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Sample records for absorption fine structures

  1. Improved self-absorption correction for extended x-ray absorption fine-structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, C.H.; Bridges, F.

    2003-06-04

    Extended x-ray absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) data collected in the fluorescence mode are susceptible to an apparent amplitude reduction due to the self-absorption of the fluorescing photon by the sample before it reaches a detector. Previous treatments have made the simplifying assumption that the effect of the EXAFS on the correction term is negligible, and that the samples are in the thick limit. We present a nearly exact treatment that can be applied for any sample thickness or concentration, and retains the EXAFS oscillations in the correction term.

  2. Ab initio X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Cumulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vila, F.; Rehr, J. J.; Rossner, H. H.; Krappe, H. J.

    2006-03-01

    Theoretical calculations of vibrational effects in x-ray absorption spectra typically employ semi-phenomenological models, e.g. empirical force constants or correlated Debye or Einstein models. Instead we introduce an efficient and generally applicable ab initio approach based on electronic structure calculations of the dynamical matrix together with the Lanczos recursion algorithm [1] and relations between the cumulants. The approach yields 1) the thermal expansion coefficients (first cumulant of the vibrational distribution function); 2) correlated Debye-Waller factors (second cumulants) and 3) anharmonic contributions (third cumulants). Results are presented for crystalline (Cu, Au, Ge, GaAs) and molecular (GeCl4, C6H6) systems. Our results for the Debye-Waller factors agree well with experiment. [1]H.J. Krappe and H.H. Rossner, Phys. Rev. B70, 104102 (2004).

  3. Ab initio self-consistent x-ray absorption fine structure analysis for metalloproteins.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Bunker, Grant

    2006-12-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure is a powerful tool for probing the structures of metals in proteins in both crystalline and noncrystalline environments. Until recently, a fundamental problem in biological XAFS has been that ad hoc assumptions must be made concerning the vibrational properties of the amino acid residues that are coordinated to the metal to fit the data. Here, an automatic procedure for accurate structural determination of active sites of metalloproteins is presented. It is based on direct multiple-scattering simulation of experimental X-ray absorption fine structure spectra combining electron multiple scattering calculations with density functional theory calculations of vibrational modes of amino acid residues and the genetic algorithm differential evolution to determine a global minimum in the space of fitting parameters. Structure determination of the metalloprotein active site is obtained through a self-consistent iterative procedure with only minimal initial information.

  4. Titanium local structure in tektite probed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yoshiasa, Akira; Okube, Maki; Takeda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    The local structure of titanium in tektites from six strewn fields was studied by Ti K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in order to provide quantitative data on Ti-O distance and Ti coordination number. The titanium in tektites possessed different coordination environment types. XANES spectra patterns revealed resemblance to high-temperature TiO(2)-SiO(2) glass and TiO(2) anatase. All samples showed that the valence of Ti is 4+. Based on the Ti-O distances, coordination numbers and radial distribution function determined by EXAFS analyses, the tektites were classified into three types: type I, Ti occupies a four-coordinated tetrahedral site with Ti-O distances of 1.84-1.79 Å; type II, Ti occupies a five-coordinated trigonal bipyramidal or tetragonal pyramidal site with Ti-O distances of 1.92-1.89 Å; type III, Ti occupies a six-coordinated octahedral site with Ti-O distances of 2.00-1.96 Å. Although Ti occupies the TiO(6) octahedral site in most titanium minerals under ambient conditions, some tektites have four- and five-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that the local structure of Ti might change in impact events and the following stages.

  5. Titanium local structure in tektite probed by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Yoshiasa, Akira; Okube, Maki; Takeda, Takashi

    2011-11-01

    The local structure of titanium in tektites from six strewn fields was studied by Ti K-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) in order to provide quantitative data on Ti-O distance and Ti coordination number. The titanium in tektites possessed different coordination environment types. XANES spectra patterns revealed resemblance to high-temperature TiO(2)-SiO(2) glass and TiO(2) anatase. All samples showed that the valence of Ti is 4+. Based on the Ti-O distances, coordination numbers and radial distribution function determined by EXAFS analyses, the tektites were classified into three types: type I, Ti occupies a four-coordinated tetrahedral site with Ti-O distances of 1.84-1.79 Å; type II, Ti occupies a five-coordinated trigonal bipyramidal or tetragonal pyramidal site with Ti-O distances of 1.92-1.89 Å; type III, Ti occupies a six-coordinated octahedral site with Ti-O distances of 2.00-1.96 Å. Although Ti occupies the TiO(6) octahedral site in most titanium minerals under ambient conditions, some tektites have four- and five-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that the local structure of Ti might change in impact events and the following stages. PMID:21997913

  6. Correction method for the self-absorption effects in fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure on multilayer samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen Bin; Yang, Xiao Yue; Zhu, Jing Tao; Tu, Yu Chun; Mu, Bao Zhong; Yu, Hai Sheng; Wei, Xiang Jun; Huang, Yu Ying; Wang, Zhan Shan

    2014-05-01

    A novel correction method for self-absorption effects is proposed for extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) detected in the fluorescence mode on multilayer samples. The effects of refraction and multiple reflection at the interfaces are fully considered in this correction method. The correction is performed in k-space before any further data analysis, and it can be applied to single-layer or multilayer samples with flat surfaces and without thickness limit when the model parameters for the samples are known. The validity of this method is verified by the fluorescence EXAFS data collected for a Cr/C multilayer sample measured at different experimental geometries. PMID:24763646

  7. Measurements of photon interference X-ray absorption fine structure (piXAFS).

    PubMed

    Tröger, L; Kappen, P; Nishino, Y; Haack, N; Materlik, G

    2001-03-01

    Experimental data are presented which demonstrate the existence of a fine structure in extended X-ray absorption spectra due to interference effects in the initial photon state (piXAFS). Interference occurs between the incident electromagnetic wave and its coherently scattered waves from neighboring atoms. Using fine platinum and tungsten powders as well as polycrystalline platinum foil, piXAFS was measured in high-precision absorption experiments at beamline X1 at HASYLAB/DESY over a wide energy range. piXAFS is observed below and above absorption-edge positions in both transmission and total-electron-yield detection. Based on experimental data it is shown that piXAFS is sensitive to geometric atomic structure. Fourier-transformed piXAFS data carry information, comparable with that of EXAFS, about the short-range-order structure of the sample. Sharp structures occur in piXAFS when a Bragg backscattering condition of the incident X-rays is fulfilled. They allow precise measurement of long-range-order structural information. Measured data are compared with simulations based on piXAFS theory. Although piXAFS structures are similarly observed in two detection techniques, the importance of scattering off the sample for the measurements needs to be investigated further. Disentangling piXAFS, multielectron photoexcitations and atomic XAFS in high-precision measurements close to absorption edges poses a challenge for future studies.

  8. The 16th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grunwaldt, J.-D.; Hagelstein, M.; Rothe, J.

    2016-05-01

    This preface of the proceedings volume of the 16th International Conference on X- ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS16) gives a glance on the five days of cutting-edge X-ray science which were held in Karlsruhe, Germany, August 23 - 28, 2015. In addition, several satellite meetings took place in Hamburg, Berlin and Stuttgart, a Sino-German workshop, three data analysis tutorials as well as special symposia on industrial catalysis and XFELs were held at the conference venue.

  9. Silicon 1s near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of functionalized silicon nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchie, A.; Cao, W.; Dasog, M.; Purkait, T. K.; Senger, C.; Hu, Y. F.; Xiao, Q. F.; Veinot, J. G. C.; Urquhart, S. G.

    2016-10-01

    Silicon 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra of silicon nanocrystals have been examined as a function of nanocrystal size (3-100 nm), varying surface functionalization (hydrogen or 1-pentyl termination), or embedded in oxide. The NEXAFS spectra are characterized as a function of nanocrystal size and surface functionalization. Clear spectroscopic evidence for long range order is observed silicon nanocrystals that are 5-8 nm in diameter or larger. Energy shifts in the silicon 1s NEXAFS spectra of covalently functionalized silicon nanocrystals with changing size are attributed to surface chemical shifts and not to quantum confinement effects.

  10. Thermal Expansion Behaviour of Silver Examined by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dubiel, M.; Chasse, A.; Haug, J.; Schneider, R.; Kruth, H.

    2007-02-02

    EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) investigations are reported concerning the thermal expansion behaviour of silver in an extended range of temperature from 10 K to about 950 K measured in transmission mode. Both the ratio method and an EXAFS fitting procedure were applied to reveal the temperature dependence of EXAFS parameters. Models based on quantum and classical thermodynamic perturbation theory have been used to interpret experimental data and compared to XRD (X-ray diffraction) results of bulk silver material. The description of thermodynamic data of thermal expansion of silver in the complete range of temperature by EXAFS Spectroscopy was successful by first calculations using third order quantum perturbation theory.

  11. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study of CaSO 4:Dy phosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, D.; Bakshi, A. K.; Ciatto, G.; Aquilanti, G.; Pradhan, A. S.; Pascarelli, S.

    2006-03-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements have been carried out on CaSO 4:Dy phosphors at the Dy L 3 edge with synchrotron radiation. The data have been analysed to find out the Dy-S and Dy-O bond lengths in the neighborhood of the Dy atoms. Measurements have been carried out over several samples thermally annealed for different cycles at 400 °C in air for 1 h and the change in bond lengths in samples with increasing number of annealing cycles have been studied by analyzing the EXAFS data.

  12. Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure of low-Z absorbates using fluorescence detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoehr, J.; Kollin, E.B.; Fischer, D.A.; Hastings, J.B.; Zaera, F.; Sette, F.

    1985-05-01

    Comparison of x-ray fluorescence yield (FY) and electron yield surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectra above the S K-edge for c(2 x 2) S on Ni(100) reveals an order of magnitude higher sensitivity of the FY technique. Using FY detection, thiophene (C/sub 4/H/sub 4/S) chemisorption on Ni(100) is studied with S coverages down to 0.08 monolayer. The molecule dissociates at temperatures as low as 100K by interaction with fourfold hollow Ni sites. Blocking of these sites by oxygen leaves the molecule intact.

  13. A new analysis of fine-structure constant measurements and modelling errors from quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilczynska, Michael R.; Webb, John K.; King, Julian A.; Murphy, Michael T.; Bainbridge, Matthew B.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2015-12-01

    We present an analysis of 23 absorption systems along the lines of sight towards 18 quasars in the redshift range of 0.4 ≤ zabs ≤ 2.3 observed on the Very Large Telescope (VLT) using the Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES). Considering both statistical and systematic error contributions we find a robust estimate of the weighted mean deviation of the fine-structure constant from its current, laboratory value of Δα/α = (0.22 ± 0.23) × 10-5, consistent with the dipole variation reported in Webb et al. and King et al. This paper also examines modelling methodologies and systematic effects. In particular, we focus on the consequences of fitting quasar absorption systems with too few absorbing components and of selectively fitting only the stronger components in an absorption complex. We show that using insufficient continuum regions around an absorption complex causes a significant increase in the scatter of a sample of Δα/α measurements, thus unnecessarily reducing the overall precision. We further show that fitting absorption systems with too few velocity components also results in a significant increase in the scatter of Δα/α measurements, and in addition causes Δα/α error estimates to be systematically underestimated. These results thus identify some of the potential pitfalls in analysis techniques and provide a guide for future analyses.

  14. Structural studies of amorphous titanium diboride thin films by extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure and extended electron-energy-loss fine-structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloyeros, Alain E.; Hoffman, Mark P.; Williams, Wendell S.; Greene, Alex E.; McMillan, Joyce A.

    1988-10-01

    The local atomic structure of amorphous titanium diboride thin films, prepared by electron-beam vaporization (EBV) of the crystalline compound onto liquid-nitrogen-cooled substrates, was studied using extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) and extended energy-loss fine-structure (EXELFS) techniques. From a comparison of the extended fine-structure spectra of the amorphous films with corresponding spectra of crystalline titanium diboride, accurate information was derived on the nature of the local structure, or short-range order, and on the coordination numbers, interatomic distances, and nanostructural atomic disorder in amorphous TiB2. A relaxation of the interatomic spacing and a reduction of coordination number for the nearest-neighbor atoms was inferred for the amorphous state. Local prismatic coordination with random 90° rotations about prismatic planes is proposed as a likely atomic structure consistent with the data for the amorphous form. Finally, EXAFS and EXELFS were employed to examine in detail the structural changes induced in amorphous TiB2 by variations in the EBV deposition parameters, and to determine a set of optimized parameters for the EBV deposition of a TiB2 stable amorphous phase.

  15. Single shot near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in the laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantouvalou, I.; Witte, K.; Martyanov, W.; Jonas, A.; Grötzsch, D.; Streeck, C.; Löchel, H.; Rudolph, I.; Erko, A.; Stiel, H.; Kanngießer, B.

    2016-05-01

    With the help of adapted off-axis reflection zone plates, near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at the C and N K-absorption edge have been recorded using a single 1.2 ns long soft X-ray pulse. The transmission experiments were performed with a laser-produced plasma source in the laboratory rendering time resolved measurements feasible independent on large scale facilities. A resolving power of E/ΔE ˜ 950 at the respective edges could be demonstrated. A comparison of single shot spectra with those collected with longer measuring time proves that all features of the used reference samples (silicon nitrate and polyimide) can be resolved in 1.2 ns. Hence, investigations of radiation sensitive biological specimen become possible due to the high efficiency of the optical elements enabling low dose experiments.

  16. X-ray absorption fine structure of aged, Pu-doped glass and ceramic waste forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, N. J.; Weber, W. J.; Conradson, S. D.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies were performed on three compositionally identical, Pu-doped, borosilicate glasses prepared 15 years ago at different α-activities by varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio. The resulting α-activities ranged from 1.9×10 7 to 4.2×10 9 Bq/g and have current, accumulated doses between 8.8×10 15 to 1.9×10 18 α-decays/g. Two ceramic, polycrystalline zircon (ZrSiO 4) samples prepared 16 years ago with 10.0 wt% Pu was also investigated. Varying the 239Pu/ 238Pu isotopic ratio in these samples resulted in α-activities of 2.5×10 8 and 5.6×10 10 Bq/g and current, accumulated doses of 1.2×10 17 and 2.8×10 19 α-decays/g. The multicomponent composition of the waste forms permitted XAS investigations at six absorption edges for the borosilicate glass and at three absorption edges for the polycrystalline zircons. For both waste forms, analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectra indicates that the local environment around the cations exhibits different degrees of disorder as a result of the accumulated α-decay dose. In general, cations with short cation-oxygen bonds show little effect from self-radiation whereas cations with long cation-oxygen bonds show a greater degree of disorder with accumulated α-decay dose.

  17. Negative thermal expansion in CuCl: An extended x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Vaccari, M.; Grisenti, R.; Fornasini, P.; Rocca, F.; Sanson, A.

    2007-05-01

    Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been measured from liquid helium to ambient temperature at the Cu K edge of copper chloride (CuCl) to investigate the local origin of negative thermal expansion. A quantitative analysis of the first coordination shell, performed by the cumulant method, reveals that the nearest-neighbor Cu-Cl interatomic distance undergoes a strong positive expansion, contrasting with the much weaker negative expansion of the crystallographic distance between average atomic positions below 100 K. The anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations, monitored by the ratio {gamma} between perpendicular and parallel mean square relative displacements, is considerably high, while the diffraction thermal factors are isotropic. The relative perpendicular vibrations measured by EXAFS are related to the tension mechanism and to the transverse acoustic modes, which are considered responsible for negative thermal expansion in zinc-blende structures.

  18. Xe nanocrystals in Si studied by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Faraci, Giuseppe; Pennisi, Agata R.; Zontone, Federico

    2007-07-15

    The structural configuration of Xe clusters, obtained by ion implantation in a Si matrix, has been investigated as a function of the temperature by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. In contrast with previous results, we demonstrate that an accurate analysis of the data, using high order cumulants, gives evidence of Xe fcc nanocrystals at low temperature, even in the as-implanted Si; expansion of the Xe lattice is always found as a function of the temperature, with no appreciable overpressure. We point out that a dramatic modification of these conclusions can be induced by an incorrect analysis using standard symmetrical pair distribution function G(r); for this reason, all the results were checked by x-ray diffraction measurements.

  19. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: systematic errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption spectra with laboratory spectra allows us to probe possible variations in the fundamental constants over cosmological time-scales. In a companion paper we present an analysis of Keck/HIRES spectra and report possible evidence suggesting that the fine-structure constant, α, may have been smaller in the past: [formmu2]Δα/α=(-0.72+/-0.18)×10-5 over the redshift range [formmu3]0.5

  20. Synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and extended x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J.R.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Kraner, H.W.; Chao, E.C.T.; Minkin, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of dedicated synchrotron radiation sources has led to a significant increase in activity in many areas of science dealing with the interaction of x-rays with matter. Synchrotron radiation provides intense, linearly polarized, naturally collimated, continuously tunable photon beams, which are used to determine not only the elemental composition of a complex, polyatomic, dilute material but also the chemical form of the elements with improved accuracy. Examples of the application of synchrotron radiation include experiments in synchrotron x-ray fluorescence (SXRF) analysis and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis. New synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobes for elemental analysis in the parts per billion range are under construction at several laboratories. 76 references, 24 figures.

  1. Study on the Coordination Structure of Pt Sorbed on Bacterial Cells Using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Watanabe, Naoko

    2015-01-01

    Biosorption has been intensively investigated as a promising technology for the recovery of precious metals from solution. However, the detailed mechanism responsible for the biosorption of Pt on a biomass is not fully understood because of a lack of spectroscopic studies. We applied X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy to elucidate the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. We examined the sorption of Pt(II) and Pt(IV) species on bacterial cells of Bacillus subtilis and Shewanella putrefaciens in NaCl solutions. X-ray absorption near-edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) of Pt-sorbed bacteria suggested that Pt(IV) was reduced to Pt(II) on the cell’s surface, even in the absence of an organic material as an exogenous electron donor. EXAFS spectra demonstrated that Pt sorbed on bacterial cells has a fourfold coordination of chlorine ions, similar to PtCl42-, which indicated that sorption on the protonated amine groups of the bacterial cells. This work clearly demonstrated the coordination structure of Pt sorbed on bacterial cells. The findings of this study will contribute to the understanding of Pt biosorption on biomass, and facilitate the development of recovery methods for rare metals using biosorbent materials. PMID:25996945

  2. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy of Diamondoid Thiol Monolayers on Gold

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Fabbri, J; Lee, J I; Schreiner, P; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J; Carlson, B; Vance, A L; Yang, W; Terminello, L J; van Buuren, T; Melosh, N

    2007-11-27

    Diamondoids, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures, have unique properties with potential value for nanotechnology. The availability and ability to selectively functionalize this special class of nanodiamond materials opens new possibilities for surface-modification, for high-efficiency field emitters in molecular electronics, as seed crystals for diamond growth, or as robust mechanical coatings. The properties of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of diamondoids are thus of fundamental interest for a variety of emerging applications. This paper presents the effects of thiol substitution position and polymantane order on diamondoid SAMs on gold using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). A framework to determine both molecular tilt and twist through NEXAFS is presented and reveals highly ordered diamondoid SAMs, with the molecular orientation controlled by the thiol location. C 1s and S 2p binding energies are lower in adamantane thiol than alkane thiols on gold by 0.67 {+-} 0.05 eV and 0.16 {+-} 0.04 eV respectively. These binding energies vary with diamondoid monolayer structure and thiol substitution position, consistent with different amounts of steric strain and electronic interaction with the substrate. This work demonstrates control over the assembly, in particular the orientational and electronic structure, providing a flexible design of surface properties with this exciting new class of diamond clusters.

  3. Neutron induced damage in reactor pressure vessel steel: An X-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuri, G.; Cammelli, S.; Degueldre, C.; Bertsch, J.; Gavillet, D.

    2009-03-01

    The radiation damage produced in reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels during neutron irradiation is a long-standing problem of considerable practical interest. In this study, an extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has been applied at Cu, Ni and Mn K-edges to systematically investigate neutron induced radiation damage to the metal-site bcc structure of RPV steels, irradiated with neutrons in the fluence range from 0.85 to 5.0 × 1019 cm-2. An overall similarity of Cu, Ni and Mn atomic environment in the iron matrix is observed. The radial distribution functions (RDFs), derived from EXAFS data have been found to evolve continuously as a function of neutron fluence describing the atomic-scale structural modifications in RPVs by neutron irradiations. From the pristine data, long range order beyond the first- and second-shell is apparent in the RDF spectra. In the irradiated specimens, all near-neighbour peaks are greatly reduced in magnitude, typical of damaged material. Prolonged annealing leads annihilation of point defects to give rise to an increase in the coordination numbers of near-neighbour atomic shells approaching values close to that of non-irradiated material, but does not suppress the formation of nano-sized Cu and/or Ni-rich-precipitates. Total amount of radiation damage under a given irradiation condition has been determined. The average structural parameters estimated from the EXAFS data are presented and discussed.

  4. Uniform Catalytic Site in Sn-beta Zeolite Determined using X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bare,S.; Kelly, S.; Sinkler, W.; Low, J.; Modica, F.; Valencia, S.; Corma, A.; Nemeth, L.

    2005-01-01

    The Sn silicate zeolite, Sn-{beta}, has been shown to be an efficient, selective heterogeneous catalyst for Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. Using primarily a multishell fit to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, we show that the Sn does not randomly insert into the {beta}-zeolite structure but rather occupies identical, specific, crystallographic sites. These sites are the T5/T6 sites in the six-membered rings. Moreover, the Sn is substituted in pairs on opposite sides of these six-membered rings. We believe that it is the specific, uniform crystallographic location of the Sn in the crystal structure that leads to sites with uniform catalytic activity, and consequently to the high chemical selectivity demonstrated for this catalyst. This manifests itself in the almost enzyme-like selectivity of this catalyst in Baeyer-Villiger oxidations. This uniform site distribution of the Sn suggests that there is likely a symbiotic relationship between the structure-directing agent in the zeolite synthesis and the Sn heteroatoms during the framework formation.

  5. Constraining the variation of the fine-structure constant with observations of narrow quasar absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Songaila, A.; Cowie, L. L.

    2014-10-01

    The unequivocal demonstration of temporal or spatial variability in a fundamental constant of nature would be of enormous significance. Recent attempts to measure the variability of the fine-structure constant α over cosmological time, using high-resolution spectra of high-redshift quasars observed with 10 m class telescopes, have produced conflicting results. We use the many multiplet (MM) method with Mg II and Fe II lines on very high signal-to-noise, high-resolution (R = 72, 000) Keck HIRES spectra of eight narrow quasar absorption systems. We consider both systematic uncertainties in spectrograph wavelength calibration and also velocity offsets introduced by complex velocity structure in even apparently simple and weak narrow lines and analyze their effect on claimed variations in α. We find no significant change in α, Δα/α = (0.43 ± 0.34) × 10{sup –5}, in the redshift range z = 0.7-1.5, where this includes both statistical and systematic errors. We also show that the scatter in measurements of Δα/α arising from absorption line structure can be considerably larger than assigned statistical errors even for apparently simple and narrow absorption systems. We find a null result of Δα/α = (– 0.59 ± 0.55) × 10{sup –5} in a system at z = 1.7382 using lines of Cr II, Zn II, and Mn II, whereas using Cr II and Zn II lines in a system at z = 1.6614 we find a systematic velocity trend that, if interpreted as a shift in α, would correspond to Δα/α = (1.88 ± 0.47) × 10{sup –5}, where both results include both statistical and systematic errors. This latter result is almost certainly caused by varying ionic abundances in subcomponents of the line: using Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II in the analysis changes the result to Δα/α = (– 0.47 ± 0.53) × 10{sup –5}. Combining the Mg II and Fe II results with estimates based on Mn II, Ni II, and Cr II gives Δα/α = (– 0.01 ± 0.26) × 10{sup –5}. We conclude that spectroscopic measurements of

  6. Local structure of Titanium in natural glasses probed by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Yoshiasa, A.; Okube, M.; Nakatani, T.; Hayasaka, Y.; Isobe, H.

    2013-04-01

    Synchrotron radiation has been used to collect titanium K-edge absorption spectra of a suite of natural glasses (tektites, impact glasses, fault rocks and volcanic glasses). XANES and XAFS analysis provided the qualitative and quantitative information of Ti oxidation state, Ti-O distance and site geometry. Tektites possess four-, five-, six-coordinated Ti, whereas fault rock-pseudotachylite, volcanic glasses and impact glass only presented five- and six-coordinated Ti. This study indicated that different petrogenesis of natural glasses has different local structures of titanium.

  7. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) Analysis of Novel High Laser Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemantha, Aranwela; Marasinghe, G. K.; Segre, Carlo; Brow, Richard

    2011-03-01

    Rare earth-doped phosphate glasses are useful for a variety of optical and optoelectronic applications including high energy/high power (~ 1015 watt) Lasers. Binary (R2 O3)x (P2 O5)1-x glasses can be prepared in the compositional range 0 <= x <= ~ 0.30 . Atomic-scale structure, especially the coordination environment of R3+ ions, play a major role in determining optical/physical characteristics. We have investigated the R3+ local environment of Praseodymium and Neodymium ultraphosphate and meta phosphate(REMP) glasses using extended X-ray absorption fine structure technique. For both Nd and Pr phosphate glasses, nearest neighbor (oxygen) coordination decreases with increasing RE concentration. For the first oxygen shell the RE-O distance ranges between 2.38-2.40 Å and 2.39-2.46 Å for Nd and Pr respectively. The second co-ordination shell around the RE ions consists of phosphorus ions, with RE-P distance about 3.4-3.5 Å and co-ordination numbers ranging from 1.5 to 3. There exists an Oxygen shell (third shell) about 4.1 Å from RE ion for both Nd and Pr phosphate glasses. Support was provided by the NSF (UND) and DoE (Argonne Natl. Lab).

  8. Vibronic fine structure in high-resolution x-ray absorption spectra from ion-bombarded boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Petravic, Mladen; Peter, Robert; Varasanec, Marijana; Li Luhua; Chen Ying; Cowie, Bruce C. C.

    2013-05-15

    The authors have applied high-resolution near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure measurements around the nitrogen K-edge to study the effects of ion-bombardment on near-surface properties of boron nitride nanotubes. A notable difference has been observed between surface sensitive partial electron yield (PEY) and bulk sensitive total electron yield (TEY) fine-structure measurements. The authors assign the PEY fine structure to the coupling of excited molecular vibrational modes to electronic transitions in NO molecules trapped just below the surface. Oxidation resistance of the boron nitride nanotubes is significantly reduced by low energy ion bombardment, as broken B-N bonds are replaced by N-O bonds involving oxygen present in the surface region. In contrast to the PEY spectra, the bulk sensitive TEY measurements on as-grown samples do not exhibit any fine structure while the ion-bombarded samples show a clear vibronic signature of molecular nitrogen.

  9. Radiation effects in water ice: A near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laffon, C.; Lacombe, S.; Bournel, F.; Parent, Ph.

    2006-11-01

    The changes in the structure and composition of vapor-deposited ice films irradiated at 20K with soft x-ray photons (3-900eV) and their subsequent evolution with temperatures between 20 and 150K have been investigated by near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the oxygen K edge. We observe the hydroxyl OH, the atomic oxygen O, and the hydroperoxyl HO2 radicals, as well as the oxygen O2 and hydrogen peroxide H2O2 molecules in irradiated porous amorphous solid water (p-ASW) and crystalline (Icryst) ice films. The evolution of their concentrations with the temperature indicates that HO2, O2, and H2O2 result from a simple step reaction fuelled by OH, where O2 is a product of HO2 and HO2 a product of H2O2. The local order of ice is also modified, whatever the initial structure is. The crystalline ice Icryst becomes amorphous. The high-density amorphous phase (Iah ) of ice is observed after irradiation of the p-ASW film, whose initial structure is the normal low-density form of the amorphous ice (Ial). The phase Iah is thus peculiar to irradiated ice and does not exist in the as-deposited ice films. A new "very high density" amorphous phase—we call Iavh—is obtained after warming at 50K the irradiated p-ASW ice. This phase is stable up to 90K and partially transforms into crystalline ice at 150K.

  10. Dynamics of Femtosecond Laser Ablation Plume Studied With Ultrafast X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2010-10-08

    We investigated the dynamic process of an expanding femtosecond laser ablation plume of aluminum generated in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 13}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} with the ultrafast x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) imaging technique. The XAFS spectra of the aluminum L{sub II,III} edge of the plume revealed that the plume consists of doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid particles, and possible atomic clusters. Scanning electron microscopy of deposited ablation particles confirmed that the liquid particles corresponds to the spherical nanoparticles with a size ranging from several tens nanometers to approximately 200 nm. The spatiotemporal evolution of the XAFS image of the plume shows the sequential appearance of each ablation particle from aluminum surface according to its ejection velocity. The result suggests that the photomechanical fragmentation process, which was theoretically proposed, is dominant mechanism for the nanoparticle ejection under the irradiation intensity far from the ablation threshold of aluminum. This study clearly demonstrates the potential of our technique for measuring the ultrafast dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation process.

  11. A surface extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of tellurium adsorbed onto Si(100)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, S. R.; Cowie, B. C. C.; Wilks, S. P.; Dunstan, P. R.; Dunscombe, C. J.; Williams, R. H.

    1996-09-01

    The adsorption of tellurium on Si(100) has been studied using surface extended X-ray adsorption fine structure (SEXAFS) and X-ray standing wave spectroscopy (XSW). This particular system is of interest due to its potential applicability in the surfactant aided growth of CdHgTeCdTeSi(100) based infra-red detectors. The Te/Si(100) structure was generated by depositing a thick layer (˜ 100 Å) of CdTe onto a clean Si (2 × 1) double domain surface, and annealing the sample to 350°C. This resulted is a ˜ 1 ML Te terminated surface where the (2 × 1) reconstruction was lost in favour of a (1 × 1) symmetry. X-ray absorption of the Te L 3 edge ( E = 4341 eV), with a photon energy range of 4440-4700 eV, was probed using a total yield detection scheme. The SEXAFS results indicated that the Te atoms sat in 2-fold bridge sites directly above a fourth layer Si atom. The corresponding bond length was measured to be 2.52 ± 0.05 Å. The XSW measurements of the (400) reflection gave a coherent position of 1.63 ± 0.03 Å and a coherent fraction of 0.65. This is consistent with the breaking of the SiSi dimers and thus could be an example of the phenomena of adsorbate-induced dereconstruction of the surface. These results are compared with those of Bennet et al. who examined a similar system using soft X-ray photoemission (SXPS) and the STM study of Yoshikawa et al.

  12. Log spiral of revolution highly oriented pyrolytic graphite monochromator for fluorescence x-ray absorption edge fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Pease, D. M.; Daniel, M.; Budnick, J. I.; Rhodes, T.; Hammes, M.; Potrepka, D. M.; Sills, K.; Nelson, C.; Heald, S. M.; Brewe, D. I.

    2000-09-01

    We have constructed an x-ray monochromator based on a log spiral of revolution covered with highly oriented pyrolytic graphite. Such a monochromator is used for obtaining x-ray absorption edge fine structure by the fluorescence method, and is particularly useful for measuring the fine structure of dilute element A in a concentrated matrix of element B, where B is to the left of A in the Periodic Table. Using the log spiral monochromator, we measure good Cr x-ray fine structure in an alloy of 1% Cr in a V matrix, whereas the corresponding spectrum is severely distorted by the V background if nonmonochromatized fluorescence is used. We also obtain excellent rejection of Mn fluorescence relative to Cr fluorescence in a Cr{sub 80}Mn{sub 20} alloy, and can tune the monochromator such that the entire Mn step height is significantly smaller than the Cr x-ray absorption edge fine structure oscillations for this system. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  13. Sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) of thiol and thioether compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Beyhan, Shirin; Urquhart, Stephen G.; Hu Yongfeng

    2011-06-28

    The speciation and quantification of sulfur species based on sulfur K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy is of wide interest, particularly for biological and petroleum science. These tasks require a firm understanding of the sulfur 1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of relevant species. To this end, we have examined the gas phase sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of a group of simple thiol and thioether compounds. These high-resolution gas phase spectra are free of solid-state broadening, charging, and saturation effects common in the NEXAFS spectra of solids. These experimental data have been further analyzed with the aid of improved virtual orbital Hartree-Fock ab initio calculations. The experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve assignment of spectroscopic features relevant for the speciation and quantification of the sulfur compounds.

  14. Determining Orientational Structure of Diamondoid Thiols Attached to Silver Using Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, T M; Lee, J I; Fabbri, J D; Wang, D; Nielsen, M; Randel, J C; Schreiner, P R; Fokin, A A; Tkachenko, B A; Fokina, N A; Dahl, J P; Carlson, R K; Terminello, L J; Melosh, N A; van Buuren, T

    2008-10-07

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) is a powerful tool for determination of molecular orientation in self-assembled monolayers and other surface-attached molecules. A general framework for using NEXAFS to simultaneously determine molecular tilt and twist of rigid molecules attached to surfaces is presented. This framework is applied to self-assembled monolayers of higher diamondoid, hydrocarbon molecules with cubic-diamond-cage structures. Diamondoid monolayers chemisorbed on metal substrates are known to exhibit interesting electronic and surface properties. This work compares molecular orientation in monolayers prepared on silver substrates using two different thiol positional isomers of [121]tetramantane, and thiols derived from two different pentamantane structural isomers, [1212]pentamantane and [1(2,3)4]pentamantane. The observed differences in monolayer structure demonstrate the utility and limitations of NEXAFS spectroscopy and the framework. The results also demonstrate the ability to control diamondoid assembly, in particular the molecular orientational structure, providing a flexible platform for the modification of surface properties with this exciting new class of nanodiamond materials.

  15. Geometric Structure Determination of N694C Lipoxygenase: a Comparative Near-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy And Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Study

    SciTech Connect

    Sarangi, R.; Hocking, R.K.; Neidig, M.L.; Benfatto, M.; Holman, T.R.; Solomon, E.I.; Hodgson, K.O.; Hedman, B.

    2009-05-27

    The mononuclear nonheme iron active site of N694C soybean lipoxygenase (sLO1) has been investigated in the resting ferrous form using a combination of Fe-K-pre-edge, near-edge (using the minuit X-ray absorption near-edge full multiple-scattering approach), and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) methods. The results indicate that the active site is six-coordinate (6C) with a large perturbation in the first-shell bond distances in comparison to the more ordered octahedral site in wild-type sLO1. Upon mutation of the asparigine to cystiene, the short Fe-O interaction with asparigine is replaced by a weak Fe-(H{sub 2}O), which leads to a distorted 6C site with an effective 5C ligand field. In addition, it is shown that near-edge multiple scattering analysis can give important three-dimensional structural information, which usually cannot be accessed using EXAFS analysis. It is further shown that, relative to EXAFS, near-edge analysis is more sensitive to partial coordination numbers and can be potentially used as a tool for structure determination in a mixture of chemical species.

  16. Study of the Local Structure of II-Vi Ternary Alloys by Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pong, Way-Faung

    Bondlengths, Debye-Waller factors, and site occupancy in the diluted magnetic semiconductors Zn_ {rm 1 - x}Mn_{ rm x}Se and Hg_{ rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x}Te, and the narrow-gap semiconductor Hg _{rm 1 - x}Cd _{rm x}Te have been measured using extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The nearest-neighbor bond lengths in all of these alloys are found to be constant as a function of alloy composition within the experimental uncertainty of 0.01A. Because the average cation-cation distance changes with Mn composition, these results necessarily imply distortion of the tetrahedral bond angles. In the case of Zn_{rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x} Se, the anion sublattice is shown to suffer the largest distortion, but the cation sublattice also exhibits some relaxation. The repercussions of these results are discussed, in terms of the amount of cation and anion sublattice distortion at low temperature and its connection to the superexchange mechanism occurring between the Mn ^{+2} ions and mediated by the intervening anion in Zn_{rm 1 - x}Mn_{rm x} Se. From the NN bond length relaxation results shown in this study and those reported elsewhere for the III -V-based and II-VI-based ternary compounds and DMS alloys, it appears that substitution of Mn^{+2 } ions into II-VI-based compounds causes greater local distortion, in general, than otherwise observed when group II cations are substituted for one another. We believe that the tetrahedral bond weakening in DMS is due to MN 3d-orbital (t_2) and anion p-orbital hybridization in DMS, leaving fewer p-orbitals available for tetrahedral bonding. This leads to the weakening of the bond force constants alpha, beta, as well as the bond becoming more ionic as Mn^{+2} is substituted into the II-VI-based compounds. Finally, the experimentally extended electron energy loss fine structure (EXELFS) technique, with modulations in the differential inelastic electron scattering cross -section above an absorption core edge, has been used in recent years to

  17. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies of the atomic structure of nanoparticles in different metallic matrices.

    PubMed

    Baker, S H; Roy, M; Gurman, S J; Binns, C

    2009-05-01

    It has been appreciated for some time that the novel properties of particles in the size range 1-10 nm are potentially exploitable in a range of applications. In order to ultimately produce commercial devices containing nanosized particles, it is necessary to develop controllable means of incorporating them into macroscopic samples. One way of doing this is to embed the nanoparticles in a matrix of a different material, by co-deposition for example, to form a nanocomposite film. The atomic structure of the embedded particles can be strongly influenced by the matrix. Since some of the key properties of materials, including magnetism, strongly depend on atomic structure, the ability to determine atomic structure in embedded nanoparticles is very important. This review focuses on nanoparticles, in particular magnetic nanoparticles, embedded in different metal matrices. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) provides an excellent means of probing atomic structure in nanocomposite materials, and an overview of this technique is given. Its application in probing catalytic metal clusters is described briefly, before giving an account of the use of EXAFS in determining atomic structure in magnetic nanocomposite films. In particular, we focus on cluster-assembled films comprised of Fe and Co nanosized particles embedded in various metal matrices, and show how the crystal structure of the particles can be changed by appropriate choice of the matrix material. The work discussed here demonstrates that combining the results of structural and magnetic measurements, as well as theoretical calculations, can play a significant part in tailoring the properties of new magnetic cluster-assembled materials.

  18. Near Edge X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy with X-Ray Free-Electron Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Bernstein, D.P.; Acremann, Y.; Scherz, A.; Burkhardt, M.; Stohr, J.; Beye, M.; Schlotter, W.F.; Beeck, T.; Sorgenfrei, F.; Pietzsch, A.; Wurth, W.; Fohlisch, A.; /Hamburg U.

    2009-12-11

    We demonstrate the feasibility of Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy on solids by means of femtosecond soft x-ray pulses from a free-electron laser (FEL). Our experiments, carried out at the Free-Electron Laser at Hamburg (FLASH), used a special sample geometry, spectrographic energy dispersion, single shot position-sensitive detection and a data normalization procedure that eliminates the severe fluctuations of the incident intensity in space and photon energy. As an example we recorded the {sup 3}D{sub 1} N{sub 4,5}-edge absorption resonance of La{sup 3+}-ions in LaMnO{sub 3}. Our study opens the door for x-ray absorption measurements on future x-ray FEL facilities.

  19. Structural Analysis of Freshwater-Cultured Pearls with Different Lusters Using the Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monarumit, N.; Noirawee, N.; Phlayrahan, A.; Promdee, K.; Won-in, K.; Satitkune, S.

    2016-05-01

    The quality of freshwater-cultured pearls (Chamberlainia hainesiana) is determined by their luster, which is related to the content of the two CaCO3 mineral phases: aragonite and vaterite. The atomic structures of pearl samples were analyzed by the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique using synchrotron radiation to compare the atomic environment and atomic bonding around Ca atoms of high- and low-luster pearls. The Ca K-edge EXAFS spectra of the pearl samples were determined and interpreted in terms of the photoelectron wave number and the distance between Ca atoms and neighboring atoms. From the results, the wave oscillation of high-luster pearls is less than that of low-luster pearls. This indicates the presence of the aragonite phase in high-luster pearls and a combination of aragonite and vaterite phases in low-luster pearls, especially in the fi rst and second shells of Ca atoms. It can be concluded that the different lusters of freshwater-cultured pearls are related to the different CaCO3 phases in their structures.

  20. Displacive phase-transition of cuprite Ag2O revealed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    The low-temperature phase-transition of silver oxide (Ag2O) has been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy as a function of temperature. The thermal evolution of the local structure around Ag atoms has been determined. In particular, below the phase-transition temperature at ∼35 K, a progressive splitting of the Ag-Ag next-nearest-neighbor distances is observed. This definitely supports the idea that the phase-transition of Ag2O is due to displacive disorder of the Ag atoms.

  1. Oxygen on Ni(111): A multiple-scattering analysis of the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedio, M.; Becker, L.; Hillert, B.; D'addato, S.; Haase, J.

    1990-04-01

    Oxygen chemisorption and oxide formation on a Ni(111) surface have been monitored by using the near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure technique. The adsorption site of oxygen in the p(2×2) and (√3 × √3 )R30° superstructures has been determined by a multiple-scattering analysis. In both structures the oxygen occupies a threefold-coordinated fcc site with a nearest-neighbor O-Ni bond length of 1.85+/-0.05 Å on a Ni(111) surface relaxed outwards by ~0.15 Å.

  2. Photoluminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on cadmium telluride material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangxin

    The direct-band-gap semiconductor CdTe is an important material for fabricating high efficiency, polycrystalline thin-film solar cells in a heterojunction configuration. The outstanding physical properties of this material such as its good band-gap match to the solar spectrum, ease of fabrication of stoichiometric films, and easy grain boundary passivation make it an important candidate for large area, thin-film solar cells. However, there are several poorly understood processing steps that are commonly utilized in cell fabrication. One of these is a CdCl2 treatment near 400°C in the presence of oxygen, which can improve the cell efficiency a factor of two or more. Another factor is the role of copper in cell performance. In high performance CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells, copper is usually included in the fabrication of low-resistance back contacts to obtain heavy p-type doping of the absorber CdTe at the contact. However, most of the copper is not electrically active. For example, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) on typical CdTe cells has shown Cu concentrations of 1019 atoms/cm3 and even higher, although capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate typical ionized acceptor levels on the order of 1014/cm 3. Thus, there is great interest in the location and role of this inactive copper in CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. In this thesis, I will describe results obtained on magnetron-sputtered CdTe films that were diffused with copper following the procedure used for creating a cell back contact. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements identified the chemical environment of the majority of the copper and show major differences depending on whether the CdTe film has been treated with chloride prior to the Cu diffusion. The EXAFS data indicate that the Cu chemistry is strongly affected by the chloride treatments---predominantly Cu2Te when Cu was diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film, but a Cu2O environment when Cu was diffused after

  3. Structural transitions of mechanically alloyed Fe 100- xCu x systems studied by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Shiqiang; Yan, Wensheng; Li, Yuzhi; Liu, Wenhan; Fan, Jiangwei; Zhang, Xinyi

    2001-11-01

    The local structures of the immiscible Fe 100- xCu x alloys ( x=0, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80 and 100) produced by mechanical alloying have been investigated by X-ray absorption fine structure technique. For the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40, the local environment around the Fe atoms changes from bcc to fcc structure and the Cu atoms maintain the original coordination geometry after milling for 160 h. In contrast, the local structures around the Cu atoms in both Fe 80Cu 20 and Fe 90Cu 10 alloys exhibit a transition from fcc to bcc structure. Furthermore, we found that the coordination numbers N in the first shell of the Fe and Cu atoms were largely deviated from the stoichiometric composition for the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40. The Debye-waller factor σ of the fcc Fe-Cu phase is larger than that of the bcc Fe-Cu phase, and the σ (0.099 Å) around Fe atoms is larger than that around Cu atoms (0.089 Å) in the Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩾40. This indicates that the mechanically alloyed Fe 100- xCu x supersaturated solid solutions with x⩾40 is not a homogeneous alloy, but consists of fcc Fe-rich and fcc Cu-rich regions. However, In Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions with x⩽20, the Cu atoms were almost homogeneously solved into the bcc Fe-Cu phase. A possible mechanism for bcc-to-fcc and fcc-to-bcc changes in Fe 100- xCu x solid solutions is discussed in relation to the interdiffusion and the transition induced by the ball milling.

  4. Characterization of protein immobilization at silver surfaces bynear edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X.; Jang, C.-H.; Zheng, F.; J rgensen, A.; Denlinger, J.D.; Dickson, K.A.; Raines, R.T.; Abbott, N.L.; Himpsel, F.J.

    2006-06-21

    Ribonuclease A (RNase A) is immobilized on silver surfacesin oriented and random form via self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) ofalkanethiols. The immobilization process is characterized step-by-stepusing chemically selective near-edge X-ray absorption fine structurespectroscopy (NEXAFS) at the C, N, and S K-edges. Causes of imperfectimmobilization are pinpointed, such as oxidation and partial desorptionof the alkanethiol SAMs and incomplete coverage. The orientation of theprotein layer manifests itself in an 18 percent polarization dependenceof the NEXAFS signal from the N 1s to pi* transition of the peptide bond,which is not seen for a random orientation. The S 1s to C-S sigma*transition exhibits an even larger polarization dependence of 41 percent,which is reduced to 5 percent for a random orientation. A quantitativemodel is developed that explains the sign and magnitude of thepolarization dependence at both edges. The results demonstrate thatNEXAFS is able to characterize surface reactions during theimmobilization of proteins and to provide insight into their orientationson surfaces.

  5. Time-variability of the fine-structure constant expected from the Oklo constraint and the QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2003-10-01

    The data from the QSO absorption lines indicating a nonzero time-variability of the fine-structure constant has been re-analyzed on the basis of a ``damped-oscillator'' fit, as motivated by the same type of behavior of a scalar field, dilaton, which mimics a cosmological constant to understand the accelerating universe. We find nearly as good fit to the latest data as the simple weighted mean. In this way, we offer a way to fit the more stringent result from the Oklo phenomenon, as well.

  6. PREFACE: The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Z. Y.

    2013-04-01

    The 15th International Conference on X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS15) was held on 22-28 July 2012 in Beijing, P. R. China. About 340 scientists from 34 countries attended this important international event. Main hall Figure 1. Main hall of XAFS15. The rapidly increasing application of XAFS to the study of a large variety of materials and the operation of the new SR source led to the first meeting of XAFS users in 1981 in England. Following that a further 14 International Conferences have been held. Comparing a breakdown of attendees according to their national origin, it is clear that participation is spreading to include attendees from more and more countries every year. The strategy of development in China of science and education is increasing quickly thanks to the large investment in scientific and technological research and infrastructure. There are three Synchrotron Radiation facilities in mainland China, Hefei Light Source (HLS) in the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSRL), Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility (BSRF) in the Institute of High Energy Physics, and Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF) in the Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics. More than 10000 users and over 5000 proposals run at these facilities. Among them, many teams from the USA, Japan, German, Italy, Russia, and other countries. More than 3000 manuscript were published in SCI journals, including (incomplete) Science (7), Nature (10), Nature Series (7), PNAS (3), JACS (12), Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. (15), Nano Lett. (2), etc. In XAFS15, the participants contributed 18 plenary invited talks, 16 parallel invited talks, 136 oral presentations, 12 special talks, and 219 poster presentations. Wide communication was promoted in the conference halls, the classical banquet restaurant, and the Great Wall. Parallel hallCommunicationPoster room Figure 2. Parallel hallFigure 3. CommunicationFigure 4. Poster room This volume contains 136 invited and contributed papers

  7. Further constraints on variation of the fine-structure constant from alkali-doublet QSO absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Prochaska, J. X.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a precise probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We constrain variation in α in 21 Keck/HIRES Siiv absorption systems using the alkali-doublet (AD) method in which changes in α are related to changes in the doublet spacing. The precision obtained with the AD method has been increased by a factor of 3: Δα/α=(-0.5+/-1.3)×10-5. We also analyse potential systematic errors in this result. Finally, we compare the AD method with the many-multiplet method, which has achieved an order of magnitude greater precision, and we discuss the future of the AD method.

  8. X-ray absorption fine structure study of aging behavior of oxidized copper in CdTe films

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiangxin; Compaan, A.D.; Terry, J.

    2005-10-19

    We have used the MR-CAT beamline of the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to study the fine structure in the Cu K-edge X-ray absorption in 2 {micro}m thick polycrystalline films of CdTe on fused silica. 4 nm of evaporated Cu is diffused either with or without prior vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatments in dry air. The phase-uncorrected radial distribution function inferred from the absorption fine structure indicates predominantly Cu{sub 2}Te when Cu is diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film but indicates a Cu{sub 2}O environment when Cu is diffused after the vapor CdCl{sub 2} treatment. We believe most of the diffused Cu decorates grain boundaries as oxides, consistent with the low doping densities typically observed in CdTe solar cells. This Cu{sub 2}O likely plays a role in grain-boundary passivation. We also found that the chemical environment around Cu atoms in both CdTe and real cells can change with light soaking. This instability of Cu{sub 2}O in sputtered CdTe could contribute to cell degradation.

  9. Exploration of Heterogeneous Chemistry in Model Atmospheric Particles Using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Bramante,J.; Hinrichs, R.; Brown, E.; Calvin, S.

    2007-01-01

    As models of the composition and heterogeneous chemical reactions of the troposphere undergo refinement, novel application of state-of-the-art analytical techniques will be necessary to propound realistic characterizations of mineral dust chemistry. In this study, strontium carbonate particles treated with gaseous nitric acid and nitrogen dioxide were examined with X-ray absorption fine structure analysis (EXAFS). The X-ray spectra of carbonate and nitrate standards were fitted to ab initio calculations, which were used to determine the structure and consistency of strontium nitrate formed on strontium carbonate. By examining differences in mean square radial displacement and lattice spacing values obtained for bulk Sr(NO3)2 as compared to Sr(NO3)2 formed on SrCO3, EXAFS proves effective as a tool for investigating the local structure and composition of heterogeneous aerosol particles. The implications of findings on reacted strontium carbonate for atmospheric models of calcium carbonate aerosol are discussed.

  10. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic determination of plutonium speciation at the Rocky Flats environmental technology

    SciTech Connect

    Lezama-pacheco, Juan S; Conradson, Steven D; Clark, David L

    2008-01-01

    X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectroscopy was used to probe the speciation of the ppm level Pu in thirteen soil and concrete samples from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site in support of the site remediation effort that has been successfully completed since these measurements. In addition to X-ray Absorption Near Edge Spectra, two of the samples yielded Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure spectra that could be analyzed by curve-fits. Most of these spectra exhibited features consistent with PU(IV), and more specificaJly, PuO{sub 2+x}-type speciation. Two were ambiguous, possibly indicating that Pu that was originally present in a different form was transforming into PuO{sub 2+x}, and one was interpreted as demonstrating the presence of an unusual Pu(VI) compound, consistent with its source being spills from a PUREX purification line onto a concrete floor and the resultant extreme conditions. These experimental results therefore validated models that predicted that insoluble PuO{sub 2+x} would be the most stable form of Pu in equilibrium with air and water even when the source terms were most likely Pu metal with organic compounds or a Pu fire. A corollary of these models' predictions and other in situ observations is therefore that the minimal transport of Pu that occurred on the site was via the resuspension and mobilization of colloidal particles. Under these conditions, the small amounts of diffusely distributed Pu that were left on the site after its remediation pose only a negligible hazard.

  11. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Khalid, S; Caliebe, W; Siddons, P; So, I; Clay, B; Lenhard, T; Hanson, J; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A I; Marinkovic, N; Hould, N; Ginder-Vogel, M; Landrot, G L; Sparks, D L; Ganjoo, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  12. Zinc cysteine active sites of metalloproteins: a density functional theory and x-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Dimakis, Nicholas; Farooqi, Mohammed Junaid; Garza, Emily Sofia; Bunker, Grant

    2008-03-21

    Density functional theory (DFT) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy are complementary tools for the biophysical study of active sites in metalloproteins. DFT is used to compute XAFS multiple scattering Debye Waller factors, which are then employed in genetic algorithm-based fitting process to obtain a global fit to the XAFS in the space of fitting parameters. Zn-Cys sites, which serve important functions as transcriptional switches in Zn finger proteins and matrix metalloproteinases, previously have proven intractable by this method; here these limitations are removed. In this work we evaluate optimal DFT nonlocal functionals and basis sets for determining optimal geometries and vibrational densities of states of mixed ligation Zn(His)(4-n)(Cys)(n) sites. Theoretical results are compared to experimental XAFS measurements and Raman spectra from the literature and tabulated for use.

  13. Note: Construction of x-ray scattering and x-ray absorption fine structure beamline at the Pohang Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Ik-Jae; Yu, Chung-Jong; Yun, Young-Duck; Lee, Chae-Soon; Seo, In Deuk; Kim, Hyo-Yun; Lee, Woul-Woo; Chae, Keun Hwa

    2010-02-15

    A new hard x-ray beamline, 10B KIST-PAL beamline (BL10B), has been designed and constructed at the Pohang Light Source (PLS) in Korea. The beamline, operated by Pohang Accelerator Laboratory-Korean Institute of Science and Technology consortium, is dedicated to x-ray scattering (XRS) and x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. X rays with photon energies from 4.0 to 16.0 keV are delivered to the experimental station passing a collimating mirror, a fixed-exit double-crystal Si(111) monochromator, and a toroidal mirror. Basic experimental equipments for XAFS measurement, a high resolution diffractometry, an image plate detector system, and a hot stage have been prepared for the station. From our initial commissioning and performance testing of the beamline, it is observed that BL10B beamline can perform XRS and XAFS measurements successfully.

  14. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). PMID:27250401

  15. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM).

  16. Dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation studied with time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum in an energy range well above the ablation threshold with the ultrafast time-resolved x-ray-absorption fine structure imaging technique. Analyzing the spectral structures near the L absorption edge that appeared in one-dimensional images of soft-x-ray absorbance, we successfully identified doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid nanoparticles, and possible atomic clusters in the expanding ablation plume. We also clarified that the ejected particles depend strongly on the laser irradiation intensity. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ablation particles allows us to estimate the spatial distribution of atomic density and the ejection velocity of each type of particle. In particular, we discuss the temporal sequence of the particle ejection in the early stages of plume expansion. Our experimental results strongly support the idea that photomechanical fragmentation and vaporization are dominant mechanisms for the production of liquid nanoparticles and neutral atoms, respectively, in femtosecond laser ablation induced in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Possible evidence for a variable fine-structure constant from QSO absorption lines: motivations, analysis and results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, M. T.; Webb, J. K.; Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Barrow, J. D.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-11-01

    An experimental search for variation in the fundamental coupling constants is strongly motivated by modern high-energy physics theories. Comparison of quasar (QSO) absorption-line spectra with laboratory spectra provides a sensitive probe for variability of the fine-structure constant, α, over cosmological time-scales. We have previously developed and applied a new method providing an order-of-magnitude gain in precision over previous optical astrophysical constraints. Here we extend that work by including new quasar spectra of damped Lyman-α absorption systems. We also reanalyse our previous lower-redshift data and confirm our initial results. The constraints on α come from simultaneous fitting of absorption lines of subsets of the following species: Mgi, Mgii, Alii, Aliii, Siii, Crii, Feii, Niii and Znii. We present a detailed description of our methods and results based on an analysis of 49 quasar absorption systems (towards 28 QSOs) covering the redshift range [formmu2]0.5

  18. Sulfur 1s near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behyan, Shirin; Hu, Yongfeng; Urquhart, Stephen G.

    2013-06-01

    Thiophenic compounds are major constituents of fossil fuels and pose problems for fuel refinement. The quantification and speciation of these compounds is of great interest in different areas such as biology, fossil fuels studies, geology, and archaeology. Sulfur 1s Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has emerged as a qualitative and quantitative method for sulfur speciation. A firm understanding of the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of organosulfur species is required for these analytical studies. To support this development, the sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra of simple thiols and thioethers were previously examined, and are now extended to studies of thiophenic and aromatic thioether compounds, in the gas and condensed phases. High-resolution spectra have been further analyzed with the aid of Improved Virtual Orbital (IVO) and Δ(self-consistent field) ab initio calculations. Experimental sulfur 1s NEXAFS spectra show fine features predicted by calculation, and the combination of experiment and calculation has been used to improve the assignment of spectroscopic features important for the speciation and quantification of sulfur compounds. Systematic differences between gas and condensed phases are also explored; these differences suggest a significant role for conformational effects in the NEXAFS spectra of condensed species.

  19. Studying the local structures of novel materials using the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yu

    2009-12-01

    In this dissertation, investigations on the local lattice structures for a variety of novel materials using Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) technique are presented. Different experiment schemes were applied to obtain EXAFS data with high quality, and some interesting results were obtained by careful analysis. The power of the EXAFS technique was once again proved. In Chapter 1, I first briefly introduce the EXAFS theory and experiments, then give readers who are not familiar with this technique a short introduction on data reduction and analysis, and finally discuss some problems that are easily ignored in the interpretation of the experiment results. In Chapter 2, a temperature-dependent EXAFS investigation of La 1-xCaxMnO 3 is presented for the concentration range that spans the ferromagnetic-insulator (FMI) to ferromagnetic-metal (FMM) transition region, x = 0.16, 0.18, 0.20, and 0.22; the titrated hole concentrations are slightly higher y = 0.2, 0.22, 0.24, and 0.25 respectively. In Chapter 3, I report EXAFS studies of n- and p-type Ba8Ga 16Ge30 samples (type I clathrate) at the Ga, Ge, and Ba K-edges, to probe the local structure, particularly around the Ba atoms located inside 20- and 24-atom cages (Ba1 and Ba2 sites respectively) formed of Ga/Ge atoms. In agreement with diffraction analysis we find Ba2 is off-center, with a component in the bc plane (0.15 A) comparable to that found in diffraction; however, under the assumption of a stiff cage we also require a significant a component. This suggests a coupling or attraction between the Ba2 atoms and the hexagonal rings at the top or bottom of the cage that encloses the Ba2 site. In Chapter 4, I report detailed degradation and rejuvenation studies for AC electro-luminescence (EL) devices made using the phosphor ZnS:Cu,CI. We find that the AC EL emission spectra vary considerably with AC driving frequency but all spectra can be fit to a sum of four Gaussians. The combined experiments place

  20. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements of quasi-isentropically compressed vanadium targets on the OMEGA laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T. R.; Sangster, T. C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Remington, B. A.; Allen, P. G.; Pollaine, S. M.; Lorenzana, H. E.; Lorenz, K. T.; Hawreliak, J. A.

    2008-06-15

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to {approx}0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  1. Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Measurements of Quasi-Isentropically Compressed Vanadium Targets on the OMEGA Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Yaakobi, B.; Boehly, T.R.; Sangster, T.C.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Remington, B.A.; Allen, P.G.; Pollaine, S.M.; Lorenzana, H.E.; Lorenz, K.T.; Hawreliak, J.A.

    2008-07-21

    The use of in situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) for characterizing nanosecond laser-shocked vanadium, titanium, and iron has recently been demonstrated. These measurements are extended to laser-driven, quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE). The radiation source (backlighter) for EXAFS in all of these experiments is obtained by imploding a spherical target on the OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 508 (1995)]. Isentropic compression (where the entropy is kept constant) enables to reach high compressions at relatively low temperatures. The absorption spectra are used to determine the temperature and compression in a vanadium sample quasi-isentropically compressed to pressures of up to ~0.75 Mbar. The ability to measure the temperature and compression directly is unique to EXAFS. The drive pressure is calibrated by substituting aluminum for the vanadium and interferometrically measuring the velocity of the back target surface by the velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). The experimental results obtained by EXAFS and VISAR agree with each other and with the simulations of a hydrodynamic code. The role of a shield to protect the sample from impact heating is studied. It is shown that the shield produces an initial weak shock that is followed by a quasi-isentropic compression at a relatively low temperature. The role of radiation heating from the imploding target as well as from the laser-absorption region is studied. The results show that in laser-driven ICE, as compared with laser-driven shocks, comparable compressions can be achieved at lower temperatures. The EXAFS results show important details not seen in the VISAR results.

  2. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy of naphthalene diimide-thiophene co-polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Gann, Eliot; McNeill, Christopher R.; Szumilo, Monika; Sirringhaus, Henning; Sommer, Michael; Maniam, Subashani; Langford, Steven J.; Thomsen, Lars

    2014-04-28

    Near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is an important tool for probing the structure of conjugated polymer films used in organic electronic devices. High-performance conjugated polymers are often donor-acceptor co-polymers which feature a repeat unit with multiple functional groups. To facilitate better application of NEXAFS spectroscopy to the study of such materials, improved understanding of the observed NEXAFS spectral features is required. In order to examine how the NEXAFS spectrum of a donor-acceptor co-polymer relates to the properties of the sub-units, a series of naphthalene diimide-thiophene-based co-polymers have been studied where the nature and length of the donor co-monomer has been systematically varied. The spectra of these materials are compared with that of a thiophene homopolymer and naphthalene diimide monomer enabling peak assignment and the influence of inter-unit electronic coupling to be assessed. We find that while it is possible to attribute peaks within the π* manifold as arising primarily due to the naphthalene diimide or thiophene sub-units, very similar dichroism of these peaks is observed indicating that it may not be possible to separately probe the molecular orientation of the separate sub-units with carbon K-edge NEXAFS spectroscopy.

  3. Interaction of Isophorone with Pd(111): A Combination of Infrared Reflection–Absorption Spectroscopy, Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Atomistic level understanding of interaction of α,β-unsaturated carbonyls with late transition metals is a key prerequisite for rational design of new catalytic materials with the desired selectivity toward C=C or C=O bond hydrogenation. The interaction of this class of compounds with transition metals was investigated on α,β-unsaturated ketone isophorone on Pd(111) as a prototypical system. In this study, infrared reflection–absorption spectroscopy (IRAS), near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments, and density functional theory calculations including van der Waals interactions (DFT+vdW) were combined to obtain detailed information on the binding of isophorone to palladium at different coverages and on the effect of preadsorbed hydrogen on the binding and adsorption geometry. According to these experimental observations and the results of theoretical calculations, isophorone adsorbs on Pd(111) in a flat-lying geometry at low coverages. With increasing coverage, both C=C and C=O bonds of isophorone tilt with respect to the surface plane. The tilting is considerably more pronounced for the C=C bond on the pristine Pd(111) surface, indicating a prominent perturbation and structural distortion of the conjugated π system upon interaction with Pd. Preadsorbed hydrogen leads to higher tilting angles of both π bonds, which points to much weaker interaction of isophorone with hydrogen-precovered Pd and suggests the conservation of the in-plane geometry of the conjugated π system. The results of the DFT+vdW calculations provide further insights into the perturbation of the molecular structure of isophorone on Pd(111). PMID:26089998

  4. Interatomic distances for some first row transition element dichlorides isolated in cryogenic matrices using x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beattie, Ian R.; Spicer, Mark D.; Young, Nigel A.

    1994-06-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) data for several 3d transition metal dichlorides isolated in nitrogen, argon, or methane matrices have been collected and analyzed. The bond lengths obtained are in reasonable agreement with those from vapor phase electron diffraction. The results are briefly discussed with reference to Badger's rule extended to triatomics.

  5. Precise limits on cosmological variability of the fine-structure constant with zinc and chromium quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Malec, Adrian L.; Prochaska, J. Xavier

    2016-09-01

    The strongest transitions of Zn and Cr II are the most sensitive to relative variations in the fine-structure constant (Δα/α) among the transitions commonly observed in quasar absorption spectra. They also lie within just 40 Å of each other (rest frame), so they are resistant to the main systematic error affecting most previous measurements of Δα/α: long-range distortions of the wavelength calibration. While Zn and Cr II absorption is normally very weak in quasar spectra, we obtained high signal-to-noise, high-resolution echelle spectra from the Keck and Very Large Telescopes of nine rare systems where it is strong enough to constrain Δα/α from these species alone. These provide 12 independent measurements (three quasars were observed with both telescopes) at redshifts 1.0-2.4, 11 of which pass stringent reliability criteria. These 11 are all consistent with Δα/α = 0 within their individual uncertainties of 3.5-13 parts per million (ppm), with a weighted mean Δα/α = 0.4 ± 1.4stat ± 0.9sys ppm (1σ statistical and systematic uncertainties), indicating no significant cosmological variations in α. This is the first statistical sample of absorbers that is resistant to long-range calibration distortions (at the <1 ppm level), with a precision comparable to previous large samples of ˜150 (distortion-affected) absorbers. Our systematic error budget is instead dominated by much shorter range distortions repeated across echelle orders of individual spectra.

  6. Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure measurements of copper: Local dynamics, anharmonicity, and thermal expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Fornasini, P.; Beccara, S.; Dalba, G.; Grisenti, R.; Sanson, A.; Vaccari, M.; Rocca, F.

    2004-11-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) of copper has been measured from 4 to 500 K and analyzed by the cumulant method, to check the effectiveness of EXAFS as a probe of local dynamics and thermal expansion. The comparison between parallel mean square relative displacements (MSRD) of the first four coordination shells has allowed detecting a significant deviation from a pure Debye behavior. The first-shell EXAFS thermal expansion is larger than the crystallographic one: the difference has allowed evaluating the perpendicular MSRD, whose Debye temperature is slightly larger than the one of the parallel MSRD, due to anisotropy effects. High-order first-shell cumulants are in good agreement with quantum perturbative models. The anharmonic contribution to the first-shell parallel MSRD amounts to less than 1.5 percent. The third cumulant cannot be neglected in the analysis, if accurate values of the first cumulant are sought; it cannot however be used to directly estimate the thermal expansion. The shape of the effective pair potential is independent of temperature; a rigid shift, partially due to the relative motion perpendicular to the bond direction, is however observed.

  7. Mechanism of Pb Adsorption to Fatty Acid Langmuir Monolayers Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Boyanov, M.I.; Kmetko, J.; Shibata, T.; Datta, A.; Dutta, P.; Bunker, B.A.

    2010-09-30

    The local atomic environment of lead (Pb) adsorbed to a CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 19}COOH Langmuir monolayer was investigated in situ using grazing-incidence X-ray absorption fine structure (GI-XAFS) spectroscopy at the Pb L{sub III} edge. Measurements were performed at pH 6.5 of the 10{sup -5} M PbCl{sub 2} solution subphase, a condition under which grazing incidence diffraction (GID) revealed a large-area commensurate superstructure underneath the close-packed organic monolayer. The XAFS results indicate covalent binding of the Pb cations to the carboxyl headgroups, and the observed Pb-Pb coordination suggests that the metal is adsorbed as a hydrolysis polymer, rather than as individual Pb{sup 2+} ions. The data are consistent with a bidentate chelating mechanism and a one Pb atom to one carboxyl headgroup binding stoichiometry. We discuss how this adsorption model can explain the peculiarities observed with Pb in previous metal-Langmuir monolayer studies. A systematic study of lead perchlorate and lead acetate aqueous solutions is presented and used in the analysis. XAFS multiple scattering effects from alignment of the Pb-C-C atoms in the lead acetate solutions are reported.

  8. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Mn Coordination in Doped Perovskite SrTiO3

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, I.; Krayzman, V; Woicik, J; Tkach, A; Vilarinho, P

    2010-01-01

    The coordination of Mn in doped SrTiO{sub 3} ceramics having nominal compositions SrTi{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}O{sub 3} and Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sub 0.02}TiO{sub 3} was analyzed using x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements. As expected, Mn{sup 4+} substitution for Ti{sup 4+} leads to Mn occupancy of the octahedral B-sites of ABO{sub 3} perovskite lattice with a Mn-O bond distance of 1.902 {angstrom} (compared to 1.953 {angstrom} for Ti-O) and no significant local distortions around the Mn atoms. In contrast, for the composition Sr{sub 0.98}Mn{sup 0.02}TiO{sub 3}, Mn segregates to both the A-sites (as Mn{sup 2+}) and the B-sites (predominantly as Mn{sup 4+}). Extended XAFS confirms strong ({approx} 0.77 {angstrom}) displacements of Mn{sup 2+} cations off the ideal A-site positions along <001> directions with a significant distortion of several coordination shells around the dopant atoms.

  9. Chromium oxide as a metal diffusion barrier layer: An x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamad Mohiddon, Md.; Lakshun Naidu, K.; Ghanashyam Krishna, M.; Dalba, G.; Ahmed, S. I.; Rocca, F.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction at the interface between chromium and amorphous Silicon (a-Si) films in the presence of a sandwich layer of chromium oxide is investigated using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. The oxidized interface was created, in situ, prior to the deposition of a 400 nm tick a-Si layer over a 50 nm tick Cr layer. The entire stack of substrate/metallic Cr/Cr2O3/a-Si was then annealed at temperatures from 300 up to 700 °C. Analysis of the near edge and extended regions of each XAFS spectrum shows that only a small fraction of Cr is able to diffuse through the oxide layer up to 500 °C, while the remaining fraction is buried under the oxide layer in the form of metallic Cr. At higher temperatures, diffusion through the oxide layer is enhanced and the diffused metallic Cr reacts with a-Si to form CrSi2. At 700 °C, the film contains Cr2O3 and CrSi2 without evidence of unreacted metallic Cr. The activation energy and diffusion coefficient of Cr are quantitatively determined in the two temperature regions, one where the oxide acts as diffusion barrier and another where it is transparent to Cr diffusion. It is thus demonstrated that chromium oxide can be used as a diffusion barrier to prevent metal diffusion into a-Si.

  10. Mercury Speciation by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy and Sequential Chemical Extractions: A Comparison of Speciation Methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, C.S.; Bloom, N.S.; Rytuba, J.J.; Brown, Gordon E.

    2003-01-01

    Determining the chemical speciation of mercury in contaminated mining and industrial environments is essential for predicting its solubility, transport behavior, and potential bioavailability as well as for designing effective remediation strategies. In this study, two techniques for determining Hg speciation-X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and sequential chemical extractions (SCE)-are independently applied to a set of samples with Hg concentrations ranging from 132 to 7539 mg/kg to determine if the two techniques provide comparable Hg speciation results. Generally, the proportions of insoluble HgS (cinnabar, metacinnabar) and HgSe identified by XAFS correlate well with the proportion of Hg removed in the aqua regia extraction demonstrated to remove HgS and HgSe. Statistically significant (> 10%) differences are observed however in samples containing more soluble Hg-containing phases (HgCl2, HgO, Hg3S2O 4). Such differences may be related to matrix, particle size, or crystallinity effects, which could affect the apparent solubility of Hg phases present. In more highly concentrated samples, microscopy techniques can help characterize the Hg-bearing species in complex multiphase natural samples.

  11. The forms of trace metals in an Illinois basin coal by x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chou, I.-Ming; Bruinius, J.A.; Lytle, J.M.; Ruch, R.R.; Huggins, Frank E.; Huffman, G.P.; Ho, K.K.

    1997-01-01

    Utilities burning Illinois coals currently do not consider trace elements in their flue gas emissions. After the US EPA completes an investigation on trace elements, however, this may change and flue gas emission standards may be established. The mode of occurrence of a trace element may determine its cleanability and Hue gas emission potential. X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) is a spectroscopic technique that can differentiate the mode of occurrence of an element, even at the low concentrations that trace elements are found in coal. This is principally accomplished by comparing the XAFS spectra of a coal to a database of reference sample spectra. This study evaluated the technique as a potential tool to examine six trace elements in an Illinois #6 coal. For the elements As and Zn, the present database provides a definitive interpretation on their mode of occurrence. For the elements Ti, V, Cr, and Mn the database of XAFS spectra of trace elements in coal was still too limited to allow a definitive interpretation. The data obtained on these elements, however, was sufficient to rule out several of the mineralogical possibilities that have been suggested previously. The results indicate that XAFS is a promising technique for the study of trace elements in coal.

  12. X-ray absorption fine structure determination of pH-dependent U-bacterial cell wall interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, S. D.; Kemner, K. M.; Fein, J. B.; Fowle, D. A.; Boyanov, M. I.; Bunker, B. A.; Yee, N.

    2002-11-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements was used at the U L3-edge to directly determine the pH dependence of the cell wall functional groups responsible for the absorption of aqueous UO 22+ to Bacillus subtilis from pH 1.67 to 4.80. Surface complexation modeling can be used to predict metal distributions in water-rock systems, and it has been used to quantify bacterial adsorption of metal cations. However, successful application of these models requires a detailed knowledge not only of the type of bacterial surface site involved in metal adsorption/desorption, but also of the binding geometry. Previous acid-base titrations of B. subtilis cells suggested that three surface functional group types are important on the cell wall; these groups have been postulated to correspond to carboxyl, phosphoryl, and hydroxyl sites. When the U(VI) adsorption to B. subtilis is measured, observed is a significant pH-independent absorption at low pH values (<3.0), ascribed to an interaction between the uranyl cation and a neutrally charged phosphoryl group on the cell wall. The present study provides independent quantitative constraints on the types of sites involved in uranyl binding to B. subtilis from pH 1.67 to 4.80. The XAFS results indicate that at extremely low pH (pH 1.67) UO 22+ binds exclusively to phosphoryl functional groups on the cell wall, with an average distance between the U atom and the P atom of 3.64 ± 0.01 Å. This U-P distance indicates an inner-sphere complex with an oxygen atom shared between the UO 22+ and the phosphoryl ligand. The P signal at extremely low pH value is consistent with the UO 22+ binding to a protonated phosphoryl group, as previously ascribed. With increasing pH (3.22 and 4.80), UO 22+ binds increasingly to bacterial surface carboxyl functional groups, with an average distance between the U atom and the C atom of 2.89 ± 0.02 Å. This U-C distance indicates an inner-sphere complex with two oxygen atoms shared between the UO 22

  13. Dynamical Study of Femtosecond-Laser-Ablated Liquid-Aluminum Nanoparticles Using Spatiotemporally Resolved X-Ray-Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2007-10-19

    We study the temperature evolution of aluminum nanoparticles generated by femtosecond laser ablation with spatiotemporally resolved x-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. We successfully identify the nanoparticles based on the L-edge absorption fine structure of the ablation plume in combination with the dependence of the edge structure on the irradiation intensity and the expansion velocity of the plume. In particular, we show that the lattice temperature of the nanoparticles is estimated from the L-edge slope, and that its spatial dependence reflects the cooling of the nanoparticles during plume expansion. The results reveal that the emitted nanoparticles travel in a vacuum as a condensed liquid phase with a lattice temperature of about 2500 to 4200 K in the early stage of plume expansion.

  14. Applications of x ray absorption fine structure to the in situ study of the effect of cobalt in nickel hydrous oxide electrodes for fuel cells and rechargeable batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Sunghyun; Tryk, Donald A.; Scherson, Daniel A.; Antonio, Mark R.

    1993-01-01

    Electronic and structural aspects of composite nickel-cobalt hydrous oxides have been examined in alkaline solutions using in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results obtained have indicated that cobalt in this material is present as cobaltic ions regardless of the oxidation state of nickel in the lattice. Furthermore, careful analysis of the Co K-edge Extended X-ray absorption fine structure data reveals that the co-electrodeposition procedure generates a single phase, mixed metal hydrous oxide, in which cobaltic ions occupy nickel sites in the NiO2 sheet-like layers and not two intermixed phases each consisting of a single metal hydrous oxide.

  15. Electronic structure of octane on Cu(1 1 1) and Ni(1 1 1) studied by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Entani, Shiro; Ikeda, Susumu; Yoshikawa, Genki; Nakai, Ikuyo; Kondoh, Hiroshi; Ohta, Toshiaki; Saiki, Koichiro

    2007-09-01

    The electronic structure of an octane film grown on Cu(1 1 1) and Ni(1 1 1) was studied using C K-edge near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak was observed on the bulk edge onset for the 1 ML thick octane films on the metal substrates. The pre-peak originated from metal induced gap states (MIGS) in the band gap of octane. The intensity of the pre-peak for octane/Ni(1 1 1) was the same as that of octane/Cu(1 1 1), suggesting that there was little difference in the density of unoccupied MIGS between the octane film on Ni(1 1 1) and Cu(1 1 1). We discuss the metal dependence of the density of unoccupied MIGS on the band structure of the metals.

  16. Structures of Liquid GaSb and InSb Studied with the Extended X-Ray-Absorption Fine-Structure Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuren; Lu, Kunquan; Li, Chenxi

    1997-11-01

    The extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure technique is applied to study the local atomic structures of liquid GaSb and InSb using an improved sample holding method. The partial pair distribution functions and coordination distributions of the two liquids are given by using reverse Monte Carlo simulation. The coordination numbers in liquid GaSb are mostly 5 and 6, in addition to which there are about 15% of 4 coordination and about 10% of 7 coordination. On average, the coordination number is 5.4. The results are similar in liquid InSb. This structural study provides some hints of the metallic behavior and density increase in the liquid.

  17. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction.

  18. Adsorption of dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110): a photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study.

    PubMed

    Jackman, Mark J; Syres, Karen L; Cant, David J H; Hardman, Samantha J O; Thomas, Andrew G

    2014-07-29

    Synchrotron radiation photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) techniques have been used to study the adsorption of dopamine on a rutile TiO2 (110) single crystal. Photoemission results suggest that dopamine bonds through the oxygen molecules in a bidentate fashion. From the data, it is ambiguous whether the oxygens bond to the same 5-fold coordinated surface titanium atom or bridges across two, although based on the bonding of pyrocatechol on rutile TiO2 (110), it is likely that the dopamine bridges two titanium atoms. Using the searchlight effect, the carbon K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure NEXAFS spectra recorded for dopamine on rutile TiO2 (110) show the phenyl ring to be oriented at 78° ± 5° from the surface and twisted 11 ± 10° relative to the (001) direction. PMID:25003716

  19. High resolution spectrometer for extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements in the 6 keV to 15 keV energy range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seely, J. F.; Hudson, L. T.; Henins, Albert; Feldman, U.

    2016-11-01

    A Cauchois transmission-crystal spectrometer has been developed with high crystal resolving power in the 6 keV-15 keV energy range and sufficient sensitivity to record single-shot spectra from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Titan laser and other comparable or more energetic lasers. The spectrometer capabilities were tested by recording the W L transitions from a laboratory source and the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectrum through a Cu foil.

  20. Orientation-dependent local structural properties of Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O nanorods studied by extended X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Jeong, E S; Park, Changin; Jin, Zhenlan; Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Han, S W

    2013-03-01

    The orientation-dependent structural properties of Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O nanorods with different Mg concentrations were investigated quantitatively using polarization-dependent extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Zn K edge. Vertically-aligned Zn(1-x)Mg(x)O nanorods were synthesized on Si substrates using catalyst free metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Polarization-dependent EXAFS measurements showed that Mg ions mainly occupied the Zn sites of the nanorods. EXAFS revealed that the distance between Zn-Mg pairs in all directions is - 0.2 angstroms shorter than that of Zn-Zn pairs and that there is a substantial amount of disorder in the Mg sites of the nanorods, independent of Mg concentrations.

  1. Incorporation of Pertechnetate and Perrhenate into Corroded Steel Surfaces Studied by X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Heald, Steve M.; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-04-01

    Batch reaction experiments and solid-phase characterization analyses were completed to examine the uptake of dissolved perrhenate [Re(VII)] or pertechnetate [Tc(VII)] by A-516 steel coupons that corroded in simulated groundwater solutions or dilute water. The goal was to identify the mechanism(s) that control the uptake of 99Tc by corrosion products on carbon steel in the presence of dilute solutions. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (XAFS) was used to study the oxidation states of Re and Tc incorporated into the corroded steel coupon surfaces. X-ray fluorescence maps showed that the corroded coupons contain localized regions enriched in Re or Tc. The Re L3 near edge XAS results for the coupons reacted with Re-spiked waters were consistent with all sorbed Re being present as perrhenate and not significantly reduced to Re(IV). Linear combination fits of the EXAFS signals for the perrhenate and ReIVO2 standards indicate that Re sorbed to the steel coupons corroded in simulated J-13 (a relatively dilute Na-HCO3-CO3 groundwater) and even more dilute waters consists of a maximum of 5 and 10% Re(IV), respectively. The fluorescence results also showed that the Re concentrations increased with increasing time of exposure to the x-ray beam time, which suggests that the perrhenate ions are only weakly bonded to the matrix of the corrosion product. In contrast to the Re results, the Tc K edge XAFS results for the coupons reacted in 99Tc-spiked waters indicate that most of the sorbed Tc had been reduced to Tc(IV). The shape of the near edge and extended fine structure is similar to the Tc(IV)-hydrous ferric oxide (HFO) and not the TcO2-nH2O standard. Differences were noted in the XAS results for steel coupons reacted with waters spiked with 0.001 versus 0.1 mmol/L 99Tc in that much more of the sorbed Tc from 0.001 mmol/L 99Tc experiments was in the form of pertechnetate. Comparison of the XAS results for coupons reacted with 0.001 mmol/L 99Tc-spiked dilute

  2. Electronic structure of individual hybrid colloid particles studied by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy in the X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Henzler, Katja; Guttmann, Peter; Lu, Yan; Polzer, Frank; Schneider, Gerd; Ballauff, Matthias

    2013-02-13

    The electronic structure of individual hybrid particles was studied by nanoscale near-edge X-ray absorption spectromicroscopy. The colloidal particles consist of a solid polystyrene core and a cross-linked poly-N-(isopropylacrylamide) shell with embedded crystalline titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) nanoparticles (d = 6 ± 3 nm). The TiO(2) particles are generated in the carrier network by a sol-gel process at room temperature. The hybrid particles were imaged with photon energy steps of 0.1 eV in their hydrated environment with a cryo transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) at the Ti L(2,3)-edge. By analyzing the image stacks, the obtained near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra of our individual hybrid particles show clearly that our synthesis generates TiO(2) in the anastase phase. Additionally, our spectromicroscopy method permits the determination of the density distribution of TiO(2) in single carrier particles. Therefore, NEXAFS spectroscopy combined with TXM presents a unique method to get in-depth insight into the electronic structure of hybrid materials. PMID:23360082

  3. The determination of interfacial structure and phase transitions in Al/Cu and Al/Ni interfaces by means of surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science); Heald, S.M. )

    1991-01-01

    Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) was used to investigate the interfacial conditions of Al/Cu and Al/Ni shallow buried interfaces. Previous studies using glancing angle extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray reflectivity, photoemission, and SEXAFS produced conflicting results as to whether or not the interfaces between Al and Cu and Al and Ni were reacted upon room temperature deposition. In this study polycrystalline bilayers of Al/Cu and Al/Ni and trilayers of Al/Cu/Al and Al/Ni/Al were deposited on tantalum foil at room temperature in ultra high vacuum and analyzed to evaluate the reactivity of these systems on a nanometer scale. It become overwhelming apparent that the interfacial phase reactions were a function of the vacuum conditions. Samples deposited with the optimum vacuum conditions showed reaction products upon deposition at room temperature which were characterized by comparisons to standards and by least squares fitting the be CuAl{sub 2} and NiAl{sub 3} respectively. The results of this study that the reacted zone thicknesses were readily dependent on the deposition parameters. For both Al on Cu and Al on Ni as well as the metal on Al conditions 10{Angstrom} reaction zones were observed. These reaction zones were smaller than that observed for bilayers of Al on Cu (30{Angstrom}) and Al on Ni (60{Angstrom}) where deposition rates were much higher and samples were much thicker. The reaction species are evident by SEXAFS, where the previous photoemission studies only indicated that changes had occurred. Improved vacuum conditions as compared to the earlier experiments is primarily the reason reactions on deposition were seen in this study as compared to the earlier SEXAFS studies.

  4. The determination of interfacial structure and phase transitions in Al/Cu and Al/Ni interfaces by means of surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barrera, E.V.; Heald, S.M.

    1991-12-31

    Surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure (SEXAFS) was used to investigate the interfacial conditions of Al/Cu and Al/Ni shallow buried interfaces. Previous studies using glancing angle extended x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray reflectivity, photoemission, and SEXAFS produced conflicting results as to whether or not the interfaces between Al and Cu and Al and Ni were reacted upon room temperature deposition. In this study polycrystalline bilayers of Al/Cu and Al/Ni and trilayers of Al/Cu/Al and Al/Ni/Al were deposited on tantalum foil at room temperature in ultra high vacuum and analyzed to evaluate the reactivity of these systems on a nanometer scale. It become overwhelming apparent that the interfacial phase reactions were a function of the vacuum conditions. Samples deposited with the optimum vacuum conditions showed reaction products upon deposition at room temperature which were characterized by comparisons to standards and by least squares fitting the be CuAl{sub 2} and NiAl{sub 3} respectively. The results of this study that the reacted zone thicknesses were readily dependent on the deposition parameters. For both Al on Cu and Al on Ni as well as the metal on Al conditions 10{Angstrom} reaction zones were observed. These reaction zones were smaller than that observed for bilayers of Al on Cu (30{Angstrom}) and Al on Ni (60{Angstrom}) where deposition rates were much higher and samples were much thicker. The reaction species are evident by SEXAFS, where the previous photoemission studies only indicated that changes had occurred. Improved vacuum conditions as compared to the earlier experiments is primarily the reason reactions on deposition were seen in this study as compared to the earlier SEXAFS studies.

  5. Iron (III)-silica interactions in aqueous solution: insights from X.-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovski, Gleb S.; Schott, Jacques; Farges, François; Hazemann, Jean-Louis

    2003-10-01

    The influence of aqueous silica on the hydrolysis of iron(III) nitrate and chloride salts in dilute aqueous solutions ( mFe ˜ 0.01 mol/kg) was studied at ambient temperature using X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy at the Fe K-edge. Results show that in Si-free iron nitrate and chloride solutions at acid pH (pH < 2.5), Fe is hexa-coordinated with 6 oxygens of H 2O- and/or OH-groups in the first coordination sphere of the metal, at an Fe-O distance of 2.00 ± 0.01 Å. With increasing pH (2.7 < pH < 13), these groups are rapidly replaced by bridging hydroxyls (-OH-) or oxygens (-O-), and polymerized Fe hydroxide complexes form via Fe-(O/OH)-Fe bonds. In these polymers, the first atomic shell of iron represents a distorted octahedron with six O/OH groups and Fe-O distances ranging from 1.92 to 2.07 Å. The Fe octahedra are linked together by their edges (Fe-Fe distance 2.92-3.12 Å) and corners (Fe-Fe distance ˜3.47 ± 0.03 Å). The Fe-Fe coordination numbers ( Nedge = 1-2; Ncorner = 0.5-0.7) are consistent with the dominant presence of iron dimers, trimers and tetramers at pH 2.5 to 2.9, and of higher-polymerized species at pH > 3. At pH > 2.5 in the presence of aqueous silica, important changes in Fe(III) hydrolysis are detected. In 0.05- m Si solutions (pH ˜ 2.7-3.0), the corner linkages between Fe octahedra in the polymeric complexes disappear, and the Fe-Fe distances corresponding to the edge linkages slightly increase (Fe-Fe edge ˜ 3.12-3.14 Å). The presence of 1 to 2 silicons at 3.18 ± 0.03 Å is detected in the second atomic shell around iron. At basic pH (˜12.7), similar structural changes are observed for the iron second shell. The Fe-Si and Fe-Fe distances and coordination numbers derived in this study are consistent with (1) Fe-Si complex stoichiometries Fe 2Si 1-2 and Fe 3Si 2-3 at pH < 3; (2) structures composed of Fe-Fe dimers and trimers sharing one or two edges of FeO 6-octahedra; and (3) silicon tetrahedra linked to two

  6. A combined fit of total scattering and extended x-ray absorption fine structure data for local-structure determination in crystalline materials

    SciTech Connect

    Proffen, Thomas E; Krayzman, Victor; Levin, Igor; Tucker, Matt

    2009-01-01

    Reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) refinements of local structure using a simultaneous fit of X-ray/neutron total scattering and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data were developed to incorporate an explicit treatment of both single- and multiple-scattering contributions to EXAFS. The refinement algorithm, implemented as an extension to the public domain computer software RMCProfile, enables accurate modeling of EXAFS over distances encompassing several coordination shells around the absorbing species. The approach was first tested on Ni, which exhibits extensive multiple scattering in EXAFS, and then applied to perovskite-like SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3}. This compound crystal1izes with a cubic double-perovskite structure but presents a challenge for local-structure determination using a total pair-distribution function (PDF) alone because of overlapping peaks of the constituent partial PDFs (e.g. Al-O and Nb-O or Sr-O and O-O). The results obtained here suggest that the combined use of the total scattering and EXAFS data provides sufficient constraints for RMC refinements to recover fine details of local structure in complex perovskites. Among other results, it was found that the probability density distribution for Sr in SrAl{sub 1/2}Nb{sub 1/2}O{sub 3} adopts T{sub d} point-group symmetry for the Sr sites, determined by the ordered arrangement of Al and Nb, as opposed to a spherical distribution commonly assumed in traditional Rietveld refinements.

  7. Structural analysis of polymer-protected Pd/Pt bimetallic clusters as dispersed catalysts by using extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Toshima, Naoki; Harada, Masafumi; Yonezawa, Tetsu; Kushihashi, Kakuta; Asakura, Kiyotaka )

    1991-09-19

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) was applied to the determination of the structure of colloidal dispersions of the poly (N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone)-protected palladium/platinum bimetallic clusters, which work as the catalysts for selective partial hydrogenation of 1,3-cyclooctadiene to cyclooctene. The catalytic activity was found to depend on the structure of the bimetallic clusters. The EXAFS data on the Pd/Pt (4/1) bimetallic clusters, which are the most active catalysts, indicate a Pt core structure, in which the 42 Pd atoms are on the surface of the cluster particle and 13 Pt atoms are at the center of the particle, forming a core. In contrast, the Pd/Pt (1/1) bimetallic clusters are suggested to have a modified Pt core structure, in which 28 Pt atoms connect directly with each other, being located both in the core and on the surface, and 27 Pd atoms form three islands on the surface of the cluster particle. These bimetallic clusters work as active catalysts for selective hydrogenation of olefins, selective partial hydrogenation of diene to monoene, and visible light-induced hydrogen generation from water.

  8. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure examination of chemical bonding in sputter deposited boron and boron-nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, A.F.; Hayes, J.P.; Suthreland, D.G.J.

    1996-05-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) is used to examine the chemical bonding in boron and boron-nitride films sputter deposited from a fully-dense, pure boron target. Reactive sputtering is used to prepare the boron-nitride and multilayered films. Although the process of sputter deposition often produces films that lack long range order, NEXAFS reveals the distinguishing features of sp{sup 2} and sp{sup 3} hybridization that are associated with different crystalline structures. The sensitivity of NEXAFS to local order further provides details in bonding modifications that exist in these films.

  9. Temperature dependent evolution of the local electronic structure of atmospheric plasma treated carbon nanotubes: Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure study

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, S. S.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Okpalugo, T. I. T.; Murphy, H.

    2006-09-01

    Near edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy has been employed to obtain the temperature dependent evolution of the electronic structure of acid treated carbon nanotubes, which were further modified by dielectric barrier discharge plasma processing in an ammonia atmosphere. The NEXAFS studies were performed from room temperature up to 900 deg. C. The presence of oxygen and nitrogen containing functional groups was observed in C K edge, N K edge, and O K edge NEXAFS spectra of the multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The N K edge spectra revealed three types of {pi}* features, the source of which was decisively identified by their temperature dependent evolution. It was established that these features are attributed to pyridinelike, NO, and graphitelike structures, respectively. The O K edge indicated that both carbonyl (C=O), {pi}*(CO), and ether C-O-C, {sigma}*(CO), functionalities were present. Upon heating in a vacuum to 900 deg. C the {pi}*(CO) resonances disappeared while the {sigma}*(CO) resonances were still present confirming their higher thermal stability. Heating did not produce a significant change in the {pi}* feature of the C K edge spectrum indicating that the tabular structure of the nanotubes is essentially preserved following the thermal decomposition of the functional groups on the nanotube surface.

  10. Analysis of the near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure of anthracene: A combined theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Klues, Michael; Witte, Gregor; Hermann, Klaus

    2014-01-07

    The near-edge fine structure of the carbon K-edge absorption spectrum of anthracene was measured and theoretically analyzed by density functional theory calculations implemented in the StoBe code. It is demonstrated that the consideration of electronic relaxation of excited states around localized core holes yields a significant improvement of the calculated excitation energies and reproduces the experimentally observed fine structure well. The detailed analysis of excitation spectra calculated for each symmetry inequivalent excitation center allows in particular to examine the influence of chemical shifts and core hole effects on the excitation energies. Moreover, the visualization of final states explains the large variations in the oscillator strength of various transitions as well as the nature of Rydberg-states that exhibit a notable density of states below the ionization potentials.

  11. High temperature extended x-ray absorption fine structure study of multiferroic BiFeO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghavendra Reddy, V.; Meneghini, Carlo; Kothari, Deepti; Gupta, Ajay; Aquilanti, Giuliana

    2012-08-01

    Local atomic structure modifications around Fe atoms in polycrystalline multiferroic BiFeO3 are studied by Fe K edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy as a function of temperature across the Néel temperature (TN = 643 K) in order to reveal local structure modifications related to the magnetic transition. This work demonstrates that on crossing TN the local structure around Fe shows peculiar changes: the Fe-O bond lengths get shorter, the ligand symmetry increases and the Fe-O bond length disorder (σ2) deviates from Debye behaviour. These results suggest that the structural transition at the ferroelectric Curie temperature (TC = 1103 K) is anticipated by early local rearrangement of the structure starting already at TN.

  12. C 1s Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) of substituted benzoic acids: a theoretical and experimental study

    SciTech Connect

    Baldea,I.; Schimmelpfennig, B.; Plaschke, M.; Rothe, J.; Schirmer, J.; Trofimov, A.; Fanghaenel, T.

    2007-01-01

    Ab initio calculations are performed to explain the discrete transitions in experimental C 1s-NEXAFS (near edge X-ray absorption fine structure) spectra of various benzoic acid derivates. Transition energies and oscillator strengths of the contributing C 1s-{pi}* excitations are computed using the ADC(2) (second-order algebraic-diagrammatic construction) method. This method is demonstrated to be well suited for the finite electronic systems represented by these simple organic acids. There is good agreement between experiment and theory reproducing all the relevant spectral features. Some transitions can only be assigned based on a theoretical foundation. Remaining discrepancies between experimental and computed spectra are discussed.

  13. Na-induced bonding and bond-length changes for CO on Pt(111): A near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sette, F.; Stöhr, J.; Kollin, E. B.; Dwyer, D. J.; Gland, J. L.; Robbins, J. L.; Johnson, A. L.

    1985-03-01

    Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure studies above the C and O K edges for CO on Pt(111) reveal a 4-eV shift of the σ shape resonance when Na(0.2 monolayer) is coabsorbed. This allows determination of a Na-induced (0.12+/-0.03)-Å expansion of the C-O bond. Na does not affect the vertical molecular orientation on the surface. Reduction and broadening of the 1s-->2π* resonance and the CO bond lengthening in the presence of Na signifies substantially increased metal to CO backbonding.

  14. State of manganese in the photosynthetic apparatus. 1. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure studies on chloroplasts and di-.mu.-oxo-bridged dimanganese model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J. A.; Robertson, A. S.; Smith, J. P.; Thompson, A. C.; Cooper, S. R.; Klein, M. P.

    1981-09-01

    In this paper, extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on the manganese contained in spinach chloroplasts and on certain di-p-oxo-bridged manganese dimers of the form (X2Mn)O2(MnX2) (X = 2,2'-bipyridine and 1 ,10-phenanthroline) are reported. From these studies, the manganese associated with photosynthetic oxygen evolution is suggested to occur as a bridged transition-metal dimer with most likely another manganese. Finally, extensive details on the analysis are included.

  15. In situ surface extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy of a lead monolayer at a silver(111) electrode/electrolyte interface

    SciTech Connect

    Samant, M.G.; Borges, G.L.; Gordon J.G. II; Melroy, O.R.; Blum, L.

    1987-09-30

    With use of fluorescence detection and grazing incidence excitation, the X-ray absorption spectrum was obtained, at the PbL/sub III/ edge, of a monoatomic adlayer of lead on a silver (111) electrode immersed in solution. The adlayer was produced by under potential deposition from aqueous lead acetate/sodium acetate electrolyte. The edge position and the near-edge structure confirm that the lead is fully reduced to the zerovalent state. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) contains no detectable contribution from lead-silver scattering, either because the lead layer is incommensurate with the underlying silver lattice or because there is large thermal motion of the lead atoms. Instead, the fine structure is due to scattering from a single type of light atom, most likely oxygen. This oxygen must arise from adsorbed water molecules or acetate ions. The lead-oxygen distance changes with the electrode potential from 2.33 +/- 0.02 A at -0.53 V to 2.38 +/- 0.02 A at -1 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, 3 M KCl).

  16. Application of x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) to local-order analysis in Fe-Cr maghemite-like materials

    SciTech Connect

    Montero-Cabrera, M. E. Fuentes-Cobas, L. E.; Macías-Ríos, E.; Fuentes-Montero, M. E.

    2015-07-23

    The maghemite-like oxide system γ-Fe{sub 2-x}Cr{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.75, 1 and 1.25) was studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (XRD). Measurements were performed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource at room temperature, at beamlines 2-1, 2-3 and 4-3. High-resolution XRD patterns were processed by means of the Rietveld method. In cases of atoms being neighbors in the Periodic Table, the order/disorder degree of the considered solutions is indiscernible by “normal” (absence of “anomalous scattering”) diffraction experiments. Thus, maghemite-like materials were investigated by XAFS in both Fe and Cr K-edges to clarify, via short-range structure characterization, the local ordering of the investigated system. Athena and Artemis graphic user interfaces for IFEFFIT and FEFF8.4 codes were employed for XAFS spectra interpretation. Pre-edge decomposition and theoretical modeling of X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) transitions were performed. By analysis of the Cr K-edge XANES, it has been confirmed that Cr is located in an octahedral environment. Fitting of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra was performed under the consideration that the central atom of Fe is allowed to occupy octa- and tetrahedral positions, while Cr occupies only octahedral ones. Coordination number of neighboring atoms, interatomic distances and their quadratic deviation average were determined for x=1, by fitting simultaneously the EXAFS spectra of both Fe and Cr K-edges. The results of fitting the experimental spectra with theoretical standards showed that the cation vacancies tend to follow a regular pattern within the structure of the iron-chromium maghemite (FeCrO{sub 3})

  17. In situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure study during selective alcohol oxidation over Pd/Al2O3 in supercritical carbon dioxide.

    PubMed

    Grunwaldt, Jan-Dierk; Caravati, Matteo; Baiker, Alfons

    2006-05-25

    High-pressure in situ X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data are reported during the selective oxidation of benzyl alcohol to benzaldehyde in supercritical carbon dioxide over a Pd/Al(2)O(3) catalyst (shell impregnated). For this purpose, a continuous-flow system with a spectroscopic cell suitable for in situ X-ray absorption studies on heterogeneous catalysts up to 200 degrees C and 200 bar has been developed. Due to the high contribution of the dense fluid to the overall X-ray absorption, high stability of the process pressure is mandatory, particularly when recording EXAFS spectra. According to EXAFS and XANES results, the palladium particles were fully reduced after exposure to benzyl alcohol in scCO(2). In contrast to Pd-catalyzed liquid-phase oxidation, a higher oxygen tolerance of the catalyst was observed. Palladium was partially oxidized on the surface under typical reaction conditions (0.9 mol % benzyl alcohol/0.5 mol % O(2) in carbon dioxide), which gradually increased when the concentration of oxygen in the feed was raised. Both XANES and EXAFS data uncovered that palladium is mainly oxidized on the surface or within the outermost layers. These results are in accordance with simulations of the XANES data using the FEFF8.20 code (program for ab initio calculations on multiple scattering XAS) and EXAFS data fitting/simulation. PMID:16706447

  18. Surface Structure and Chemical Switching of Thioctic Acid Adsorbed on Au(111) as Observed Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    SciTech Connect

    Meulenberg, R W; van Buuren, T; Vance, A L; Terminello, L J; Willey, T M; Bostedt, C; Fadley, C S

    2004-01-06

    Thioctic acid (alpha-lipoic acid) is a molecule with a large disulfide-containing base, a short alkyl-chain with four CH{sub 2} units, and a carboxyl termination. Self-assembled monolayer (SAM) films of thioctic acid adsorbed on Au(111) have been investigated with near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to determine film quality, bonding and morphology. Using standard preparation protocols for SAMs, that is, dissolving thioctic acid in ethanol and exposing gold to the solution, results in poor films. These films are highly disordered, contain a mixture of carboxyl and carboxylate terminations, have more than monolayer coverage, and exhibit unbound disulfide. Conversely, forming films by dissolving 1 mmol thioctic acid into 5% acetic acid in ethanol (as previously reported with carboxyl-terminated alkyl-thiols) forms ordered monolayers with small amounts of unbound sulfur. NEXAFS indicates tilted over endgroups with the carboxyl group normal on average 38{sup o} from the surface normal. Slight dichroism in other features indicates alkyl chains statistically more upright than prostrate on the surface. Reflection-absorption Fourier transform infrared (RA-FTIR) spectra indicate hydrogen bonding between neighboring molecules. In such well-formed monolayers, a stark reorientation occurs upon deprotonation of the endgroup by rinsing in a KOH solution. The carboxylate plane normal is now about 66{sup o} from sample normal, a much more upright orientation. Data indicate this reorientation may also cause a more upright orientation to the alkyl portion of the molecules.

  19. Low-temperature adsorption of H2S on Ni(001) studied by near-edge- and surface-extended-x-ray-absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, R.; MacDowell, A. A.; Hashizume, T.; Sette, F.; Citrin, P. H.

    1989-11-01

    The adsorption of H2S on Ni(001) has been studied with surface-extended x-ray-absorption fine structure and near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) using the AT&T Bell Laboratories X15B beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source. At 95 K and full saturation coverage, ~0.45 monolayer (ML) of S atoms in fourfold-hollow sites are produced, characteristic of room-temperature adsorption, accompanied by ~0.05 ML of oriented molecular H2S. Both these atomic and molecular chemisorbed species are buried under ~0.9 ML of disordered physisorbed H2S. No evidence for HS is found. Above 190 K the two molecular H2S phases desorb, leaving only dissociated S. These findings differ from previously reported interpretations of data obtained with high-resolution electron-energy-loss spectroscopy. They also exemplify the utility of NEXAFS for identifying and quantifying atomic and molecular surface species even when their difference involves only H and the two species coexist.

  20. In-situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of electrostriction in Gd doped ceria

    SciTech Connect

    Korobko, Roman; Wachtel, Ellen; Lubomirsky, Igor; Lerner, Alyssa; Li, Yuanyuan; Frenkel, Anatoly I.

    2015-01-26

    Studying electric field-induced structural changes in ceramics is challenging due to the very small magnitude of the atomic displacements. We used differential X-ray absorption spectroscopy, an elementally specific and spatially sensitive method, to detect such changes in Gd-doped ceria, recently shown to exhibit giant electrostriction. We found that the large electrostrictive stress generation can be associated with a few percent of unusually short Ce-O chemical bonds that change their length and degree of order under an external electric field. The remainder of the lattice is reduced to the role of passive spectator. This mechanism is fundamentally different from that in electromechanically active materials currently in use.

  1. In situ X-ray absorption fine structure studies of a manganese dioxide electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn alkaline battery environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mo, Y.; Hu, Y.; Bae, I.T.; Miller, B.; Scherson, D.A.; Antonio, M.R.

    1996-12-31

    Electronic and structural aspects of a MnO{sub 2} electrode in a rechargeable MnO{sub 2}/Zn battery environment have been investigated by in situ Mn K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The relative amplitudes of the three major Fourier transform shells of the EXAFS (extended XAFS) function of the rechargeable MnO{sub 2} electrode in the undischarged state were found to be similar to those found for ramsdellite, a MnO{sub 2} polymorph with substantial corner-sharing linkages among the basic MnO{sub 6} octahedral units. The analyses of the background-subtracted pre-edge peaks and absorption edge regions for the nominally 1-e{sup {minus}} discharged electrode were consistent with Mn{sup 3+} as being the predominant constituent species, rather than a mixture of Mn{sup 4+} and Mn{sup 2+} sites. Furthermore, careful inspection of both the XANES (X-ray absorption near edge structure) and EXAFS indicated that the full recharge of MnO, which had been previously discharged either by a 1- or 2-equivalent corner-sharing linkages compared to the original undischarged MnO{sub 2}.

  2. Absolute determination of charge-coupled device quantum detection efficiency using Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, J; Steel, A B

    2012-05-06

    We report a method to determine the quantum detection efficiency and the absorbing layers on a front-illuminated charge-coupled device (CCD). The CCD under study, as part of a crystal spectrometer, measures intense continuum x-ray emission from a picosecond laser-produced plasma and spectrally resolves the Si K-edge x-ray absorption fine structure features due to the electrode gate structure of the device. The CCD response across the Si K-edge shows a large discontinuity as well as a number of oscillations that are identified individually and uniquely from Si, SiO{sub 2}, and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} layers. From the spectral analysis of the structure and K-edge discontinuity, the active layer thickness and the different absorbing layers thickness can be determined precisely. A precise CCD detection model from 0.2-10 keV can be deduced from this highly sensitive technique.

  3. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe–Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  4. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  5. Thermal and magnetic anomalies of α-iron: an exploration by extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and synchrotron x-ray diffraction.

    PubMed

    Boccato, Silvia; Sanson, Andrea; Kantor, Innokenty; Mathon, Olivier; Dyadkin, Vadim; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Carnera, Alberto; Pascarelli, Sakura

    2016-09-01

    The local structure and dynamics of α-iron have been investigated by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction (XRD) in order to shed light on some thermal and magnetic anomalies observed in the last decades. The quantitative EXAFS analysis of the first two coordination shells reveals a peculiar local vibrational dynamics of α-iron: the second neighbor distance exhibits anharmonicity and vibrational anisotropy larger than the first neighbor distance. We search for possible distortions of the bcc structure to justify the unexplained magnetostriction anomalies of α-iron and provide a value for the maximum dislocation of the central Fe atom. No thermal anomalies have been detected from the current XRD data. On the contrary, an intriguing thermal anomaly at about 150 K, ascribed to a stiffening of the Fe-Fe bonds, was found by EXAFS.

  6. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure fingerprints of bulk-amorphous and nanostructured Pd-based alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kapaklis, V.; Poulopoulos, P.; Wilhelm, F.; Jaouen, N.; Rogalev, A.; Politis, C.

    2005-08-15

    Bulk amorphous PdCuNiP alloys have been prepared from the liquid state by means of solidification under an argon atmosphere. The addition of a small amount of Fe ({approx}5 at. %) results in the formation of nanocrystalline inclusions inside the residual amorphous matrix. Element-specific near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy provides information on the electronic structure and symmetry properties of the samples. In combination with conventional {theta}-2{theta} x-ray diffraction measurements, it allows for the investigation of the modifications in structure after the addition of Fe, as well as for the determination of the most probable crystalline phases. The results are discussed in terms of thermodynamics.

  7. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P. L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2012-06-01

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  8. An X-ray Absorption Fine Structure study of Au adsorbed onto the non-metabolizing cells of two soil bacterial species

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Zhen; Kenney, Janice P.L.; Fein, Jeremy B.; Bunker, Bruce A.

    2015-02-09

    Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial cells can remove Au from Au(III)-chloride solutions, and the extent of removal is strongly pH dependent. In order to determine the removal mechanisms, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy experiments were conducted on non-metabolizing biomass of Bacillus subtilis and Pseudomonas putida with fixed Au(III) concentrations over a range of bacterial concentrations and pH values. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) data on both bacterial species indicate that more than 90% of the Au atoms on the bacterial cell walls were reduced to Au(I). In contrast to what has been observed for Au(III) interaction with metabolizing bacterial cells, no Au(0) or Au-Au nearest neighbors were observed in our experimental systems. All of the removed Au was present as adsorbed bacterial surface complexes. For both species, the XAFS data suggest that although Au-chloride-hydroxide aqueous complexes dominate the speciation of Au in solution, Au on the bacterial cell wall is characterized predominantly by binding of Au atoms to sulfhydryl functional groups and amine and/or carboxyl functional groups, and the relative importance of the sulfhydryl groups increases with increasing pH and with decreasing Au loading. The XAFS data for both microorganism species suggest that adsorption is the first step in the formation of Au nanoparticles by bacteria, and the results enhance our ability to account for the behavior of Au in bacteria-bearing geologic systems.

  9. Epitaxy of CoSix (1absorption fine-structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirri, C.; Hong, S.; Tuilier, M. H.; Wetzel, P.; Gewinner, G.; Cortès, R.

    1996-01-01

    Electronic and structural properties of epitaxial CoSix layers have been investigated by means of core-level and valence-band photoemission, x-ray photoelectron diffraction, and extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) experiments. CoSix layers of various x compositions have been grown on silicon by low rate Co and Si co-deposition onto room-temperature Si(111) substrates, with film thicknesses ranging from 30 to 100 Å. Photoemission shows substantial differences in valence and core-level spectra with respect to those of stable fluorite-type CoSi2 and ɛ-CoSi and indicate that well-defined metastable phases are formed. In particular, core-level photoemission experiments performed with a monochromatized x-ray source show large Si 2p binding-energy shifts (~0.4 eV) in the room-temperature deposited CoSix (1absorption fine-structure measurements suggest that these pseudomorphic phases have a cubic structure, over a wide composition range. EXAFS measurements reveal that Co atoms are coordinated with eight Si atoms with a bond length of ~2.33 Å and with Co atoms with bond lengths in the 2.67-2.68 Å range. Such short Co-Co bond lengths show that the structure is definitively different from the stable CaF2-type CoSi2, even at the CoSi2 composition. All experimental data indicate that CoSix silicides crystallize in a cubic lattice close to that of pseudomorphic FeSix silicides, namely, a CsCl-type derived structure.

  10. A Stringent Limit on Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Absorption Line Multiplets in the Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-06-01

    One of the key questions of modern physics concerns the possibility that physical constants have varied throughout the history of the Universe. The standard model of physics is built on these constants, but it does not provide any explanation for their values, nor does it require their constancy over space and time. Here, we set a new limit on possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/4πɛ0 ħc by comparing transitions and line multiplets in an ensemble of Fe II λ 1608, λ 2344, λ 2374, λ 2383, λ 2587, and λ 2600 observed in the early Universe with those measured in the laboratory. Based on the optical spectrum observations of QSO HE 0515-4414, we deduce a constraint of Δα/α = (-0.157± 0.300)×10-6 at redshift z = 1.15. At present, this represents the tightest limit on Δα/α in early cosmological epochs compared to the published results in the literature.

  11. Structural characterization of poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates and uranium mill neutralized raffinate solids using X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, N; Jiang, D T; Cutler, J; Kotzer, T; Jia, Y F; Demopoulos, G P; Rowson, J W

    2009-12-01

    X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) is used to characterize the mineralogy of the iron(III)-arsenate(V) precipitates produced during the raffinate (aqueous effluent) neutralization process at the McClean Lake uranium mill in northern Saskatchewan, Canada. To facilitate the structural characterization of the precipitated solids derived from the neutralized raffinate, a set of reference compounds were synthesized and analyzed. The reference compounds include crystalline scorodite, poorly-crystalline scorodite, iron(III)-arsenate co-precipitates obtained under different pH conditions, and arsenate-adsorbed on goethite. The poorly-crystalline scorodite (prepared at pH 4 with Fe/As = 1) has similar As local structure as that of crystalline scorodite. Both As and Fe K-edge XAFS of poorly-crystalline scorodite yield consistent results on As-Fe (or Fe-As) shell. From As K-edge analysis the As-Fe shell has an inter-atomic distance of 3.33 ± 0.02 Å and coordination number of 3.2; while from Fe K-edge analysis the Fe-As distance and coordination number are 3.31 ± 0.02 Å and 3.8, respectively. These are in contrast with the typical arsenate adsorption on bidentate binuclear sites on goethite surfaces, where the As-Fe distance is 3.26 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number is close to 2. A similar local structure identified in the poorly-crystalline scorodite is also found in co-precipitation solids (Fe(III)/As(V) = 3) when precipitated at the same pH (pH = 4): As-Fe distance 3.30 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number 3.9; while at pH = 8 the co-precipitate has As-Fe distance of 3.27 ± 0.03 Å and coordination number about 2, resembling more closely the adsorption case. The As local structure in the two neutralized raffinate solid series (precipitated at pH values up to 7) closely resembles that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite. All of the raffinate solids have the same As-Fe inter-atomic distance as that in the poorly-crystalline scorodite, and a systematic decrease in the

  12. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements on radio frequency magnetron sputtered HfO2 thin films deposited with different oxygen partial pressures.

    PubMed

    Maidul Haque, S; Nayak, C; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu; Jha, S N; Sahoo, N K

    2016-03-20

    Two sets of HfO2 thin film have been deposited by the radio frequency magnetron sputtering technique at various oxygen partial pressures, one set without any substrate bias and another set with a 50 W pulsed dc substrate bias. The films have been characterized by extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements at the Hf L3 edge, and the structural information obtained from analysis of the EXAFS data has been used to explain the macroscopic behavior of the refractive index obtained from spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements. It has been observed that the variation of refractive index with oxygen partial pressure depends on the Hf-Hf bond length for the set of films deposited without substrate bias, while for the other set of films deposited with pulsed dc substrate bias, it depends on the oxygen coordination of the nearest neighbor shell surrounding Hf sites.

  13. Metal induced gap states at LiCl Cu(0 0 1) interface studied by X-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiguchi, Manabu; Katayama, Masao; Yoshikawa, Genki; Saiki, Koichiro; Koma, Atushi

    2003-05-01

    A single crystalline LiCl film grows heteroepitaxially on Cu(0 0 1) in a layer-by-layer fashion at 300 K. The LiCl-Cu(0 0 1) system provides a well-defined insulator-metal interface. Electronic structure of the LiCl film grown on Cu(0 0 1) was studied using Cl K-edge near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). A pre-peak was observed on the bulk edge onset for the thin LiCl films. The pre-peak showed formation of metal-induced gap states (MIGS) in the band gap of LiCl. The characteristic decay length of the MIGS was determined to be 2.6 Å by analyzing the thickness dependence on the intensity of the pre-peak. The present result has revealed the MIGS at the well-defined insulator-metal interface for the first time.

  14. Composition analysis of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell microporous layer using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy and near edge X-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Michael G.; Wang, Jian; Banerjee, Rupak; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    The novel application of scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) to the microporous layer (MPL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell is investigated. A spatially resolved chemical component distribution map is obtained for the MPL of a commercially available SGL 25 BC sample. This is achieved with near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic analysis. Prior to analysis the sample is embedded in non-reactive epoxy and ultra-microtomed to a thickness of 100 nm. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), carbon particle agglomerates, and supporting epoxy resin distributions are identified and reconstructed for a scanning area of 6 μm × 6 μm. It is observed that the spatial distribution of PTFE is strongly correlated to the carbon particle agglomerations. Additionally, agglomerate structures of PTFE are identified, possibly indicating the presence of a unique mesostructure in the MPL. STXM analysis is presented as a useful technique for the investigation of chemical species distributions in the MPL.

  15. X-ray absorption near edge structure and extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of standards and biological samples containing mixed oxidation states of chromium(III) and chromium(VI).

    PubMed

    Parsons, J G; Dokken, K; Peralta-Videa, J R; Romero-Gonzalez, J; Gardea-Torresdey, J L

    2007-03-01

    For the first time a method has been developed for the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data analyses of biological samples containing multiple oxidation states of chromium. In this study, the first shell coordination and interatomic distances based on the data analysis of known standards of potassium chromate (Cr(VI)) and chromium nitrate hexahydrate (Cr(III)) were investigated. The standards examined were mixtures of the following molar ratios of Cr(VI):Cr(III), 0:1, 0.25:0.75, 0.5:0.5, 0.75:0.25, and 1:0. It was determined from the calibration data that the fitting error associated with linear combination X-ray absorption near edge structure (LC-XANES) fittings was approximately +/-10% of the total fitting. The peak height of the Cr(VI) pre-edge feature after normalization of the X-ray absorption (XAS) spectra was used to prepare a calibration curve. The EXAFS fittings of the standards were also investigated and fittings to lechuguilla biomass samples laden with different ratios of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were performed as well. An excellent agreement between the XANES data and the data presented in the EXAFS spectra was observed. The EXFAS data also presented mean coordination numbers directly related to the ratios of the different chromium oxidation states in the sample. The chromium oxygen interactions had two different bond lengths at approximately 1.68 and 1.98 A for the Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in the sample, respectively. PMID:17389076

  16. X-Ray Absorption Near Edge Structure And Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Analysis of Standards And Biological Samples Containing Mixed Oxidation States of Chromium(III) And Chromium(VI)

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, J.G.; Dokken, K.; Peralta-Videa, J.R.; Romero-Gonzalez, J.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.

    2009-06-02

    For the first time a method has been developed for the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data analyses of biological samples containing multiple oxidation states of chromium. In this study, the first shell coordination and interatomic distances based on the data analysis of known standards of potassium chromate (Cr(VI)) and chromium nitrate hexahydrate (Cr(III)) were investigated. The standards examined were mixtures of the following molar ratios of Cr(VI):Cr(III), 0:1, 0.25:0.75, 0.5:0.5, 0.75:0.25, and 1:0. It was determined from the calibration data that the fitting error associated with linear combination X-ray absorption near edge structure (LC-XANES) fittings was approximately {+-}10% of the total fitting. The peak height of the Cr(VI) pre-edge feature after normalization of the X-ray absorption (XAS) spectra was used to prepare a calibration curve. The EXAFS fittings of the standards were also investigated and fittings to lechuguilla biomass samples laden with different ratios of Cr(III) and Cr(VI) were performed as well. An excellent agreement between the XANES data and the data presented in the EXAFS spectra was observed. The EXFAS data also presented mean coordination numbers directly related to the ratios of the different chromium oxidation states in the sample. The chromium oxygen interactions had two different bond lengths at approximately 1.68 and 1.98 {angstrom} for the Cr(VI) and Cr(III) in the sample, respectively.

  17. X-ray absorption fine structure measurement with a 9 V electric battery x-ray emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsuya, Shota; Ishii, Hideshi; Kawai, Jun; Tanaka, Keiichi

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption spectral analysis is a well known technique for analyzing the chemical environment of an element in a specimen. It has been believed that high intensity and monochromatized x rays such as the synchrotron radiation are required for an x-ray absorption experiment. In the present study, however, we demonstrate that the x-ray absorption spectral measurement of transition metal foils with an energy resolution of 10 eV is possible with a combination of a 9 V dry electric battery pyroelectric x-ray generator and a superconducting microcalorimeter.

  18. [X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) study of the effects of pH on Pb(II) sorption by soil].

    PubMed

    Hu, Ning-Jing; Huang, Peng; Luo, Yong-Ming; Hu, Tian-Dou; Xie, Ya-Ning; Wu, Zi-Yu

    2010-12-01

    Combined batch sorption and in situ X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) provide direct assessment of the mechanisms for Pb(II) sorption at the soil-water interface under different pH conditions. The XAFS data indicated that the innersphere Pb sorption complex with ionic character (Pb4 (OH)4(4+)) dominated the Pb surface speciation, and the outer-sphere Pb sorption complex and the precipitation of calcium carbonate containing Pb(PbCaCO3) were also involved in the adsorption samples. Coordination number and radial distance of the first-shell Pb-O decreased from 0.172 7 to 0.166 6 nm and the percentage of inner-sphere complexes increased when the initial pH changed from 6.0 to 8.5, indicating that the mechanism of Pb(II) sorption by the soil was pH-dependent. PMID:21322254

  19. Time-resolved near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy on photo-induced phase transitions using a tabletop soft-x-ray spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossmann, P.; Rajkovic, I.; Moré, R.; Norpoth, J.; Techert, S.; Jooss, C.; Mann, Klaus

    2012-05-01

    We present a table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer for the wavelength range λ = 1-5 nm based on a stable laser-driven x-ray source, making use of a gas-puff target. With this setup, optical light-pump/soft-x-ray probe near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) experiments with a temporal resolution of about 230 ps are feasible. Pump-probe NEXAFS measurements were carried out in the "water-window" region (2.28 nm-4.36 nm) on the manganite Pr0.7Ca0.3MnO3, investigating diminutive changes of the oxygen K edge that derive from an optically induced phase transition. The results show the practicability of the table-top soft-x-ray spectrometer on demanding investigations so far exclusively conducted at synchrotron radiation sources.

  20. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  1. Near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure study of disordering in Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 pyrochlores.

    PubMed

    Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Adams, Evan M; Weber, William J; Begg, Bruce D; Mun, Bongjin S; Shuh, David K; Lindle, Dennis W; Gullikson, Eric M; Perera, Rupert C C

    2005-02-01

    Disorder in Gd2(Ti(1-y)Zry)2O7 pyrochlores, for y = 0.0-1.0, is investigated by Ti 2p and O 1s near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Ti(4+) ions are found to occupy octahedral sites in Gd2Ti2O7 with a tetragonal distortion induced by vacant oxygen sites. As Zr substitutes for Ti, the tetragonal distortion decreases, and Zr coordination increases from 6 to 8. The migration of oxygen ions from 48f or 8b sites to vacant 8a sites compensate for the increased Zr coordination, thereby reducing the number of vacant 8a sites, which further reduces the tetragonal distortion and introduces more disorder around Ti. This is evidence for simultaneous cation disorder with anion migration.

  2. Study of hard disk and slider surfaces using X-ray photoemission electron microscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Anders, S.; Stammler, T.; Bhatia, C.S.; Fong, W.; Chen, C.Y.; Bogy, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    X-ray Photo Emission Electron Microscopy (X-PEEM) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy were applied to study the properties of amorphous hard carbon overcoats on disks and sliders, and the properties of the lubricant. The modification of lubricants after performing thermal desorption studies was measured by NEXAFS, and the results are compared to the thermal desorption data. The study of lubricant degradation in wear tracks is described. Sliders were investigated before and after wear test, and the modification of the slider coating as well as the transfer of lubricant to the slider was studied. The studies show that the lubricant is altered chemically during the wear. Fluorine is removed and carboxyl groups are formed.

  3. Local order of Sb and Bi dopants in hydrogenated amorphous germanium thin films studied by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalba, G.; Fornasini, P.; Grisenti, R.; Rocca, F.; Chambouleyron, I.

    2002-07-01

    This letter reports on the investigation of the local order and coordination of Sb and Bi impurities in hydrogenated amorphous germanium thin films. The study uses the extended x-ray absorption fine structure technique in fluorescence mode at room temperature. The investigation includes doping concentrations ranging from 1.1 x1019 to 5 x1020 cm-3. For both impurities, the evidence is that the thermal equilibrium model is not applicable in this case. This result qualitatively follows the behavior of Ga and In impurities in hydrogenated amorphous germanium (a-Ge:H) samples except for Bi. These findings are consistent with data on the transport properties of Sb- and Bi-doped a-Ge:H films.

  4. Local structure of germanium selenide glasses around the rigidity percolation threshold using atomic pair distribution function and X-ray absorption fine structure techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatnawi, Moneeb Taiseer

    A search for a structural response to a recently proposed self-organized and stress-free intermediate phase [1, 2] in semiconductor chalcogenide Ge xSe1-x glasses has been performed in this study. These glasses, according to the mean-field approach, undergo a structural phase transition from floppy to rigid network that occurs at a mean coordination number of 2.4. Based on thermodynamic and spectroscopic measurements, these glasses appear to exhibit two transitions instead of one [3]. The region between these transitions has been called the intermediate phase (IP) [3, 4]. The original theoretical work assumed that the network was generic and the connectivity random [5]. It was therefore suggested [1] that the IP phase is a region of finite width in composition where the network could self-organize in such a way that maintains a rigid but unstressed state. However, it has proved difficult to establish this result experimentally. High-resolution atomic pair distribution functions (PDF), derived from high energy synchrotron radiation, coupled with high-resolution X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements on 18 compositions of well-prepared Ge xSe1-x glasses that span the range of the IP have been performed to elucidate aspects of rigidity percolation and the IP. These data sets are the most complete and the highest resolution data set on this system to date. Analysis of the structure functions (in reciprocal space) and the PDFs (in real space) as well as the XAFS data at both Ge and Se edges show no correlations with the IP. The network evolves smoothly without any break in slope or discontinuity that might be linked due to the IP. The results obtained in this study contradict previously published work [1, 2] that claim experimental evidence for a structural origin of the IP. The so-called first sharp diffraction peak (FSDP), which is a signature of the medium range order in these glasses, changes systematically with Ge content. It develops smoothly from a

  5. Photoemission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the bacterial surface protein layer of Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602.

    PubMed

    Vyalikh, Denis V; Kirchner, Alexander; Danzenbächer, Steffen; Dedkov, Yuriy S; Kade, Andreas; Mertig, Michael; Molodtsov, Serguei L

    2005-10-01

    The electronic structure of the regular, two-dimensional bacterial surface protein layer of Bacillus sphaericus NCTC 9602 has been examined by photoemission (PE) and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Both the O 1s and the N 1s core-level PE spectra show a single structure, whereas the C 1s core-level spectrum appears manifold, suggesting similar chemical states for each oxygen atom and also for each nitrogen atom, while carbon atoms exhibit a range of chemical environments in the different functional groups of the amino acids. This result is supported by the element-specific NEXAFS spectra of the unoccupied valence electronic states, which exhibit a series of characteristic NEXAFS peaks that can be assigned to particular molecular orbitals of the amino acids by applying a phenomenological building-block model. The relative contributions of the C-O, C-N, and C-C bond originating signals into the C 1s PE spectrum are in good agreement with the number ratios of the corresponding bonds calculated from the known primary structure of the bacterial surface protein. First interpretation of the PE spectrum of the occupied valence states is achieved on the basis of electronic density-of-states calculations performed for small peptides. It was found that mainly the pi clouds of the aromatic rings contribute to both the lowest unoccupied and the highest occupied molecular orbitals.

  6. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Centomo, P.; Meneghini, C.; Zecca, M.

    2013-05-01

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 °C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O2, H2, H2O2, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  7. Towards atomic resolution in sodium titanate nanotubes using near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectromicroscopy combined with multichannel multiple-scattering calculations

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Peter; Lagos, Maureen J; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris; Umek, Polona; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary Recent advances in near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy coupled with transmission X-ray microscopy (NEXAFS–TXM) allow large-area mapping investigations of individual nano-objects with spectral resolution up to E/ΔE = 104 and spatial resolution approaching 10 nm. While the state-of-the-art spatial resolution of X-ray microscopy is limited by nanostructuring process constrains of the objective zone plate, we show here that it is possible to overcome this through close coupling with high-level theoretical modelling. Taking the example of isolated bundles of hydrothermally prepared sodium titanate nanotubes ((Na,H)TiNTs) we are able to unravel the complex nanoscale structure from the NEXAFS–TXM data using multichannel multiple-scattering calculations, to the extent of being able to associate specific spectral features in the O K-edge and Ti L-edge with oxygen atoms in distinct sites within the lattice. These can even be distinguished from the contribution of different hydroxyl groups to the electronic structure of the (Na,H)TiNTs. PMID:23213642

  8. Towards atomic resolution in sodium titanate nanotubes using near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectromicroscopy combined with multichannel multiple-scattering calculations.

    PubMed

    Bittencourt, Carla; Krüger, Peter; Lagos, Maureen J; Ke, Xiaoxing; Van Tendeloo, Gustaaf; Ewels, Chris; Umek, Polona; Guttmann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Recent advances in near-edge X-ray-absorption fine-structure spectroscopy coupled with transmission X-ray microscopy (NEXAFS-TXM) allow large-area mapping investigations of individual nano-objects with spectral resolution up to E/ΔE = 10(4) and spatial resolution approaching 10 nm. While the state-of-the-art spatial resolution of X-ray microscopy is limited by nanostructuring process constrains of the objective zone plate, we show here that it is possible to overcome this through close coupling with high-level theoretical modelling. Taking the example of isolated bundles of hydrothermally prepared sodium titanate nanotubes ((Na,H)TiNTs) we are able to unravel the complex nanoscale structure from the NEXAFS-TXM data using multichannel multiple-scattering calculations, to the extent of being able to associate specific spectral features in the O K-edge and Ti L-edge with oxygen atoms in distinct sites within the lattice. These can even be distinguished from the contribution of different hydroxyl groups to the electronic structure of the (Na,H)TiNTs. PMID:23213642

  9. Versatile plug flow catalytic cell for in situ transmission/fluorescence x-ray absorption fine structure measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Centomo, P.; Zecca, M.; Meneghini, C.

    2013-05-15

    A novel flow-through catalytic cell has been developed for in situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) experiments on heterogeneous catalysts under working conditions and in the presence of a liquid and a gas phase. The apparatus allows to carry out XAS measurements in both the transmission and fluorescence modes, at moderate temperature (from RT to 50-80 Degree-Sign C) and low-medium gas pressure (up to 7-8 bars). The materials employed are compatible with several chemicals such as those involved in the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (O{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, methanol). The versatile design of the cell allows to fit it to different experimental setups in synchrotron radiation beamlines. It was used successfully for the first time to test nanostructured Pd catalysts during the direct synthesis of hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) in methanol solution from dihydrogen and dioxygen.

  10. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of the anion complexes of FeZn uteroferrin.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Que, L

    1998-05-26

    Molybdate and tungstate are strong inhibitors of the purple acid phosphatases. The binding modes of these anions to the FeZn derivative of uteroferrin, the purple acid phosphatase from porcine uterus (FeZnUf), have been characterized by X-ray absorption spectroscopy at both the iron and zinc K-edges. Pre-edge data show that both FeZnUf.MoO4 and FeZnUf.WO4 have six-coordinate iron sites. Analysis of the EXAFS regions shows that the iron sites of both molybdate and tungstate complexes are best simulated by a shell of three O or N atoms at 2.08-2.09 A and a shell of two O or N atoms at 1.93-1.95 A. On the other hand, the zinc sites have shells of five O or N atoms at approximately 2.1 A and one O or N atom at approximately 2.5 A. Because of the higher resolution of the FeZnUf. MoO4 data, the main shell at approximately 2.1 A can be further split into shells of four O or N at 2.04 A and one O or N at 2.22 A, the latter being associated with a molybdate oxygen. Outer-sphere EXAFS analysis indicates an Fe-Zn separation of approximately 3.4 A for both FeZnUf.MoO4 and FeZnUf.WO4, Fe-Mo/W distances of 3.2 A, and Zn-Mo/W distances of 3.6-3.7 A. Thus, molybdate and tungstate bridge the FeZn active site like phosphate, but do so unsymmetrically. The asymmetric bidentate bridging mode of molybdate and tungstate helps explain the effect of these anions on the redox properties of the diiron uteroferrin.

  11. X-ray-Excited Optical Luminescence (XEOL) and X-ray Absorption Fine Structures (XAFS) Studies of Gold(I) Complexes with Diphosphine and Bipyridine Ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Pil-Sook G.; Hu, Yongfeng; Brandys, Marie-C.; Burchell, Tara J.; Puddephatt, Richard J.; Sham, Tsun K.

    2008-10-14

    Synchrotron techniques, X-ray-excited optical luminescence (XEOL) combined with X-ray absorption fine structures (XAFS), have been used to study the electronic structure and optical properties of a series of luminescent gold(I) complexes with diphosphine and bipyridine ligands using tunable X-rays (in the regions of the C and P K-edges and the Au L{sub 3}-edge) and UV from synchrotron light sources. The effects of gold-ligand and aurophilic interactions on the luminescence from these gold(I) complexes have been investigated. It is found that the luminescence from these complexes is phosphorescence, primarily due to the decay of the Au (5d) {yields} PR{sub 3} ({pi}*), metal to ligand charge transfer (MLCT) excitation as well as contributions from the conjugated {pi}-system in the bipyridine ligands via the gold-nitrogen bond. The large Au 5d spin-orbit coupling enhances the intersystem crossing. The elongation of the hydrocarbon chain of the diphosphine ligand does not greatly affect the spectral features of the luminescence from the gold(I) complexes. However, the intensity of the luminescence was reduced significantly when the bipyridine ligand was replaced with 1,2-bis(4-pyridylamido)benzene. The aurophilic interaction, as investigated by EXAFS at the Au L{sub 3}-edge, is shown to be only one of the factors that contribute to the luminescence of the complexes.

  12. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies of Electrospun Poly(dimethylsiloxane)/Poly (methyl methacrylate)/Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composites

    PubMed Central

    Winter, A. Douglas; Larios, Eduardo; Alamgir, Faisal M.; Jaye, Cherno; Fischer, Daniel; Campo, Eva M.

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the near conduction band edge structure of electrospun mats of MWCNT-PDMS-PMMA by near edge X-Ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. Effects of adding nanofillers of different sizes were addressed. Despite observed morphological variations and inhomogeneous carbon nanotube distribution, spun mats appeared homogeneous under NEXAFS analysis. Spectra revealed differences in emissions from glancing and normal spectra; which may evidence phase separation within the bulk of the micron-size fibers. Further, dichroic ratios show polymer chains did not align, even in the presence of nanofillers. Addition of nanofillers affected emissions in the C-H, C=O and C-C regimes, suggesting their involvement in interfacial matrix-carbon nanotube bonding. Spectral differences at glancing angles between pristine and composite mats suggest that geometric conformational configurations are taking place between polymeric chains and carbon nanotubes. These differences appear to be carbon nanotube-dimension dependent, and are promoted upon room temperature mixing and shear flow during electrospinning. CH-π bonding between polymer chains and graphitic walls, as well as H-bonds between impurities in the as-grown CNTs and polymer pendant groups are proposed bonding mechanisms promoting matrix conformation. PMID:24308286

  13. Depth-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure study of Fe/Si interfaces using x-ray standing waves

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Ajay; Rajput, Parasmani; Meneghini, Carlo

    2007-11-15

    X-ray standing waves generated by total external reflection (TER) from an underlayer of Au have been used to perform depth resolved x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) studies on a Si/Fe/Si trilayer in which intermixing has been induced by irradiation with 100 MeV Au ions. It is demonstrated that the technique has a sufficient depth resolution so as to elucidate the depth distribution of various phases formed across the interfaces. Irradiation to a fluence of 1x10{sup 13} ions/cm{sup 2} results in complete mixing of the Fe layer. It is observed that in the center of the intermixed layer, the short-range order around Fe ions is similar to the FeSi phase. Moving away from the center, Si concentration increases and the local structure around Fe becomes similar to that of the FeSi{sub 2} phase. On the other hand, depth integrated XAFS data could have been interpreted in terms of a homogeneous FeSi{sub 2} type of short-range order in the system. Thus, the depth selectivity achieved using TER standing waves combined with the sensitivity of XAFS to local order around a specific element makes it a valuable tool for studying layered materials.

  14. Th uptake on montmorillonite: a powder and polarized extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) study.

    PubMed

    Dähn, Rainer; Scheidegger, André M; Manceau, Alain; Curti, Enzo; Baeyens, Bart; Bradbury, Michael H; Chateigner, Daniel

    2002-05-01

    The uptake process of Th(IV) onto montmorillonite was studied using powder and polarized-EXAFS (P-EXAFS) spectroscopy. Sorption samples were prepared in 0.1 M NaClO(4) solutions either undersaturated (pH 2 and 3, [Th](initial): 2.7x10(-6) to 4x10(-4) M) or supersatured (pH 5, [Th](initial): 4.3x10(-5) to 4x10(-4) M) with respect to amorphous ThO(2). Th loading varied between 1-157 micromol/g at pH 3 and 14-166 micromol/g at pH 5 and equaled 41 micromol/g at pH 2. At pH 5 and high surface loading the EXAFS spectrum resembled that of amorphous Th(OH)(4), suggesting the precipitation of a Th hydrous hydroxide. At low and intermediate surface coverage two O coordination shells at approximately 2.24 and approximately 2.48 A, and one Si shell at 3.81-3.88 A, were systematically observed regardless of pH. The formation of Th nucleation products and Th-Si solution complexes and the sorption of Th on a silica precipitate were excluded from the EXAFS spectra analysis and solution chemistry. In these conditions, Th was shown to bond the montmorillonite surface by sharing double corners with Si tetrahedra. This structural interpretation is consistent with surface coverage calculations which showed that the edge sites were saturated in the two highest concentrated samples (34 and 157 micromol/g) at pH 3.

  15. Local vibrational dynamics of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) studied by extended x-ray absorption fine structure and molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Sanson, A.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2014-06-14

    The local vibrational dynamics of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has been investigated by temperature-dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The local dynamics of both the short and long nearest-neighbor Fe–O distances has been singled out, i.e., their local thermal expansion and the parallel and perpendicular mean-square relative atomic displacements have been determined, obtaining a partial agreement with molecular dynamics. No evidence of the Morin transition has been observed. More importantly, the strong anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations found for the short Fe–O distance has been related to its negative thermal expansion. The differences between the local dynamics of short and long Fe–O distances are discussed in terms of projection and correlation of atomic motion. As a result, we can conclude that the short Fe–O bond is stiffer to stretching and softer to bending than the long Fe–O bond.

  16. Lead is not off center in PbTe: the importance of r-space phase information in extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Keiber, T; Bridges, F; Sales, B C

    2013-08-30

    PbTe is a well-known thermoelectric material. Recent x-ray total scattering studies suggest that Pb moves off center along 100 in PbTe, by ∼0.2  Å at 300 K, producing a split Pb-Te pair distribution. We present an extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) study of PbTe (and Tl doped PbTe) to determine if Pb or Te is off center. EXAFS provides sensitive r- or k-space phase information which can differentiate between a split peak for the Pb-Te distribution (indicative of off-center Pb) and a thermally broadened peak. We find no evidence for a split peak for Pb-Te or Te-Pb. At 300 K, the vibration amplitude for Pb-Te (or Te-Pb) is large; this thermally induced disorder is indicative of weak bonds, and the large disorder is consistent with the low thermal conductivity at 300 K. We also find evidence of an anharmonic potential for the nearest Pb-Te bonds, consistent with the overall anharmonicity found for the phonon modes. This effect is modeled by a "skew" factor (C3) which significantly improves the fit of the Pb-Te and Te-Pb peaks for the high temperature EXAFS data; C3 becomes significant above approximately 150-200 K. The consequences of these results will be discussed.

  17. Extended X- ray absorption fine structure study at the K-edge of copper in mixed ligand complexes having benzimidazole as one of the ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinge, V. K.; Joshi, S. K.; Nitin Nair, N.; Singh Verma, Vikram; Shrivastava, B. D.; Prasad, J.; Srivastava, K.

    2014-09-01

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been studied at the K-edge of copper in some of its biologically important complexes, viz., [Cu(BzImH)4X2] and [Cu(BzIm)2], where X= Cl, Br, 1/2SO4, ClO4, NO3, and BzIm = Benzimidazolato anion. The spectra have been recorded using a bent crystal 0.4 m Cauchois-type transmission spectrograph. The positions of EXAFS maxima and minima have been used to determine the bond lengths in the complexes with the help of three different methods, namely, Levy's, Lytle's and Lytle, Sayers and Stern's (L.S.S.) methods. The phase uncorrected bond lengths have also been determined from Fourier transforms of the experimental spectra. The results obtained from these methods have been discussed and it has been found that the results obtained by L.S.S. method are comparable with the results obtained by Fourier transformation method and that these two methods give phase uncorrected bond lengths.

  18. EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy) study of the position of Zr within the unit cell of Sm sub 2 Co sub 17

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenberg, L. . Center for Materials Science and Engineering); Barrera, E.V. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science); Maury, C.E.; Allibert, C.H. . Lab. de Thermodynamique et PhysicoChimie Metallurgiques); Heald, S.M. (Brookhaven National Lab

    1990-01-01

    Extended X-ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy (EXAFS) has been used to determine the position of Zr within the unit cell of Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17}. Zr is routinely added to Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17} permanent magnet alloys because of its effects on their metallurgical development, but the details of its behavior remain controversial. Induction melted Sm{sub 2}Co{sub 17}:Zr ternary alloys, aged at 1180{degrees}C, then quenched, consisted of intimately mixed H2:17 and R2:17 having Zr in solid solution as well some regions of R2:17 that were poor in Zr. EXAFS spectroscopy of these specimens indicates that the most probable position for Zr is a site having two Sm near neighbor atoms and 11 Co atoms distributed over three different interatomic distances. This is consistent with a direct substitution of Zr for Co in the Co site in the mixed planes (12j in P6{sub 3}/mmc, or 18f in R3m). These results are discussed in terms of the metallurgy of 2:17 magnet alloys. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  19. PRELIMINARY IN-SITU X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE EXAMINATION OF PT/C AND PTCO/C CATHODE CATALYSTS IN AN OPERATIONAL POLYMER ELECTROLYTE FUEL CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Phelan, B.T.; Myers, D.J.; Smith, M.C.

    2009-01-01

    State-of-the-art polymer electrolyte fuel cells require a conditioning period to reach optimized cell performance. There is insuffi cient understanding about the behavior of catalysts during this period, especially with regard to the changing environment of the cathode electrocatalyst, which is typically Pt nanoparticles supported on high surface area Vulcan XC-72 carbon (Pt/C). The purpose of this research was to record preliminary observations of the changing environment during the conditioning phase using X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XAFS was recorded for a Pt/C cathode at the Pt L3-edge and a PtCo/C cathode at both the Pt L3-edge and Co K-edge. Using precision machined graphite cell-blocks, both transmission and fl uorescence data were recorded at Sector 12-BM-B of Argonne National Laboratory’s Advanced Photon Source. The fl uorescence and transmission edge steps allow for a working description of the changing electrocatalyst environment, especially water concentration, at the anode and cathode as functions of operating parameters. These features are discussed in the context of how future analysis may correlate with potential, current and changing apparent thickness of the membrane electrode assembly through loss of catalyst materials (anode, cathode, carbon support). Such direct knowledge of the effect of the conditioning protocol on the electrocatalyst may lead to better catalyst design. In turn, this may lead to minimizing, or even eliminating, the conditioning period.

  20. Local vibrational dynamics of hematite (α-Fe2O3) studied by extended x-ray absorption fine structure and molecular dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanson, A.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.

    2014-06-01

    The local vibrational dynamics of hematite (α-Fe2O3) has been investigated by temperature-dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The local dynamics of both the short and long nearest-neighbor Fe-O distances has been singled out, i.e., their local thermal expansion and the parallel and perpendicular mean-square relative atomic displacements have been determined, obtaining a partial agreement with molecular dynamics. No evidence of the Morin transition has been observed. More importantly, the strong anisotropy of relative thermal vibrations found for the short Fe-O distance has been related to its negative thermal expansion. The differences between the local dynamics of short and long Fe-O distances are discussed in terms of projection and correlation of atomic motion. As a result, we can conclude that the short Fe-O bond is stiffer to stretching and softer to bending than the long Fe-O bond.

  1. Searching for variations in the fine-structure constant and the proton-to-electron mass ratio using quasar absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Julian A.

    2012-02-01

    (abridged) Quasar absorption lines provide a precise test of the assumed constancy of the fundamental constants of physics. We have investigated potential changes in the fine-structure constant, alpha, and the proton-to-electron mass ratio, mu. The many-multiplet method allows one to use optical fine-structure transitions to constrain (Delta alpha)/alpha at better than the 10^(-5) level. We present a new analysis of 154 quasar absorbers with 0.2 < z <3.7 in VLT/UVES spectra. From these absorbers we find 2.2 sigma evidence for angular variations in alpha under a dipole+monopole model. Combined with previous Keck/HIRES observations, we find 4.1 sigma evidence for angular (and therefore spatial) variations in alpha, with maximal increase of alpha occurring in the direction RA=(17.3 +/- 1.0) hr, dec=(-61 +/- 10) deg. Under a model where the observed effect is proportional to the lookback-time distance the significance increases to 4.2 sigma. Dipole models fitted to the VLT and Keck samples and models fitted to z<1.6 and z>1.6 sub-samples independently yield consistent estimates of the dipole direction, which suggests that the effect is not caused by telescope systematics. We consider a number of systematic effects and show that they are unable to explain the observed dipole effect. We have used spectra of the quasars Q0405-443, Q0347-383 and Q0528-250 from VLT/UVES to investigate the absorbers at z=2.595, 3.025 and 2.811 in these spectra respectively. We find that (Delta mu)/mu=(10.1 +/- 6.6) x 10^(-6), (8.2 +/- 7.5) x 10^(-6) and (-1.4 +/- 3.9) x 10^(-6) in these absorbers respectively. A second spectrum of Q0528-250 provides an additional constraint of (Delta mu)/mu=(0.2 +/- 3.2_stat +/- 1.9_sys) x 10^(-6). The weighted mean of these values yields (Delta mu)/mu=(1.7 +/- 2.4) x 10^(-6), the most precise constraint on evolution in mu at z>1.

  2. Communication: Coordination structure of bromide ions associated with hexyltrimethylammonium cations at liquid/liquid interfaces under potentiostatic control as studied by total-reflection X-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Nagatani, Hirohisa; Harada, Makoto; Tanida, Hajime; Sakae, Hiroki; Imura, Hisanori

    2014-03-14

    Total-reflection X-ray absorption fine structure (TR-XAFS) technique was applied for the first time to an interface between two immiscible electrolyte solutions under potentiostatic control. The hydration structure of bromide ions was investigated at polarized 2-octanone/water interfaces. TR-XAFS spectra at Br K-edge measured in the presence of hexyltrimethylammonium bromide (C6TAB) were slightly modified depending on the Galvani potential difference (Δ(o)(w)φ). The extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis exposed hydration structure changes of bromide ions at the polarized interface. The coordination structure of bromide ions at the interface could be analyzed as compared with bromide ions dissolved in aqueous solution and Br(-)-exchanged resin having quaternary ammonium groups. The results indicated that bromide ions were associated with C6TA(+) at the polarized interface. The relative contribution of ion association form of bromide ions with quaternary ammonium groups was enhanced at a potential close to the ion transfer of C6TA(+), where the interfacial concentration of C6TA(+) is increased as a function of Δ(o)(w)φ.

  3. Characterizing phosphorus speciation of Chesapeake Bay sediments using chemical extraction, 31P NMR, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Joshi, Sunendra R; Hou, Guangjin; Burdige, David J; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination has been one of the lingering issues in the Chesapeake Bay because the bay restoration is complicated by temporally and seasonally variable nutrient sources and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. Differential reactivity of sedimentary phosphorus (P) pools in response to imposed biogeochemical conditions can record past sediment history and therefore a detailed sediment P speciation may provide information on P cycling particularly the stability of a P pool and the formation of one pool at the expense of another. This study examined sediment P speciation from three sites in the Chesapeake Bay: (i) a North site in the upstream bay, (ii) a middle site in the central bay dominated by seasonally hypoxic bottom water, and (iii) a South site at the bay-ocean boundary using a combination of sequential P extraction (SEDEX) and spectroscopic techniques, including (31)P NMR, P X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results from sequential P extraction reveal that sediment P is composed predominantly of ferric Fe-bound P and authigenic P, which was further confirmed by solid-state (31)P NMR, XANES, and EXAFS analyses. Additionally, solution (31)P NMR results show that the sediments from the middle site contain high amounts of organic P such as monoesters and diesters, compared to the other two sites, but that these compounds rapidly decrease with sediment depth indicating remineralized P could have precipitated as authigenic P. Fe EXAFS enabled to identify the changes in Fe mineral composition and P sinks in response to imposed redox condition in the middle site sediments. The presence of lepidocrocite, vermiculite, and Fe smectite in the middle site sediments indicates that some ferric Fe minerals can still be present along with pyrite and vivianite, and that ferric Fe-bound P pool can be a major P sink in anoxic sediments. These results provide

  4. Characterizing phosphorus speciation of Chesapeake Bay sediments using chemical extraction, 31P NMR, and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Joshi, Sunendra R; Hou, Guangjin; Burdige, David J; Sparks, Donald L; Jaisi, Deb P

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient contamination has been one of the lingering issues in the Chesapeake Bay because the bay restoration is complicated by temporally and seasonally variable nutrient sources and complex interaction between imported and regenerated nutrients. Differential reactivity of sedimentary phosphorus (P) pools in response to imposed biogeochemical conditions can record past sediment history and therefore a detailed sediment P speciation may provide information on P cycling particularly the stability of a P pool and the formation of one pool at the expense of another. This study examined sediment P speciation from three sites in the Chesapeake Bay: (i) a North site in the upstream bay, (ii) a middle site in the central bay dominated by seasonally hypoxic bottom water, and (iii) a South site at the bay-ocean boundary using a combination of sequential P extraction (SEDEX) and spectroscopic techniques, including (31)P NMR, P X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES), and Fe extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). Results from sequential P extraction reveal that sediment P is composed predominantly of ferric Fe-bound P and authigenic P, which was further confirmed by solid-state (31)P NMR, XANES, and EXAFS analyses. Additionally, solution (31)P NMR results show that the sediments from the middle site contain high amounts of organic P such as monoesters and diesters, compared to the other two sites, but that these compounds rapidly decrease with sediment depth indicating remineralized P could have precipitated as authigenic P. Fe EXAFS enabled to identify the changes in Fe mineral composition and P sinks in response to imposed redox condition in the middle site sediments. The presence of lepidocrocite, vermiculite, and Fe smectite in the middle site sediments indicates that some ferric Fe minerals can still be present along with pyrite and vivianite, and that ferric Fe-bound P pool can be a major P sink in anoxic sediments. These results provide

  5. Impacts of chemical amendment and plant growth on lead speciation and enzyme activities in a shooting range soil: an x-ray absorption fine structure investigation.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Yohey; Matsufuru, Hiroki; Takaoka, Masaki; Tanida, Hajime; Sato, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    In situ chemical immobilization is a practical remediation technology for metal-contaminated soils because of its capability to reduce cost and environmental impacts. We assessed the immobilization effects of poultry waste amendment and plant growth (Panicum maximum Jacq.) on Pb speciation and enzyme activities in shooting range soils. Soil contaminated with Pb was obtained from the top 20 cm of a shooting range. To evaluate Pb mobility in the soil profile treated with plants and immobilizing amendment, we used large columns filled with Pb-contaminated soil (0-20 cm, surface soils) and non-contaminated soil (20-75 cm, subsurface soils). The column study demonstrated that the amendment reduced the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure-extractable Pb in the surface soil by 90% of the Control soil. Lead mobility from the surface to subsurface profiles was significantly attenuated by plant growth but was promoted by the amendment without plant application. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis revealed that the amendment reduced the proportion of PbCO(3) and Pb-organic complexes and transformed them into a more geochemically stable species of Pb(5)(PO(4))(3)Cl with 30 to 35% of the total Pb species. Applications of plant and amendment increased activities of dehydrogenase and phosphatase in the surface soil with 2.7- and 1.1-fold greater than those in Control, respectively. The use of amendments in combination with plant growth may have potential as an integrated remediation strategy that enables Pb immobilization and soil biological restoration in shooting range soils.

  6. Systematic Oxidation of Polystyrene by Ultraviolet-Ozone, Characterized by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Contact Angle

    SciTech Connect

    Klein,R.; Fischer, D.; Lenhart, J.

    2008-01-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double OC bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 {+-} 2, due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above Tg allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  7. Spectroscopic analysis of small organic molecules: A comprehensive near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure study of C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Kolczewski, C.; Puettner, R.; Martins, M.; Schlachter, A.S.; Snell, G.; Sant'Anna, M.M.; Hermann, K.; Kaindl, G.

    2006-01-21

    We report high-resolution C 1s near-edge x-ray-absorption fine-structure (NEXAFS) spectra of the C{sub 6}-ring-containing molecules benzene (C{sub 6}H{sub 6}), 1,3- and 1,4-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}), cyclohexene (C{sub 6}H{sub 10}), cyclohexane (C{sub 6}H{sub 12}), styrene (C{sub 8}H{sub 8}), and ethylbenzene (C{sub 8}H{sub 10}) which allow us to examine the gradual development of delocalization of the corresponding {pi} electron systems. Due to the high experimental resolution, vibrational progressions can be partly resolved in the spectra. The experimental spectra are compared with theoretical NEXAFS spectra obtained from density-functional theory calculations where electronic final-state relaxation is accounted for. The comparison yields very good agreement between theoretical spectra and experimental results. In all cases, the spectra can be described by excitations to {pi}*- and {sigma}*-type final-state orbitals with valence character, while final-state orbitals of Rydberg character make only minor contributions. The lowest C 1s{yields}1{pi}* excitation energy is found to agree in the (experimental and theoretical) spectra of all molecules except for 1,3-cyclohexadiene (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}) where an energy smaller by about 0.6 eV is obtained. The theoretical analysis can explain this result by different binding properties of this molecule compared to the others.

  8. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of Sn local environment in strained and relaxed epitaxial Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} films

    SciTech Connect

    Gencarelli, F. Heyns, M.; Grandjean, D.; Shimura, Y.; Vandervorst, W.; Vincent, B.; Loo, R.; Banerjee, D.; Vantomme, A.; Temst, K.

    2015-03-07

    We present an extended X-ray absorption fine structure investigation of the local environment of Sn atoms in strained and relaxed Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers with different compositions. We show that the preferred configuration for the incorporation of Sn atoms in these Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers is that of a α-Sn defect, with each Sn atom covalently bonded to four Ge atoms in a classic tetrahedral configuration. Sn interstitials, Sn-split vacancy complexes, or Sn dimers, if present at all, are not expected to involve more than 2.5% of the total Sn atoms. This finding, along with a relative increase of Sn atoms in the second atomic shell around a central Sn atom in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers with increasing Sn concentrations, suggests that the investigated materials are homogeneous random substitutional alloys. Within the accuracy of the measurements, the degree of strain relaxation of the Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} layers does not have a significant impact on the local atomic surrounding of the Sn atoms. Finally, the calculated topological rigidity parameter a** = 0.69 ± 0.29 indicates that the strain due to alloying in Ge{sub 1−x}Sn{sub x} is accommodated via bond stretching and bond bending, with a slight predominance of the latter, in agreement with ab initio calculations reported in literature.

  9. Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Imaging of Spherical and Flat Counterfaces of Ultrananocrystalline Diamond Tribological Contacts: A Correlation of Surface Chemistry and Friction

    SciTech Connect

    A Konicek; C Jaye; M Hamilton; W Sawyer; D Fischer; R Carpick

    2011-12-31

    A recently installed synchrotron radiation near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) full field imaging electron spectrometer was used to spatially resolve the chemical changes of both counterfaces from an ultra-nanocrystalline diamond (UNCD) tribological contact. A silicon flat and Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} sphere were both coated with UNCD, and employed to form two wear tracks on the flat in a linear reciprocating tribometer. The first wear track was produced using a new, unconditioned sphere whose surface was thus conditioned during this first experiment. This led to faster run-in and lower friction when producing a second wear track using the conditioned sphere. The large depth of field of the magnetically guided NEXAFS imaging detector enabled rapid, large area spectromicroscopic imaging of both the spherical and flat surfaces. Laterally resolved NEXAFS data from the tribological contact area revealed that both substrates had an as-grown surface layer that contained a higher fraction of sp{sup 2}-bonded carbon and oxygen which was mechanically removed. Unlike the flat, the film on the sphere showed evidence of having graphitic character, both before and after sliding. These results show that the graphitic character of the sphere is not solely responsible for low friction and short run-in. Rather, conditioning the sphere, likely by removing asperities and passivating dangling bonds, leads to lower friction with less chemical modification of the substrate in subsequent tests. The new NEXAFS imaging spectroscopy detector enabled a more complete understanding of the tribological phenomena by imaging, for the first time, the surface chemistry of the spherical counterface which had been in continual contact during wear track formation.

  10. Characterization of functionalized self-assembled monolayers and surface-attached interlocking molecules using near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willey, Trevor Michael

    Quantitative knowledge of the fundamental structure and substrate binding, as well as the direct measurement of conformational changes, are essential to the development of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and surface-attached interlocking molecules, catenanes and rotaxanes. These monolayers are vital to development of nano-mechanical, molecular electronic, and biological/chemical sensor applications. This dissertation investigates properties of functionalized SAMs in sulfur-gold based adsorbed molecular monolayers using quantitative spectroscopic techniques including near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stability of the gold-thiolate interface is addressed. A simple model SAM consisting of dodecanethiol adsorbed on Au(111) degrades significantly in less than 24 hours under ambient laboratory air. S 2p and O 1s XPS show the gold-bound thiolates oxidize to sulfinates and sulfonates. A reduction of organic material on the surface and a decrease in order are observed as the layer degrades. The effect of the carboxyl vs. carboxylate functionalization on SAM structure is investigated. Carboxyl-terminated layers consisting of long alkyl-chain thiols vs. thioctic acid with short, sterically separated, alkyl groups are compared and contrasted. NEXAFS shows a conformational change, or chemical switchability, with carboxyl groups tilted over and carboxylate endgroups more upright. Surface-attached loops and simple surface-attached rotaxanes are quantitatively characterized, and preparation conditions that lead to desired films are outlined. A dithiol is often insufficient to form a molecular species bound at each end to the substrate, while a structurally related disulfide-containing polymer yields surface-attached loops. Similarly, spectroscopic techniques show the successful production of a simple, surface-attached rotaxane that requires a "molecular riveting" step to hold the mechanically attached

  11. Characterization of Functionalized Self-Assembled Monolayers and Surface-Attached Interlocking Molecules Using Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Willey, Trevor M.

    2004-04-01

    Quantitative knowledge of the fundamental structure and substrate binding, as well as the direct measurement of conformational changes, are essential to the development of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) and surface-attached interlocking molecules, catenanes and rotaxanes. These monolayers are vital to development of nano-mechanical, molecular electronic, and biological/chemical sensor applications. This dissertation investigates properties of functionalized SAMs in sulfur-gold based adsorbed molecular monolayers using quantitative spectroscopic techniques including near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The stability of the gold-thiolate interface is addressed. A simple model SAM consisting of dodecanethiol adsorbed on Au(111) degrades significantly in less than 24 hours under ambient laboratory air. S 2p and O 1s XPS show the gold-bound thiolates oxidize to sulfinates and sulfonates. A reduction of organic material on the surface and a decrease in order are observed as the layer degrades. The effect of the carboxyl vs. carboxylate functionalization on SAM structure is investigated. Carboxyl-terminated layers consisting of long alkyl-chain thiols vs. thioctic acid with short, sterically separated, alkyl groups are compared and contrasted. NEXAFS shows a conformational change, or chemical switchability, with carboxyl groups tilted over and carboxylate endgroups more upright. Surface-attached loops and simple surface-attached rotaxanes are quantitatively characterized, and preparation conditions that lead to desired films are outlined. A dithiol is often insufficient to form a molecular species bound at each end to the substrate, while a structurally related disulfide-containing polymer yields surface-attached loops. Similarly, spectroscopic techniques show the successful production of a simple, surface-attached rotaxane that requires a ''molecular riveting'' step to hold the mechanically attached

  12. New fine structure cooling rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  13. Surface complexation and precipitate geometry for aqueous Zn(II) sorption on ferrihydrite I: X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waychunas, G.A.; Fuller, C.C.; Davis, J.A.

    2002-01-01

    "Two-line" ferrihydrite samples precipitated and then exposed to a range of aqueous Zn solutions (10-5 to 10-3 M), and also coprecipitated in similar Zn solutions (pH 6.5), have been examined by Zn and Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Typical Zn complexes on the surface have Zn-O distances of 1.97(0.2) A?? and coordination numbers of about 4.0(0.5), consistent with tetrahedral oxygen coordination. This contrasts with Zn-O distances of 2.11(.02) A?? and coordination numbers of 6 to 7 in the aqueous Zn solutions used in sample preparation. X-ray absorption extended fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) fits to the second shell of cation neighbors indicate as many as 4 Zn-Fe neighbors at 3.44(.04) A?? in coprecipitated samples, and about two Zn-Fe neighbors at the same distance in adsorption samples. In both sets of samples, the fitted coordination number of second shell cations decreases as sorption density increases, indicating changes in the number and type of available complexing sites or the onset of competitive precipitation processes. Comparison of our results with the possible geometries for surface complexes and precipitates suggests that the Zn sorption complexes are inner sphere and at lowest adsorption densities are bidentate, sharing apical oxygens with adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 octahedra. Coprecipitation samples have complexes with similar geometry, but these are polydentate, sharing apices with more than two adjacent edge-sharing Fe(O,OH)6 polyhedra. The results are inconsistent with Zn entering the ferrihydrite structure (i.e., solid solution formation) or formation of other Zn-Fe precipitates. The fitted Zn-Fe coordination numbers drop with increasing Zn density with a minimum of about 0.8(.2) at Zn/(Zn + Fe) of 0.08 or more. This change appears to be attributable to the onset of precipitation of zinc hydroxide polymers with mainly tetrahedral Zn coordination. At the highest loadings studied, the nature of the complexes changes further

  14. Systematic oxidation of polystyrene by ultraviolet-ozone, characterized by near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure and contact angle.

    PubMed

    Klein, Robert J; Fischer, Daniel A; Lenhart, Joseph L

    2008-08-01

    The process of implanting oxygen in polystyrene (PS) via exposure to ultraviolet-ozone (UV-O) was systematically investigated using the characterization technique of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). Samples of PS exposed to UV-O for 10-300 s and washed with isopropanol were analyzed using the carbon and oxygen K-edge NEXAFS partial electron yields, using various retarding bias voltages to depth-profile the oxygen penetration into the surface. Evaluation of reference polymers provided a scale to quantify the oxygen concentration implanted by UV-O treatment. We find that ozone initially reacts with the double bonds on the phenyl rings, forming carbonyl groups, but within 1 min of exposure, the ratio of double to single oxygen bonds stabilizes at a lower value. Oxygen penetrates the film with relative ease, creating a fairly uniform distribution of oxygen within at least the first 4 nm (the effective depth probed by NEXAFS here). Before oxygen accumulates in large concentrations, however, it preferentially degrades the uppermost layer of the film by removing oxygenated low-molecular-weight oligomers. The failure to accumulate high concentrations of oxygen is seen in the nearly constant carbon edge jump, the low concentration of oxygen even at 5 min exposure (58% of that in poly(4-acetoxystyrene), the polymer with the most similarities to UV-O-treated PS), and the relatively high contact angles. At 5 min exposure the oxygen concentration contains ca. 7 atomic % oxygen. The oxygen species that are implanted consist predominantly of single O-C bonds and double O=C bonds but also include a small fraction of O-H. UV-O treatment leads a plateau after 2 min exposure in the water contact angle hysteresis, at a value of 67 +/- 2 degrees , due primarily to chemical heterogeneity. Annealing above T(g) allows oxygenated species to move short distances away from the surface but not diffuse further than 1-2 nm.

  15. Temperature-dependent local structure of NdFeAsO(1-x)F(x) system using arsenic K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure.

    PubMed

    Joseph, B; Iadecola, A; Malavasi, L; Saini, N L

    2011-07-01

    Local structure of NdFeAsO(1-x)F(x) (x = 0.0, 0.05, 0.15 and 0.18) high temperature iron-pnictide superconductor system is studied using arsenic K-edge extended x-ray absorption fine structure measurements as a function of temperature. Fe-As bond length shows only a weak temperature and F-substitution dependence, consistent with the strong covalent nature of this bond. The temperature dependence of the mean square relative displacements of the Fe-As bond length are well described by the correlated Einstein model for all the samples, but with different Einstein temperatures for the superconducting and non-superconducting samples. The results indicate distinct local Fe-As lattice dynamics in the superconducting and non-superconducting iron-pnictide systems.

  16. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies of Zn2Fe2 hybrid hemoglobins: absence of heme bond length changes in half-ligated species.

    PubMed

    Simolo, K; Korszun, Z R; Stucky, G; Moffat, K; McLendon, G; Bunker, G

    1986-07-01

    Metal hybrid hemoglobins, in which Zn(II) replaces Fe(II), have been structurally characterized by extended X-ray absorption structure (EXAFS) studies. Since Zn and Fe have very different K absorption edge energies, the structures of the ligated (Fe) and unligated (Zn) sites could be examined independently within a single molecule that mimics an intermediate ligation state. The observed EXAFS spectra and associated structural parameters are compared among the ligand free (alpha Zn)2(beta Zn)2, half-ligated (alpha FeCO)2(beta Zn)2 and (alpha Zn)2(beta FeCO)2, and fully ligated (alpha FeCO)2(beta FeCO)2 systems.

  17. Antimony(III) complexing with O-bearing organic ligands in aqueous solution: An X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and solubility study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tella, Marie; Pokrovski, Gleb S.

    2009-01-01

    The stability and structure of aqueous complexes formed by trivalent antimony (Sb III) with carboxylic acids (acetic, adipic, malonic, lactic, oxalic, tartaric, and citric acid), phenols (catechol), and amino acids (glycine) having O- and N-functional groups (carboxyl, alcoholic hydroxyl, phenolic hydroxyl and amine) typical of natural organic matter, were determined at 20 and 60 °C from solubility and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy measurements. In organic-free aqueous solutions and in the presence of acetic, adipic, malonic acids and glycine, both spectroscopic and solubility data are consistent with the dominant formation of Sb III hydroxide species, Sb(OH)3-nn+,Sb(OH)30andSb(OH)4-, at strongly acid, acid-to-neutral and basic pH, respectively, demonstrating negligible complexing with mono-functional organic ligands (acetic) or those having non adjacent carboxylic groups (adipic, malonic). In contrast, in the presence of poly-functional carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic acids and catechol, Sb III forms stable 1:1 and 1:2 complexes with the studied organic ligands over a wide pH range typical of natural waters (3 < pH < 9). XAFS spectroscopy measurements show that in these species the central Sb III atom has a distorted pseudo-trigonal pyramidal geometry composed of the lone pair of 5s 2 electrons of Sb and four oxygen atoms from two adjacent functional groups of the ligand (O dbnd C-OH and/or C sbnd OH), forming a five-membered bidendate chelate cycle. Stability constants for these species, generated from Sb 2O 3 (rhomb.) solubility experiments, were used to model Sb complexing with natural humic acids possessing the same functional groups as those investigated in this study. Our predictions show that in an aqueous solution of pH between 2 and 10, containing 1 μg/L of Sb and 5 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon (DOC), up to 35% of total dissolved Sb binds to aqueous organic matter via carboxylic and hydroxy-carboxylic groups. This amount of

  18. Structural Study of Cu-Deficient Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 Solar Cell Materials by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Feng; Yamazoe, Seiji; Maeda, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Takahiro

    2012-10-01

    Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 powders were prepared from elemental powders. The crystal structure of Cu-poor Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 was examined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analyses. Kesterite-type Cu2(1-x)ZnSnSe4 could be prepared in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750. The lattice parameters were refined by the Rietveld analysis of X-ray diffraction data. The lattice constants a and c decreased with a decrease in the Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio. However, there was little change in c/a value. On the other hand, the position of the Se atom (u parameters) changed considerably. The XAFS study showed that the local structure of Sn in Cu2ZnSnSe4 (CZTSe) changed with a decrease in Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio and the local structural changes in Cu, Zn, or Se could not be clearly observed. These local structural changes around Sn are due to the disordering of Cu, Zn, and Sn atoms. The diffuse reflectance spectra showed that the band gap of Cu2ZnSnSe4 is 0.98 eV and that the band gaps do not depend on Cu/(Zn+Sn) ratio in the range of 0≤x ≤0.0750.

  19. Extended x-ray absorption fine structure study of arsenic in HgCdTe: p-type doping linked to nonsubstitutional As incorporation in an unknown AsHg{sub 8} structure

    SciTech Connect

    Biquard, X.; Alliot, I.; Ballet, P.

    2009-11-15

    An extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) investigation has been carried out on arsenic-doped Hg{sub 70}Cd{sub 30}Te samples. The incorporation of atomic arsenic has been achieved using a nonconventional radio-frequency plasma source in a molecular beam epitaxy reactor. Two samples from the same epitaxial wafer have been studied. One underwent a 400 deg. C activation annealing under Hg pressure, leading to n to p-type conversion. In the commonly admitted scenario, this conversion is associated with the annealing-induced migration of As from a Hg site to a Te site. This study shows that this is not the case. Before annealing, As is found to be involved in noncrystalline structures: 50% inside an As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} chalcogenide glass and 50% inside a new AsHg{sub 8} compact structure. After annealing, the As{sub 2}Te{sub 3} chalcogenide glass disappears, 31% of As occupies Hg sites and 69% incorporates inside this new AsHg{sub 8} compact structure that occupies Te sites. The EXAFS results are in excellent agreement with 77 K Hall-effect measurements. The new AsHg{sub 8} structure is found to have an acceptor behavior. Overall, this study provides an entirely new vision of extrinsic p-type doping of HgCdTe as well as the first experimental evidence of As site transfer induced by annealing.

  20. Adsorption and stability of malonic acid on rutile TiO2 (110), studied by near edge X-ray absorption fine structure and photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syres, Karen L.; Thomas, Andrew G.; Graham, Darren M.; Spencer, Ben F.; Flavell, Wendy R.; Jackman, Mark J.; Dhanak, Vinod R.

    2014-08-01

    The adsorption of malonic acid on rutile TiO2 (110) has been studied using photoelectron spectroscopy and C K-edge, near edge X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (NEXAFS). Analysis of the O 1s and Ti 2p spectra suggest that the molecule adsorbs dissociatively in a doubly-bidentate adsorption geometry as malonate. The data are unable to distinguish between a chelating bonding mode with the backbone of the molecule lying along the [001] azimuth or a bridging geometry along the direction. Work carried out on a wiggler beamline suggests that the molecule is unstable under irradiation by high-flux synchrotron radiation from this type of insertion device.

  1. Structural Analysis of the Mn(IV)/Fe(III) Cofactor of Chlamydia Trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase By Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy And Density Functional Theory Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Younker, J.M.; Krest, C.M.; Jiang, W.; Krebs, C.; Bollinger, J.M.Jr.; Green, M.T.

    2009-05-28

    The class Ic ribonucleotide reductase from Chlamydia trachomatis (C{bar A}) uses a stable Mn(lV)/ Fe(lll) cofactor to initiate nucleotide reduction by a free-radical mechanism. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and density functional theory (DFT) calculations are used to postulate a structure for this cofactor. Fe and Mn K-edge EXAFS data yield an intermetallic distance of -2.92 {angstrom}. The Mn data also suggest the presence of a short 1.74 {angstrom} Mn-O bond. These metrics are compared to the results of DFT calculations on 12 cofactor models derived from the crystal structure of the inactive Fe2(lll/ III) form of the protein. Models are differentiated by the protonation states of their bridging and terminal OH{sub x} ligands as well as the location of the Mn(lV) ion (site 1 or 2). The models that agree best with experimental observation feature a{mu}-1, 3-carboxylate bridge (E120), terminal solvent (H{sub 2}O/OH) to site 1, one {mu}-O bridge, and one {mu}-OH bridge. The site-placement of the metal ions cannot be discerned from the available data.

  2. Characterizing xBa(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3+(1-x )Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 microwave ceramics using extended x-ray absorption fine structure method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, P.-J.; Chia, C.-T.; Lin, I.-N.; Lee, J.-F.; Lin, C. M.; Wu, K. T.

    2006-06-01

    The structures of TaO6 and NbO6 oxygen octahedra in xBa(Mg1/3Ta2/3)O3+(1-x )Ba(Mg1/3Nb2/3)O3 perovskite ceramics with x =0, 0.25, 0.50, 0.75, and 1.0 were investigated by the extended x-ray absorption fine structure method. The decline in the microwave dielectric constant as x increases is caused mainly by the decrease of the mean volume of the oxygen octahedra, regardless of the 1:2 ordered structure and the distortion of the oxygen octahedron. The low Qf values of the TaO6 and NbO6 mixed samples are caused by not only the degrading of the 1:2 ordered structure but also the distortion of oxygen octahedral cages.

  3. The Fe-heme structure of met-indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 determined by X-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Aitken, Jade B.; Austin, Christopher J.D.; Hunt, Nicholas H.; Ball, Helen J.; Lay, Peter A.

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • IDO2 is a newly discovered tryptophan metabolising enzyme with a role in immunity. • IDO2’s active site contains a heme moiety for tryptophan binding and catabolism. • EXAFS/XANES analysis provides the first data of an IDO2 Fe-heme environment. • IDO2 Fe-heme exists as a low spin bis(His) form at 10 K; mixed spin-state at RT. - Abstract: Multiple-scattering (MS) analysis of EXAFS data on met-indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-2 (IDO2) and analysis of XANES have provided the first direct structural information about the axial donor ligands of the iron center for this recently discovered protein. At 10 K, it exists in a low-spin bis(His) form with Fe–N{sub p}(av) = 1.97 Å, the Fe–N{sub Im} bond lengths of 2.11 Å and 2.05 Å, which is in equilibrium with a high-spin form at room temperature. The bond distances in the low-spin form are consistent with other low-spin hemeproteins, as is the XANES spectrum, which is closer to that of the low-spin met-Lb than that of the high-spin met-Mb. The potential physiological role of this spin equilibrium is discussed.

  4. In Situ X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Studies on the Effect of pH on Pt Electronic Density during Aqueous Phase Reforming of Glycerol

    SciTech Connect

    Karim, Ayman M.; Howard, Christopher J.; Roberts, Benjamin Q.; Kovarik, Libor; Zhang, Liang; King, David L.; Wang, Yong

    2012-10-30

    In situ x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) results on correlating the Pt local coordination and electronic structure with the Pt/C catalyst activity and selectivity during aqueous reforming of glycerol at different pH are reported. The results show that both low and high pH favor C-O cleavage over that of C-C. However, the selectivity towards C-O bond cleavage was higher under the acidic conditions. XANES measurements under reaction conditions showed that low pH increased the Pt electron density while the effect of basic conditions was minimal. ΔXANES was used to estimate the coverage of adsorbates under reaction conditions and the results suggest a change in the adsorbates coverage by the acidic conditions, resulting in higher electron density on Pt

  5. Fine structures at pore boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, L.; Quintero Noda, C.; Joshi, C.; Rakesh, S.; Pandya, A.

    2016-10-01

    We present high resolution observations of fine structures at pore boundaries. The inner part of granules towards umbra show dark striations which evolve into a filamentary structure with dark core and `Y' shape at the head of the filaments. These filaments migrate into the umbra similar to penumbral filaments. These filaments show higher temperature, lower magnetic field strength and more inclined field compared to the background umbra. The optical depth stratification of physical quantities suggests their similarity with penumbral filaments. However, line-of-sight velocity pattern is different from penumbral filaments where they show downflows in the deeper layers of the atmosphere while the higher layers show upflows. These observations show filamentation in a simple magnetic configuration.

  6. Fine Structure in Solar Flares.

    PubMed

    Warren

    2000-06-20

    We present observations of several large two-ribbon flares observed with both the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer (TRACE) and the soft X-ray telescope on Yohkoh. The high spatial resolution TRACE observations show that solar flare plasma is generally not confined to a single loop or even a few isolated loops but to a multitude of fine coronal structures. These observations also suggest that the high-temperature flare plasma generally appears diffuse while the cooler ( less, similar2 MK) postflare plasma is looplike. We conjecture that the diffuse appearance of the high-temperature flare emission seen with TRACE is due to a combination of the emission measure structure of these flares and the instrumental temperature response and does not reflect fundamental differences in plasma morphology at the different temperatures.

  7. Complex polarization propagator approach in the restricted open-shell, self-consistent field approximation: the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of allyl and copper phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Linares, Mathieu; Stafström, Sven; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Ågren, Hans; Norman, Patrick

    2011-05-12

    A presentation of the complex polarization propagator in the restricted open-shell self-consistent field approximation is given. It rests on a formulation of a resonant-convergent, first-order polarization propagator approach that makes it possible to directly calculate the X-ray absorption cross section at a particular frequency without explicitly addressing the excited states. The quality of the predicted X-ray spectra relates only to the type of density functional applied without any separate treatment of dynamical relaxation effects. The method is applied to the calculation of the near K-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectra of allyl and copper phthalocyanine. Comparison is made between the spectra of the radicals and those of the corresponding cations and anions to assess the effect of the increase of electron charge in the frontier orbital. The method offers the possibility for unique assignment of symmetry-independent atoms. The overall excellent spectral agreement motivates the application of the method as a routine precise tool for analyzing X-ray absorption of large systems of technological interest.

  8. Fine structure of cluster decays

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O.

    1994-03-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach, expressions are derived for the hindrance factors of cluster radioactive decays in which {ital y} {ital the} {ital shell} {ital model} {ital with} {ital effective} {ital residual} {ital interactions} [{ital e}.{ital g}.,{ital thelar} in the Michigan State University version for nearly spherical nuclei, or the enlarged superfluid model (ESM) recently proposed for deformed nuclei]. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the M3Y interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 241}Am and {sup 243}Cm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra, and {sup 34}Si decay of {sup 243}Cm. Good agreement with the experimental data is obtained.

  9. Probing cation antisite disorder in Gd2 Ti2 O7 pyrochlore by site-specific near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachimuthu, P.; Thevuthasan, S.; Engelhard, M. H.; Weber, W. J.; Shuh, D. K.; Hamdan, N. M.; Mun, B. S.; Adams, E. M.; McCready, D. E.; Shutthanandan, V.; Lindle, D. W.; Balakrishnan, G.; Paul, D. M.; Gullikson, E. M.; Perera, R. C. C.; Lian, J.; Wang, L. M.; Ewing, R. C.

    2004-09-01

    Disorder in Gd2Ti2O7 is investigated by near-edge x-ray-absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). NEXAFS shows Ti4+ ions occupy octahedral sites with a tetragonal distortion induced by vacant oxygen sites. O1s XPS spectra obtained with a charge neutralization system from Gd2Ti2O7(100) and the Gd2Ti2O7 pyrochlore used by Chen [Phys. Rev. Lett. 88, 105901 (2002)], both yielded a single peak, unlike the previous result on the latter that found two peaks. The current results give no evidence for an anisotropic distribution of Ti and O. The extra features reported in the aforementioned communication resulted from charging effects and incomplete surface cleaning. Thus, a result confirming the direct observation of simultaneous cation-anion antisite disordering and lending credence to the split vacancy model has been clarified.

  10. X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure study of epitaxial mixed ternary bixbyite PrxY2-xO3 (x = 0-2) films on Si (111)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, G.; Zoellner, M. H.; Zaumseil, P.; Pouliopoulos, A.; d'Acapito, F.; Schroeder, T.; Boscherini, F.

    2013-01-01

    Ternary single crystalline bixbyite PrxY2-xO3 films over the full stoichiometry range (x = 0-2) have been epitaxially grown on Si (111) with tailored electronic and crystallographic structure. In this work, we present a detailed study of their local atomic environment by extended X-ray absorption fine structure at both Y K and Pr LIII edges, in combination with complementary high resolution x-ray diffraction measurements. The local structure exhibits systematic variations as a function of the film composition. The cation coordination in the second and third coordination shells changes with composition and is equal to the average concentration, implying that the PrxY2-xO3 films are indeed fully mixed and have a local bixbyite structure with random atomic-scale ordering. A clear deviation from the virtual crystal approximation for the cation-oxygen bond lengths is detected. This demonstrates that the observed Vegard's law for the lattice variation as a function of composition is based microscopically on a more complex scheme related to local structural distortions which accommodate the different cation-oxygen bond lengths.

  11. Limits on the time variation of the electromagnetic fine-structure constant in the low energy limit from absorption lines in the spectra of distant quasars.

    PubMed

    Srianand, R; Chand, H; Petitjean, P; Aracil, B

    2004-03-26

    We present the results of a detailed many-multiplet analysis performed on a new sample of Mg ii systems observed in high quality quasar spectra obtained using the Very Large Telescope. The weighted mean value of the variation in alpha derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.4absorption line systems.

  12. Near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure study of ion-beam-induced phase transformation in Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachimuthu, P.; Thevuthasan, S.; Shutthanandan, V.; Adams, E. M.; Weber, W. J.; Begg, B. D.; Shuh, D. K.; Lindle, D. W.; Gullikson, E. M.; Perera, R. C. C.

    2005-02-01

    The structural and electronic properties of Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 (y =0-1) pyrochlores following a 2.0-MeV Au2+ ion-beam irradiation (˜5.0×1014Au2+/cm2) have been investigated by Ti2p and O1s near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS). The irradiation of Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 leads to the phase transformation from the ordered pyrochlore structure (Fd3m) to the defect fluorite structure (Fm3m) regardless of Zr concentration. Irradiated Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 with y ⩽0.5 are amorphous, although significant short-range order is present. Contrasting to this behavior, compositions with y ⩾0.75 retain crystallinity in the defect fluorite structure following irradiation. The local structures of Zr4+ in the irradiated Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 with y ⩾0.75 determined by NEXAFS are the same as in the cubic fluorite-structured yttria-stabilized zirconia (Y -ZrO2), thereby providing conclusive evidence for the phase transformation. The TiO6 octahedra present in Gd2(Ti1-yZry)2O7 are completely modified by ion-beam irradiation to TiOx polyhedra, and the Ti coordination is increased to eight with longer Ti -O bond distances. The similarity between cation sites and the degree of disorder in Gd2Zr2O7 facilitate the rearrangement and relaxation of Gd, Zr, and O ions/defects. This inhibits amorphization during the ion-beam-induced phase transition to the radiation-resistant defect fluorite structure, which is in contrast to the ordered Gd2Ti2O7.

  13. Spatially resolved micro-X-ray fluorescence and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure study of a fractured granite bore core following a radiotracer experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denecke, Melissa A.; Brendebach, Boris; De Nolf, Wout; Falkenberg, Gerald; Janssens, Koen; Simon, Rolf

    2009-08-01

    Spatially resolved X-ray absorption and fluorescence investigation with a micrometer-scale resolution on actinide-containing samples provide information necessary for safety assessment of nuclear waste disposal. In this paper one example of such an experiment is presented. This example entails neptunium speciation in a fractured granite bore core from the Swedish Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory following a radiotracer experiment using µ-XAFS and µ-XRF. In order to probe micro-volumes below the surface in the granite samples and thereby avoid potential changes in the Np speciation during cutting of the bore core, a confocal irradiation-detection geometry is employed. µ-XAFS results for a selected granite bore core cross section with ~ 3 nmol Np/g reveal that Np, originally introduced as Np(V) in the tracer cocktail, is present in the granite in its reduced Np(IV) form. The Np(IV) is often present as particles, tens of µm in size. Elemental distribution maps show the tracer Np to be located in fissures and permeable channels not larger than 100 µm. The Np distribution appears often correlated with Zn also present in some fissures. We observe small granite fissures containing Fe (presumably Fe(II)), where we do not detect any Np. It is feasible that inflowing Np(V) has a shorter residence time in large fractures, while in the smaller fissures migration is slower, leading to longer residence times, i.e., reaction times, where it is reduced to less soluble Np(IV) and becomes thereby immobilized.

  14. Speciation of deeply buried TiOx nanolayers with grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence combined with a near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollakowski, Beatrix; Beckhoff, Burkhard; Reinhardt, Falk; Braun, Stefan; Gawlitza, Peter

    2008-06-01

    Nondestructive methods based on electron emission may encounter serious difficulties when probing the chemical state of deeply buried nanolayers due to restricted information depth. The purpose of the present work is to evaluate to which extent photon emission can overcome these restrictions. Grazing-incidence x-ray fluorescence combined with a near-edge x-ray absorption fine-structure investigation (GIXRF-NEXAFS) offers access to depth-resolving analysis of buried nanolayers with respect to both the chemical speciation and the layer composition. By varying the angle of incidence, the penetration depth can be tuned from a few to several hundreds of nanometers. The information depth of the emitted fluorescence radiation is in the same general range as the soft x-ray regime. Initial measurements were performed on nominally 30 nm thick titanium nanolayers oxidized to different extents and buried below 5 nm carbon layers. These layered structures were produced by means of ion beam sputtering deposition. The plane grating monochromator beamline for undulator radiation in the laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt at the electron storage ring BESSY II provides tunable radiation of both well-known flux and high spectral purity for GIXRF-NEXAFS studies. The current results confirm that GIXRF-NEXAFS has the potential to substantially contribute to the speciation of deeply buried nanolayers. The analysis of measurements at a constant incident angle demonstrated that it is not possible to find an angle of incidence for the NEXAFS region to ensure a stable penetration depth. However, appropriate angular corrections can ensure a constant mean penetration depth, in particular, in the vicinity of absorption edges.

  15. Cationic vacancies and anomalous spectral-weight transfer in Ti1-xTaxO2 thin films studied via polarization-dependent near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Dong-Chen; Barman, Arkajit Roy; Debbichi, Lamjed; Dhar, S.; Santoso, Iman; Asmara, Teguh Citra; Omer, Humair; Yang, Kesong; Krüger, Peter; Wee, Andrew T. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Rusydi, Andrivo

    2013-06-01

    We report the electronic structures of Ta-doped anatase TiO2 thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition (PLD) with varying magnetization using a combination of first-principles calculations and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy. The roles of Ta doping and Ti vacancies are clarified, and the observed room-temperature ferromagnetism is attributed to the localized magnetic moments at Ti vacancy sites ferromagnetically ordered by electron charge carriers. O K-edge spectra exhibit significant polarization dependence which is discussed and supported by first-principles calculations in relation to both the crystal symmetry and the formation of defects. In particular, anomalous spectral-weight transfer across the entire O K edge for the ferromagnetic thin film is associated exclusively with the occurrence of Ti vacancies and strong correlation effects, which result in the enhancement of the direct interaction between oxygen sites and of the anisotropy of the eg-pσ hybridizations in the out-of-plane component. Our results show that O K-edge NEXAFS spectra can provide reliable experimental probes capable of revealing cationic defects that are intimately related to the ferromagnetism in transition metal oxides.

  16. Fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis of half-metallic ferromagnet ``zinc-blende CrAs'' grown on GaAs by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofuchi, H.; Mizuguchi, M.; Ono, K.; Oshima, M.; Akinaga, H.; Manago, T.

    2003-01-01

    In this work, geometric structures for a half-metallic ferromagnet "zinc-blende CrAs", which showed ferromagnetic behavior beyond room temperature, were investigated using fluorescence extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurement. The EXAFS measurements revealed that As atoms around Cr atoms in the 2 nm CrAs film grown on a GaAs(0 0 1) substrate were coordinated tetrahedrally, indicating formation of zinc-blende CrAs. The Cr-As bond length in the zinc-blende CrAs is 2.49 Å. This value is close to that which was estimated from the lattice constant (5.82 Å) of ferromagnetic zinc-blende CrAs calculated by full-potential linearized augmented-plane wave method. The EXAFS analysis show that the theoretically predicted zinc-blende CrAs can be fabricated on GaAs(0 0 1) substrate by low-temperature molecular-beam epitaxy.

  17. Experimental study of germanium adsorption on goethite and germanium coprecipitation with iron hydroxide: X-ray absorption fine structure and macroscopic characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokrovsky, O. S.; Pokrovski, G. S.; Schott, J.; Galy, A.

    2006-07-01

    Adsorption of germanium on goethite was studied at 25 °C in batch reactors as a function of pH (1-12), germanium concentration in solution (10 -7 to 0.002 M) and solid/solution ratio (1.8-17 g/L). The maximal surface site density determined via Ge adsorption experiments at pH from 6 to 10 is equal to 2.5 ± 0.1 μmol/m 2. The percentage of adsorbed Ge increases with pH at pH < 9, reaches a maximum at pH ˜ 9 and slightly decreases when pH is further increased to 11. These results allowed generation of a 2-p K Surface Complexation Model (SCM) which implies a constant capacitance of the electric double layer and postulates the presence of two Ge complexes, >FeO-Ge(OH)30 and >FeO-GeO(OH)2-, at the goethite-solution interface. Coprecipitation of Ge with iron oxy(hydr)oxides formed during Fe(II) oxidation by atmospheric oxygen or by Fe(III) hydrolysis in neutral solutions led to high Ge incorporations in solid with maximal Ge/Fe molar ratio close to 0.5. The molar Ge/Fe ratio in precipitated solid is proportional to that in the initial solution according to the equation (Ge/Fe) solid = k × (Ge/Fe) solution with 0.7 ⩽ k ⩽ 1.0. The structure of adsorbed and coprecipitated Ge complexes was further characterized using XAFS spectroscopy. In agreement with previous data on oxyanions adsorption on goethite, bi-dentate bi-nuclear surface complexes composed of tetrahedrally coordinated Ge attached to the corners of two adjacent Fe octahedra represent the dominant contribution to the EXAFS signal. Coprecipitated samples with Ge/Fe molar ratios >0.1, and samples not aged in solution (<1 day) having intermediate Ge/Fe ratios (0.01-0.1) show 4 ± 0.3 oxygen atoms at 1.76 ± 0.01 Å around Ge. Samples less concentrated in Ge (0.001 < Ge/Fe < 0.10) and aged longer times in solution (up to 280 days) exhibit a splitting of the first atomic shell with Ge in both tetrahedral ( R = 1.77 ± 0.02 Å) and octahedral ( R = 1.92 ± 0.03 Å) coordination with oxygen. In these samples

  18. Interrogation of Surface, Skin, and Core Orientation in Thermotropic Liquid-Crystalline Copolyester Moldings by Near-Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Rendon,S.; Bubeck, R.; Thomas, L.; Burghardt, W.; Hexemer, A.; Fischer, D.

    2007-01-01

    Injection molding thermotropic liquid-crystalline polymers (TLCPs) usually results in the fabrication of molded articles that possess complex states of orientation that vary greatly as a function of thickness. 'Skin-core' morphologies are often observed in TLCP moldings. Given that both 'core' and 'skin' orientation states may often differ both in magnitude and direction, deconvolution of these complex orientation states requires a method to separately characterize molecular orientation in the surface region. A combination of two-dimensional wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) in transmission and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopy is used to probe the molecular orientation in injection molded plaques fabricated from a 4,4'-dihydroxy-{alpha}-methylstilbene (DH{alpha}MS)-based thermotropic liquid crystalline copolyester. Partial electron yield (PEY) mode NEXAFS is a noninvasive ex situ characterization tool with exquisite surface sensitivity that samples to a depth of 2 nm. The effects of plaque geometry and injection molding processing conditions on surface orientation in the regions on- and off- axis to the centerline of injection molded plaques are presented and discussed. Quantitative comparisons are made between orientation parameters obtained by NEXAFS and those from 2D WAXS in transmission, which are dominated by the microstructure in the skin and core regions. Some qualitative comparisons are also made with 2D WAXS results from the literature.

  19. Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure observation of collinear ordering of Fe-Sn-Fe atoms in the Chevrel-phase superconductor SnFe/sub 0. 05/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/

    SciTech Connect

    Vaishnava, P.P.; Kimball, C.W.; Matykiewicz, J.L.; Fradin, F.Y.; Shenoy, G.K.; Montano, P.A.

    1986-10-01

    Extended x-ray-absorption fine-structure (EXAFS) and x-ray-diffraction studies have been conducted on the Chevrel-phase superconductor SnFe/sub 0.05/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/. The site symmetry of the iron is found to be similar to that of copper in the high-temperature phase of Cu/sub 1.8/Mo/sub 6/S/sub 8/. EXAFS analysis yielded interatomic distances, e.g., Fe-Sn and Fe-S, in this compound. The Fe-S distances are found to be characteristic of iron sulfides (e.g., FeS and Fe/sub 7/S/sub 8/). Through the observation of focused multiple scattering, a distance corresponding to a linear array of Fe-Sn-Fe atoms was measured. Iron atoms were found to be situated in two different configurations, one where iron has only a tin neighbor and the other where a linear-chain-like configuration of Fe-Sn-Fe atoms occurs.

  20. Controlled agglomeration of Tb-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanocrystals studied by x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray excited luminescence, and photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Soo, Y.L.; Huang, S.W.; Kao, Y.H.; Chhabra, V.; Kulkarni, B.; Veliadis, J.V.; Bhargava, R.N.

    1999-10-01

    Local environment surrounding Y atoms in Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb nanocrystals under various heat treatment conditions has been investigated by using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. X-ray excited luminescence (XEL) with the incident x-ray energy near Y {ital K} edge and Tb {ital L} edges has also been measured to investigate the mechanisms of x-ray-to-visible down conversion in these doped nanoparticles. The observed changes in EXAFS, XEL, and photoluminescent data can be explained on the basis of increased average size of the nanoparticles as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy studies. Our results thus demonstrate that the doped nanoparticles can agglomerate to a controllable degree by varying the heat treatment temperature. At higher temperatures, the local environment surrounding Y atoms in the nanoparticles is found to become similar to that in bulk Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} while the XEL output still shows the characteristics of nanocrystals. These results indicate that appropriate heat treatment can afford an effective means to control the intensity and signal-to-background ratio of green luminescence output of these doped nanocrystal phosphors, potentially useful for some device applications. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  1. Effect of different thickness crystalline SiC buffer layers on the ordering of MgB{sub 2} films probed by extended x-ray absorption fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Putri, W. B. K.; Tran, D. H.; Kang, B.; Lee, O. Y.; Kang, W. N.; Miyanaga, T.; Yang, D. S.

    2014-03-07

    Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is a powerful method to investigate the local structure of thin films. Here, we have studied EXAFS of MgB{sub 2} films grown on SiC buffer layers. Crystalline SiC buffer layers with different thickness of 70, 100, and 130 nm were deposited on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (0001) substrates by using a pulsed laser deposition method, and then MgB{sub 2} films were grown on the SiC buffer layer by using a hybrid physical-chemical vapor deposition technique. Transition temperature of MgB{sub 2} film decreased with increasing thickness of SiC buffer layer. However, the T{sub c} dropping went no farther than 100 nm-thick-SiC. This uncommon behavior of transition temperature is likely to be created from electron-phonon interaction in MgB{sub 2} films, which is believed to be related to the ordering of MgB{sub 2} atomic bonds, especially in the ordering of Mg–Mg bonds. Analysis from Mg K-edge EXAFS measurements showed interesting ordering behavior of MgB{sub 2} films. It is noticeable that the ordering of Mg–B bonds is found to decrease monotonically with the increase in SiC thickness of the MgB{sub 2} films, while the opposite happens with the ordering in Mg–Mg bonds. Based on these results, crystalline SiC buffer layers in MgB{sub 2} films seemingly have evident effects on the alteration of the local structure of the MgB{sub 2} film.

  2. Spectropolarimetry of fine magnetized structures in the upper solar atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schad, Thomas Anthony

    2013-12-01

    One of the earliest indications of magnetic fields acting in the solar atmosphere came at the beginning of the 20th century when George Hale noted a "decided definiteness of structure" in photographs within the Hydrogen Balmer-alpha line core. Fine structure both in the chromosphere and in the corona result from processes that are not well understood but accepted as a consequence of the solar magnetic field. Our knowledge of this field is lacking, and until recently, the assumed relationship between fine thermal structure and the magnetic field remained untested. Here, spectropolarimetric diagnostics of fine structures in the solar chromosphere and cool corona are advanced using the infrared He I triplet at 1083 nm. Precise calibration procedures are developed for the Facility Infrared Spectropolarimeter (FIRS), recently commissioned at the Dunn Solar Telescope. Together with high-order adaptive optics, we simultaneously map fine structures while obtaining a polarimetric sensitivity of up to 2 x 10--4 of the incoming intensity. These instrument improvements result in the first maps of the He I polarized signatures within an active region superpenumbra, where Hale first recognized fine-structuring. Selective absorption and emission processes due to non-equilibrium optical pumping are recognized. Our interpretation, using advanced inversions of the He I triplet, provides confirmation of Hale's initial suspicion---the fine structures of the solar chromosphere are visual markers for the magnetic field. Yet, the fine chromospheric thermal structure is not matched by an equivalently fine magnetic structure. Our ability to measure this field suggests the utility of the He I triplet as an inner boundary condition for the inner heliospheric magnetic field. In the corona itself, we infer the vector properties of a catastrophically-cooled coronal loop, uniting space-based and ground-based instrumentation. We determine how fine loops are anchored in the photosphere via a

  3. X-ray absorption fine structure evidence for amorphous zinc sulfide as a major zinc species in suspended matter from the Seine River downstream of Paris, Ile-de-France, France.

    PubMed

    Priadi, Cindy; Le Pape, Pierre; Morin, Guillaume; Ayrault, Sophie; Maillot, Fabien; Juillot, Farid; Hochreutener, Rebecca; Llorens, Isabelle; Testemale, Denis; Proux, Olivier; Brown, Gordon E

    2012-04-01

    Zinc is one of the most widespread trace metals (TMs) in Earth surface environments and is the most concentrated TM in the downstream section of the Seine River (France) due to significant anthropogenic input from the Paris conurbation. In order to better identify the sources and cycling processes of Zn in this River basin, we investigated seasonal and spatial variations of Zn speciation in suspended particulate matter (SPM) in the oxic water column of the Seine River from upstream to downstream of Paris using synchrotron-based extend X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy at the Zn K-edge. First-neighbor contributions to the EXAFS were analyzed in SPM samples, dried and stored under a dry nitrogen atmosphere or under an ambient oxygenated atmosphere. We found a sulfur first coordination environment around Zn (in the form of amorphous zinc sulfide) in the raw SPM samples stored under dry nitrogen vs an oxygen first coordination environment around Zn in the samples stored in an oxygenated atmosphere. These findings are supported by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry observations. Linear combination fitting of the EXAFS data for SPM samples, using a large set of EXAFS spectra of Zn model compounds, indicates dramatic changes in the Zn speciation from upstream to downstream of Paris, with amorphous ZnS particles becoming dominant dowstream. In contrast, Zn species associated with calcite (either adsorbed or incorporated in the structure) are dominant upstream. Other Zn species representing about half of the Zn pool in the SPM consist of Zn-sorbed on iron oxyhydroxides (ferrihydrite and goethite) and, to a lesser extent, Zn-Al layered double hydroxides, Zn incorporated in dioctahedral layers of clay minerals and Zn sorbed to amorphous silica. Our results highlight the importance of preserving the oxidation state in TM speciation studies when sampling suspended matter, even in an oxic water column.

  4. Study of the local distortions of the perovskite system La1-xSrxCoO3 (0≤x≤0.35) using the extended x-ray absorption fine structure technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Y.; Bridges, F.; Sundaram, N.; Belanger, D. P.; Anderson, I. E.; Mitchell, J. F.; Zheng, H.

    2009-10-01

    We present a temperature-dependent extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS)/x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) investigation of La1-xSrxCoO3 (LSCO) over a wide doping concentration range (0≤x≤0.35) . Five of the samples are nanoparticles ( x=0.15 , 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, and 0.35) and four are bulk powders ( x=0 , 0.15, 0.20, and 0.30). From the EXAFS analysis, we find that the Co-O bonds are well ordered for both bulk and nanoparticle materials and there is no clear evidence for a Jahn-Teller (JT) distortion in the LSCO system (either static or dynamic). The distortion of the Co-O bond with increasing T , parameterized by the width of the pair distribution function (PDF), σ(T) , can easily be modeled using a correlated Debye model with a high correlated Debye temperature ˜800K . There is also no evidence for a step in plots of σ2 vs T . In addition, the very small nonthermal contribution to σ2 for the Co-O (PDF), σstatic2 , sets an upper limit on the extent of any Jahn-Teller distortion at low T . These experiments are inconsistent with the existence of a significant fraction of Co sites with an intermediate spin (IS) state, for which there is a JT active eg electron on the Co atoms. We cannot, however, exclude the possibility of a tiny fraction of sites having a JT distortion or some other (non-JT active) means of producing an IS state. The bulk samples are well ordered out to at least the third neighbors (Co-Co) while the nanoparticles show increased disorder and a reduction in coordination for Co-Co. XANES data are also presented, and, for both bulk and nanoparticle samples, there is essentially no edge shift with increasing Sr concentration. Bond-valence sums also indicate no change in effective Co valence. These results indicate that when holes are introduced via Sr doping, they have little Co(3d) character and the Co configuration remains close to 3d6 ; we argue that the holes have mostly O(2p) character and are localized more on the O

  5. Effect of Iron(II) on Arsenic Sequestration by δ-MnO2: Desorption Studies Using Stirred-Flow Experiments and X-Ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-17

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) oxides are ubiquitous solids in terrestrial systems and have high sorptive capacities for many trace metals, including As. Although numerous studies have studied the effects of As adsorption and desorption onto Fe and Mn oxides individually, the fate of As within mixed systems representative of natural environments has not been resolved. In this research, As(III) was initially reacted with a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) prior to desorption. This initial reaction resulted in the sorption of both As(III) and As(V) on mixed Fe/Mn-oxides surfaces. A desorption study was carried out using two environmentally significant ions, phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca(2+)). Both a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) analysis were used to investigate As desorption behavior. Results showed that when As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:1 in the initial reaction, only As(V) was desorbed, agreeing with a previous study showing that As(III) is not associated with the Fe/Mn-oxides. When As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:10 in the initial reaction, both As(III) and As(V) can be desorbed from the Fe/Mn-oxide surface, and more As(III) is desorbed than As(V). Neither of the desorbents used in this study completely removed As(III) or As(V) from the Fe/Mn-oxides surface. However, the As desorption fraction decreases with increasing Fe(II) concentration in the initial reactions.

  6. Effect of Iron(II) on Arsenic Sequestration by δ-MnO2: Desorption Studies Using Stirred-Flow Experiments and X-Ray Absorption Fine-Structure Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Li, Wei; Sparks, Donald L

    2015-11-17

    Arsenic (As) mobility in the environment is greatly affected by its oxidation state and the degree to which it is sorbed on metal oxide surfaces. Manganese (Mn) and iron (Fe) oxides are ubiquitous solids in terrestrial systems and have high sorptive capacities for many trace metals, including As. Although numerous studies have studied the effects of As adsorption and desorption onto Fe and Mn oxides individually, the fate of As within mixed systems representative of natural environments has not been resolved. In this research, As(III) was initially reacted with a poorly crystalline phyllomanganate (δ-MnO2) in the presence of Fe(II) prior to desorption. This initial reaction resulted in the sorption of both As(III) and As(V) on mixed Fe/Mn-oxides surfaces. A desorption study was carried out using two environmentally significant ions, phosphate (PO4(3-)) and calcium (Ca(2+)). Both a stirred-flow technique and X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy (XAFS) analysis were used to investigate As desorption behavior. Results showed that when As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:1 in the initial reaction, only As(V) was desorbed, agreeing with a previous study showing that As(III) is not associated with the Fe/Mn-oxides. When As(III)/Fe(II) = 1:10 in the initial reaction, both As(III) and As(V) can be desorbed from the Fe/Mn-oxide surface, and more As(III) is desorbed than As(V). Neither of the desorbents used in this study completely removed As(III) or As(V) from the Fe/Mn-oxides surface. However, the As desorption fraction decreases with increasing Fe(II) concentration in the initial reactions. PMID:26477604

  7. Invited article: The fast readout low noise camera as a versatile x-ray detector for time resolved dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure and diffraction studies of dynamic problems in materials science, chemistry, and catalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Labiche, Jean-Claude; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark A.; Ferre, Gemma Guilera; Curfs, Caroline; Vaughan, Gavin; Homs, Alejandro; Carreiras, David Fernandez

    2007-09-15

    Originally conceived and developed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) as an 'area' detector for rapid x-ray imaging studies, the fast readout low noise (FReLoN) detector of the ESRF [J.-C. Labiche, ESRF Newsletter 25, 41 (1996)] has been demonstrated to be a highly versatile and unique detector. Charge coupled device (CCD) cameras at present available on the public market offer either a high dynamic range or a high readout speed. A compromise between signal dynamic range and readout speed is always sought. The parameters of the commercial cameras can sometimes be tuned, in order to better fulfill the needs of specific experiments, but in general these cameras have a poor duty cycle (i.e., the signal integration time is much smaller than the readout time). In order to address scientific problems such as time resolved experiments at the ESRF, a FReLoN camera has been developed by the Instrument Support Group at ESRF. This camera is a low noise CCD camera that combines high dynamic range, high readout speed, accuracy, and improved duty cycle in a single image. In this paper, we show its application in a quasi-one-dimensional sense to dynamic problems in materials science, catalysis, and chemistry that require data acquisition on a time scale of milliseconds or a few tens of milliseconds. It is demonstrated that in this mode the FReLoN can be applied equally to the investigation of rapid changes in long range order (via diffraction) and local order (via energy dispersive extended x-ray absorption fine structure) and in situations of x-ray hardness and flux beyond the capacity of other detectors.

  8. Combined time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy study on the complexation of trivalent actinides with chloride at T = 25-200 °C.

    PubMed

    Skerencak-Frech, Andrej; Fröhlich, Daniel R; Rothe, Jörg; Dardenne, Kathy; Panak, Petra J

    2014-01-21

    The complexation of trivalent actinides (An(III)) with chloride is studied in the temperature range from 25 to 200 °C by spectroscopic methods. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) is applied to determine the thermodynamic data of Cm(III)-Cl(-) complexes, while extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) is used to determine the structural data of the respective Am(III) complexes. The experiments are performed in a custom-built high-temperature cell which is modified for the respective spectroscopic technique. The TRLFS results show that at 25 °C the speciation is dominated mainly by the Cm(3+) aquo ion. Only a minor fraction of the CmCl(2+) complex is present in solution. As the temperature increases, the fraction of this species decreases further. Simultaneously, the fraction of the CmCl2(+) complex increases strongly with the temperature. Also, the CmCl3 complex is formed to a minor extent at T > 160 °C. The conditional stability constant log β'2 is determined as a function of the temperature and extrapolated to zero ionic strength with the specific ion interaction theory approach. The log β°2(T) values increase by more than 3 orders of magnitude in the studied temperature range. The temperature dependency of log β°2 is fitted by the extended van't Hoff equation to determine ΔrH°m, ΔrS°m, and ΔrC°p,m. The EXAFS results support these findings. The results confirm the absence of americium(III) chloride complexes at T = 25 and 90 °C ([Am(III)] = 10(-3) m, [Cl(-)] = 3.0 m), and the spectra are described by 9-10 oxygen atoms at a distance of 2.44-2.48 Å. At T = 200 °C two chloride ligands are present in the inner coordination sphere of Am(III) at a distance of 2.78 Å.

  9. Fine structure constant and quantized optical transparency of plasmonic nanoarrays.

    PubMed

    Kravets, V G; Schedin, F; Grigorenko, A N

    2012-01-01

    Optics is renowned for displaying quantum phenomena. Indeed, studies of emission and absorption lines, the photoelectric effect and blackbody radiation helped to build the foundations of quantum mechanics. Nevertheless, it came as a surprise that the visible transparency of suspended graphene is determined solely by the fine structure constant, as this kind of universality had been previously reserved only for quantized resistance and flux quanta in superconductors. Here we describe a plasmonic system in which relative optical transparency is determined solely by the fine structure constant. The system consists of a regular array of gold nanoparticles fabricated on a thin metallic sublayer. We show that its relative transparency can be quantized in the near-infrared, which we attribute to the quantized contact resistance between the nanoparticles and the metallic sublayer. Our results open new possibilities in the exploration of universal dynamic conductance in plasmonic nanooptics.

  10. The Fine-Structure Constant and Wavelength Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan

    The fine-structure constant is a fundamental constant of the universe--and widely thought to have an unchanging value. However, the past decade has witnessed a controversy unfold over the claimed detection that the fine-structure constant had a different value in the distant past. These astrophysical measurements were made with spectrographs at the world's largest optical telescopes. The spectrographs make precise measurements of the wavelength spacing of absorption lines in the metals in the gas between the quasar background source and our telescopes on Earth. The wavelength spacing gives a snapshot of the atomic physics at the time of the interaction. Whether the fine-structure constant has changed is determined by comparing the atomic physics in the distant past with the atomic physics of today. We present our contribution to the discussion by analyzing three nights data taken with the HIRES instrument (High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph) on the Keck telescope. We provide an independent measurement on the fine-structure constant from the Damped Lyman alpha system at a redshift of z =2.309 (10.8 billion years ago) quasar PHL957. We developed a new method for calibrating the wavelength scale of a quasar exposure to a much higher precision than previously achieved. In our subsequent analysis, we discovered unexpected wavelength calibration errors that has not been taken into account in the previously reported measurements. After characterizing the wavelength miscalibrations on the Keck-HIRES instrument, we obtained several nights of data from the main competing instrument, the VLT (Very Large Telescope) with UVES (Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph). We applied our new wavelength calibration method and uncovered similar in nature systematic errors as found on Keck-HIRES. Finally, we make a detailed Monte Carlo exploration of the effects that these miscalibrations have on making precision fine-structure constant measurements.

  11. Ultraviolet observations of solar fine structure.

    PubMed

    Dere, K P; Bartoe, J D; Brueckner, G E; Cook, J W; Socker, D G

    1987-11-27

    The High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph was flown on the Spacelab-2 shuttle mission to perform extended observations of the solar chromosphere and transition zone at high spatial and temporal resolution. Ultraviolet spectroheliograms show the temporal development of macrospicules at the solar limb. The C IV transition zone emission is produced in discrete emission elements that must be composed of exceedingly fine (less than 70 kilometers) subresolution structures. PMID:17744366

  12. Structure and Elongation of fine Ladies’ Hosiery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozo, M.; Vrljicak, Z.

    2016-07-01

    On a sock-knitting machine with diameter of cylindrical needle bed 100 mm (4e") that knitted with 400 needles, samples of fine women's hosiery were made from four PA filament yarns in counts 20 dtex f 20, 30 dtex f 34, 40 dtex f 40 and 60 dtex f 60. Each type of yarns was used to make hosiery samples with four loop sinking depths of unit values in a computer program 400, 550, 700 and 850. For all the samples, parameters of yarn structure were analyzed and elongation properties of knitted fabric were measured. During the elongation of knitted fabric, areas of knitted fabric elasticity, beginning of permanent deformation and elongation at break were measured. Elongation of knitted fabric in the wale direction, i.e. transverse hosiery elongation and elongation of knitted fabric in the course direction, or longitudinal direction of hosiery were measured. Yarn fineness and loop sinking depth significantly influence the elongation properties of hosiery.

  13. Further Evidence for Cosmological Evolution of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, J. K.; Murphy, M. T.; Flambaum, V. V.; Dzuba, V. A.; Barrow, J. D.; Churchill, C. W.; Prochaska, J. X.; Wolfe, A. M.

    2001-08-01

    We describe the results of a search for time variability of the fine structure constant α using absorption systems in the spectra of distant quasars. Three large optical data sets and two 21 cm and mm absorption systems provide four independent samples, spanning ~23% to 87% of the age of the universe. Each sample yields a smaller α in the past and the optical sample shows a 4σ deviation: Δα/α = -0.72+/-0.18×10-5 over the redshift range 0.5

  14. Internal Fine Structure of Ellerman Bombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Yuki; Kitai, Reizaburo; Ichimoto, Kiyoshi; Ueno, Satoru; Nagata, Shin'ichi; Ishii, Takako T.; Hagino, Masaoki; Komori, Hiroyuki; Nishida, Keisuke; Matsumoto, Takuma; Otsuji, Kenichi; Nakamura, Tahei; Kawate, Tomoko; Watanabe, Hiroko; Shibata, Kazunari

    2010-08-01

    We conducted coordinated observations of Ellerman bombs (EBs) between Hinode Satellite and Hida Observatory (HOP12). CaII H broad-band filter images of NOAA 10966 on 2007 August 9 and 10 were obtained with the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT) aboard the Hinode Satellite, and many bright points were observed. We identified a total of 4 bright points as EBs, and studied the temporal variation of their morphological fine structures and spectroscopic characteristics. With high-resolution CaII H images of SOT, we found that the EBs, thus far thought of as single bright features, are composed of a few of fine subcomponents. Also, by using Stokes I/V filtergrams with Hinode/SOT, and CaII H spectroheliograms with Hida/Domeless Solar Telescope (DST), our observation showed: (1) The mean duration, the mean width, the mean length, and the mean aspect ratio of the subcomponents were 390 s, 170 km, 450 km, and 2.7, respectively. (2) Subcomponents started to appear on the magnetic neutral lines, and extended their lengths from the original locations. (3) When the CaII H line of EBs showed the characteristic blue asymmetry, they are associated with the appearance or re-brightening of subcomponents. Summarizing our results, we obtained an observational view that elementary magnetic reconnections take place one by one successively and intermittently in EBs, and that their manifestation is the fine subcomponents of the EB phenomena.

  15. Magnetic tension of sunspot fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatakrishnan, P.; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar

    2010-06-01

    Context. The equilibrium structure of sunspots depends critically on its magnetic topology and is dominated by magnetic forces. Tension force is one component of the Lorentz force, which balances the gradient of magnetic pressure in force-free configurations. Aims: We employ the tension term of the Lorentz force to clarify the structure of sunspot features like penumbral filaments, umbral light bridges, and outer penumbral fine structures. Methods: We computed the vertical component of the tension term of Lorentz force over two active regions, NOAA AR 10933 and NOAA AR 10930 observed on 5 January 2007 and 12 December 2006, respectively. The former is a simple active region while the latter is a complex one with highly sheared polarity inversion line (PIL). We obtained the vector magnetograms from Hinode(SOT/SP). Results: We find an inhomogeneous distribution of tension with both positive and negative signs in various features of the sunspots. The existence of positive tension at locations of lower field strength and higher inclination is compatible with the uncombed model of the penumbral structure. Positive tension is also seen in umbral light bridges, which could be indication of uncombed structure of the light bridge. Likewise, the upwardly directed tension associated with bipolar regions in the penumbra could be a direct confirmation of the sea serpent model of penumbral structures. Upwardly directed tension at the PIL of AR 10930 seems to be related to flux emergence. The magnitude of the tension force is greater than the force of gravity in some places, implying a nearly force-free configuration for these sunspot features. Conclusions: From our study, magnetic tension emerges as a useful diagnostic of the local equilibrium of the sunspot fine structures. Figures A.1-A.3 are only available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  16. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α-1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  17. The fine structure constant and habitable planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandora, McCullen

    2016-08-01

    We use the existence of habitable planets to impose anthropic requirements on the fine structure constant, α. To this effect, we present two considerations that restrict its value to be very near the one observed. The first, that the end product of stellar fusion is iron and not one of its neighboring elements, restricts α‑1 to be 145± 50. The second, that radiogenic heat in the Earth's interior remains adequately productive for billions of years, restricts it to be 145±9. A connection with the grand unified theory window is discussed, effectively providing a route to probe ultra-high energy physics with upcoming advances in planetary science.

  18. Molecular Eigensolution Symmetry Analysis and Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Harter, William G.; Mitchell, Justin C.

    2013-01-01

    Spectra of high-symmetry molecules contain fine and superfine level cluster structure related to J-tunneling between hills and valleys on rovibronic energy surfaces (RES). Such graphic visualizations help disentangle multi-level dynamics, selection rules, and state mixing effects including widespread violation of nuclear spin symmetry species. A review of RES analysis compares it to that of potential energy surfaces (PES) used in Born–Oppenheimer approximations. Both take advantage of adiabatic coupling in order to visualize Hamiltonian eigensolutions. RES of symmetric and D2 asymmetric top rank-2-tensor Hamiltonians are compared with Oh spherical top rank-4-tensor fine-structure clusters of 6-fold and 8-fold tunneling multiplets. Then extreme 12-fold and 24-fold multiplets are analyzed by RES plots of higher rank tensor Hamiltonians. Such extreme clustering is rare in fundamental bands but prevalent in hot bands, and analysis of its superfine structure requires more efficient labeling and a more powerful group theory. This is introduced using elementary examples involving two groups of order-6 (C6 and D3~C3v), then applied to families of Oh clusters in SF6 spectra and to extreme clusters. PMID:23344041

  19. A Geometric and Electrostatic Study of the [4Fe-4S] Cluster of Adenosine-5´-Phosphosulfate Reductase from Broken Symmetry Density Functional Calculations and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Devayani P.; Han, Wen-Ge; Pazicni, Samuel; Penner-Hahn, James E.; Carroll, Kate S.; Noodleman, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate reductase (APSR) is an iron-sulfur protein that catalyses the reduction of adenosine-5’-phosphosulfate (APS) to sulfite. APSR coordinates to a [4Fe-4S] cluster via a conserved CC-X~80-CXXC motif and the cluster is essential for catalysis. Despite extensive functional, structural and spectroscopic studies, the exact role of the iron-sulfur cluster in APS reduction remains unknown. To gain an understanding into the role of the cluster, density functional theory (DFT) analysis and extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) have been performed to reveal insights into the coordination, geometry and electrostatics of the [4Fe-4S] cluster. XANES data confirms that the cluster is in the [4Fe-4S]2+ state in both native and substrate-bound APSR while EXAFS data recorded at ~0.1 Å resolution indicates that there is no significant change in the structure of the [4Fe-4S] cluster between the native and substrate-bound forms of the protein. On the other hand, DFT calculations provide an insight into the subtle differences between the geometry of the cluster in the native and APS-bound forms of APSR. A comparison between models with and without the tandem cysteine pair coordination of the cluster suggests a role for the unique coordination in facilitating a compact geometric structure and ‘fine-tuning’ the electronic structure to prevent reduction of the cluster. Further, calculations using models in which residue Lys144 is mutated to Ala confirm the finding that Lys144 serves as a crucial link in the interactions involving the [4Fe-4S] cluster and APS. PMID:21678934

  20. Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.J.

    1985-03-01

    Measurements of the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) from the S(1s) core level of a c(2 x 2)S/Ni(001) are analyzed to determine the spacing between the S overlayer and the first and second Ni layers. ARPEFS is a type of photoelectron diffraction measurement in which the photoelectron kinetic energy is swept typically from 100 to 600 eV. By using this wide range of intermediate energies we add high precision and theoretical simplification to the advantages of the photoelectron diffraction technique for determining surface structures. We report developments in the theory of photoelectron scattering in the intermediate energy range, measurement of the experimental photoemission spectra, their reduction to ARPEFS, and the surface structure determination from the ARPEFS by combined Fourier and multiple-scattering analyses. 202 refs., 67 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Sheath over a finely structured divertor plate

    SciTech Connect

    Cohen, R. H., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    The surface of a divertor plate typically has fine structure. Depending on the material - and the duration of exposure to the plasma, the characteristic size of the surface imperfections may vary over a broad range. In this paper, we consider the case where these structures have scale h that is much smaller than the ion gyroradius {rho}{sub i} but greater than the electron gyroradius {rho}{sub e}. The magnetic field intersects the divertor plate at a shallow angle {alpha}<fine surface structures and strongly tilted magnetic field, gives rise to many interesting new phenomena in the sheath. We consider only the plasma part of the problem: given the presence of some structure, what are the consequences in terms of the plasma properties in the vicinity of the surface? We are not addressing the issue of what process has caused the appearance of the structure. However, once the plasma part of the problem is solved, on could return to the analysis of the wall erosion problem, based on the solution obtained. For the environment of the divertor region of a medium-size tokamak (plasma density n{approximately}4x10{sup 13} cm{sup -3}, plasma temperature T{approximately}50 eV, the magnetic field strength B{approximately} 2T), one has: {rho}{sub i} {approximately}500 {micro}m (hydrogen), {rho}{sub e}{approximately}10 {micro}m. We, therefore, are going to analyze the scales of imperfections in the range 10 {micro}m

  2. Magnetic fine structure of solar coronal loops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ballegooijen, A. A.

    1988-01-01

    A numerical simulation of the effect of a random photospheric flow on the magnetic structure of a coronal loop is presented. An initially uniform field embedded in a perfectly conducting plasma is assumed, extending between two flat parallel plates representing the solar photosphere at both ends of the loop. The field is perturbed by a sequence of randomly phased, sinusoidal flow patterns applied at one of the boundary plates, and the corresponding sequence of force-free fields is determined. It is found that the electric currents generated by these flows develop a fine structure on a scale significantly smaller than the wavelength of the velocity patterns. This suggests that magnetic energy is transferred to smaller scale via a cascade process.

  3. Fine structure in deformed proton emitters.

    SciTech Connect

    Sonzogni, A. A.; Davids, C. N.; Woods, P. J.; Seweryniak, D.; Carpenter, M. P.; Ressler, J. J.; Schwartz, J.; Uusitalo, J.; Walters, W. B.

    1999-12-07

    In a recent experiment to study the proton radioactivity of the highly deformed {sup 131}Eu nucleus, two proton lines were detected. The higher energy one was assigned to the ground-state to ground-state decay, while the lower energy, to the ground-state to the 2{sup +} state decay. This constitutes the first observation of fine structure in proton radioactivity. With these four measured quantities, proton energies, half-life and branching ratio, it is possible to determine the Nilsson configuration of the ground state of the proton emitting nucleus as well as the 2{sup +} energy and nuclear deformation of the daughter nucleus. These results will be presented and discussed.

  4. Solar Prominence Fine Structure and Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    We review recent observational and theoretical results on the fine structure and dynamics of solar prominences, beginning with an overview of prominence classifications, the proposal of possible new ``funnel prominence'' classification, and a discussion of the recent ``solar tornado'' findings. We then focus on quiescent prominences to review formation, down-flow dynamics, and the ``prominence bubble'' phenomena. We show new observations of the prominence bubble Rayleigh-Taylor instability triggered by a Kelvin-Helmholtz shear flow instability occurring along the bubble boundary. Finally we review recent studies on plasma composition of bubbles, emphasizing that differential emission measure (DEM) analysis offers a more quantitative analysis than photometric comparisons. In conclusion, we discuss the relation of prominences to coronal magnetic flux ropes, proposing that prominences can be understood as partially ionized condensations of plasma forming the return flow of a general magneto-thermal convection in the corona.

  5. FINE STRUCTURE OF BRUCELLA SUIS SPHEROPLASTS

    PubMed Central

    Hines, William D.; Freeman, Bob A.; Pearson, Gary R.

    1964-01-01

    Hines, William D. (University of Chicago, Chicago, Ill.), Bob A. Freeman, and Gary R. Pearson. Fine structure of Brucella suis spheroplasts. J. Bacteriol. 87:1492–1498. 1964.—Spheroplasts of Brucella suis, prepared by treatment with penicillin and glycine, and normal cells were sectioned and studied by electron microscopy. These spheroplasts differed from the normal cell in that they were greatly expanded and coccoid in shape. The cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane were more easily demonstrated in the spheroplasts. The cell wall and cytoplasmic membrane of normal cells appeared structureless, but in the spheroplasts both were shown to consist of two dark layers sandwiching a lighter layer. The cytoplasm of the spheroplasts was more dilute than that of normal cells and, in the case of glycine-induced spheroplasts, tended to aggregate. Images PMID:14188733

  6. Characterization of the Cu(Π) and Zn(Π) binding to the Amyloid-β short peptides by both the Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure and the Synchrotron Radiation Circular Dichroism spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhiyin; Sun, Shuaishuai; Xu, Jianhua; Zhang, Jing; Huang, Yan; Zhang, Bingbing; Tao, Ye

    2013-04-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive and devastating neurodegenerative pathology, clinically characterized by dementia, cognitive impairment, personality disorders and memory loss. It is generally accepted that, misfolding of Aβ peptides is the key element in pathogenesis and the secondary structure of Aβ can be changed to major β-strand with reasons unknown yet. Many studies have shown that the misfolding may be linked with some biometals, mainly copper and zinc ions. To characterize interactions of Aβ and metal ions, we utilized both the extended X-ray fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and the synchrotron radiation circular dichroism spectroscopy (SRCD). Aβ (13-22), Aβ (13-21), Aβ (E22G) and Aβ(HH-AA) were selected to study the mechanism of copper and zinc binding to Aβ. We found that Cu interaction with H13 and H14 residues led to the disappearance of the PPΠ, while the Cu binding E22 residue caused a remarkable conformation change to β-sheet enrichment. The Zn ion, in contrast, made little effect on the conformation and it coordinated to only one histidine (H residue) or not.

  7. Time variation of the fine structure constant driven by quintessence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anchordoqui, Luis; Goldberg, Haim

    2003-10-01

    There are indications from the study of quasar absorption spectra that the fine structure constant α may have been measurably smaller for redshifts z>2. Analyses of other data (149Sm fission rate for the Oklo natural reactor, variation of 187Re β-decay rate in meteorite studies, atomic clock measurements) which probe variations of α in the more recent past imply much smaller deviations from its present value. In this work we tie the variation of α to the evolution of the quintessence field proposed by Albrecht and Skordis, and show that agreement with all these data, as well as consistency with Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe observations, can be achieved for a range of parameters. Some definite predictions follow for upcoming space missions searching for violations of the equivalence principle.

  8. Cell fine structure and function - Past and present

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez-Moran, H.

    1970-01-01

    Electron microscopic studies of nerve membrane fine structure, discussing cell membrane multienzyme and macromolecular energy and information transduction, protein synthesis and nucleic acids interrelations

  9. Fine velocity structures collisional dissipation in plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    In a weakly collisional plasma, such as the solar wind, collisions are usually considered far too weak to produce any significant effect on the plasma dynamics [1]. However, the estimation of collisionality is often based on the restrictive assumption that the particle velocity distribution function (VDF) shape is close to Maxwellian [2]. On the other hand, in situ spacecraft measurements in the solar wind [3], as well as kinetic numerical experiments [4], indicate that marked non-Maxwellian features develop in the three-dimensional VDFs, (temperature anisotropies, generation of particle beams, ring-like modulations etc.) as a result of the kinetic turbulent cascade of energy towards short spatial scales. Therefore, since collisional effects are proportional to the velocity gradients of the VDF, the collisionless hypothesis may fail locally in velocity space. Here, the existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can increase locally due to the velocity space deformation of the particle velocity distribution. In particular, by means of Eulerian simulations of collisional relaxation of a spatially homogeneous force-free plasma, in which collisions among particles of the same species are modeled through the complete Landau operator, we show that the system entropy growth occurs over several time scales, inversely proportional to the steepness of the velocity gradients in the VDF. We report clear evidences that fine velocity structures are dissipated by collisions in a time much shorter than global non-Maxwellian features, like, for example, temperature anisotropies. Moreover we indicate that, if small-scale structures

  10. 21-cm radiation: a new probe of variation in the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Rishi; Wandelt, Benjamin D

    2007-03-16

    We investigate the effect of variation in the value of the fine-structure constant (alpha) at high redshifts (recombination > z > 30) on the absorption of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at 21 cm hyperfine transition of the neutral atomic hydrogen. We find that the 21 cm signal is very sensitive to the variations in alpha and it is so far the only probe of the fine-structure constant in this redshift range. A change in the value of alpha by 1% changes the mean brightness temperature decrement of the CMB due to 21 cm absorption by >5% over the redshift range z < 50. There is an effect of similar magnitude on the amplitude of the fluctuations in the brightness temperature. The redshift of maximum absorption also changes by approximately 5%.

  11. Local Fine Structural Insight into Mechanism of Electrochemical Passivation of Titanium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Yu, Hongying; Wang, Ke; Xu, Haisong; Wang, Shaoyang; Sun, Dongbai

    2016-07-20

    Electrochemically formed passive film on titanium in 1.0 M H2SO4 solution and its thickness, composition, chemical state, and local fine structure are examined by Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption fine structure. AES analysis reveals that the thickness and composition of oxide film are proportional to the reciprocal of current density in potentiodynamic polarization. XPS depth profiles of the chemical states of titanium exhibit the coexistence of various valences cations in the surface. Quantitative X-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of the local electronic structure of the topmost surface (∼5.0 nm) shows that the ratio of [TiO2]/[Ti2O3] is consistent with that of passivation/dissolution of electrochemical activity. Theoretical calculation and analysis of extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectra at Ti K-edge indicate that both the structures of passivation and dissolution are distorted caused by the appearance of two different sites of Ti-O and Ti-Ti. And the bound water in the topmost surface plays a vital role in structural disorder confirmed by XPS. Overall, the increase of average Ti-O coordination causes the electrochemical passivation, and the dissolution is due to the decrease of average Ti-Ti coordination. The structural variations of passivation in coordination number and interatomic distance are in good agreement with the prediction of point defect model. PMID:27355902

  12. A five dimensional model of varying effective gravitational and fine structure constants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, J. P.; Lachièze-Rey, M.

    2003-01-01

    We explore the possibility that the reported time variation of the fine structure constant alpha is due to a coupling between electromagnetism and gravitation. We predict such a coupling from a very simple effective theory of physical interactions, under the form of an improved version of the Kaluza-Klein theory. We show that it precisely leads to a variation of the effective fine structure constant with cosmic conditions, and thus with cosmic time. The comparison with the recent data from distant quasars absorption line spectra gives a good agreement; moreover, this may reconcile the claimed results on alpha with the upper limit from the Oklo naturel Uranium fission reactor.

  13. Fine structures in decametric noise storms: possible mechanisms.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melrose, D. B.

    The properties and existing theories for three types of fine structure observed in solar decametric storms are reviewed. The types are stria bursts, including split pair bursts, triple bursts and type IIIb bursts, drift pair (DP) bursts and S bursts.

  14. Structural Characterization of CO-Inhibited Mo-Nitrogenase by Combined Application of Nuclear Resonance Vibrational Spectroscopy, Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure, and Density Functional Theory: New Insights into the Effects of CO Binding and the Role of the Interstitial Atom

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The properties of CO-inhibited Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) Mo-nitrogenase (N2ase) have been examined by the combined application of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and density functional theory (DFT). Dramatic changes in the NRVS are seen under high-CO conditions, especially in a 188 cm–1 mode associated with symmetric breathing of the central cage of the FeMo-cofactor. Similar changes are reproduced with the α-H195Q N2ase variant. In the frequency region above 450 cm–1, additional features are seen that are assigned to Fe-CO bending and stretching modes (confirmed by 13CO isotope shifts). The EXAFS for wild-type N2ase shows evidence for a significant cluster distortion under high-CO conditions, most dramatically in the splitting of the interaction between Mo and the shell of Fe atoms originally at 5.08 Å in the resting enzyme. A DFT model with both a terminal −CO and a partially reduced −CHO ligand bound to adjacent Fe sites is consistent with both earlier FT-IR experiments, and the present EXAFS and NRVS observations for the wild-type enzyme. Another DFT model with two terminal CO ligands on the adjacent Fe atoms yields Fe-CO bands consistent with the α-H195Q variant NRVS. The calculations also shed light on the vibrational “shake” modes of the interstitial atom inside the central cage, and their interaction with the Fe-CO modes. Implications for the CO and N2 reactivity of N2ase are discussed. PMID:25275608

  15. Structural characterization of CO-inhibited Mo-nitrogenase by combined application of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and density functional theory: new insights into the effects of CO binding and the role of the interstitial atom.

    PubMed

    Scott, Aubrey D; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Yan, Lifen; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J; Dapper, Christie H; Newton, William E; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Yoshihito; Cramer, Stephen P

    2014-11-12

    The properties of CO-inhibited Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) Mo-nitrogenase (N2ase) have been examined by the combined application of nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS), extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), and density functional theory (DFT). Dramatic changes in the NRVS are seen under high-CO conditions, especially in a 188 cm(-1) mode associated with symmetric breathing of the central cage of the FeMo-cofactor. Similar changes are reproduced with the α-H195Q N2ase variant. In the frequency region above 450 cm(-1), additional features are seen that are assigned to Fe-CO bending and stretching modes (confirmed by (13)CO isotope shifts). The EXAFS for wild-type N2ase shows evidence for a significant cluster distortion under high-CO conditions, most dramatically in the splitting of the interaction between Mo and the shell of Fe atoms originally at 5.08 Å in the resting enzyme. A DFT model with both a terminal -CO and a partially reduced -CHO ligand bound to adjacent Fe sites is consistent with both earlier FT-IR experiments, and the present EXAFS and NRVS observations for the wild-type enzyme. Another DFT model with two terminal CO ligands on the adjacent Fe atoms yields Fe-CO bands consistent with the α-H195Q variant NRVS. The calculations also shed light on the vibrational "shake" modes of the interstitial atom inside the central cage, and their interaction with the Fe-CO modes. Implications for the CO and N2 reactivity of N2ase are discussed.

  16. SEISMOLOGY OF STANDING KINK OSCILLATIONS OF SOLAR PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURES

    SciTech Connect

    Soler, R.; Arregui, I.; Oliver, R.; Ballester, J. L.

    2010-10-20

    We investigate standing kink magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) oscillations in a prominence fine structure modeled as a straight and cylindrical magnetic tube only partially filled with the prominence material and with its ends fixed at two rigid walls representing the solar photosphere. The prominence plasma is partially ionized and a transverse inhomogeneous transitional layer is included between the prominence thread and the coronal medium. Thus, ion-neutral collisions and resonant absorption are the damping mechanisms considered. Approximate analytical expressions of the period, the damping time, and their ratio are derived for the fundamental mode in the thin tube and thin boundary approximations. We find that the dominant damping mechanism is resonant absorption, which provides damping ratios in agreement with the observations, whereas ion-neutral collisions are irrelevant for damping. The values of the damping ratio are independent of both the prominence thread length and its position within the magnetic tube, and coincide with the values for a tube fully filled with the prominence plasma. The implications of our results in the context of the MHD seismology technique are discussed, pointing out that the reported short-period (2-10 minutes) and short-wavelength (700-8000 km) thread oscillations may not be consistent with a standing mode interpretation and could be related to propagating waves. Finally, we show that the inversion of some prominence physical parameters, e.g., Alfven speed, magnetic field strength, transverse inhomogeneity length scale, etc., is possible using observationally determined values of the period and damping time of the oscillations along with the analytical approximations of these quantities.

  17. Effects of backlight structure on absorption experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Iglesias, C A

    2004-11-08

    The impact of spectral details in the backlight of absorption spectroscopy experiments is considered. It is shown that experimentally unresolved structure in the backlight spectrum can introduce significant errors in the inferred transmission. Furthermore, it is shown that a valuable experimental procedure previously used to test the accuracy of the data fails to reveal these errors.

  18. Fine thermal structure of a coronal active region.

    PubMed

    Reale, Fabio; Parenti, Susanna; Reeves, Kathy K; Weber, Mark; Bobra, Monica G; Barbera, Marco; Kano, Ryouhei; Narukage, Noriyuki; Shimojo, Masumi; Sakao, Taro; Peres, Giovanni; Golub, Leon

    2007-12-01

    The determination of the fine thermal structure of the solar corona is fundamental to constraining the coronal heating mechanisms. The Hinode X-ray Telescope collected images of the solar corona in different passbands, thus providing temperature diagnostics through energy ratios. By combining different filters to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio, we observed a coronal active region in five filters, revealing a highly thermally structured corona: very fine structures in the core of the region and on a larger scale further away. We observed continuous thermal distribution along the coronal loops, as well as entangled structures, and variations of thermal structuring along the line of sight.

  19. Preliminary optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel detection of near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) spectra in the 280-550 eV energy range

    SciTech Connect

    Wheeler, B.S.; McKinney, W.R.; Hussain, Z.; Padmore, H.

    1996-07-01

    The optical design of a varied line-space spectrograph for the multi-channel recording of NEXAFS spectra in a single {open_quotes}snapshot{close_quotes} is proposed. The spectrograph is to be used with a bending magnet source on beamline 7.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Approximately 20 volts of spectra are simultaneously imaged across a small square of material sample at each respective K absorption edge of carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen. Photoelectrons emitted from the material sample will be collected by an electron imaging microscope, the view field of which determines the sampling size. The sample also forms the exit slit of the optical system. This dispersive method of NEXAFS data acquisition is three to four orders of magnitude faster than the conventional method of taking data point-to-point using scanning of the grating. The proposed design is presented along with the design method and supporting SHADOW raytrace analysis.

  20. Enhanced absorption in silicon metamaterials waveguide structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouche, Houria; Shabat, Mohammed M.

    2016-07-01

    Metamaterial waveguide structures for silicon solar cells are a novel approach to antireflection coating structures that can be used for the achievement of high absorption in silicon solar cells. This paper investigates numerically the possibility of improving the performance of a planar waveguide silicon solar cell by incorporating a pair of silicon nitride/metamaterial layer between a semi-infinite glass cover layer and a semi-infinite silicon substrate layer. The optimized layer thicknesses of the pair are determined under the solar spectrum AM1.5 by the effective average reflectance method. The transmission and reflection coefficients are derived by the transfer matrix method for values of metamaterial's refractive index in visible and near-infrared radiation. In addition, the absorption coefficient is examined for several angles of incidence of the transverse electric polarized (TE), transverse magnetic polarized (TM) and the total (TE&TM) guided waves. Numerical results provide an extremely high absorption. The absorptivity of the structure achieves greater than 98 %.

  1. Re/Os Constraint on the Time Variability of the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-01

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re→187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant α, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  2. Re/Os constraint on the time variability of the fine-structure constant.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    2003-12-31

    We argue that the accuracy by which the isochron parameters of the decay 187Re-->187Os are determined by dating iron meteorites may constrain the possible time dependence of the decay rate and hence of the fine-structure constant alpha, not directly but only in a model-dependent manner. From this point of view, some of the attempts to analyze the Oklo constraint and the results of the quasistellar-object absorption lines are reexamined.

  3. Substitution behavior of x(Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3}-(1 − x)BaTiO{sub 3} ceramics for multilayer ceramic capacitors by a near edge x-ray absorption fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Jooyeon; Ryu, Jiseung; Lee, Heesoo

    2014-06-30

    The doping effect of (Na{sub 0.5}K{sub 0.5})NbO{sub 3} (NKN) as alternatives for rare-earth elements on the electrical properties of BaTiO{sub 3} has been investigated, in terms of their substitution behavior. The dielectric constant of a specimen with x = 0.05 was about 79% higher than that of pure BaTiO{sub 3}, and the temperature coefficient of capacitance was satisfied by the X7R specification. The specimen with x = 0.05 showed the lowest tetragonality among the four compositions and had a fine grain size of <2 μm. Although the addition of NKN decreased the specimen's tetragonality, the electrical properties were enhanced by the formation of defect dipoles and conduction electrons, which resulted from an acceptor and donor substitution behavior. Through O K-edge near edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy, the practical substitution behavior was defined by the change in Ti 3d orbital states. The energy separation of the Ti 3d orbitals was more apparent with the specimen of x = 0.05, which is related to the donor level from the donor substitution of Nb{sup 5+} ion for Ti-sites. Therefore, the simultaneous substitution of Na{sup +}/K{sup +} and Nb{sup 5+} ions into BaTiO{sub 3} can improve dielectric properties, based on the charge-transfer process.

  4. Residence time and pH effects on the bonding configuration of orthophosphate surface complexes at the goethite/water interface as examined by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Abdala, Dalton Belchior; Northrup, Paul Andrew; Vicentin, Flávio César; Sparks, Donald Lewis

    2015-03-15

    Identifying the mechanisms by which P is bound to soils and soil constituents is ultimately important as they provide information on the stability of bound species and their reactivity in the environment. EXAFS studies were carried out to provide information on how the local chemical environment of sorbed P changes as an effect of pH and time. Goethite was reacted with orthophosphate at a P concentration of 0.8mmolL(-1) P at pH 3.0, 4.5 and 6.0. The residence time effect on the mechanisms of P sorption on goethite was also evaluated for two different reaction times, 5 and 18days, on goethite suspensions reacted at pH 4.5. The objective of this study was to understand how P sorption mechanisms change over a wide pH range when subjected to P concentrations above the P saturation ratio of goethite. Phosphorus K-edge EXAFS spectra were collected at 2150eV in fluorescence mode and the structural parameters were obtained through the fits of sorption data using Artemis. The monodentate surface complex was shown to be the predominant mechanism by which P sorbs at the goethite surface under the experimental conditions. The lack of a discrete Fe-P shell and the presence of highly disordered structures, particularly, at R-space ⩾3.5 suggested the formation of P surface precipitates at the goethite/water interface. PMID:25514644

  5. Examination of the local structure in composite and lowdimensional semiconductor by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lawniczak-Jablonska, K.; Demchenko, I.N.; Piskorska, E.; Wolska,A.; Talik, E.; Zakharov, D.N.; Liliental-Weber, Z.

    2006-09-25

    X-ray absorption methods have been successfully used to obtain quantitative information about local atomic composition of two different materials. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure analysis and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy allowed us to determine seven chemical compounds and their concentrations in c-BN composite. Use of Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure in combination with Transmission Electron Microscopy enabled us to determine the composition and size of buried Ge quantum dots. It was found that the quantum dots consisted out of pure Ge core covered by 1-2 monolayers of a layer rich in Si.

  6. Fine crystal structure of porous corundum ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M. V.; Kulkov, S. N.

    2011-05-01

    The microstructure of corundum ceramics based on powders with a varying grain size has been investigated. Both commercial alumina powders and those fabricated by denitration of aluminum salts in a high-frequency discharge plasma were used. An increase in the plasma-chemical Al2O3 powder content in the sample was found to change the pore structure of the corundum ceramics from a high-porosity ceramic skeleton with a well-developed system of channel-forming pores to ceramics with isolated pores. The change in the pore structure was observed for 50% porosity and caused an increase in the level of crystal lattice microdistortions. An increase in the sintering temperature from 1200 to 1650°C is shown to be responsible for a two-fold increase in the average crystallite size and for annealing of lattice defects along grain boundaries.

  7. The Fine Structure of Some Retinal Photoreceptors

    PubMed Central

    Moody, M. F.; Robertson, J. D.

    1960-01-01

    An electron microscope study has been made of octopus and amphibian photoreceptors, after fixing with KMnO4 and embedding in araldite. What has previously been seen as a single dense stratum bounding the tubular compartments (octopus) or the double membrane discs (rods and cones), now shows a double structure. We interpret this as showing that these tubules and discs have similar bounding surfaces, which are probably directly related to the cell membrane. This is confirmed by the finding that the tubules and discs are (at least occasionally) continuous with the cell membrane. PMID:14423794

  8. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    SciTech Connect

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Zanoni, R.; Stranges, S.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-07

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the {sigma}/{pi} hyperconjugation in EtFC and the {pi}-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  9. C-C bond unsaturation degree in monosubstituted ferrocenes for molecular electronics investigated by a combined near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure, x-ray photoemission spectroscopy, and density functional theory approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccia, A.; Lanzilotto, V.; Marrani, A. G.; Stranges, S.; Zanoni, R.; Alagia, M.; Fronzoni, G.; Decleva, P.

    2012-04-01

    We present the results of an experimental and theoretical investigation of monosubstituted ethyl-, vinyl-, and ethynyl-ferrocene (EtFC, VFC, and EFC) free molecules, obtained by means of synchrotron-radiation based C 1s photoabsorption (NEXAFS) and photoemission (C 1s XPS) spectroscopies, and density functional theory (DFT) calculations. Such a combined study is aimed at elucidating the role played by the C-C bond unsaturation degree of the substituent on the electronic structure of the ferrocene derivatives. Such substituents are required for molecular chemical anchoring onto relevant surfaces when ferrocenes are used for molecular electronics hybrid devices. The high resolution C 1s NEXAFS spectra exhibit distinctive features that depend on the degree of unsaturation of the hydrocarbon substituent. The theoretical approach to consider the NEXAFS spectrum made of three parts allowed to disentangle the specific contribution of the substituent group to the experimental spectrum as a function of its unsaturation degree. C 1s IEs were derived from the experimental data analysis based on the DFT calculated IE values for the different carbon atoms of the substituent and cyclopentadienyl (Cp) rings. Distinctive trends of chemical shifts were observed for the substituent carbon atoms and the substituted atom of the Cp ring along the series of ferrocenes. The calculated IE pattern was rationalized in terms of initial and final state effects influencing the IE value, with special regard to the different mechanism of electron conjugation between the Cp ring and the substituent, namely the σ/π hyperconjugation in EtFC and the π-conjugation in VFC and EFC.

  10. Temporal Fine Structure and Applications to Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xing

    2013-01-01

    Complex broadband sounds are decomposed by the auditory filters into a series of relatively narrowband signals, each of which conveys information about the sound by time-varying features. The slow changes in the overall amplitude constitute envelope, while the more rapid events, such as zero crossings, constitute temporal fine structure (TFS).…

  11. Precision Measurements: Testing the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoreaux, Steve

    2004-05-01

    Often, precision measurements from diverse fields can be used to learn new facts about the universe. The usual definition of "precision" is based on improvements over previous measurements. A review of the present state of knowledge regarding the possible time variation of the fine structure constant α will be presented; "precise" data from natural phenomena, which include an apparent shift in the red-shift-scaled fine structure in the absorption spectra of quasar light, and the isotopic abundances in the fission products of a prehistoric natural reactor in Oklo, Gabon. Prospects to improve the accuracy for the constancy of α with laboratory experiments will be discussed. Our two experimental investigations currently being developed are based on optical spectroscopy of trapped ions and on radiofrequency spectroscopy of an atomic dysprosium beam. A sensitivity of dotα/α≈ 10-18/yr is anticipated. Because this accuracy exceeds that by which the second is defined, these measurements will necessarily be differential.

  12. How Strongly does Dating Meteorites Constrain the Time-Dependence of the Fine-Structure Constant?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori; Iwamoto, Akira

    We review our argument on the nature of the so-called meteorite constraint on the possible time-dependence of the fine-structure constant, emphasizing that dating meteorites at the present time is different in principle from searching directly for the traces in the past, as in the Oklo phenomenon and the QSO absorption lines. In the related literature, we still find some arguments not necessarily consistent with this difference to be taken properly into account. It does not immediately follow that any model-dependent approaches are useless in practice, though we cannot help suspecting that dating meteorites is no match for the Oklo and the QSO in probing the time-variability of the fine-structure constant, at this moment. Some of the relevance to the QSO data particularly in terms of the scalar field will be discussed.

  13. Constraints on field theoretical models for variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhardt, Charles L.

    2005-02-01

    Recent theoretical ideas and observational claims suggest that the fine structure constant α may be variable. We examine a spectrum of models in which α is a function of a scalar field. Specifically, we consider three scenarios: oscillating α, monotonic time variation of α, and time-independent α that is spatially varying. We examine the constraints imposed upon these theories by cosmological observations, particle detector experiments, and “fifth force” experiments. These constraints are very strong on models involving oscillation but cannot compete with bounds from the Oklo subnuclear reactor on models with monotonic timelike variation of α. One particular model with spatial variation is consistent with all current experimental and observational measurements, including those from two seemingly conflicting measurements of the fine structure constant using the many multiplet method on absorption lines.

  14. Assigning {gamma} deformation from fine structure in exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ferreira, L. S.; Maglione, E.; Arumugam, P.

    2011-10-28

    The nonadiabatic quasiparticle model for triaxial shapes is used to perform calculations for decay of {sup 141}Ho, the only known odd-Z even-N deformed nucleus for which fine structure in proton emission from both ground and isomeric states has been observed. All experimental data corresponding to this unique case namely, the rotational spectra of parent and daughter nuclei, decay widths and branching ratios for ground and isomeric states, could be well explained with a strong triaxial deformation {gamma}{approx}20. The recent experimental observation of fine structure decay from the isomeric state, can be explained only with an assignment of I{sup {pi}} = 3/2{sup +} as the decaying state, in contradiction with the previous assignment, of I{sup {pi}} 1/2{sup +}, based on adiabatic calculations. This study reveals that proton emission measurements could be a precise tool to probe triaxial deformations and other structural properties of exotic nuclei beyond the proton dripline.

  15. Efferent Modulation of Stimulus Frequency Otoacoustic Emission Fine Structure

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Wei; Dewey, James B.; Boothalingam, Sriram; Dhar, Sumitrajit

    2015-01-01

    Otoacoustic emissions, sounds generated in the inner ear, have become a convenient non-invasive tool to examine the efferent modulation of cochlear mechanics. Activation of the medial olivocochlear (MOC) efferents has been shown to alter the magnitude of these emissions. When the effects of efferent activation on the detailed spectral structures of these emissions have been examined, a shift of the spectral patterns toward higher frequencies has been reported for distortion product and spontaneous otoacoustic emissions. Stimulus frequency otoacoustic emissions (SFOAEs) have been proposed as the preferred emission type in the study of efferent modulation due to the simplicity of their production leading to the possibility of clearer interpretation of results. The effects of efferent activation on the complex spectral patterns of SFOAEs have not been examined to the best of our knowledge. We have examined the effects of activating the MOC efferents using broadband noise in normal-hearing humans. The detailed spectral structure of SFOAEs, known as fine structure, was recorded with and without contralateral acoustic stimulation. Results indicate that SFOAEs are reduced in magnitude and their fine structure pushed to higher frequencies by contralateral acoustic stimulation. These changes are similar to those observed in distortion product or spontaneous otoacoustic emissions and behavioral hearing thresholds. Taken together with observations made about magnitude and phase changes in otoacoustic emissions and hearing thresholds upon contralateral acoustic stimulation, all changes in otoacoustic emission and hearing threshold fine structure appear to be driven by a common set of mechanisms. Specifically, frequency shifts in fine structure patterns appear to be linked to changes in SFOAE phase due to contralateral acoustic stimulation. PMID:26696843

  16. Thermally detected optical absorption in sophisticated nitride structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasson, A.; Shubina, T. V.; Leymarie, J.

    2005-02-01

    The thermally detected optical absorption (TDOA) is applied to elucidate peculiarities of absorption in nitride structures of unusual morphology like GaN nanocolumns or InN layers with various imperfections. A study of GaN structures permits us to establish position of an absorption edge in TDOA spectra. We demonstrate that the absorption edge is different in GaN regions of opposite polarities. In InN with metallic In inclusions, this technique enable separation of InN interband absorption and extinction related to the Mie resonances, if the latter are below the principal absorption edge.

  17. Fine structure of the solar transition region - Observations and interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, J. W.; Brueckner, G. E.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation is conducted of recent high spatial resolution observations of the solar transition region and temperature minimum, in the form of UV spectra and spectroheliographs from both sounding rockets and the Spacelab 2 flights of the High Resolution Telescope and Spectrograph (HRTS). Attention is given to the solar atmosphere structure implications of the HRST's observational results. The inclusion of fine structure in conjectures concerning the transition region affects the plausibility of 1D average models of the solar atmosphere, as well as the determination of temperature gradients, possible nonradiative-heating mechanisms, and the comparison of transition region structures with corresponding observations of the photosphere and corona.

  18. Variations in the fine-structure constant constraining gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezerra, V. B.; Cunha, M. S.; Muniz, C. R.; Tahim, M. O.; Vieira, H. S.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate how the fine-structure constant, α, locally varies in the presence of a static and spherically symmetric gravitational source. The procedure consists in calculating the solution and the energy eigenvalues of a massive scalar field around that source, considering the weak-field regime. From this result, we obtain expressions for a spatially variable fine-structure constant by considering suitable modifications in the involved parameters admitting some scenarios of semi-classical and quantum gravities. Constraints on free parameters of the approached theories are calculated from astrophysical observations of the emission spectra of a white dwarf. Such constraints are finally compared with those obtained in the literature.

  19. Relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosley, D. R.; Bischel, W. K.

    1984-01-01

    A discrepancy is pointed out between experimental determinations of the relative intensities for different fine-structure components of the two-photon transitions 2p3P 3p3P in oxygen and 2p3 4S0 - 2p2 3p4D0 in nitrogen, which agreed well with calculations involving a single virtual intermediate level, and a two-photon selection rule dJ not equal to one, derived in a purely theoretical and erroneous treatment of these transitions. Five other experiments are also briefly examined, with the conclusion that relative fine-structure intensities in two-photon transitions are well understood as straightforward extensions of angular momentum coupling in single-photon cases, in accordance with allowed dJ = 0, + or -1, and + or -2 transitions.

  20. Analysis of fine structure in the nuclear continuum

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Usman, I.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.

    2008-02-15

    Fine structure has been shown to be a general phenomenon of nuclear giant resonances of different multipolarities over a wide mass range. In this article we assess various techniques that have been proposed to extract quantitative information from the fine structure in terms of characteristic scales. These include the so-called local scaling dimension, the entropy index method, Fourier analysis, and continuous and discrete wavelet transforms. As an example, results on the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in {sup 208}Pb from high-energy-resolution inelastic proton scattering and calculations with the quasiparticle-phonon model are analyzed. Wavelet analysis, both continuous and discrete, of the spectra is shown to be a powerful tool to extract the magnitude and localization of characteristic scales.

  1. Fine Structure of Dark Energy and New Physics

    DOE PAGES

    Jejjala, Vishnu; Kavic, Michael; Minic, Djordje

    2007-01-01

    Following our recent work on the cosmological constant problem, in this letter we make a specific proposal regarding the fine structure (i.e., the spectrum) of dark energy. The proposal is motivated by a deep analogy between the blackbody radiation problem, which led to the development of quantum theory, and the cosmological constant problem, for which we have recently argued calls for a conceptual extension of the quantum theory. We argue that the fine structure of dark energy is governed by a Wien distribution, indicating its dual quantum and classical nature. We discuss observational consequences of such a picture of darkmore » energy and constrain the distribution function.« less

  2. Oklo Constraint on the Time-Variabilityof the Fine-Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    The Oklo phenomenon, natural fission reactors which had taken place in Gabon about 2 billion years ago, provides one of the most stringent constraints on the possible time-variability of the fine-structure constant . We first review briefly what it is and how reliable it is in constraining . We then compare the result with a more recent result on the nonzero change of obtained from the observation of the QSO absorption lines. We suggest a possible way to make these results consistent with each other in terms of the behavior of a scalar field which is expected to be responsible for the acceleration of the universe.

  3. Fine-scale human genetic structure in Western France

    PubMed Central

    Karakachoff, Matilde; Duforet-Frebourg, Nicolas; Simonet, Floriane; Le Scouarnec, Solena; Pellen, Nadine; Lecointe, Simon; Charpentier, Eric; Gros, Françoise; Cauchi, Stéphane; Froguel, Philippe; Copin, Nane; Balkau, B; Ducimetière, P; Eschwège;, E; Alhenc-Gelas, F; Girault, A; Fumeron, F; Marre, M; Roussel, R; Bonnet, F; Cauchi, S; Froguel, P; Cogneau, J; Born, C; Caces, E; Cailleau, M; Lantieri, O; Moreau, J G; Rakotozafy, F; Tichet, J; Le Tourneau, Thierry; Probst, Vincent; Le Marec, Hervé; Molinaro, Sabrina; Balkau, Beverley; Redon, Richard; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Blum, Michael GB; Dina, Christian

    2015-01-01

    The difficulties arising from association analysis with rare variants underline the importance of suitable reference population cohorts, which integrate detailed spatial information. We analyzed a sample of 1684 individuals from Western France, who were genotyped at genome-wide level, from two cohorts D.E.S.I.R and CavsGen. We found that fine-scale population structure occurs at the scale of Western France, with distinct admixture proportions for individuals originating from the Brittany Region and the Vendée Department. Genetic differentiation increases with distance at a high rate in these two parts of Northwestern France and linkage disequilibrium is higher in Brittany suggesting a lower effective population size. When looking for genomic regions informative about Breton origin, we found two prominent associated regions that include the lactase region and the HLA complex. For both the lactase and the HLA regions, there is a low differentiation between Bretons and Irish, and this is also found at the genome-wide level. At a more refined scale, and within the Pays de la Loire Region, we also found evidence of fine-scale population structure, although principal component analysis showed that individuals from different departments cannot be confidently discriminated. Because of the evidence for fine-scale genetic structure in Western France, we anticipate that rare and geographically localized variants will be identified in future full-sequence analyses. PMID:25182131

  4. Deeper Probing of the Fine-structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goradia, Shantilal

    2008-10-01

    In our earlier attempt in [1] to derive fine-structure constant, one subtle reason why the natural logarithm of the age of the universe in Planck times comes out to be slightly greater than the reciprocal of the fine structure constant is that the variable W in Boltzmann's expression should be the age of the universe in Planck times divided by the bit depth for our specific application. Since we cannot decode the nature's bit depth, we cannot come up with the expected value of ALPHA. For an assumed bit depth of 10, the reciprocal of ALPHA goes down by ln10 (2.3) without having a significant impact on the order of magnitude of the baud rate (baud rate = bits per second/bit depth = 10^43 (Planck time/second)/10 = 10^42). Use of terms and equations from informatics in both of author's interrelated abstracts this meeting is meant to engage a wider audience simply. [1] Goradia, Shantilal ``What is Fine-structure Constant?'' http://www.arXiv.org/pdf/physics/0210040v3.

  5. Solar chromospheric fine scale structures: dynamics and energetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tziotziou, K.

    2012-01-01

    The solar chromosphere is a very inhomogeneous and dynamic layer of the solar atmosphere that exhibits several phenomena on a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. High-resolution and long-duration observations, employing mostly lines, such as Halpha, the Ca II infrared lines and the Ca II H and K lines, obtained both from ground-based telescope facilities (e.g. DST, VTT, THEMIS, SST, DOT), as well as state-of-the-art satellites (e.g. SOHO, TRACE, HINODE) reveal an incredibly rich, dynamic and highly structured chromospheric environment. What is known in literature as the chromospheric fine-scale structure mainly consists of small fibrilar-like features that connect various parts of quiet/active regions or span across the chromospheric network cell interiors, showing a large diversity of both physical and dynamic characteristics. The highly dynamic, fine-scale chromospheric structures are mostly governed by flows which reflect the complex geometry and dynamics of the local magnetic field and play an important role in the propagation and dissipation of waves. A comprehensive study of these structures requires deep understanding of the physical processes involved and investigation of their intricate link with structures/processes at lower photospheric levels. Furthermore, due to their large number present on the solar surface, it is essential to investigate their impact on the mass and energy transport to higher atmospheric layers through processes such as magnetic reconnection and propagation of waves. The in-depth study of all aforementioned characteristics and processes, with the further addition of non-LTE physics, as well as the use of three-dimensional numerical simulations poses a fascinating challenge for both theory and numerical modeling of chromospheric fine-scale structures.

  6. Fine structure of coupled optical modes in photonic molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakovich, Y. P.; Donegan, J. F.; Gerlach, M.; Bradley, A. L.; Connolly, T. M.; Boland, J. J.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in a photonic molecule formed from two melamine-formaldehyde spherical microcavities with a thin shell of CdTe nanocrystals. Utilizing a microporous polymer structure to orient the photonic molecule, we have excited the photonic molecule both on and off axis. This controllable geometry has allowed the observation of an off-axis fine structure that consists of very sharp peaks resulting from the removal of the WGM degeneracy with respect to the azimuthal quantum number m . The mode splittings are in very good agreement with theory.

  7. Fine structure of coupled optical modes in photonic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Rakovich, Y.P.; Donegan, J.F.; Gerlach, M.; Bradley, A.L.; Connolly, T.M.; Boland, J.J.; Gaponik, N.; Rogach, A.

    2004-11-01

    We report on the coherent coupling of whispering gallery modes (WGM) in a photonic molecule formed from two melamine-formaldehyde spherical microcavities with a thin shell of CdTe nanocrystals. Utilizing a microporous polymer structure to orient the photonic molecule, we have excited the photonic molecule both on and off axis. This controllable geometry has allowed the observation of an off-axis fine structure that consists of very sharp peaks resulting from the removal of the WGM degeneracy with respect to the azimuthal quantum number m. The mode splittings are in very good agreement with theory.

  8. [Spectrum characterization and fine structure of copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities].

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-lin; Zhang, Xin-yi; Zhong, Ju-hua; Zhu, Yi-hua; He, Bo; Wei, Shi-qiang

    2007-10-01

    Copper phthalocyanine-doped TiO2 microcavities were fabricated by chemistry method. Their spectrum characterization was studied by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy, and their fine structure was analyzed by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS). The results show that there is interaction of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and TiO2 microcavities after TiO2 microcavities was doped with CuPc. For example, there is absorption at 900.76 cm(-1) in FTIR spectra, and the "red shift" of both OH vibration at 3392.75 cm(-1) and CH vibration at 2848.83 cm(-1). There exist definite peak shifts and intensity changes in infrared absorption in the C-C or C-N vibration in the planar phthalocyanine ring, the winding vibration of C-H inside and C-N outside plane of benzene ring. In Raman spectrum, there are 403.4, 592.1 and 679.1 cm(-1) characterized peaks of TiO2 in CuPc-doped TiO2 microcavities, but their wave-numbers show shifts to anatase TiO2. The vibration peaks at 1586.8 and 1525.6 cm(-1) show that there exists the composite material of CuPc and TiO2. These changes are related to the plane tropism of the molecule structure of copper phthalocyanine. XAFS showed tetrahedron TiO4 structure of Ti in TiO2 microcavities doped with copper phthalocyanine, and the changes of inner "medial distances" and the surface structure of TiO2 microcavities.

  9. Studying the Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant Using Emission-Line Multiplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grupe, Dirk; Pradhan, Anil K.; Frank, Stephan

    2005-08-01

    As an extension of the method by Bahcall and coworkers to investigate the time dependence of the fine-structure constant, we describe an approach based on new observations of forbidden-line multiplets from different ionic species. We obtain optical spectra of fine-structure transitions in [Ne III], [Ne V], [O III], [O I], and [S II] multiplets from a sample of 14 Seyfert 1.5 galaxies in the low-z range 0.035fine-structure constant. The approach can be further extended and generalized to a ``many-multiplet emission-line method'' analogous in principle to the corresponding method using absorption lines. With that aim, we note that the theoretical limits on emission-line ratios of selected ions are precisely known and provide well-constrained selection criteria. We also discuss several other forbidden and allowed lines that may constitute the basis for a more rigorous study using high-resolution instruments on the next generation of 8 m class telescopes. Based on observations obtained at MDM Observatory, Arizona.

  10. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment. PMID:24734598

  11. Effect of heat treatment on the far-infrared emission spectra and fine structures of black tourmaline.

    PubMed

    Meng, Junping; Liang, Jinsheng; Liu, Jie; Ding, Yan; Gan, Kun

    2014-05-01

    Mineral black tourmaline powders were heat-treated at different temperatures. Their crystal structure was studied by X-ray diffractometer. Their infrared absorption and emission spectra before and after the heat treatment were analyzed by the Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The corresponding fine structures were discussed in detail. The results showed that the powders possessed higher infrared emissivity at the band where they showed stronger infrared absorption. However, there is no certain correlation between the peak intensity of infrared absorption and emissivity values at the same frequency. Because of the crystal shrinkage of c-axis, the electronic transitions were stimulated between different energy levels, and the abilities of infrared absorption and emission were enhanced with increasing the temperature of heat treatment.

  12. A simple cosmology with a varying fine structure constant.

    PubMed

    Sandvik, Håvard Bunes; Barrow, John D; Magueijo, João

    2002-01-21

    We investigate the cosmological consequences of a theory in which the electric charge e can vary. In this theory the fine structure "constant," alpha, remains almost constant in the radiation era, undergoes a small increase in the matter era, but approaches a constant value when the universe starts accelerating because of a positive cosmological constant. This model satisfies geonuclear, nucleosynthesis, and cosmic microwave background constraints on time variation in alpha, while fitting the observed accelerating Universe and evidence for small alpha variations in quasar spectra. It also places specific restrictions on the nature of the dark matter. Further tests, involving stellar spectra and Eötvös experiments, are proposed.

  13. Urban, Forest, and Agricultural AIS Data: Fine Spectral Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.

    1985-01-01

    Spectra acquired by the Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) near Lafayette, IN, Ely, MN, and over the Stanford University campus, CA were analyzed for fine spectral structure using two techniques: the ratio of radiance of a ground target to the radiance of a standard and also the correlation coefficient of radiances at adjacent wavelengths. The results show ramp like features in the ratios. These features are due to the biochemical composition of the leaf and to the optical scattering properties of its cuticle. The size and shape of the ramps vary with ground cover.

  14. New Tests for Variations of the Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant, by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atomos with different atomic number Z. H- maser, Cs and Hg+ clocks have a different dependence on ia relativistic contributions of order (Z. Recent H-maser vs Hg+ clock comparison data improves laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to giveFuture laser cooled clocks (Be+, Rb, Cs, Hg+, etc.), when compared, will yield the most senstive of all tests for.

  15. Numerical models of sunspot formation and fine structure.

    PubMed

    Rempel, Matthias

    2012-07-13

    Sunspots are central to our understanding of solar (and stellar) magnetism in many respects. On the large scale, they link the magnetic field observable in the photosphere to the dynamo processes operating in the solar interior. Properly interpreting the constraints that sunspots impose on the dynamo process requires a detailed understanding of the processes involved in their formation, dynamical evolution and decay. On the small scale, they give an insight into how convective energy transport interacts with the magnetic field over a wide range of field strengths and inclination angles, leading to sunspot fine structure observed in the form of umbral dots and penumbral filaments. Over the past decade, substantial progress has been made on both observational and theoretical sides. Advanced ground- and space-based observations have resolved, for the first time, the details of umbral dots and penumbral filaments and discovered similarities in their substructures. Numerical models have advanced to the degree that simulations of entire sunspots with sufficient resolution to resolve sunspot fine structure are feasible. A combination of improved helioseismic inversion techniques with seismic forward modelling provides new views on the subsurface structure of sunspots. In this review, we summarize recent progress, with particular focus on numerical modelling. PMID:22665895

  16. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  17. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    PubMed Central

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers. PMID:27622503

  18. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance.

    PubMed

    Moritake, Y; Kanamori, Y; Hane, K

    2016-09-13

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  19. Emission wavelength tuning of fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moritake, Y.; Kanamori, Y.; Hane, K.

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrated fine emission wavelength tuning of quantum dot (QD) fluorescence by fine structural control of optical metamaterials with Fano resonance. An asymmetric-double-bar (ADB), which was composed of only two bars with slightly different bar lengths, was used to obtain Fano resonance in the optical region. By changing the short bar length of ADB structures with high dimensional accuracy in the order of 10 nm, resonant wavelengths of Fano resonance were controlled from 1296 to 1416 nm. Fluorescence of QDs embedded in a polymer layer on ADB metamaterials were modified due to coupling to Fano resonance and fine tuning from 1350 to 1376 nm was observed. Wavelength tuning of modified fluorescence was reproduced by analysis using absorption peaks of Fano resonance. Tuning range of modified fluorescence became narrow, which was interpreted by a simple Gaussian model and resulted from comparable FWHM in QD fluorescence and Fano resonant peaks. The results will help the design and fabrication of metamaterial devices with fluorophores such as light sources and biomarkers.

  20. Thermal stability analysis of the fine structure of solar prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demoulin, Pascal; Malherbe, Jean-Marie; Schmieder, Brigitte; Raadu, Mickael A.

    1986-01-01

    The linear thermal stability of a 2D periodic structure (alternatively hot and cold) in a uniform magnetic field is analyzed. The energy equation includes wave heating (assumed proportional to density), radiative cooling and both conduction parallel and orthogonal to magnetic lines. The equilibrium is perturbed at constant gas pressure. With parallel conduction only, it is found to be unstable when the length scale 1// is greater than 45 Mn. In that case, orthogonal conduction becomes important and stabilizes the structure when the length scale is smaller than 5 km. On the other hand, when the length scale is greater than 5 km, the thermal equilibrium is unstable, and the corresponding time scale is about 10,000 s: this result may be compared to observations showing that the lifetime of the fine structure of solar prominences is about one hour; consequently, our computations suggest that the size of the unresolved threads could be of the order of 10 km only.

  1. Fine structure in the cluster decays of the translead nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitrescu, O. |; Cioaca, C.

    1995-06-01

    Within the one level {ital R}-matrix approach several hindrance factors for the radioactive decays in which are emitted {sup 4}He, {sup 14}C, and {sup 20}O atomic nuclei are calculated. The interior wave functions are supposed to be given by the recently proposed enlarged superfluid model, an extension of the JINR-Dubna`s quasiparticle phonon nuclear model. The spectroscopic factors are expanded in terms of products of cluster overlaps and intrinsic overlap integrals. The cluster overlaps are equivalents of the generalized coefficients of fractional parentage, while for the intrinsic overlap integrals we construct a model, which is an extension of the usual models for simple particle decay such as deuteron, triton, and {alpha} decay. The exterior wave functions are calculated from a cluster-nucleus double-folding model potential obtained with the {ital M}3{ital Y} interaction. As examples of the cluster decay fine structure we analyzed the particular cases of {alpha} decay of {sup 255}Fm, {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 20}O decay of {sup 229}Th and {sup 255}Fm. A relatively good agreement with the experimental data is obtained especially in the case of the {alpha}-decay fine structure.

  2. SOLAR RADIO BURSTS WITH SPECTRAL FINE STRUCTURES IN PREFLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yin; Tan, Baolin; Huang, Jing; Tan, Chengming; Karlický, Marian; Mészárosová, Hana; Simões, Paulo J.A.

    2015-01-20

    Good observations of preflare activities are important for us to understand the origin and triggering mechanism of solar flares, and to predict the occurrence of solar flares. This work presents the characteristics of microwave spectral fine structures as preflare activities of four solar flares observed by the Ondřejov radio spectrograph in the frequency range of 0.8-2.0 GHz. We found that these microwave bursts which occurred 1-4 minutes before the onset of flares have spectral fine structures with relatively weak intensities and very short timescales. They include microwave quasi-periodic pulsations with very short periods of 0.1-0.3 s and dot bursts with millisecond timescales and narrow frequency bandwidths. Accompanying these microwave bursts are filament motions, plasma ejection or loop brightening in the EUV imaging observations, and non-thermal hard X-ray emission enhancements observed by RHESSI. These facts may reveal certain independent, non-thermal energy releasing processes and particle acceleration before the onset of solar flares. They may help us to understand the nature of solar flares and to predict their occurrence.

  3. The Fine-Structure Lines of Hydrogen in H II Regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennison, Brian; Turner, B. E.; Minter, Anthony H.

    2005-11-01

    The 2s1/2 state of hydrogen is metastable and overpopulated in H II regions. In addition, the 2p states may be pumped by ambient Lyα radiation. Fine-structure transitions between these states may be observable in H II regions at 1.1 GHz (2s1/2-2p1/2) and/or 9.9 GHz (2s1/2-2p3/2), although the details of absorption versus emission are determined by the relative populations of the 2s and 2p states. The n=2 level populations are solved with a parameterization that allows for Lyα pumping of the 2p states. The Lyα pumping rate has long been considered uncertain, as it involves solution of the difficult Lyα transfer problem. The density of Lyα photons is set by their creation rate, easily determined from the recombination rate, and their removal rate. Here we suggest that the dominant removal mechanism of Lyα radiation in H II regions is absorption by dust. This circumvents the need to solve the Lyα transfer problem and provides an upper limit to the rate at which the 2p states are populated by Lyα photons. In virtually all cases of interest, the 2p states are predominantly populated by recombination, rather than Lyα pumping. We then solve the radiative transfer problem for the fine-structure lines in the presence of free-free radiation. In the likely absence of Lyα pumping, the 2s1/2-->2p1/2 lines will appear in stimulated emission, and the 2s1/2-->2p3/2 lines in absorption. Because the final 2p states are short lived, these lines are dominated by intrinsic line width (99.8 MHz). In addition, each fine-structure line is a multiplet of three blended hyperfine transitions. Searching for the 9.9 GHz lines in high emission measure H II regions offers the best prospects for detection. The lines are predicted to be weak; in the best cases, line-to-continuum ratios of several tenths of a percent might be expected with line strengths of tens to a hundred mK with the Green Bank Telescope. Predicted line strengths, at both 1.1 and 9.9 GHz, are given for a number of H II

  4. Fine structure of Bodo curvifilus Griessmann (Kinetoplastida: Bodonidae).

    PubMed

    Burzell, L A

    1975-02-01

    Bodo curvifilus Griessmann conforms in its fine structure to the criteria proposed for the genus Bodo, including the presence of subpellicular microtubules, a single large kinetoplast-mitochondrion, emergence of the 2 heterodynamic flagella from a subapical flagellar pocket, and the presence of a paraxial rod associated with the axoneme of each flagellum. B. curvifilus possesses cytoplasmic bodies which resemble endosymbiotic bacteria. These are similar to those found in Bodo saltans. Bodo curvifilus can be distinguished ultrastructurally from Bodo caudatus and B. saltans by the presence in B. curvifilus of a hitherto unreported structure, "the microtubular prism," consisting of a bundle of 19 microtubules. In cross section, 15 of these microtubules form a cross-linked prismatic array. This microtubular bundle originates near the flagellar pocket and extends for several micrometers into the body of the organism where it follows the periphery of the cell and the long finger-like projections of the kinetoplast-mitochondrion.

  5. Structural Characterization of Bimetallic Nanomaterials with Overlapping X-ray Absorption Edges

    SciTech Connect

    Menard, L.; Wang, Q; Kang, J; Sealey, A; Girolami, G; Teng, X; Frenkel, A; Nuzzo, R

    2009-01-01

    We describe a data analysis method for extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy suitable for use with compounds of diverse form that contain overlapping absorption edges. This method employs direct concurrent analysis of the data-demonstrated here for cases involving two interfering metal edges-and does not utilize subtractive or data filtering strategies that have been previously used to address this challenge. Its generality and precision are demonstrated in analyses made on two model nanoscale samples: (1) a Ir-Pt nanoparticle system supported on ?-Al2O3 and (2) a hybrid system of Pt nanowires on which Au nanoparticles have been nucleated and grown at the nanowire tips, stacking faults, and twinning boundaries. The results obtained demonstrate the unique compositional and structural qualities of these two systems as well as the broader utility of the new x-ray absorption spectroscopy based protocol used to characterize them.

  6. Surface structure of CdSe Nanorods revealed by combined X-rayabsorption fine structure measurements and ab-initio calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Aruguete, Deborah A.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Li, Liang-shi; Williamson, Andrew; Fakra, Sirine; Gygi, Francois; Galli, Giulia; Alivisatos, A. Paul

    2006-01-27

    We report orientation-specific, surface-sensitive structural characterization of colloidal CdSe nanorods with extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy and ab-initio density functional theory calculations. Our measurements of crystallographically-aligned CdSe nanorods show that they have reconstructed Cd-rich surfaces. They exhibit orientation-dependent changes in interatomic distances which are qualitatively reproduced by our calculations. These calculations reveal that the measured interatomic distance anisotropy originates from the nanorod surface.

  7. Optimal design of porous structures for the fastest liquid absorption.

    PubMed

    Shou, Dahua; Ye, Lin; Fan, Jintu; Fu, Kunkun

    2014-01-14

    Porous materials engineered for rapid liquid absorption are useful in many applications, including oil recovery, spacecraft life-support systems, moisture management fabrics, medical wound dressings, and microfluidic devices. Dynamic absorption in capillary tubes and porous media is driven by the capillary pressure, which is inversely proportional to the pore size. On the other hand, the permeability of porous materials scales with the square of the pore size. The dynamic competition between these two superimposed mechanisms for liquid absorption through a heterogeneous porous structure may lead to an overall minimum absorption time. In this work, we explore liquid absorption in two different heterogeneous porous structures [three-dimensional (3D) circular tubes and porous layers], which are composed of two sections with variations in radius/porosity and height. The absorption time to fill the voids of porous constructs is expressed as a function of radius/porosity and height of local sections, and the absorption process does not follow the classic Washburn's law. Under given height and void volume, these two-section structures with a negative gradient of radius/porosity against the absorption direction are shown to have faster absorption rates than control samples with uniform radius/porosity. In particular, optimal structural parameters, including radius/porosity and height, are found that account for the minimum absorption time. The liquid absorption in the optimized porous structure is up to 38% faster than in a control sample. The results obtained can be used a priori for the design of porous structures with excellent liquid management property in various fields.

  8. Collisional Relaxation of Fine Velocity Structures in Plasmas.

    PubMed

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    The existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can locally increase due to velocity space deformations of the particle velocity distribution function. These results support the idea that high-resolution measurements of the particle velocity distribution function are crucial for an accurate description of weakly collisional systems, such as the solar wind, in order to answer relevant scientific questions, related, for example, to particle heating and energization. PMID:27104713

  9. Fine structure in the cluster decay of radium isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santhosh, K. P.

    2010-01-01

    Half-life times for 14C cluster emission from various radium isotopes are computed taking interacting potential as the sum of Coulomb and proximity potentials. The half-life time values are compared with experimental data and with the values reported by Poenaru et al using the analytical super-asymmetric fission model (ASAFM). The lowest half-life time for 222Ra stresses the role of the doubly magic 208Pb daughter in the exotic decay process. It is found that neutron excess in the parent nucleus slows down the exotic decay process. The high hindrance factor (HF) of the 14C branch to the ground state (9/2+) and the low HF to the first excited state (11/2+) of the 209Pb daughter are in good agreement with the experimental result. The fine structure from 223Ra gives direct evidence of the presence of a spherical component in the deformed parent nucleus.

  10. FOURIER ANALYSIS OF EXTENDED FINE STRUCTURE WITH AUTOREGRESSIVE PREDICTION

    SciTech Connect

    Barton, J.; Shirley, D.A.

    1985-01-01

    Autoregressive prediction is adapted to double the resolution of Angle-Resolved Photoemission Extended Fine Structure (ARPEFS) Fourier transforms. Even with the optimal taper (weighting function), the commonly used taper-and-transform Fourier method has limited resolution: it assumes the signal is zero beyond the limits of the measurement. By seeking the Fourier spectrum of an infinite extent oscillation consistent with the measurements but otherwise having maximum entropy, the errors caused by finite data range can be reduced. Our procedure developed to implement this concept applies autoregressive prediction to extrapolate the signal to an extent controlled by a taper width. Difficulties encountered when processing actual ARPEFS data are discussed. A key feature of this approach is the ability to convert improved measurements (signal-to-noise or point density) into improved Fourier resolution.

  11. Nonlinear Electrodynamics Analysis Of The Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, Jean Paul

    2010-10-01

    It has been claimed that during the late time history of our universe, the fine structure constant, α, has been increasing [1],[2]. However, other teams has claimed a discordant result [3],[4]. Also, the current precision of laboratory tests is not sufficient to either comfort or reject any of these astronomical observations. Here we suggest that a nonlinear electrodynamics (NLED) interaction of photons with the weak local background magnetic fields of a gas cloud absorber can reconcile the null result of refs.[3] and [4] with the negative variation found by refs. [2] and [1] and also to find a bridge with the positive variation found later by Levshakov et al.. [5]-[7]. Moreover, NLED photon propagation in a vacuum permeated by a background magnetic field is actually in full agreement with constraints from Oklo natural reactor data.

  12. Collisional Relaxation of Fine Velocity Structures in Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pezzi, Oreste; Valentini, Francesco; Veltri, Pierluigi

    2016-04-01

    The existence of several characteristic times during the collisional relaxation of fine velocity structures is investigated by means of Eulerian numerical simulations of a spatially homogeneous force-free weakly collisional plasma. The effect of smoothing out velocity gradients on the evolution of global quantities, such as temperature and entropy, is discussed, suggesting that plasma collisionality can locally increase due to velocity space deformations of the particle velocity distribution function. These results support the idea that high-resolution measurements of the particle velocity distribution function are crucial for an accurate description of weakly collisional systems, such as the solar wind, in order to answer relevant scientific questions, related, for example, to particle heating and energization.

  13. Varying Fine-Structure Constant and the Cosmological Constant Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    We start with a brief account of the latest analysis of the Oklo phenomenon providing the still most stringent constraint on time variability of the fine-structure constant α. Comparing this with the recent result from the measurement of distant QSO's appears to indicate a non-uniform time-dependence, which we argue to be related to another recent finding of the accelerating universe. This view is implemented in terms of the scalar-tensor theory, applied specifically to the small but nonzero cosmological constant. Our detailed calculation shows that these two phenomena can be understood in terms of a common origin, a particular behavior of the scalar field, dilaton. We also sketch how this theoretical approach makes it appropriate to revisit non-Newtonian gravity featuring small violation of Weak Equivalence Principle at medium distances.

  14. Atomic Clocks and Variations of the FIne Structure Constant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prestage, John D.; Tjoelker, Robert L.; Maleki, Lute

    1995-01-01

    We describe a new test for possible variations of the fine structure constant alpha by comparisons of rates between clocks based on hyperfine transitions in alkali atoms with different atomic number Z. H-maser, Cs, and Hg(+) clocks have a different dependence on alpha via relativistic contributions of order (Z-alpha)(sup 2). Recent H-maser vs Hg(+) clock comparison data improve laboratory limits on a time variation by 100-fold to give dot-alpha less than or equal to 3.7 x 10(exp -14)/yr. Future laser cooled clocks (Be(+), Rb, Cs, Hg(+), etc.), when compared, will yield the most sensitive of all tests for dot-alpha/alpha.

  15. HERSCHEL GALACTIC PLANE SURVEY OF [N ii] FINE STRUCTURE EMISSION

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Yıldız, Umut A.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first large-scale high angular resolution survey of ionized nitrogen in the Galactic Plane through emission of its two fine structure transitions ([N ii]) at 122 and 205 μm. The observations were largely obtained with the PACS instrument onboard the Herschel Space Observatory. The lines of sight were in the Galactic plane, following those of the Herschel OTKP project GOT C+. Both lines are reliably detected at the 10{sup −8}–10{sup −7} Wm{sup −2} sr{sup −1} level over the range –60° ≤ l ≤ 60°. The rms of the intensity among the 25 PACS spaxels of a given pointing is typically less than one third of the mean intensity, showing that the emission is extended. [N ii] is produced in gas in which hydrogen is ionized, and collisional excitation is by electrons. The ratio of the two fine structure transitions provides a direct measurement of the electron density, yielding n(e) largely in the range 10–50 cm{sup −3} with an average value of 29 cm{sup −3} and N{sup +} column densities 10{sup 16}–10{sup 17} cm{sup −2}. [N ii] emission is highly correlated with that of [C ii], and we calculate that between 1/3 and 1/2 of the [C ii] emission is associated with the ionized gas. The relatively high electron densities indicate that the source of the [N ii] emission is not the warm ionized medium (WIM), which has electron densities more than 100 times smaller. Possible origins of the observed [N ii] include the ionized surfaces of dense atomic and molecular clouds, the extended low-density envelopes of H ii regions, and low-filling factor high-density fluctuations of the WIM.

  16. A heterogeneity test for fine-scale genetic structure.

    PubMed

    Smouse, Peter E; Peakall, Rod; Gonzales, Eva

    2008-07-01

    For organisms with limited vagility and/or occupying patchy habitats, we often encounter nonrandom patterns of genetic affinity over relatively small spatial scales, labelled fine-scale genetic structure. Both the extent and decay rate of that pattern can be expected to depend on numerous interesting demographic, ecological, historical, and mating system factors, and it would be useful to be able to compare different situations. There is, however, no heterogeneity test currently available for fine-scale genetic structure that would provide us with any guidance on whether the differences we encounter are statistically credible. Here, we develop a general nonparametric heterogeneity test, elaborating on standard autocorrelation methods for pairs of individuals. We first develop a 'pooled within-population' correlogram, where the distance classes (lags) can be defined as functions of distance. Using that pooled correlogram as our null-hypothesis reference frame, we then develop a heterogeneity test of the autocorrelations among different populations, lag-by-lag. From these single-lag tests, we construct an analogous test of heterogeneity for multilag correlograms. We illustrate with a pair of biological examples, one involving the Australian bush rat, the other involving toadshade trillium. The Australian bush rat has limited vagility, and sometimes occupies patchy habitat. We show that the autocorrelation pattern diverges somewhat between continuous and patchy habitat types. For toadshade trillium, clonal replication in Piedmont populations substantially increases autocorrelation for short lags, but clonal replication is less pronounced in mountain populations. Removal of clonal replicates reduces the autocorrelation for short lags and reverses the sign of the difference between mountain and Piedmont correlograms.

  17. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration. PMID:23705418

  18. [Study on the fine structure of K-feldspar of Qichun granite].

    PubMed

    Du, Deng-Wen; Hong, Han-Lie; Fan, Kan; Wang, Chao-Wen; Yin, Ke

    2013-03-01

    Fine structure of K-feldspar from the Qichun granite was investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier infrared absorption spectroscopy (FTIR), and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry methods to understand the evolution of the granitic magmatism and its correlation to molybdenite mineralization. The XRD results showed that K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has higher ordering index and triclinicity and is namely microcline with triclinic symmetry. K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively lower ordering index and has widening [131] peak and is locally triclinic ordering. K-feldspar of the late cretaceous granite has lowest ordering index and sharp [131] peak and is honiogeneously monoclinic. The FTIR results showed that the IR spectra of the Qichun K-feldspar are similar to that of orthoclase reported by Farmer (1974). The 640 cm-1 absorption band increases while the 540 cm-' absorption band decreases with increase in K-feldspar ordering index, also, the 1,010 cm-1 absorption band separates into 1,010 and 1,046 cm-1 absorption bands, with a change in the band shape from widening to sharp outline. The ICP-MS results suggested that K-feldspar of the early cretaceous granite has relatively higher metal elements and rare earth elements, and the granite exhibits better mineralization background, K-feldspar of the potassic alteration veins has markedly lower Sr and Ba, indicating that the alteration fluid originated from the granitic magmatism, and hence, potassic alteration is a good indicator for molybdenite exploration.

  19. 3D WHOLE-PROMINENCE FINE STRUCTURE MODELING. II. PROMINENCE EVOLUTION

    SciTech Connect

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-20

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  20. COLLISIONAL EXCITATION OF THE [C II] FINE STRUCTURE TRANSITION IN INTERSTELLAR CLOUDS

    SciTech Connect

    Goldsmith, Paul F.; Langer, William D.; Pineda, Jorge L.; Velusamy, T.

    2012-11-15

    We analyze the collisional excitation of the 158 {mu}m (1900.5 GHz) fine structure transition of ionized carbon in terms of line intensities produced by simple cloud models. The single C{sup +} fine structure transition is a very important coolant of the atomic interstellar medium (ISM) and of photon-dominated regions in which carbon is partially or completely in ionized form. The [C II] line is widely used as a tracer of star formation in the Milky Way and other galaxies. Excitation of the [C II] fine structure transition can be via collisions with hydrogen molecules, atoms, and electrons. Analysis of [C II] observations is complicated by the fact that it is difficult to determine the optical depth of the line. We discuss the excitation of the [C II] line, deriving analytic results for several limiting cases and carry out numerical solutions using a large velocity gradient model for a more inclusive analysis. For antenna temperatures up to 1/3 of the brightness temperature of the gas kinetic temperature, the antenna temperature is linearly proportional to the column density of C{sup +} irrespective of the optical depth of the transition. This is appropriately referred to as the effectively optically thin approximation. We review the critical densities for excitation of the [C II] line by various collision partners, briefly analyze C{sup +} absorption, and conclude with a discussion of C{sup +} cooling and how the considerations for line intensities affect the behavior of this important coolant of the ISM.

  1. 3D Whole-prominence Fine Structure Modeling. II. Prominence Evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunár, Stanislav; Mackay, Duncan H.

    2015-10-01

    We use the new three-dimensional (3D) whole-prominence fine structure model to study the evolution of prominences and their fine structures in response to changes in the underlying photospheric magnetic flux distribution. The applied model combines a detailed 3D prominence magnetic field configuration with a realistic description of the prominence plasma distributed along multiple fine structures. In addition, we utilize an approximate Hα visualization technique to study the evolution of the visible cool prominence plasma both in emission (prominence) and absorption (filament). We show that the initial magnetic field configuration of the modeled prominence is significantly disturbed by the changing position of a single polarity of a magnetic bipole as the bipole is advected toward the main body of the filament. This leads to the creation of a barb, which becomes the dominant feature visible in the synthetic Hα images of both the prominence and filament views. The evolution of the bipole also creates conditions that lead to the disappearance and reappearance of large portions of the main body. We also show that an arch-like region containing a dark void (a bubble) can be naturally produced in the synthetic prominence Hα images. While not visible in terms of the magnetic field lines, it is due to a lack of Hα emission from low-pressure, low-density plasma located in shallow magnetic dips lying along the lines of sight intersecting the dark void. In addition, a quasi-vertical small-scale feature consisting of short and deep dips, piled one above the other, is produced.

  2. Fine structure of a resonantly excited p -shell exciton in a CdTe quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoleński, T.; Kazimierczuk, T.; Goryca, M.; Wojnar, P.; Kossacki, P.

    2016-05-01

    We present a polarization-resolved photoluminescence excitation study of the absorption spectrum of a p -shell neutral exciton in a single CdTe/ZnTe quantum dot. We find that the fine structure of the p -shell exciton is completely analogous to the fine structure of the s -shell exciton, including the selection rules and the effects of a magnetic field applied in Faraday and Voigt configurations. The energy spectrum of the p -shell exciton is found to be well described by introducing respective isotropic and anisotropic constants of the exchange interaction between a p -shell electron and a p -shell hole. The typical values of these exchange constants averaged over several randomly selected quantum dots yield δ0p p=(0.92 ±0.16 ) meV and δ1p p=(0.58 ±0.25 ) meV. Additionally, we demonstrate that the nonresonant relaxation of the p -shell exciton conserves the exciton spin to a very high degree for both bright and dark exciton configurations.

  3. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5).

  4. Astronomical constraints on the cosmic evolution of the fine structure constant and possible quantum dimensions.

    PubMed

    Carilli, C L; Menten, K M; Stocke, J T; Perlman, E; Vermeulen, R; Briggs, F; de Bruyn, A G; Conway, J; Moore, C P

    2000-12-25

    We present measurements of absorption by the 21 cm hyperfine transition of neutral hydrogen toward radio sources at substantial look-back times. These data are used in combination with observations of rotational transitions of common interstellar molecules to set limits on the evolution of the fine structure constant: alpha/ alpha<3.5x10(-15) yr(-1), to a look-back time of 4.8 Gyr. In the context of string theory, the limit on the secular evolution of the scale factor of the compact dimensions, R, is &Rdot/ R<10(-15) yr(-1). Including terrestrial and other astronomical measurements places 2sigma limits on slow oscillations of R from the present to the epoch of cosmic nucleosynthesis, just seconds after the big bang, of DeltaR /R<10(-5). PMID:11136034

  5. Constraints on a possible variation of the fine structure constant from galaxy cluster data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Landau, S. J.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Sánchez G., I. E.; Busti, V. C.

    2016-05-01

    We propose a new method to probe a possible time evolution of the fine structure constant α from X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich measurements of the gas mass fraction (fgas) in galaxy clusters. Taking into account a direct relation between variations of α and violations of the distance-duality relation, we discuss constraints on α for a class of dilaton runaway models. Although not yet competitive with bounds from high-z quasar absorption systems, our constraints, considering a sample of 29 measurements of fgas, in the redshift interval 0.14 < z < 0.89, provide an independent estimate of α variation at low and intermediate redshifts. Furthermore, current and planned surveys will provide a larger amount of data and thus allow to improve the limits on α variation obtained in the present analysis.

  6. Varying fine structure 'constant' and charged black holes

    SciTech Connect

    Bekenstein, Jacob D.; Schiffer, Marcelo

    2009-12-15

    Speculation that the fine-structure constant {alpha} varies in spacetime has a long history. We derive, in 4-D general relativity and in isotropic coordinates, the solution for a charged spherical black hole according to the framework for dynamical {alpha} J. D. Bekenstein, Phys. Rev. D 25, 1527 (1982).. This solution coincides with a previously known one-parameter extension of the dilatonic black hole family. Among the notable properties of varying-{alpha} charged black holes are adherence to a 'no hair' principle, the absence of the inner (Cauchy) horizon of the Reissner-Nordstroem black holes, the nonexistence of precisely extremal black holes, and the appearance of naked singularities in an analytic extension of the relevant metric. The exteriors of almost extremal electrically (magnetically) charged black holes have simple structures which makes their influence on applied magnetic (electric) fields transparent. We rederive the thermodynamic functions of the modified black holes; the otherwise difficult calculation of the electric potential is done by a shortcut. We confirm that variability of {alpha} in the wake of expansion of the universe does not threaten the generalized second law.

  7. Observations on the Fine Structure of the Turtle Atrium

    PubMed Central

    Fawcett, Don W.; Selby, Cecily C.

    1958-01-01

    The general fine structure of the atrial musculature of the turtle heart is described, including; the nature of the sarcolemma; the cross-banded structure of the myofibrils; the character of the sarcoplasm, and the form and disposition of its organelles. An abundant granular component of the sarcoplasm in this species is tentatively identified as a particulate form of glycogen. The myocardium is composed of individual cells joined end to end at primitive intercalated discs, and side to side at sites of cohesion that resemble the desmosomes of epithelia. Transitional forms are found between desmosomes and intercalated discs. Both consist of a thickened area of the cell membrane with an accumulation of dense material in the subjacent cytoplasm. This dense amorphous component is often continuous with the Z substance of the myofibrils and may be of the same composition. The observations reported reemphasize the basic similarity between desmosomes and terminal bars of epithelia and intercalated discs of cardiac muscle. Numerous unmyelinated nerves are found beneath the endocardium. Some of these occupy recesses in the surface of Schwann cells; others are naked axons. No specialized nerve endings are found. Axons passing near the sarcolemma contain synaptic vesicles, and it is believed that this degree of proximity is sufficient to constitute a functioning myoneural junction. PMID:13502430

  8. FINE STRUCTURES AND OVERLYING LOOPS OF CONFINED SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shuhong; Zhang, Jun; Xiang, Yongyuan

    2014-10-01

    Using the Hα observations from the New Vacuum Solar Telescope at the Fuxian Solar Observatory, we focus on the fine structures of three confined flares and the issue why all the three flares are confined instead of eruptive. All the three confined flares take place successively at the same location and have similar morphologies, so can be termed homologous confined flares. In the simultaneous images obtained by the Solar Dynamics Observatory, many large-scale coronal loops above the confined flares are clearly observed in multi-wavelengths. At the pre-flare stage, two dipoles emerge near the negative sunspot, and the dipolar patches are connected by small loops appearing as arch-shaped Hα fibrils. There exists a reconnection between the small loops, and thus the Hα fibrils change their configuration. The reconnection also occurs between a set of emerging Hα fibrils and a set of pre-existing large loops, which are rooted in the negative sunspot, a nearby positive patch, and some remote positive faculae, forming a typical three-legged structure. During the flare processes, the overlying loops, some of which are tracked by activated dark materials, do not break out. These direct observations may illustrate the physical mechanism of confined flares, i.e., magnetic reconnection between the emerging loops and the pre-existing loops triggers flares and the overlying loops prevent the flares from being eruptive.

  9. Fine structure of the Mn acceptor in GaAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krainov, I. V.; Debus, J.; Averkiev, N. S.; Dimitriev, G. S.; Sapega, V. F.; Lähderanta, E.

    2016-06-01

    We reveal the electronic level structure of the Mn acceptor, which consists of a valence-band hole bound to an Mn2 + ion, in presence of applied uniaxial stress and an external magnetic field in bulk GaAs. Resonant spin-flip Raman scattering is used to measure the g factor of the AMn0 center in the ground and excited states with the total angular momenta F =1 and F =2 and characterize the optical selection rules of the spin-flip transitions between these Mn-acceptor states. We determine the random stress fields near the Mn acceptor, the constant of the antiferromagnetic exchange interaction between the valence-band holes and the electrons of the inner Mn2 + shell as well as the deformation potential for the exchange energy. The p -d exchange energy, in particular, decreases significantly with increasing compressive stress. By combining the experimental Raman study with the developed theoretical model on the scattering efficiency, in which also the random local and external uniaxial stresses and magnetic field are considered, the fine structure of the Mn acceptor is determined in full detail.

  10. Galaxy clusters, type Ia supernovae and the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holanda, R. F. L.; Busti, V. C.; Colaço, L. R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Landau, S. J.

    2016-08-01

    As is well known, measurements of the Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect can be combined with observations of the X-ray surface brightness of galaxy clusters to estimate the angular diameter distance to these structures. In this paper, we show that this technique depends on the fine structure constant, α. Therefore, if α is a time-dependent quantity, e.g., α = α0phi(z), where phi is a function of redshift, we argue that current data do not provide the real angular diameter distance, DA(z), to the cluster, but instead DAdata(z) = phi(z)2 DA(z). We use this result to derive constraints on a possible variation of α for a class of dilaton runaway models considering a sample of 25 measurements of DAdata(z) in redshift range 0.023 < z < 0.784 and estimates of DA(z) from current type Ia supernovae observations. We find no significant indication of variation of α with the present data.

  11. Quasi-static energy absorption of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Jacobsen, AJ; Chen, X

    2014-12-01

    We present a comprehensive modeling and numerical study focusing on the energy quasi-static crushing behavior and energy absorption characteristics of hollow tube microlattice structures. The peak stress and effective plateau stress of the hollow microlattice structures are deduced for different geometrical parameters which gives volume and mass densities of energy absorption, D-v and D-m, scale with the relative density, (rho) over bar, as D-v similar to (rho) over bar (1) (5) and D-m similar to (rho) over bar (0 5), respectively, fitting very well to the experimental results of both 60 degrees inclined and 90 degrees predominately microlattices. Then the strategies for energy absorption enhancement are proposed for the engineering design of microlattice structures. By introducing a gradient in the thickness or radius of the lattice members, the buckle propagation can be modulated resulting in an increase in energy absorption density that can exceed 40%. Liquid filler is another approach to improve energy absorption by strengthening the microtruss via circumference expansion, and the gain may be over 100% in terms of volume density. Insight into the correlations between microlattice architecture and energy absorption performance combined with the high degree of architecture control paves the way for designing high performance microlattice structures for a range of impact and impulse mitigation applications for vehicles and structures. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Can Temporal Fine Structure and Temporal Envelope be Considered Independently for Pitch Perception?

    PubMed

    Grimault, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    In psychoacoustics, works on pitch perception attempt to distinguish between envelope and fine structure cues that are generally viewed as independent and separated using a Hilbert transform. To empirically distinguish between envelope and fine structure cues in pitch perception experiments, a dedicated signal has been proposed. This signal is an unresolved harmonic complex tones with all harmonics shifted by the same amount of Hz. As the frequency distance between adjacent components is regular and identical than in the original harmonic complex tone, such a signal has the same envelope but a different fine structure. So, any perceptual difference between these signals is interpreted as a fine structure based percept. Here, as illustrated by very basic simulations, I suggest that this orthogonal point of view that is generally admitted could be a conceptual error. In fact, neither the fine structure nor the envelope is required to be fully encoded to explain pitch perception. Sufficient information is conveyed by the peaks in the fine structure that are located nearby a maximum of the envelope. Envelope and fine structure could then be in perpetual interaction and the pitch would be conveyed by "the fine structure under envelope". Moreover, as the temporal delay between peaks of interest is rather longer than the delay between two adjacent peaks of the fine structure, such a mechanism would be much less constrained by the phase locking limitation of the auditory system. Several data from the literature are discussed from this new conceptual point of view. PMID:27080676

  13. fine structure of 410km discontinuity beneath the Southern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, K.; Wan, X.; Ni, S.

    2005-12-01

    In the distance range of 10-14 degrees, P waves from the topside reflection off the 410km discontinuity are very sensitive to the fine structure of the discontinuity. We analyzed 49 broadband seismograms from an earthquake ( May 18, 1998) in Italy (Mw 5.8) , recorded by Orfeus and SZGRF networks. Distances between the source and the stations were from 9° to 19°, and provided a detailed look at the 410km structure. On the other hand, the azimuth of these records were in a narrow range from 334° and 356°, so the differences in azimuth may have little effects on the waveforms. From our observation, P410 phase has little change in amplitude when the distance decreases from 15° to about 11.5°. However, an abrupt termination was observed from distance 11° to 10.5°. These features cannot be explained with PREM model. We calculated several groups of models with F-K method and compared their synthetic seismograms with the observed one. These models are: 1) two-step sharp jump models, with different thickness; 2) linear models; 3) linear-sharp jump models[Tim Melbourne, Don Helmberger, Journal of Geophysical Research, 1998]; 4) models calculated from a mineralogical model[Gaherty, Wang, Geophysical research letters, 1999]; Features in the observed waveform can be well modeled with model 3 and 4 while only parts of them fitted to model 1 or 2. But when we calculated with a less detailed model, seismograms of model 4 should have more noise than model 3. In conclusion, the structure of 410km discontinuity can be considered as a linear-sharp velocity jump, which is consistent with mineralogical models.

  14. Bumblebee Homing: The Fine Structure of Head Turning Movements

    PubMed Central

    Boeddeker, Norbert; Mertes, Marcel; Dittmar, Laura; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Changes in flight direction in flying insects are largely due to roll, yaw and pitch rotations of their body. Head orientation is stabilized for most of the time by counter rotation. Here, we use high-speed video to analyse head- and body-movements of the bumblebee Bombus terrestris while approaching and departing from a food source located between three landmarks in an indoor flight-arena. The flight paths consist of almost straight flight segments that are interspersed with rapid turns. These short and fast yaw turns (“saccades”) are usually accompanied by even faster head yaw turns that change gaze direction. Since a large part of image rotation is thereby reduced to brief instants of time, this behavioural pattern facilitates depth perception from visual motion parallax during the intersaccadic intervals. The detailed analysis of the fine structure of the bees’ head turning movements shows that the time course of single head saccades is very stereotypical. We find a consistent relationship between the duration, peak velocity and amplitude of saccadic head movements, which in its main characteristics resembles the so-called "saccadic main sequence" in humans. The fact that bumblebee head saccades are highly stereotyped as in humans, may hint at a common principle, where fast and precise motor control is used to reliably reduce the time during which the retinal images moves. PMID:26352836

  15. Speech identification based on temporal fine structure cues

    PubMed Central

    Sheft, Stanley; Ardoint, Marine; Lorenzi, Christian

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of temporal fine structure (TFS) cues to consonant identification was assessed in normal-hearing listeners with two speech-processing schemes designed to remove temporal envelope (E) cues. Stimuli were processed vowel-consonant-vowel speech tokens. Derived from the analytic signal, carrier signals were extracted from the output of a bank of analysis filters. The “PM” and “FM” processing schemes estimated a phase- and frequency-modulation function, respectively, of each carrier signal and applied them to a sinusoidal carrier at the analysis-filter center frequency. In the FM scheme, processed signals were further restricted to the analysis-filter bandwidth. A third scheme retaining only E cues from each band was used for comparison. Stimuli processed with the PM and FM schemes were found to be highly intelligible (50–80% correct identification) over a variety of experimental conditions designed to affect the putative reconstruction of E cues subsequent to peripheral auditory filtering. Analysis of confusions between consonants showed that the contribution of TFS cues was greater for place than manner of articulation, whereas the converse was observed for E cues. Taken together, these results indicate that TFS cues convey important phonetic information that is not solely a consequence of E reconstruction. PMID:18646999

  16. Fine structure of seminiferous tubules in antarctic seals.

    PubMed

    Sinha, A A; Erickson, A W; Seal, U S

    1977-03-01

    The fine structure of seminiferous tubules from 5 crabeater, 2 leopard and 2 Ross seals showed that during the nonbreeding season the tubules were essentially similar in possessing spermatogenic and Sertoli cells. However, the tubules of leopard and Ross seals had more primary and secondary spermatocytes and spermatids than the crabeater seals. In general, the tubules were devoid of spermatozoa. The spermatids showed stages of maturation such as Golgi phase of acrosome formation, acrosomal cap formation and condensation of nuclei. Some spermatids degenerated in tubules. Both maturing and degenerating spermatids were closely associated with Sertoli cells. Junctional complexes with plaques of filaments were observed between Sertoli cells and the spermatogenic cells. Sertoli cells, irregular and polygonal, contained highly convoluted nuclei, strands of rough endoplasmic reticulum, smooth endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi complexes, small mitochondria, variable amounts of lipid droplets, lysosomes, lipofuscin granules and highly plicated plasma membranes. In brief, the spermatogenic activity had practically ceased in the testes and the animals probably secreted low levels of testosterone during the nonbreeding season. PMID:844074

  17. Consonant identification using temporal fine structure and recovered envelope cuesa)

    PubMed Central

    Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Reed, Charlotte M.; Desloge, Joseph G.; Braida, Louis D.; Delhorne, Lorraine A.

    2014-01-01

    The contribution of recovered envelopes (RENVs) to the utilization of temporal-fine structure (TFS) speech cues was examined in normal-hearing listeners. Consonant identification experiments used speech stimuli processed to present TFS or RENV cues. Experiment 1 examined the effects of exposure and presentation order using 16-band TFS speech and 40-band RENV speech recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Prior exposure to TFS speech aided in the reception of RENV speech. Performance on the two conditions was similar (∼50%-correct) for experienced listeners as was the pattern of consonant confusions. Experiment 2 examined the effect of varying the number of RENV bands recovered from 16-band TFS speech. Mean identification scores decreased as the number of RENV bands decreased from 40 to 8 and were only slightly above chance levels for 16 and 8 bands. Experiment 3 examined the effect of varying the number of bands in the TFS speech from which 40-band RENV speech was constructed. Performance fell from 85%- to 31%-correct as the number of TFS bands increased from 1 to 32. Overall, these results suggest that the interpretation of previous studies that have used TFS speech may have been confounded with the presence of RENVs. PMID:25235005

  18. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates. PMID:14154485

  19. FINE STRUCTURE OF THE EYE OF A CHAETOGNATH.

    PubMed

    EAKIN, R M; WESTFALL, J A

    1964-04-01

    Electron microscopy reveals a star-like pigment cell at the center of the eye of the arrow-worm, Sagitta scrippsae. Between the arms of the pigment cell are clusters of photoreceptor cell processes, each process consisting of: (1) a tubular segment containing longitudinally arranged microtubules about 500 A in diameter and 20 micro in length; (2) a remarkable conical body, composed of cords and large granules, situated at the base of the tubular segment; and (3) a connecting piece which, like that of rods and cones, connects the process with the sensory cell proper and through which runs a fibrillar apparatus consisting of nine peripheral double tubules. Beneath the connecting piece lies a typical centriole with a striated rootlet. The receptor cell process is deeply recessed into the sensory cell which may possess a corona of microvilli at its inner surface. A nerve fiber arises from the outer end of the cell and passes into the optic nerve. Additional features are some supporting cells, an external layer of flattened epithelial cells, and an over-all investment of basement membrane and thick fibrous capsule. The fine structure and function of these elements of the eye are discussed in relation to earlier studies with the light microscope. The ciliary nature of the photoreceptor cell process in S. scrippsae points to a probable evolutionary relationship of chaetognaths to echinoderms and chordates.

  20. Electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene under strain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Houjian; Yang, Mou; Wang, Ruiqiang

    2016-07-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optic absorption of phosphorene (monolayer of black phosphorus) under strain. Strain was found to be a powerful tool for the band structure engineering. The in-plane strain in armchair or zigzag direction changes the effective mass components along both directions, while the vertical strain only has significant effect on the effective mass in the armchair direction. The band gap is narrowed by compressive in-plane strain and tensile vertical strain. Under certain strain configurations, the gap is closed and the energy band evolves to the semi-Dirac type: the dispersion is linear in the armchair direction and is gapless quadratic in the zigzag direction. The band-edge optic absorption is completely polarized along the armchair direction, and the polarization rate is reduced when the photon energy increases. Strain not only changes the absorption edge (the smallest photon energy for electron transition), but also the absorption polarization.

  1. Characterization of fine resolution field spectrometers using solar Fraunhofer lines and atmospheric absorption features.

    PubMed

    Meroni, Michele; Busetto, Lorenzo; Guanter, Luis; Cogliati, Sergio; Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Migliavacca, Mirco; Panigada, Cinzia; Rossini, Micol; Colombo, Roberto

    2010-05-20

    The accurate spectral characterization of high-resolution spectrometers is required for correctly computing, interpreting, and comparing radiance and reflectance spectra acquired at different times or by different instruments. In this paper, we describe an algorithm for the spectral characterization of field spectrometer data using sharp atmospheric or solar absorption features present in the measured data. The algorithm retrieves systematic shifts in channel position and actual full width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the instrument by comparing data acquired during standard field spectroscopy measurement operations with a reference irradiance spectrum modeled with the MODTRAN4 radiative transfer code. Measurements from four different field spectrometers with spectral resolutions ranging from 0.05 to 3.5nm are processed and the results validated against laboratory calibration. An accurate retrieval of channel position and FWHM has been achieved, with an average error smaller than the instrument spectral sampling interval.

  2. Iron absorption and phenolic compounds: importance of different phenolic structures.

    PubMed

    Brune, M; Rossander, L; Hallberg, L

    1989-08-01

    The phenolic compounds (phenolic monomers, polyphenols, tannins) are considered to interfere with iron absorption by complex formation with iron in the gastro-intestinal lumen, making the iron less available for absorption. Very little is known about the extent to which different types of phenolic compounds of different size and chemical structure inhibit iron absorption. The relationship between iron absorption and the amount and type of phenolic compounds was studied by the extrinsic tag method. The aims of the studies were as follows: (i) To study the effect of small phenolic compounds with different hydroxylation patterns (gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid) on iron absorption, (ii) To study the effect of different amounts of a hydrolysable tannin containing ten gallic acid residues (tannic acid) on iron absorption. (iii) To study the degree of inhibition of iron absorption by some foods and beverages (oregano, spinach, coffee and tea) in relation to their respective content of iron-binding phenolic groups, measured by a newly developed method. The inhibition of iron absorption by tannic acid was strongly dose-related. The smallest amount (5 mg) inhibited absorption by 20 per cent, 25 mg by 67 per cent and 100 mg by 88 per cent. Gallic acid inhibited iron absorption to the same extent as tannic acid, per mol galloyl groups, whereas no inhibition was observed when catechin was added to the test meal. Chlorogenic acid inhibited iron absorption to a lesser extent. Oregano and tea inhibited iron absorption in proportion to their respective content of galloyl groups, whereas the inhibitory effect of spinach was less marked. The inhibiting effect of coffee was explained mainly by its content of galloyl groups, but also by some other factor, probably chlorogenic acid. It is concluded that the content of iron-binding galloyl groups might be a major determinant of the inhibitory effect of phenolic compounds on iron absorption from the diet, whereas the phenolic

  3. Fine structure and optical properties of biological polarizers in crustaceans and cephalopods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiou, Tsyr-Huei; Caldwell, Roy L.; Hanlon, Roger T.; Cronin, Thomas W.

    2008-04-01

    The lighting of the underwater environment is constantly changing due to attenuation by water, scattering by suspended particles, as well as the refraction and reflection caused by the surface waves. These factors pose a great challenge for marine animals which communicate through visual signals, especially those based on color. To escape this problem, certain cephalopod mollusks and stomatopod crustaceans utilize the polarization properties of light. While the mechanisms behind the polarization vision of these two animal groups are similar, several distinctive types of polarizers (i.e. the structure producing the signal) have been found in these animals. To gain a better knowledge of how these polarizers function, we studied the relationships between fine structures and optical properties of four types of polarizers found in cephalopods and stomatopods. Although all the polarizers share a somewhat similar spectral range, around 450- 550 nm, the reflectance properties of the signals and the mechanisms used to produce them have dramatic differences. In cephalopods, stack-plates polarizers produce the polarization patterns found on the arms and around their eyes. In stomatopods, we have found one type of beam-splitting polarizer based on photonic structures and two absorptive polarizer types based on dichroic molecules. These stomatopod polarizers may be found on various appendages, and on the cuticle covering dorsal or lateral sides of the animal. Since the efficiencies of all these polarizer types are somewhat sensitive to the change of illumination and viewing angle, how these animals compensate with different behaviors or fine structural features of the polarizer also varies.

  4. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine particle light absorption based on water and methanol extracts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Bergin, M.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Kotra, N.; Edgerton, E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-07-01

    Light absorbing organic carbon, often termed brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon are poorly understood. With this in mind field measurements were made at both urban (Atlanta), and rural (Yorkville) sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a central site and a road side site adjacent to a main highway near the city center. Fine particle brown carbon optical absorption is estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size resolved measurements of chromophores in filter extracts. Size-resolved atmospheric aerosol samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and solution light absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Fine particle absorption was also measured with a Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) and seven-wavelength Aethalometer. Scattering-corrected aethalometer and MAAP absorption were in good agreement at 670 nm and Mie-estimated absorption based on size-resolved EC data were within 30% of these optical instruments. When applied

  5. Fine structure of the 2003 geomagnetic jerk near China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, J.; Du, A.

    2015-12-01

    The 2003 jerk has an abrupt change in the geomagnetic secular variation (SV), and was recognized as a local phenomenon of internal origin from the satellite observations (Olsen and Mandea, 2007). Notable strength of the 2003 jerk is located near China. The temporal and spatial features at this area are important to resolve the Earth's core fluid flow dynamics at local scale (e.g. Wardinski et al., 2008). We investigate the temporal-spatial development of the 2003 jerk in more detail near China with the ground-based observations and CHAOS-3 core field model. We select the data in the international geomagnetic quiet days to calculate the monthly means. In order to reduce the influence of the external field, we adopt a function comprising the terms associated with the indices of the geomagnetic activity, and the terms of the periodic signals on the observatory monthly means data (Stewart and Whaler, 1992). We then use an empirical AR-2 model to represent the internal field signals in the observatory data. The extreme detection is applied to identify the jerk in the SV time series. The onset time and the strength of the 2003 jerk are obtained through the detection for geomagnetic field component, X, Y and Z. The maximum of the strength of the 2003 jerk is located under the Indian mainland. The onset time of this jerk propagates approximately southeastward. Two jerks in 2001 and 2003 for the Z component are further compared and they are confirmed as independent processes. We suggest the jerk in 2001 identical to the well known 1999 jerk in Europe (Mandea et al., 2000). Our results reveal the fine structures of the 2003 jerk that corroborate the conclusions in previous studies. The larger scale time-spatial structure given by the AR-2 model constructed from ground observatory data (monthly values) is consistent with the results from the CHAOS-3 model. This structure can be applied for further inversion of the local core surface fluid flow motions.

  6. A New Physical Meaning of Sommerfeld Fine Structure Constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohrab, Siavash

    2015-04-01

    Identifying physical space or Casimir vacuum as a compressible tachyon fluid, Planck compressible ether, leads to stochastic definitions of Planck h = mk <λk > c and Boltzmann k = mk <νk > c constants, finite photon mass mk = (hk/c3)1/2 , amu = mk c2 = (hkc)1/2 , and modified Avogadro-Loschmidt number No = 1/(hkc)1/2 = 6.03766 x1023 mole-1 . Thus, Lorentz-FitzGerald contractions now result from compressibility of physical space and become causal (Pauli) in accordance with Poincaré-Lorentz dynamic theory of relativity as opposed to Einstein kinematic theory of relativity. At thermodynamic equilibrium he = me <λe > ve = hk = mk <λk > c = h, Compton wavelength can be expressed as λc = h/me c = (ve /c)h <λe > /(me <λe > ve) = αλe . Hence, Sommerfeld fine structure constant α is identified as the ratio of electron to photon speeds α = e2/(2ɛo hc) = ve/c = 1/137.036. The mean thermal speed of electron at equilibrium with photon gas is ve = 2.187640x106 m/s and its de Broglie wavelength is λe = 3.3250x10-10 m. Also, electron kinetic energy for oscillations in two directions < x + > and < x- > or ɛe = hνe = me ve2= kTe results in electron temperature Te = 3.15690x105 K.

  7. Interstellar dust grain composition from high-resolution X-ray absorption edge structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corrales, Lia

    2016-06-01

    X-ray light is sufficient to excite electrons from n=1 (K-shell) and n=2 (L-shell) energy levels of neutral interstellar metals, causing a sharp increase in the absorption cross-section. Near the ionization energy, the shape of the photoelectric absorption edge depends strongly on whether the atom is isolated or bound in molecules or minerals (dust). With high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, we can directly measure the state of metals and the mineral composition of dust in the interstellar medium. In addition, the scattering contribution to the X-ray extinction cross-section can be used to gauge grain size, shape, and filling factor. In order to fully take advantage of major advances in high resolution X-ray spectroscopy, lab measurements of X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) from suspected interstellar minerals are required. Optical constants derived from the absorption measurements can be used with Mie scattering or anomalous diffraction theory in order to model the full extinction cross-sections from the interstellar medium. Much like quasar spectra are used to probe other intergalactic gas, absorption spectroscopy of Galactic X-ray binaries and bright stars will yield key insights to the mineralogy and evolution of dust grains in the Milky Way.

  8. Dynamic energy absorption characteristics of hollow microlattice structures

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, YL; Schaedler, TA; Chen, X

    2014-10-01

    Hollow microlattice structures are promising candidates for advanced energy absorption and their characteristics under dynamic crushing are explored. The energy absorption can be significantly enhanced by inertial stabilization, shock wave effect and strain rate hardening effect. In this paper we combine theoretical analysis and comprehensive finite element method simulation to decouple the three effects, and then obtain a simple model to predict the overall dynamic effects of hollow microlattice structures. Inertial stabilization originates from the suppression of sudden crushing of the microlattice and its contribution scales with the crushing speed, v. Shock wave effect comes from the discontinuity across the plastic shock wave front during dynamic loading and its contribution scales with e. The strain rate effect increases the effective yield strength upon dynamic deformation and increases the energy absorption density. A mechanism map is established that illustrates the dominance of these three dynamic effects at a range of crushing speeds. Compared with quasi-static loading, the energy absorption capacity a dynamic loading of 250 m/s can be enhanced by an order of magnitude. The study may shed useful insight on designing and optimizing the energy absorption performance of hollow microlattice structures under various dynamic loads. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Absorption-reduced waveguide structure for efficient terahertz generation

    SciTech Connect

    Pálfalvi, L.; Fülöp, J. A.; Hebling, J.

    2015-12-07

    An absorption-reduced planar waveguide structure is proposed for increasing the efficiency of terahertz (THz) pulse generation by optical rectification of femtosecond laser pulses with tilted-pulse-front in highly nonlinear materials with large absorption coefficient. The structure functions as waveguide both for the optical pump and the generated THz radiation. Most of the THz power propagates inside the cladding with low THz absorption, thereby reducing losses and leading to the enhancement of the THz generation efficiency by up to more than one order of magnitude, as compared with a bulk medium. Such a source can be suitable for highly efficient THz pulse generation pumped by low-energy (nJ-μJ) pulses at high (MHz) repetition rates delivered by compact fiber lasers.

  10. Energy absorption characteristics of nano-composite conical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, F.; Sachse, S.; Njuguna, J.

    2012-09-01

    The effect of the filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of polyamide 6 composite structures is studied in details in the present paper. The axial dynamic and quasi-static collapse of conical structures was conducted using a high energy drop tower, as well as Instron 5500R electro-mechanical testing machine. The impact event was recorded using a high-speed camera and the fracture surface was investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The obtained results indicate an important influence of filler material on the energy absorption capabilities of the polymer composites. A significant increase in specific energy absorption (SEA) is observed in polyamide 6 (PA6) reinforced with nano-silica particles (SiO2) and glass-spheres (GS), whereas addition of montmorillonite (MMT) did not change the SEA parameter.

  11. Simple surface structure determination from Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, Y. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-02-01

    The authors show by Fourier analyses of experimental data, with no further treatment, that the positions of all the strong peaks in Fourier transforms of angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) from adsorbed surfaces can be explicitly predicted from a trial structure with an accuracy of about {+-} 0.3 {angstrom} based on a single-scattering cluster model together with the concept of a strong backscattering cone, and without any additional analysis. This characteristic of ARPEFS Fourier transforms can be developed as a simple method for determining the structures of adsorbed surfaces to an accuracy of about {+-} 0.1 {angstrom}.

  12. Fine Resolution Termohaline Structure Of The Yuctatan Coastal Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino-Tapia, I.; Enriquez-Ortiz, C.; Capurro, L.; Euan-Avila, J.

    2007-05-01

    In the Yucatan peninsula there are a variety processes that drastically affect the thermohaline structure of the coastal seas. Some of these include hyperhaline lagoons that export salt to the ocean, upwelling events that propagate to the coast, persistent submarine groundwater discharges, and very high evaporation rates caused by the intense solar radiation. On July 2006 a fine resolution oceanographic campaign was performed on the Yucatan coast to study the detailed structure of thermohaline processes and currents from the shore to the 10 m isobath. A total of sixty nine transects that cover the entire northern stretch of the Yucatan coast were made. The transects extend seven kilometers in the offshore direction and have an alongshore spacing of 5 km. The temperature and salinity characteristics of the water column were monitored with a SEABIRD SBE 19 CTD performing profiles every 500 m along each transect. Ocean currents were measures along the same transect using a 1.5 MHz Acoustic Doppler Profiler (Sontek). The results clearly show the effects of coastal lagoons on the adjoining sea, with net salt export associated with hyperhaline lagoons (e.g. Ria Lagartos) or more estuarine influence of lagoons such as Celestun, where groundwater discharges play the role of rivers on the estuary. An assessment of this influence on the coastal ocean will be presented. It is well known the meteor impact at the end of the Cretacic era at Chicxulub, Yucatan, generated a crater with multiple rings which is evident from horizontal gravity gradients of the Yucatan mainland, and that associated with the outer ring there is a high concentration of cenotes (sinkholes) (Pope et al. 1991; Hildebrand, et al. 1995). It has also been shown that groundwater flows along this cenote ring towards the ocean, and the zones where the ring intersects the coast (Celestun and Dzilam Bravo) have impressive geologic features known as `submarine water springs' where freshwater springs as a fountain

  13. Reconstruction of the fine structure of an acoustic scatterer against the distorting influence of its large-scale inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burov, V. A.; Grishina, I. M.; Lapshenkina, O. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Rumyantseva, O. D.; Sukhov, E. G.

    2003-11-01

    In the ultrasonic diagnostics of small-size neoplasms of biological tissues at the earliest stage of their development, an efficient way to eliminate the distorting influence of high-contrast or large inhomogeneities of the biological medium is to apply the iterative technique. A simple approach is proposed, which makes it possible with only two iteration steps to achieve an efficient focusing of the tomograph array. At the first step, the unknown distribution of the large-scale inhomogeneities of sound velocity and absorption over the scatterer is reconstructed, where the large-scale inhomogeneities are those whose size exceeds several wavelengths. At the second step, the fine structure of the scatterer is reconstructed against the large-scale background, which can be performed with a high accuracy owing to the evaluation of the background at the first step. The possibility of simultaneous reconstruction of the large-scale and fine structures by the noniterative Grinevich-Novikov algorithm is considered as an alternative. This algorithm reconstructs in an explicit form two-dimensional refractive-absorbing acoustic scatterers of almost arbitrary shape and strength. Taking into account the effects of multiple scattering, this algorithm provides resolution of the fine structure almost as good as that achieved in reconstructing the same structure against an undistorting homogeneous background. The results of numerical simulations of both algorithms are presented.

  14. Relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in lexical-tone perception (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Li; Pfingst, Bryan E.

    2003-12-01

    The relative importance of temporal envelope and fine structure in speech and music perception was investigated by Smith et al. [Nature (London) 416, 87-90 (2002)] using ``auditory chimera'' in which the envelope from one sound was paired with the fine structure of another. Smith et al. found that, when 4 to 16 frequency bands were used, recognition of English speech was dominated by the envelope, whereas recognition of melody was dominated by the fine structure. In the present study, Mandarin Chinese monosyllables were divided into 4, 8, or 16 frequency bands and the fine structure and envelope of one tone pattern were exchanged with those of another tone pattern of the same monosyllable. Five normal-hearing native Mandarin Chinese speakers completed a four-alternative forced-choice tone-identification task. In the vast majority of trials, subjects based their identification of the monosyllables on the fine structure rather than the envelope. Thus, the relative importance of envelope and fine structure for lexical-tone perception resembled that for melody recognition rather than that for English speech recognition. Delivering fine-structure information in cochlear implant stimulation could be particularly beneficial for lexical-tone perception.

  15. Fine-structure enhancement — assessment of a simple method to resolve overlapping bands in spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, Andreas

    2000-05-01

    A simple mathematical procedure — fine-structure enhancement — has been assessed on its ability to resolve overlapping bands in spectra. Its advantages and limitations have been explored using synthetic and experimental spectra. Fine-structure enhancement involves smoothing the original spectrum, multiplying the smoothed spectrum with a weighting factor and subtracting this spectrum from the original spectrum. As a result, the fine-structure of the original spectrum is enhanced in the processed spectrum and bands that overlap in the original spectrum appear as distinct bands in the processed spectrum. To be resolved by fine-structure enhancement, Lorentzian lines have to be separated by more than their quarter width at half maximum, Gaussian lines by more than their half width at half maximum. A comparison of fine-structure enhancement and Fourier self-deconvolution shows that Fourier self-deconvolution has in theory a higher potential to resolve overlapping bands. However, this depends crucially on the correct choice of the parameters. In practice, when parameters commonly used are chosen for Fourier self-deconvolution, fine-structure enhancement leads to similar results. This is demonstrated at the example of the infrared absorbance spectrum of the protein papain, where the amide I band components could be resolved similarly with both methods. Thus, fine-structure enhancement seems to be a simple alternative to Fourier self-deconvolution that does not require specialised software.

  16. Compensation of logarithmic corrections in calculating the fine structure of levels in hydrogen-like atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Boikova, N. A. Tyukhtyaev, Yu. N.; Faustov, R. N.

    2011-01-15

    Special features of the quasipotential approach to calculating logarithmic (in the fine-structure constant) contributions to the fine splitting of energy levels in hydrogen-like atoms are analyzed. The boundaries of the region of applicability of the Fell technique are indicated, and the order of corrections beyond this region is estimated.

  17. Fine-scale structure in the far-infrared Milky-Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.; Wall, William F.; Reach, William T.; Varosi, Frank; Ebert, Rick; Laughlin, Gaylin; Boulanger, Francois

    1995-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed and which falls into five broad categories: (1) generation of a new data product (mosaics of the far-infrared emission in the Milky Way); (2) acquisition of associated data products at other wavelengths; (3) spatial filtering of the far-infrared mosaics and resulting images of the FIR fine-scale structure; (4) evaluation of the spatially filtered data; (5) characterization of the FIR fine-scale structure in terms of its spatial statistics; and (6) identification of interstellar counterparts to the FIR fine-scale structure.

  18. Local Structure Determination of Carbon/Nickel Ferrite Composite Nanofibers Probed by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nilmoung, Sukunya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit; Maensiri, Santi

    2015-11-01

    Carbon/NiFe2O4 composite nanofibers have been successfully prepared by electrospinning method using a various concentration solution of Ni and Fe nitrates dispersed into polyacrylonitride (PAN) solution in N,N' dimethylformamide. The phase and mophology of PAN/NiFe2O4 composite samples were characterized and investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The magnetic properties of the prepared samples were measured at ambient temperature by a vibrating sample magnetometer. It is found that all composite samples exhibit ferromagnetism. This could be local-structurally explained by the existed oxidation states of Ni2+ and Fe3+ in the samples. Moreover, local environments around Ni and Fe ions could be revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) measurement including X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS).

  19. Size-resolved measurements of brown carbon in water and methanol extracts and estimates of their contribution to ambient fine-particle light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Bergin, M.; Guo, H.; King, L.; Kotra, N.; Edgerton, E.; Weber, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Light absorbing organic carbon, often called brown carbon, has the potential to significantly contribute to the visible light-absorption budget, particularly at shorter wavelengths. Currently, the relative contributions of particulate brown carbon to light absorption, as well as the sources of brown carbon, are poorly understood. With this in mind size-resolved direct measurements of brown carbon were made at both urban (Atlanta), and rural (Yorkville) sites in Georgia. Measurements in Atlanta were made at both a representative urban site and a road-side site adjacent to a main highway. Fine particle absorption was measured with a multi-angle absorption photometer (MAAP) and seven-wavelength Aethalometer, and brown carbon absorption was estimated based on Mie calculations using direct size-resolved measurements of chromophores in solvents. Size-resolved samples were collected using a cascade impactor and analyzed for water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC), organic and elemental carbon (OC and EC), and solution light-absorption spectra of water and methanol extracts. Methanol extracts were more light-absorbing than water extracts for all size ranges and wavelengths. Absorption refractive indices of the organic extracts were calculated from solution measurements for a range of wavelengths and used with Mie theory to predict the light absorption by fine particles comprised of these components, under the assumption that brown carbon and other aerosol components were externally mixed. For all three sites, chromophores were predominately in the accumulation mode with an aerodynamic mean diameter of 0.5 μm, an optically effective size range resulting in predicted particle light absorption being a factor of 2 higher than bulk solution absorption. Mie-predicted brown carbon absorption at 350 nm contributed a significant fraction (20 to 40%) relative to total light absorption, with the highest contributions at the rural site where organic to elemental carbon ratios were

  20. Fine structure of the amide i band in acetanilide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Careri, G.; Gratton, E.; Shyamsunder, E.

    1988-05-01

    Their absorption spectrum of both single crystals and powdered samples of acetanilide (a model system for proteins) has been studied in the amide i region, where a narrow band has been identified as a highly trapped soliton state. The powder-sample spectra have been decomposed using four Lorentzian bands. A strong temperature dependence has been found for the intensity of two of the subbands, which also show a complementary behavior. Polarization studies performed on thin crystals have shown that the subbands have the same polarization. Low-temperature spectra of partially deuterated samples show the presence of the subbands at the same absorption frequencies found using the fitting procedure in the spectra of nondeuterated samples. The soliton model currently proposed to explain the origin of the anomalous amide i component at 1650 cm-1 still holds, but some modification of the model is required to account for the new features revealed by this study.

  1. Thin resonant structures for angle and polarization independent microwave absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockyear, Matthew J.; Hibbins, Alastair P.; Sambles, J. Roy; Hobson, Peter A.; Lawrence, Christopher R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a microwave absorbing structure comprised of an array of subwavelength radius copper disks, closely spaced from a ground plane by a low loss dielectric. Experiments and accompanying modeling demonstrate that this structure supports electromagnetic standing wave resonances associated with a cylindrical cavity formed by the volume immediately beneath each metal disk. Microwave absorption on resonance of these modes, at wavelengths much greater than the thickness of the structure, is dictated almost entirely by the radius of the disk and permittivity of the dielectric, being largely independent of the incident angle and polarization.

  2. New fine structure cooling rate. [electron impact transitions in the ionosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoegy, W. R.

    1976-01-01

    One of the dominant electron cooling processes in the ionosphere is caused by electron impact induced fine structure transitions among the ground state levels of atomic oxygen. This fine structure cooling rate is based on theoretical cross sections. Recent advances in the numerical cross section determinations to include polarization effects and more accurate representations of the atomic target result in new lower values. These cross sections are employed in this paper to derive a new fine structure cooling rate which is between 40% and 60% of the currently used rate. A new generalized formula is presented for the cooling rate (from which the fine structure cooling rate is derived), valid for arbitrary mass and temperature difference of the colliding particles and arbitrary inelastic energy difference.

  3. Path integral formalism for the spectral line shape in plasmas: Lyman-{alpha} with fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Bedida, N.; Meftah, M. T.; Boland, D.; Stamm, R.

    2008-10-22

    We examine in this work the expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function for an emitter in the plasma using the path integrals formalism. The results for Lyman alpha lines with fine structure are retrieved in a compact formula. The expression of the dipolar autocorrelation function takes into account the ions dynamics and the fine structure effects. The electron's effect is represented by the impact operator {phi}{sub e} in the final formula.

  4. Chemical speciation of Fe and Ni in residual oil fly ash fine particulate matter using X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pattanaik, Sidhartha; Huggins, Frank E; Huffman, Gerald P

    2012-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have linked residual oil fly ash fine particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm (ROFA PM(2.5)) to morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. Bioavailable transition metals within PM have been cited as one of the components that induce such illnesses. By combining synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy with leaching experiment, we studied the effect of residual oil compositions and combustion conditions on the speciation of Fe and Ni in ROFA PM(2.5) and the implication of these species for human health and environment. PM(2.5) samples were obtained from two types of combustors, a fire tube boiler (FTB) and a refractory line combustor (RLC). The study reveals that only Fe(2)(SO(4))(3)·nH(2)O is present in RLC PM(2.5) while Fe(2)(SO(4))(3)·nH(2)O predominates in FTB PM(2.5) with inclusion of varying amounts of nickel ferrite. The finding that RLC PM(2.5) is more bioavailable and hence more toxic than FTB PM(2.5) is significant. The reduction of toxicity of FTB PM(2.5) is due to the immobilization of a portion of Fe and Ni in the formation of an insoluble NiFe(2)O(4). This may explain the variation of toxicity from exposure to different ROFA PM(2.5). Additionally, the speciation data are sought for developing emission inventories for source apportionment study and understanding the mechanism of PM formation.

  5. Impact of instrumental systematic errors on fine-structure constant measurements with quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Murphy, Michael T.

    2015-02-01

    We present a new `supercalibration' technique for measuring systematic distortions in the wavelength scales of high-resolution spectrographs. By comparing spectra of `solar twin' stars or asteroids with a reference laboratory solar spectrum, distortions in the standard thorium-argon calibration can be tracked with ˜10 m s-1 precision over the entire optical wavelength range on scales of both echelle orders (˜50-100 Å) and entire spectrographs arms (˜1000-3000 Å). Using archival spectra from the past 20 yr, we have probed the supercalibration history of the Very Large Telescope-Ultraviolet and Visible Echelle Spectrograph (VLT-UVES) and Keck-High Resolution Echelle Spectrograph (HIRES) spectrographs. We find that systematic errors in their wavelength scales are ubiquitous and substantial, with long-range distortions varying between typically ±200 m s-1 per 1000 Å. We apply a simple model of these distortions to simulated spectra that characterize the large UVES and HIRES quasar samples which previously indicated possible evidence for cosmological variations in the fine-structure constant, α. The spurious deviations in α produced by the model closely match important aspects of the VLT-UVES quasar results at all redshifts and partially explain the HIRES results, though not self-consistently at all redshifts. That is, the apparent ubiquity, size and general characteristics of the distortions are capable of significantly weakening the evidence for variations in α from quasar absorption lines.

  6. Non-linear electrodynamics and the variation of the fine structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbelek, Jean Paul; Mosquera Cuesta, Herman J.

    2008-09-01

    It has been claimed that during the late-time history of our Universe, the fine structure constant of electromagnetism, α, has been increasing. The conclusion is achieved after looking at the separation between lines of ions like CIV, MgII, SiII, FeII, among others in the absorption spectra of very distant quasars, and comparing them with their counterparts obtained in the laboratory. However, in the meantime, other teams have claimed either a null result or a decreasing α with respect to the cosmic time. Also, the current precision of laboratory tests does not allow one to either comfort or reject any of these astronomical observations. Here, we suggest that as photons are the sidereal messengers, a non-linear electrodynamics (NLED) description of the interaction of photons with the weak local background magnetic fields of a gas cloud absorber around the emitting quasar can reconcile the Chand et al. and Levshakov et al. findings with the negative variation found by Murphy et al. and Webb et al., and also to find a bridge with the positive variation argued more recently by Levshakov et al. We also show that NLED photon propagation in a vacuum permeated by a background magnetic field presents a full agreement with constraints from Oklo natural reactor data. Finally, we show that NLED may render a null result only in a narrow range of the local background magnetic field which should be the case of both the claims by Chand et al. and by Srianand et al.

  7. Cosmological variation of the fine structure constant from an ultralight scalar field: The effects of mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Carl L.

    2003-08-01

    Cosmological variation of the fine structure constant α due to the evolution of a spatially homogeneous ultralight scalar field (m˜H0) during the matter and Λ dominated eras is analyzed. Agreement of Δα/α with the value suggested by recent observations of quasar absorption lines is obtained by adjusting a single parameter, the coupling of the scalar field to matter. Asymptotically α(t) in this model goes to a constant value α¯≈α0 in the early radiation and the late Λ dominated eras. The coupling of the scalar field to (nonrelativistic) matter drives α slightly away from α¯ in the epochs when the density of matter is important. Simultaneous agreement with the more restrictive bounds on the variation |Δα/α| from the Oklo natural fission reactor and from meteorite samples can be achieved if the mass of the scalar field is on the order of 0.5 0.6 HΛ, where HΛ=Ω1/2ΛH0. Depending on the scalar field mass, α may be slightly smaller or larger than α0 at the times of big bang nucleosynthesis, the emission of the cosmic microwave background, the formation of early solar system meteorites, and the Oklo reactor. The effects on the evolution of α due to nonzero mass for the scalar field are emphasized. An order of magnitude improvement in the laboratory technique could lead to a detection of (α˙/α)0.

  8. Accelerating universe and the time-dependent fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Yasunori

    2010-11-01

    I start with assuming a gravitational scalar field as the dark-energy supposed to be responsible for the accelerating universe. Also from the point of view of unification, a scalar field implies a time-variability of certain “constants” in Nature. In this context I once derived a relation for the time-variability of the fine-structure constant α: Δα/α =ζ Ƶ(α/π) Δσ, where ζ and Ƶ are the constants of the order one, while σ on the right-hand side is the scalar field in action in the accelerating universe. I use the reduced Planckian units with c=ℏ =MP(=(8π G)-1/2)=1. I then compared the dynamics of the accelerating universe, on one hand, and Δα/α derived from the analyses of QSO absorption lines, Oklo phenomenon, also different atomic clocks in the laboratories, on the other hand. I am here going to discuss the theoretical background of the relation, based on the scalar-tensor theory invented first by Jordan in 1955.

  9. Time variation of the fine structure constant α from realistic models of Oklo reactors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Lamoreaux, S. K.

    2006-11-01

    The topic of whether the fundamental constants of nature vary with time has been a subject of great interest since Dirac originally proposed the possibility that GN˜1/tuniverse. Recent observations of absorption spectra lines from distant quasars appeared to indicate a possible increase in the fine structure constant α over ten billion years. Contrarily, analyses of the time evolution of α from Oklo natural nuclear reactor data have yielded inconsistent results, some indicating a decrease over two billion years while others indicated no change. We have used known Oklo reactor epithermal spectral indices as criteria for selecting realistic reactor models. Reactors RZ2 and RZ10 were modeled with MCNP and the resulting neutron spectra were used to calculate the change in the ^149Sm capture cross section as a function of a possible shift in the energy of the 97.3-meV resonance. Our study resolves the contradictory situation with previous Oklo α-results. Our suggested 2 σ bound on a possible time variation of α over two billion years is stringent: -0.11 <=δαα <=0.24, in units of 10-7, but model dependent in that it assumes only α has varied over time.

  10. Metalloprotein active site structure determination: synergy between X-ray absorption spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    PubMed

    Cotelesage, Julien J H; Pushie, M Jake; Grochulski, Pawel; Pickering, Ingrid J; George, Graham N

    2012-10-01

    Structures of metalloprotein active sites derived from X-ray crystallography frequently contain chemical anomalies such as unexpected atomic geometries or elongated bond-lengths. Such anomalies are expected from the known errors inherent in macromolecular crystallography (ca. 0.1-0.2Å) and from the lack of appropriate restraints for metal sites which are often without precedent in the small molecule structure literature. Here we review the potential of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to provide information and perspective which could aid in improving the accuracy of metalloprotein crystal structure solutions. We also review the potential problem areas in analysis of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and discuss the use of density functional theory as another possible source of geometrical restraints for crystal structure analysis of metalloprotein active sites.

  11. Sound absorption by subwavelength membrane structures: A geometric perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Min; Li, Yong; Meng, Chong; Fu, Caixing; Mei, Jun; Yang, Zhiyu; Sheng, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Decorated membranes comprising a thin layer of elastic film with small rigid platelets fixed on top have been found to be efficient absorbers of low-frequency sound. In this work we consider the problem of sound absorption from a perspective aimed at deriving upper bounds under different scenarios, i.e., whether the sound is incident from one side only or from both sides, and whether there is a reflecting surface on the back side of the membrane. By considering the negligible thickness of the membrane, usually on the order of a fraction of one millimeter, we derive a relation showing that the sum of the incoming sound waves' (complex) pressure amplitudes, averaged over the area of the membrane, must be equal to that of the outgoing waves. By using this relation, and without going to any details of the wave solutions, it is shown that the maximum absorption achievable from one-sided incidence is 50%, while the maximum absorption with a back-reflecting surface can reach 100%. The latter was attained by the hybridized resonances. All the results are shown to be in excellent agreement with the experiments. This generalized perspective, when used together with the Green function's formalism, can be useful in gaining insights into the constraints on what are achievable in scatterings and absorption by thin film structures and delineating them.

  12. Solvation structure of the halides from x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Antalek, Matthew; Pace, Elisabetta; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O; Chillemi, Giovanni; Benfatto, Maurizio; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick

    2016-07-28

    Three-dimensional models for the aqueous solvation structures of chloride, bromide, and iodide are reported. K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Minuit X-ray absorption near edge (MXAN) analyses found well-defined single shell solvation spheres for bromide and iodide. However, dissolved chloride proved structurally distinct, with two solvation shells needed to explain its strikingly different X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. Final solvation models were as follows: iodide, 8 water molecules at 3.60 ± 0.13 Å and bromide, 8 water molecules at 3.40 ± 0.14 Å, while chloride solvation included 7 water molecules at 3.15 ± 0.10 Å, and a second shell of 7 water molecules at 4.14 ± 0.30 Å. Each of the three derived solvation shells is approximately uniformly disposed about the halides, with no global asymmetry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations simulating the chloride XANES spectra following from alternative solvation spheres revealed surprising sensitivity of the electronic state to 6-, 7-, or 8-coordination, implying a strongly bounded phase space for the correct structure during an MXAN fit. MXAN analysis further showed that the asymmetric solvation predicted from molecular dynamics simulations using halide polarization can play no significant part in bulk solvation. Classical molecular dynamics used to explore chloride solvation found a 7-water solvation shell at 3.12 (-0.04/+0.3) Å, supporting the experimental result. These experiments provide the first fully three-dimensional structures presenting to atomic resolution the aqueous solvation spheres of the larger halide ions. PMID:27475372

  13. Solvation structure of the halides from x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antalek, Matthew; Pace, Elisabetta; Hedman, Britt; Hodgson, Keith O.; Chillemi, Giovanni; Benfatto, Maurizio; Sarangi, Ritimukta; Frank, Patrick

    2016-07-01

    Three-dimensional models for the aqueous solvation structures of chloride, bromide, and iodide are reported. K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) and Minuit X-ray absorption near edge (MXAN) analyses found well-defined single shell solvation spheres for bromide and iodide. However, dissolved chloride proved structurally distinct, with two solvation shells needed to explain its strikingly different X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectrum. Final solvation models were as follows: iodide, 8 water molecules at 3.60 ± 0.13 Å and bromide, 8 water molecules at 3.40 ± 0.14 Å, while chloride solvation included 7 water molecules at 3.15 ± 0.10 Å, and a second shell of 7 water molecules at 4.14 ± 0.30 Å. Each of the three derived solvation shells is approximately uniformly disposed about the halides, with no global asymmetry. Time-dependent density functional theory calculations simulating the chloride XANES spectra following from alternative solvation spheres revealed surprising sensitivity of the electronic state to 6-, 7-, or 8-coordination, implying a strongly bounded phase space for the correct structure during an MXAN fit. MXAN analysis further showed that the asymmetric solvation predicted from molecular dynamics simulations using halide polarization can play no significant part in bulk solvation. Classical molecular dynamics used to explore chloride solvation found a 7-water solvation shell at 3.12 (-0.04/+0.3) Å, supporting the experimental result. These experiments provide the first fully three-dimensional structures presenting to atomic resolution the aqueous solvation spheres of the larger halide ions.

  14. Structure- and dose-absorption relationships of coffee polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Erk, Thomas; Hauser, Johanna; Williamson, Gary; Renouf, Mathieu; Steiling, Heike; Dionisi, Fabiola; Richling, Elke

    2014-01-01

    Chlorogenic acids (CGAs) from coffee have biological effects related to human health. Thus, specific data on their bioavailability in the upper gastrointestinal tract are of high interest, since some molecules are absorbed here and so are not metabolized by colonic microflora. Up to now, no data on structure-absorption relationships for CGAs have been published, despite this being the most consumed group of polyphenols in the western diet. To address this gap, we performed ex vivo absorption experiments with pig jejunal mucosa using the Ussing chamber model (a model simulating the mucosa and its luminal/apical side). The main coffee polyphenols, caffeoylquinic acid (CQA), feruloylquinic acid (FQA), caffeic acid (CA), dicaffeoylquinic acid (diCQA), and D-(-)-quinic acid (QA), were incubated in individual experiments equivalent to gut lumen physiologically achievable concentrations (0.2-3.5 mM). Identification and quantification were performed with HPLC-diode array detection and HPLC-MS/MS. Additionally, the presence of ABC-efflux transporters was determined by Western blot analysis. The percentages of initially applied CGAs that were absorbed through the jejunal pig mucosa were, in increasing order: diCQA, trace; CQA, ≈ 1%; CA, ≈ 1.5%; FQA, ≈ 2%; and QA, ≈ 4%. No differences were observed within the CGA subgroups. Dose-absorption experiments with 5-CQA suggested a passive diffusion (nonsaturable absorption and a linear dose-flux relationship) and its secretion was affected by NaN3 , indicating an active efflux. The ABC-efflux transporters MDR 1 and MRP 2 were identified in pig jejunal mucosa for the first time. We conclude that active efflux plays a significant role in CGA bioavailability and, further, that the mechanism of CGA absorption in the jejunum is governed by their physicochemical properties.

  15. Fine-tuning structural RNA alignments in the twilight zone

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A widely used method to find conserved secondary structure in RNA is to first construct a multiple sequence alignment, and then fold the alignment, optimizing a score based on thermodynamics and covariance. This method works best around 75% sequence similarity. However, in a "twilight zone" below 55% similarity, the sequence alignment tends to obscure the covariance signal used in the second phase. Therefore, while the overall shape of the consensus structure may still be found, the degree of conservation cannot be estimated reliably. Results Based on a combination of available methods, we present a method named planACstar for improving structure conservation in structural alignments in the twilight zone. After constructing a consensus structure by alignment folding, planACstar abandons the original sequence alignment, refolds the sequences individually, but consistent with the consensus, aligns the structures, irrespective of sequence, by a pure structure alignment method, and derives an improved sequence alignment from the alignment of structures, to be re-submitted to alignment folding, etc.. This circle may be iterated as long as structural conservation improves, but normally, one step suffices. Conclusions Employing the tools ClustalW, RNAalifold, and RNAforester, we find that for sequences with 30-55% sequence identity, structural conservation can be improved by 10% on average, with a large variation, measured in terms of RNAalifold's own criterion, the structure conservation index. PMID:20433706

  16. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. I. General theory and direct photoionization.

    PubMed

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-28

    We develop a model for predicting fine- and hyperfine intensities in the direct photoionization of molecules based on the separability of electron and nuclear spin states from vibrational-electronic states. Using spherical tensor algebra, we derive highly symmetrized forms of the squared photoionization dipole matrix elements from which we derive the salient selection and propensity rules for fine- and hyperfine resolved photoionizing transitions. Our theoretical results are validated by the analysis of the fine-structure resolved photoelectron spectrum of O2 reported by Palm and Merkt [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1385 (1998)] and are used for predicting hyperfine populations of molecular ions produced by photoionization. PMID:27475368

  17. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. I. General theory and direct photoionization.

    PubMed

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-28

    We develop a model for predicting fine- and hyperfine intensities in the direct photoionization of molecules based on the separability of electron and nuclear spin states from vibrational-electronic states. Using spherical tensor algebra, we derive highly symmetrized forms of the squared photoionization dipole matrix elements from which we derive the salient selection and propensity rules for fine- and hyperfine resolved photoionizing transitions. Our theoretical results are validated by the analysis of the fine-structure resolved photoelectron spectrum of O2 reported by Palm and Merkt [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1385 (1998)] and are used for predicting hyperfine populations of molecular ions produced by photoionization.

  18. Fine- and hyperfine-structure effects in molecular photoionization. I. General theory and direct photoionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Germann, Matthias; Willitsch, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    We develop a model for predicting fine- and hyperfine intensities in the direct photoionization of molecules based on the separability of electron and nuclear spin states from vibrational-electronic states. Using spherical tensor algebra, we derive highly symmetrized forms of the squared photoionization dipole matrix elements from which we derive the salient selection and propensity rules for fine- and hyperfine resolved photoionizing transitions. Our theoretical results are validated by the analysis of the fine-structure resolved photoelectron spectrum of O2 reported by Palm and Merkt [Phys. Rev. Lett. 81, 1385 (1998)] and are used for predicting hyperfine populations of molecular ions produced by photoionization.

  19. The fine-scale genetic structure of the British population.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Stephen; Winney, Bruce; Hellenthal, Garrett; Davison, Dan; Boumertit, Abdelhamid; Day, Tammy; Hutnik, Katarzyna; Royrvik, Ellen C; Cunliffe, Barry; Lawson, Daniel J; Falush, Daniel; Freeman, Colin; Pirinen, Matti; Myers, Simon; Robinson, Mark; Donnelly, Peter; Bodmer, Walter

    2015-03-19

    Fine-scale genetic variation between human populations is interesting as a signature of historical demographic events and because of its potential for confounding disease studies. We use haplotype-based statistical methods to analyse genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from a carefully chosen geographically diverse sample of 2,039 individuals from the United Kingdom. This reveals a rich and detailed pattern of genetic differentiation with remarkable concordance between genetic clusters and geography. The regional genetic differentiation and differing patterns of shared ancestry with 6,209 individuals from across Europe carry clear signals of historical demographic events. We estimate the genetic contribution to southeastern England from Anglo-Saxon migrations to be under half, and identify the regions not carrying genetic material from these migrations. We suggest significant pre-Roman but post-Mesolithic movement into southeastern England from continental Europe, and show that in non-Saxon parts of the United Kingdom, there exist genetically differentiated subgroups rather than a general 'Celtic' population.

  20. The fine scale genetic structure of the British population

    PubMed Central

    Davison, Dan; Boumertit, Abdelhamid; Day, Tammy; Hutnik, Katarzyna; Royrvik, Ellen C; Cunliffe, Barry; Lawson, Daniel J; Falush, Daniel; Freeman, Colin; Pirinen, Matti; Myers, Simon; Robinson, Mark; Donnelly, Peter; Bodmer, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Summary Fine-scale genetic variation between human populations is interesting as a signature of historical demographic events and because of its potential for confounding disease studies. We use haplotype-based statistical methods to analyse genome-wide SNP data from a carefully chosen geographically diverse sample of 2,039 individuals from the United Kingdom (UK). This reveals a rich and detailed pattern of genetic differentiation with remarkable concordance between genetic clusters and geography. The regional genetic differentiation and differing patterns of shared ancestry with 6,209 individuals from across Europe carry clear signals of historical demographic events. We estimate the genetic contribution to SE England from Anglo-Saxon migrations to be under half, identify the regions not carrying genetic material from these migrations, suggest significant pre-Roman but post-Mesolithic movement into SE England from the Continent, and show that in non-Saxon parts of the UK there exist genetically differentiated subgroups rather than a general “Celtic” population. PMID:25788095

  1. The fine-scale genetic structure of the British population.

    PubMed

    Leslie, Stephen; Winney, Bruce; Hellenthal, Garrett; Davison, Dan; Boumertit, Abdelhamid; Day, Tammy; Hutnik, Katarzyna; Royrvik, Ellen C; Cunliffe, Barry; Lawson, Daniel J; Falush, Daniel; Freeman, Colin; Pirinen, Matti; Myers, Simon; Robinson, Mark; Donnelly, Peter; Bodmer, Walter

    2015-03-19

    Fine-scale genetic variation between human populations is interesting as a signature of historical demographic events and because of its potential for confounding disease studies. We use haplotype-based statistical methods to analyse genome-wide single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from a carefully chosen geographically diverse sample of 2,039 individuals from the United Kingdom. This reveals a rich and detailed pattern of genetic differentiation with remarkable concordance between genetic clusters and geography. The regional genetic differentiation and differing patterns of shared ancestry with 6,209 individuals from across Europe carry clear signals of historical demographic events. We estimate the genetic contribution to southeastern England from Anglo-Saxon migrations to be under half, and identify the regions not carrying genetic material from these migrations. We suggest significant pre-Roman but post-Mesolithic movement into southeastern England from continental Europe, and show that in non-Saxon parts of the United Kingdom, there exist genetically differentiated subgroups rather than a general 'Celtic' population. PMID:25788095

  2. An action-based fine-grained access control mechanism for structured documents and its application.

    PubMed

    Su, Mang; Li, Fenghua; Tang, Zhi; Yu, Yinyan; Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an action-based fine-grained access control mechanism for structured documents. Firstly, we define a describing model for structured documents and analyze the application scenarios. The describing model could support the permission management on chapters, pages, sections, words, and pictures of structured documents. Secondly, based on the action-based access control (ABAC) model, we propose a fine-grained control protocol for structured documents by introducing temporal state and environmental state. The protocol covering different stages from document creation, to permission specification and usage control are given by using the Z-notation. Finally, we give the implementation of our mechanism and make the comparisons between the existing methods and our mechanism. The result shows that our mechanism could provide the better solution of fine-grained access control for structured documents in complicated networks. Moreover, it is more flexible and practical.

  3. An Action-Based Fine-Grained Access Control Mechanism for Structured Documents and Its Application

    PubMed Central

    Su, Mang; Li, Fenghua; Tang, Zhi; Yu, Yinyan; Zhou, Bo

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an action-based fine-grained access control mechanism for structured documents. Firstly, we define a describing model for structured documents and analyze the application scenarios. The describing model could support the permission management on chapters, pages, sections, words, and pictures of structured documents. Secondly, based on the action-based access control (ABAC) model, we propose a fine-grained control protocol for structured documents by introducing temporal state and environmental state. The protocol covering different stages from document creation, to permission specification and usage control are given by using the Z-notation. Finally, we give the implementation of our mechanism and make the comparisons between the existing methods and our mechanism. The result shows that our mechanism could provide the better solution of fine-grained access control for structured documents in complicated networks. Moreover, it is more flexible and practical. PMID:25136651

  4. The fine structure of Meissner's touch corpuscles of human fingers.

    PubMed

    CAUNA, N; ROSS, L L

    1960-10-01

    Thin slices of the finger pads of six individuals were fixed in buffered 1 per cent osmic acid, embedded in deaerated, nitrogenated methacrylate, and cut into thin sections for electron microscopic study. Before embedding, the slices were trimmed so as to include several digital tactile corpuscles. Some thin sections were stained in 10 per cent aqueous phosphotungstic acid solution. The principal part of Meissner's corpuscle is made up of flattened laminar cells stretching across the corpuscle in irregular layers. The perinuclear cytoplasm of these cells contains numerous small mitochondria, a sparse granular endoplasmic reticulum, and a large number of small vesicles. Nerve fibers enter the side or base of the corpuscle, lose their myelin sheaths, and follow a meandering course between the laminar cell plates. The nerve endings enter into a close appositional relationship with the flattened portions of the laminar cells. In some areas the apposed axolemma and cell membranes are slightly thickened with small vesicles located along the cell membrane or on both surfaces. These regions are interpreted as synapses. The most prominent feature of the nerve endings is an extraordinary accumulation of small mitochondria which vary in size and internal density. The nerve endings also contain vacuoles, groups of dense concentric membranes, and small dense vesicles of irregular distribution. The laminar cells are separated from one another by a dense intercellular substance of uniform thickness which also envelops the entire corpuscle. This material contains randomly oriented collagen fibers and fine fibrils bound together by a dense material at nodal points recurring at regular intervals of approximately 120 mmicro. These findings are discussed in relation to the problems of the function of Meissner's corpuscle, neural material loss and replacement, and the presence of synapses.

  5. A note on chromospheric fine structure at active region polarity boundaries.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prata, S. W.

    1971-01-01

    High resolution H-alpha filtergrams from Big Bear Solar Observatory reveal that some filamentary features in active regions have fine structure and hence magnetic field transverse to the gross structure and the zero longitudinal field line. These features are distinct from the usual active region filament, in which fine structure, magnetic field, and filament are all parallel to the zero longitudinal field line. The latter occur on boundaries between regions of weaker fields, while the former occur at boundaries between regions of stronger field.

  6. Fine structure on flat surfaces of quasicrystalline Al-Pd-Mn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Z.; Stoldt, C. R.; Jenks, C. J.; Lograsso, T. A.; Thiel, P. A.

    1999-12-01

    We have analyzed the fine structure revealed by scanning tunneling microscopy for a flat (within 0.8 Å) fivefold surface of i-Al-Pd-Mn. Even though features in the image appear to be arranged randomly, self-similar features are separated by distinct distances. The distribution of such distances is compatible with the separations between pseudo-Mackay icosahedra tangent to the topmost layer, and with separations between other cluster-based units. We propose that the fine structure is due to electronic structure imposed by the clusters.

  7. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2012-04-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  8. Energy absorption characteristics of lightweight structural member by stacking conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Juho; Yang, Yongjun; Hwang, Woochae; Pyeon, Seokbeom; Min, Hanki; Yeo, Ingoo; Yang, Inyoung

    2011-11-01

    The recent trend in vehicle design is aimed at improving crash safety and environmental-friendliness. To solve these issues, the needs for lighter vehicle to limit exhaust gas and improve fuel economy has been requested for environmental-friendliness. Automobile design should be made for reduced weight once the safety of vehicle is maintained. In this study, composite structural members were manufactured using carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) which are representative lightweight structural materials. Carbon fiber has been researched as alternative to metals for lightweight vehicle and better fuel economy. CFRP is an anisotropic material which is the most widely adapted lightweight structural member because of their inherent design flexibility and high specific strength and stiffness. Also, variation of CFRP interface number is important to increase the energy absorption capacity. In this study, one type of circular shaped composite tube was used, combined with reinforcing foam. The stacking condition was selected to investigate the effect of the fiber orientation angle and interface number. The crashworthy behavior of circular composite material tubes subjected to static axial compression under same conditions is reported. The axial static collapse tests were carried out for each section member. The collapse modes and the energy absorption capability of the members were analyzed.

  9. [Ultraviolet spectroscopic study on the fine structures in the solar polar hole].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Dong; Liu, Guo-Hong

    2014-07-01

    Fine structures in the south solar polar coronal hole were observed by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph. The scales of the fine structures range spatially range from 1 arcsec to several arcsecs, temporally from 1 min to several minutes, and parts of them are in strip shape along the slit direction. The line-of-sight velocity of them is up to tens of km x s(-1) with red and blue shift intercrossed occasionally, which appear periodically as long as 100 minutes in some regions. Part of the fine structures can be clearly observed at the Ne V III line with higher formation temperature in the same spectral window. The time and location of some fine structures with high velocity in the Ne V III spectrum are almost the same as that in N IV spectrum, but they are extended and diffused in the Ne V III spectrum. Some fine structures have non-Gaussian profiles with the line-of-sight Doppler velocities up to 150 km x s(-1) in the N IV blue/red wings, which is similar with the explosive events in the transition region. In the past, explosive events are small-scale dynamic phenomena often observed in the quiet-sun (QS) region, while their properties in coronal holes (CHs) remain unclear. Here, we find the EE-like events with strong dynamics in the south solar polar coronal hole by N IV line of SOHO/SUMER spectrograph.

  10. Fine structural dependence of ultraviolet reflections in the King Penguin beak horn.

    PubMed

    Dresp, Birgitta; Langley, Keith

    2006-03-01

    The visual perception of many birds extends into the near-ultraviolet (UV) spectrum and ultraviolet is used by some to communicate. The beak horn of the King Penguin (Aptenodytes patagonicus) intensely reflects in the ultraviolet and this appears to be implicated in partner choice. In a preliminary study, we recently demonstrated that this ultraviolet reflectance has a structural basis, resulting from crystal-like photonic structures, capable of reflecting in the near-UV. The present study attempted to define the origin of the photonic elements that produce the UV reflectance and to better understand how the UV signal is optimized by their fine structure. Using light and electron microscopic analysis combined with new spectrophotometric data, we describe here in detail the fine structure of the entire King Penguin beak horn in addition to that of its photonic crystals. The data obtained reveal a one-dimensional structural periodicity within this tissue and demonstrate a direct relationship between its fine structure and its function. In addition, they suggest how the photonic structures are produced and how they are stabilized. The measured lattice dimensions of the photonic crystals, together with morphological data on its composition, permit predictions of the wavelength of reflected light. These correlate well with experimentally observed values. The way the UV signal is optimized by the fine structure of the beak tissue is discussed with regard to its putative biological role. PMID:16470837

  11. Fine structure of subauroral electric field and electron content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makarevich, Roman A.; Bristow, W. A.

    2014-05-01

    Small-scale structure of the plasma convection and electron content within the subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) is investigated. We present ionospheric observations during the main phase of the geomagnetic storm on 17 March 2013, during which a sequence of intense, highly localized, and fast-moving electric field (EF) structures within SAPS was observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network Christmas Valley West (CVW) radar. The CVW EF measurements at 60 s resolution are analyzed in context of coincident GPS measurements of the total electron content (TEC) at 30 s resolution. The strong and narrow feature of the subauroral ion drift (SAID) was observed poleward of the TEC trough, with a TEC enhancement (peak) seen in the SAPS (SAID) region. The SAPS wave activity commenced ~2 h (15 min) after first appearance of SAPS (SAID). The SAPS structures appeared near the poleward edge of the trough, propagated westward, and merged with SAID near TEC peak. The propagation velocity was comparable with convection velocity within each EF structure. The SAPS TEC exhibited a general decrease toward the end of the period. On a smaller time scale, TEC exhibited a small but appreciable decrease within EF structures. The wavelet spectra of EF and TEC showed similar variations, with wave period of ~5 min period near onset and increasing to 8-10 min toward the end of the period with significant wave activity. A scenario is discussed, in which the SAPS wave activity may modify the ionospheric conductance and TEC at small scales, with large-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere feedback acting to continuously deplete TEC where/when such activity does not occur.

  12. Fine Level Set Structure of Flat Isometric Immersions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hornung, Peter

    2011-03-01

    A result by Pogorelov asserts that C 1 isometric immersions u of a bounded domain {S subset mathbb R^2} into {mathbb {R}^3} whose normal takes values in a set of zero area enjoy the following regularity property: the gradient {f := nabla u} is `developable' in the sense that the nondegenerate level sets of f consist of straight line segments intersecting the boundary of S at both endpoints. Motivated by applications in nonlinear elasticity, we study the level set structure of such f when S is an arbitrary bounded Lipschitz domain. We show that f can be approximated by uniformly bounded maps with a simplified level set structure. We also show that the domain S can be decomposed (up to a controlled remainder) into finitely many subdomains, each of which admits a global line of curvature parametrization.

  13. CONSTRAINTS ON SPATIAL VARIATIONS IN THE FINE-STRUCTURE CONSTANT FROM PLANCK

    SciTech Connect

    O'Bryan, Jon; Smidt, Joseph; De Bernardis, Francesco; Cooray, Asantha

    2015-01-01

    We use the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy data from Planck to constrain the spatial fluctuations of the fine-structure constant α at a redshift of 1100. We use a quadratic estimator to measure the four-point correlation function of the CMB temperature anisotropies and extract the angular power spectrum fine-structure constant spatial variations projected along the line of sight at the last scattering surface. At tens of degree angular scales and above, we constrain the fractional rms fluctuations of the fine-structure constant to be (δα/α){sub rms} < 3.4 × 10{sup –3} at the 68% confidence level. We find no evidence for a spatially varying α at a redshift of 10{sup 3}.

  14. Laplace defect spectroscopy for recognition of deep-level fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Junyong; Zhan, Huahan; Huang, Qi/sheng

    2000-03-01

    A Laplace defect spectrometer (LDS) was investigated for use in decomposition of non-exponential transients. The system was tested by measuring known multi-exponential transients generated by RC circuits and applied to the study of non-exponential transients resulting from electron emission from Sn-related DX centers and hole emission from Fe-related deep acceptors. The non-exponential transients were investigated under different conditions and related to the alloy random effect. Their LDS spectra exhibited several well-resolved sharp peaks that were assigned to the fine structures of the two DX centers and the Fe-related deep acceptors, respectively, after comparison with DLTS observations. The activation energies of the fine structures were determined by linear fitting of the slopes of temperature dependences of electron and hole emission rates. The results show that the LDS is useful for investigation of deep-level fine structures.

  15. A simulation for gravity fine structure recovery from high-low GRAVSAT SST data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, R. H.; Lancaster, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    Covariance error analysis techniques were applied to investigate estimation strategies for the high-low SST mission for accurate local recovery of gravitational fine structure, considering the aliasing effects of unsolved for parameters. Surface density blocks of 5 deg x 5 deg and 2 1/2 deg x 2 1/2 deg resolution were utilized to represent the high order geopotential with the drag-free GRAVSAT configured in a nearly circular polar orbit at 250 km. altitude. GEOPAUSE and geosynchronous satellites were considered as high relay spacecraft. It is demonstrated that knowledge of gravitational fine structure can be significantly improved at 5 deg x 5 deg resolution using SST data from a high-low configuration with reasonably accurate orbits for the low GRAVSAT. The gravity fine structure recoverability of the high-low SST mission is compared with the low-low configuration and shown to be superior.

  16. Fine Structure of Fossilized Bacteria in Volyn Kerite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorlenko, V. M.; Zhmur, S. I.; Duda, V. I.; Suzina, N. E.; Osipov, G. A.; Dmitriev, V. V.

    2000-12-01

    Ultrathin sectioning and cryofracture of fibrous kerite, sampled from 1.8-1.75 billion year old Volyn sediments (Ukraine), revealed in bacteria-like bodies the presence of structures similar to sheath, cell wall, periplasm, cytoplasm, septum, membranes, intramembrane particles, poly-β-hydroxybutyrate inclusions. On the strength of these data and also the fatty acid profiles of these microfossils, we concluded that fibrous kerites are biogenic formations, namely fossilized bacterial mats.

  17. Fine structure of adhesive devices of Strepsiptera (Insecta).

    PubMed

    Pohl, Hans; Beutel, Rolf G

    2004-01-01

    Legs and other body parts of males, females and first instar larvae of almost all recognised families of Strepsiptera (Insecta) were examined. Descriptions of tibial, tarsal and pretarsal adhesive structures for each family are presented. These and attachment devices not associated with the legs are discussed. Strepsiptera evolved two strictly different types of tarsal attachment structures: hairy surfaces in the males and smooth flexible pads in the first instar larvae. Additional adhesive devices are present in several subgroups: mushroom-shaped microtrichia on the maxillary palp of males of Bohartillidae and acute pointed tibiae, or tarsal segments of males in different families. First instar larvae have evolved adhesive hairs on the ventral side of the body and on the podomeres. Specialised adhesive hairs are absent in the groundplan of adult males of Strepsiptera, but have evolved with the adoption of permanent endoparasitism of females. The most elaborate attachment structures, both in males and first instar larvae, are present in parasites of fast flying hymenopteran hosts (Aculeata). PMID:18089021

  18. Keck constraints on a varying fine-structure constant: wavelength calibration errors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael T.; Webb, John K.; Flambaum, Victor V.

    2010-11-01

    The Keck telescope's High Resolution Spectrograph (HIRES) has previously provided evidence for a smaller fine-structure constant, α, compared to the current laboratory value, in a sample of 143 quasar absorption systems: Δα/α=(-0.57±0.11)×10-5. The analysis was based on a variety of metal-ion transitions which, if α varies, experience different relative velocity shifts. This result is yet to be robustly contradicted, or confirmed, by measurements on other telescopes and spectrographs; it remains crucial to do so. It is also important to consider new possible instrumental systematic effects which may explain the Keck/HIRES results. Griest et al. (2009) recently identified distortions in the echelle order wavelength scales of HIRES with typical amplitudes ±250 m s-1. Here we investigate the effect such distortions may have had on the Keck/HIRES varying α results. Using a simple model of these intra-order distortions, we demonstrate that they cause a random effect on Δα/α from absorber to absorber because the systems are at different redshifts, placing the relevant absorption lines at different positions in different echelle orders. The typical magnitude of the effect on Δα/α is ~0.4×10-5 for individual absorbers which, compared to the median error on Δα/α in the sample, ~1.9×10-5, is relatively small. Consequently, the weighted mean value changes by less than 0.05×10-5 if the corrections we calculate are applied. Unsurprisingly, with corrections this small, we do not find direct evidence that applying them is actually warranted. Nevertheless, we urge caution, particularly for analyses aiming to achieve high precision Δα/α measurements on individual systems or small samples, that a much more detailed understanding of such intra-order distortions and their dependence on observational parameters is important if they are to be avoided or modelled reliably.

  19. Modeling fine-scale soil surface structure using geostatistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, H.; Anderson, K.; Brazier, R. E.; Kuhn, N. J.

    2013-04-01

    There is widespread recognition that spatially distributed information on soil surface roughness (SSR) is required for hydrological and geomorphological applications. Such information is necessary to describe variability in soil structure, which is highly heterogeneous in time and space, to parameterize hydrology and erosion models and to understand the temporal evolution of the soil surface in response to rainfall. This paper demonstrates how results from semivariogram analysis can quantify key elements of SSR for such applications. Three soil types (silt, silt loam, and silty clay) were used to show how different types of structural variance in SSR evolve during simulated rainfall events. All three soil types were progressively degraded using artificial rainfall to produce a series of roughness states. A calibrated laser profiling instrument was used to measure SSR over a 10 cm × 10 cm spatial extent, at a 2 mm resolution. These data were geostatistically analyzed in the context of aggregate breakdown and soil crusting. The results show that such processes are represented by a quantifiable decrease in sill variance, from 7.81 (control) to 0.94 (after 60 min of rainfall). Soil surface features such as soil cracks, tillage lines and erosional areas were quantified by local maxima in semivariance at a given length scale. This research demonstrates that semivariogram analysis can retrieve spatiotemporal variations in soil surface condition; in order to provide information on hydrological pathways. Consequently, geostatistically derived SSR shows strong potential for inclusion as spatial information in hydrology and erosion models to represent complex surface processes at different soil structural scales.

  20. Fine structure of the pygmy dipole resonance in (136)Xe.

    PubMed

    Savran, D; Fritzsche, M; Hasper, J; Lindenberg, K; Müller, S; Ponomarev, V Yu; Sonnabend, K; Zilges, A

    2008-06-13

    The photoresponse of the semimagic N=82 nucleus (136)Xe was measured up to the neutron separation energy S(n) using the (gamma, gamma') reaction. A concentration of strong dipole excitations is observed well below S(n) showing a fragmented resonancelike structure. Microscopic calculations in the quasiparticle phonon model including complex configurations of up to three phonons agree well with the experimental data in the total integrated strength, in the shape and the fragmentation of the resonance, which allows us to draw conclusions on the damping mechanism of the pygmy dipole resonance.

  1. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of platinum isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-09-15

    The fine structure observed in the {alpha} decay of deformed platinum isotopes is investigated using the recently developed five-channel formalism, based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation with outgoing wave boundary conditions. The internal effect of daughter states is taken into account in dealing with the interaction matrix and the {alpha}-cluster formation. The available experimental data concerning {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures are reproduced. Some predictions are made especially for the {alpha} decay of neutron-rich isotopes, which could guide future experiments.

  2. Progress towards a precision measurement of the n=2 triplet P fine structure of atomic helium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, K.; Fitzakerley, D. W.; George, M. C.; Vutha, A. C.; Storry, C. H.; Hessels, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    We report progress on the measurement of the J = 1 to J = 2 23 P fine-structure interval of atomic helium. The measurement uses a liquid-nitrogen-cooled DC discharge source of metastable helium and the atomic beam is laser cooled in the transverse directions. The atoms are excited to 23 P by a 1083-nm diode laser, and the fine-structure transition is driven by microwaves using the frequency-offset separated oscillatory fields technique. The transition is detected by further laser excitation to a Rydberg state, followed by Stark ionization. This work is supported by NSERC, CRC.

  3. Fine structure of the jet from Cygnus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveyenko, L. I.; Seleznev, S. V.

    2015-12-01

    The superfine structure of the bipolar outflow from the radio galaxy Cygnus A has been investigated at a wavelength of 2 cm. The surrounding thermal plasma inflows onto the disk and is transferred in a spiral to the center, with the plasma velocity and temperature increasing to relativistic values. The rotating bipolar outflow carries away an excess angular momentum as it is accumulated. The high-velocity central flow is surrounded by parallel chains of components, the tangential directions of the low-velocity flows. Rotation collimates the flow; ring currents, a longitudinal magnetic field, are generated in it. The size of the high-velocity jet exceeds the size of the counterjet by a factor of 3.5 due to the velocity difference: the acceleration of the flow moving along the field and its decelerationwhenmoving in a direction opposite to the magnetic field of the system. The observed features are typical of objects with active nuclei.

  4. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  5. Fine structure of the spermatozoon of the strepsipteran Xenos moutoni.

    PubMed

    Mazzini, M; Carcupino, M; Kathirithamby, J

    1991-01-01

    Spermatozoa of Xenos moutoni De Buysson belonging to the order Strepsiptera (Insecta) were examined by electron microscopy. The spermatozoon was seen to have an elongated head and a tail containing a 9+9+2 axoneme and two mitochondrial derivatives of equal size. The pear-shaped acrosome is characterised by a mono-layered structure and terminates anteriorly forming two pyramidal evaginations. The nucleus exhibits an external portion of dense chromatin and an internal one of uncondensed material. The latter occupies a central position at the base and becomes progressively peripheral at the apex. The tail is long and in its final portion the axoneme loses its elements progressively. These results have been compared with the ultrastructure of the spermatozoa of Coleoptera which have been considered as a sister group of Strepsiptera. PMID:18621157

  6. Fine Structure of Extracellular Polysaccharide of Erwinia amylovora†

    PubMed Central

    Politis, D. J.; Goodman, R. N.

    1980-01-01

    Virulent E9 and avirulent E8 strains of Erwinia amylovora were shown by means of light, transmission, and scanning microscopy to be, respectively, encapsulated and unencapsulated. Difficulty was encountered in stabilizing the fibrillar-appearing capsular extracellular polysaccharide. We suggest that the ephemeral nature of extracellular polysaccharide is due to the collapse of its extended structure upon dehydration. This occurs when bacteria are prepared for either transmission or scanning electron microscopy. The electron micrographs support our previous biochemical and immunological studies contending that the capsule is composed of tightly bound and loosely held components. The preparation of bacteria in freeze-dried colonies has permitted us to observe and explain the fluidity of the encapsulated strain. We suggest that this fluidity is a reflection of the loosely held extracellular polysaccharide or slime. Images PMID:16345638

  7. Design of Far-Red Sensitizing Squaraine Dyes Aiming Towards the Fine Tuning of Dye Molecular Structure.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Takuya; Fujikawa, Naotaka; Ogomi, Yuhei; Pandey, Shyam S; Ma, Tingli; Hayase, Shuzi

    2016-04-01

    Model squaraine dyes having sharp and narrow absorptions mainly in the far-red wavelength region has been logically designed, synthesized and used for their application as sensitizer in the dyesensitized solar cells (DSSC). In order to have fine control on energetics, dyes having same mother core and alkyl chain length varying only in molecular symmetry and position of substituent were designed. It has been found that even keeping all other structural factor constant, only positional variation of substituent leads to not only in the variation of energetics by 0.1 eV but affects the photovoltaic characteristics also. Optimum concentration of dye de-aggregating agent was found to be 100 times with respect to the sensitizing dye concentration. Amongst dyes utilized in this work best performance was obtained for unsymmetrical dye SQ-40 giving a photoconversion efficiency of 4.01% under simulated solar irradiation at global AM 1.5. PMID:27451618

  8. Grazing exit versus grazing incidence geometry for x-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of arsenic traces

    SciTech Connect

    Meirer, F.; Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Zoeger, N.; Pepponi, G.

    2009-04-01

    In the presented study the grazing exit x-ray fluorescence was tested for its applicability to x-ray absorption near edge structure analysis of arsenic in droplet samples. The experimental results have been compared to the findings of former analyses of the same samples using a grazing incidence (GI) setup to compare the performance of both geometries. Furthermore, the investigations were accomplished to gain a better understanding of the so called self-absorption effect, which was observed and investigated in previous studies using a GI geometry. It was suggested that a normal incidence-grazing-exit geometry would not suffer from self-absorption effects in x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis due to the minimized path length of the incident beam through the sample. The results proved this assumption and in turn confirmed the occurrence of the self-absorption effect for GI geometry. Due to its lower sensitivity it is difficult to apply the GE geometry to XAFS analysis of trace amounts (few nanograms) of samples but the technique is well suited for the analysis of small amounts of concentrated samples.

  9. THE FINE STRUCTURE OF TESTICULAR INTERSTITIAL CELLS IN GUINEA PIGS

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, A. Kent

    1965-01-01

    In guinea pig testes perfused with either glutaraldehyde or osmium tetroxide fixative, the cytoplasm of the interstitial cells contains an exceptionally abundant agranular endoplasmic reticulum. The reticulum in central regions of the cell is a network of interconnected tubules, but in extensive peripheral areas the reticulum is commonly organized into closely packed, flattened cisternae which are fenestrated. Occasional small patches of the granular reticulum occur in the cytoplasm and connect freely with the agranular reticulum. The mitochondria have a dense matrix and contain cristae and some tubules. The Golgi complex is disperse and shows no evidence of secretory material. The cytoplasm also contains lipid droplets. Lipofuscin pigment granules are probably polymorphic residual bodies and contain three components: (1) a dense material which at high magnification shows a 75-A periodicity; (2) a medium-sized lipid droplet; and (3) a cap-like structure. In glutaraldehyde-perfused testis the interstitial cell cytoplasm appears to have the same density from cell to cell, and the agranular reticulum is tubular or cisternal but not in the form of empty vesicles. Thus the "dark" and "light" cells and the vesicular agranular reticulum sometimes encountered in other fixations may be artifacts. Biochemical results from other laboratories, correlated with the present findings, indicate that the membranes of the agranular endoplasmic reticulum in guinea pig interstitial cells are the site of at least two enzymes of androgen biosynthesis, the 17-hydroxylase and the 17-desmolase. PMID:19866687

  10. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure. PMID:19411602

  11. Fine structure of the sensilla of Peripatopsis moseleyi (Onychophora).

    PubMed

    Storch, V; Ruhberg, H

    1977-02-14

    Three types of sensilla occurring on the lips and on the antennae of Peripatopsis moseleyi have been investigated by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. On the lips sensory spines can be found which contain numerous cilia originating from bipolar receptor cells. They reach the tip of the spine where the cuticle is modified. The perikarya of the sensory cells, a large supporting cell with a complicated surface and a second type of receptor, form a bud-like structure and are surrounded by a layer of collagen fibrils. The second receptor cell bears apical stereocilia as well as a kinocilium which are directed towards the centre of the animal -- thus the cell appears to be turned upside down. The sensilla of the antennae are 1) sensory bristles containing two or three kinds of receptor cells, one of which bears an apical cilium and one kind of supportive cell and 2) sensory bulbs located within furrows consisting of receptor cells with branched cilia and two kinds of supportive cells which are covered by a modified thin cuticle. According to the electron microscopical findings the sensory spines on the lips are presumably chemoreceptors. The sensory bristles on the antennae can be regarded as mechanoreceptors and the sensory bulbs as chemoreceptors.

  12. FINE STRUCTURE OF FLARE RIBBONS AND EVOLUTION OF ELECTRIC CURRENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sharykin, I. N.; Kosovichev, A. G.

    2014-06-10

    Emission of solar flares across the electromagnetic spectrum is often observed in the form of two expanding ribbons. The standard flare model explains flare ribbons as footpoints of magnetic arcades, emitting due to interaction of energetic particles with the chromospheric plasma. However, the physics of this interaction and properties of the accelerated particles are still unknown. We present results of multiwavelength observations of the C2.1 flare of 2013 August 15, observed with the New Solar Telescope of the Big Bear Solar Observatory, and the Solar Dynamics Observatory, GOES, and Fermi spacecraft. The observations reveal previously unresolved sub-arcsecond structure of flare ribbons in regions of strong magnetic field consisting from numerous small-scale bright knots. We observe a red-blue asymmetry of H{sub α} flare ribbons with a width as small as ∼100 km. We discuss the relationship between the ribbons and vertical electric currents estimated from vector magnetograms, and show that Joule heating can be responsible for energization of H{sub α} knots in the ribbons.

  13. Fine-scaled human genetic structure revealed by SNP microarrays.

    PubMed

    Xing, Jinchuan; Watkins, W Scott; Witherspoon, David J; Zhang, Yuhua; Guthery, Stephen L; Thara, Rangaswamy; Mowry, Bryan J; Bulayeva, Kazima; Weiss, Robert B; Jorde, Lynn B

    2009-05-01

    We report an analysis of more than 240,000 loci genotyped using the Affymetrix SNP microarray in 554 individuals from 27 worldwide populations in Africa, Asia, and Europe. To provide a more extensive and complete sampling of human genetic variation, we have included caste and tribal samples from two states in South India, Daghestanis from eastern Europe, and the Iban from Malaysia. Consistent with observations made by Charles Darwin, our results highlight shared variation among human populations and demonstrate that much genetic variation is geographically continuous. At the same time, principal components analyses reveal discernible genetic differentiation among almost all identified populations in our sample, and in most cases, individuals can be clearly assigned to defined populations on the basis of SNP genotypes. All individuals are accurately classified into continental groups using a model-based clustering algorithm, but between closely related populations, genetic and self-classifications conflict for some individuals. The 250K data permitted high-level resolution of genetic variation among Indian caste and tribal populations and between highland and lowland Daghestani populations. In particular, upper-caste individuals from Tamil Nadu and Andhra Pradesh form one defined group, lower-caste individuals from these two states form another, and the tribal Irula samples form a third. Our results emphasize the correlation of genetic and geographic distances and highlight other elements, including social factors that have contributed to population structure.

  14. Delay between the Circularly Polarized Components in Fine Structures during Solar Type IV Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, G. P.; Zlobec, P.

    1995-08-01

    We analyzed intermediately polarized (20 80%) fine structures (pulsations, sudden reductions, fiber bursts and zebras) that were recorded in type IV events. The mean polarization degree was practically the same for all the fine structures recorded in an interval lasting a few minutes and it was similar to the polarization of the continuum. A detailed analysis during the evolution of single structures reveals changes in polarization (in particular an ‘undulation’ at flux density minima) even stronger than 20%. They were caused by a delay, up to 0.1 s, between the two circularly polarized components. The weaker polarimetric component was delayed in 2 sets and the stronger one in 1 set. In the event of April 24, 1985 different types of fine structures were sporadically detected in more than one hour long time interval. Short delays of the stronger or of the weaker component were sometimes observed. The events characterized by fine structures are generally totally polarized in the ordinary mode. We assume that this holds also for the phenomena studied here. The observed intermediate polarization therefore requires a depolarization due to propagation effects. We discuss the mode coupling and the reflection of the original radio signal that could also generate the delay of the weaker and the stronger component respectively. The possibility of polarization variation due to the change of the angle between the direction of the propagation and the magnetic field in a quasi-transversal region and in a low intensity magnetic field in a current sheet is also given.

  15. Spike-like Bursts as Fine Structure of Zebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zlobec, P.; Karlický, M.

    2007-12-01

    We studied the characteristics of the zebra-associated spike-like bursts that were recorded with high time resolution at 1420 MHz in four intervals (from 12:45 to 12:48 UT) during 5 August 2003. Our detailed analysis is based on the selection of more than 500 such spike-like bursts and it is, at least to our knowledge, the first study devoted to such short-lived bursts. Their characteristics are different from those pertinent to “normal” spike bursts, as presented in the paper by Güdel and Benz ( Astron. Astrophys. 231, 202, 1990); in particular, their duration (about 7.4 ms at half power) is shorter, so they should be members of the SSS (super short structures) family (Magdalenić et al., Astrophys. J. 642, L77, 2006). The bursts were generally strongly R-polarized; however, during the decaying part of interval I a low R-polarized and L-polarized bursts were also present. This change of polarization shows a trend that resembles the peculiar form of the zebra lines in the spectral dominion (“V” like). A global statistical analysis on the bursts observed in the two polarimetric channels shows that the highest cross-correlation coefficient (about 0.5) was pertinent to interval I. The zebras and the bursts can be interpreted by the same double plasma resonance process as proposed by Bárta and Karlický ( Astron. Astrophys. 379, 1045, 2001) and Karlický et al. ( Astron. Astrophys. 375, 638, 2001); in particular, the spikes are generated by the interruption of this process by assumed turbulence (density or magnetic field variations). This process should be present in the region close to the reconnection site ( e.g., in the plasma reconnection outflows) where the density and the magnetic field vary strongly.

  16. Application of X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy to the study of nuclear structural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shanshan

    One of key technologies for the next generation nuclear systems are advanced materials, including high temperature structural materials, fast neutron resistance core materials and so on. Local structure determination in these systems, which often are crystallographically intractable, is critical to gaining an understanding of their properties. In this thesis, X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS), including Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) and X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES), is used to examine the geometric and electronic structure of nuclear structural materials under varying conditions. The thesis is divided into two main sections. The first examines the structural analysis of nanostructured ferritic alloys (NFA) which are dispersion strengthened by an ultra high density of Y-Ti-O enriched nano-features, resulting in remarkable high temperature creep strength and radiation damage resistance. Titanium and Yttrium K-edge XAS shows commercial alloys MA957 and J12YWT more closely resemble the as received Fe-14Cr-3W-0.4Ti (wt. %) powders, and mechanically alloyed (MA) powders with 0.25Y2O3 (wt. %). It shows that a significant fraction of substitutional Ti remains dissolved in the (BCC) ferrite matrix. In contrast, annealed powders and hot isostatic press (HIP) consolidated alloys show high temperature heat treatments shift the Y and Ti to more oxidized states that are consistent with combinations of Y2Ti2O7 and, especially, TiO. The second section describes corrosion studies of Pb with 316L stainless steel, molybdenum and spinet (MgAl2O4) at high temperature by XAS. The corrosion of fuel cladding and structural materials by liquid lead at elevated temperatures is an issue that must be considered when designing advanced nuclear systems and high-power spallation neutron targets. The results of ex-situ studies show that a Mo substrate retained a smooth and less corroded surface than 316L stainless steel sample at elevated temperature. In

  17. X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidates the impact of structural disorder on electron mobility in amorphous zinc-tin-oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Siah, Sin Cheng E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Yun Seog; Buonassisi, Tonio E-mail: buonassisi@mit.edu; Lee, Sang Woon; Gordon, Roy G.; Heo, Jaeyeong; Shibata, Tomohiro; Segre, Carlo U.

    2014-06-16

    We investigate the correlation between the atomic structures of amorphous zinc-tin-oxide (a-ZTO) thin films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD) and their electronic transport properties. We perform synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy at the K-edges of Zn and Sn with varying [Zn]/[Sn] compositions in a-ZTO thin films. In extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) measurements, signal attenuation from higher-order shells confirms the amorphous structure of a-ZTO thin films. Both quantitative EXAFS modeling and X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) reveal that structural disorder around Zn atoms increases with increasing [Sn]. Field- and Hall-effect mobilities are observed to decrease with increasing structural disorder around Zn atoms, suggesting that the degradation in electron mobility may be correlated with structural changes.

  18. Fine structure of bat deep posterior lingual glands (von Ebner's)

    PubMed

    Azzali, G; Gatti, R; Bucci, G; Orlandini, G

    1989-10-01

    We studied the morphology and ultrastructure of the bat (Pipistrellus k.k. and Rhinolophus f.e.) deep posterior lingual glands (Ebner's glands) during hibernation, summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine. Ebner's glands are formed by serous tubulo-alveolar adenomeres and by an excretory system organized in intercalated ducts, long excretory ducts and a main excretory duct. The latter opens in the vallum which surrounds the circumvallate papillae and in the groove of the foliate papillae. The secretory cells, which lack basal folds, show abundant and dense granules (PAS+, Alcian blue -), microvilli (scarce during hibernation), a Golgi apparatus (well developed during summer and after stimulation with pilocarpine), a large nucleus and RER cisternae stacked at the basal pole. Centrioles, lipid droplets, heterogeneous bodies (in content and density, probably lipofuscin bodies), lysosomal multivesicular bodies and large, dense granules with a microcrystalline structure were also encountered. The lateral membranes of adjacent cells are joined by desmosomes; their interdigitations are neither numerous nor prominent during summer. Microfilaments, often gathered in small bundles, lie in the lateral, peripheral cytoplasm without any relation with desmosomes. In summer and particularly after stimulation with pilocarpine, the apical pole of the secretory cells is characterized by many long microvilli, pedunculated hyaloplasmic protrusions and secretory granules. During hibernation the lumen is filled with secretory material. Myoepithelial cells are arranged among secretory cells or between them and the basal lamina. The short intercalated ducts show similarities with the analogous ducts of the parotid gland. Striated ducts are absent. Excretory ducts are endowed with: a) an inner layer of cuboidal cells characterized by poorly developed cytoplasmic organelles, rare dense granules and a few small microvilli; b) an outer layer of basal cells lying on the basal lamina

  19. Revealing the Fine Structures of the Lithosphere Asthenosphere Boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olugboji, Tolulope Morayo

    to the generation of the observed fabric. A contrast with normal oceans lends further evidence that this hypothesized origin for crustal anisotropy is a distinct feature of ocean-islands, separate from the formation of normal ocean crust/plates. Anisotropic structures are also observed at the LAB and may be due to changes in plate motion through time, hotspot activity or both.

  20. Fine structure of the subradular organ of Lepidochitona cinereus (L), (Mollusca, Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Boyle, P R

    1975-10-13

    Electron microscopy of the subradular organ of the chiton Lepidochitona cinereus (L) reveals at least three cell types, microvillous, ciliated and mucus-secreting, situated in a single epithelium. The base of the epithelium is abundantly innervated and supplied with muscle cells. The fine structure is consistent with a chemosensory function for the subradular organ.

  1. Accuracy of mapping the Earth's gravity field fine structure with a spaceborne gravity gradiometer mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    The spaceborne gravity gradiometer is a potential sensor for mapping the fine structure of the Earth's gravity field. Error analyses were performed to investigate the accuracy of the determination of the Earth's gravity field from a gravity field satellite mission. The orbital height of the spacecraft is the dominating parameter as far as gravity field resolution and accuracies are concerned.

  2. Fine-structured TiO2 ceramic patterns on the ceramic surface fabricated by replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. D.; Nakayama, T.; Hong, B. J.; Imaki, K.; Yoshimura, T.; Suzuki, T.; Suematsu, H.; Lee, S. W.; Fu, Z.; Niihara, K.

    2011-03-01

    The ability to fabricate high precision micro- to nanoscale structure in a wide variety of materials is of crucial importance for the advancement of microtechnology, nanotechnology and nanoscience. Also, the ability to create micrometer and sub-micrometer architecture for functional ceramics is a prerequisite of exploring the rich field of ceramic nanotechnology. In this work we fabricated three-dimensional oxide ceramic materials with fine-structure over multiple length scales by combining replication patterning technique, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), oxide ceramic material (TiO2) nano-sized particles. Our study is based on the idea that PVA can be easily detached from a mold by peeling. We confirmed that micron and sub-micron-sized fine-structured oxide ceramic patterns containing nano-sized pores could be fabricated using this procedure. The results presented demonstrate the compositional and structural diversities that are possible with a facile approach and simple method.

  3. Scattering pulse of label free fine structure cells to determine the size scale of scattering structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Chen, Xingyu; Zhang, Zhenxi; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Hong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Kaixing; Yuan, Li

    2016-04-01

    Scattering pulse is sensitive to the morphology and components of each single label-free cell. The most direct detection result, label free cell's scattering pulse is studied in this paper as a novel trait to recognize large malignant cells from small normal cells. A set of intrinsic scattering pulse calculation method is figured out, which combines both hydraulic focusing theory and small particle's scattering principle. Based on the scattering detection angle ranges of widely used flow cytometry, the scattering pulses formed by cell scattering energy in forward scattering angle 2°-5° and side scattering angle 80°-110° are discussed. Combining the analysis of cell's illuminating light energy, the peak, area, and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of label free cells' scattering pulses for fine structure cells with diameter 1-20 μm are studied to extract the interrelations of scattering pulse's features and cell's morphology. The theoretical and experimental results show that cell's diameter and FWHM of its scattering pulse agree with approximate linear distribution; the peak and area of scattering pulse do not always increase with cell's diameter becoming larger, but when cell's diameter is less than about 16 μm the monotone increasing relation of scattering pulse peak or area with cell's diameter can be obtained. This relationship between the features of scattering pulse and cell's size is potentially a useful but very simple criterion to distinguishing malignant and normal cells by their sizes and morphologies in label free cells clinical examinations.

  4. Fine structure zonal flow excitation by beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Zhiyong; Chen, Liu; Zonca, Fulvio

    2016-10-01

    Nonlinear excitation of low frequency zonal structure (LFZS) by beta-induced Alfvén eigenmode (BAE) is investigated using nonlinear gyrokinetic theory. It is found that electrostatic zonal flow (ZF), rather than zonal current, is preferentially excited by finite amplitude BAE. In addition to the well-known meso-scale radial envelope structure, ZF is also found to exhibit fine radial structure due to the localization of BAE with respect to mode rational surfaces. Specifically, the zonal electric field has an even mode structure at the rational surface where radial envelope peaks.

  5. The fine-structure intervals of (N-14)+ by far-infrared laser magnetic resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, John M.; Varberg, Thomas D.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Cooksy, Andrew L.

    1994-01-01

    The far-infrared laser magnetic resonance spectra associated with both fine-structure transitions in (N-14)+ in its ground P-3 state have been recorded. This is the first laboratory observation of the J = 1 left arrow 0 transition and its frequency has been determined two orders of magnitude more accurately than previously. The remeasurement of the J = 2 left arrow 1 spectrum revealed a small error in the previous laboratory measurements. The fine-structure splittings (free of hyperfine interactions) determined in this work are (delta)E(sub 10) = 1461.13190 (61) GHz, (delta)E(sub 21) = 2459.38006 (37) GHz. Zero-field transition frequencies which include the effects of hyperfine structure have also been calculated. Refined values for the hyperfine constants and the g(sub J) factors have been obtained.

  6. Local structure and polarization resistance of Ce doped SrMnO{sub 3} using extended x-ray fine structure analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, Jiseung; Lee, Heesoo

    2014-09-15

    Changes to the local structure of Sr and Mn atoms in Sr{sub 1−x}Ce{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (SCM) according to increasing Ce content and the effect of the structural change on the polarization resistance of SCM were investigated. The reduction of manganese was confirmed by the absorption edge shift of the Mn K-edge toward lower energies. The noise of oscillation in extended X-ray absorption fine structure k{sup 3}χ data at Mn K-edge reveals the distortion of the local structure of Mn atoms, and the peak that indicates the bonding length of Mn-O, Sr/Ce, and -Mn decreased with the addition of Ce content in Fourier transformations of the Mn K-edge. The distortion of the local structure at Mn atoms was affected by the reduced manganese ions having larger ionic radii than Mn{sup 4+}. Meanwhile, few distortions of local atomic structures of Sr atoms occurred, and the average nearest neighboring distances of Sr-O and Sr-Mn are ∼2.13 Å and ∼2.95 Å, respectively. The average bonding lengths of the Ce-O and Ce-Mn increased because the ionic radius of substituted Ce ion with 12 coordination number is smaller than that of Sr ion, which leads the reduction of Mn ions and the distortion of local structure at the substituted A-site. Therefore, we reasoned that the distortion of the local atomic structure at Mn atoms in MnO{sub 6} and Ce atoms in A-site is one of the causes for interrupting oxygen ion transfers as a geometric factor, which results in an increase in the polarization resistance of SCM within the Ce composition range from 10 mol. % to 30 mol. %.

  7. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials. PMID:25121688

  8. Omnidirectional light absorption of disordered nano-hole structure inspired from Papilio ulysses.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wanlin; Zhang, Wang; Fang, Xiaotian; Huang, Yiqiao; Liu, Qinglei; Bai, Mingwen; Zhang, Di

    2014-07-15

    Butterflies routinely produce nanostructured surfaces with useful properties. Here, we report a disordered nano-hole structure with ridges inspired by Papilio ulysses that produce omnidirectional light absorption compared with the common ordered structure. The result shows that the omnidirectional light absorption is affected by polarization, the incident angle, and the wavelength. Using the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, the stable omnidirectional light absorption is achieved in the structure inspired from the Papilio ulysses over a wide incident angle range and with various wavelengths. This explains some of the mysteries of the structure of the Papilio ulysses butterfly. These conclusions can guide the design of omnidirectional absorption materials.

  9. X-ray absorption structural study of a reversible, photoexcited charge-transfer state

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.X.; Bowman, M.K.; Norris, J.R. Univ. of Chicago, IL ); Montano, P.A. )

    1993-05-19

    Electron-transfer reactions can be accompanied by significant nuclear movements. Nuclear motion appears to be especially vital to the reversible, photoinduced charge-transfer chemistry of cyclopentadienylnickel nitrosyl (C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO). Although extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy has recorded photoinduced changes in the ligation of myoglobins, similar X-ray studies of electron-transfer chemistry have not been reported. Here we examine reversible, photoinduced structural changes in C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO by EXAFS and propose a mechanism for the electron-transfer chemistry. This work demonstrates that EXAFS can measure distance changes accompanying photoinduced electron transfer to provide new details of the geometry of photoexcited state and suggests that electron transfer occurs in the transient, optically excited states of C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO and C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] as dictated by NO movement that produces either C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup CT] or C[sub 5]H[sub 5]NiNO[sup GS]. 14 refs., 2 figs.

  10. Behavior of heptavalent technetium in sulfuric acid under α-irradiation: structural determination of technetium sulfate complexes by X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Denden, I; Poineau, F; Schlegel, M L; Roques, J; Solari, P Lorenzo; Blain, G; Czerwinski, K R; Essehli, R; Barbet, J; Fattahi, M

    2014-03-01

    The effect of α-radiolysis on the behavior of heptavalent technetium has been investigated in 13 and 18 M H2SO4. Irradiation experiments were performed using α-particles ((4)He(2+), E = 68 MeV) generated by the ARRONAX cyclotron. UV-visible and X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopic studies indicate that Tc(VII) is reduced to Tc(V) under α-irradiation. Extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy measurements are consistent with the presence of mononuclear technetium sulfate complexes. Experimental results and density functional calculations show the formation of [TcO(HSO4)3(H2O)(OH)](-) and/or [TcO(HSO4)3(H2O)2] and [Tc(HSO4)3(SO4)(H2O)] and/or [Tc(HSO4)3(SO4)(OH)](-) for 13 and 18 M H2SO4, respectively.

  11. Magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlický, M.; Jiricka, K.

    2002-10-01

    Using the recent model of the radio zebra fine structures (Ledenev et al. 2001) the magnetic fields, plasma densities, and plasma beta parameters are estimated from high-frequency zebra fine structures. It was found that in the flare radio source of high-frequency (1-2 GHz) zebras the densities and magnetic fields vary in the intervals of (1-4)×1010 cm-3 and 40-230 G, respectively. Assuming then the flare temperature as about of 107K, the plasma beta parameters in the zebra radio sources are in the 0.05-0.81 interval. Thus the plasma pressure effects in such radio sources, especially in those with many zebra lines, are not negligible.

  12. Solar Cycle Fine Structure and Surface Rotation from Ca II K-Line Time Series Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scargle, Jeff; Keil, Steve; Worden, Pete

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of three and a half decades of data from the NSO/AFRL/Sac Peak K-line monitoring program yields evidence for four components to the variation: (a) the solar cycle, with considerable fine structure and a quasi-periodicity of 122.4 days; (b) a stochastic process, faster than (a) and largely independent of it, (c) a quasi-periodic signal due to rotational modulation, and of course (d) observational errors (shown to be quite small). Correlation and power spectrum analyses elucidate periodic and aperiodic variation of these chromospheric parameters. Time-frequency analysis is especially useful for extracting information about differential rotation, and in particular elucidates the connection between its behavior and fine structure of the solar cycle on approximately one-year time scales. These results further suggest that similar analyses will be useful at detecting and characterizing differential rotation in stars from stellar light-curves such as those being produced at NASA's Kepler observatory.

  13. Fine structure in plasma waves and radiation near the plasma frequency in Earth's foreshock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    1994-01-01

    Novel observations are presented of intrunsic fine structure in the frequency spectrum of electomagnetic (EM) radiation and plasma waves near the electron plasma frequency f(sub p) during a period of unusually high interplanetary magnetic field strength. Measured using the wideband receiver on the International Sun-Earth Explorer (ISEE) 1 spacecraft, fine-structured emissions are observed both in the solar wind and the foreshock, The fine structure is shown to correspond to emissions spaced above f(sub p) near half harmonies of the electon cyclotron frequency f(sub ce), i.e., near f(sub p) + nf(sub ce)/2. These appear to be the first space physics observations of emissions spaced by f(sub ce)/2. Indirect but strong arguments are used to discriminate between EM and electrostatic (ES) signals, to identify whether ISEE 1 is in the solar wind or the foreshock, and to determine the relative frequencies of the emissions and the local f(sub p). The data are consistent with generation of the ES and EM emissions in the foreshock, with subsequent propagation of the EM emissions into the solar wind. It remains possible that some emissions currently identified as ES have significant EM character. The ES and EM emisions often merge into one another with minimal changes in frequency, arguing that their source regions and generation mechanisms are related and imposing significant constraints on theories. The f(sub ce)/2 ES and EM fine structures observed may be intrinsic to the emission mechanisms or to superposition of two series of signals with f(sub ce) spacing that differ in starting frequency by f(sub ce)/2. Present theories for nonlinear wave coupling processes, cyclotron maser emission, and other linear instability processes are all unable to explain multiple EM and/or ES components spaced by approximately f(sub ce)/2 above f(sub p) for f(sub p)/f(sub ce) much greater than 1 and typical for shock beams parameters. Suitable avenues for further theoretical research are

  14. Fine structure of alpha decay to rotational states of heavy nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Y. Z.; Dong, J. M.; Peng, B. B.; Zhang, H. F.

    2010-06-15

    To gain a better insight into alpha-decay fine structure, we calculate the relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} and 4{sup +} rotational states in the framework of the generalized liquid drop model (GLDM) and improved Royer's formula. The calculated relative intensities of alpha decay to 2{sup +} states are in good agreement with the experimental data. For the relative intensities of alpha decay to 4{sup +} states, a good agreement with experimental data is achieved for Th and U isotopes. The formula we obtain is useful for the analysis of experimental data of alpha-decay fine structure. In addition, some predicted relative intensities which are still not measured are provided for future experiments.

  15. Topological map of the Hofstadter butterfly: Fine structure of Chern numbers and Van Hove singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumis, Gerardo G.

    2016-04-01

    The Hofstadter butterfly is a quantum fractal with a highly complex nested set of gaps, where each gap represents a quantum Hall state whose quantized conductivity is characterized by topological invariants known as the Chern numbers. Here we obtain simple rules to determine the Chern numbers at all scales in the butterfly fractal and lay out a very detailed topological map of the butterfly by using a method used to describe quasicrystals: the cut and projection method. Our study reveals the existence of a set of critical points that separates orderly patterns of both positive and negative Cherns that appear as a fine structure in the butterfly. This fine structure can be understood as a small tilting of the projection subspace in the cut and projection method and by using a Chern meeting formula. Finally, we prove that the critical points are identified with the Van Hove singularities that exist at every band center in the butterfly landscape.

  16. Interpretation of the fine structure in the sup 14 C radioactive decay of sup 223 Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Sheline, R.K. ); Ragnarsson, I. )

    1991-03-01

    The experimental hindrance factors determined from the fine structure in the {sup 14}C decay of {sup 223}Ra are strikingly similar to the hindrance factors observed in the alpha decay of odd-{ital A} reflection-asymmetric deformed nuclei in spite of the deformed to spherical shape which occurs in the {sup 14}C decay. Calculations of the overlap between the reflection-asymmetric ground state of {sup 223}Ra and the spherical shell-model orbitals of {sup 209}Pb involved in the {sup 14}C decay are consistent with the experimental hindrance factors from the {sup 14}C fine structure except that the {ital j}{sub 15/2} orbital is more strongly populated experimentally than the calculations suggest.

  17. Relation Between Basophilia and Fine Structure of Cytoplasm in the Fungus Allomyces macrogynus Em

    PubMed Central

    Blondel, Benigna; Turian, Gilbert

    1960-01-01

    In a fungus, Allomyces macrogynus Em., staining tests have revealed changes in the location of cytoplasmic basophilia following different phases of the developmental cycle. These variations in location were used to observe which fine structures correspond to basophile and non-basophile areas of the cytoplasm. Hyphae, gametangia, zygotes, and plants were fixed at various developmental stages in OsO4, pH 6.1, and embedded in vestopal. Sections were examined in the electron microscope. Comparison of basophile and non-basophile cytoplasms leads to the conclusion that cytoplasmic particles of 150 to 200 A in diameter are responsible for basophilia. The possibility of these particles being ribosomes is discussed and confirmed. The present paper also describes some observations on the fine structure of other cellular components of this fungus, such as nuclei, mitochondria, various granules, and flagella. PMID:13801597

  18. Measuring h /mCs and the Fine Structure Constant with Bragg Diffraction and Bloch Oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, Richard

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We suppress many systematic effects, e.g., Zeeman shifts and effects from Earth's gravity and vibrations, use Bloch oscillations to increase the signal and reduce the diffraction phase, simulate multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implement spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  19. Measuring the fine structure constant with Bragg diffraction and Bloch oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Chenghui; Estey, Brian; Parker, Richard; Dudley, Jordan; Müller, Holger

    2016-05-01

    We have demonstrated a new scheme for atom interferometry based on large-momentum-transfer Bragg beam splitters and Bloch oscillations. In this new scheme, we have achieved a resolution of δα / α =0.25ppb in the fine structure constant measurement, which gives up to 4.4 million radians of phase difference between freely evolving matter waves. We have suppressed many systematic effects known in most atom interferometers with Raman beam splitters such as light shift, Zeeman effect shift as well as vibration. We have also simulated multi-atom Bragg diffraction to understand sub-ppb systematic effects, and implemented spatial filtering to further suppress systematic effects. We present our recent progress toward a measurement of the fine structure constant, which will provide a stringent test of the standard model of particle physics.

  20. Special Features of Polarization-Induced Relaxation in Structurally Disordered Finely Dispersed Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbachenko, L. A.; Tanaev, A. B.; Bezrukova, Ya. V.; Ezhova, L. I.; Baryshnikov, D. S.; Marchuk, S. D.; Berezovskii, P. P.

    2015-04-01

    Dielectric characteristics of finely dispersed hydrated natural coal from the Krasnoyarsk Strip Mine are measured in wide ranges of external measuring electric field frequencies, environmental temperatures, and humidities. The frequency, temperature, and concentration dispersions of the dielectric permittivity are revealed for the examined structures. An analysis of the results obtained demonstrates that a cluster layer of the polar aqueous matrix characterized by rigid fixing of water molecules is formed at the interphase boundaries of the examined system. It is demonstrated that this layer plays the role of the potential barrier that complicates transitions for both free water molecules and surface active dispersed coals oriented by the electric field. This layer can increase the electric strength of the examined disordered finely dispersed structures.

  1. Cosmological variation of the fine-structure constant versus a new interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Angstmann, E.J.; Flambaum, V.V.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2004-10-01

    We show that using the modified form of the Dirac Hamiltonian as suggested by Bekenstein does not affect the analysis of QSO data pertaining to a measurement of {alpha} variation. We obtain the present time limit on Bekenstein's parameter, tan{sup 2} {chi}=(0.2{+-}0.7)x10{sup -6}, from the measurement of the hydrogen 2p fine structure using a value of {alpha} obtained from different experiments.

  2. Type IIIb bursts and their fine structure in frequency band 18-30 MHz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnik, V. N.; Rucker, H. O.; Konovalenko, A. A.; Shevchuk, N. V.; Abranin, E. P.; Dorovskyy, V. V.; Lecacheux, A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper deals with Type IIIb bursts, which were observed in the frequency band from 18 to 30 MHz. These bursts have fine frequency structures contrary to usual Type III bursts. The main properties of Type IIIb bursts such as number of striae in a burst, their frequency drift rates, durations, frequency widths of stria, emission fluxes are presented. It is also shown that parameters of stria bursts depend on the position of active areas on the solar disk.

  3. Enhanced effect of temporal variation of the fine-structure constant in diatomic molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V. V.

    2006-03-15

    We show that the relative effect of variation of the fine-structure constant in microwave transitions between very close and narrow rotational-hyperfine levels may be enhanced 2-3 orders of magnitude in diatomic molecules with unpaired electrons like LaS, LaO, LuS, LuO, YbF, and similar molecular ions. The enhancement is result of cancellation between the hyperfine and rotational intervals.

  4. Fine structures in the broadened line of distributed feedback lasers under high-speed direct modulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshikuni, Y.; Matsuoka, T.; Motosugi, G.; Yamanaka, N.

    1984-10-15

    Precise observation of the single longitudinal mode spectrum for distributed feeedback lasers revealed fine structures when the spectrum was broadened by high-speed modulation. A dynamic simulation can explain reasonably the above behavior if the model takes into account the carrier density modulation enhanced by the relaxation oscillation. In this letter, experimental results where both modulation depth and speed were varied are described along with a calculated result.

  5. Atomic oxygen fine-structure splittings with tunable far-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zink, Lyndon R.; Evenson, Kenneth M.; Matsushima, Fusakazu; Nelis, Thomas; Robinson, Ruth L.

    1991-01-01

    Fine-structure splittings of atomic oxygen (O-16) in the ground state have been accurately measured using a tunable far-infrared spectrometer. The 3P0-3pl splitting is 2,060,069.09 (10) MHz, and the 3Pl-3P2 splitting is 4,744,777.49 (16) MHz. These frequencies are important for measuring atomic oxygen concentration in earth's atmosphere and the interstellar medium.

  6. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2[times]1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16[plus minus]2[degree] from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94[plus minus]0.02[Angstrom]. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27[plus minus]0.04[Angstrom], up from 1.10[Angstrom] for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25[Angstrom] Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20[Angstrom] and 15--23[degrees]) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16[Angstrom] and 19[degrees]. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95[Angstrom] for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals' radius [approximately] 1.5 [Angstrom] for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2[times]2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS [chi](k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  7. Structural studies of molecular and metallic overlayers using angle- resolved photoemission extended fine structure

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Z.

    1992-10-01

    Angle-resolved photoemission extended fine structure (ARPEFS) was used to study molecular and metallic overlayers on metal surfaces through analysis of p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) and the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) adsorption. For the dense p2mg(2{times}1)CO/Ni(110) surface layer, photoemission intensities from C 1s level were measured in three directions at photoelectron kinetic energies 60-400 eV. Using multiple-scattering spherical-wave (MSSW) modeling, it was found that CO molecules are adsorbed on short-bridge sites, with adjacent CO along the [110] direction displaced alternatively in opposite directions towards the [001] azimuths to form a zigzag chain geometry. The tilt angle is 16{plus_minus}2{degree} from the surface normal for the direction linking the C atom and the center of the Ni bridge. The carbon C-Ni interatomic distance was determined to be 1.94{plus_minus}0.02{Angstrom}. The first- to second-layer spacing of Ni is 1.27{plus_minus}0.04{Angstrom}, up from 1.10{Angstrom} for the clean Ni(110) surface, but close to the 1.25{Angstrom} Ni interlayer spacing in the bulk. The C-O bond length and tilt angle were varied within small ranges (1.10--1.20{Angstrom} and 15--23{degrees}) in our MSSW simulations. Best agreement between experiment and simulations was achieved at 1.16{Angstrom} and 19{degrees}. This yields an O-O distance of 2.95{Angstrom} for the two nearest CO molecules, (van der Waals` radius {approximately} 1.5 {Angstrom} for oxygen). Two different partial-wave phase-shifts were used in MSSW, and structural results from both are in very good agreement. For the p(2{times}2)K/Ni(111) overlayer, ARPEFS {chi}(k) curves from K 1s level measured along [111] and [771] at 130K showed that the K atoms are preferentially adsorbed on the atop sites, in agreement with a LEED study of the same system.

  8. Multipoint MMS observations of fine-scale SAPS structure in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erickson, P. J.; Matsui, H.; Foster, J. C.; Torbert, R. B.; Ergun, R. E.; Khotyaintsev, Yu. V.; Lindqvist, P.-A.; Argall, M. R.; Farrugia, C. J.; Paulson, K. W.; Strangeway, R. J.; Magnes, W.

    2016-07-01

    We present detailed observations of dynamic, fine-scale inner magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling at ˜3.9 RE in the Region 2 Birkeland field-aligned current (FAC). We find that observed electrodynamic spatial/temporal scales are primarily characteristic of magnetically mapped ionospheric structure. On 15 September 2015, conjugate Magnetospheric Multiscale (MMS) spacecraft and Millstone Hill radar observations show plasmasphere boundary region subauroral polarization stream (SAPS) electric fields at L = 4.0-4.2 near 21 MLT. MMS observations reveal high-altitude ˜1 mV/m fine-scale radial and azimuthal electric field perturbations over ≤0.15 L with high spatial coherence over ≥2-3 min and show outward motion within a broader FAC of ˜0.12 μA/m2. Our analysis shows that MMS electric field fluctuations are most likely reflective of SAPS ionospheric structure at scales of ˜22 km and with ionospheric closure of small-scale filamentary FAC perturbations. The results highlight the ionosphere's importance in regulating fine-scale magnetosphere-ionosphere structure.

  9. Characterizing HII regions in High-z ULIRGs with far infrared fine structure lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brisbin, Drew; Ferkinhoff, Carl; Stacey, Gordon J.; Parshley, Stephen; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steve; Lamarche, Cody

    2015-01-01

    The nature of star-forming ULIRGs in the early Universe remains mysterious. Is their star formation fueled predominantly through cold flow accretion, or through major mergers? What fraction of the sources have AGN, and what is the stellar mass function powering the HII regions? Of particular importance to these questions is the characterization of the ionized gas properties, and the coupling with the cooler photodissociation region (PDR) gas. To address these issues we have undertaken a mini-survey of several z~1-2 luminous galaxies observed in multiple ionized oxygen far infrared fine structure lines. These fine structure lines allow us to constrain the density and radiation field of the ionized gas and test for the presence of harder AGN powered radiation. Coupled with previous data including the [CII] and [OI] fine structure lines emanating from PDR gas, we will also test the ability to simultaneously model both PDR and HII gas components. This survey, modest in extent, offers an illustrative snapshot of the diversity of systems in the early Universe.

  10. Helium induced fine structure in the electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets

    SciTech Connect

    Pentlehner, D.; Slenczka, A.

    2015-01-07

    Electronic spectra of organic molecules doped into superfluid helium nanodroplets show characteristic features induced by the helium environment. Besides a solvent induced shift of the electronic transition frequency, in many cases, a spectral fine structure can be resolved for electronic and vibronic transitions which goes beyond the expected feature of a zero phonon line accompanied by a phonon wing as known from matrix isolation spectroscopy. The spectral shape of the zero phonon line and the helium induced phonon wing depends strongly on the dopant species. Phonon wings, for example, are reported ranging from single or multiple sharp transitions to broad (Δν > 100 cm{sup −1}) diffuse signals. Despite the large number of example spectra in the literature, a quantitative understanding of the helium induced fine structure of the zero phonon line and the phonon wing is missing. Our approach is a systematic investigation of related molecular compounds, which may help to shed light on this key feature of microsolvation in superfluid helium droplets. This paper is part of a comparative study of the helium induced fine structure observed in electronic spectra of anthracene derivatives with particular emphasis on a spectrally sharp multiplet splitting at the electronic origin. In addition to previously discussed species, 9-cyanoanthracene and 9-chloroanthracene will be presented in this study for the first time.

  11. Effective collision strengths for fine-structure transitions in Si VII

    SciTech Connect

    Sossah, A. M.; Tayal, S. S.

    2014-05-20

    The effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of fine-structure transitions in Si VII are calculated as a function of electron temperature in the range 5000-2,000,000 K. The B-spline Breit-Pauli R-matrix method has been used to calculate collision strengths by electron impact. The target wave functions have been obtained using the multi-configuration Hartree-Fock method with term-dependent non-orthogonal orbitals. The 92 fine-structure levels belonging to the 46 LS states of 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 4}, 2s2p {sup 5}, 2p {sup 6}, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3s, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3p, 2s {sup 2}2p {sup 3}3d, and 2s2p {sup 4}3s configurations are included in our calculations of oscillator strengths and collision strengths. There are 4186 possible fine-structure allowed and forbidden transitions among the 92 levels. The present excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and collision strengths have been compared with previous theoretical results and available experimental data. Generally, a good agreement is found with the 6 LS-state close-coupling approximation results of Butler and Zeippen and the 44 LS-state distorted wave calculation of Bhatia and Landi.

  12. Strong limit on the spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le, T. D.

    2016-10-01

    Observed spectra of quasars provide a powerful tool to test the possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine-structure constant α = e 2/ћc over the history of the Universe. It is demonstrated that high sensitivity to the variation of α can be obtained from a comparison of the spectra of quasars and laboratories. We reported a new constraint on the variation of the fine-structure constant based on the analysis of the optical spectra of the fine-structure transitions in [NeIII], [NeV], [OIII], [OI] and [SII] multiplets from 14 Seyfert 1.5 galaxies. The weighted mean value of the α-variation derived from our analysis over the redshift range 0.035 < z < 0.281 Δα/α= (4.50 +/- 5.53) \\times 10-5. This result presents strong limit improvements on the constraint on Δα/α compared to the published in the literature

  13. Fine structure of the alloy-broadened thermal emission spectra from DX centers in GaAlAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calleja, E.; Gomez, A.; Muñoz, E.; Cámara, P.

    1988-05-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy in Si- and Sn-doped GaAlAs reveals a fine structure of the DX center thermal emission spectra under adequate filling pulse and sampling window times. This structure is reproducible in samples with Al mode fractions near 30% but it is not detectable in samples with 85% Al content. All resolved peaks of this fine structure have the same thermal emission energy but quite different capture cross section (σ∞n). This fact indicates that the origin of the fine structure and of the nonexponential behavior of the thermal emission processes is the discrete broadening of σ∞n due to the alloy effect.

  14. Fine-Scale Structure of the Moho From Receiver Functions: Effects of a Deforming Crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zandt, G.; Gilbert, H.; Ozacar, A.; Owens, T. J.

    2004-12-01

    Andrija Mohorovicic, a Croatian seismologist, is credited with the first estimation in 1906 of crustal thickness using the critically refracted phase Pn. The crust-mantle boundary has become commonly known as the Moho and its depth, structure, formation, and evolution remains an important research topic in seismology, petrology, and tectonics. Other seismic phases sensitive to Moho depth and structure are the converted phases Ps and Sp, and the associated 2p1s and 1p2s reverberation phases that are isolated in receiver function waveforms. With sufficient station coverage, multiple receiver functions can be migrated and stacked into cross-sections of the crust. Crustal cross-sections from tectonically active regions reveal dramatic variations in amplitude and frequency content of Moho phases that we associate with fine-scale structure, and possibly anisotropy at the crust-mantle boundary. The Moho amplitude or "brightness" is a measure of the crust-mantle impedance contrast, thickness and structure within the crust-mantle boundary, and effects of scattering from 3D structure. Processes directly related to these Moho structures include crustal thickening, crustal extension, crustal flow, delamination or convective removal, and eclogitization. Therefore, the fine-scale seismological structure of the Moho is an important constraint in regional tectonic reconstructions. Examples of receiver function crustal images and their tectonic implications from the western US, South American Andes, and the Tibetan plateau will be reviewed.

  15. Suppression of fine-structure splitting and oscillator strength of sodium D-line in a Debye plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Basu, Joyee Ray, Debasis

    2014-01-15

    We investigate theoretically the influence of static plasma screening on relativistic spin-orbit interaction-induced fine-structure splitting of the D-line doublet arising from the transitions 3p{sub 1/2}–3s{sub 1/2} and 3p{sub 3/2}–3s{sub 1/2} of the valence electron of a sodium atom embedded in a model plasma environment. The many-electron atomic problem is formulated first as an effective one-electron problem in which the interaction between the optically active valence electron and the atomic ion core is represented by an accurate parametric model potential including core-polarization correction, and then the plasma effect on the atomic system is simulated by the Debye-screening model for the valence-core interaction. It is observed that the magnitude of spin-orbit energy shift reduces for both the upper component 3p{sub 3/2} and the lower component 3p{sub 1/2} with increasing plasma screening strength, thereby reducing the spin-orbit energy separation between these two components as the screening becomes stronger. As a consequence, the magnitude of fine-structure splitting between the D{sub 1} and D{sub 2} line energies of sodium drops significantly with stronger plasma screening. The optical (absorption) oscillator strength for 3s → 3p transition is seen to reduce with stronger screening and this leads to a screening-induced gradual suppression of the 3p → 3s spontaneous decay rate.

  16. Fabrication of multi-layered absorption structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro

    2009-12-16

    We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered absorption structure for maximizing photon absorption in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive index values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An absorption measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.

  17. X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2009-07-09

    This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy, both X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray absorption spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.

  18. Quad-plane stereoscopic PIV for fine-scale structure measurements in turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naka, Y.; Tomita, K.; Shimura, M.; Fukushima, N.; Tanahashi, M.; Miyauchi, T.

    2016-05-01

    The fine-scale structure in turbulence is investigated by quad-plane stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (QPSPIV). The quad-plane consists of two each of different polarizations and wavelengths, and it provides three velocity components at four independent parallel planes. Measurements have been undertaken in the developed region of a turbulent round jet with a spatial resolution sufficient to capture the small-scale structures. The advantage of the QPSPIV is presented in terms of the spectral response in the evaluation of the out-of-plane velocity gradient. The full velocity gradient tensor is computed with a fourth-order finite difference scheme in the out-of-plane direction as well as the in-plane directions. The turbulence quantities, such as the vorticity components, the energy dissipation rate and the second and third invariants of the velocity gradient tensor, are computed according to their faithful definitions. The coherent fine-scale eddies are extracted from the present QPSPIV data. The probability density functions of the diameter and the maximum azimuthal velocity of the extracted eddies exhibit their peak at approximately 8η and 1.5u_k, respectively, where η and u_k are the Kolmogorov length and velocity. These values agree well with the data in the literature. The phase-averaged distributions of turbulence quantities around the coherent fine-scale eddy indicate an apparent elliptic feature around the axis. Furthermore, the state of the strain rate exerting the eddy is quantified from the phase-averaged distributions of eigenvalues of the strain rate tensor and the alignment of the corresponding eigenvectors against the axis. The present study gives a solid experimental support of the coherent fine-scale structures in turbulence, and the technique can be applied to various flow fields and to the higher Reynolds number condition.

  19. Fine-Tunable Absorption of Uniformly Aligned Polyurea Thin Films for Optical Filters Using Sequentially Self-Limited Molecular Layer Deposition.

    PubMed

    Park, Yi-Seul; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Hyein; Lee, Jin Seok

    2016-05-11

    Development of methods enabling the preparation of uniformly aligned polymer thin films at the molecular level is a prerequisite for realizing their optoelectronic characteristics as innovative materials; however, these methods often involve a compromise between scalability and accuracy. In this study, we have grown uniformly aligned polyurea thin films on a SiO2 substrate using molecular layer deposition (MLD) based on sequential and self-limiting surface reactions. By integrating plane-polarized Fourier-transform infrared, Raman spectroscopic tools, and density functional theory calculations, we demonstrated the uniform alignment of polyurea MLD films. Furthermore, the selective-wavelength absorption characteristics of thickness-controlled MLD films were investigated by integrating optical measurements and finite-difference time-domain simulations of reflection spectra, resulting from their thickness-dependent fine resonance with photons, which could be used as color filters in optoelectronics. PMID:27092573

  20. Rare Variation Facilitates Inferences of Fine-Scale Population Structure in Humans

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Timothy D.; Fu, Wenqing; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Logsdon, Benjamin; Auer, Paul; Carlson, Christopher S.; Leal, Suzanne M.; Smith, Joshua D.; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Akey, Joshua M.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic structure of human populations has important implications for the design and interpretation of disease mapping studies and reconstructing human evolutionary history. To date, inferences of human population structure have primarily been made with common variants. However, recent large-scale resequencing studies have shown an abundance of rare variation in humans, which may be particularly useful for making inferences of fine-scale population structure. To this end, we used an information theory framework and extensive coalescent simulations to rigorously quantify the informativeness of rare and common variation to detect signatures of fine-scale population structure. We show that rare variation affords unique insights into patterns of recent population structure. Furthermore, to empirically assess our theoretical findings, we analyzed high-coverage exome sequences in 6,515 European and African American individuals. As predicted, rare variants are more informative than common polymorphisms in revealing a distinct cluster of European–American individuals, and subsequent analyses demonstrate that these individuals are likely of Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry. Our results provide new insights into the population structure using rare variation, which will be an important factor to account for in rare variant association studies. PMID:25415970

  1. The fine structure of the axostyle and its associations with organelles in Trichomonads.

    PubMed

    Benchimol, M; Diniz, J A; Ribeiro, K

    2000-04-01

    The fine structure of the axostyle in the protists Tritrichomonas foetus and Monocercomonas sp is described using transmission electron microscopy after quick-freezing techniques and immunocytochemistry. The axostyle microtubules presents a lateral projection formed by two protofilaments in addition to the 13 protofilaments normally found in microtubules. The axostyle is associated with other cell structures such as hydrogenosomes, endoplasmic reticulum, sigmoid filaments and glycogen particles. The microtubules of the pelta-axostylar system are connected to each other by bridges regularly spaced with an interval of 9 nm. Labeling of the axostyle was observed after cell incubation with monoclonal antibodies recognizing alpha-tubulin and acetylated-tubulin.

  2. Electronic structure and optical properties of CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures from X-ray absorption near edge structure, X-ray excited optical luminescence, and density functional theory investigations

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, M. W.; Yiu, Y. M. Sham, T. K.; Ward, M. J.; Liu, L.; Hu, Y.; Zapien, J. A.; Liu, Yingkai

    2014-11-21

    The electronic structure and optical properties of a series of iso-electronic and iso-structural CdS{sub x}Se{sub 1−x} solid solution nanostructures have been investigated using X-ray absorption near edge structure, extended X-ray absorption fine structure, and X-ray excited optical luminescence at various absorption edges of Cd, S, and Se. It is found that the system exhibits compositions, with variable local structure in-between that of CdS and CdSe accompanied by tunable optical band gap between that of CdS and CdSe. Theoretical calculation using density functional theory has been carried out to elucidate the observations. It is also found that luminescence induced by X-ray excitation shows new optical channels not observed previously with laser excitation. The implications of these observations are discussed.

  3. Fine Structure of the Eggshell of the Blow Fly, Lucilia cuprina

    PubMed Central

    Sukontason, Kabkaew L.; Bunchu, Nophawan; Chaiwong, Tarinee; Kuntalue, Budsabong; Sukontason, Kom

    2007-01-01

    The fine structure of the eggshell of blow fly, Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann) (Diptera: Calliphoridae), was examined using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Eggs, 1.09±0.07 mm in length and 0.25±0.05 mm in width, bore a relatively wide plastron that extending along almost the entire length. The polygonal pattern of chorionic sculpture was indistinct. The ultrathin section indicated a multi-layered eggshell having an exochorion, outer endochorion, pillars, an inner endochorion, innermost chorionic layer, and a wax layer. This study provides new information about the fine morphology of blow flies eggs. A key to differentiate the eggs of forensically important flies in Thailand is given. PMID:20334590

  4. The Effect of Quantum-Mechanical Interference on Precise Measurements of the n = 2 Triplet P Fine Structure of Helium

    SciTech Connect

    Marsman, A.; Horbatsch, M.; Hessels, E. A.

    2015-09-15

    For many decades, improvements in both theory and experiment of the fine structure of the n = 2 triplet P levels of helium have allowed for an increasingly precise determination of the fine-structure constant. Recently, it has been observed that quantum-mechanical interference between neighboring resonances can cause significant shifts, even if such neighboring resonances are separated by thousands of natural widths. The shifts depend in detail on the experimental method used for the measurement, as well as the specific experimental parameters employed. Here, we review how these shifts apply for the most precise measurements of the helium 2{sup 3}P fine-structure intervals.

  5. Fine-scale spatial genetic structure of common and declining bumble bees across an agricultural landscape

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Stephanie; Redhead, John W; Warren, Ian A; Bourke, Andrew F G; Heard, Matthew S; Jordan, William C; Sumner, Seirian; Wang, Jinliang; Carvell, Claire

    2014-01-01

    Land-use changes have threatened populations of many insect pollinators, including bumble bees. Patterns of dispersal and gene flow are key determinants of species' ability to respond to land-use change, but have been little investigated at a fine scale (<10 km) in bumble bees. Using microsatellite markers, we determined the fine-scale spatial genetic structure of populations of four common Bombus species (B. terrestris, B. lapidarius, B. pascuorum and B. hortorum) and one declining species (B. ruderatus) in an agricultural landscape in Southern England, UK. The study landscape contained sown flower patches representing agri-environment options for pollinators. We found that, as expected, the B. ruderatus population was characterized by relatively low heterozygosity, number of alleles and colony density. Across all species, inbreeding was absent or present but weak (FIS = 0.01–0.02). Using queen genotypes reconstructed from worker sibships and colony locations estimated from the positions of workers within these sibships, we found that significant isolation by distance was absent in B. lapidarius, B. hortorum and B. ruderatus. In B. terrestris and B. pascuorum, it was present but weak; for example, in these two species, expected relatedness of queens founding colonies 1 m apart was 0.02. These results show that bumble bee populations exhibit low levels of spatial genetic structure at fine spatial scales, most likely because of ongoing gene flow via widespread queen dispersal. In addition, the results demonstrate the potential for agri-environment scheme conservation measures to facilitate fine-scale gene flow by creating a more even distribution of suitable habitats across landscapes. PMID:24980963

  6. Fine-scale genetic structure in populations of the Chagas' disease vector Triatoma infestans (Hemiptera, Reduvidae).

    PubMed

    Pérez de Rosas, Alicia R; Segura, Elsa L; Fusco, Octavio; Guiñazú, Adolfo L Bareiro; García, Beatriz A

    2013-03-01

    Fine scale patterns of genetic structure and dispersal in Triatoma infestans populations from Argentina was analysed. A total of 314 insects from 22 domestic and peridomestic sites from the locality of San Martín (Capayán department, Catamarca province) were typed for 10 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The results confirm subdivision of T. infestans populations with restricted dispersal among sampling sites and suggest inbreeding and/or stratification within the different domestic and peridomestic structures. Spatial correlation analysis showed that the scale of structuring is approximately of 400 m, indicating that active dispersal would occur within this distance range. It was detected difference in scale of structuring among sexes, with females dispersing over greater distances than males. This study suggests that insecticide treatment and surveillance should be extended within a radius of 400 m around the infested area, which would help to reduce the probability of reinfestation by covering an area of active dispersal. The inferences made from fine-scale spatial genetic structure analyses of T. infestans populations has demonstrated to be important for community-wide control programs, providing a complementary approach to help improve vector control strategies.

  7. PLUTONIUM CONTAMINATION VALENCE STATE DETERMINATION USING X-RAY ABSORPTION FINE STRUCTURE PERMITS CONCRETE RECYCLE

    SciTech Connect

    Ervin, P. F.; Conradson, S. D.

    2002-02-25

    This paper describes the determination of the speciation of plutonium contamination present on concrete surfaces at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS). At RFETS, the plutonium processing facilities have been contaminated during multiple events over their 50 year operating history. Contamination has resulted from plutonium fire smoke, plutonium fire fighting water, milling and lathe operation aerosols, furnace operations vapors and plutonium ''dust'' diffusion.

  8. Speciation of arsenic in pyrite by micro-X-ray absorption fine- structure spectroscopy (XAFS)

    SciTech Connect

    Paktunc, D.

    2008-09-30

    Pyrite (FeS2) often contains variable levels of arsenic, regardless of the environment of formation. Arsenian pyrite has been reported in coals, sediments and ore deposits. Arsenian pyrite having As concentrations of up to 10 wt % in sedimentary rocks (Kolker et al. 1997), about 10 wt% in gold deposits (Fleet et al. 1993), 12 wt % in a refractory gold ore (Paktunc et al. 2006) and 20 wt % in a Carlin-type gold deposit in Nevada (Reich et al. 2005) have been reported. Arsenian pyrite is the carrier of gold in hydrothermal Carlin-type gold deposits, and gold concentrations of up to 0.9 wt % have been reported (Reich et al. 2005; Paktunc et al. 2006). In general, high Au concentrations correlate with As-rich zones in pyrite (Paktunc et al. 2006). Pyrite often ends up in mining and metallurgical wastes as an unwanted mineral and consititutes one of the primary sources of As in the wastes. Arsenic can be readily released to the environment due to rapid oxidative dissolution of host pyrite under atmospheric conditions. Pyrite is also the primary source of arsenic in emissions and dust resulting from combustion of bituminous coals. Despite the importance of arsenian pyrite as a primary source of anthropogenic arsenic in the environment and its economic significance as the primary carrier of gold in Carlin-type gold deposits, our understanding of the nature of arsenic in pyrite is limited. There are few papers dealing with the mode of occurrence of arsenic by bulk XAFS in a limited number of pyrite-bearing samples. The present study documents the analysis of pyrite particles displaying different morphologies and a range of arsenic and gold concentrations to determine the nature and speciation of arsenic.

  9. Sulphur speciation in bitumens and asphaltenes by X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasrai, Masoud; Bancroft, G. Michael; Brunner, Roger W.; Jonasson, Ralph G.; Brown, James R.; Tan, Kim H.; Feng, Xinghong

    1994-07-01

    The S L-edge and K-edge XANES spectra were collected on bitumen and asphaltene samples as well as model compounds in order to determine the feasibility of monitoring transformations of organic sulphur in bitumen during genesis, processing, and upgrading. Using the spectra of model compounds as fingerprints, it was possible to speciate the sulphur forms in bitumen and asphaltene. The reduced form of sulphur such as thiophenes are the predominant form of sulphur in the bitumen and asphaltene samples analyzed. No significant amounts of oxidized sulphur forms could be detected. Spectra collected using total electron yield and fluorescence yield were identical, confirming that there is no preferential partitioning at the bitumen/air interface, or oxidation during sample handling. Also important was the finding that bitumen could be analyzed at moderately high vacuum (10 -8 torr). Thus XANES represents a rapid, nondestructive mean of characterizing specific classes of compounds in complex matrices, such as bitumen.

  10. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe− using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm−1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe− were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm−1 accuracy. PMID:27138292

  11. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-05-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe‑ using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm‑1 or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe‑ were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm‑1 accuracy.

  12. Accurate Electron Affinity of Iron and Fine Structures of Negative Iron ions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaolin; Luo, Zhihong; Li, Jiaming; Ning, Chuangang

    2016-01-01

    Ionization potential (IP) is defined as the amount of energy required to remove the most loosely bound electron of an atom, while electron affinity (EA) is defined as the amount of energy released when an electron is attached to a neutral atom. Both IP and EA are critical for understanding chemical properties of an element. In contrast to accurate IPs and structures of neutral atoms, EAs and structures of negative ions are relatively unexplored, especially for the transition metal anions. Here, we report the accurate EA value of Fe and fine structures of Fe(-) using the slow electron velocity imaging method. These measurements yield a very accurate EA value of Fe, 1235.93(28) cm(-1) or 153.236(34) meV. The fine structures of Fe(-) were also successfully resolved. The present work provides a reliable benchmark for theoretical calculations, and also paves the way for improving the EA measurements of other transition metal atoms to the sub cm(-1) accuracy. PMID:27138292

  13. Coarse-fine vertical scanning based optical profiler for structured surface measurement with large step height

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yi; Liu, Xiaojun; Lei, Zili; Li, Qian; Yang, Xiao; Chen, Liangzhou; Lu, Wenlong

    2015-02-01

    White light interference (WLI) optical profiler had been used widely for structured surface measurement. To achieve high measuring accuracy, piezoelectric ceramic (PZT) was usually used as the vertical scanning unit, which was normally less than 100um and only for small range structured surface measurement. With the development of advanced manufacturing technology, precision structured surfaces with large step height were appearing. To satisfy the measurement requirements of this kind of precision structured surfaces, WLI optical profiler with large range had to be developed. In this paper, an optical profiler was proposed, in which a coarse-fine vertical scanning system was adopted to expand its measurement range to 10mm while its resolution still at nanometer level.

  14. Lack of sex-biased dispersal promotes fine-scale genetic structure in alpine ungulates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roffler, Gretchen H.; Talbot, Sandra L.; Luikart, Gordon; Sage, George K.; Pilgrim, Kristy L.; Adams, Layne G.; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns of fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations can advance understanding of critical ecological processes such as dispersal and gene flow across heterogeneous landscapes. Alpine ungulates generally exhibit high levels of genetic structure due to female philopatry and patchy configuration of mountain habitats. We assessed the spatial scale of genetic structure and the amount of gene flow in 301 Dall’s sheep (Ovis dalli dalli) at the landscape level using 15 nuclear microsatellites and 473 base pairs of the mitochondrial (mtDNA) control region. Dall’s sheep exhibited significant genetic structure within contiguous mountain ranges, but mtDNA structure occurred at a broader geographic scale than nuclear DNA within the study area, and mtDNA structure for other North American mountain sheep populations. No evidence of male-mediated gene flow or greater philopatry of females was observed; there was little difference between markers with different modes of inheritance (pairwise nuclear DNA F ST = 0.004–0.325; mtDNA F ST = 0.009–0.544), and males were no more likely than females to be recent immigrants. Historical patterns based on mtDNA indicate separate northern and southern lineages and a pattern of expansion following regional glacial retreat. Boundaries of genetic clusters aligned geographically with prominent mountain ranges, icefields, and major river valleys based on Bayesian and hierarchical modeling of microsatellite and mtDNA data. Our results suggest that fine-scale genetic structure in Dall’s sheep is influenced by limited dispersal, and structure may be weaker in populations occurring near ancestral levels of density and distribution in continuous habitats compared to other alpine ungulates that have experienced declines and marked habitat fragmentation.

  15. Boron carbide: Consistency of components, lattice parameters, fine structure and chemical composition makes the complex structure reasonable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werheit, Helmut

    2016-10-01

    The complex, highly distorted structure of boron carbide is composed of B12 and B11C icosahedra and CBC, CBB and B□B linear elements, whose concentration depends on the chemical composition each. These concentrations are shown to be consistent with lattice parameters, fine structure data and chemical composition. The respective impacts on lattice parameters are estimated and discussed. Considering the contributions of the different structural components to the energy of the overall structure makes the structure and its variation within the homogeneity range reasonable; in particular that of B4.3C representing the carbon-rich limit of the homogeneity range. Replacing in B4.3C virtually the B□B components by CBC yields the hypothetical moderately distorted B4.0C (structure formula (B11C)CBC). The reduction of lattice parameters related is compatible with recently reported uncommonly prepared single crystals, whose compositions deviate from B4.3C.

  16. Global investigation of the fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Shevchenko, A.; Burda, O.; Kalmykov, Y.; Neumann-Cosel, P. von; Ponomarev, V. Yu.; Richter, A.; Wambach, J.; Carter, J.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Foertsch, S. V.; Lawrie, J. J.; Neveling, R.; Smit, F. D.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; Lacroix, D.

    2009-04-15

    Fine structure in the region of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance (ISGQR) in {sup 58}Ni, {sup 89}Y, {sup 90}Zr, {sup 120}Sn, {sup 166}Er, and {sup 208}Pb has been observed in high-energy-resolution ({delta}E{sub 1/2}{approx_equal}35-50 keV) inelastic proton scattering measurements at E{sub 0}=200 MeV at iThemba LABS. Calculations of the corresponding quadrupole excitation strength functions performed within models based on the random-phase approximation (RPA) reveal similar fine structure when the mixing of one-particle one-hole states with two-particle two-hole states is taken into account. A detailed comparison of the experimental data is made with results from the quasiparticle-phonon model (QPM) and the extended time-dependent Hartree-Fock (ETDHF) method. For {sup 208}Pb, additional theoretical results from second RPA and the extended theory of finite Fermi systems (ETFFS) are discussed. A continuous wavelet analysis of the experimental and the calculated spectra is used to extract dominant scales characterizing the fine structure. Although the calculations agree with qualitative features of these scales, considerable differences are found between the model and experimental results and amongst different models. Within the framework of the QPM and ETDHF calculations it is possible to decompose the model spaces into subspaces approximately corresponding to different damping mechanisms. It is demonstrated that characteristic scales mainly arise from the collective coupling of the ISGQR to low-energy surface vibrations.

  17. Fine Structure in the Mm-Wavelength Spectra of the Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawant, H. S.; Cecatto, J. R.

    1990-11-01

    RESUMEN. Faltan observaciones solares espectrosc6picas en la longitud de onda milimetrica. Hay sugerencias de que se puede superponer una fi na estructura en frecuencia a la componente-S de la regi6n solar activa, asi como a la componente del brote en las longitudes de onda milimetri- cas. Se ha desarrollado un receptor de alta sensibilidad de pasos de frecuencia que opera en el intervalo de 23-18 GHz con una resoluci6n de 1 GHz y resoluci6n de tiempo variable entre 1.2 y 96 sec, usando la an- tena de Itapetinga de 13.7-m para estudiar la estructura fina en frecuencia y tiempo. Discutimos el espectro en longitud de onda-mm en re- giones activas y su evoluci6n en el tiempo. El estudio de Ia evoluci6n en el tiempo de la regi6n activa en AR 5569 observada el 29 de junio de 1989, sugiere la existencia de estructuras finas como funci6n deltiempo. ABSTRACT. There is a lack of mm-wavelength spectroscopic solar observations. There are suggestions that a fine structure in frequency may be superimposed on the S-component of solar active region as well as on the burst component at inm-wavelengths. To study fine structure in frequency and time, a high sensitivity step frequency receiver operating in the frequency range 23-18 GHz with frequency resolution of 1 GHz and variable time resolution 1.2 to 96 sec, using 13.7 m diameter Itapetinga radome covered antenna, has been developed. Here, we discuss mm-wavelength spectra of active regions and their time evolution. Study of time evolution of an active region AR 5569 observed on 29th June, 1989 suggests existence of fine structures as a function of time. ( Ck : SUN-ACTIVITY - SUN-RADIO RADIATION

  18. Observation of a straight-line wind case caused by a gust front and its associated fine-scale structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Wanqing; Xu, Xin; Wang, Yuan

    2014-12-01

    A straight-line wind case was observed in Tianjin on 13 June 2005, which was caused by a gust front from a squall line. Mesoscale analyses based on observations from in-situ surface stations, sounding, and in-situ radar as well as fine-scale analyses based on observation tower data were performed. The mesoscale characteristics of the gust front determined its shape and fine-scale internal structures. Based on the scale and wavelet analyses, the fine-scale structures within the gust front were distinguished from the classical mesoscale structures, and such fine-scale structures were associated with the distribution of straight-line wind zones. A series of cross-frontal fine-scale circulations at the lowest levels of the gust front was discovered, which caused a relatively weak wind zone within the frontal strong wind zone. The downdraft at the rear of the head region of the gust front was more intense than in the classical model, and similar to the microburst, a series of vertical vortices propagated from the rear region to the frontal region. In addition, strong tangential fine-scale instability was detected in the frontal region. Finally, a fine-scale gust front model with straight-line wind zones is presented.

  19. Study of microscopic structure of porous media - fine coal filter cakes

    SciTech Connect

    Kakwani, R.M.

    1983-01-01

    The macroscopic properties of the porous media, e.g., permeability, capillary pressure, relative permeability, depend upon the microscopic structure of the porous medium. In the coal preparation plants, the filtration and dewatering rates of the fine coal filter cakes are important in determining the final moisture content. The microscopic structure of the porous coal filter cakes plays an important role in these operations. Moreover, the two phase flow through the porous medium can be explained in detail by considering its pore structure. Hence, the development of a technique for the micro-structural analysis of unconsolidated coal filter cakes is investigated. The technique developed is also applicable to many consolidated porous media like sandstones, rocks, etc. Optical methods were utilized to study the micro-structure of fine coal cakes. The investigation of -32 mesh Pittsburgh seam coal cakes reveals a non-uniform structure at low solid concentration of 0.33 kg coal/kg water. An increase in the solid concentration in the slurry produces a more uniform structure with an increase in the filtration and dewatering rates. It was found that coal filter cakes are incompressible over the range of 28 to 67 kPa applied vacuum. An important aspect of this work was to provide quantitative information about the presence of air bubbles in the coal filter cakes. These air bubbles are evolved from the aerated slurry and they reduce the filtration rates. A linear correlation between the particle and pore size distribution of -32 mesh Pittsburgh coal was found.

  20. Fine-structure splittings in high-lying {sup 2}F states of rubidium via three-step laser spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, J. R.; Malyshev, G. S.

    2010-03-15

    Three-step laser spectroscopy has been used to measure six additional fine-structure splittings in the n {sup 2}F states of {sup 87}Rb for 11{<=}n{<=}16. When combined with our previous measurements for 4{<=}n{<=}10, they constitute a continuous sequence of 13 measurements suitable for comparison to fine-structure calculations in heavy alkali-metal atoms where relativistic effects, core polarization, configuration mixing, and electron correlation are important.

  1. Fine structure of transient waves in a random medium: The correlation and spectral density functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenzel, Alan R.

    1994-01-01

    This is essentially a progress report on a theoretical investigation of the propagation of transient waves in a random medium. The emphasis in this study is on applications to sonic-boom propagation, particularly as regards the effect of atmospheric turbulence on the sonic-boom waveform. The analysis is general, however, and is applicable to other types of waves besides sonic-boom waves. The phenomenon of primary concern in this investigation is the fine structure of the wave. A figure is used to illustrate what is meant by finestructure.

  2. Enhanced Laboratory Sensitivity to Variation of the Fine-Structure Constant using Highly Charged Ions

    SciTech Connect

    Berengut, J. C.; Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.

    2010-09-17

    We study atomic systems that are in the frequency range of optical atomic clocks and have enhanced sensitivity to potential time variation of the fine-structure constant {alpha}. The high sensitivity is due to coherent contributions from three factors: high nuclear charge Z, high ionization degree, and significant differences in the configuration composition of the states involved. Configuration crossing keeps the frequencies in the optical range despite the large ionization energies. We discuss a few promising examples that have the largest {alpha} sensitivities seen in atomic systems.

  3. Origin of fine structure in si photoelectron spectra at silicon surfaces and interfaces.

    PubMed

    Yazyev, Oleg V; Pasquarello, Alfredo

    2006-04-21

    Using a first-principles approach, we investigate the origin of the fine structure in Si 2p photoelectron spectra at the Si(100)-(2 x 1) surface and at the Si(100)-SiO2 interface. Calculated and measured shifts show very good agreement for both systems. By using maximally localized Wannier functions, we clearly identify the shifts resulting from the electronegativity of second-neighbor atoms. The other shifts are then found to be proportional to the average bond-length variation around the Si atom. Hence, in combination with accurate modeling, photoelectron spectroscopy can provide a direct measure of the strain field at the atomic scale.

  4. Coupled-channels study of fine structure in the {alpha} decay of well deformed nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Ni Dongdong; Ren Zhongzhou

    2011-06-15

    We formulate a theoretical model for the {alpha} decay of well-deformed even-even nuclei based on the coupled-channel Schroedinger equation. The {alpha}-decay half-lives and fine structures observed in {alpha} decay are well described by the five-channel microscopic calculations. Since the branching ratios to high-spin states are hard to understand in the traditional {alpha}-decay theories, this success could be important to interpret future observations of heavier nuclei. It is also found that the {alpha} transition to high-spin states is a powerful tool to probe the energy spectrum and deformation of daughter nuclei.

  5. The fine structure of the sperm of the round goby (Neogobius melanostomus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Jeffrey D.; Walker, Glenn K.; Nichols, Susan J.; Sorenson, Dorothy

    2004-01-01

    The fine structural details of the spermatozoon of the round goby are presented for the first time in this study. Scanning and transmission electron microscopic examination of testis reveals an anacrosomal spermatozoon with a slightly elongate head and uniformly compacted chromatin. The midpiece contains a single, spherical mitochondrion. Two perpendicularly oriented centrioles lie in a deep, eccentric nuclear fossa with no regularly observed connection to the nucleus. The flagellum develops bilateral fins soon after emerging from the fossa; each extends approximately 1 A?m from the axoneme and persists nearly the length of the flagellum.

  6. On the fine-structure constant in a plasma model of the fluctuating vacuum substratum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cragin, B. L.

    1986-01-01

    The existence of an intimate connection between the quivering motion of electrons and positrons (Zitterbewegung), predicted by the Dirac equation, and the zero-point fluctuations of the vacuum is suggested. The nature of the proposed connection is discussed quantitatively, and an approximate self-consistency relation is derived, supplying a purely mathematical expression that relates the dimensionless coupling strengths (fine-structure constants) alpha sub e and alpha sub g of electromagnetism and gravity. These considerations provide a tentative explanation for the heretofore puzzling number 1/alpha sub e of about 137.036 and suggest that attempts to unify gravity with the electroweak and strong interactions will ultimately prove successful.

  7. Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant in the Spacetime of a Cosmic Domain Wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campanelli, L.; Cea, P.; Tedesco, L.

    The gravitational field produced by a domain wall acts as a medium with spacetime-dependent permittivity ɛ. Therefore, the fine structure constant α=e2/4πɛ will be a time-dependent function at fixed position. The most stringent constraint on the time-variation of α comes from the natural reactor Oklo and gives |˙ α /α | < few × 10-17 yr-1. This limit constrains the tension of a cosmic domain wall to be less than σ ≲ 10-2 MeV3, and then represents the most severe limit on the energy density of a cosmic wall stretching our Universe.

  8. Electronic fine structure in the electron-hole plasma in SrB6

    PubMed

    Rodriguez; Weht; Pickett

    2000-04-24

    Electron-hole mixing-induced fine structure in alkaline earth hexaborides leads to lower energy (temperature) scales, and thus a stronger tendency toward an excitonic instability than in their doped counterparts (viz. Ca1-xLaxB6, x approximately 0.005), which are high-Curie-temperature, small-moment ferromagnets. Comparison of Fermi surfaces and spectral distributions with de Haas-van Alphen, optical, transport, and tunneling data indicates that SrB6 remains a fermionic semimetal down to (at least) 5 K, rather than forming an excitonic condensate. For the doped system the Curie temperature is higher than the degeneracy temperature.

  9. Time evolution of the fine structure constant in a two-field quintessence model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bento, M. C.; Bertolami, O.; Santos, N. M.

    2004-11-01

    We examine the variation of the fine structure constant in the context of a two-field quintessence model. We find that, for solutions that lead to a transient late period of accelerated expansion, it is possible to fit the data arising from quasar spectra and comply with the bounds on the variation of α from the Oklo reactor, meteorite analysis, atomic clock measurements, cosmic microwave background radiation, and big bang nucleosynthesis. That is more difficult if we consider solutions corresponding to a late period of permanent accelerated expansion.

  10. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Sanvito, Simona; Victoria-Cota, Nelva; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis; Gendron, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009) of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05) were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1) a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2) a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area) were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population. PMID:23505485

  11. Fine-scale population structure of blue whale wintering aggregations in the Gulf of California.

    PubMed

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Sanvito, Simona; Victoria-Cota, Nelva; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis; Gendron, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988-2009) of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1-0.001, p>0.05) were found. We ran two bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1) a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2) a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area) were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population.

  12. Fine-Scale Population Structure of Blue Whale Wintering Aggregations in the Gulf of California

    PubMed Central

    Costa-Urrutia, Paula; Sanvito, Simona; Victoria-Cota, Nelva; Enríquez-Paredes, Luis; Gendron, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Population differentiation in environments without well-defined geographical barriers represents a challenge for wildlife management. Based on a comprehensive database of individual sighting records (1988–2009) of blue whales from the winter/calving Gulf of California, we assessed the fine-scale genetic and spatial structure of the population using individual-based approaches. Skin samples of 187 individuals were analyzed for nine microsatellite loci. A single population with no divergence among years and months and no isolation by distance (Rxy = 0.1–0.001, p>0.05) were found. We ran two Bayesian clustering methods using Structure and Geneland softwares in two different ways: 1) a general analysis including all individuals in which a single cluster was identified with both softwares; 2) a specific analysis of females only in which two main clusters (Loreto Bay and northern areas, and San Jose-La Paz Bay area) were revealed by Geneland program. This study provides information indicating that blue whales wintering in the Gulf of California are part of a single population unit and showed a fine-scale structure among females, possibly associated with their high site fidelity, particularly when attending calves. It is likely that the loss of genetic variation is minimized by male mediated gene flow, which may reduce the genetic drift effect. Opportunities for kin selection may also influence calf survival and, in consequence, have a positive impact on population demography in this small and endangered population. PMID:23505485

  13. Features of sound propagation in the ocean with fine-structure inhomogeneities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gostev, V. S.; Mikryukov, A. V.; Popov, O. E.

    2016-09-01

    We analyze the results of an experiment using an explosive sound source in the tropical part of the Indian Ocean. We consider the time structure of sound signals in geometric shadow zones to a distance of 270 km and the scheme of how the sound field in the shadow zone is formed by rays reflected from horizontally extended fine-structured sound velocity layers. From the results of calculation using a wave program that realizes the method of psuedodifferential parabolic equations, we analyze the influence of signal scattering by fine-structure sound velocity inhomogeneities on the sound field distribution in a waveguide. We show that the field formed by spots of light in each of the shadow zones is generated by a regular field and propagates in parallel to it, taking energy from the regular zone in the near field and in each subsequent convergence zone. This mechanism causes an additional decrease in the field in illuminated zones, which can be interpreted as additional attenuation of the regular sound field.

  14. Fine structure in sup 14 C emission from sup 223 Ra and sup 224 Ra

    SciTech Connect

    Hourani, E.; Rosier, L.; Berrier-Ronsin, G.; Elayi, A.; Mueller, A.C.; Rappenecker, G.; Rotbard, G.; Renou, G.; Liebe, A.; Stab, L. ); Ravn, H.L. )

    1991-10-01

    The measurement of the energy spectrum of {sup 14}C nuclei emitted in the spontaneous radioactivity of {sup 223}Ra and {sup 224}Ra has been carried out, using thin and intense sources (480 MBq for {sup 223}Ra and 3550 MBq for {sup 224}Ra). The sources were obtained by implanting mass-separated beams into Al and vitreous C catchers. The measurement was performed with a superconducting solenoidal spectrometer. Our discovery, previously reported, of fine structure in the energy spectrum of {sup 14}C emission from {sup 223}Ra, which is analogous to the one known for {alpha} emission, is confirmed. Only 13% of the branching ratio in {sup 14}C decay leads to the ground state of the residual nucleus, while 81% to the first excited state. For {sup 14}C emission from {sup 224}Ra, a lower limit of 2 for the hindrance factor has been measured for the transition to the first excited state in the residual nucleus. Also, a precise identification in {ital Z} with an {ital E}{times}{Delta}{ital E} telescope has been performed for the radiation from the {sup 223}Ra source. Our measurements of fine structure in {sup 14}C emissions open this field to nuclear structure studies.

  15. Position-sensitive change in the transition metal L-edge fine structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gulec, Ahmet; Phillips, Patrick J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2015-10-05

    Studying the structure and composition of solid-state materials on the atomic scale has become nearly routine in transmission electron microscopy with the development of novel electron optics and electron sources. In particular, with spatial resolutions better than 0.1 nm and energy resolution smaller than 100 meV, the stoichiometry, bonding, and coordination can now be examined on similar scales. Aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) have played a crucial role in identifying charge ordering, valence, and as spin state transitions in transition metal perovskite oxides. In this letter, we investigate the effects of ever-decreasing electron-probe sizes on the measured near-edge fine-structure of the transition metal core-loss edge using EELS. We find that for certain transition metal perovskites, the position of the electron probe with respect to the atomic column is crucial in determining the correct valence state. Several reasons for the observed position-sensitive EELS fine-structure are discussed.

  16. Reexamining X-mode suppression and fine structure in artificial E region field-aligned plasma density irregularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miceli, R. J.; Hysell, D. L.; Munk, J.; McCarrick, M.; Huba, J. D.

    2013-09-01

    Artificial field-aligned plasma density irregularities (FAIs) were generated in the E region of the ionosphere above the High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program facility during campaigns in May and August of 2012 and observed using a 30 MHz coherent scatter radar imager in Homer, Alaska. The purpose of this ionospheric modification experiment was to measure the threshold pump power required to excite thermal parametric instabilities by O-mode heating and to investigate the suppression of the FAIs by simultaneous X-mode heating. We find that the threshold pump power for irregularity excitation was consistent with theoretical predictions and increased by approximately a factor of 2 when X-mode heating was present. A modified version of the Another Model of the Ionosphere (SAMI2) ionospheric model was used to simulate the threshold experiments and suggested that the increase was entirely due to enhanced D region absorption associated with X-mode heating. Additionally, a remarkable degree of fine structure possibly caused by natural gradient drift instability in the heater-modified volume was observed in experiments performed during geomagnetically active conditions.

  17. Probing Warm Dense Matter electronic structure using X-ray absorption Near Edge Spectroscopy (XANES)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benuzzi Mounaix, Alessandra

    2011-06-01

    The behavior and physical properties of warm dense matter, fundamental for various branches of physics including planetology and Inertial Confinement Fusion, are non trivial to simulate either theoretically, numerically or experimentally. Despite important progress obtained in the last decade on macroscopic characterization (e.g. equations of state), microscopic studies are today necessary to investigate finely the WDM structure changes, the phase transitions and to test physical hypothesis and approximations commonly used in calculations. In this work, highly compressed aluminum has been investigated with the aim of bringing information on the evolution of its electronic structure by using K-edge shift and XANES. The experiment was performed at LULI laboratory where we used one long pulse (500 ps, IL ~ 8 1013 W/cm2) to create a uniform shock and a second ps beam (IL ~ 1017 W/cm2) to generate an ultra-short broadband X-ray source near the Al K-edge. The spectra were registered by using two conical KAP Bragg crystals. The main target was designed to probe the Aluminum in reshocked conditions allowing us to probe and to test theories in an extreme regime up to now unexplored (ρ ~ 3 ρ0 and T ~ 8 eV). The hydrodynamical Al conditions were measured by using VISARs interferometers and self-emission diagnostics. By increasing the delay between the two beams, we have been able to observe the modification of absorption spectra for unloading Al conditions (ρ >= 0.5 g/cc), and to put in evidence the relocalization of the 3p valence electrons occurring in the metal-non metal transition. All data have been compared to ab initio and dense plasma calculations.

  18. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure Arises during Range Expansion of an Invasive Gecko

    PubMed Central

    Short, Kristen Harfmann; Petren, Kenneth

    2011-01-01

    Processes of range expansion are increasingly important in light of current concerns about invasive species and range shifts due to climate change. Theoretical studies suggest that genetic structuring may occur during range expansion. Ephemeral genetic structure can have important evolutionary implications, such as propagating genetic changes along the wave front of expansion, yet few studies have shown evidence of such structure. We tested the hypothesis that genetic structure arises during range expansion in Hemidactylus mabouia, a nocturnal African gecko recently introduced to Florida, USA. Twelve highly variable microsatellite loci were used to screen 418 individuals collected from 43 locations from four sampling sites across Florida, representing a gradient from earlier (∼1990s) to very recent colonization. We found earlier colonized locations had little detectable genetic structure and higher allelic richness than more recently colonized locations. Genetic structuring was pronounced among locations at spatial scales of tens to hundreds of meters near the leading edge of range expansion. Despite the rapid pace of range expansion in this introduced gecko, dispersal is limited among many suitable habitat patches. Fine-scale genetic structure is likely the result of founder effects during colonization of suitable habitat patches. It may be obscured over time and by scale-dependent modes of dispersal. Further studies are needed to determine if such genetic structure affects adaptation and trait evolution in range expansions and range shifts. PMID:22053186

  19. Structure and magnetic properties of Nd2Fe14B fine particles produced by spark erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, H.; Berkowitz, A. E.

    1994-11-01

    At present Nd2Fe14B is the best permanent magnet because of its extremely high coercivity and energy product. Optimum properties of Nd2Fe14B magnets can be attained by producing single domain particles, and then aligning and compacting them. Due to the reactivity of the Nd constitutent, it is challenging to produce and handle a large amount of fine particles of this material. We have prepared fine particles of Nd2Fe14B by spark erosion with various dielectric media. Yield, size, size distribution, structure, and magnetic properties are discussed. The Nd2Fe14B particles were made by the sharker pot spark erosion method. Relaxation oscillators or a pulse generator were used to power the park erosion. Commercial Neomax 35 was employed as the primary material. The dielectric media were liquid Ar, Ar gas, and hydrocarbons, which provided an oxygen free environment. Structure and size were studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and x-ray diffraction. Magnetic properties were measured by vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM) with temperatures in range of 4.2-1200 K. The particles produced in these three different dielectric media had different microstructures and crystal structures. The particles made in Ar gas were pure Nd2Fe14B phase. The particles made in liquid Ar were a mixture of amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B, because the liquid Ar provided a much higher quench rate than Ar gas, which produced some amorphous Nd2Fe14B. Upon annealing, the amorphous particles became crystalline. The fine particles produced in hydrocarbons, such as pentane and dodecane, had more complex mixed phases, since the rare earth reacted with the hydrocarbons during the sparking process. The phases were NdC2, alpha-Fe, and amorphous and crystalline Nd2Fe14B. The effects of power parameters, such as voltage and capacitance, on particle size were investigated. Particle sizes from 20 nm to 50 microns were obtained.

  20. The tunable electronic structure and optic absorption properties of phosphorene by a normally applied electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mou; Duan, Hou-Jian; Wang, Rui-Qiang

    2016-10-01

    We studied the electronic structure and optical absorption properties of phosphorene (a monolayer black phosphorus) under a normally applied electric field. The electric field enlarges the energy gap, weakens the effective mass anisotropy, and increases the effective mass component along the armchair direction (x-direction) for both conduction and valence bands but provides little change to the component along the zigzag direction (y-direction). The band edge optical absorption is completely polarized in the x-direction, and decreases when increasing the electric field. If the exciting frequency is beyond the energy gap, the absorption for the y-polarized light becomes nonzero, but the absorption is still highly polarized.

  1. Fine-scale population genetic structure in a fission-fusion society.

    PubMed

    Archie, Elizabeth A; Maldonado, Jésus E; Hollister-Smith, Julie A; Poole, Joyce H; Moss, Cynthia J; Fleischer, Robert C; Alberts, Susan C

    2008-06-01

    Nonrandom patterns of mating and dispersal create fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations - especially of social mammals - with important evolutionary and conservation genetic consequences. Such structure is well-characterized for typical mammalian societies; that is, societies where social group composition is stable, dispersal is male-biased, and males form permanent breeding associations in just one or a few social groups over the course of their lives. However, genetic structure is not well understood for social mammals that differ from this pattern, including elephants. In elephant societies, social groups fission and fuse, and males never form permanent breeding associations with female groups. Here, we combine 33 years of behavioural observations with genetic information for 545 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), to investigate how mating and dispersal behaviours structure genetic variation between social groups and across age classes. We found that, like most social mammals, female matrilocality in elephants creates co-ancestry within core social groups and significant genetic differentiation between groups (Phi(ST) = 0.058). However, unlike typical social mammals, male elephants do not bias reproduction towards a limited subset of social groups, and instead breed randomly across the population. As a result, reproductively dominant males mediate gene flow between core groups, which creates cohorts of similar-aged paternal relatives across the population. Because poaching tends to eliminate the oldest elephants from populations, illegal hunting and poaching are likely to erode fine-scale genetic structure. We discuss our results and their evolutionary and conservation genetic implications in the context of other social mammals.

  2. Fine-scale population genetic structure in a fission-fusion society.

    PubMed

    Archie, Elizabeth A; Maldonado, Jésus E; Hollister-Smith, Julie A; Poole, Joyce H; Moss, Cynthia J; Fleischer, Robert C; Alberts, Susan C

    2008-06-01

    Nonrandom patterns of mating and dispersal create fine-scale genetic structure in natural populations - especially of social mammals - with important evolutionary and conservation genetic consequences. Such structure is well-characterized for typical mammalian societies; that is, societies where social group composition is stable, dispersal is male-biased, and males form permanent breeding associations in just one or a few social groups over the course of their lives. However, genetic structure is not well understood for social mammals that differ from this pattern, including elephants. In elephant societies, social groups fission and fuse, and males never form permanent breeding associations with female groups. Here, we combine 33 years of behavioural observations with genetic information for 545 African elephants (Loxodonta africana), to investigate how mating and dispersal behaviours structure genetic variation between social groups and across age classes. We found that, like most social mammals, female matrilocality in elephants creates co-ancestry within core social groups and significant genetic differentiation between groups (Phi(ST) = 0.058). However, unlike typical social mammals, male elephants do not bias reproduction towards a limited subset of social groups, and instead breed randomly across the population. As a result, reproductively dominant males mediate gene flow between core groups, which creates cohorts of similar-aged paternal relatives across the population. Because poaching tends to eliminate the oldest elephants from populations, illegal hunting and poaching are likely to erode fine-scale genetic structure. We discuss our results and their evolutionary and conservation genetic implications in the context of other social mammals. PMID:18466226

  3. Fine structure of epithelial canal cells in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum

    SciTech Connect

    Maksymowych, R.; Ledbetter, M.C. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY )

    1987-01-01

    Secretory canals were examined in petioles of Xanthium pensylvanicum (Cocklebur) grown under long day illumination to maintain vegetative growth. The fine structure of the canal and its epithelium was studied by electron microscopy of thin section cut transverse to the principal axis of petioles from leaves in an early stage of development. The canal proper is delimited by walls of epithelial cells which protrude into a scallop shaped cavity. In comparison to the surrounding parenchyma, the epithelial cells are smaller, cytoplasmically more dense, and less vacuolate. The epithelium contains pleomorphic starch-free plastids with planar thylakoids frequently stacked into grana; thus, the plastids are presumed photosynthetically active. Mitochondria are abundant and often dense. The cytoplasm is rich in free polysomes, and smooth endoplasmic reticulum predominates over the rough form. Spheroidal granules averaging about 530 nm in diameter are numerous in the epithelium and appear at lower concentration in neighboring cells. Many features of fine structure of the epithelial cells suggest that a high metabolic activity in present in this tissue during this early stage of development. A possible function of the canals is defense against insect predation and animal grazing.

  4. Fine structure of the red luminescence band in undoped GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Reshchikov, M. A.; Usikov, A.; Helava, H.; Makarov, Yu.

    2014-01-20

    Many point defects in GaN responsible for broad photoluminescence (PL) bands remain unidentified. Their presence in thick GaN layers grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE) detrimentally affects the material quality and may hinder the use of GaN in high-power electronic devices. One of the main PL bands in HVPE-grown GaN is the red luminescence (RL) band with a maximum at 1.8 eV. We observed the fine structure of this band with a zero-phonon line (ZPL) at 2.36 eV, which may help to identify the related defect. The shift of the ZPL with excitation intensity and the temperature-related transformation of the RL band fine structure indicate that the RL band is caused by transitions from a shallow donor (at low temperature) or from the conduction band (above 50 K) to an unknown deep acceptor having an energy level 1.130 eV above the valence band.

  5. The variation of the fine-structure constant from disformal couplings

    SciTech Connect

    De Bruck, Carsten van; Mifsud, Jurgen; Nunes, Nelson J. E-mail: jmifsud1@sheffield.ac.uk

    2015-12-01

    We study a theory in which the electromagnetic field is disformally coupled to a scalar field, in addition to a usual non-minimal electromagnetic coupling. We show that disformal couplings modify the expression for the fine-structure constant, α. As a result, the theory we consider can explain the non-zero reported variation in the evolution of α by purely considering disformal couplings. We also find that if matter and photons are coupled in the same way to the scalar field, disformal couplings itself do not lead to a variation of the fine-structure constant. A number of scenarios are discussed consistent with the current astrophysical, geochemical, laboratory and the cosmic microwave background radiation constraints on the cosmological evolution of α. The models presented are also consistent with the current type Ia supernovae constraints on the effective dark energy equation of state. We find that the Oklo bound in particular puts strong constraints on the model parameters. From our numerical results, we find that the introduction of a non-minimal electromagnetic coupling enhances the cosmological variation in α. Better constrained data is expected to be reported by ALMA and with the forthcoming generation of high-resolution ultra-stable spectrographs such as PEPSI, ESPRESSO, and ELT-HIRES. Furthermore, an expected increase in the sensitivity of molecular and nuclear clocks will put a more stringent constraint on the theory.

  6. Electron affinity of arsenic and the fine structure of As- measured using infrared photodetachment threshold spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walter, C. W.; Gibson, N. D.; Field, R. L., III; Snedden, A. P.; Shapiro, J. Z.; Janczak, C. M.; Hanstorp, D.

    2009-07-01

    The binding energy and fine-structure splittings of the arsenic negative ion (As-) have been measured using infrared photodetachment threshold spectroscopy. The relative cross section for neutral atom production was measured with a crossed ion-beam-laser-beam apparatus over selected photon energy ranges between 630-810 meV. An s -wave threshold was observed due to the opening of the As-(4p4P32) to As(4p3S43/2) ground-state to ground-state transition, which yields the electron affinity of As to be 804.8(2) meV. s -wave thresholds were also observed for detachment from the J=1 and J=0 excited levels of As- , permitting accurate determination of the fine-structure splittings of 127.6(2) meV for P31-P32 and 164.3(10) meV for P30-P32 . The present values are consistent with previous measurements and substantially reduce the uncertainties.

  7. Fine structure of uterus and non-functioning paruterine organ in Orthoskrjabinia junlanae (Cestoda, Cyclophyllidea).

    PubMed

    Korneva, Janetta V; Kornienko, Svetlana A; Jones, Malcolm K

    2016-06-01

    Some cyclophyllidean cestodes provide protection for their eggs in the external environment by providing them with additional protective layers around the egg membranes. In attempting to examine such adaptations, the microanatomy and fine structure of the uterus of pregravid and gravid proglottids of the cyclophyllidean cestode Orthoskrjabinia junlanae, a parasite of mammals that inhabit a terrestrial but moist environment, were studied. In the initial stages of uterine development, developing embryos locate freely in the lumen of a saccate uterus that later partitions into chambers. Each chamber that forms encloses several embryos. The chambers are surrounded by muscle cells that synthesize extracellular matrix actively. The paruterine organs consist of stacks of flattened long outgrowths of muscular cells, interspersed with small lipid droplets. In the gravid proglottids, the size of paruterine organ increases and consists of flattened basal and small rounded apical parts separated by constrictions. The fine structure of the organ wall remains the same: sparse nuclei and stacks of flattened cytoplasmic outgrowths but internal invaginations or lumen in the paruterine organ are absent. Completely developed eggs remain localized in the uterus. Based on the comparative morpho-functional analysis of uterine and paruterine organs and uterine capsules in cestodes, we conclude that these non-functioning paruterine organ in O. junlanae is an example of an atavism. We postulate that the life cycle of the parasite, which infects mammals living in wet habitats, where threats of desiccation of parasite ova is reduced, has favoured a reversion to a more ancestral form of uterine development. PMID:26997340

  8. Unexpected fine-scale population structure in a broadcast-spawning Antarctic marine mollusc.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Joseph I; Clarke, Andy; Clark, Melody S; Fretwell, Peter; Peck, Lloyd S

    2012-01-01

    Several recent empirical studies have challenged the prevailing dogma that broadcast-spawning species exhibit little or no population genetic structure by documenting genetic discontinuities associated with large-scale oceanographic features. However, relatively few studies have explored patterns of genetic differentiation over fine spatial scales. Consequently, we used a hierarchical sampling design to investigate the basis of a weak but significant genetic difference previously reported between Antarctic limpets (Nacella concinna) sampled from Adelaide and Galindez Islands near the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. Three sites within Ryder Bay, Adelaide Island (Rothera Point, Leonie and Anchorage Islands) were each sub-sampled three times, yielding a total of 405 samples that were genotyped at 155 informative Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs). Contrary to our initial expectations, limpets from Anchorage Island were found to be subtly, but significantly distinct from those sampled from the other sites. This suggests that local processes may play an important role in generating fine-scale population structure even in species with excellent dispersal capabilities, and highlights the importance of sampling at multiple spatial scales in population genetic surveys.

  9. Atmospheric fine structure during GTE TRACE A: Relationships among ozone, carbon monoxide, and water vapor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, James E.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Sachse, Glen W.; Barrick, John D. W.; Wade, Larry O.; Burney, Lewis G.; Hill, Gerald F.

    1996-10-01

    A major focus of the Global Tropospheric Experiment/Transport and Chemistry Near the Equator-Atlantic (GTE TRACE A) experiment was to determine whether the seasonal tropospheric ozone (O3) buildup over the tropical South Atlantic, observed by both satellites and sondes, is due to photochemical production of O3 from biomass burning effluents or from transport of O3 from the stratosphere. During this expedition, fast response in situ measurements were made of O3, carbon monoxide (CO), and dew point (DP) from aboard the NASA DC-8 aircraft. Numerous vertical profiles were obtained over Brazil, Africa, and the South Atlantic to determine the origin of the observed O3 enhancement. Fine structure in these data was examined by (1) investigating differences in the species concentration (5-s averages) and its 2 km vertical running mean during altitude profiles, (2) calculating Fishman-Seiler coefficients for all vertical profiles with altitude range greater than 3 km, and (3) calculating linear regressions between species across short time intervals (2.5 min) using time series data. The fine structure holds information about the recent history of an air mass and therefore can indicate the "source" of tropospheric O3 enhancement: either transport from the stratosphere (negative correlation with CO and DP) or from photochemistry in the troposphere (positive correlation with CO). All three methods indicate that within the tropical South Atlantic during the TRACE A experiment, net in situ photochemical production is significantly more important than transport from the stratosphere.

  10. Unexpected Fine-Scale Population Structure in a Broadcast-Spawning Antarctic Marine Mollusc

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Joseph I.; Clarke, Andy; Clark, Melody S.; Fretwell, Peter; Peck, Lloyd S.

    2012-01-01

    Several recent empirical studies have challenged the prevailing dogma that broadcast-spawning species exhibit little or no population genetic structure by documenting genetic discontinuities associated with large-scale oceanographic features. However, relatively few studies have explored patterns of genetic differentiation over fine spatial scales. Consequently, we used a hierarchical sampling design to investigate the basis of a weak but significant genetic difference previously reported between Antarctic limpets (Nacella concinna) sampled from Adelaide and Galindez Islands near the base of the Antarctic Peninsula. Three sites within Ryder Bay, Adelaide Island (Rothera Point, Leonie and Anchorage Islands) were each sub-sampled three times, yielding a total of 405 samples that were genotyped at 155 informative Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs). Contrary to our initial expectations, limpets from Anchorage Island were found to be subtly, but significantly distinct from those sampled from the other sites. This suggests that local processes may play an important role in generating fine-scale population structure even in species with excellent dispersal capabilities, and highlights the importance of sampling at multiple spatial scales in population genetic surveys. PMID:22403655

  11. Perceptual weighting of individual and concurrent cues for sentence intelligibility: Frequency, envelope, and fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Fogerty, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The speech signal may be divided into frequency bands, each containing temporal properties of the envelope and fine structure. For maximal speech understanding, listeners must allocate their perceptual resources to the most informative acoustic properties. Understanding this perceptual weighting is essential for the design of assistive listening devices that need to preserve these important speech cues. This study measured the perceptual weighting of young normal-hearing listeners for the envelope and fine structure in each of three frequency bands for sentence materials. Perceptual weights were obtained under two listening contexts: (1) when each acoustic property was presented individually and (2) when multiple acoustic properties were available concurrently. The processing method was designed to vary the availability of each acoustic property independently by adding noise at different levels. Perceptual weights were determined by correlating a listener’s performance with the availability of each acoustic property on a trial-by-trial basis. Results demonstrated that weights were (1) equal when acoustic properties were presented individually and (2) biased toward envelope and mid-frequency information when multiple properties were available. Results suggest a complex interaction between the available acoustic properties and the listening context in determining how best to allocate perceptual resources when listening to speech in noise. PMID:21361454

  12. On the mechanisms involved in the recovery of envelope information from temporal fine structure

    PubMed Central

    Apoux, Frédéric; Millman, Rebecca E.; Viemeister, Neal F.; Brown, Christopher A.; Bacon, Sid P.

    2011-01-01

    Three experiments were designed to provide psychophysical evidence for the existence of envelope information in the temporal fine structure (TFS) of stimuli that were originally amplitude modulated (AM). The original stimuli typically consisted of the sum of a sinusoidally AM tone and two unmodulated tones so that the envelope and TFS could be determined a priori. Experiment 1 showed that normal-hearing listeners not only perceive AM when presented with the Hilbert fine structure alone but AM detection thresholds are lower than those observed when presenting the original stimuli. Based on our analysis, envelope recovery resulted from the failure of the decomposition process to remove the spectral components related to the original envelope from the TFS and the introduction of spectral components related to the original envelope, suggesting that frequency- to amplitude-modulation conversion is not necessary to recover envelope information from TFS. Experiment 2 suggested that these spectral components interact in such a way that envelope fluctuations are minimized in the broadband TFS. Experiment 3 demonstrated that the modulation depth at the original carrier frequency is only slightly reduced compared to the depth of the original modulator. It also indicated that envelope recovery is not specific to the Hilbert decomposition. PMID:21786897

  13. Fine structures of organic photovoltaic thin films probed by frequency-shift electrostatic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, Kento; Ie, Yutaka; Aso, Yoshio; Matsumoto, Takuya

    2016-07-01

    The localized charge and electrostatic properties of organic photovoltaic thin films are predominating factors for controlling energy conversion efficiency. The surface potential and electrostatic structures of organic photovoltaic thin films were investigated by frequency shift mode Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) and electrostatic force microscopy (EFM). The KFM images of a poly[2-methoxy-5-(3‧,7‧-dimethyloctyloxy)-1,4-phenylene vinylene]/phenyl-C61-butyric-acid-methyl ester (PCBM) blend thin film reveals that the PCBM domains precipitate as the topmost layer on the thin films. We find fine structures that were not observed in the topography and KFM images. The bias dependence of the EFM images suggests that the EFM contrast reflects the field-induced polarization, indicating the presence of charge trapping sites.

  14. The fine structure of pulmonary contusion and the effect of various drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Casley-Smith, J. R.; Eckert, P.; Földi-Börcsök, E.

    1976-01-01

    The results of contusion were examined by electron and light microscopy in the lungs of rats. It was found that the results here were very similar to those elsewhere in the body, with a few minor modifications due to the unique structure of the lung. Densitometry of protein concentration and visual estimation of oedema were used to quantitate the effects on the injury. The benzo-pyrone drug Venalot had a considerable effect in reducing the protein concentration in the air spaces and the interstitial tissue, and of the oedema in the latter. Neither the proteinase inhibitor Trasylol nor the pectin-based plasma expander HAS had any significant effect on the fine structural alterations of pulmonary contusion. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 PMID:1087159

  15. Using networks to identify fine structural differences between functionally distinct protein states.

    PubMed

    Swint-Kruse, Liskin

    2004-08-31

    The vast increase in available data from the "-omics" revolution has enabled the fields of structural proteomics and structure prediction to make great progress in assigning realistic three-dimensional structures to each protein molecule. The challenge now lies in determining the fine structural details that endow unique functions to sequences that assume a common fold. Similar problems are encountered in understanding how distinct conformations contribute to different phases of a single protein's dynamic function. However, efforts are hampered by the complexity of these large, three-dimensional molecules. To overcome this limitation, structural data have been recast as two-dimensional networks. This analysis greatly reduces visual complexity but retains information about individual residues. Such diagrams are very useful for comparing multiple structures, including (1) homologous proteins, (2) time points throughout a dynamics simulation, and (3) functionally different conformations of a given protein. Enhanced structural examination results in new functional hypotheses to test experimentally. Here, network representations were key to discerning a difference between unliganded and inducer-bound lactose repressor protein (LacI), which were previously presumed to be identical structures. Further, the interface of unliganded LacI was surprisingly similar to that of the K84L variant and various structures generated by molecular dynamics simulations. Apo-LacI appears to be poised to adopt the conformation of either the DNA- or inducer-bound structures, and the K84L mutation appears to freeze the structure partway through the conformational transition. Additional examination of the effector binding pocket results in specific hypotheses about how inducer, anti-inducer, and neutral sugars exert their effects on repressor function. PMID:15323549

  16. Breed Locally, Disperse Globally: Fine-Scale Genetic Structure Despite Landscape-Scale Panmixia in a Fire-Specialist

    PubMed Central

    Pierson, Jennifer C.; Allendorf, Fred W.; Drapeau, Pierre; Schwartz, Michael K.

    2013-01-01

    An exciting advance in the understanding of metapopulation dynamics has been the investigation of how populations respond to ephemeral patches that go ‘extinct’ during the lifetime of an individual. Previous research has shown that this scenario leads to genetic homogenization across large spatial scales. However, little is known about fine-scale genetic structuring or how this changes over time in ephemeral patches. We predicted that species that specialize on ephemeral habitats will delay dispersal to exploit natal habitat patches while resources are plentiful and thus display fine-scale structure. To investigate this idea, we evaluated the effect of frequent colonization of ephemeral habitats on the fine-scale genetic structure of a fire specialist, the black-backed woodpecker (Picoides arcticus) and found a pattern of fine-scale genetic structure. We then tested for differences in spatial structure between sexes and detected a pattern consistent with male-biased dispersal. We also detected a temporal increase in relatedness among individuals within newly burned forest patches. Our results indicate that specialist species that outlive their ephemeral patches can accrue significant fine-scale spatial structure that does not necessarily affect spatial structure at larger scales. This highlights the importance of both spatial and temporal scale considerations in both sampling and data interpretation of molecular genetic results. PMID:23825646

  17. Microsatellite analyses reveal fine-scale genetic structure in grey mouse lemurs (Microcebus murinus).

    PubMed

    Fredsted, T; Pertoldi, C; Schierup, M H; Kappeler, P M

    2005-07-01

    Information on genetic structure can be used to complement direct inferences on social systems and behaviour. We studied the genetic structure of the solitary grey mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), a small, nocturnal primate endemic to western Madagascar, with the aim of getting further insight on its breeding structure. Tissue samples from 167 grey mouse lemurs in an area covering 12.3 km2 in Kirindy Forest were obtained from trapping. The capture data indicated a noncontinuous distribution of individuals in the study area. Using 10 microsatellite markers, significant genetic differentiation in the study area was demonstrated and dispersal was found to be significantly male biased. Furthermore, we observed an overall excess of homozygotes in the total population (F(IT) = 0.131), which we interpret as caused by fine-scale structure with breeding occurring in small units. Evidence for a clumped distribution of identical homozygotes was found, supporting the notion that dispersal distance for breeding was shorter than that for foraging, i.e. the breeding neighbourhood size is smaller than the foraging neighbourhood size. In conclusion, we found a more complex population structure than what has been previously reported in studies performed on smaller spatial scales. The noncontinuous distribution of individuals and the effects of social variables on the genetic structure have implications for the interpretation of social organization and the planning of conservation activities that may apply to other solitary and endangered mammals as well.

  18. Fine structures and switching of electrical conductivity in labyrinth silver films on sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vartanyan, T. A.; Gladskikh, I. A.; Leonov, N. B.; Przhibel'skii, S. G.

    2014-04-01

    Changes in electrical resistance of silver films were measured in the range from 1013 to 103 Ω during thermal deposition on sapphire in a high vacuum, after the deposition over time, and under an applied voltage. The dependences of the electrical resistance of the films on their thickness and deposition rate were determined. It was established that, with an increase in the film thickness from 2 to 10 nm during the deposition at rates of 0.6 and 0.1 Å/s, the resistance decreases by 7.5 and 4 orders of magnitude, respectively. The measured dependences of the resistance on the deposition time were found to be close to exponential. The room-temperature resistance of 10-nm-thick films deposited at different rates changed spontaneously by 3-4 orders of magnitude in different ways: the resistance of the slowly deposited films spontaneously increased, whereas in the rapidly deposited films, it spontaneously decreased. After fine annealing, the steady-state resistance changed also differently: it increased by 2 orders of magnitude in the former case and by 9 orders of magnitude in the latter case. Under voltages above 5 V, the resistance of the rapidly deposited films abruptly decreased from ˜1012 to ˜106 Ω, and these films became ohmic. After fine annealing, they became again high-ohmic. Under voltages above 5 V, the high-ohmic films thus obtained became again low-ohmic. This cycle of electrical conductivity switching was reproduced many times. The observed phenomena were explained in the framework of the hypothesis of the formation of fine metastable structures in channels of labyrinth films, namely, protrusions and bridges that bring together the boundaries of islands and connect them into conducting clusters, respectively.

  19. Mode manipulation and near-THz absorptions in binary grating-graphene layer structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The excitation and absorption properties of grating coupled graphene surface plasmons were studied. It was found that whether a mode can be excited is mainly determined by the frequency of incident light and the duty ratio of gratings. In the structure consisting graphene bilayer, a blueshift of the excitation frequency existed when the distance between neighbor graphene layer were decreased gradually. In graphene-grating multilayer structures, a strong absorption (approximately 90% at maximum) was found in near-THz range. PMID:24559407

  20. Mechanical properties and structural evolution during deformation of fine grain magnesium and aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qi

    Grain refinement improves the formability and the strength of wrought Mg and Al alloys. Ultrafine grain Mg is produced by a new process for severe plastic deformation, called Alternate Biaxial Reverse Corrugation (ABRC). Fine grain structure in Al is produced by creating a new composition capable of precipitating dispersed intermetallics in the alloy. Slip and twinning subdivide an initial bimodal grain structure of Mg alloy during processing. Dynamic recovery and recrystallization lead to the formation of nearly uniform ultrafine microstructure of average grain size 1.4mum, containing many submicron grains. In Mg, twinning causes grain refinement in the early stages, but it is inhibited when grain size becomes finer. A strong basal texture is created after several corrugation and flattening steps, but eventually weakened as grain size becomes finer. Grain rotation and possible dynamic recrystallization are believed to cause a drop in the intensity of basal texture. At room temperature, grain refinement causes a considerable increase in strain rate sensitivity of flow stress (m) leading to the enhancement of post-uniform elongation. Yield strength increases, and becomes more isotropic due to the inhibition of twinning in fine grain Mg alloy, compared to coarse grain alloy. Normal anisotropy ratio (R value) for fine grain Mg at room temperature is higher than that for coarse grain alloy. At warm temperatures, formability is significantly increased due to an increase in strain rate sensitivity of flow stress and diffuse quasistable flow in fine grain Mg, as compared with coarse grain alloy. At 200°C and strain rates below 2x10-4s-1, the fine grain alloy demonstrates a high rate of strain hardening up to a true strain of 0.6 in addition to its high strain rate sensitivity (m ˜ 0.4-0.5), leading to a high elongation of 300-400%. There is competition between dynamic grain growth and grain refinement during straining at warm temperature. Mg exhibits isotropic

  1. The Effects of Instrumental Elliptical Polarization on Stellar Point Spread Function Fine Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carson, Joseph C.; Kern, Brian D.; Breckinridge, James B.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    We present procedures and preliminary results from a study on the effects of instrumental polarization on the fine structure of the stellar point spread function (PSF). These effects are important to understand because the the aberration caused by instrumental polarization on an otherwise diffraction-limited will likely have have severe consequences for extreme high contrast imaging systems such as NASA's planned Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission and the proposed NASA Eclipse mission. The report here, describing our efforts to examine these effects, includes two parts: 1) a numerical analysis of the effect of metallic reflection, with some polarization-specific retardation, on a spherical wavefront; 2) an experimental approach for observing this effect, along with some preliminary laboratory results. While the experimental phase of this study requires more fine-tuning to produce meaningful results, the numerical analysis indicates that the inclusion of polarization-specific phase effects (retardation) results in a point spread function (PSF) aberration more severe than the amplitude (reflectivity) effects previously recorded in the literature.

  2. Morphology and fine structure of Acipenser persicus (Acipenseridae, Chondrostei) spermatozoon: Inter-species comparison in Acipenseriformes.

    PubMed

    Hatef, Azadeh; Alavi, Sayyed Mohammad Hadi; Noveiri, Shahrouz Baradaran; Poorbagher, Hadi; Alipour, Ali Reza; Pourkazemi, Mohammad; Linhart, Otomar

    2011-01-01

    This study describes morphology and fine structure of the Persian sturgeon (Acipenser persicus) (Acipenseridae, Chondrostei) spermatozoon. The results show that the spermatozoon of A. persicus is differentiated into an elongated head (length: mean±SD: 7.1±0.5μm) with an acrosome (length: 1.2±0.2μm), a cylindrical midpiece (length: 1.8±0.5μm), a flagellum (length: 50.3±5.9μm) and a total length of 59.2±6.2μm. Ten posterolateral projections (PLPs) arise from the posterior edge of the acrosome and there were 3 endonuclear canals that traversed the nucleus from the acrosomal end to the basal nuclear fossa region. Three to six mitochondria were in peripheral midpiece and the proximal and distal centrioles were located near to "implantation fossa" and basement of the flagellum. The axoneme has a typical eukaryotic structure composed of 9 peripheral microtubules and a central pair of single microtubule surrounded by the plasma membrane. Lateral fins were observed along the flagellum. The fins started and ended at 0.5-1μm from midpiece and at 4-6μm from the end of flagellum. There were significant differences in the size of almost all measured morphological parameters between males and flagellar, midpiece and nucleus characters were more isolated parameters that can be considered for detecting inter-individual variations. This study showed that sperm morphology and fine structure are similar among sturgeon species, but the dimensions of the parameters may differ. PMID:21144681

  3. Outlier SNP markers reveal fine-scale genetic structuring across European hake populations (Merluccius merluccius).

    PubMed

    Milano, Ilaria; Babbucci, Massimiliano; Cariani, Alessia; Atanassova, Miroslava; Bekkevold, Dorte; Carvalho, Gary R; Espiñeira, Montserrat; Fiorentino, Fabio; Garofalo, Germana; Geffen, Audrey J; Hansen, Jakob H; Helyar, Sarah J; Nielsen, Einar E; Ogden, Rob; Patarnello, Tomaso; Stagioni, Marco; Tinti, Fausto; Bargelloni, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Shallow population structure is generally reported for most marine fish and explained as a consequence of high dispersal, connectivity and large population size. Targeted gene analyses and more recently genome-wide studies have challenged such view, suggesting that adaptive divergence might occur even when neutral markers provide genetic homogeneity across populations. Here, 381 SNPs located in transcribed regions were used to assess large- and fine-scale population structure in the European hake (Merluccius merluccius), a widely distributed demersal species of high priority for the European fishery. Analysis of 850 individuals from 19 locations across the entire distribution range showed evidence for several outlier loci, with significantly higher resolving power. While 299 putatively neutral SNPs confirmed the genetic break between basins (F(CT) = 0.016) and weak differentiation within basins, outlier loci revealed a dramatic divergence between Atlantic and Mediterranean populations (F(CT) range 0.275-0.705) and fine-scale significant population structure. Outlier loci separated North Sea and Northern Portugal populations from all other Atlantic samples and revealed a strong differentiation among Western, Central and Eastern Mediterranean geographical samples. Significant correlation of allele frequencies at outlier loci with seawater surface temperature and salinity supported the hypothesis that populations might be adapted to local conditions. Such evidence highlights the importance of integrating information from neutral and adaptive evolutionary patterns towards a better assessment of genetic diversity. Accordingly, the generated outlier SNP data could be used for tackling illegal practices in hake fishing and commercialization as well as to develop explicit spatial models for defining management units and stock boundaries.

  4. Fine Structure ENA Sources Beyond the Termination Shock: Observational Constraints and Detection Limits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demajistre, R.; Janzen, P. H.; Allegrini, F.; Dayeh, M. A.; McComas, D. J.; Schwadron, N.

    2015-12-01

    High spatial resolution maps from the IBEX mission (McComas et al, Science, 2009) suggest the presence of "fine structure" in the signal from beyond the termination shock. That is, areas of enhanced ENA emission that span less than a degree in the IBEX sky map. If confirmed, this would suggest very concentrated areas of emission from sources with scales of a few AU embedded in the outer heliosphere (or proportionally larger if they are located beyond the heliopause). This, in turn, would require the presence of unanticipated structures (plasma or neutral) beyond the termination shock for which the physics is poorly defined. It is therefore crucial to confirm the presence of these structures through careful analysis, or to establish the detection limits if the data taken to date is not sufficient for such a confirmation. In this work, we use 5 years worth of IBEX data to examine the statistical significance of these enhancements. We examine correlations in time, ENA energy and coincidence type for evidence of these small-scale spatial structures. Then, using the known spatial response of the IBEX instrument, establish the conditions under which such structure, if present, would be detectable. This detection threshold analysis is fully applicable future measurements, such as those planned for IMAP.

  5. Resolving Fine Cardiac Structures in Rats with High-Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging.

    PubMed

    Teh, Irvin; McClymont, Darryl; Burton, Rebecca A B; Maguire, Mahon L; Whittington, Hannah J; Lygate, Craig A; Kohl, Peter; Schneider, Jürgen E

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac architecture is fundamental to cardiac function and can be assessed non-invasively with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, we aimed to overcome technical challenges in ex vivo DTI in order to extract fine anatomical details and to provide novel insights in the 3D structure of the heart. An integrated set of methods was implemented in ex vivo rat hearts, including dynamic receiver gain adjustment, gradient system scaling calibration, prospective adjustment of diffusion gradients, and interleaving of diffusion-weighted and non-diffusion-weighted scans. Together, these methods enhanced SNR and spatial resolution, minimised orientation bias in diffusion-weighting, and reduced temperature variation, enabling detection of tissue structures such as cell alignment in atria, valves and vessels at an unprecedented level of detail. Improved confidence in eigenvector reproducibility enabled tracking of myolaminar structures as a basis for segmentation of functional groups of cardiomyocytes. Ex vivo DTI facilitates acquisition of high quality structural data that complements readily available in vivo cardiac functional and anatomical MRI. The improvements presented here will facilitate next generation virtual models integrating micro-structural and electro-mechanical properties of the heart. PMID:27466029

  6. Resolving Fine Cardiac Structures in Rats with High-Resolution Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Irvin; McClymont, Darryl; Burton, Rebecca A. B.; Maguire, Mahon L.; Whittington, Hannah J.; Lygate, Craig A.; Kohl, Peter; Schneider, Jürgen E.

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac architecture is fundamental to cardiac function and can be assessed non-invasively with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Here, we aimed to overcome technical challenges in ex vivo DTI in order to extract fine anatomical details and to provide novel insights in the 3D structure of the heart. An integrated set of methods was implemented in ex vivo rat hearts, including dynamic receiver gain adjustment, gradient system scaling calibration, prospective adjustment of diffusion gradients, and interleaving of diffusion-weighted and non-diffusion-weighted scans. Together, these methods enhanced SNR and spatial resolution, minimised orientation bias in diffusion-weighting, and reduced temperature variation, enabling detection of tissue structures such as cell alignment in atria, valves and vessels at an unprecedented level of detail. Improved confidence in eigenvector reproducibility enabled tracking of myolaminar structures as a basis for segmentation of functional groups of cardiomyocytes. Ex vivo DTI facilitates acquisition of high quality structural data that complements readily available in vivo cardiac functional and anatomical MRI. The improvements presented here will facilitate next generation virtual models integrating micro-structural and electro-mechanical properties of the heart. PMID:27466029

  7. Properties and Modeling of Unresolved Fine Structure Loops Observed in the Solar Transition Region by IRIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, David H.; Reep, Jeffrey W.; Warren, Harry P.

    2016-08-01

    Recent observations from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) have discovered a new class of numerous low-lying dynamic loop structures, and it has been argued that they are the long-postulated unresolved fine structures (UFSs) that dominate the emission of the solar transition region. In this letter, we combine IRIS measurements of the properties of a sample of 108 UFSs (intensities, lengths, widths, lifetimes) with one-dimensional non-equilibrium ionization simulations, using the HYDRAD hydrodynamic model to examine whether the UFSs are now truly spatially resolved in the sense of being individual structures rather than being composed of multiple magnetic threads. We find that a simulation of an impulsively heated single strand can reproduce most of the observed properties, suggesting that the UFSs may be resolved, and the distribution of UFS widths implies that they are structured on a spatial scale of 133 km on average. Spatial scales of a few hundred kilometers appear to be typical for a range of chromospheric and coronal structures, and we conjecture that this could be an important clue for understanding the coronal heating process.

  8. Fine-scale community and genetic structure are tightly linked in species-rich grasslands

    PubMed Central

    Whitlock, Raj; Bilton, Mark C.; Grime, J. Phil; Burke, Terry

    2011-01-01

    Recent evidence indicates that grassland community structure and species diversity are influenced by genetic variation within species. We review what is known regarding the impact of intraspecific diversity on grassland community structure, using an ancient limestone pasture as a focal example. Two genotype-dependent effects appear to modify community structure in this system. First, the abundance of individual constituent species can depend upon the combined influence of direct genetic effects stemming from individuals within the population. Second, the outcome of localized interspecific interactions occurring within the community can depend on the genotypes of participating individuals (indicating indirect genetic effects). Only genotypic interactions are thought to be capable of allowing the long-term coexistence of both genotypes and species. We discuss the implications of these effects for the maintenance of diversity in grasslands. Next, we present new observations indicating that losses of genotypic diversity from each of two species can be predicted by the abundance of other coexisting species within experimental grassland communities. These results suggest genotype-specific responses to abundance in other coexisting species. We conclude that both direct and indirect genetic effects are likely to shape community structure and species coexistence in grasslands, implying tight linkage between fine-scale genetic and community structure. PMID:21444309

  9. WAVELENGTH ACCURACY OF THE KECK HIRES SPECTROGRAPH AND MEASURING CHANGES IN THE FINE STRUCTURE CONSTANT

    SciTech Connect

    Griest, Kim; Whitmore, Jonathan B.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Howk, J. Christopher; Marcy, Geoffrey W. E-mail: jonathan.b.whitmore@gmail.co

    2010-01-01

    We report on an attempt to accurately wavelength calibrate four nights of data taken with the Keck HIRES spectrograph on QSO PHL957, for the purpose of determining whether the fine structure constant was different in the past. Using new software and techniques, we measured the redshifts of various Ni II, Fe II, Si II, etc. lines in a damped Lyalpha system at z = 2.309. Roughly half the data were taken through the Keck iodine cell which contains thousands of well calibrated iodine lines. Using these iodine exposures to calibrate the normal Th-Ar Keck data pipeline output, we found absolute wavelength offsets of 500 m s{sup -1} to 1000 m s{sup -1} with drifts of more than 500 m s{sup -1} over a single night, and drifts of nearly 2000 m s{sup -1} over several nights. These offsets correspond to an absolute redshift of uncertainty of about DELTAz approx 10{sup -5}(DELTAlambda approx 0.02 A), with daily drifts of around DELTAz approx 5 x 10{sup -6} (DELTAlambda approx 0.01 A), and multiday drifts of nearly DELTAz approx 2 x 10{sup -5}(approx0.04 A). The causes of the wavelength offsets are not known, but since claimed shifts in the fine structure constant would result in velocity shifts of less than 100 m s{sup -1}, this level of systematic uncertainty may make it difficult to use Keck HIRES data to constrain the change in the fine structure constant. Using our calibrated data, we applied both our own fitting software and standard fitting software to measure DELTAalpha/alpha, but discovered that we could obtain results ranging from significant detection of either sign, to strong null limits, depending upon which sets of lines and which fitting method were used. We thus speculate that the discrepant results on DELTAalpha/alpha reported in the literature may be due to random fluctuations coming from underestimated systematic errors in wavelength calibration and fitting procedure.

  10. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  11. Fine structure of the mineralized teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata (Mollusca: Polyplacophora).

    PubMed

    Wealthall, Rosamund J; Brooker, Lesley R; Macey, David J; Griffin, Brendan J

    2005-08-01

    The major lateral teeth of the chiton Acanthopleura echinata are composite structures composed of three distinct mineral zones: a posterior layer of magnetite; a thin band of lepidocrocite just anterior to this; and apatite throughout the core and anterior regions of the cusp. Biomineralization in these teeth is a matrix-mediated process, in which the minerals are deposited around fibers, with the different biominerals described as occupying architecturally discrete compartments. In this study, a range of scanning electron microscopes was utilized to undertake a detailed in situ investigation of the fine structure of the major lateral teeth. The arrangement of the organic and biomineral components of the tooth is similar throughout the three zones, having no discrete borders between them, and with crystallites of each mineral phase extending into the adjacent mineral zone. Along the posterior surface of the tooth, the organic fibers are arranged in a series of fine parallel lines, but just within the periphery their appearance takes on a "fish scale"-like pattern, reflective of the cross section of a series of units that are overlaid, and offset from each other, in adjacent rows. The units are approximately 2 microm wide and 0.6 microm thick and comprise biomineral plates separated by organic fibers. Two types of subunits make up each "fish scale": one is elongate and curved and forms a trough, in which the other, rod-like unit, is nestled. Adjacent rod and trough units are aligned into large sheets that define the fracture plane of the tooth. The alignment of the plates of rod-trough units is complex and exhibits extreme spatial variation within the tooth cusp. Close to the posterior surface the plates are essentially horizontal and lie in a lateromedial plane, while anteriorly they are almost vertical and lie in the posteroanterior plane. An understanding of the fine structure of the mineralized teeth of chitons, and of the relationship between the organic and

  12. Omnidirectional polarization insensitive tunable absorption in graphene metamaterial of nanodisk structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Renxia; Bao, Jie; Jiao, Zheng; Xu, Yuan

    2015-11-01

    Tunable absorption based on graphene metamaterial with nanodisk structure at near-infrared frequency was investigated using the finite difference time domain method. The absorption of the nanodisk structure which consisting of Au-MgF2-graphene-Au-polyimide (from bottom to top) can be tuned by the chemical potential of graphene at certain diameter of nanodisk. The permittivity of graphene is discussed with different chemical potential to obtain tunable absorption. It is shown that the increased value of the chemical potential of graphene can lead to blue-shifted of the absorption peaks and the values decreased. Moreover, dual-band and triple-band absorption can be achieved for resonance frequencies at normal incidence. Compared with diameter of nanodisks, the multilayer structure shows multi-band absorber, and an omnidirectional absorption at 195.25 THz is insensitive to TE/TM polarization. This omnidirectional polarization insensitive absorption may be applied by optical communications such as optical absorber, near infrared stealth, and filter.

  13. Relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure cues to lexical tone recognition in hearing-impaired listeners.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuo; Xu, Li; Mannell, Robert

    2011-12-01

    It has been reported that normal-hearing Chinese speakers base their lexical tone recognition on fine structure regardless of temporal envelope cues. However, a few psychoacoustic and perceptual studies have demonstrated that listeners with sensorineural hearing impairment may have an impaired ability to use fine structure information, whereas their ability to use temporal envelope information is close to normal. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relative contributions of temporal envelope and fine structure cues to lexical tone recognition in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired native Mandarin Chinese speakers. Twenty-two normal-hearing subjects and 31 subjects with various degrees of sensorineural hearing loss participated in the study. Sixteen sets of Mandarin monosyllables with four tone patterns for each were processed through a "chimeric synthesizer" in which temporal envelope from a monosyllabic word of one tone was paired with fine structure from the same monosyllable of other tones. The chimeric tokens were generated in the three channel conditions (4, 8, and 16 channels). Results showed that differences in tone responses among the three channel conditions were minor. On average, 90.9%, 70.9%, 57.5%, and 38.2% of tone responses were consistent with fine structure for normal-hearing, moderate, moderate to severe, and severely hearing-impaired groups respectively, whereas 6.8%, 21.1%, 31.4%, and 44.7% of tone responses were consistent with temporal envelope cues for the above-mentioned groups. Tone responses that were consistent neither with temporal envelope nor fine structure had averages of 2.3%, 8.0%, 11.1%, and 17.1% for the above-mentioned groups of subjects. Pure-tone average thresholds were negatively correlated with tone responses that were consistent with fine structure, but were positively correlated with tone responses that were based on the temporal envelope cues. Consistent with the idea that the spectral resolvability is

  14. Biomimetic cellular metals-using hierarchical structuring for energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Bührig-Polaczek, A; Fleck, C; Speck, T; Schüler, P; Fischer, S F; Caliaro, M; Thielen, M

    2016-07-19

    Fruit walls as well as nut and seed shells typically perform a multitude of functions. One of the biologically most important functions consists in the direct or indirect protection of the seeds from mechanical damage or other negative environmental influences. This qualifies such biological structures as role models for the development of new materials and components that protect commodities and/or persons from damage caused for example by impacts due to rough handling or crashes. We were able to show how the mechanical properties of metal foam based components can be improved by altering their structure on various hierarchical levels inspired by features and principles important for the impact and/or puncture resistance of the biological role models, rather than by tuning the properties of the bulk material. For this various investigation methods have been established which combine mechanical testing with different imaging methods, as well as with in situ and ex situ mechanical testing methods. Different structural hierarchies especially important for the mechanical deformation and failure behaviour of the biological role models, pomelo fruit (Citrus maxima) and Macadamia integrifolia, were identified. They were abstracted and transferred into corresponding structural principles and thus hierarchically structured bio-inspired metal foams have been designed. A production route for metal based bio-inspired structures by investment casting was successfully established. This allows the production of complex and reliable structures, by implementing and combining different hierarchical structural elements found in the biological concept generators, such as strut design and integration of fibres, as well as by minimising casting defects. To evaluate the structural effects, similar investigation methods and mechanical tests were applied to both the biological role models and the metallic foams. As a result an even deeper quantitative understanding of the form-structure

  15. Biomimetic cellular metals-using hierarchical structuring for energy absorption.

    PubMed

    Bührig-Polaczek, A; Fleck, C; Speck, T; Schüler, P; Fischer, S F; Caliaro, M; Thielen, M

    2016-01-01

    Fruit walls as well as nut and seed shells typically perform a multitude of functions. One of the biologically most important functions consists in the direct or indirect protection of the seeds from mechanical damage or other negative environmental influences. This qualifies such biological structures as role models for the development of new materials and components that protect commodities and/or persons from damage caused for example by impacts due to rough handling or crashes. We were able to show how the mechanical properties of metal foam based components can be improved by altering their structure on various hierarchical levels inspired by features and principles important for the impact and/or puncture resistance of the biological role models, rather than by tuning the properties of the bulk material. For this various investigation methods have been established which combine mechanical testing with different imaging methods, as well as with in situ and ex situ mechanical testing methods. Different structural hierarchies especially important for the mechanical deformation and failure behaviour of the biological role models, pomelo fruit (Citrus maxima) and Macadamia integrifolia, were identified. They were abstracted and transferred into corresponding structural principles and thus hierarchically structured bio-inspired metal foams have been designed. A production route for metal based bio-inspired structures by investment casting was successfully established. This allows the production of complex and reliable structures, by implementing and combining different hierarchical structural elements found in the biological concept generators, such as strut design and integration of fibres, as well as by minimising casting defects. To evaluate the structural effects, similar investigation methods and mechanical tests were applied to both the biological role models and the metallic foams. As a result an even deeper quantitative understanding of the form-structure

  16. Constraints on the Time Variation of the Fine Structure Constant by the 5-Year WMAP Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, M.; Nagata, R.; Yokoyama, J.

    2008-12-01

    The constraints on the time variation of the fine structure constant at recombination epoch relative to its present value, Δα/α ≡ (α_{rec} - α_{now})/α_{now}, are obtained from the analysis of the 5-year WMAP cosmic microwave background data. As a result of Markov-Chain Monte-Carlo analysis, it is found that, contrary to the analysis based on the previous WMAP data, the mean value of Δα/α = -0.0009 does not change significantly whether we use the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) measurement of the Hubble parameter as a prior or not. The resultant 95% confidence ranges of Δα/α are -0.028 < Δα/α < 0.026 with HST prior and -0.050 < Δα/α < 0.042 without HST prior.

  17. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  18. New limit on the present temporal variation of the fine structure constant

    SciTech Connect

    Peik, E.; Lipphardt, B.; Schnatz, H.; Schneider, T.; Tamm, Chr.; Karshenboim, S.G.

    2005-05-05

    A comparison of different atomic frequency standards over time can be used to perform a measurement of the present value of the temporal derivative of the fine structure constant {alpha} in a model-independent way without assumptions on constancy or variability of other parameters. We have measured an optical transition frequency at 688 THz in Yb+ with a cesium atomic clock at two times separated by 2.8 years and find that a variation of this frequency can be excluded within a 1{sigma} relative uncertainty of 4.4{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Combined with recently published values for the constancy of other transition frequencies this measurement provides a limit on the present variability of {alpha} at the level of 2.0{center_dot}10-15 yr-1. Constraints are also derived for the drift rates of other fundamental constants like the electron/proton mass ratio and the proton g-factor.

  19. New determination of the fine structure constant and test of the quantum electrodynamics.

    PubMed

    Bouchendira, Rym; Cladé, Pierre; Guellati-Khélifa, Saïda; Nez, François; Biraben, François

    2011-02-25

    We report a new measurement of the ratio h/m(Rb) between the Planck constant and the mass of (87)Rb atom. A new value of the fine structure constant is deduced, α(-1)=137.035999037(91) with a relative uncertainty of 6.6×10(-10). Using this determination, we obtain a theoretical value of the electron anomaly a(e)=0.00115965218113(84), which is in agreement with the experimental measurement of Gabrielse [a(e)=0.00115965218073(28)]. The comparison of these values provides the most stringent test of the QED. Moreover, the precision is large enough to verify for the first time the muonic and hadronic contributions to this anomaly.

  20. Fine structure of the isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usman, I. T.; Buthelezi, Z.; Carter, J.; Cooper, G. R. J.; Fearick, R. W.; Förtsch, S. V.; Fujita, H.; Fujita, Y.; von Neumann-Cosel, P.; Neveling, R.; Papakonstantinou, P.; Pysmenetska, I.; Richter, A.; Roth, R.; Sideras-Haddad, E.; Smit, F. D.

    2016-08-01

    The isoscalar giant quadrupole resonance in 28Si and 27Al has been investigated with high-energy-resolution proton inelastic scattering at Ep=200 MeV and at scattering angles close to the maximum of Δ L =2 angular distributions with the K600 magnetic spectrometer of iThemba LABS, South Africa. Characteristic scales are extracted from the observed fine structure with a wavelet analysis and compared for 28Si with random-phase approximation and second random phase approximation calculations with an interaction derived from the Argonne V18 potential by a unitary transformation. A recent extension of the method to deformed nuclei provides the best description of the data, suggesting the significance of Landau damping.