts, were constructed to fit inside the tube. The absorption was measured by varying the transmitter receiver separation from 1 to 4 m and observing the decay of multiple reflections or change in amplitude of the first received burst. The resulting absorption was compared with that from a proposed procedure for computing sound absorption in still air. Absorption of bands of noise was numerically computed by using the pure tone results. The results depended on spectrum shape, on filter type, and nonlinearly on propagation distance. For some of the cases considered, comparison with the extrapolation of ARP-866A showed a difference as large as a factor of 2. However, for many cases, the absorption for a finite band was nearly equal to the pure tone absorption at the center frequency of the band. A recommended prediction procedure is described for 1/3 octave band absorption coefficients.

  16. The source of 3-μm absorption in Jupiter’s clouds: Reanalysis of ISO observations using new NH3 absorption models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sromovsky, L. A.; Fry, P. M.

    2010-11-01

    A prominent characteristic of jovian near-IR spectra is the widely distributed presence of a strong absorption at wavelengths from about 2.9 μm to 3.1 μm, first noticed in a 3-μm spectrum obtained by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) in 1996. While Brooke et al. (Brooke, T.Y., Knacke, R.F., Encrenaz, T., Drossart, P., Crisp, D., Feuchtgruber, H. [1998]. Icarus 136, 1-13) were able to fit the ISO spectrum very well using ammonia ice as the sole source of particulate absorption, Irwin et al. (Irwin, P.G.J., Weir, A.L., Taylor, F.W., Calcutt, S.B., Carlson, R.W. [2001]. Icarus 149, 397-415) noted that their best-fit cloud model implied a strong absorption at 2 μm that was not observed in Galileo NIMS spectra, raising questions about the source of the absorption. Subsequent significant revisions in ammonia gas absorption models (Bowles, N., Calcutt, S., Irwin, P., Temple, J. [2008]. Icarus 196, 612-614) also raised questions about these conclusions because ammonia gas absorption overlaps regions of ammonia ice absorption. Our reanalysis, based on improved ammonia absorption models, finds that the ISO spectrum can be well fit by models that include both NH 3 ice and solid NH 4SH, with the latter substance providing most of the absorption. The component due to NH 3 is very possibly due to NH 3 present as a coating on either large ( r ˜ 15 μm) NH 4SH particles in a deeper layer at ˜550 mb or on small ( r ˜ 0.3 μm) photochemical haze particles in a lower pressure layer at ˜370 mb. Neither option creates conflict with the lack of significant NH 3 absorption features at thermal wavelengths.

  17. Special Feature: Graphic Communications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidhazy, Andrew; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Special feature includes "There's More to Blur than Meets the Eye" (Davidhazy), about photographic imaging; "Photography Lab's Silver Lining" (Borchers), about recycling silver; "Budget-Priced Layout Programs for School Publishing with DPT [Desktop Publishing]" (Dose); and "Good Learning and Good PR--All in One…

  18. Assistive Technologies, Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wobschall, Rachel, Ed.; Lakin, Charlie, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    This feature issue of a newsletter on community integration of individuals with developmental disabilities considers the role of assistive technologies. It describes efforts to utilize consumer direction, public policy, creativity, energy, and professional know-how in the pursuit of technology-based opportunities to enhance community inclusion,…

  19. Integrated Education. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    York, Jennifer, Ed.; Vandercook, Terri, Ed.

    1988-01-01

    This "feature issue" provides various perspectives on a number of integrated education topics, including successful integration practices and strategies, the changing roles of teachers, the appropriate role of research, the history and future of integrated education, and the realization of dreams of life in the mainstream for children with severe…

  20. Main features of meiosis

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 17, outlines the main features of meiosis, beginning with its significance and proceeding through the meiotic stages. Meiosis is the most important modification of mitosis because it is the reduction division that gives rise to the haploid generation in the life cycle. 17 refs., 6 figs.

  1. Transition. Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Teri, Ed.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This feature issue of a quarterly bulletin on community integration addresses the topic of transition services for preparing youth with disabilities for adult community living. It contains articles with the following titles and authors: "Transition: The Next Five Years" (David R. Johnson and others); "Transition Policy in the 1990s:…

  2. CATS Featured Articles

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-01-31

      CATS Featured Articles       A Slice of Cirrus: Image of ... just hours before by the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS) onboard the International Space Station. Nighttime View of Raung Volcanic Plume : Natural Hazards  - The CATS instrument slices through darkness to reveal the vertical structure of a ...

  3. Advanced regenerative absorption refrigeration cycles

    DOEpatents

    Dao, Kim

    1990-01-01

    Multi-effect regenerative absorption cycles which provide a high coefficient of performance (COP) at relatively high input temperatures. An absorber-coupled double-effect regenerative cycle (ADR cycle) (10) is provided having a single-effect absorption cycle (SEA cycle) (11) as a topping subcycle and a single-effect regenerative absorption cycle (1R cycle) (12) as a bottoming subcycle. The SEA cycle (11) includes a boiler (13), a condenser (21), an expansion device (28), an evaporator (31), and an absorber (40), all operatively connected together. The 1R cycle (12) includes a multistage boiler (48), a multi-stage resorber (51), a multisection regenerator (49) and also uses the condenser (21), expansion device (28) and evaporator (31) of the SEA topping subcycle (11), all operatively connected together. External heat is applied to the SEA boiler (13) for operation up to about 500 degrees F., with most of the high pressure vapor going to the condenser (21) and evaporator (31) being generated by the regenerator (49). The substantially adiabatic and isothermal functioning of the SER subcycle (12) provides a high COP. For higher input temperatures of up to 700 degrees F., another SEA cycle (111) is used as a topping subcycle, with the absorber (140) of the topping subcycle being heat coupled to the boiler (13) of an ADR cycle (10). The 1R cycle (12) itself is an improvement in that all resorber stages (50b-f) have a portion of their output pumped to boiling conduits (71a-f) through the regenerator (49), which conduits are connected to and at the same pressure as the highest pressure stage (48a) of the 1R multistage boiler (48).

  4. Energy Absorption of Composite Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-01

    34 tion in a helicopter crash is accomplished Foye , et al. [4 an 5] examlnei th, primarily through three mechanisms; strok- energy absorption chara"tr...irar [3] and Foye , et al. [4]. No significant o. ’, energy release was obse:’viV-cirur, i m: rcg . . the Gr/FE tubes s .. 0T Fu!.A 4r /-e 45rK r5 1...K/E, GI/E, hybrid com- posite tubes and aluminum tubes. The 5. R. L. Foye , and W. T. H,.dg, " r following statements are based on results Results from

  5. Carbon Dioxide Absorption Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A carbon dioxide absorption heat pump cycle is disclosed using a high pressure stage and a super-critical cooling stage to provide a non-toxic system. Using carbon dioxide gas as the working fluid in the system, the present invention desorbs the CO2 from an absorbent and cools the gas in the super-critical state to deliver heat thereby. The cooled CO2 gas is then expanded thereby providing cooling and is returned to an absorber for further cycling. Strategic use of heat exchangers can increase the efficiency and performance of the system.

  6. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  7. Energy efficient data centers

    SciTech Connect

    Tschudi, William; Xu, Tengfang; Sartor, Dale; Koomey, Jon; Nordman, Bruce; Sezgen, Osman

    2004-03-30

    Data Center facilities, prevalent in many industries and institutions are essential to California's economy. Energy intensive data centers are crucial to California's industries, and many other institutions (such as universities) in the state, and they play an important role in the constantly evolving communications industry. To better understand the impact of the energy requirements and energy efficiency improvement potential in these facilities, the California Energy Commission's PIER Industrial Program initiated this project with two primary focus areas: First, to characterize current data center electricity use; and secondly, to develop a research ''roadmap'' defining and prioritizing possible future public interest research and deployment efforts that would improve energy efficiency. Although there are many opinions concerning the energy intensity of data centers and the aggregate effect on California's electrical power systems, there is very little publicly available information. Through this project, actual energy consumption at its end use was measured in a number of data centers. This benchmark data was documented in case study reports, along with site-specific energy efficiency recommendations. Additionally, other data center energy benchmarks were obtained through synergistic projects, prior PG&E studies, and industry contacts. In total, energy benchmarks for sixteen data centers were obtained. For this project, a broad definition of ''data center'' was adopted which included internet hosting, corporate, institutional, governmental, educational and other miscellaneous data centers. Typically these facilities require specialized infrastructure to provide high quality power and cooling for IT equipment. All of these data center types were considered in the development of an estimate of the total power consumption in California. Finally, a research ''roadmap'' was developed through extensive participation with data center professionals, examination of case

  8. Tunneling induced absorption with competing Nonlinearities

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yandong; Yang, Aihong; Xu, Yan; Wang, Peng; Yu, Yang; Guo, Hongju; Ren, Tingqi

    2016-01-01

    We investigate tunneling induced nonlinear absorption phenomena in a coupled quantum-dot system. Resonant tunneling causes constructive interference in the nonlinear absorption that leads to an increase of more than an order of magnitude over the maximum absorption in a coupled quantum dot system without tunneling. Resonant tunneling also leads to a narrowing of the linewidth of the absorption peak to a sublinewidth level. Analytical expressions show that the enhanced nonlinear absorption is largely due to the fifth-order nonlinear term. Competition between third- and fifth-order nonlinearities leads to an anomalous dispersion of the total susceptibility. PMID:27958303

  9. Absorption of CO laser radiation by NO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes absorption calculations and measurements at selected infrared CO laser wavelengths which are nearly coincident with absorption lines in the fundamental vibration-rotation band of NO near 5.3 microns. Initial work was directed towards establishing the optimal CO laser-NO absorption line coincidence for high temperature applications. Measurements of the absorption coefficient at this optimal laser wavelength were carried out, first using a room-temperature absorption cell for high-temperature calculations and then using a shock tube, for the temperature range 630-4000 K, to validate the high temperature calculations.

  10. Infrared absorption spectroscopy and chemical kinetics of free radicals

    SciTech Connect

    Curl, R.F.; Glass, G.P.

    1993-12-01

    This research is directed at the detection, monitoring, and study of chemical kinetic behavior by infrared absorption spectroscopy of small free radical species thought to be important intermediates in combustion. During the last year, infrared kinetic spectroscopy using excimer laser flash photolysis and color-center laser probing has been employed to study the high resolution spectrum of HCCN, the rate constant of the reaction between ethynyl (C{sub 2}H) radical and H{sub 2} in the temperature region between 295 and 875 K, and the recombination rate of propargyl (CH{sub 2}CCH) at room temperature.

  11. Spinoff 2001: Special Millennium Feature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Research and Processing Laboratory. The new laboratory is the first step toward the development of a proposed 400-acre Space Commerce Park, located at Kennedy Space Center. Spinoff, once again, successfully showcases the variety of commercial successes and benefits resulting from the transfer of NASA technology to private industry. It is with great pride and pleasure that we present Spinoff 2001 with a Special Millennium Feature. With help from U.S. industry and commercial technology programs, NASA will continue to assist in the presentation of innovative new products to our nation.

  12. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process. PMID:26120588

  13. Five-Photon Absorption and Selective Enhancement of Multiphoton Absorption Processes.

    PubMed

    Friese, Daniel H; Bast, Radovan; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-05-20

    We study one-, two-, three-, four-, and five-photon absorption of three centrosymmetric molecules using density functional theory. These calculations are the first ab initio calculations of five-photon absorption. Even- and odd-order absorption processes show different trends in the absorption cross sections. The behavior of all even- and odd-photon absorption properties shows a semiquantitative similarity, which can be explained using few-state models. This analysis shows that odd-photon absorption processes are largely determined by the one-photon absorption strength, whereas all even-photon absorption strengths are largely dominated by the two-photon absorption strength, in both cases modulated by powers of the polarizability of the final excited state. We demonstrate how to selectively enhance a specific multiphoton absorption process.

  14. Study on polarization features of carbonaceous particles in atmosphere pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Da; Zeng, Nan; Wang, Yunfei; Chen, Dongsheng; Chen, Yuerong; Ma, Hui

    2016-09-01

    The carbonaceous particles are the main source of the light absorption in atmospheric aerosol. Different from the case in tissue-like turbid media, the light absorption in atmospheric environments can be described as an inherent attribute on scatterers rather than an interstitial propagation effect. In this paper, we simulated the optical absorption due to carbonaceous scatterers and analyzed the influence of various parameters on their polarization properties, such as the imaginary part refractive index, the size and shape. Also we compare these results with our previous research work on absorption effect in ambient medium. For the single scattering, the polarization scattering angular distribution implies the potential of distinguishing different carbonaceous particles with different structural and absorption parameters. In the other hand, for the week scattering case of suspension system, using the backward Mueller matrix polar decomposition method, we can find out that the additional absorption effect on carbonaceous particles can enhance their depolarization and moreover produce more diattenuation and linear retardance for those anisotropic particles. The subsequent experiments of standard samples show a good agreement with simulation results. The paper further studies the phase function of single scattering and the distribution of scattering numbers, which can explain these unique polarization scattering phenomena. We hope these fundamental results can help to investigate how to identify the carbonaceous particles and characterize their optical features from the atmospheric hybrid suspension system.

  15. Feature Selection in the Tensor Product Feature Space

    PubMed Central

    Smalter, Aaron; Huan, Jun; Lushington, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Classifying objects that are sampled jointly from two or more domains has many applications. The tensor product feature space is useful for modeling interactions between feature sets in different domains but feature selection in the tensor product feature space is challenging. Conventional feature selection methods ignore the structure of the feature space and may not provide the optimal results. In this paper we propose methods for selecting features in the original feature spaces of different domains. We obtained sparsity through two approaches, one using integer quadratic programming and another using L1-norm regularization. Experimental studies on biological data sets validate our approach. PMID:24632658

  16. High ionisation absorption in low mass X-ray binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponti, G.; Bianchi, S.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; De, K.; Fender, R.; Merloni, A.

    2016-05-01

    The advent of the new generation of X-ray telescopes yielded a significant step forward in our understanding of ionised absorption generated in the accretion discs of X-ray binaries. It has become evident that these relatively weak and narrow absorption features, sporadically present in the X-ray spectra of some systems, are actually the signature of equatorial outflows, which might carry away more matter than that being accreted. Therefore, they play a major role in the accretion phenomenon. These outflows (or ionised atmospheres) are ubiquitous during the softer states but absent during the power-law dominated, hard states, suggesting a strong link with the state of the inner accretion disc, presence of the radio-jet and the properties of the central source. Here, we discuss the current understanding of this field.

  17. New insights on oxygen absorption in unsparged stirred vessels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Averkina, A. S.; Kazakov, D. A.; Asnin, L. D.; Kaczmarski, K.; Krol, G.; Vol'khin, V. V.

    2016-12-01

    A combination of experimental and numerical techniques revealed subtle features of oxygen absorption in unsparged stirred vessels. It was shown that the absorption kinetics was influenced not only by the mass transfer resistance in the gas-liquid interface but also by imperfect mixing in the bulk liquid. The liquid's viscosity and density were suggested to affect the oxygen mass transfer by influencing the turbulence both at the surface and in the bulk phase, while the modification of the surface layer through surfactant addition affected only surface turbulence. The axial dispersion model proved good in the explanation of the experimental results. For the sake of comparison, the classical stagnant film model was also tested but led to slight, yet systematic, deviations in its predictions from the experimental data.

  18. Mapping of the Local Interstellar Medium using Absorption Line Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penprase, Bryan Edward

    2017-01-01

    Using the Yale SMARTS 1.5-meter telescope at CTIO and the CHIRON spectrograph, we have developed a program for mapping the local interstellar medium using a sample of over 200 newly observed B stars previously unobserved using Na I absorption lines. This sample includes stars that extend out to map beyond the local bubble to 500 pc. The sample has been observed using high resolution absorption lines, and when combined with previously observed stars with Na I and Ca II data provides a more complete picture of the local ISM than previous surveys. The distances to the stars using the new GAIA database also allows for more accurate determination of distances to features in the lcoal ISM, and new maps of the structure of the ISM hav been prepared with the data.

  19. Interfacial charge transfer absorption: Application to metal molecule assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creutz, Carol; Brunschwig, Bruce S.; Sutin, Norman

    2006-05-01

    Optically induced charge transfer between adsorbed molecules and a metal electrode was predicted by Hush to lead to new electronic absorption features, but has been only rarely observed experimentally. Interfacial charge transfer absorption (IFCTA) provides information concerning the barriers to charge transfer between molecules and the metal/semiconductor and the magnitude of the electronic coupling and could thus provide a powerful tool for understanding interfacial charge-transfer kinetics. Here, we utilize a previously published model [C. Creutz, B.S. Brunschwig, N. Sutin, J. Phys. Chem. B 109 (2005) 10251] to predict IFCTA spectra of metal-molecule assemblies and compare the literature observations to these predictions. We conclude that, in general, the electronic coupling between molecular adsorbates and the metal levels is so small that IFCTA is not detectable. However, few experiments designed to detect IFCTA have been done. We suggest approaches to optimizing the conditions for observing the process.

  20. An iron absorption model of gamma-ray burst spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, Edison P.; Kargatis, Vincent E.

    1994-01-01

    Most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) exhibit deficits of X-rays below approximately 200 keV. Here we consider a spectral model in which the burst source is shielded by an optically thick layer of circumburster material (CBM) rich in iron-group elements whose photoelectric absorption opacity exceeds the Thomson opacity below approximately 120 keV. For power-law distributions of absorption depths along the lines of sight the absorbed spectrum can indeed mimic the typial GRB spectrum. This model predicts that (a) the spectrum should evolve monotonically from hard to soft during each energy release, which is observed in most bursts, especially in fast rise exponential decay bursts; (b) Fe spectral features near 7 keV may be present in some bursts; and (c) the ratio of burst distances to the CBM and to Earth should be approximately 10(exp -11) if the spectral evolution is purely due to Fe stripping by the photons.

  1. Sulphate absorption across biological membranes.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Stephen C; Waring, Rosemary H

    2016-01-01

    1. Sulphonation is unusual amongst the common Phase II (condensation; synthetic) reactions experienced by xenobiotics, in that the availability of the conjugating agent, sulphate, may become a rate-limiting factor. This sulphate is derived within the body via the oxygenation of sulphur moieties liberated from numerous ingested compounds including the sulphur-containing amino acids. Preformed inorganic sulphate also makes a considerable contribution to this pool. 2. There has been a divergence of opinion as to whether or not inorganic sulphate may be readily absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and this controversy still continues in some quarters. Even more so, is the vexing question of potential absorption of inorganic sulphate via the lungs and through the skin. 3. This review examines the relevant diverse literature and concludes that sulphate ions may move across biological membranes by means of specific transporters and, although the gastrointestinal tract is by far the major portal of entry, some absorption across the lungs and the skin may take place under appropriate circumstances.

  2. Formaldehyde Absorption toward W51

    SciTech Connect

    Kogut, A.; Smoot, G.F.; Bennett, C.L.; Petuchowski, S.J.

    1988-04-01

    We have measured formaldehyde (H{sub 2}CO) absorption toward the HII region complex W51A (G49.5-0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions with angular resolution of approximately 4 inch. The continuum HII region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. We observe no H{sub 2}CO emission in regions of low continuum intensity. The absorption, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping than previous maps at lower resolution. The good S/N of the maps allows accurate estimation of the complicated line profiles, showing some of the absorbing clouds to be quite patchy. We list the properties of the opacity spectra for a number of positions both in the clumps and in the more diffuse regions of the absorbing clouds, and derive column densities for the 1{sub 11} and 2{sub 12} rotational levels of ortho-formaldehyde.

  3. QED-driven laser absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Blackburn, T.; Ratan, N.; Sadler, J.; Ridgers, C.; Kasim, M.; Ceurvorst, L.; Holloway, J.; Baring, M.; Bell, A.; Glenzer, S.; Gregori, G.; Ilderton, A.; Marklund, M.; Tabak, M.; Wilks, S.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Absorption covers the physical processes which convert intense photon flux into energetic particles when a high-power laser (I >1018 W cm-2 where I is intensity at 1 μm wavelength) illuminates optically-thick matter. It underpins important applications of petawatt laser systems today, e.g., in isochoric heating of materials. Next-generation lasers such as ELI are anticipated to produce quantum electrodynamical (QED) bursts of γ-rays and anti-matter via the multiphoton Breit-Wheeler process which could enable scaled laboratory probes, e.g., of black hole winds. Here, applying strong-field QED to advances in plasma kinematic theory, we present a model elucidating absorption limited only by an avalanche of self-created electron-positron pairs at ultra-high-field. The model, confirmed by multidimensional QED-PIC simulations, works over six orders of magnitude in optical intensity and reveals this cascade is initiated at 1.8 x 1025 W cm-2 using a realistic linearly-polarized laser pulse. Here the laser couples its energy into highly-collimated electrons, ions, γ-rays, and positrons at 12%, 6%, 58% and 13% efficiency, respectively. We remark on attributes of the QED plasma state and possible applications.

  4. Iodine Absorption Cells Purity Testing

    PubMed Central

    Hrabina, Jan; Zucco, Massimo; Philippe, Charles; Pham, Tuan Minh; Holá, Miroslava; Acef, Ouali; Lazar, Josef; Číp, Ondřej

    2017-01-01

    This article deals with the evaluation of the chemical purity of iodine-filled absorption cells and the optical frequency references used for the frequency locking of laser standards. We summarize the recent trends and progress in absorption cell technology and we focus on methods for iodine cell purity testing. We compare two independent experimental systems based on the laser-induced fluorescence method, showing an improvement of measurement uncertainty by introducing a compensation system reducing unwanted influences. We show the advantages of this technique, which is relatively simple and does not require extensive hardware equipment. As an alternative to the traditionally used methods we propose an approach of hyperfine transitions’ spectral linewidth measurement. The key characteristic of this method is demonstrated on a set of testing iodine cells. The relationship between laser-induced fluorescence and transition linewidth methods will be presented as well as a summary of the advantages and disadvantages of the proposed technique (in comparison with traditional measurement approaches). PMID:28067834

  5. Iron Absorption in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-01-01

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration. PMID:23686013

  6. Iron absorption in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Mandilaras, Konstantinos; Pathmanathan, Tharse; Missirlis, Fanis

    2013-05-17

    The way in which Drosophila melanogaster acquires iron from the diet remains poorly understood despite iron absorption being of vital significance for larval growth. To describe the process of organismal iron absorption, consideration needs to be given to cellular iron import, storage, export and how intestinal epithelial cells sense and respond to iron availability. Here we review studies on the Divalent Metal Transporter-1 homolog Malvolio (iron import), the recent discovery that Multicopper Oxidase-1 has ferroxidase activity (iron export) and the role of ferritin in the process of iron acquisition (iron storage). We also describe what is known about iron regulation in insect cells. We then draw upon knowledge from mammalian iron homeostasis to identify candidate genes in flies. Questions arise from the lack of conservation in Drosophila for key mammalian players, such as ferroportin, hepcidin and all the components of the hemochromatosis-related pathway. Drosophila and other insects also lack erythropoiesis. Thus, systemic iron regulation is likely to be conveyed by different signaling pathways and tissue requirements. The significance of regulating intestinal iron uptake is inferred from reports linking Drosophila developmental, immune, heat-shock and behavioral responses to iron sequestration.

  7. Absorption in Extended Inhomogeneous Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joiner, Joanna; Vasilkov, Alexander; Spurr, Robert; Bhartia, P. K.; Krotkov, Nick

    2008-01-01

    The launch of several different sensors, including CloudSat, into the A-train constellation of satellites allows us for the first time to compute absorption that can occur in realistic vertically inhomogeneous clouds including multiple cloud decks. CloudSat data show that these situations are common. Therefore, understanding vertically inhomogeneous clouds is important from both climate and satellite atmospheric composition remote sensing perspectives. Satellite passive sensors that operate from the near IR to the UV often rely on radiative cloud pressures derived from absorption in oxygen bands (A, B, gamma, or O2-O2 bands) or from rotational-Raman scattering in order to retrieve information about atmospheric trace gases. The radiative cloud pressure is distinct from the physical cloud top derived from thermal infrared measurements. Therefore, the combination of information from different passive sensors yields some information about the cloud vertical profile. When either or both the clouds or atmospheric absorbers (trace gases and aerosols) are vertically inhomogeneous, the use of an effective cloud pressure derived from these approaches may lead to errors. Here, we focus on several scenarios (deep convective clouds and distinct two layer clouds) based on realistic cloud optical depth vertical profiles derived from the CloudSatfMODIS combination. We focus on implications for trace-gas column amount retrievals (specifically ozone and NO2) and derived surface UV irradiance from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Atrain Aura platform.

  8. Energy absorption of composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farley, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    Results of a study on the energy absorption characteristics of selected composite material systems are presented and the results compared with aluminum. Composite compression tube specimens were fabricated with both tape and woven fabric prepreg using graphite/epoxy (Gr/E), Kevlar (TM)/epoxy (K/E) and glass/epoxy (Gl/E). Chamfering and notching one end of the composite tube specimen reduced the peak load at initial failure without altering the sustained crushing load, and prevented catastrophic failure. Static compression and vertical impact tests were performed on 128 tubes. The results varied significantly as a function of material type and ply orientation. In general, the Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the Gl/E or K/E tubes for the same ply orientation. The 0/ + or - 15 Gr/E tubes absorbed more energy than the aluminum tubes. Gr/E and Gl/E tubes failed in a brittle mode and had negligible post crushing integrity, whereas the K/E tubes failed in an accordian buckling mode similar to the aluminum tubes. The energy absorption and post crushing integrity of hybrid composite tubes were not significantly better than that of the single material tubes.

  9. Money-center structures in dynamic banking systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shouwei; Zhang, Minghui

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a dynamic model for banking systems based on the description of balance sheets. It generates some features identified through empirical analysis. Through simulation analysis of the model, we find that banking systems have the feature of money-center structures, that bank asset distributions are power-law distributions, and that contract size distributions are log-normal distributions.

  10. Identification of acetylene (C2H2) in infrared atmospheric absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A.; Murcray, F. J.; Blatherwick, R. D.; Gillis, J. R.; Bonomo, F. S.; Murcray, F. H.; Murcray, D. G.; Cicerone, R. J.

    1981-12-01

    Infrared atmospheric absorption spectra at ˜0.02 cm-1 resolution obtained during a balloon flight made on March 23, 1981, show absorption features attributable to C2H2. These features are used to derive a preliminary mixing ratio of ˜25 pptv near 9 km. This mixing ratio falls into the range of values we calculate for upper tropospheric C2H2 in a photochemical/transport model but well below values measured previously in samples collected by other researchers.

  11. Environmental mapping of the World Trade Center area with imaging spectroscopy after the September 11, 2001 attack

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Roger N.; Swayze, Gregg A.; Hoefen, Todd M.; Green, Robert O.; Livo, Keith E.; Meeker, Gregory P.; Sutley, Stephen J.; Plumlee, Geoffrey S.; Pavri, Betina; Sarture, Charles M.; Boardman, Joe; Brownfield, Isabelle; Morath, Laurie C.

    2009-01-01

    The Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) was flown over the World Trade Center area on September 16, 18, 22, and 23, 2001. The data were used to map the WTC debris plume and its contents, including the spectral signatures of asbestiform minerals. Samples were collected and used as ground truth for the AVARIS mapping. A number of thermal hot spots were observed with temperatures greater than 700 °C. The extent and temperatures of the fires were mapped as a function of time. By September 23, most of the fires observed by AVIRIS had been eliminated or reduced in intensity. The mineral absorption features mapped by AVARIS only indicated the presence of serpentine mineralogy and not if the serpentine has asbestiform.

  12. Major depression with psychotic features

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000933.htm Major depression with psychotic features To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Major depression with psychotic features is a mental disorder in ...

  13. North Polar Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    28 November 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows banded terrain of the north polar region of Mars. The bands are exposures of layered material, possibly composed of dust and ice. The dark, rounded to elliptical mounds in this image might be the locations of ancient sand dunes that were completely buried in the north polar layered material. In more recent times, these mounds have been exhumed from within the layered material. Alternatively, the dark features are not ancient, exhumed dunes, but perhaps the remnants of a dark layer of material that once covered the entire area shown in the image. These features are located near 79.9oN, 31.4oW. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the lower left.

  14. Intrinsic Feature Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Goddard, Jr., James S.

    2013-03-19

    Subject motion during 3D medical scanning can cause blurring and artifacts in the 3D images resulting in either rescans or poor diagnosis. Anesthesia or physical restraints may be used to eliminate motion but are undesirable and can affect results. This software measures the six degree of freedom 3D motion of the subject during the scan under a rigidity assumption using only the intrinsic features present on the subject area being monitored. This movement over time can then be used to correct the scan data removing the blur and artifacts. The software acquires images from external cameras or images stored on disk for processing. The images are from two or three calibrated cameras in a stereo arrangement. Algorithms extract and track the features over time and calculate position and orientation changes relative to an initial position. Output is the 3D position and orientation change measured at each image.

  15. Vapor Absorption and Conductivity in Poly(ethylene Oxide)-Salt-Propylene Glycol Films.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE il. REPORT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION lb. RESTRICTIVE MARKINGS Unclassified 2. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION ...OF I JAN 73 IS OBSOLETE. UNCILASSIFIED SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE SC5384.TR Rockwell InternationalSciTnce Center VAPOR ABSORPTION AND...salt electrolytes occurs primarily in amorphous regions; hence, a low crystal-to- glass transition temperature is a most desirable characteristic

  16. Point defect absorption by grain boundaries in α -iron by atomic density function modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapikranian, O.; Zapolsky, H.; Patte, R.; Pareige, C.; Radiguet, B.; Pareige, P.

    2015-12-01

    Using the atomic density function theory (ADFT), we examine the point defect absorption at [110] symmetrical tilt grain boundaries in body-centered cubic iron. It is found that the sink strength strongly depends on misorientation angle. We also show that the ADFT is able to reproduce reasonably well the elastic properties and the point defect formation volume in α -iron.

  17. Possible detection of a cyclotron resonance scattering feature in the X-ray pulsar 4U 1909+07

    SciTech Connect

    Jaisawal, Gaurava K.; Naik, Sachindra; Paul, Biswajit

    2013-12-10

    We present timing and broad band spectral studies of the high-mass X-ray binary pulsar 4U 1909+07 using data from Suzaku observations during 2010 November 2-3. The pulse period of the pulsar is estimated to be 604.11 ± 0.14 s. Pulsations are seen in the X-ray light curve up to ∼70 keV. The pulse profile is found to be strongly energy-dependent: a complex, multi-peaked structure at low energy becomes a simple single peak at higher energy. We found that the 1-70 keV pulse-averaged continuum can be fit by the sum of a blackbody and a partial covering Negative and Positive power law with Exponential cutoff model. A weak iron fluorescence emission line at 6.4 keV was detected in the spectrum. An absorption-like feature at ∼44 keV was clearly seen in the residuals of the spectral fitting, independent of the continuum model adopted. To check the possible presence of a cyclotron resonance scattering feature (CRSF) in the spectrum, we normalized the pulsar spectrum with the spectrum of the Crab Nebula. The resulting Crab ratio also showed a clear dip centered at ∼44 keV. We performed statistical tests on the residuals of the spectral fitting and also on the Crab spectral ratio to determine the significance of the absorption-like feature and identified it as a CRSF of the pulsar. We estimated the corresponding surface magnetic field of the pulsar to be 3.8 × 10{sup 12} G.

  18. Isidis Planitia Features

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    26 June 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the most typical features of Isidis Planitia at full (1.5 meters -- 5 feet -- per pixel) resolution. The typical features are: (1) light-toned, ripple-like dunes and (2) mounds with summit pits. The dunes are formed by wind. The double-cone feature in the lower right quarter of the image is similar to many mounds and chains of mounds or cones found all across Isidis Planitia. These were seen at lower resolution in Viking orbiter images in the 1970s and were generally considered to be either small volcanoes or ice-cored mounds known as pingoes. With high resolution MOC images, it became apparent that many of these mounds may simply be the remnants of crater and pit chain floors, elevated above the surrounding plains as the layers of rock into which they formed were stripped away. Like much of Mars, there are more questions than answers. This image is located near 8.6oN, 268.2oW, and covers an area about 1.1 km (0.7 mi) wide. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left/lower left.

  19. Fermi Galactic Center Zoom

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation zooms into an image of the Milky Way, shown in visible light, and superimposes a gamma-ray map of the galactic center from NASA's Fermi. Raw data transitions to a view with all known...

  20. The EROS Data Center

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1975-01-01

    The EROS Data Center, 16 miles (25 km) northeast of Sioux Falls, South Dakota, is operated by the EROS Program to provide access to NASA's LANDSAT [formerly Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS)] imagery, aerial photography acquired by the U.S. Department of the Interior, and photography and imagery acquired by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) from research aircraft and from Skylab, Apollo, and Gemini spacecraft. The primary functions of the Center are data storage and reproduction, and user assistance and training. This publication describes the Data Center operations, data products, services, and procedures for ordering remotely sensed data. The EROS Data Center and its principal facility, the 120,000-square-foot (11,200 m2) Karl E. Mundt Federal Building, were dedicated August 7, 1973.