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Sample records for absorption fluorescence excitation

  1. Excitation energy dependence of excited states dynamics in all- trans-carotenes determined by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Yanagi, Kazuhiro; Nishio, Tomohiro; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2005-06-01

    Ultrafast relaxation kinetics in β-carotene and lycopene has been investigated by femtosecond absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies using tunable excitation pulses. The transient signals induced by the photoexcitation with larger excess energy have broader bands and longer lifetimes both in the 11Bu+and21Ag- excited states. The excess vibrational energy remains longer than several picoseconds and slows the relaxation kinetics in carotenoids.

  2. Fluorescence, Absorption, and Excitation Spectra of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons as a Tool for Quantitative Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rivera-Figueroa, A. M.; Ramazan, K. A.; Finlayson-Pitts, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    A quantitative and qualitative study of the interplay between absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of pollutants called polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is conducted. The study of five PAH displays the correlation of the above-mentioned properties along with the associated molecular changes.

  3. Excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+:KY3F10

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Labbé, C.; Doualan, J. L.; Moncorgé, R.; Braud, A.; Camy, P.

    2018-05-01

    We report here on a complete investigation of the excited-state absorption and fluorescence dynamics of Er3+ doped KY3F10 single crystals versus dopant concentrations and optical excitation conditions. Radiative and effective (including non-radiative relaxations) emission lifetimes and branching ratios are determined from a Judd-Ofelt analysis of the absorption spectra and via specific fluorescence experiments using wavelength selective laser excitations. Excited-state absorption and emission spectra are registered within seven spectral domains, i.e. 560 nm, 650 nm, 710 nm, 810 nm, 970 nm, 1550 nm and 2750 nm. A maximum gain cross-section of 0.93 × 10-21 cm2 is determined at the potential laser wavelength of 2.801 μm for a population ratio of 0.48. Saturation of fluorescence intensities and variations of population ratios versus pumping rates are registered and confronted with a rate equation model to derive the rates of the most important up-conversion and cross-relaxation energy transfers occurring at high dopant concentrations.

  4. Two-Photon Excitation, Fluorescence Microscopy, and Quantitative Measurement of Two-Photon Absorption Cross Sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeArmond, Fredrick Michael

    As optical microscopy techniques continue to improve, most notably the development of super-resolution optical microscopy which garnered the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 2014, renewed emphasis has been placed on the development and use of fluorescence microscopy techniques. Of particular note is a renewed interest in multiphoton excitation due to a number of inherent properties of the technique including simplified optical filtering, increased sample penetration, and inherently confocal operation. With this renewed interest in multiphoton fluorescence microscopy, comes an increased demand for robust non-linear fluorescent markers, and characterization of the associated tool set. These factors have led to an experimental setup to allow a systematized approach for identifying and characterizing properties of fluorescent probes in the hopes that the tool set will provide researchers with additional information to guide their efforts in developing novel fluorophores suitable for use in advanced optical microscopy techniques as well as identifying trends for their synthesis. Hardware was setup around a software control system previously developed. Three experimental tool sets were set up, characterized, and applied over the course of this work. These tools include scanning multiphoton fluorescence microscope with single molecule sensitivity, an interferometric autocorrelator for precise determination of the bandwidth and pulse width of the ultrafast Titanium Sapphire excitation source, and a simplified fluorescence microscope for the measurement of two-photon absorption cross sections. Resulting values for two-photon absorption cross sections and two-photon absorption action cross sections for two standardized fluorophores, four commercially available fluorophores, and ten novel fluorophores are presented as well as absorption and emission spectra.

  5. Measurement of two-photon-absorption spectra through nonlinear fluorescence produced by a line-shaped excitation beam.

    PubMed

    Hasani, E; Parravicini, J; Tartara, L; Tomaselli, A; Tomassini, D

    2018-05-01

    We propose an innovative experimental approach to estimate the two-photon absorption (TPA) spectrum of a fluorescent material. Our method develops the standard indirect fluorescence-based method for the TPA measurement by employing a line-shaped excitation beam, generating a line-shaped fluorescence emission. Such a configuration, which requires a relatively high amount of optical power, permits to have a greatly increased fluorescence signal, thus avoiding the photon counterdetection devices usually used in these measurements, and allowing to employ detectors such as charge-coupled device (CCD) cameras. The method is finally tested on a fluorescent isothiocyanate sample, whose TPA spectrum, which is measured with the proposed technique, is compared with the TPA spectra reported in the literature, confirming the validity of our experimental approach. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Fluorescence and picosecond induced absorption from the lowest singlet excited states of quercetin in solutions and polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, S. L.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Raichenok, T. F.

    2017-03-01

    The spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant antioxidant quercetin in organic solvents, polymer films of polyvinyl alcohol, and a buffer solution at pH 7.0 are studied by stationary luminescence and femtosecond laser spectroscopy at room temperature and 77 K. The large magnitude of the dipole moment of the quercetin molecule in the excited Franck-Condon state μ e FC = 52.8 C m indicates the dipolar nature of quercetin in this excited state. The transient induced absorption spectra S 1→ S n in all solvents are characterized by a short-wave band at λ abs max = 460 nm with exponential decay times in the range of 10.0-20.0 ps. In the entire spectral range at times of >100 ps, no residual induced absorption was observed that could be attributed to the triplet-triplet transitions T 1 → T k in quercetin. In polar solvents, two-band fluorescence was also recorded at room temperature, which is due to the luminescence of the initial enol form of quercetin ( 415 nm) and its keto form with a transferred proton (550 nm). The short-wave band is absent in nonpolar 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF). The spectra of fluorescence and fluorescence excitation exhibit a low dependence on the wavelength of excitation and detection, which may be related to the solvation and conformational changes in the quercetin molecule. Decreasing the temperature of a glassy-like freezing quercetin solution in ethanol and 2-MTHF to 77 K leads to a strong increase in the intensity (by a factor of 100) of both bands. The energy circuits for the proton transfer process are proposed depending on the polarity of the medium. The main channel for the exchange of electronic excitation energy in the quercetin molecule at room temperature is the internal conversion S 1 ⇝ S 0, induced by the state with a proton transfer.

  7. Light Absorption and Excitation-Emission Fluorescence of Urban Organic Aerosol Components and Their Relationship to Chemical Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qingcai; Ikemori, Fumikazu; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-10-18

    The present study used a combination of solvent and solid-phase extractions to fractionate organic compounds with different polarities from total suspended particulates in Nagoya, Japan, and their optical characteristics were obtained on the basis of their UV-visible absorption spectra and excitation-emission matrices (EEMs). The relationship between their optical characteristics and chemical structures was investigated based on high-resolution aerosol mass spectra (HR-AMS spectra), soft ionization mass spectra and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectra. The major light-absorption organics were less polar organic fractions, which tended to have higher mass absorption efficiencies (MAEs) and lower wavelength dependent Ångström exponents (Å) than the more polar organic fractions. Correlation analyses indicate that organic compounds with O and N atoms may contribute largely to the total light absorption and fluorescence of the organic aerosol components. The extracts from the aerosol samples were further characterized by a classification of the EEM profiles using a PARAFAC model. Different fluorescence components in the aerosol organic EEMs were associated with specific AMS ions and with different functional groups from the FT-IR analysis. These results may be useful to determine and further classify the chromophores in atmospheric organic aerosols using EEM spectroscopy.

  8. Excitation/Detection Strategies for OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Presence of Interfering Fuel Signal and Absorption Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) excitation/detection methods have been applied to obtain spatial distributions of the hydroxyl [OH] reacting intermediary and hydrocarbon [HC] primary species in laminar and turbulent combustion reactions. In this report, broadband and narrowband excitation/filtering techniques are explored to identify an optimal experimental configuration yielding significant fluorescent signal with low absorption losses. The combustion environments analyzed include 1) a laminar non-premixed methane/air flame and 2) a turbulent, non-premixed Jet-A/air fueled flame within a lean flame tube combustor. Hydrocarbon-based fuel and OH were excited via the R1 (1), R1(10) and R2(7) transitions of the A(sup 2)Epsilon(+) X(sup 2)pi(1,0) band using a broadband Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and narrowband Nd:YAG/dye laser with ultraviolet frequency extension (UVX) package. Variables tested for influence on fluorescent signal and absorption characteristics were excitation line, laser energy, exciting linewidth, combustion reactants, and test flow conditions. Results are intended to guide the transition from a dye/UVX laser to an OPO system for performing advanced diagnostics of low-emission combustion concepts.

  9. Quantitative treatment of the solvent effects on the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectra of acridines and phenazines. The ground and first excited singlet-state dipole moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaron, Jean Jacques; Maafi, Mounir; Párkányi, Cyril; Boniface, Christian

    1995-04-01

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of four acridines (acridine, Acridine Yellow, 9-aminoacridine and proflavine) and three phenazines (phenazine, neutral Red and safranine) are determined at room temperature (298 K) in several solvents of various polarities (dioxane, chloroform, ethyl ether, ethyl acetate, 1-butanol, 2-propanol, ethanol, methanol, dimethylformamide, acetonitrile and dimethyl sulfoxide). The effect of the solvent upon the spectral characteristics of the above compounds, is studied. In combination with the ground-state dipole moments of these compounds, the spectral data are used to evaluate their first excited singlet-state dipole moments by means of the solvatochromic shift method (Bakhshiev's and Kawski-Chamma-Viallet's correlations). The theoretical ground and excited singlet-state dipole moments for acridines and phenazines are also calculated as a vector sum of the π-component (obtained by the PPP method) and the σ-component (obtained from σ-bond moments). For most acridines and phenazines under study, the experimental excited singlet-state dipole moments are found to be higher than their ground state counterpart. The application of the Kamlet-Abboud-Taft solvatochromic parameters to the solvent effect on spectral properties of acridine and phenazine derivatives is discussed.

  10. Prediction of BOD, COD, and total nitrogen concentrations in a typical urban river using a fluorescence excitation-emission matrix with PARAFAC and UV absorption indices.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Cho, Jinwoo

    2012-01-01

    The development of a real-time monitoring tool for the estimation of water quality is essential for efficient management of river pollution in urban areas. The Gap River in Korea is a typical urban river, which is affected by the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) and various anthropogenic activities. In this study, fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEM) with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and UV absorption values at 220 nm and 254 nm were applied to evaluate the estimation capabilities for biochemical oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total nitrogen (TN) concentrations of the river samples. Three components were successfully identified by the PARAFAC modeling from the fluorescence EEM data, in which each fluorophore group represents microbial humic-like (C1), terrestrial humic-like organic substances (C2), and protein-like organic substances (C3), and UV absorption indices (UV(220) and UV(254)), and the score values of the three PARAFAC components were selected as the estimation parameters for the nitrogen and the organic pollution of the river samples. Among the selected indices, UV(220), C3 and C1 exhibited the highest correlation coefficients with BOD, COD, and TN concentrations, respectively. Multiple regression analysis using UV(220) and C3 demonstrated the enhancement of the prediction capability for TN.

  11. Estimation of ground and excited state dipole moment of laser dyes C504T and C521T using solvatochromic shifts of absorption and fluorescence spectra.

    PubMed

    Basavaraja, Jana; Suresh Kumar, H M; Inamdar, S R; Wari, M N

    2016-02-05

    The absorption and fluorescence spectra of laser dyes: coumarin 504T (C504T) and coumarin 521T (C521T) have been recorded at room temperature in a series of non-polar and polar solvents. The spectra of these dyes showed bathochromic shift with increasing in solvent polarity indicating the involvement of π→π⁎ transition. Kamlet-Taft and Catalan solvent parameters were used to analyze the effect of solvents on C504T and C521T molecules. The study reveals that both general solute-solvent interactions and specific interactions are operative in these two systems. The ground state dipole moment was estimated using Guggenheim's method and also by quantum mechanical calculations. The solvatochromic data were used to determine the excited state dipole moment (μ(e)). It is observed that dipole moment value of excited state (μ(e)) is higher than that of the ground state in both the laser dyes indicating that these dyes are more polar in nature in the excited state than in the ground state. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Waveguide-excited fluorescence microarray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagarzazu, Gabriel; Bedu, Mélanie; Martinelli, Lucio; Ha, Khoi-Nguyen; Pelletier, Nicolas; Safarov, Viatcheslav I.; Weisbuch, Claude; Gacoin, Thierry; Benisty, Henri

    2008-04-01

    Signal-to-noise ratio is a crucial issue in microarray fluorescence read-out. Several strategies are proposed for its improvement. First, light collection in conventional microarrays scanners is quite limited. It was recently shown that almost full collection can be achieved in an integrated lens-free biosensor, with labelled species hybridizing practically on the surface of a sensitive silicon detector [L. Martinelli et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 91, 083901 (2007)]. However, even with such an improvement, the ultimate goal of real-time measurements during hybridization is challenging: the detector is dazzled by the large fluorescence of labelled species in the solution. In the present paper we show that this unwanted signal can effectively be reduced if the excitation light is confined in a waveguide. Moreover, the concentration of excitation light in a waveguide results in a huge signal gain. In our experiment we realized a structure consisting of a high index sol-gel waveguide deposited on a low-index substrate. The fluorescent molecules deposited on the surface of the waveguide were excited by the evanescent part of a wave travelling in the guide. The comparison with free-space excitation schemes confirms a huge gain (by several orders of magnitude) in favour of waveguide-based excitation. An optical guide deposited onto an integrated biosensor thus combines both advantages of ideal light collection and enhanced surface localized excitation without compromising the imaging properties. Modelling predicts a negligible penalty from spatial cross-talk in practical applications. We believe that such a system would bring microarrays to hitherto unattained sensitivities.

  13. Control of excitation in the fluorescence microscope.

    PubMed

    Lea, D J; Ward, D J

    1979-01-01

    In fluorescence microscopy image brightness and contrast and the rate of fading depend upon the intensity of illumination of the specimen. An iris diaphragm or neutral density filters may be used to reduce fluorescence excitation. Also the excitation bandwidth may be varied by using a broad band exciter filter with a set of interchangeable yellow glass filters at the lamphouse.

  14. Combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Arafat Hossain, Md; Canning, John; Ast, Sandra; Cook, Kevin; Rutledge, Peter J; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2015-04-15

    A combined "dual" absorption and fluorescence smartphone spectrometer is demonstrated. The optical sources used in the system are the white flash LED of the smartphone and an orthogonally positioned and interchangeable UV (λex=370  nm) and blue (λex=450  nm) LED. The dispersive element is a low-cost, nano-imprinted diffraction grating coated with Au. Detection over a 300 nm span with 0.42 nm/pixel resolution was carried out with the camera CMOS chip. By integrating the blue and UV excitation sources into the white LED circuitry, the entire system is self-contained within a 3D printed case and powered from the smartphone battery; the design can be scaled to add further excitation sources. Using a customized app, acquisition of absorption and fluorescence spectra are demonstrated using a blue-absorbing and green-emitting pH-sensitive amino-naphthalimide-based fluorescent probe and a UV-absorbing and blue-emitting Zn2+-sensitive fluoro-ionophore.

  15. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Bixler, Joel N; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU.

  16. Intravital Fluorescence Excitation in Whole-Animal Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bixler, Joel N.; Kong, Ying; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Maitland, Kristen C.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-animal fluorescence imaging with recombinant or fluorescently-tagged pathogens or cells enables real-time analysis of disease progression and treatment response in live animals. Tissue absorption limits penetration of fluorescence excitation light, particularly in the visible wavelength range, resulting in reduced sensitivity to deep targets. Here, we demonstrate the use of an optical fiber bundle to deliver light into the mouse lung to excite fluorescent bacteria, circumventing tissue absorption of excitation light in whole-animal imaging. We present the use of this technology to improve detection of recombinant reporter strains of tdTomato-expressing Mycobacterium bovis BCG (Bacillus Calmette Guerin) bacteria in the mouse lung. A microendoscope was integrated into a whole-animal fluorescence imager to enable intravital excitation in the mouse lung with whole-animal detection. Using this technique, the threshold of detection was measured as 103 colony forming units (CFU) during pulmonary infection. In comparison, the threshold of detection for whole-animal fluorescence imaging using standard epi-illumination was greater than 106 CFU. PMID:26901051

  17. Application of excitation and emission matrix fluorescence (EEM) and UV-vis absorption to monitor the characteristics of Alizarin Red S (ARS) during electro-Fenton degradation process.

    PubMed

    Lai, Bo; Zhou, Yuexi; Wang, Juling; Yang, Zhishan; Chen, Zhiqiang

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative degradation of Alizarin Red S (ARS) in aqueous solutions by using electro-Fenton was studied. At first, effect of operating parameters such as current density, aeration rate and initial pH on the degradation of ARS were studied by using UV-vis spectrum, respectively. Then, under the optimal operating conditions (current density: 10.0mAcm(-2), aeration rate: 1000mLmin(-1), initial pH: 2.8), the identification of degradation products of ARS was carried out by using GC-MS and HPLC, meanwhile its degradation pathway was proposed according to the intermediates. Considering the location, intensity and intensity ratio of fluorescence center peak of the ARS in aqueous solution, a convenient and quick monitoring method by using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectrum technology was developed to monitor the degradation degree of ARS through electro-Fenton process. Furthermore, it is suggested that the developed method would be promising for the quick analysis and evaluation of the degradation degree of the pollutants with π-conjugated system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Two-photon excitation fluorescence bioassays.

    PubMed

    Hänninen, Pekka; Soukka, Jori; Soini, Juhani T

    2008-01-01

    Application of two-photon excitation of fluorescence in microscopy is one of the major discoveries of the "renaissance" of light microscopy that started in the 1980s. The technique derives its advantages from the biologically "smooth" wavelength of the excitation light and the confinement of the excitation. Difficult, and seemingly nontransparent, samples may be imaged with the technique with good resolution. Although the bioresearch has been concentrating mostly on the positive properties of the technique for imaging, the same properties may be applied successfully to nonimaging bioassays. This article focuses on the development path of two-photon excitation-based assay system.

  19. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and cavity ring-down (CRD) absorption spectroscopy of oil-contaminated jet fuel using fiber-optic probes.

    PubMed

    Omrani, Hengameh; Barnes, Jack A; Dudelzak, Alexander E; Loock, Hans-Peter; Waechter, Helen

    2012-06-21

    Excitation emission matrix (EEM) and cavity ring-down (CRD) spectral signatures have been used to detect and quantitatively assess contamination of jet fuels with aero-turbine lubricating oil. The EEM spectrometer has been fiber-coupled to permit in situ measurements of jet turbine oil contamination of jet fuel. Parallel Factor (PARAFAC) analysis as well as Principal Component Analysis and Regression (PCA/PCR) were used to quantify oil contamination in a range from the limit of detection (10 ppm) to 1000 ppm. Fiber-loop cavity ring-down spectroscopy using a pulsed 355 nm laser was used to quantify the oil contamination in the range of 400 ppm to 100,000 ppm. Both methods in combination therefore permit the detection of oil contamination with a linear dynamic range of about 10,000.

  20. Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine at 170 nm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herring, G. C.; Dyer, Mark J.; Jusinski, Leonard E.; Bischel, William K.

    1988-01-01

    Two-photon-excited fluorescence spectroscopy of atomic fluorine is reported. A doubled dye laser at 286-nm is Raman shifted in H2 to 170 nm (sixth anti-Stokes order) to excite ground-state 2P(0)J fluorine atoms to the 2D(0)J level. The fluorine atoms are detected by one of two methods: observing the fluorescence decay to the 2PJ level or observing F(+) production through the absorption of an additional photon by the excited atoms. Relative two-photon absorption cross sections to and the radiative lifetimes of the 2D(0)J states are measured.

  1. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Ji; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia

    2013-05-10

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and a-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ~100 ppb ammonia vapor in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM)more » spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (~0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for excitation = 420+- 50 nm and emission = 475 +- 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to excitation = 320 +- 25 nm and emission = 425 +- 38 nm for the a-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Our study suggests that, despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles should have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.« less

  2. Evanescent excitation and emission in fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2013-04-02

    Evanescent light-light that does not propagate but instead decays in intensity over a subwavelength distance-appears in both excitation (as in total internal reflection) and emission (as in near-field imaging) forms in fluorescence microscopy. This review describes the physical connection between these two forms as a consequence of geometrical squeezing of wavefronts, and describes newly established or speculative applications and combinations of the two. In particular, each can be used in analogous ways to produce surface-selective images, to examine the thickness and refractive index of films (such as lipid multilayers or protein layers) on solid supports, and to measure the absolute distance of a fluorophore to a surface. In combination, the two forms can further increase selectivity and reduce background scattering in surface images. The polarization properties of each lead to more sensitive and accurate measures of fluorophore orientation and membrane micromorphology. The phase properties of the evanescent excitation lead to a method of creating a submicroscopic area of total internal reflection illumination or enhanced-resolution structured illumination. Analogously, the phase properties of evanescent emission lead to a method of producing a smaller point spread function, in a technique called virtual supercritical angle fluorescence. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Excitation-emission spectra and fluorescence quantum yields for fresh and aged biogenic secondary organic aerosols.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Ji Julie; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Nizkorodov, Sergey A

    2013-06-04

    Certain biogenic secondary organic aerosols (SOA) become absorbent and fluorescent when exposed to reduced nitrogen compounds such as ammonia, amines, and their salts. Fluorescent SOA may potentially be mistaken for biological particles by detection methods relying on fluorescence. This work quantifies the spectral distribution and effective quantum yields of fluorescence of water-soluble SOA generated from two monoterpenes, limonene and α-pinene, and two different oxidants, ozone (O3) and hydroxyl radical (OH). The SOA was generated in a smog chamber, collected on substrates, and aged by exposure to ∼100 ppb ammonia in air saturated with water vapor. Absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra of aqueous extracts of aged and control SOA samples were measured, and the effective absorption coefficients and fluorescence quantum yields (∼0.005 for 349 nm excitation) were determined from the data. The strongest fluorescence for the limonene-derived SOA was observed for λexcitation = 420 ± 50 nm and λemission = 475 ± 38 nm. The window of the strongest fluorescence shifted to λexcitation = 320 ± 25 nm and λemission = 425 ± 38 nm for the α-pinene-derived SOA. Both regions overlap with the EEM spectra of some of the fluorophores found in primary biological aerosols. Despite the low quantum yield, the aged SOA particles may have sufficient fluorescence intensities to interfere with the fluorescence detection of common bioaerosols.

  4. Absorption bleaching of squarylium dye J aggregates via a two-photon excitation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuki, Makoto; Tian, Minquan; Sato, Yasuhiro; Pu, Lyong Sun; Tatsuura, Satoshi; Abe, Shuji

    2001-08-01

    Squarylium dye J aggregates exhibit ultrafast nonlinear optical response of absorption saturation at the resonant wavelength of 770 nm. We studied the two-photon excitation process of J aggregates. By fluorescence measurement, we found the two-photon absorption band at 1.3 μm, which was different from that of the dye solution at 1.2 μm. Absorption saturation at 770 nm via a two-photon excitation process was observed by two-photon resonant excitation at 1.3 μm and also by off-resonant excitation at 1.55 μm, suggesting the possibility of J aggregates for optical switching materials working at the wavelength used in optical communications.

  5. Optimal fluorescence waveband determination for detecting defect cherry tomatoes using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A multi-spectral fluorescence imaging technique was used to detect defect cherry tomatoes. The fluorescence excitation and emission matrix was used to measure for defects, sound surface, and stem areas to determine the optimal fluorescence excitation and emission wavelengths for discrimination. Two-...

  6. Interferometric temporal focusing microscopy using three-photon excitation fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Toda, Keisuke; Isobe, Keisuke; Namiki, Kana; Kawano, Hiroyuki; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Midorikawa, Katsumi

    2018-04-01

    Super-resolution microscopy has become a powerful tool for biological research. However, its spatial resolution and imaging depth are limited, largely due to background light. Interferometric temporal focusing (ITF) microscopy, which combines structured illumination microscopy and three-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy, can overcome these limitations. Here, we demonstrate ITF microscopy using three-photon excitation fluorescence, which has a spatial resolution of 106 nm at an imaging depth of 100 µm with an excitation wavelength of 1060 nm.

  7. Study on excitation and fluorescence spectrums of Japanese citruses to construct machine vision systems for acquiring fluorescent images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momin, Md. Abdul; Kondo, Naoshi; Kuramoto, Makoto; Ogawa, Yuichi; Shigi, Tomoo

    2011-06-01

    Research was conducted to acquire knowledge of the ultraviolet and visible spectrums from 300 -800 nm of some common varieties of Japanese citrus, to investigate the best wave-lengths for fluorescence excitation and the resulting fluorescence wave-lengths and to provide a scientific background for the best quality fluorescent imaging technique for detecting surface defects of citrus. A Hitachi U-4000 PC-based microprocessor controlled spectrophotometer was used to measure the absorption spectrum and a Hitachi F-4500 spectrophotometer was used for the fluorescence and excitation spectrums. We analyzed the spectrums and the selected varieties of citrus were categorized into four groups of known fluorescence level, namely strong, medium, weak and no fluorescence.The level of fluorescence of each variety was also examined by using machine vision system. We found that around 340-380 nm LEDs or UV lamps are appropriate as lighting devices for acquiring the best quality fluorescent image of the citrus varieties to examine their fluorescence intensity. Therefore an image acquisition device was constructed with three different lighting panels with UV LED at peak 365 nm, Blacklight blue lamps (BLB) peak at 350 nm and UV-B lamps at peak 306 nm. The results from fluorescent images also revealed that the findings of the measured spectrums worked properly and can be used for practical applications such as for detecting rotten, injured or damaged parts of a wide variety of citrus.

  8. Up-conversion fluorescence: noncoherent excitation by sunlight.

    PubMed

    Baluschev, S; Miteva, T; Yakutkin, V; Nelles, G; Yasuda, A; Wegner, G

    2006-10-06

    We demonstrate up-conversion of noncoherent sunlight realized by ultralow excitation intensity. The bimolecular up-conversion process in our systems relies on the presence of a metastable triplet excited state, and thus has dramatically different photophysical characteristics relative to the other known methods for photon up-conversion (two-photon absorption, parametric processes, second harmonic generation, sequential multiphoton absorption, etc.).

  9. Excitation anisotropy in laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy: Broad-line excitation case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, A.; Nambu, Y.; Fujimoto, T.

    1986-01-01

    Treatment of excitation anisotropy for Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS) is extended to the intense excitation case. The depolarization coefficient is derived for intense excitation limit (linearly-polarized or unpolarized light excitation), and the result is presented in tables. For the region of intermediate intensity between the weak and intense excitation limits, the master equation is solved for specific example of transitions and its result is compared with experiment.

  10. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for colon cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Walters, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-10-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the potential to discriminate between cancerous and noncancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. However, to date, these techniques have not been effectively translated to real-time endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents new technology that may be well suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the initial feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging for measuring changes in fluorescence excitation spectrum concurrent with colonic adenocarcinoma using a small pre-pilot-scale sample size. Ex vivo analysis was performed using resected pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) permanent sections. Specimens were imaged using a custom hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation-scanning microscope system. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation range of 390 to 450 nm that could be the basis for wavelength-dependent detection of colorectal cancers. Hence, excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for discriminating adenocarcinoma from surrounding normal colonic mucosa, but further studies will be required to evaluate the accuracy of this approach using a larger patient cohort.

  11. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for colon cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Walters, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the potential to discriminate between cancerous and noncancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. However, to date, these techniques have not been effectively translated to real-time endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents new technology that may be well suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The goal of this study was to evaluate the initial feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging for measuring changes in fluorescence excitation spectrum concurrent with colonic adenocarcinoma using a small pre-pilot-scale sample size. Ex vivo analysis was performed using resected pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal mucosa. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) permanent sections. Specimens were imaged using a custom hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation-scanning microscope system. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation range of 390 to 450 nm that could be the basis for wavelength-dependent detection of colorectal cancers. Hence, excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for discriminating adenocarcinoma from surrounding normal colonic mucosa, but further studies will be required to evaluate the accuracy of this approach using a larger patient cohort. PMID:27792808

  12. Excitation Anisotropy in Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Spectroscopy —High-Intensity, Broad-Line Excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirabayashi, Atsumu; Nambu, Yoshihiro; Fujimoto, Takashi

    1986-10-01

    The problem of excitation anisotropy in laser-induced-fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) was investigated for the intense excitation case under the broad-line condition. The depolarization coefficient for the fluorescence light was derived in the intense-excitation limit (linearly-polarized or unpolarized light excitation) and the results are presented in tables. In the region of intermediate intensity, between the weak and intense-excitation limits, the master equation was solved for a specific example of atomic transitions and its result is compared with experimental results.

  13. Two-photon excited fluorescence emission from hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Qiqi; Zeng, Yan; Zhang, Wei; Zheng, Wei; Luo, Yi; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2015-03-01

    Hemoglobin, one of the most important proteins in blood, is responsible for oxygen transportation in almost all vertebrates. Recently, we discovered two-photon excited hemoglobin fluorescence and achieved label-free microvascular imaging based on the hemoglobin fluorescence. However, the mechanism of its fluorescence emission still remains unknown. In this work, we studied the two-photon excited fluorescence properties of the hemoglobin subunits, heme/hemin (iron (II)/(III) protoporphyrin IX) and globin. We first studied the properties of heme and the similar spectral and temporal characteristics of heme and hemoglobin fluorescence provide strong evidence that heme is the fluorophore in hemoglobin. Then we studied the fluorescence properties of hemin, globin and methemoglobin, and found that the hemin may have the main effect on the methemoglobin fluorescence and that globin has tryptophan fluorescence like other proteins. Finally, since heme is a centrosymmetric molecule, that the Soret band fluorescence of heme and hemoglobin was not observed in the single photon process in the previous study may be due to the parity selection rule. The discovery of heme two-photon excited fluorescence may open a new window for heme biology research, since heme as a cofactor of hemoprotein has many functions, including chemical catalysis, electron transfer and diatomic gases transportation.

  14. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of vitiligo skin in vivo (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Jianhua; Richer, Vincent; Al Jasser, Mohammed; Zandi, Soodabeh; Kollias, Nikiforos; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; Lui, Harvey

    2016-02-01

    Fluorescence signals depend on the intensity of the exciting light, the absorption properties of the constituent molecules, and the efficiency with which the absorbed photons are converted to fluorescence emission. The optical features and appearance of vitiligo have been explained primarily on the basis of reduced epidermal pigmentation, which results in abnormal white patches on the skin. The objective of this study is to explore the fluorescence properties of vitiligo and its adjacent normal skin using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy. Thirty five (35) volunteers with vitiligo were acquired using a double-grating spectrofluorometer with excitation and emission wavelengths of 260-450 nm and 300-700 nm respectively. As expected, the most pronounced difference between the spectra obtained from vitiligo lesions compared to normally pigmented skin was that the overall fluorescence was much higher in vitiligo; these differences increased at shorter wavelengths, thus matching the characteristic spectral absorption of epidermal melanin. When comparing the fluorescence spectra from vitiligo to normal skin we detected three distinct spectral bands centered at 280nm, 310nm, and 335nm. The 280nm band may possibly be related to inflammation, whereas the 335 nm band may arise from collagen or keratin cross links. The source of the 310 nm band is uncertain; it is interesting to note its proximity to the 311 nm UV lamps used for vitiligo phototherapy. These differences are accounted for not only by changes in epidermal pigment content, but also by other optically active cutaneous biomolecules.

  15. Melanin fluorescence spectra by step-wise three photon excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Kerimo, Josef; DiMarzio, Charles A.

    2012-03-01

    Melanin is the characteristic chromophore of human skin with various potential biological functions. Kerimo discovered enhanced melanin fluorescence by stepwise three-photon excitation in 2011. In this article, step-wise three-photon excited fluorescence (STPEF) spectrum between 450 nm -700 nm of melanin is reported. The melanin STPEF spectrum exhibited an exponential increase with wavelength. However, there was a probability of about 33% that another kind of step-wise multi-photon excited fluorescence (SMPEF) that peaks at 525 nm, shown by previous research, could also be generated using the same process. Using an excitation source at 920 nm as opposed to 830 nm increased the potential for generating SMPEF peaks at 525 nm. The SMPEF spectrum peaks at 525 nm photo-bleached faster than STPEF spectrum.

  16. Red-light excitation of protoporphyrin IX fluorescence for subsurface tumor detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, David W; Olson, Jonathan D; Evans, Linton T; Kolste, Kolbein K; Kanick, Stephen C; Fan, Xiaoyao; Bravo, Jaime J; Wilson, Brian C; Leblond, Frederic; Marois, Mikael; Paulsen, Keith D

    2018-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to detect 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced tumor fluorescence from glioma below the surface of the surgical field by using red-light illumination. METHODS To overcome the shallow tissue penetration of blue light, which maximally excites the ALA-induced fluorophore protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) but is also strongly absorbed by hemoglobin and oxyhemoglobin, a system was developed to illuminate the surgical field with red light (620-640 nm) matching a secondary, smaller absorption peak of PpIX and detecting the fluorescence emission through a 650-nm longpass filter. This wide-field spectroscopic imaging system was used in conjunction with conventional blue-light fluorescence for comparison in 29 patients undergoing craniotomy for resection of high-grade glioma, low-grade glioma, meningioma, or metastasis. RESULTS Although, as expected, red-light excitation is less sensitive to PpIX in exposed tumor, it did reveal tumor at a depth up to 5 mm below the resection bed in 22 of 24 patients who also exhibited PpIX fluorescence under blue-light excitation during the course of surgery. CONCLUSIONS Red-light excitation of tumor-associated PpIX fluorescence below the surface of the surgical field can be achieved intraoperatively and enables detection of subsurface tumor that is not visualized under conventional blue-light excitation. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT02191488 (clinicaltrials.gov).

  17. Far wing depolarization of light - Generalized absorption profiles. [in laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Sr vapor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomann, P.; Burnett, K.; Cooper, J.

    1981-01-01

    An absorption (and/or emission) event which takes place during a strong collision is called a 'correlated event'. It is discussed how correlated events affect the far red wing depolarization of fluorescence. Attention is given to an atomic vapor which is irradiated by linearly polarized light of a frequency on the red side of the resonance line. Two limiting cases are considered, corresponding to excitation in the impact region and in the quasi-static wing. In the quasi-static wing, absorption of a photon followed by fluorescence (rather than Rayleigh scattering), occurs mostly during a collision. Correlated events dominate the scattering process. Expressions derived for the polarization of the fluorescent light are applied to far red wing depolarization. It is found that the polarization of the fluorescent light does not go to zero in the far wing, but depends crucially on the detailed nature of the anisotropy in the long-range part of the interatomic potential.

  18. Individual bioaerosol particle discrimination by multi-photon excited fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, Denis; Bonacina, Luigi; Wolf, Jean-Pierre

    2011-11-21

    Femtosecond laser induced multi-photon excited fluorescence (MPEF) from individual airborne particles is tested for the first time for discriminating bioaerosols. The fluorescence spectra, analysed in 32 channels, exhibit a composite character originating from simultaneous two-photon and three-photon excitation at 790 nm. Simulants of bacteria aggregates (clusters of dyed polystyrene microspheres) and different pollen particles (Ragweed, Pecan, Mulberry) are clearly discriminated by their MPEF spectra. This demonstration experiment opens the way to more sophisticated spectroscopic schemes like pump-probe and coherent control. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  19. Light emitting diode excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hart, Sean J; JiJi, Renée D

    2002-12-01

    An excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence instrument has been developed using a linear array of light emitting diodes (LED). The wavelengths covered extend from the upper UV through the visible spectrum: 370-640 nm. Using an LED array to excite fluorescence emission at multiple excitation wavelengths is a low-cost alternative to an expensive high power lamp and imaging spectrograph. The LED-EEM system is a departure from other EEM spectroscopy systems in that LEDs often have broad excitation ranges which may overlap with neighboring channels. The LED array can be considered a hybrid between a spectroscopic and sensor system, as the broad LED excitation range produces a partially selective optical measurement. The instrument has been tested and characterized using fluorescent dyes: limits of detection (LOD) for 9,10-bis(phenylethynyl)-anthracene and rhodamine B were in the mid parts-per-trillion range; detection limits for the other compounds were in the low parts-per-billion range (< 5 ppb). The LED-EEMs were analyzed using parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), which allowed the mathematical resolution of the individual contributions of the mono- and dianion fluorescein tautomers a priori. Correct identification and quantitation of six fluorescent dyes in two to six component mixtures (concentrations between 12.5 and 500 ppb) has been achieved with root mean squared errors of prediction (RMSEP) of less than 4.0 ppb for all components.

  20. Micromanipulation and physiological monitoring of cells using two-photon excited fluorescence in cw laser tweezers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sonek, Gregory J.; Liu, Yagang; Berns, Michael W.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    1996-05-01

    We report the observation of two-photon fluorescence excitation and cell confinement, simultaneously, in a continuous-wave (cw) single-beam gradient force optical trap, and demonstrate its use as an in-situ probe to study the physiological state of an optically confined cell sample. At the wavelength of 1064 nm, a single focused gaussian laser beam is used to simultaneously confine, and excite visible fluorescence from, a human sperm cell that has been tagged with propidium iodide, a exogenous fluorescent dye that functions as a viability assay of cellular physiological state. The intensity at the dye peak emission wavelength of 620 nm exhibits a near-square-law dependence on incident trapping beam photon laser power, a behavior consistent with a two-photon absorption process. In addition, for a sperm cell held stationary in the optical tweezers for a period of several minutes at a constant trapping power, red fluorescence emission was observed to increase the time, indicating that the cell has gradually transitioned between a live and dead state. Two-photon excited fluorescence was also observed in chinese hamster ovary cells that were confined by cw laser tweezers and stained with either propidium iodide or Snarf, a pH-sensitive dye probe. These results suggest that, for samples suitably tagged with fluorescent probes and vital stains, optical tweezers can be used to generate their own in-situ diagnostic optical probes of cellular viability or induced photodamage, via two-photon processes.

  1. Polymethine and squarylium molecules with large excited-state absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Jin Hong; Przhonska, Olga V.; Khodja, Salah; Yang, Sidney; Ross, T. S.; Hagan, David J.; Van Stryland, Eric W.; Bondar, Mikhail V.; Slominsky, Yuriy L.

    1999-07-01

    We study nonlinear absorption in a series of ten polymethine dyes and two squarylium dyes using Z-scan, pump-probe and optical limiting experiments. Both picosecond and nanosecond characterization were performed at 532 nm, while picosecond measurements were performed using an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) from 440 to 650 nm. The photophysical parameters of these dyes including cross sections and excited-state lifetimes are presented both in solution in ethanol and in an elastopolymeric material, polyurethane acrylate (PUA). We determine that the dominant nonlinearity in all these dyes is large excited-state absorption (ESA), i.e. reverse saturable absorption. For several of the dyes we measure a relatively large ground-state absorption cross section, σ01, which effectively populates an excited state that possesses an extremely large ESA cross section, σ12. The ratios of σ12/ σ01 are the largest we know of, up to 200 at 532 nm, and lead to very low thresholds for optical limiting. However, the lifetimes of the excited state are of the order of 1 ns in ethanol, which is increased to up to 3 ns in PUA. This lifetime is less than optimum for sensor protection applications for Q-switched inputs, and intersystem crossing times for these molecules are extremely long, so that triplet states are not populated. These parameters show a significant improvement over those of the first set of this class of dyes studied and indicate that further improvement of the photophysical parameters may be possible. From these measurements, correlations between molecular structure and nonlinear properties are made. We propose a five-level, all-singlet state model, which includes reorientation processes in the first excited state. This includes a trans- cis conformational change that leads to the formation of a new state with a new molecular configuration which is also absorbing but can undergo a light-induced degradation at high inputs.

  2. Integrated ultrasonic particle positioning and low excitation light fluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernassau, A. L.; Al-Rawhani, M.; Beeley, J.; Cumming, D. R. S.

    2013-12-01

    A compact hybrid system has been developed to position and detect fluorescent micro-particles by combining a Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) imager with an acoustic manipulator. The detector comprises a SPAD array, light-emitting diode (LED), lenses, and optical filters. The acoustic device is formed of multiple transducers surrounding an octagonal cavity. By stimulating pairs of transducers simultaneously, an acoustic landscape is created causing fluorescent micro-particles to agglomerate into lines. The fluorescent pattern is excited by a low power LED and detected by the SPAD imager. Our technique combines particle manipulation and visualization in a compact, low power, portable setup.

  3. Continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence parameters: a review for practitioners.

    PubMed

    Banks, Jonathan M

    2017-08-01

    This review introduces, defines and critically reviews a number of chlorophyll fluorescence parameters with specific reference to those derived from continuous excitation chlorophyll fluorescence. A number of common issues and criticisms are addressed. The parameters fluorescence origin (F0) and the performance indices (PI) are discussed as examples. This review attempts to unify definitions for the wide range of parameters available for measuring plant vitality, facilitating their calculation and use. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Double-excitation fluorescence spectral imaging: eliminating tissue auto-fluorescence from in vivo PPIX measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torosean, Sason; Flynn, Brendan; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Davis, Scott C.; Gunn, Jason; Axelsson, Johan; Pogue, Brian W.

    2012-02-01

    An ultrasound coupled handheld-probe-based optical fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system has been in development for the purpose of quantifying the production of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) in aminolevulinic acid treated (ALA), Basal Cell Carcinoma (BCC) in vivo. The design couples fiber-based spectral sampling of PPIX fluorescence emission with a high frequency ultrasound imaging system, allowing regionally localized fluorescence intensities to be quantified [1]. The optical data are obtained by sequential excitation of the tissue with a 633nm laser, at four source locations and five parallel detections at each of the five interspersed detection locations. This method of acquisition permits fluorescence detection for both superficial and deep locations in ultrasound field. The optical boundary data, tissue layers segmented from ultrasound image and diffusion theory are used to estimate the fluorescence in tissue layers. To improve the recovery of the fluorescence signal of PPIX, eliminating tissue autofluorescence is of great importance. Here the approach was to utilize measurements which straddled the steep Qband excitation peak of PPIX, via the integration of an additional laser source, exciting at 637 nm; a wavelength with a 2 fold lower PPIX excitation value than 633nm.The auto-fluorescence spectrum acquired from the 637 nm laser is then used to spectrally decouple the fluorescence data and produce an accurate fluorescence emission signal, because the two wavelengths have very similar auto-fluorescence but substantially different PPIX excitation levels. The accuracy of this method, using a single source detector pair setup, is verified through animal tumor model experiments, and the result is compared to different methods of fluorescence signal recovery.

  5. Two-dimensional Fano lineshapes: Excited-state absorption contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Pullerits, Tõnu; Hansen, Thorsten

    2018-05-01

    Fano interferences in nanostructures are influenced by dissipation effects as well as many-body interactions. Two-dimensional coherent spectroscopies have just begun to be applied to these systems where the spectroscopic signatures of a discrete-continuum structure are not known. In this article, we calculate the excited-state absorption contribution for different models of higher lying excited states. We find that the characteristic asymmetry of one-dimensional spectroscopies is recovered from the many-body contributions and that the higher lying excited manifolds have distorted lineshapes that are not anticipated from discrete-level Hamiltonians. We show that the Stimulated Emission cannot have contributions from a flat continuum of states. This work completes the Ground-State Bleach and Stimulated Emission signals that were calculated previously [D. Finkelstein-Shapiro et al., Phys. Rev. B 94, 205137 (2016)]. The model reproduces the observations reported for molecules on surfaces probed by 2DIR.

  6. Two-dimensional Fano lineshapes: Excited-state absorption contributions.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein-Shapiro, Daniel; Pullerits, Tõnu; Hansen, Thorsten

    2018-05-14

    Fano interferences in nanostructures are influenced by dissipation effects as well as many-body interactions. Two-dimensional coherent spectroscopies have just begun to be applied to these systems where the spectroscopic signatures of a discrete-continuum structure are not known. In this article, we calculate the excited-state absorption contribution for different models of higher lying excited states. We find that the characteristic asymmetry of one-dimensional spectroscopies is recovered from the many-body contributions and that the higher lying excited manifolds have distorted lineshapes that are not anticipated from discrete-level Hamiltonians. We show that the Stimulated Emission cannot have contributions from a flat continuum of states. This work completes the Ground-State Bleach and Stimulated Emission signals that were calculated previously [D. Finkelstein-Shapiro et al., Phys. Rev. B 94, 205137 (2016)]. The model reproduces the observations reported for molecules on surfaces probed by 2DIR.

  7. Optimizing ultrafast illumination for multiphoton-excited fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Stoltzfus, Caleb R.; Rebane, Aleksander

    2016-01-01

    We study the optimal conditions for high throughput two-photon excited fluorescence (2PEF) and three-photon excited fluorescence (3PEF) imaging using femtosecond lasers. We derive relations that allow maximization of the rate of imaging depending on the average power, pulse repetition rate, and noise characteristics of the laser, as well as on the size and structure of the sample. We perform our analysis using ~100 MHz, ~1 MHz and 1 kHz pulse rates and using both a tightly-focused illumination beam with diffraction-limited image resolution, as well loosely focused illumination with a relatively low image resolution, where the latter utilizes separate illumination and fluorescence detection beam paths. Our theoretical estimates agree with the experiments, which makes our approach especially useful for optimizing high throughput imaging of large samples with a field-of-view up to 10x10 cm2. PMID:27231620

  8. Absorption Reconstruction Improves Biodistribution Assessment of Fluorescent Nanoprobes Using Hybrid Fluorescence-mediated Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Gremse, Felix; Theek, Benjamin; Kunjachan, Sijumon; Lederle, Wiltrud; Pardo, Alessa; Barth, Stefan; Lammers, Twan; Naumann, Uwe; Kiessling, Fabian

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT) holds potential for accelerating diagnostic and theranostic drug development. However, for proper quantitative fluorescence reconstruction, knowledge on optical scattering and absorption, which are highly heterogeneous in different (mouse) tissues, is required. We here describe methods to assess these parameters using co-registered micro Computed Tomography (µCT) data and nonlinear whole-animal absorption reconstruction, and evaluate their importance for assessment of the biodistribution and target site accumulation of fluorophore-labeled drug delivery systems. Methods: Besides phantoms with varying degrees of absorption, mice bearing A431 tumors were imaged 15 min and 48 h after i.v. injection of a fluorophore-labeled polymeric drug carrier (pHPMA-Dy750) using µCT-FMT. The outer shape of mice and a scattering map were derived using automated segmentation of the µCT data. Furthermore, a 3D absorption map was reconstructed from the trans-illumination data. We determined the absorption of five interactively segmented regions (heart, liver, kidney, muscle, tumor). Since blood is the main near-infrared absorber in vivo, the absorption was also estimated from the relative blood volume (rBV), determined by contrast-enhanced µCT. We compared the reconstructed absorption with the rBV-based values and analyzed the effect of using the absorption map on the fluorescence reconstruction. Results: Phantom experiments demonstrated that absorption reconstruction is possible and necessary for quantitative fluorescence reconstruction. In vivo, the reconstructed absorption showed high values in strongly blood-perfused organs such as the heart, liver and kidney. The absorption values correlated strongly with the rBV-based absorption values, confirming the accuracy of the absorption reconstruction. Usage of homogenous absorption instead of the reconstructed absorption map resulted in reduced values in the heart, liver and kidney, by

  9. [Study of the Detecting System of CH4 and SO2 Based on Spectral Absorption Method and UV Fluorescence Method].

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-tao; Wang, Zhi-fang; Liu, Ming-hua; Wei, Meng; Chen, Dong-ying; Wang, Xing-long

    2016-01-01

    According to the spectral absorption characteristics of polluting gases and fluorescence characteristics, a time-division multiplexing detection system is designed. Through this system we can detect Methane (CH4) and sulfur dioxide (SO2) by using spectral absorption method and the SO2 can be detected by using UV fluorescence method. The system consists of four parts: a combination of a light source which could be switched, the common optical path, the air chamber and the signal processing section. The spectral absorption characteristics and fluorescence characteristics are measured first. Then the experiment of detecting CH4 and SO2 through spectral absorption method and the experiment of detecting SO2 through UV fluorescence method are conducted, respectively. Through measuring characteristics of spectral absorption and fluorescence, we get excitation wavelengths of SO2 and CH4 measured by spectral absorption method at the absorption peak are 280 nm and 1.64 μm, respectively, and the optimal excitation wavelength of SO2 measured by UV fluorescence method is 220 nm. we acquire the linear relation between the concentration of CH4 and relative intensity and the linear relation between the concentration of SO2 and output voltage after conducting the experiment of spectral absorption method, and the linearity are 98.7%, 99.2% respectively. Through the experiment of UV fluorescence method we acquire that the relation between the concentration of SO2 and the voltage is linear, and the linearity is 99.5%. Research shows that the system is able to be applied to detect the polluted gas by absorption spectrum method and UV fluorescence method. Combing these two measurement methods decreases the costing and the volume, and this system can also be used to measure the other gases. Such system has a certain value of application.

  10. Two-color two-photon excited fluorescence of indole: Determination of wavelength-dependent molecular parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbrich, Sebastian; Al-Hadhuri, Tawfik; Gericke, Karl-Heinz; Shternin, Peter S.; Smolin, Andrey G.; Vasyutinskii, Oleg S.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed study of two-color two-photon excited fluorescence in indole dissolved in propylene glycol. Femtosecond excitation pulses at effective wavelengths from 268 to 293.33 nm were used to populate the two lowest indole excited states 1La and 1Lb and polarized fluorescence was then detected. All seven molecular parameters and the two-photon polarization ratio Ω containing information on two-photon absorption dynamics, molecular lifetime τf, and rotation correlation time τrot have been determined from experiment and analyzed as a function of the excitation wavelength. The analysis of the experimental data has shown that 1Lb-1La inversion occurred under the conditions of our experiment. The two-photon absorption predominantly populated the 1La state at all excitation wavelengths but in the 287-289 nm area which contained an absorption hump of the 1Lb state 0-0 origin. The components of the two-photon excitation tensor S were analyzed giving important information on the principal tensor axes and absorption symmetry. The results obtained are in a good agreement with the results reported by other groups. The lifetime τf and the rotation correlation time τrot showed no explicit dependence on the effective excitation wavelength. Their calculated weighted average values were found to be τf = 3.83 ± 0.14 ns and τrot = 0.74 ± 0.06 ns.

  11. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M.; Specht, Christian G.; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling. PMID:26711992

  12. Small fluorescence-activating and absorption-shifting tag for tunable protein imaging in vivo.

    PubMed

    Plamont, Marie-Aude; Billon-Denis, Emmanuelle; Maurin, Sylvie; Gauron, Carole; Pimenta, Frederico M; Specht, Christian G; Shi, Jian; Quérard, Jérôme; Pan, Buyan; Rossignol, Julien; Moncoq, Karine; Morellet, Nelly; Volovitch, Michel; Lescop, Ewen; Chen, Yong; Triller, Antoine; Vriz, Sophie; Le Saux, Thomas; Jullien, Ludovic; Gautier, Arnaud

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents Yellow Fluorescence-Activating and absorption-Shifting Tag (Y-FAST), a small monomeric protein tag, half as large as the green fluorescent protein, enabling fluorescent labeling of proteins in a reversible and specific manner through the reversible binding and activation of a cell-permeant and nontoxic fluorogenic ligand (a so-called fluorogen). A unique fluorogen activation mechanism based on two spectroscopic changes, increase of fluorescence quantum yield and absorption red shift, provides high labeling selectivity. Y-FAST was engineered from the 14-kDa photoactive yellow protein by directed evolution using yeast display and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Y-FAST is as bright as common fluorescent proteins, exhibits good photostability, and allows the efficient labeling of proteins in various organelles and hosts. Upon fluorogen binding, fluorescence appears instantaneously, allowing monitoring of rapid processes in near real time. Y-FAST distinguishes itself from other tagging systems because the fluorogen binding is highly dynamic and fully reversible, which enables rapid labeling and unlabeling of proteins by addition and withdrawal of the fluorogen, opening new exciting prospects for the development of multiplexing imaging protocols based on sequential labeling.

  13. [Development of X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer].

    PubMed

    Ni, Chen; Gu, Mu; Di, Wang; Cao, Dun-Hua; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Huang, Shi-Ming

    2009-08-01

    An X-ray excited fluorescence spectrometer was developed with an X-ray tube and a spectrometer. The X-ray tube, spectrometer, autocontrol method and data processing selected were roundly evaluated. The wavelength and detecting efficiency of the apparatus were calibrated with the mercury and tungsten bromine standard lamps, and the X-ray excited emission spectra of BaF2, Cs I (Tl) crystals were measured. The results indicate that the apparatus has advantages of good wavelength resolution, high stability, easy to operation and good radioprotection. It is a wery effective tool for exploration of new scintillation materials.

  14. Hyperspectral fluorescence imaging with multi wavelength LED excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luthman, A. Siri; Dumitru, Sebastian; Quirós-Gonzalez, Isabel; Bohndiek, Sarah E.

    2016-04-01

    Hyperspectral imaging (HSI) can combine morphological and molecular information, yielding potential for real-time and high throughput multiplexed fluorescent contrast agent imaging. Multiplexed readout from targets, such as cell surface receptors overexpressed in cancer cells, could improve both sensitivity and specificity of tumor identification. There remains, however, a need for compact and cost effective implementations of the technology. We have implemented a low-cost wide-field multiplexed fluorescence imaging system, which combines LED excitation at 590, 655 and 740 nm with a compact commercial solid state HSI system operating in the range 600 - 1000 nm. A key challenge for using reflectance-based HSI is the separation of contrast agent fluorescence from the reflectance of the excitation light. Here, we illustrate how it is possible to address this challenge in software, using two offline reflectance removal methods, prior to least-squares spectral unmixing. We made a quantitative comparison of the methods using data acquired from dilutions of contrast agents prepared in well-plates. We then established the capability of our HSI system for non-invasive in vivo fluorescence imaging in small animals using the optimal reflectance removal method. The HSI presented here enables quantitative unmixing of at least four fluorescent contrast agents (Alexa Fluor 610, 647, 700 and 750) simultaneously in living mice. A successful unmixing of the four fluorescent contrast agents was possible both using the pure contrast agents and with mixtures. The system could in principle also be applied to imaging of ex vivo tissue or intraoperative imaging in a clinical setting. These data suggest a promising approach for developing clinical applications of HSI based on multiplexed fluorescence contrast agent imaging.

  15. Towards two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging microendoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hage, C. H.; Leclerc, P.; Brevier, J.; Fabert, M.; Le Nézet, C.; Kudlinski, A.; Héliot, L.; Louradour, F.

    2017-01-01

    In situ fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) in an endoscopic configuration of the endogenous biomarker nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) has a great potential for malignant tissue diagnosis. Moreover, two-photon nonlinear excitation provides intrinsic optical sectioning along with enhanced imaging depth. We demonstrate, for the first time to our knowledge, nonlinear endogenous FLIM in a fibered microscope with proximal detection, applied to NADH in cultured cells, as a first step to a nonlinear endomicroscope, using a double-clad microstructured fiber with convenient fiber length (> 3 m) and excitation pulse duration (≈50 fs). Fluorescence photons are collected by the fiber inner cladding and we show that its contribution to the impulse response function (IRF), which originates from its intermodal and chromatic dispersions, is small (< 600 ps) and stable for lengths up to 8 m and allows for short lifetime measurements. We use the phasor representation as a quick visualization tool adapted to the endoscopy speed requirements. PMID:29359093

  16. Lettuce flavonoids screening and phenotyping by chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio.

    PubMed

    Zivcak, Marek; Brückova, Klaudia; Sytar, Oksana; Brestic, Marian; Olsovska, Katarina; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2017-06-01

    Environmentally induced variation and the genotypic differences in flavonoid and phenolic content in lettuce can be reliably detected using the appropriate parameters derived from the records of rapid non-invasive fluorescence technique. The chlorophyll fluorescence excitation ratio method was designed as a rapid and non-invasive tool to estimate the content of UV-absorbing phenolic compounds in plants. Using this technique, we have assessed the dynamics of accumulation of flavonoids related to developmental changes and environmental effects. Moreover, we have tested appropriateness of the method to identify the genotypic differences and fluctuations in total phenolics and flavonoid content in lettuce. Six green and two red genotypes of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) grown in pots were exposed to two different environments for 50 days: direct sunlight (UV-exposed) and greenhouse conditions (low UV). The indices based on the measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence after red, green and UV excitation indicated increase of the content of UV-absorbing compounds and anthocyanins in the epidermis of lettuce leaves. In similar, the biochemical analyses performed at the end of the experiment confirmed significantly higher total phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants exposed to direct sun compared to greenhouse conditions and in red compared to green genotypes. As the correlation between the standard fluorescence indices and the biochemical records was negatively influenced by the presence of red genotypes, we proposed the use of a new parameter named Modified Flavonoid Index (MFI) taking into an account both absorbance changes due to flavonol and anthocyanin content, for which the correlation with flavonoid and phenolic content was relatively good. Thus, our results confirmed that the fluorescence excitation ratio method is useful for identifying the major differences in phenolic and flavonoid content in lettuce plants and it can be used for high-throughput pre

  17. Atomic Absorption, Atomic Fluorescence, and Flame Emission Spectrometry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horlick, Gary

    1984-01-01

    This review is presented in six sections. Sections focus on literature related to: (1) developments in instrumentation, measurement techniques, and procedures; (2) performance studies of flames and electrothermal atomizers; (3) applications of atomic absorption spectrometry; (4) analytical comparisons; (5) atomic fluorescence spectrometry; and (6)…

  18. Laser line illumination scheme allowing the reduction of background signal and the correction of absorption heterogeneities effects for fluorescence reflectance imaging.

    PubMed

    Fantoni, Frédéric; Hervé, Lionel; Poher, Vincent; Gioux, Sylvain; Mars, Jérôme I; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2015-10-01

    Intraoperative fluorescence imaging in reflectance geometry is an attractive imaging modality as it allows to noninvasively monitor the fluorescence targeted tumors located below the tissue surface. Some drawbacks of this technique are the background fluorescence decreasing the contrast and absorption heterogeneities leading to misinterpretations concerning fluorescence concentrations. We propose a correction technique based on a laser line scanning illumination scheme. We scan the medium with the laser line and acquire, at each position of the line, both fluorescence and excitation images. We then use the finding that there is a relationship between the excitation intensity profile and the background fluorescence one to predict the amount of signal to subtract from the fluorescence images to get a better contrast. As the light absorption information is contained both in fluorescence and excitation images, this method also permits us to correct the effects of absorption heterogeneities. This technique has been validated on simulations and experimentally. Fluorescent inclusions are observed in several configurations at depths ranging from 1 mm to 1 cm. Results obtained with this technique are compared with those obtained with a classical wide-field detection scheme for contrast enhancement and with the fluorescence by an excitation ratio approach for absorption correction.

  19. Polarized two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of indole and benzimidazole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Bruce E.; Jones, Richard D.; Rehms, Aden A.; Ilich, Predrag; Callis, Patrik R.

    1986-03-01

    Polarized two-photon fluorescence excitation spectra of indole in hexane, benzimidazole in isopropanol, and benzimidazole cation in methanol-H 2SO 4, all at 0.2 M and 25°C are reported for the excitation range 470-600 nm, the region of their L b, and L a bands. Relative two-photon absorptivities are deduced by correcting for different fluorescence response and are compared to toluene's L b band. The indole integrated absorptivity is about 10 times greater than that of toluene. The L a band of indole appears less dominant than in one-photon but still outweighs the L b band by a factor of 4. The two-photon polarization spectrum for indole indicates that the L a origin lies ≈500-1000 cm -1 above the L b origin in hexane. The benzimidazoles absorb only about twice as strongly as toluene and show strong vibronic peaks; the L a, bands are only faintly seen. Two-photon properties calculated from INDO/S CI wavefunctions with doubly excited configurations are in good agreement with those of indole, but predict the benzimidazole TPA to be several times stronger than observed. For the cation, the predicted results are nearly two orders of magnitude too high.

  20. Absorption into fluorescence. A method to sense biologically relevant gas molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strianese, Maria; Varriale, Antonio; Staiano, Maria; Pellecchia, Claudio; D'Auria, Sabato

    2011-01-01

    In this work we present an innovative optical sensing methodology based on the use of biomolecules as molecular gating nano-systems. Here, as an example, we report on the detection ofanalytes related to climate change. In particular, we focused our attention on the detection ofnitric oxide (NO) and oxygen (O2). Our methodology builds on the possibility of modulating the excitation intensity of a fluorescent probe used as a transducer and a sensor molecule whose absorption is strongly affected by the binding of an analyte of interest used as a filter. The two simple conditions that have to be fulfilled for the method to work are: (a) the absorption spectrum of the sensor placed inside the cuvette, and acting as the recognition element for the analyte of interest, should strongly change upon the binding of the analyte and (b) the fluorescence dye transducer should exhibit an excitation band which overlaps with one or more absorption bands of the sensor. The absorption band of the sensor affected by the binding of the specific analyte should overlap with the excitation band of the transducer. The high sensitivity of fluorescence detection combined with the use of proteins as highly selective sensors makes this method a powerful basis for the development of a new generation of analytical assays. Proof-of-principle results showing that cytochrome c peroxidase (CcP) for NO detection and myoglobin (Mb) for O2 detection can be successfully used by exploiting our new methodology are reported. The proposed technology can be easily expanded to the determination of different target analytes.

  1. Remote excitation fluorescence correlation spectroscopy using silver nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Liang; Yuan, Haifeng; Lu, Gang; Hofkens, Johan; Roeffaers, Maarten; Uji-i, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a powerful tool to resolve local properties, dynamical process of molecules, rotational and translational diffusion motions, relies on the fluctuations of florescence observables in the observation volume. In the case of rare transition events or small dynamical fluctuations, FCS requires few molecules or even single molecules in the observation volume at a time to minimize the background signals. Metal nanoparticle which possess unique localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) have been used to reduce the observation volume down to sub-diffraction limited scale while maintain at high analyst concentration up to tens of micromolar. Nevertheless, the applications of functionalized nanoparticles in living cell are limited due to the continuous diffusion after cell uptake, which makes it difficult to target the region of interests in the cell. In this work, we demonstrate the use of silver nanowires for remote excitation FCS on fluorescent molecules in solution. By using propagation surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) which supported by the silver nanowire to excite the fluorescence, both illumination and observation volume can be reduced simultaneously. In such a way, less perturbation is induced to the target region, and this will broaden the application scope of silver nanowire as tip in single cell endoscopy.

  2. Simulations of fluorescence solvatochromism in substituted PPV oligomers from excited state molecular dynamics with implicit solvent

    DOE PAGES

    Bjorgaard, J. A.; Nelson, T.; Kalinin, K.; ...

    2015-04-28

    In this study, an efficient method of treating solvent effects in excited state molecular dynamics (ESMD) is implemented and tested by exploring the solvatochromic effects in substituted p-phenylene vinylene oligomers. A continuum solvent model is used which has very little computational overhead. This allows simulations of ESMD with solvent effects on the scale of hundreds of picoseconds for systems of up to hundreds of atoms. At these time scales, solvatochromic shifts in fluoresence spectra can be described. Solvatochromic shifts in absorption and fluorescence spectra from ESMD are compared with time-dependent density functional theory calculations and experiments.

  3. Fluorescence detection of glutathione and oxidized glutathione in blood with a NIR-excitable cyanine probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chang-hui; Qi, Feng-pei; Wen, Fu-bin; Long, Li-ping; Liu, Ai-juan; Yang, Rong-hua

    2018-04-01

    Cyanine has been widely utilized as a near infrared (NIR) fluorophore for detection of glutathione (GSH). However, the excitation of most of the reported cyanine-based probes was less than 800 nm, which inevitably induce biological background absorption and lower the sensitivity, limiting their use for detection of GSH in blood samples. To address this issue, here, a heptamethine cyanine probe (DNIR), with a NIR excitation wavelength at 804 nm and a NIR emission wavelength at 832 nm, is employed for the detection of GSH and its oxidized form (GSSG) in blood. The probe displays excellent selectivity for GSH over GSSG and other amino acids, and rapid response to GSH, in particular a good property for indirect detection of GSSG in the presence of enzyme glutathione reductase and the reducing agent nicotinamideadenine dinucleotide phosphate, without further separation prior to fluorescent measurement. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first attempt to explore NIR fluorescent approach for the simultaneous assay of GSH and GSSG in blood. As such, we expect that our fluorescence sensors with both NIR excitation and NIR emission make this strategy suitable for the application in complex physiological systems.

  4. Visible to near-IR fluorescence from single-digit detonation nanodiamonds: excitation wavelength and pH dependence.

    PubMed

    Reineck, Philipp; Lau, Desmond W M; Wilson, Emma R; Nunn, Nicholas; Shenderova, Olga A; Gibson, Brant C

    2018-02-06

    Detonation nanodiamonds are of vital significance to many areas of science and technology. However, their fluorescence properties have rarely been explored for applications and remain poorly understood. We demonstrate significant fluorescence from the visible to near-infrared spectral regions from deaggregated, single-digit detonation nanodiamonds dispersed in water produced via post-synthesis oxidation. The excitation wavelength dependence of this fluorescence is analyzed in the spectral region from 400 nm to 700 nm as well as the particles' absorption characteristics. We report a strong pH dependence of the fluorescence and compare our results to the pH dependent fluorescence of aromatic hydrocarbons. Our results significantly contribute to the current understanding of the fluorescence of carbon-based nanomaterials in general and detonation nanodiamonds in particular.

  5. Two-step excitation and blue fluorescence under continuous-wave pumping in Nd:YLF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fan, T. Y.; Byer, Robert L.

    1986-01-01

    Near-UV and blue fluorescence from the 4D3/2 and 4D5/2 manifolds in Nd:YLF has been observed at room temperature under CW pumping by a rhodamine 590 dye laser. Excitation to these manifolds is attributed to two-step excitation involving excited-state absorption from the 4F3/2 metastable level. A similar phenomenon has also been observed in Nd:YAG and Nd:glass. The effective excited-state absorption cross section is measured to be (2 + or - 1) x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 587.4 nm in the pi polarization, and the peak effective stimulated emission cross section is measured to be 5 x 10 to the -20th sq cm at 411.7 nm, also in the pi polarization. Estimated laser threshold at 411.7 nm for two-step pumping at 587.4 nm is 70 mW.

  6. Colorectal cancer detection by hyperspectral imaging using fluorescence excitation scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Deal, Joshua; Hill, Shante; Martin, Will A.; Lall, Malvika; Lopez, Carmen; Rider, Paul F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2018-02-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technologies have shown great promise for biomedical applications. These techniques have been especially useful for detection of molecular events and characterization of cell, tissue, and biomaterial composition. Unfortunately, hyperspectral imaging technologies have been slow to translate to clinical devices - likely due to increased cost and complexity of the technology as well as long acquisition times often required to sample a spectral image. We have demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging approaches which scan the fluorescence excitation spectrum can provide increased signal strength and faster imaging, compared to traditional emission-scanning approaches. We have also demonstrated that excitation-scanning approaches may be able to detect spectral differences between colonic adenomas and adenocarcinomas and normal mucosa in flash-frozen tissues. Here, we report feasibility results from using excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging to screen pairs of fresh tumoral and nontumoral colorectal tissues. Tissues were imaged using a novel hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning microscope, sampling a wavelength range of 360-550 nm, at 5 nm increments. Image data were corrected to achieve a NIST-traceable flat spectral response. Image data were then analyzed using a range of supervised and unsupervised classification approaches within ENVI software (Harris Geospatial Solutions). Supervised classification resulted in >99% accuracy for single-patient image data, but only 64% accuracy for multi-patient classification (n=9 to date), with the drop in accuracy due to increased false-positive detection rates. Hence, initial data indicate that this approach may be a viable detection approach, but that larger patient sample sizes need to be evaluated and the effects of inter-patient variability studied.

  7. Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix Regional Integration to Quantify Spectra for Dissolved Organic Matter

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chen, W.; Westerhoff, P.; Leenheer, J.A.; Booksh, K.

    2003-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy has been widely used to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in water and soil. However, interpreting the >10,000 wavelength-dependent fluorescence intensity data points represented in EEMs has posed a significant challenge. Fluorescence regional integration, a quantitative technique that integrates the volume beneath an EEM, was developed to analyze EEMs. EEMs were delineated into five excitation-emission regions based on fluorescence of model compounds, DOM fractions, and marine waters or freshwaters. Volumetric integration under the EEM within each region, normalized to the projected excitation-emission area within that region and dissolved organic carbon concentration, resulted in a normalized region-specific EEM volume (??i,n). Solid-state carbon nuclear magnetic resonance (13C NMR), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) analysis, ultraviolet-visible absorption spectra, and EEMs were obtained for standard Suwannee River fulvic acid and 15 hydrophobic or hydrophilic acid, neutral, and base DOM fractions plus nonfractionated DOM from wastewater effluents and rivers in the southwestern United States. DOM fractions fluoresced in one or more EEM regions. The highest cumulative EEM volume (??T,n = ????i,n) was observed for hydrophobic neutral DOM fractions, followed by lower ??T,n values for hydrophobic acid, base, and hydrophilic acid DOM fractions, respectively. An extracted wastewater biomass DOM sample contained aromatic protein- and humic-like material and was characteristic of bacterial-soluble microbial products. Aromatic carbon and the presence of specific aromatic compounds (as indicated by solid-state 13C NMR and FTIR data) resulted in EEMs that aided in differentiating wastewater effluent DOM from drinking water DOM.

  8. Multiphoton-gated cycloreversion reaction of a fluorescent diarylethene derivative as revealed by transient absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nagasaka, Tatsuhiro; Kunishi, Tomohiro; Sotome, Hikaru; Koga, Masafumi; Morimoto, Masakazu; Irie, Masahiro; Miyasaka, Hiroshi

    2018-06-07

    The one- and two-photon cycloreversion reactions of a fluorescent diarylethene derivative with oxidized benzothiophene moieties were investigated by means of ultrafast laser spectroscopy. Femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy under the one-photon excitation condition revealed that the excited closed-ring isomer is simply deactivated into the initial ground state with a time constant of 2.6 ns without remarkable cycloreversion, the results of which are consistent with the very low cycloreversion reaction yield (<10-5) under steady-state light irradiation. On the other hand, an efficient cycloreversion reaction was observed under irradiation with a picosecond laser pulse at 532 nm. The excitation intensity dependence of the cycloreversion reaction indicates that a highly excited state attained by the stepwise two-photon absorption is responsible for the marked increase of the cycloreversion reaction, and the quantum yield at the highly excited state was estimated to be 0.018 from quantitative analysis, indicating that the reaction is enhanced by a factor of >1800.

  9. Seasonal variability in CDOM absorption and fluorescence properties in the Barataria Basin, Louisiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shatrughan; D'Sa, Eurico; Swenson, Erick

    2010-01-01

    Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) along a 124 km transect in the Barataria Basin, a large estuary located in Louisiana, USA, were investigated during high and low flow periods of the Mississippi River in the spring and winter of 2008-2009. Mean CDOM absorption at 355 nm from the marine to the freshwater end member stations ranged from (3.25 +/- 0.56) to (20.76 +/- 2.43) m(-1) for the three month high flow period whereas it varied from (1.48 +/- 1.08) to (25.45 +/- 7.03) m(-1) for the same stations during low flow period. Corresponding salinity values at these stations indicated the influence of river and shelf exchanges in the lower basin and precipitation and runoff in the upper basin. An inverse relationship of CDOM absorbance and fluorescence with salinity observed in the basin could be a useful indicator of salinity. CDOM fluorescence also varied over a large range showing an approximately 8 to 12-fold increase between the marine and freshwater end members for the two flow seasons. Excitation-emission matrix spectral plots indicated the presence of various fluorescence components with highest being the A-peak, lowest the T-peak, and the C and M-peaks showing similar trends along the transect. During low flow season the A/C ratio were well correlated with station locations indicating increased terrestrial influence towards the upper basin. CDOM absorption and fluorescence at 355 nm were highly correlated and independent of CDOM sources suggesting that fluorescence could be used to characterize CDOM in the basin.

  10. Excitation Dynamics in Phycoerythrin 545: Modeling of Steady-State Spectra and Transient Absorption with Modified Redfield Theory

    PubMed Central

    Novoderezhkin, Vladimir I.; Doust, Alexander B.; Curutchet, Carles; Scholes, Gregory D.; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We model the spectra and excitation dynamics in the phycobiliprotein antenna complex PE545 isolated from the unicellular photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS24. The excitonic couplings between the eight bilins are calculated using the CIS/6-31G method. The site energies are extracted from a simultaneous fit of the absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and excitation anisotropy spectra together with the transient absorption kinetics using the modified Redfield approach. Quantitative fit of the data enables us to assign the eight exciton components of the spectra and build up the energy transfer picture including pathways and timescales of energy relaxation, thus allowing a visualization of excitation dynamics within the complex. PMID:20643051

  11. Fluorescence of molecular hydrogen excited by solar extreme-ultraviolet radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, P. D.; Fastie, W. G.

    1973-01-01

    During trans-earth coast, the Apollo 17 ultraviolet spectrometer was scheduled to make observations of the far ultraviolet background in selected regions of the sky. In the course of one of these observations, the spacecraft fuel cells were routinely purged of excess hydrogen and water vapor. The ultraviolet fluorescence spectrum of the purged molecular hydrogen excited by solar extreme ultraviolet radiation is interpreted by absorption of solar L-beta and L-gamma radiation in the nearly resonant (6, 0) and (11, 0) Lyman bands. The results are deemed significant for ultraviolet spectroscopic investigations of the atmospheres of the moon and planets since Lyman-band fluorescence provides an unambiguous means of identification of molecular hydrogen in upper atmospheres.

  12. Fluorescence excitation and excited state intramolecular relaxation dynamics of jet-cooled methyl-2-hydroxy-3-naphthoate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Annemarie; Ruth, Albert A.

    2013-11-01

    Two distinct S0 → S1 fluorescence excitation spectra of methyl-2-hydroxy-3-napthoate (MHN23) have been obtained by monitoring fluorescence separately in the short (˜410 nm) and long (˜650 nm) wavelength emission bands. The short wavelength fluorescence is assigned to two MHN23 conformers which do not undergo excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). Analysis of the 'long wavelength' fluorescence excitation spectrum, which arises from the proton transfer tautomer of MHN23 indicates an average lifetime of τ ⩾ 18 ± 2 fs for the initially excited states. Invoking the results of Catalan et al. [J. Phys. Chem. A, 1999, 103, 10921], who determined the N tautomer to decay predominantly via a fast non-radiative process, the limit of the rate of intramolecular excited proton transfer in MHN23 is calculated as, kpt ⩽ 1 × 1012 s-1.

  13. Toward two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime endomicroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hage, Charles-Henri; Leclerc, Pierre; Fabert, Marc; Brevier, Julien; Habert, Rémi; Braud, Flavie; Kudlinski, Alexandre; Louradour, Frédéric

    2017-02-01

    Fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) represents a powerful tool for biological studies. Endoscopic FLIM applied to the intracellular native biomarker NADH and FAD represents a promising mean for in vivo in situ malignant tissue diagnosis in the medical field. Else, 2-photon-excited fluorescence (2PEF) provides increased 3D resolution and imaging depth. But very few demonstrations about 2PEF lifetime measurement through a fiber have been reported and none about endoscopic 2P-FLIM through a practical fiber length (< 3m). Our group has recently demonstrated the possibility to efficiently deliver through a very long optical fiber the short and intense excitation pulses required for 2P-FLIM. Our goal is now to check that collecting fluorescence through the same endoscopic fiber does not deteriorate the lifetime measurement. Relying on the basis previously published in case of 1PEF by P. French and co-workers (J. Biophotonics, 2015), we have experimentally quantitatively evaluated the influence on the lifetime measurement of the fiber chromatic and intermodal dispersions. The main result is that the fiber contribution to the system impulse response function, even in the case of a 3-meter long double-clad optical fiber, does not hinder the separation between free and bound NADH states using FLIM. Related calibrations and measurements will be detailed. Ongoing experiments about the development of a 2P-FLIM endomicroscope on the basis of an previously reported 2P-endomicroscope (Ducourthial et al., Sc. Reports, 2015), used under various configurations (i.e. point measurement in the center of the 2P-endomicroscope image, averaged lifetime, binned endoscopic 2P-FLIM image), will be also presented.

  14. Absorption and fluorescence properties of colored dissolved organic matter in the Ross Sea during austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Sa, E. J.; Kim, H. C.; Ha, S. Y.

    2016-12-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) spectral absorption and excitation-emission matrix (EEMs) fluorescence with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) were examined in the Ross Sea during a survey conducted on board the R/V Araon in the austral summer of 14/15. CDOM absorption at 355 nm ranged from 0.06 to 1.14 m-1 while spectral slope S calculated between 275-295 nm wavelength ranged from 18.83 to 33.32 µm-1 with water masses playing an important role in its variability. Spectral slope S decreased with increasing CDOM absorption indicating the strong role of photo-oxidation on CDOM abundance during the summer. PARAFAC analysis of EEM data identified two humic-like (terrestrial and marine-like) and a protein-like (tryptophan-like) component. The two humic-like components were well correlated with little variability spatially and across the water column ( 0-100 m) likely indicating more refractory material. The protein-like fluorescent component was relatively quite variable supporting the autochthonous production of this fluorescent component in the highly productive Ross Sea waters.

  15. Absorption and Fluorescence Properties of Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter Produced by Algae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Tong; Lu, Xiao-lan; Su, Rong-guo; Zhang, Dong-mei

    2015-09-01

    Four kinds of diatom (Chaetoceros curvisetus, Phaeodactylum tricornutum, Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile) and two kinds of dinoflagellates (Prorocentrum donghaiense and Gymnodinium) were cultured under laboratory conditions. Variations of optical properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were studied with absorption and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy(EEM) during growth of marine microalgae in incubation experiment. Absorption spectrum revealed absorption coefficient a(355) (CDOM absorption coefficients at 355 nm) of 6 kinds of marine microalgae above increased by 64.8%, 242.3%, 535.1%, 903.2%, 836% and 196.4%, respectively. Simultaneously, the absorption spectral slope (Sg), determined between 270 and 350 nm, representing the size of molecular weight of CDOM and humic-like composition, decreased by 8.7%, 34.6%, 39.4%, 53.1%, 46.7%, and 35.7%, respectively. Applying parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) together with EEM got four components of CDOM: C1(Ex/Em=350(260) nm/450 nm), C2 (Ex/Em=260(430) nm/525 nm), C3 (Ex/Em=325 nm/400 nm) and C4(Ex/Em=275 nm/325 nm), which were relative to three humic-like and one protein-like fluorescent components of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima and Navicula halophile. In incubation experiment, fluorescence intensity of these four components during growth of Nitzschia closterium f. minutissima increased by, respectively, 8.68, 24.9, 7.19 and 39.8 times, and those of Navicula halophile increased by 2.64, 0.07, 4.39 and 12.4 times, respectively. Significant relationships were found between the fluorescence intensity of four components of CDOM, a(355) and Sg. All results demonstrated that both content and molecular weight of CDOM produced by diatom and dinoflagellate studied in incubation experiment increased, but these two parameters changed more obviously of the diatom than those of dinoflagellate; the proportion of humic-like components in the composition of CDOM

  16. Two-color two-photon excited fluorescence of indole: Determination of wavelength-dependent molecular parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Herbrich, Sebastian; Al-Hadhuri, Tawfik; Gericke, Karl-Heinz, E-mail: k.Gericke@tu-bs.de

    2015-01-14

    We present a detailed study of two-color two-photon excited fluorescence in indole dissolved in propylene glycol. Femtosecond excitation pulses at effective wavelengths from 268 to 293.33 nm were used to populate the two lowest indole excited states {sup 1}L{sub a} and {sup 1}L{sub b} and polarized fluorescence was then detected. All seven molecular parameters and the two-photon polarization ratio Ω containing information on two-photon absorption dynamics, molecular lifetime τ{sub f}, and rotation correlation time τ{sub rot} have been determined from experiment and analyzed as a function of the excitation wavelength. The analysis of the experimental data has shown that {supmore » 1}L{sub b}–{sup 1}L{sub a} inversion occurred under the conditions of our experiment. The two-photon absorption predominantly populated the {sup 1}L{sub a} state at all excitation wavelengths but in the 287–289 nm area which contained an absorption hump of the {sup 1}L{sub b} state 0-0 origin. The components of the two-photon excitation tensor S were analyzed giving important information on the principal tensor axes and absorption symmetry. The results obtained are in a good agreement with the results reported by other groups. The lifetime τ{sub f} and the rotation correlation time τ{sub rot} showed no explicit dependence on the effective excitation wavelength. Their calculated weighted average values were found to be τ{sub f} = 3.83 ± 0.14 ns and τ{sub rot} = 0.74 ± 0.06 ns.« less

  17. Improved reference standards for femtosecond three-photon excitation of fluorescence in the wavelength range 950 - 1750 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rebane, Aleksander; Mikhaylov, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    Fluorescence excited by instantaneous three-photon absorption (3PA) in organic fluorophores is gaining importance as a versatile modality for deep-tissue microscopy and imaging. However, due to technical difficulty of quantifying the higher-order nonlinear absorption cross-section, reliable 3PA cross section values, σ3PA, covering a broad spectral range have been so far not available. This lack of experimental data hinders us from gaining quantitative understanding of relevant structure-property relationships as well as impedes progress towards developing 3-photon fluorophores optimized for various applications. We report on measurement of the absolute 3PA cross section spectra in the 950 - 1750 nm range in a series of common organic fluorophores in various solvents: (a) Rhodamine 6G in deuterated methanol, (b) Coumarin 153 in DMSO and toluene, (c) Prodan in DMSO and toluene, (d) Fluorescein in pH11 buffer, (e) AF455 in toluene, (f) BDPAS in deuterated methylene chloride. In these experiments, we employ femtosecond wavelength-tunable optical parametric amplifier to excite fluorescence signal that has cubic dependence on the incident photon flux. Absolute values of σ3PA are determined using two complementary methods: (i) calibrating the fluorescence signal relative to one-photon (linear) excitation combined with accurate measurement of the pulse temporal- and spatial profile to determine the excitation photon flux and (ii) calibration of the cubic fluorescence signal relative to quadratic florescence excited in fluorophores with known two-photon absorption cross section. Depending on the method utilized, the peak σ3PA values have estimated accuracy 50% and vary in the range, σ3PA = 10-81 - 10-79 cm6 s2 photon-2 , depending on the system studied, with AF455 showing the most enhanced 3PA efficiency. The 3PA spectral shapes have estimated accuracy of 20% and show some unexpected deviations from corresponding one-photon spectral profiles.

  18. BSA Au clusters as a probe for enhanced fluorescence detection using multipulse excitation scheme.

    PubMed

    Raut, Sangram L; Rich, Ryan; Fudala, Rafal; Kokate, R; Kimball, J D; Borejdo, Julian; Vishwanatha, Jamboor K; Gryczynski, Zygmunt; Gryczynski, Ignacy

    2014-01-01

    Although BSA Au clusters fluoresce in red region (λmax: 650 nm), they are of limited use due to low fluorescence quantum yield (~6%). Here we report an enhanced fluorescence imaging application of fluorescent bio-nano probe BSA Au clusters using multipulse excitation scheme. Multipulse excitation takes advantage of long fluorescence lifetime (> 1 µs) of BSA Au clusters and enhances its fluorescence intensity 15 times over short lived cellular auto-fluorescence. Moreover we have also shown that by using time gated detection strategy signal (fluorescence of BSA Au clusters) to noise (auto-fluorescence) ratio can be increased by 30 fold. Thereby with multipulse excitation long lifetime probes can be used to develop biochemical assays and perform optical imaging with zero background.

  19. Fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosinate anion using one-, two- and three-photon excitation: tyrosinate anion fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Kierdaszuk, Borys

    2013-03-01

    We examined the emission spectra and steady-state anisotropy of tyrosinate anion fluorescence with one-photon (250-310 nm), two-photon (570-620 nm) and three-photon (750-930 nm) excitation. Similar emission spectra of the neutral (pH 7.2) and anionic (pH 13) forms of N-acetyl-L-tyrosinamide (NATyrA) (pKa 10.6) were observed for all modes of excitation, with the maxima at 302 and 352 nm, respectively. Two-photon excitation (2PE) and three-photon excitation (3PE) spectra of the anionic form were the same as that for one-photon excitation (1PE). In contrast, 2PE spectrum from the neutral form showed ~30-nm shift to shorter wavelengths relative to 1PE spectrum (λmax 275 nm) at two-photon energy (550 nm), the latter being overlapped with 3PE spectrum, both at two-photon energy (550 nm). Two-photon cross-sections for NATyrA anion at 565-580 nm were 10 % of that for N-acetyl-L-tryptophanamide (NATrpA), and increased to 90 % at 610 nm, while for the neutral form of NATyrA decreased from 2 % of that for NATrpA at 570 nm to near zero at 585 nm. Surprisingly, the fundamental anisotropy of NATyrA anion in vitrified solution at -60 °C was ~0.05 for 2PE at 610 nm as compared to near 0.3 for 1PE at 305 nm, and wavelength-dependence appears to be a basic feature of its anisotropy. In contrast, the 3PE anisotropy at 900 nm was about 0.5, and 3PE and 1PE anisotropy values appear to be related by the cos(6) θ to cos(2) θ photoselection factor (approx. 10/6) independently of excitation wavelength. Attention is drawn to the possible effect of tyrosinate anions in proteins on their multi-photon induced fluorescence emission and excitation spectra as well as excitation anisotropy spectra.

  20. Nonlinear excitation fluorescence microscopy: source considerations for biological applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wokosin, David L.

    2008-02-01

    Ultra-short-pulse solid-state laser sources have improved contrast within fluorescence imaging and also opened new windows of investigation in biological imaging applications. Additionally, the pulsed illumination enables harmonic scattering microscopy which yields intrinsic structure, symmetry and contrast from viable embryos, cells and tissues. Numerous human diseases are being investigated by the combination of (more) intact dynamic tissue imaging of cellular function with gene-targeted specificity and electrophysiology context. The major limitation to more widespread use of multi-photon microscopy has been the complete system cost and added complexity above and beyond commercial camera and confocal systems. The current status of all-solid-state ultrafast lasers as excitation sources will be reviewed since these lasers offer tremendous potential for affordable, reliable, "turnkey" multiphoton imaging systems. This effort highlights the single box laser systems currently commercially available, with defined suggestions for the ranges for individual laser parameters as derived from a biological and fluorophore limited perspective. The standard two-photon dose is defined by 800nm, 10mW, 200fs, and 80Mhz - at the sample plane for tissue culture cells, i.e. after the full scanning microscope system. Selected application-derived excitation wavelengths are well represented by 700nm, 780nm, ~830nm, ~960nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. Many of the one-box lasers have fixed or very limited excitation wavelengths available, so the lasers will be lumped near 780nm, 800nm, 900nm, 1050nm, and 1250nm. The following laser parameter ranges are discussed: average power from 200mW to 2W, pulse duration from 70fs to 700fs, pulse repetition rate from 20MHz to 200MHz, with the laser output linearly polarized with an extinction ratio at least 100:1.

  1. Two-photon excitation of nitric oxide fluorescence as a temperature indicator in unsteady gas-dynamic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, R. L.; Gross, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    A laser induced fluorescence technique, suitable for measuring fluctuating temperatures in cold turbulent flows containing very low concentrations of nitric oxide is described. Temperatures below 300 K may be resolved with signal to noise ratios greater than 50 to 1 using high peak power, tunable dye lasers. The method relies on the two photon excitation of selected ro-vibronic transitions. The analysis includes the effects of fluorescence quenching and shows the technique to be effective at all densities below ambient. Signal to noise ratio estimates are based on a preliminary measurement of the two photon absorptivity for a selected rotational transition in the NO gamma (0,0) band.

  2. Excitation of photosystem I by 760 nm femtosecond laser pulses: transient absorption spectra and intermediates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Shelaev, Ivan V.; Gostev, Fedor E.; Mamedov, Mahir D.; Petrova, Anastasia A.; Aybush, Arseniy V.; Shuvalov, Vladimir A.; Semenov, Alexey Yu; Nadtochenko, Victor A.

    2017-09-01

    Excitation of photosystem I (PS I) by a femtosecond 760 nm pump leads to one- and two-photon absorption. The one-photon excitation produces intermediates with transient absorption spectra similar to the spectra of the primary [{{{P}}700}+{{{A}}0}-{{A}}1] and secondary [{{{P}}700}+{{A}}0{{{A}}1}-] ion-radical pairs in the PS I reaction center. The two-photon absorption generates the upper level excited states of chlorophyll (Chl) and carotenoid molecules in the antenna. These excited states are converted into the long-lived intermediates and can be tentatively attributed to the excited and charge-transfer ion-radical states of Chl molecules and to the excited states of carotenoids in the antenna. The transient spectra of intermediates generated by two-photon excitation differ from the transient one-photon spectra of the primary and secondary ion-radical pairs.

  3. A transform from absorption to Raman excitation profile. A time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Soo-Y.; Yeo, Robert C. K.

    1994-04-01

    An alternative time-frame approach, which is canonically conjugate to the energy-frame approach, for implementing the transform relations for calculating Raman excitation profiles directly from the optical absorption spectrum is presented. Practical and efficient fast Fourier transformation in the time frame replaces the widely used Chan and Page algorithm for evaluating the Hilbert transform in the energy frame. The time-frame approach is applied to: (a) a two-mode model which illustrates the missing mode effect in both absorption and Raman excitation profiles, (b) carotene, in which both the absorption spectrum and the Raman excitation profile show vibrational structure and (c) hexamethylbenzene: TCNE electron donor—acceptor complex where the same spectra are structureless and the Raman excitation profile for the 168 cm -1 mode poses a problem for the energy-frame approach. A similar time-frame approach can be used for the inverse transform from the Raman excitation profile to the optical absorption spectrum.

  4. Spectral fluorescent properties of tissues in vivo with excitation in the red wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stratonnikov, Alexander A.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Klimov, D. V.; Edinac, N. E.; Wolnukhin, V. A.; Strashkevich, I. A.

    1997-12-01

    The spectral fluorescence analysis is a promising method for differential tissue diagnostic. Usually the UV and visible light is used for fluorescence excitation with emission registration in the visible wavelength range. The light penetration length in this wavelength range is very small allowing one to analyze only the surface region of the tissue. Here we present the tissue fluorescent spectra in vivo excited in the red wavelength region. As excitation light source we used compact He-Ne laser (632.8 nm) and observed the fluorescence in 650 - 800 nm spectral range. The various tissues including normal skin, psoriasis, tumors, necrosis as well as photosensitized tissues have been measured.

  5. Comparative Studies in the Fluorescence and Excitation Spectra of 3-Hydroxyflavone and 2(2 '-Heteroaryl)-3-Hydroxy-4H-Chromen-4-Ones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, R.; Kaur, K.; Bansal, M.

    2017-05-01

    The absorption, fluorescence, and excitation spectra of FHC and THC have been studied and compared with 3HF in cyclohexane, acetonitrile, and methanol. Anion formation in acetonitrile and methanol has been observed in all three flavonols in the order THC-FHC-3HF in their ground states. As excitation and absorption spectra are similar in all the cases (including the anion one), it is possible to observe the absorption spectra of the pure anion of the flavonols in neutral solvents, which is difficult to measure directly.

  6. Serial Femtosecond Crystallography and Ultrafast Absorption Spectroscopy of the Photoswitchable Fluorescent Protein IrisFP.

    PubMed

    Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Sliwa, Michel; Gallat, François-Xavier; Sugahara, Michihiro; Guillon, Virginia; Schirò, Giorgio; Coquelle, Nicolas; Woodhouse, Joyce; Roux, Laure; Gotthard, Guillaume; Royant, Antoine; Uriarte, Lucas Martinez; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Joti, Yasumasa; Byrdin, Martin; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nango, Eriko; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tono, Kensuke; Yabashi, Makina; Adam, Virgile; Cammarata, Marco; Schlichting, Ilme; Bourgeois, Dominique; Weik, Martin

    2016-03-03

    Reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins find growing applications in cell biology, yet mechanistic details, in particular on the ultrafast photochemical time scale, remain unknown. We employed time-resolved pump-probe absorption spectroscopy on the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein IrisFP in solution to study photoswitching from the nonfluorescent (off) to the fluorescent (on) state. Evidence is provided for the existence of several intermediate states on the pico- and microsecond time scales that are attributed to chromophore isomerization and proton transfer, respectively. Kinetic modeling favors a sequential mechanism with the existence of two excited state intermediates with lifetimes of 2 and 15 ps, the second of which controls the photoswitching quantum yield. In order to support that IrisFP is suited for time-resolved experiments aiming at a structural characterization of these ps intermediates, we used serial femtosecond crystallography at an X-ray free electron laser and solved the structure of IrisFP in its on state. Sample consumption was minimized by embedding crystals in mineral grease, in which they remain photoswitchable. Our spectroscopic and structural results pave the way for time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography aiming at characterizing the structure of ultrafast intermediates in reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent proteins.

  7. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, R.A.; Peck, K.

    1992-02-25

    A fluorescent scanner is designed for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier. The scanner includes a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from the volume to provide a display of the separated sample. 8 figs.

  8. Laser excited confocal microscope fluorescence scanner and method

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Peck, Konan

    1992-01-01

    A fluorescent scanner for scanning the fluorescence from a fluorescence labeled separated sample on a sample carrier including a confocal microscope for illuminating a predetermined volume of the sample carrier and/or receiving and processing fluorescence emissions from said volume to provide a display of the separated sample.

  9. Optimization strategies for a fluorescent dye with bimodal excitation spectra: application to semiautomated proteomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, Wayne F.; Berggren, Kiera N.; Lopez, Mary F.

    2001-04-01

    Facilities engaged in proteome analysis differ significantly in the degree that they implement automated systems for high-throughput protein characterization. Though automated workstation environments are becoming more routine in the biotechnology and pharmaceutical sectors of industry, university-based laboratories often perform these tasks manually, submitting protein spots excised from polyacrylamide gels to institutional core facilities for identification. For broad compatibility with imaging platforms, an optimized fluorescent dye developed for proteomics applications should be designed taking into account that laser scanners use visible light excitation and that charge-coupled device camera systems and gas discharge transilluminators rely upon UV excitation. The luminescent ruthenium metal complex, SYPRO Ruby protein gel stain, is compatible with a variety of excitation sources since it displays intense UV (280 nm) and visible (470 nm) absorption maxima. Localization is achieved by noncovalent, electrostatic and hydrophobic binding of dye to proteins, with signal being detected at 610 nm. Since proteins are not covalently modified by the dye, compatibility with downstream microchemical characterization techniques such as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry is assured. Protocols have been devised for optimizing fluorophore intensity. SYPRO Ruby dye outperforms alternatives such as silver staining in terms of quantitative capabilities, compatibility with mass spectrometry and ease of integration into automated work environments.

  10. Absorption and fluorescence spectra of heterocyclic isomers from long-range-corrected density functional theory in polarizable continuum approach.

    PubMed

    Kityk, Andriy V

    2012-03-22

    Long-range-corrected (LC) DFT/TDDFT methods may provide adequate description of ground and excited state properties; however, accuracy of such an approach depends much on a range separation (exchange screening) representing adjustable model parameter. Its relation to a size or specific of molecular systems has been explored in numerous studies, whereas the effect of solvent environment is usually ignored during the evaluation of state properties. To benchmark and assess the quality of the LC-DFT/TDDFT formalism, we report the optical absorption and fluorescence emission energies of organic heterocyclic isomers, DPIPQ and PTNA, calculated by LC-BLYP DFT/TDDFT method in the polarizable continuum (PCM) approach. The calculations are compared with the optical absorption and fluorescence spectra measured in organic solvents of different polarity. Despite a considerable structural difference, both dyes exhibit quite similar range separations being somewhat different for the optical absorption and fluorescence emission processes. Properly parametrized LC-BLYP xc-potential well reproduces basic features of the optical absorption spectra including the electronic transitions to higher excited states. The DFT/TDDFT/PCM analysis correctly predicts the solvation trends although solvatochromic shifts of the electronic transition energies appear to be evidently underestimated in most cases, especially for the fluorescence emission. Considering the discrepancy between the experiment and theory, evaluated state dipole moments and solvation corrections to the exchange screening are analyzed. The results of the present study emphasize the importance of a solvent-dependent range separation in DFT/TDDFT/PCM calculations for investigating excited state properties. © 2012 American Chemical Society

  11. Determination of the Residual Anthracene Concentration in Cultures of Haloalkalitolerant Actinomycetes by Excitation Fluorescence, Emission Fluorescence, and Synchronous Fluorescence: Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    Lara-Severino, Reyna del Carmen; Camacho-López, Miguel Ángel; García-Macedo, Jessica Marlene; Gómez-Oliván, Leobardo M.; Sandoval-Trujillo, Ángel H.; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Ramírez-Durán, Ninfa

    2016-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are compounds that can be quantified by fluorescence due to their high quantum yield. Haloalkalitolerant bacteria tolerate wide concentration ranges of NaCl and pH. They are potentially useful in the PAHs bioremediation of saline environments. However, it is known that salinity of the sample affects fluorescence signal regardless of the method. The objective of this work was to carry out a comparative study based on the sensitivity, linearity, and detection limits of the excitation, emission, and synchronous fluorescence methods, during the quantification of the residual anthracene concentration from the following haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes cultures Kocuria rosea, Kocuria palustris, Microbacterium testaceum, and 4 strains of Nocardia farcinica, in order to establish the proper fluorescence method to study the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinobacteria. The study demonstrated statistical differences among the strains and among the fluorescence methods regarding the anthracene residual concentration. The results showed that excitation and emission fluorescence methods performed very similarly but sensitivity in excitation fluorescence is slightly higher. Synchronous fluorescence using Δλ = 150 nm is not the most convenient method. Therefore we propose the excitation fluorescence as the fluorescence method to be used in the study of the PAHs biodegrading capacity of haloalkalitolerant actinomycetes. PMID:26925294

  12. Laser-excited fluorescence for measuring atmospheric pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.

    1975-01-01

    System measures amount of given pollutant at specific location. Infrared laser aimed at location has wavelength that will cause molecules of pollutant to fluoresce. Detector separates fluorescence from other radiation and measures its intensity to indicate concentration of pollutant.

  13. Analysis of particle in liquid using excitation-fluorescence spectral flow cytometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takenaka, Kei; Togashi, Shigenori

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a new flow cytometer that can measure the excitation-fluorescence spectra of a single particle. This system consists of a solution-transmitting unit and an optical unit. The solution-transmitting unit allows a sample containing particles to flow through the center of a flow cell by hydrodynamic focusing. The optical unit irradiates particles with dispersed white light (wavelength band: 400-650 nm) along the flow direction and measures their fluorescence spectra (wavelength band: 400-700 nm) using a spectroscopic photodetector array. The fluorescence spectrum of a particle changes with the shift of the wavelength of the excitation light. Using this system, the excitation-fluorescence spectra of a fluorescent particle were measured. Additionally, a homogenized tomato suspension and a homogenized spinach suspension were measured using the system. Measurement results show that it is possible to determine the components of vegetables by comparing measured fluorescence spectra of particles in a vegetable suspension.

  14. A novel small molecule mediate 18F-FDG excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zeyu; Guo, Hongbo; Hu, Zhenhua; Tian, Jie

    2018-02-01

    Fluorescence molecular imaging (FMI) has been widely used in many medical fields with small molecule indocyanine green (ICG). However, low signal-background ratio and limited specificity to tumor remain big challenges for FMI. In this study, a novel excitation strategy is proposed on the basis of clinical approved ICG and 18F-FDG. A series of in vitro experiments are designed to reveal the mechanism and results show obvious decreasing of ICG fluorescence intensity with the increasing distance to excitation source. Meanwhile, the ICG fluorescence intensity is proportional to the activity of radiopharmaceutical. Results from different respects illustrate the promising of this proposed excitation strategy.

  15. Water-Soluble Triarylborane Chromophores for One- and Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Imaging of Mitochondria in Cells.

    PubMed

    Griesbeck, Stefanie; Zhang, Zuolun; Gutmann, Marcus; Lühmann, Tessa; Edkins, Robert M; Clermont, Guillaume; Lazar, Adina N; Haehnel, Martin; Edkins, Katharina; Eichhorn, Antonius; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille; Meinel, Lorenz; Marder, Todd B

    2016-10-04

    Three water-soluble tetracationic quadrupolar chromophores comprising two three-coordinate boron π-acceptor groups bridged by thiophene-containing moieties were synthesised for biological imaging applications. Compound 3 containing the bulkier 5-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 )-2,2'-(C4 H2 S)2 -5'-(3,5-Me2 C6 H2 ) bridge is stable over a long period of time, exhibits a high fluorescence quantum yield and strong one- and two-photon absorption (TPA), and has a TPA cross section of 268 GM at 800 nm in water. Confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscopy studies in live cells indicated localisation of the chromophore at the mitochondria; moreover, cytotoxicity measurements proved biocompatibility. Thus, chromophore 3 has excellent potential for one- and two-photon-excited fluorescence imaging of mitochondrial function in cells. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of BLUF domain of AppA from Rhodobacter sphaeroides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Schiereis, T.; Hegemann, P.; Jung, A.; Schlichting, I.

    2005-08-01

    The BLUF domain of the transcriptional anti-repressor protein AppA from the non-sulfur anoxyphototrophic purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was characterized by absorption and emission spectroscopy. The BLUF domain constructs AppA 148 (consisting of amino-acid residues 1-148) and AppA 126 (amino-acid residues 1-126) are investigated. The cofactor of the investigated domains is found to consist of a mixture of the flavins riboflavin, FMN, and FAD. The dark-adapted domains exist in two different active receptor conformations (receptor states) with different sub-nanosecond fluorescence lifetimes (BLUF r,f and BLUF r,sl) and a small non-interacting conformation (BLUF nc). The active receptor conformations are transformed to putative signalling states (BLUF s,f and BLUF s,sl) of low fluorescence efficiency and picosecond fluorescence lifetime by blue-light excitation (light-adapted domains). In the dark at room temperature both signalling states recover back to the initial receptor states with a time constant of about 17 min. A quantum yield of signalling state formation of about 25% was determined by intensity dependent transmission measurements. A photo-cycle scheme is presented including photo-induced charge transfer complex formation, charge recombination, and protein binding pocket reorganisation.

  17. Invited Review Article: Imaging techniques for harmonic and multiphoton absorption fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Carriles, Ramón; Schafer, Dawn N.; Sheetz, Kraig E.; Field, Jeffrey J.; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus; Sylvester, Anne W.; Squier, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    We review the current state of multiphoton microscopy. In particular, the requirements and limitations associated with high-speed multiphoton imaging are considered. A description of the different scanning technologies such as line scan, multifoci approaches, multidepth microscopy, and novel detection techniques is given. The main nonlinear optical contrast mechanisms employed in microscopy are reviewed, namely, multiphoton excitation fluorescence, second harmonic generation, and third harmonic generation. Techniques for optimizing these nonlinear mechanisms through a careful measurement of the spatial and temporal characteristics of the focal volume are discussed, and a brief summary of photobleaching effects is provided. Finally, we consider three new applications of multiphoton microscopy: nonlinear imaging in microfluidics as applied to chemical analysis and the use of two-photon absorption and self-phase modulation as contrast mechanisms applied to imaging problems in the medical sciences. PMID:19725639

  18. Time-resolved multicolor two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy of cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Wei

    2014-11-01

    Multilabeling which maps the distribution of different targets is an indispensable technique in many biochemical and biophysical studies. Two-photon excitation fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy of endogenous fluorophores combining with conventional fluorescence labeling techniques such as genetically encoded fluorescent protein (FP) and fluorescent dyes staining could be a powerful tool for imaging living cells. However, the challenge is that the excitation and emission wavelength of these endogenous fluorophores and fluorescent labels are very different. A multi-color ultrafast source is required for the excitation of multiple fluorescence molecules. In this study, we developed a two-photon imaging system with excitations from the pump femtosecond laser and the selected supercontinuum generated from a photonic crystal fiber (PCF). Multiple endogenous fluorophores, fluorescent proteins and fluorescent dyes were excited in their optimal wavelengths simultaneously. A time- and spectral-resolved detection system was used to record the TPEF signals. This detection technique separated the TPEF signals from multiple sources in time and wavelength domains. Cellular organelles such as nucleus, mitochondria, microtubule and endoplasmic reticulum, were clearly revealed in the TPEF images. The simultaneous imaging of multiple fluorophores of cells will greatly aid the study of sub-cellular compartments and protein localization.

  19. Extending single molecule fluorescence observation time by amplitude-modulated excitation

    PubMed Central

    Kisley, Lydia; Chang, Wei-Shun; Cooper, David; Mansur, Andrea P; Landes, Christy F

    2014-01-01

    We present a hardware-based method that can improve single molecule fluorophore observation time by up to 1500% and super-localization by 47% for the experimental conditions used. The excitation was modulated using an acousto-optic modulator (AOM) synchronized to the data acquisition and inherent data conversion time of the detector. The observation time and precision in super-localization of four commonly used fluorophores were compared under modulated and traditional continuous excitation, including direct total internal reflectance excitation of Alexa 555 and Cy3, non-radiative Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) excited Cy5, and direct epi-fluorescence wide field excitation of Rhodamine 6G. The proposed amplitude-modulated excitation does not perturb the chemical makeup of the system or sacrifice signal and is compatible with multiple types of fluorophores. Amplitude-modulated excitation has practical applications for any fluorescent study utilizing an instrumental setup with time-delayed detectors. PMID:24587894

  20. Fluorescence image excited by a scanning UV-LED light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Hsin-Yi; Chen, Yi-Ju; Huang, Kuo-Cheng

    2013-03-01

    An optical scanning system using UV-LED light to induced fluorescence technology can enhance a fluorescence image significantly in a short period. It has several advantages such as lower power consumption, no scattering effect in skins, and multilayer images can be obtained to analyze skin disease. From the experiment results, the light intensity increases with increase spot size and decrease scanning speed, but the image resolution is oppositely. Moreover, the system could be widely used in clinical diagnosis and photodynamic therapy for skin disease because even the irradiated time of fluorescence substance is short but it will provide accurately positioning of fluorescence object.

  1. Excitation and fluorescence spectra of pyrene cooled in a syupersonic jet

    SciTech Connect

    Borisevich, N.A.; Vodovatov, L.B.; D`yachenko, G.G.

    1995-02-01

    The excitation and fluorescence spectra of pyrene molecules cooled in a jet are obtained upon excitation into the S{sub 1}, S{sub 2}, S{sub 3}, and S{sub 4} electronic states. Based on the K. Ohno MO/8 model, a new method for calculating frequencies of the in-plane vibrations in the excited electronic states of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is developed. The method is used for a comparitive analysis of the excitation and fluorescence spectra and assignment of the spectral lines. Good agreement between calculations and experimental data are found. The fluorescence spectrum recorded upon excitation into the high-lying electronic states shows a newmore » long-wavelength band that is probably related to pyrene dimers formed in a jet. 12 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.« less

  2. Noninvasive fluorescence excitation spectroscopy for the diagnosis of oral neoplasia in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebenezar, Jeyasingh; Ganesan, Singaravelu; Aruna, Prakasarao; Muralinaidu, Radhakrishnan; Renganathan, Kannan; Saraswathy, Thillai Rajasekaran

    2012-09-01

    Fluorescence excitation spectroscopy (FES) is an emerging approach to cancer detection. The goal of this pilot study is to evaluate the diagnostic potential of FES technique for the detection and characterization of normal and cancerous oral lesions in vivo. Fluorescence excitation (FE) spectra from oral mucosa were recorded in the spectral range of 340 to 600 nm at 635 nm emission using a fiberoptic probe spectrofluorometer to obtain spectra from the buccal mucosa of 30 sites of 15 healthy volunteers and 15 sites of 10 cancerous patients. Significant FE spectral differences were observed between normal and well differentiated squamous cell carcinoma (WDSCC) oral lesions. The FE spectra of healthy volunteers consists of a broad emission band around 440 to 470 nm, whereas in WDSCC lesions, a new primary peak was seen at 410 nm with secondary peaks observed at 505, 540, and 580 nm due to the accumulation of porphyrins in oral lesions. The FE spectral bands of the WDSCC lesions resemble the typical absorption spectra of a porphyrin. Three potential ratios (I410/I505, I410/I540, and I410/I580) were calculated from the FE spectra and used as input variables for a stepwise linear discriminant analysis (SLDA) for normal and WDSCC groups. Leave-one-out (LOO) method of cross-validation was performed to check the reliability on spectral data for tissue characterization. The diagnostic sensitivity and specificity were determined for normal and WDSCC lesions from the scatter plot of the discriminant function scores. It was observed that diagnostic algorithm based on discriminant function scores obtained by SLDA-LOO method was able to distinguish WDSCC from normal lesions with a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 100%. Results of the pilot study demonstrate that the FE spectral changes due to porphyrin have a good diagnostic potential; therefore, porphyrin can be used as a native tumor marker.

  3. Photodynamic tumor therapy and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy after aminolevulinic acid administration using 633-nm light as therapeutic and fluorescence excitation radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Kienle, Alwin; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Kaufmann, Roland; Rueck, Angelika C.; Meier, Thomas H.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-03-01

    PDT and on-line fluorescence spectroscopy were carried out on human tumors after ALA- administration using 633 nm-light of a dye laser as therapeutic radiation and as fluorescence excitation radiation. This has the following advantages: (1) use of one laser for PDT and fluorescence diagnosis only, (2) the possibility of on-line fluorescence measurements, and (3) excitation of protoporphyrin molecules in deep tissue layers. Monte Carlo calculations were carried out to determine the excitation and fluorescence photon distribution in the case of red and violet excitation radiation. The results show the possibility of depth-resolved measurements on the fluorophore distribution by variation of the excitation wavelength. The influence of remitted excitation light and of the spontaneous radiation from the laser as well as the possible excitation of food-based degradation products of chlorophyll has to be considered in high-sensitive fluorescence measurements.

  4. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence-Excitation of Molecules by Light

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-01-01

    In a recent issue of "TPT," Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1 ("Fun with Fluorescence in Olive Oil,"…

  5. Hyperspectral imaging fluorescence excitation scanning for detecting colorectal cancer: pilot study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leavesley, Silas J.; Wheeler, Mikayla; Lopez, Carmen; Baker, Thomas; Favreau, Peter F.; Rich, Thomas C.; Rider, Paul F.; Boudreaux, Carole W.

    2016-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy and hyperspectral imaging have shown the theoretical potential to discriminate between cancerous and non-cancerous tissue with high sensitivity and specificity. To date, these techniques have not been able to be effectively translated to endoscope platforms. Hyperspectral imaging of the fluorescence excitation spectrum represents a new technology that may be well-suited for endoscopic implementation. However, the feasibility of detecting differences between normal and cancerous mucosa using fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging has not been evaluated. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the changes in the fluorescence excitation spectrum of resected specimen pairs of colorectal adenocarcinoma and normal colorectal mucosa. Patients being treated for colorectal adenocarcinoma were enrolled. Representative adenocarcinoma and normal colonic mucosa specimens were collected from each case. Specimens were flash frozen in liquid nitrogen. Adenocarcinoma was confirmed by histologic evaluation of H&E permanent sections. Hyperspectral image data of the fluorescence excitation of adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal tissue were acquired using a custom microscope configuration previously developed in our lab. Results demonstrated consistent spectral differences between normal and cancerous tissues over the fluorescence excitation spectral range of 390-450 nm. We conclude that fluorescence excitation-scanning hyperspectral imaging may offer an alternative approach for differentiating adenocarcinoma and surrounding normal mucosa of the colon. Future work will focus on expanding the number of specimen pairs analyzed and will utilize fresh tissues where possible, as flash freezing and reconstituting tissues may have altered the autofluorescence properties.

  6. Excitation-emission matrices and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy for the diagnosis of gastrointestinal cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genova, Ts; Borisova, E.; Penkov, N.; Vladimirov, B.; Zhelyazkova, A.; Avramov, L.

    2016-06-01

    We report the development of an improved fluorescence technique for cancer diagnostics in the gastrointestinal tract. We investigate the fluorescence of ex vivo colorectal (cancerous and healthy) tissue samples using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy (SFS) steady-state approaches. The obtained results are processed for revealing characteristic fluorescence spectral features with a valuable diagnostic meaning. The main tissue fluorophores, contributing to the observed fluorescence, are tyrosine, tryptophan, NADH, FAD, collagen and elastin. Based on the results of the Mann-Whitney test as useful parameters for differentiation of gastrointestinal cancer from normal mucosa, we suggest using excitation wavelengths in the range 300 - 360 nm for fluorescence spectroscopy and wavelengths intervals of 60 nm and 90 nm for SFS.

  7. Multi-Channel Hyperspectral Fluorescence Detection Excited by Coupled Plasmon-Waveguide Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Chan; Liu, Le; Zhang, Lin; Guo, Jun; Guo, Jihua; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2013-01-01

    We propose in this paper a biosensor scheme based on coupled plasmon-waveguide resonance (CPWR) excited fluorescence spectroscopy. A symmetrical structure that offers higher surface electric field strengths, longer surface propagation lengths and depths is developed to support guided waveguide modes for the efficient excitation of fluorescence. The optimal parameters for the sensor films are theoretically and experimentally investigated, leading to a detection limit of 0.1 nM (for a Cy5 solution). Multiplex analysis possible with the fluorescence detection is further advanced by employing the hyperspectral fluorescence technique to record the full spectra for every pixel on the sample plane. We demonstrate experimentally that highly overlapping fluorescence (Cy5 and Dylight680) can be distinguished and ratios of different emission sources can be determined accurately. This biosensor shows great potential for multiplex detections of fluorescence analytes. PMID:24129023

  8. Excited state X-ray absorption spectroscopy: Probing both electronic and structural dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neville, Simon P.; Averbukh, Vitali; Ruberti, Marco; Yun, Renjie; Patchkovskii, Serguei; Chergui, Majed; Stolow, Albert; Schuurman, Michael S.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the sensitivity of X-ray absorption spectra, simulated using a general method, to properties of molecular excited states. Recently, Averbukh and co-workers [M. Ruberti et al., J. Chem. Phys. 140, 184107 (2014)] introduced an efficient and accurate L 2 method for the calculation of excited state valence photoionization cross-sections based on the application of Stieltjes imaging to the Lanczos pseudo-spectrum of the algebraic diagrammatic construction (ADC) representation of the electronic Hamiltonian. In this paper, we report an extension of this method to the calculation of excited state core photoionization cross-sections. We demonstrate that, at the ADC(2)x level of theory, ground state X-ray absorption spectra may be accurately reproduced, validating the method. Significantly, the calculated X-ray absorption spectra of the excited states are found to be sensitive to both geometric distortions (structural dynamics) and the electronic character (electronic dynamics) of the initial state, suggesting that core excitation spectroscopies will be useful probes of excited state non-adiabatic dynamics. We anticipate that the method presented here can be combined with ab initio molecular dynamics calculations to simulate the time-resolved X-ray spectroscopy of excited state molecular wavepacket dynamics.

  9. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-09-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp2-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  10. Plant Cell Imaging Based on Nanodiamonds with Excitation-Dependent Fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Su, Li-Xia; Lou, Qing; Jiao, Zhen; Shan, Chong-Xin

    2016-12-01

    Despite extensive work on fluorescence behavior stemming from color centers of diamond, reports on the excitation-dependent fluorescence of nanodiamonds (NDs) with a large-scale redshift from 400 to 620 nm under different excitation wavelengths are so far much fewer, especially in biological applications. The fluorescence can be attributed to the combined effects of the fraction of sp(2)-hybridized carbon atoms among the surface of the fine diamond nanoparticles and the defect energy trapping states on the surface of the diamond. The excitation-dependent fluorescent NDs have been applied in plant cell imaging for the first time. The results reported in this paper may provide a promising route to multiple-color bioimaging using NDs.

  11. Polarized fluorescence in NADH under two-photon excitation with femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasyutinskii, O. S.; Smolin, A. G.; Oswald, C.; Gericke, K. H.

    2017-04-01

    Polarized fluorescence decay in NADH molecules in aqueous solution under two-photon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses has been studied. The excitation was carried out by linear and circularly polarized radiation at four wavelengths: 720, 730, 740, and 750 nm. Time-dependent polarized fluorescence signals were recorded as a function of the excitation light polarization and used for determination of a set of molecular parameters, two lifetimes characterizing the molecular excited states, and the rotation correlation time τrot. The results obtained can be used to create and prove theoretical models describing the intensity and polarization of fluorescence in NADH involved in the regulation of the redox reactions in cells and tissues of living organisms.

  12. Energy-Looping Nanoparticles: Harnessing Excited-State Absorption for Deep-Tissue Imaging.

    PubMed

    Levy, Elizabeth S; Tajon, Cheryl A; Bischof, Thomas S; Iafrati, Jillian; Fernandez-Bravo, Angel; Garfield, David J; Chamanzar, Maysamreza; Maharbiz, Michel M; Sohal, Vikaas S; Schuck, P James; Cohen, Bruce E; Chan, Emory M

    2016-09-27

    Near infrared (NIR) microscopy enables noninvasive imaging in tissue, particularly in the NIR-II spectral range (1000-1400 nm) where attenuation due to tissue scattering and absorption is minimized. Lanthanide-doped upconverting nanocrystals are promising deep-tissue imaging probes due to their photostable emission in the visible and NIR, but these materials are not efficiently excited at NIR-II wavelengths due to the dearth of lanthanide ground-state absorption transitions in this window. Here, we develop a class of lanthanide-doped imaging probes that harness an energy-looping mechanism that facilitates excitation at NIR-II wavelengths, such as 1064 nm, that are resonant with excited-state absorption transitions but not ground-state absorption. Using computational methods and combinatorial screening, we have identified Tm(3+)-doped NaYF4 nanoparticles as efficient looping systems that emit at 800 nm under continuous-wave excitation at 1064 nm. Using this benign excitation with standard confocal microscopy, energy-looping nanoparticles (ELNPs) are imaged in cultured mammalian cells and through brain tissue without autofluorescence. The 1 mm imaging depths and 2 μm feature sizes are comparable to those demonstrated by state-of-the-art multiphoton techniques, illustrating that ELNPs are a promising class of NIR probes for high-fidelity visualization in cells and tissue.

  13. Single-molecule detection by two-photon excitation of fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zander, Christoph; Brand, Leif; Eggeling, C.; Drexhage, Karl-Heinz; Seidel, Claus A. M.

    1997-05-01

    Using a mode-locked titanium: sapphire laser at 700 nm for two-photon excitation we studied fluorescence bursts from individual coumarin 120 molecules in water and triacetin. Fluorescence lifetimes and multichannel scaler traces have been measured simultaneously. Due to the fact that scattered excitation light as well as Raman scattered photons can be suppressed by a short-pass filter a very low background level was achieved. To identify the fluorophore by its characteristic fluorescence lifetime the time-resolved fluorescence signals were analyzed by a maximum likelihood estimator. The obtained average fluorescence lifetimes (tau) av equals 4.8 +/- 1.2 ns for coumarin 120 in water and (tau) av equals 3.3 +/- 0.6 for coumarin 120 in triacetin are in good agreement with results obtained from separate measurements at higher concentrations.

  14. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy application for ex vivo investigation of ocular fundus samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Sven; Hammer, Martin; Schweitzer, Dietrich

    2011-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) imaging of ocular tissue has recently become a promising tool in ophthalmology for diagnostic and research purposes. The feasibility and the advantages of TPEF imaging, namely deeper tissue penetration and improved high-resolution imaging of microstructures, have been demonstrated lately using human ocular samples. The autofluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ocular fundus tissue are well known from spectrophotometric analysis. But fluorophores, especially when it comes to fluorescence lifetime, typically display a dependence of their fluorescence properties on local environmental parameters. Hence, a more detailed investigation of ocular fundus autofluorescence ideally in vivo is of utmost interest. The aim of this study is to determine space-resolved the stationary and time-resolved fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores in ex vivo porcine ocular fundus samples by means of two-photon excited fluorescence spectrum and lifetime imaging microscopy (FSIM/FLIM). By our first results, we characterized the autofluorescence of individual anatomical structures of porcine retina samples excited at 760 nm. The fluorescence properties of almost all investigated retinal layers are relatively homogenous. But as previously unknown, ganglion cell bodies show a significantly shorter fluorescence lifetime compared to the adjacent mueller cells. Since all retinal layers exhibit bi-exponential autofluorescence decays, we were able to achieve a more precise characterization of fluorescence properties of endogenous fluorophores compared to a present in vivo FLIM approach by confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscope (cSLO).

  15. Statistical image segmentation for the detection of skin lesion borders in UV fluorescence excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Franco, Walfre

    2016-04-01

    The skin contains several fluorescent molecules or fluorophores that serve as markers of structure, function and composition. UV fluorescence excitation photography is a simple and effective way to image specific intrinsic fluorophores, such as the one ascribed to tryptophan which emits at a wavelength of 345 nm upon excitation at 295 nm, and is a marker of cellular proliferation. Earlier, we built a clinical UV photography system to image cellular proliferation. In some samples, the naturally low intensity of the fluorescence can make it difficult to separate the fluorescence of cells in higher proliferation states from background fluorescence and other imaging artifacts -- like electronic noise. In this work, we describe a statistical image segmentation method to separate the fluorescence of interest. Statistical image segmentation is based on image averaging, background subtraction and pixel statistics. This method allows to better quantify the intensity and surface distributions of fluorescence, which in turn simplify the detection of borders. Using this method we delineated the borders of highly-proliferative skin conditions and diseases, in particular, allergic contact dermatitis, psoriatic lesions and basal cell carcinoma. Segmented images clearly define lesion borders. UV fluorescence excitation photography along with statistical image segmentation may serve as a quick and simple diagnostic tool for clinicians.

  16. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy with 1- and 2-photon excitations: Relaxation paths and cross sections of a triphenylamine dye in solution

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, J.; Dobryakov, A. L.; Hecht, S., E-mail: sh@chemie.hu-berlin.de, E-mail: skovale@chemie.hu-berlin.de

    2015-07-14

    1-photon (382 nm) and 2-photon (752 nm) excitations to the S{sub 1} state are applied to record and compare transient absorption spectra of a push-pull triphenylamine (TrP) dye in solution. After 1-photon excitation, ultrafast vibrational and structural molecular relaxations are detected on a 0.1 ps time scale in nonpolar hexane, while in polar acetonitrile, the spectral evolution is dominated by dipolar solvation. Upon 2-photon excitation, transient spectra in hexane reveal an unexpected growth of stimulated emission (SE) and excited-state absorption (ESA) bands. The behavior is explained by strong population transfer S{sub 1} → S{sub n} due to resonant absorption ofmore » a third pump photon. Subsequent S{sub n} → S{sub 1} internal conversion (with τ{sub 1} = 1 ps) prepares a very hot S{sub 1} state which cools down with τ{sub 2} = 13 ps. The pump pulse energy dependence proves the 2-photon origin of the bleach signal. At the same time, SE and ESA are strongly affected by higher-order pump absorptions that should be taken into account in nonlinear fluorescence applications. The 2-photon excitation cross sections σ{sup (2)} = 32 ⋅ 10{sup −50} cm{sup 4} s at 752 nm are evaluated from the bleach signal.« less

  17. Photoacoustic-fluorescence in vitro flow cytometry for quantification of absorption, scattering and fluorescence properties of the cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedosekin, D. A.; Sarimollaoglu, M.; Foster, S.; Galanzha, E. I.; Zharov, V. P.

    2013-03-01

    Fluorescence flow cytometry is a well-established analytical tool that provides quantification of multiple biological parameters of cells at molecular levels, including their functional states, morphology, composition, proliferation, and protein expression. However, only the fluorescence and scattering parameters of the cells or labels are available for detection. Cell pigmentation, presence of non-fluorescent dyes or nanoparticles cannot be reliably quantified. Herewith, we present a novel photoacoustic (PA) flow cytometry design for simple integration of absorbance measurements into schematics of conventional in vitro flow cytometers. The integrated system allow simultaneous measurements of light absorbance, scattering and of multicolor fluorescence from single cells in the flow at rates up to 2 m/s. We compared various combinations of excitation laser sources for multicolor detection, including simultaneous excitation of PA and fluorescence using a single 500 kHz pulsed nanosecond laser. Multichannel detection scheme allows simultaneous detection of up to 8 labels, including 4 fluorescent tags and 4 PA colors. In vitro PA-fluorescence flow cytometer was used for studies of nanoparticles uptake and for the analysis of cell line pigmentation, including genetically encoded melanin expression in breast cancer cell line. We demonstrate that this system can be used for direct nanotoxicity studies with simultaneous quantification of nanoparticles content and assessment of cell viability using a conventional fluorescent apoptosis assays.

  18. Two-Photon Absorption Properties of Gold Fluorescent Protein: A Combined Molecular Dynamics and Quantum Chemistry Study.

    PubMed

    Şimşek, Yusuf; Brown, Alex

    2018-06-07

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were carried out to obtain the conformational changes of the chromophore in the gold fluorescent protein (PDB ID: 1OXF ). To obtain two-photon absorption (TPA) cross-sections, time dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) computations were performed for chromophore geometries sampled along the trajectory. The TD-DFT computations used the CAM-B3LYP functional and 6-31+G(d) basis set. Results showed that two dihedral angles change remarkably over the simulation time. TPA cross-sections were found to average 13.82 GM for the excitation to S 1 computed from the equilibrium geometries; however, extending the structures with a water molecule and GLU residue, which make H bonds with the chromophore molecule, increased excitation energies and TPA cross-sections significantly. Besides the effects of the surrounding residues and the dihedrals on the spectroscopic properties, some bond lengths affected the excitation energies and the TPA cross-sections significantly (up to ±25-30%), while the effects of the bond angles were smaller (±5%). Overall the present results provide insight into the effects of the conformational flexibility on TPA (with gold fluorescent protein as a specific example) and suggest that further experimental measurements of TPA for the gold fluorescent protein should be undertaken.

  19. Optical absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy studies of Artepillin C, the major component of green propolis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camuri, Isamara Julia; Costa, Adriano Batista; Ito, Amando Siuiti; Pazin, Wallance Moreira

    2018-06-01

    The bioactivity of propolis against several pathogens is well established, leading to the extensive consumption of that bee product to prevent diseases. Brazilian green propolis, collected by the species Apis mellifera, is one of the most consumed in the world. The chemical composition of green propolis is complex and it has been shown that it displays antioxidant, antimicrobial, anti-inflammatory and antitumor activities, especially due to the high content of Artepillin C. The molecule is a derivative of cinnamic acid with two prenylated groups, responsible for the improvement of the affinity of the compound for lipophilic environment. A carboxylic group (COOH) is also present in the molecule, making it a pH-sensitive compound and the pH-dependent structure of Artepillin C, may modulate its biological activity related to interactions with the cellular membrane of organisms and tissues. Molecular properties of Artepillin C on aqueous solution were examined by optical absorption, steady state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopies. Acid-base titration based on the spectral position of the near UV absorption band, resulted in the pKa value of 4.65 for the carboxylic group in Artepillin C. In acidic pH, below the pKa value, an absorption band raised around 350 nm at Artepillin C concentration above 50 μM, due to aggregation of the molecule. In neutral pH, with excitation at 310 nm, Artepillin C presents dual emission at 400 and 450 nm. In pH close to the pKa, the optical spectra show contribution from both protonated and deprotonated species. A three-exponential function was necessary to fit the intensity decays at the different pHs, dominated by a very short lifetime component, around 0.060 ns. The fast decay resulted in emission before fluorescence depolarization, and in values of fluorescence anisotropy higher than could be expected for monomeric forms of the compound. The results give fundamental knowledge about the protonation-deprotonation state of the

  20. Deeper Insight into Fluorescence--Excitation of Molecules by Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, M. Farooq; Gore, Gordon R.

    2013-05-01

    In a recent issue of TPT, Gordon Gore made interesting observations about the red or yellow fluorescence when laser beams are passed through olive oil. With the excellent visuals contained in that article, we present a pictorial explanation of the questions that were raised in Ref 1.

  1. [Chromophoric dissolved organic matter absorption characteristics with relation to fluorescence in typical macrophyte, algae lake zones of Lake Taihu].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yun-lin; Qin, Bo-qiang; Ma, Rong-hua; Zhu, Guang-wei; Zhang, Lu; Chen, Wei-min

    2005-03-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) represents one of the primary light-absorbing species in natural waters and plays a critical in determining the aquatic light field. CDOM shows a featureless absorption spectrum that increases exponentially with decreasing wavelength, which limits the penetration of biologically damaging UV-B radiation (wavelength from 280 to 320 nm) in the water column, thus shielding aquatic organisms. CDOM absorption measurements and their relationship with dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and fluorescence are presented in typical macrophyte and algae lake zone of Lake Taihu based on a field investigation in April in 2004 and lab analysis. Absorption spectral of CDOM was measured from 240 to 800 nm using a Shimadzu UV-2401PC UV-Vis recording spectrophotometer. Fluorescence with an excitation wavelength of 355 nm, an emission wavelength of 450 nm is measured using a Shimadzu 5301 spectrofluorometer. Concentrations of DOC ranged from 6.3 to 17.2 mg/L with an average of 9.08 +/- 2.66 mg/L. CDOM absorption coefficients at 280 nm and 355 nm were in the range of 11.2 - 32.6 m(-1) (average 17.46m(-1) +/- 5.75 m(-1) and 2.4 - 8.3 m(-1) (average 4.17m(-1) +/- 1.47 m(-l)), respectively. The values of the DOC-specific absorption coefficient at 355 nm ranged from 0.31 to 0.64 L x (mg x m)-1. Fluorescence emission at 450 nm, excited at 355 nm, had a mean value of 1.32nm(-1) +/- 0.84 nm(-1). A significant lake zone difference is found in DOC concentration, CDOM absorption coefficient and fluorescence, but not in DOC-specific absorption coefficient and spectral slope coefficient. This regional distribution pattern is in agreement with the location of sources of yellow substance: highest concentrations close to river mouth under the influence of river inflow, lower values in East Lake Taihu. The values of algae lake zone are obvious larger than those of macrophyte lake zone. In Meiliang Bay, CDOM absorption, DOC concentration and fluorescence tend to

  2. Formation of hemoglobin photoproduct is responsible for two-photon and single photon-excited fluorescence of red blood cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirshin, Evgeny A.; Yakimov, Boris P.; Rodionov, Sergey A.; Omelyanenko, Nikolai P.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Fadeev, Victor V.; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2018-07-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence of red blood cells (RBC) has been reported to be applicable for their assessment in vitro and in vivo. The corresponding fluorescence emission was ascribed to hemoglobin (Hb), however, as Hb is essentially non-fluorescent at single-photon excitation, the mechanism of two-photon excited fluorescence of RBC remains debatable. Here we show that a fluorescent photoproduct, characterized by an ultrafast decay of excitation, is formed after irradiation of Hb with femtosecond laser pulses with ca. 8 · 10‑5 quantum yield, and that it is also fluorescent at single-photon excitation. The formation of a similar photoproduct was also shown for Hb continuous wave irradiation with blue light with ca. 10‑5 formation quantum yield. The kinetics of the Hb photoproduct formation and its spectral properties were investigated. The obtained results clarify the processes responsible for RBC fluorescence observed in two-photon microscopy experiments.

  3. Cine: Line excitation by infrared fluorescence in cometary atmospheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Val-Borro, Miguel; Cordiner, Martin A.; Milam, Stefanie N.; Charnley, Steven B.

    2017-03-01

    CINE is a Python module for calculating infrared pumping efficiencies that can be applied to the most common molecules found in cometary comae such as water, hydrogen cyanide or methanol. Excitation by solar radiation of vibrational bands followed by radiative decay to the ground vibrational state is one of the main mechanisms for molecular excitation in comets. This code calculates the effective pumping rates for rotational levels in the ground vibrational state scaled by the heliocentric distance of the comet. Line transitions are queried from the latest version of the HITRAN spectroscopic repository using the astroquery affiliated package of astropy. Molecular data are obtained from the LAMDA database. These coefficients are useful for modeling rotational emission lines observed in cometary spectra at sub-millimeter wavelengths. Combined with computational methods to solve the radiative transfer equations based, e.g., on the Monte Carlo algorithm, this model can retrieve production rates and rotational temperatures from the observed emission spectrum.

  4. Vibrational excitation of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and third-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yuki; Hara, Hideaki; Hiraki, Takahiro; Masuda, Takahiko; Sasao, Noboru; Uetake, Satoshi; Yoshimi, Akihiro; Yoshimura, Koji; Yoshimura, Motohiko

    2018-01-01

    We report the coherent excitation of the vibrational state of hydrogen molecules by two-photon absorption and the resultant third-harmonic generation (THG). Parahydrogen molecules cooled by liquid nitrogen are irradiated by mid-infrared nanosecond pulses at 4.8 μm with a nearly Fourier-transform-limited linewidth. The first excited vibrational state of parahydrogen is populated by two-photon absorption of the mid-infrared photons. Because of the narrow linewidth of the mid-infrared pulses, coherence between the ground and excited states is sufficient to induce higher-order processes. Near-infrared photons from the THG are observed at 1.6 μm. The dependence of the intensity of the near-infrared radiation on mid-infrared pulse energy, target pressure, and cell length is determined. We used a simple formula for THG with consideration of realistic experimental conditions to explain the observed results.

  5. Investigating the 3.3 micron infrared fluorescence from naphthalene following ultraviolet excitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Richard M.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1994-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) type molecules are proposed as the carriers of the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Detailed studies of the 3.3 micrometer infrared emission features from naphthalene, the simplest PAH, following ultraviolet laser excitation are used in the interpretation of the 3.29 micrometer (3040 cm(sup -1)) UIR band. A time-resolved Fourier transform spectrometer is used to record the infrared emission spectrum of gas-phase naphthalene subsequent to ultraviolet excitation facilitated by an excimer laser operated at either 193 nm or 248 nm. The emission spectra differ significantly from the absorption spectrum in the same spectral region. Following 193 nm excitation the maximum in the emission profile is red-shifted 45 cm(sup -1) relative to the absorption maximum; a 25 cm(sup -1) red-shift is observed after 248 nm excitation. The red-shifting of the emission spectrum is reduced as collisional and radiative relaxation removes energy from the highly vibrationally excited molecules. Coupling between the various vibrational modes is thought to account for the differences between absorption and emission spectra. Strong visible emission is also observed following ultraviolet excitation. Visible emission may play an important role in the rate of radiative relaxation, which according to the interstellar PAH hypothesis occurs only by the slow emission of infrared photons. Studying the visible emission properties of PAH type molecules may be useful in the interpretation of the DIB's observed in absorption.

  6. Characterization of CDOM of river waters in China using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and regional integration techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Shang, Yingxin; Shao, Tiantian; Wen, Zhidan; Lv, Lili

    2017-08-01

    The spatial characteristics of fluorescent dissolved organic matter (FDOM) components in river waters in China were first examined by excitation-emission matrix spectra and fluorescence regional integration (FRI) with the data collected during September to November between 2013 and 2015. One tyrosine-like (R1), one tryptophan-like (R2), one fulvic-like (R3), one microbial protein-like (R4), and one humic-like (R5) components have been identified by FRI method. Principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted to assess variations in the five FDOM components (FRί (ί = 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5)) and the humification index for all 194 river water samples. The average fluorescence intensities of the five fluorescent components and the total fluorescence intensities FSUM differed under spatial variation among the seven major river basins (Songhua, Liao, Hai, Yellow and Huai, Yangtze, Pearl, and Inflow Rivers) in China. When all the river water samples were pooled together, the fulvic-like FR3 and the humic-like FR5 showed a strong positive linear relationship (R2 = 0.90, n = 194), indicating that the two allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5 may originate from similar sources. There is a moderate strong positive correlation between the tryptophan-like FR2 and the microbial protein-like FR4 (R2 = 0.71, n = 194), suggesting that parts of two autochthonous FDOM components R2 and R4 are likely from some common sources. However, the total allochthonous substance FR(3+5) and the total autochthonous substances FR(1+2+4) exhibited a weak correlation (R2 = 0.40, n = 194). Significant positive linear relationships between FR3 (R2 = 0.69, n = 194), FR5 (R2 = 0.79, n = 194), and chromophoric DOM (CDOM) absorption coefficient a(254) were observed, which demonstrated that the CDOM absorption was dominated by the allochthonous FDOM components R3 and R5.

  7. Differentiation of ocular fundus fluorophores by fluorescence lifetime imaging using multiple excitation and emission wavelengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M.; Schweitzer, D.; Schenke, S.; Becker, W.; Bergmann, A.

    2006-10-01

    Ocular fundus autofluorescence imaging has been introduced into clinical diagnostics recently. It is in use for the observation of the age pigment lipofuscin, a precursor of age - related macular degeneration (AMD). But other fluorophores may be of interest too: The redox pair FAD - FADH II provides information on the retinal energy metabolism, advanced glycation end products (AGE) indicate protein glycation associated with pathologic processes in diabetes as well as AMD, and alterations in the fluorescence of collagen and elastin in connective tissue give us the opportunity to observe fibrosis by fluorescence imaging. This, however, needs techniques able to differentiate particular fluorophores despite limited permissible ocular exposure as well as excitation wavelength (limited by the transmission of the human ocular lens to >400 nm). We present an ophthalmic laser scanning system (SLO), equipped with picosecond laser diodes (FWHM 100 ps, 446 nm or 468 nm respectively) and time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) in two emission bands (500 - 560 nm and 560 - 700 nm). The decays were fitted by a bi-exponential model. Fluorescence spectra were measured by a fluorescence spectrometer fluorolog. Upon excitation at 446 nm, the fluorescence of AGE, FAD, and lipofuscin were found to peak at 503 nm, 525 nm, and 600 nm respectively. Accordingly, the statistical distribution of the fluorescence decay times was found to depend on the different excitation wavelengths and emission bands used. The use of multiple excitation and emission wavelengths in conjunction with fluorescence lifetime imaging allows us to discriminate between intrinsic fluorophores of the ocular fundus. Taken together with our knowledge on the anatomical structure of the fundus, these findings suggest an association of the short, middle and long fluorescence decay time to the retinal pigment epithelium, the retina, and connective tissue respectively.

  8. Study of excitation transfer in laser dye mixtures by direct measurement of fluorescence lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C.; Dienes, A.

    1973-01-01

    By directly measuring the donor fluorescence lifetime as a function of acceptor concentration in the laser dye mixture Rhodamine 6G-Cresyl violet, we found that the Stern-Volmer relation is obeyed, from which the rate of excitation transfer is determined. The experimental results indicate that the dominant mechanism responsible for the efficient excitation transfer is that of resonance transfer due to long range dipole-dipole interaction.

  9. Absorption and Luminescence Studies of Some Highly Fluorescent Derivatives of Vitamin B1; Solvent and pH Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciniak, B.; Koput, J.; Kozubek, H.

    1990-08-01

    The influence of solvent on the UV-visible absorption and luminescence spectra of some highly fluorescent vitamin B1 derivatives, the products of the reaction of N-methylated vitamin B1 with cytidine (I), adenosine (II) and 2-amino-4-methylpyridine (III) is studied. Spectroscopic manifestations of protonation of I and II are also investigated using a semiempirical INDO/S CI method. Singlet and triplet energy levels of the free ion and several protonated species are calculated, and transition energies and oscillator strengths are compared with the experimental spectra. Calculated charge densities on heteroatoms in the ground and excited singlet and triplet states are correlated with changes of the experimental pKa values with excitation. The results for I and II are compared with those for the trimethylated pyrichrominium ion (III) previously studied

  10. An experimental study of the electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles and their electrosynthesized polymers.

    PubMed

    Diaw, A K D; Gningue-Sall, D; Yassar, A; Brochon, J-C; Henry, E; Aaron, J-J

    2015-01-25

    Electronic absorption and fluorescence spectral properties of new p-substituted-N-phenylpyrroles (N-PhPys), including HOPhPy, MeOPhPy, ThPhPy, PhDPy, DPhDPy, PyPhThThPhPy, and their available, electrosynthesized polymers were investigated. Electronic absorption spectra, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra, fluorescence quantum yields (ΦF) and lifetimes (τF), and other photophysical parameters of these N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers were measured in DMF, DMSO diluted solutions and/or solid state at room temperature. The electronic absorption spectra of N-PhPy derivatives and their polymers included one to several bands, located in the 270-395 nm region, according to the p-phenyl substituent electron-donating effect and conjugated heteroaromatic system length. The fluorescence excitation spectra were characterized by one broad main peak, with, in most cases, one (or more) poorly resolved shoulder (s), appearing in the 270-405 nm region, and their emission spectra were generally constituted of several bands located in the 330-480 nm region. No significant shift of the absorption, fluorescence excitation and emission spectra wavelengths was found upon going from the monomers to the corresponding polymers. ΦF values were high, varying between 0.11 and 0.63, according to the nature of substituents(s) and to the conjugated system extension. Fluorescence decays were mono-exponential for the monomers and poly-exponential for PyPhThThPhPy and for polymers. τF values were relatively short (0.35-5.17 ns), and markedly decreased with the electron-donor character of the phenyl group p-substituent and the conjugated system extension. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. A total internal reflection-fluorescence correlation spectroscopy setup with pulsed diode laser excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weger, Lukas; Hoffmann-Jacobsen, Kerstin

    2017-09-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) measures fluctuations in a (sub-)femtoliter volume to analyze the diffusive behavior of fluorescent particles. This highly sensitive method has proven to be useful for the analysis of dynamic biological systems as well as in chemistry, physics, and material sciences. It is routinely performed with commercial fluorescence microscopes, which provide a confined observation volume by the confocal technique. The evanescent wave of total internal reflectance (TIR) is used in home-built systems to permit a surface sensitive FCS analysis. We present a combined confocal and TIR-FCS setup which uses economic low-power pulsed diode lasers for excitation. Excitation and detection are coupled to time-correlated photon counting hardware. This allows simultaneous fluorescence lifetime and FCS measurements in a surface-sensitive mode. Moreover, the setup supports fluorescence lifetime correlation spectroscopy at surfaces. The excitation can be easily switched between TIR and epi-illumination to compare the surface properties with those in liquid bulk. The capabilities of the presented setup are demonstrated by measuring the diffusion coefficients of a free dye molecule, a labeled polyethylene glycol, and a fluorescent nanoparticle in confocal as well as in TIR-FCS.

  12. [Seasonal variation in the absorption and fluorescence characteristics of CDOM in downstream of Liaohe River].

    PubMed

    Shao, Tian-Tian; Zhao, Ying; Song, Kai-Shan; Du, Jia; Ding, Zhi

    2014-10-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM), which is an important part of dissolved organic matter (DOM), is considered as the largest storage of dissolved organic carbon in the aquatic environment. Liaohe River is the seventh largest river in China with annual runoff of 1.48 billion m3. As a result, studying on CDOM of Liaohe River is very important in estimating the organic carbon flux into sea. Seasonal optical characteristics of CDOM in the downstream of Liaohe River were investigated using absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence excitation-emission matrices (EEMs). CDOM absorption coefficient at 355 nm [aCDOM (355)] in spring was lower than that in autumn and winter while low molecular weight substances were found in autumn and high molecular weight substances in spring based on the absorption coefficient and absorption slope (S) of CDOM. Samples in different seasons all exhibited fairly strong protein-like fluorophore (fluorophore B and fluorophore T) in the EEMs but the values showed apparent temporal variations. Based on the analysis of the relationships between different fluorophores, strong correlations (R2 > 0. 9) were observed between fluorophore A and C in spring, fluorophore B and T in autumn and winter, which illustrated that they had similar CDOM originalsources. However, a weak relationship (R2 = 0.21) was found between fluorophore B and T in spring, demonstrating the complexity and diversity of CDOM sources. Starting from autumn to winter and the subsequent spring, humic-like fluorophores exhibited enhanced fluorescent intensity, which could be ascribed to exogenous input. Furthermore, linear relationship between aCDOM (355) and Fn (355) in different seasons was examined in the study, and the strongest relationship was obtained in winter (R2 = 0.75), followed by autumn (R2 = 0.48) and spring (R2 = 0.01). This study indicated that fluorophore B in autumn and winter (R = 0.66; R = 0.89) as well as humic-like fluorophores (A and C, R = 0.74; R = 0

  13. Absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic characterisation of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirdel, J.; Zirak, P.; Penzkofer, A.; Breitkreuz, H.; Wolf, E.

    2008-09-01

    The absorption and fluorescence behaviour of the circadian blue-light photoreceptor cryptochrome from Drosophila melanogaster (dCry) in a pH 8 aqueous buffer solution is studied. The flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) cofactor of dCry is identified to be present in its oxidized form (FAD ox), and the 5,10-methenyltetrahydrofolate (MTHF) cofactor is found to be hydrolyzed and oxidized to 10-formyldihydrofolate (10-FDHF). The absorption and the fluorescence behaviour of dCry is investigated in the dark-adapted (receptor) state, the light-adapted (signalling) state, and under long-time violet light exposure. Photo-excitation of FAD ox in dCry causes a reductive electron transfer to the formation of anionic FAD semiquinone (FAD rad - ), and photo-excitation of the generated FAD rad - causes an oxidative electron transfer to the back formation of FAD ox. In light adapted dCry a photo-induced equilibrium between FAD ox and FAD rad - exists. The photo-cycle dynamics of signalling state formation and recovery is discussed. Quantum yields of photo-induced signalling state formation of about 0.2 and of photo-induced back-conversion of about 0.2 are determined. A recovery of FAD rad - to FAD ox in the dark with a time constant of 1.6 min at room temperature is found.

  14. Bulky Counterions: Enhancing the Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence of Gold Nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Bertorelle, Franck; Moulin, Christophe; Soleilhac, Antonin; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Brevet, Pierre-François; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2018-01-19

    Increasing fluorescence quantum yields of ligand-protected gold nanoclusters has attracted wide research interest. The strategy consisting in using bulky counterions has been found to dramatically enhance the fluorescence. In this Communication, we push forward this concept to the nonlinear optical regime. We show that by an appropriate choice of bulky counterions and of solvent, a 30-fold increase in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) signal at ≈600 nm for gold nanoclusters can be obtained. This would correspond to a TPEF cross-section in the range of 0.1 to 1 GM. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Oral cancer detection based on fluorescence polarization of blood plasma at excitation wavelength 405 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachaiappan, Rekha; Prakasarao, Aruna; Manoharan, Yuvaraj; Dornadula, Koteeswaran; Singaravelu, Ganesan

    2017-02-01

    During metabolism the metabolites such as hormones, proteins and enzymes were released in to the blood stream by the cells. These metabolites reflect any change that occurs due to any disturbances in normal metabolic function of the human system. This was well observed with the altered spectral signatures observed with fluorescence spectroscopic technique. Previously many have reported on the significance of native fluorescence spectroscopic method in the diagnosis of cancer. As fluorescence spectroscopy is sensitive and simple, it has complementary techniques such as excitation-emission matrix, synchronous and polarization. The fluorescence polarization measurement provides details about any association or binding reactions and denaturing effects that occurs due to change in the micro environment of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt in the diagnosis of oral cancer at 405 nm excitation using fluorescence polarization measurement. The fluorescence anisotropic values calculated from polarized fluorescence spectral data of normal and oral cancer subjects yielded a good accuracy when analyzed with linear discriminant analysis based artificial neural network. The results will be discussed in detail.

  16. Studies of Time-Resolved Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Resolved Absorption Spectra of Nucleic Acid Components.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yingxian

    1993-01-01

    There is considerable uncertainty about dynamic aspects of the photophysics of the adenylyl chromophore, stemming from the discordant values reported for the room temperature fluorescence lifetimes (tau_1 = 5 ps, tau_2 = 330 ps for 9MeAde; tau_1 = 290 ps, tau_2 = 4.17 ns for ATP). Spectra reported in conjunction with these lifetimes create difficulties in assignment of emission. To clarify this situation I have investigated the fluorescence decay times and time -resolved emission spectra of adenylyl compounds under a variety of conditions (concentration, pH, solvent) using sub-ns laser excitation at 265 nm together with gated fast sampling (100 ps) detection and signal averaging. Multi -component decays and spectra are observed in aqueous solution. Major slow components (tau = 4.4 +/- 0.2 ns) with emission maxima at 380 nm are found for all components at pH 1.1 and for ATP at pH 4.4. At pH 7 a fast component (<100 ps) predominates. There is no marked evidence for a concentration dependence, the oscillator strengths are 10^ {-3}-10^{-5} and transitions must be classified as weakly forbidden. Single component emission is observed in acetonitrile and ethanol. The UV absorption spectra of biomolecules d(CG) and polyd(GC)cdotpolyd(GC) exhibit the different hypochromic effects due to different interactions between guanosine(G) and cytidine(C) in stacked form. The present work has been carried out to explain this quantitatively. To approach this problem the absorption spectra of G and C have been resolved into gaussian components using the PeakFit program. The absorption spectra (220-310 nm) of d(CG) and polyd(GC)cdotpolyd(GC) have been fitted with gaussian components of G and C (in the order of increasing energy, G1 and G2, and C1, C2 and C3, respectively), and the contribution to both spectra from individual gaussians is estimated in terms of oscillator strengths. The fitting results suggest that the small hypochromism in absorption spectrum of d(CG) may be attributed

  17. Effect of gold nanoparticles on the fluorescence excitation spectrum of α-fetoprotein: Local environment dependent fluorescence quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jian-jun; Chen, Yu; Wang, A.-qing; Zhu, Jian; Zhao, Jun-wu

    2011-01-01

    The effect of colloid gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) on the fluorescence excitation spectrum of α-fetoprotein (AFP) has been investigated experimentally. The excitation spectral peaks of AFP with low concentration from 0.01 ng ml -1 to 12 ng ml -1 increase monotonically with increasing of AFP concentration. When some gold colloids were added to the AFP solution, the excitation peak at 285 nm decreases distinctly. By comparing the excitation peak intensity of AFP solution with gold colloids and without gold colloids at different AFP concentrations, the quenching effect from gold nanoparticle was more effective at lower AFP concentration. So the range of concentration from 0.01 ng ml -1 to 0.09 ng ml -1 will be the potential range of applications because of the higher sensitivity. The physical origin based on local field effect was investigated to illuminate this local environment dependent fluorescence quenching. The changing extent of quenching with different AFP concentrations can be attributed to the nonlinear decreasing of the local field factor of gold nanoparticles as a function of environmental dielectric constant.

  18. Concentration of atomic hydrogen in a dielectric barrier discharge measured by two-photon absorption fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvořák, P.; Talába, M.; Obrusník, A.; Kratzer, J.; Dědina, J.

    2017-08-01

    Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) was utilized for measuring the concentration of atomic hydrogen in a volume dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) ignited in mixtures of Ar, H2 and O2 at atmospheric pressure. The method was calibrated by TALIF of krypton diluted in argon at atmospheric pressure, proving that three-body collisions had a negligible effect on quenching of excited krypton atoms. The diagnostic study was complemented with a 3D numerical model of the gas flow and a zero-dimensional model of the chemistry in order to better understand the reaction kinetics and identify the key pathways leading to the production and destruction of atomic hydrogen. It was determined that the density of atomic hydrogen in Ar-H2 mixtures was in the order of 1021 m-3 and decreased when oxygen was added into the gas mixture. Spatially resolved measurements and simulations revealed a sharply bordered region with low atomic hydrogen concentration when oxygen was added to the gas mixture. At substoichiometric oxygen/hydrogen ratios, this H-poor region is confined to an area close to the gas inlet and it is shown that the size of this region is not only influenced by the chemistry but also by the gas flow patterns. Experimentally, it was observed that a decrease in H2 concentration in the feeding Ar-H2 mixture led to an increase in H production in the DBD.

  19. Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using Density Functional Theory

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-03

    Naval Research Laboratory Washington, DC 20375-5320 NRL/MR/6390--16-9681 Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra...NUMBER OF PAGES 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Calculation of Vibrational and Electronic Excited-State Absorption Spectra of Arsenic-Water Complexes Using...Unclassified Unlimited Unclassified Unlimited 59 Samuel G. Lambrakos (202) 767-2601 Calculations are presented of vibrational and electronic excited-state

  20. Synthesis, spectral behaviour and photophysics of donor-acceptor kind of chalcones: Excited state intramolecular charge transfer and fluorescence quenching studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannipara, Mehboobali; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Alamry, Khalid A.; Arshad, Muhammad N.; El-Daly, Samy A.

    2015-02-01

    The spectral and photophysical properties of two chalcones containing electron donating and accepting groups with intramolecular charge transfer characteristics were synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR and X-ray crystallography. Both compounds show very strong solvent polarity dependent changes in their photophysical characteristics, namely, remarkable red shift in the emission spectra with increasing solvent polarity, large change in Stokes shift, significant reduction in the fluorescence quantum yield; indicating that the fluorescence states of these compounds are of intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) character. The solvent effect on the photophysical parameters such as singlet absorption, molar absorptivity, oscillator strength, dipole moment, fluorescence spectra, and fluorescence quantum yield of both compounds have been investigated comprehensively. For both dyes, Lippert-Mataga and Reichardt's correlations were used to estimate the difference between the excited and ground state dipole moments (Δμ). The interactions of dyes with colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) were also studied in ethanol using steady state fluorescence quenching measurements. The fluorescence quenching data reveal that dynamic quenching and energy transfer play a major role in the fluorescence quenching of dyes by Ag NPs.

  1. Optimal optical filters of fluorescence excitation and emission for poultry fecal detection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Purpose: An analytic method to design excitation and emission filters of a multispectral fluorescence imaging system is proposed and was demonstrated in an application to poultry fecal inspection. Methods: A mathematical model of a multispectral imaging system is proposed and its system parameters, ...

  2. Light absorption and excitation energy transfer calculations in primitive photosynthetic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, Yu; Kayanuma, Megumi; Shoji, Mitsuo; Yabana, Kazuhiro; Shiraishi, Kenji; Umemura, Masayuki

    2015-06-01

    In photosynthetic organisms, light energy is converted into chemical energy through the light absorption and excitation energy transfer (EET) processes. These processes start in light-harvesting complexes, which contain special photosynthetic pigments. The exploration of unique mechanisms in light-harvesting complexes is directly related to studies, such as artificial photosynthesis or biosignatures in astrobiology. We examined, through ab initio calculations, the light absorption and EET processes using cluster models of light-harvesting complexes in purple bacteria (LH2). We evaluated absorption spectra and energy transfer rates using the LH2 monomer and dimer models to reproduce experimental results. After the calibration tests, a LH2 aggregation model, composed of 7 or 19 LH2s aligned in triangle lattice, was examined. We found that the light absorption is red shifted and the energy transfer becomes faster as the system size increases. We also found that EET is accelerated by exchanging the central pigments to lower energy excited pigments. As an astrobiological application, we calculated light absorptions efficiencies of the LH2 in different photoenvironments.

  3. Quantitative calculations of fluorescence polarization and absorption anisotropy kinetics of double- and triple-chromophore complexes with energy transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Demidov, A A

    1994-01-01

    A new method is presented for calculation of the fluorescence depolarization and kinetics of absorption anisotropy for molecular complexes with a limited number of chromophores. The method considers absorption and emission of light by both chromophores, and also energy transfer between them, with regard to their mutual orientations. The chromophores in each individual complex are rigidly positioned. The complexes are randomly distributed and oriented in space, and there is no energy transfer between them. The new "practical" formula for absorption anisotropy and fluorescence depolarization kinetics, P(t) = [3B(t) - 1 + 2A(t)]/[3 + B(t) + 4A(t)], is derived both for double- and triple-chromophore complexes with delta-pulse excitation. The parameter B(t) is given by (a) B(t) = cos2(theta) for double-chromophore complexes, and (b) B(t) = q12(t)cos2(theta 12) + q13(t)-cos2(theta 13) + q23(t)cos2(theta 23) for triple-chromophore complexes, where q12(t) + q13(t) + q23(t) = 1. Here theta ij are the angles between the chromophore transition dipole moments in the individual molecular complex. The parameters qij(t) and A(t) are dependent on chromophore spectroscopic features and on the rates of energy transfer. PMID:7696461

  4. Photothermal measurement of absorption and scattering losses in thin films excited by surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Domené, Esteban A; Balzarotti, Francisco; Bragas, Andrea V; Martínez, Oscar E

    2009-12-15

    We present a novel noncontact, photothermal technique, based on the focus error signal of a commercial CD pickup head that allows direct determination of absorption in thin films. Combined with extinction methods, this technique yields the scattering contribution to the losses. Surface plasmon polaritons are excited using the Kretschmann configuration in thin Au films of varying thickness. By measuring the extinction and absorption simultaneously, it is shown that dielectric constants and thickness retrieval leads to inconsistencies if the model does not account for scattering.

  5. Excitation-resolved multispectral method for imaging pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescent molecular tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Maomao; Zhou, Yuan; Su, Han; Zhang, Dong; Luo, Jianwen

    2017-04-01

    Imaging of the pharmacokinetic parameters in dynamic fluorescence molecular tomography (DFMT) can provide three-dimensional metabolic information for biological studies and drug development. However, owing to the ill-posed nature of the FMT inverse problem, the relatively low quality of the parametric images makes it difficult to investigate the different metabolic processes of the fluorescent targets with small distances. An excitation-resolved multispectral DFMT method is proposed; it is based on the fact that the fluorescent targets with different concentrations show different variations in the excitation spectral domain and can be considered independent signal sources. With an independent component analysis method, the spatial locations of different fluorescent targets can be decomposed, and the fluorescent yields of the targets at different time points can be recovered. Therefore, the metabolic process of each component can be independently investigated. Simulations and phantom experiments are carried out to evaluate the performance of the proposed method. The results demonstrated that the proposed excitation-resolved multispectral method can effectively improve the reconstruction accuracy of the parametric images in DFMT.

  6. Real-time intraoperative fluorescence imaging system using light-absorption correction.

    PubMed

    Themelis, George; Yoo, Jung Sun; Soh, Kwang-Sup; Schulz, Ralf; Ntziachristos, Vasilis

    2009-01-01

    We present a novel fluorescence imaging system developed for real-time interventional imaging applications. The system implements a correction scheme that improves the accuracy of epi-illumination fluorescence images for light intensity variation in tissues. The implementation is based on the use of three cameras operating in parallel, utilizing a common lens, which allows for the concurrent collection of color, fluorescence, and light attenuation images at the excitation wavelength from the same field of view. The correction is based on a ratio approach of fluorescence over light attenuation images. Color images and video is used for surgical guidance and for registration with the corrected fluorescence images. We showcase the performance metrics of this system on phantoms and animals, and discuss the advantages over conventional epi-illumination systems developed for real-time applications and the limits of validity of corrected epi-illumination fluorescence imaging.

  7. Effects of Anisotropic Excitation in Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIFS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimoto, Takashi; Goto, Chiaki; Uetani, Yasunori; Fukuda, Kuniya

    1985-07-01

    Various features of the effect of alignment in the upper-level population on the observed emission-line intensity, i.e., the spatially-anisotropic intensity distribution and polarization, are demonstrated using laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy on the neon 2p53s-2p53p transitions in a plasma. Disalignment by atomic collision is observed on the 2p2 level, and its rate coefficient is determined as (1.70± 0.03)× 10-10 cm3s-1. The case of hyperfine-structure lines is discussed. Polarization is observed in the hydrogen Balmer α line fluorescence following the laser excitation of the same transition. Conditions are given under which the alignment effect is eliminated or can be neglected. Cases of unpolarized-light excitation and high-intensity excitation are discussed.

  8. Single-photon and two-photon excited fluorescence behavior of a novel fluorene-based compound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wenbo; Wu, Yiquan; Gu, Donghong; Gan, Fuxi

    2005-09-01

    A D-π-D type compound, 2,7-bis(4-methoxystyryl)-9,9-bis(2-ethylhexyl)-9H-fluorene (abbreviated as MO-Flu-MO), where electron-donor D is methoxy group andπis fluorene unit, has been synthesized. The molecular structures of the compound were characterized by elemental analyses, EI-MS and FT-IR spectra. UV-Vis spectra in the region 230--1000 nm and single-photon excited fluorescence in tetrahydrofuran (THF) of the compound were measured. It is found that the new compound exhibits strong two-photon excited fluorescence in the region 380--500 nm and moderate two-photon absorption (TPA) value in the femtoseconds regime (TPA cross-section as high as 55×10-50 cm4 s photon-1 with 13fs laser pulses). The results demonstrate that the compound is a promising candidate for two-photon three-dimensional (3D) optical data storage.

  9. Magnetic fluorescent lamp having reduced ultraviolet self-absorption

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Samuel M.; Richardson, Robert W.

    1985-01-01

    The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly (10) is enhanced by providing means (30) for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb (12) of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

  10. Bioaerosol detection and classification using dual excitation wavelength laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jonsson, Per; Wästerby, Pär.; Gradmark, Per-Åke; Hedborg, Julia; Larsson, Anders; Landström, Lars

    2015-05-01

    We present results obtained by a detection system designed to measure laser-induced fluorescence from individual aerosol particles using dual excitation wavelengths. The aerosol is sampled from ambient air and via a 1 mm diameter nozzle, surrounded by a sheath air flow, confined into a particle beam. A continuous wave blue laser at 404 nm is focused on the aerosol beam and two photomultiplier tubes monitor the presence of individual particles by simultaneous measuring the scattered light and any induced fluorescence. When a particle is present in the detection volume, a laser pulse is triggered from an ultraviolet laser at 263 nm and the corresponding fluorescence spectrum is acquired with a spectrometer based on a diffraction grating and a 32 channel photomultiplier tube array with single-photon sensitivity. The spectrometer measures the fluorescence spectra in the wavelength region from 250 to 800 nm. In the present report, data were measured on different monodisperse reference aerosols, simulants of biological warfare agents, and different interference aerosol particles, e.g. pollen. In the analysis of the experimental data, i.e., the time-resolved scattered and fluorescence signals from 404 nm c.w. light excitation and the fluorescence spectra obtained by a pulsed 263 nm laser source, we use multivariate data analysis methods to classify each individual aerosol particle.

  11. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios of 3d transition metals by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters.

    PubMed

    Kaçal, Mustafa Recep; Han, İbrahim; Akman, Ferdi

    2015-01-01

    Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence technique (EDXRF) has been employed for measuring K-shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios for Ti, Cr, Fe, Co, Ni and Cu elements. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements were determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the Kα X-ray production cross-sections, K shell fluorescence yields, Kβ-to-Kα X-rays intensity ratios, total atomic absorption cross sections and mass attenuation coefficients. The measurements were performed using a Cd-109 radioactive point source and an Si(Li) detector in direct excitation and transmission experimental geometry. The measured values for jump factors and jump ratios were compared with theoretically calculated and the ones available in the literature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A passive two-band sensor of sunlight-excited plant fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kebabian, Paul L.; Theisen, Arnold F.; Kallelis, Spiros; Freedman, Andrew

    1999-11-01

    We have designed and built a passive remote sensor of sunlight-excited chlorophyll fluorescence (U.S. Patent No. 5,567,947, Oct. 22, 1996) which provides for the real-time, in situ sensing of photosynthetic activity in plants. This sensor, which operates as a Fraunhofer line discriminator, detects light at the cores of the lines comprising the atmospheric oxygen A and B bands, centered at 762 and 688 nm, respectively. These bands also correspond to wavelengths in the far-red and red chlorophyll fluorescence bands. The sensor is based on an induced fluorescence approach; as light collected from fluorescing plants is passed through a low-pressure cell containing oxygen, the oxygen absorbs the energy and subsequently reemits photons which are then detected by a photomultiplier tube. Since the oxygen in the cell absorbs light at the same wavelengths that have been strongly absorbed by the oxygen in the atmosphere, the response to incident sunlight is minimal. This mode of measurement is limited to target plants sufficiently close in range that the plants' fluorescence is not itself appreciably absorbed by atmospheric oxygen (˜200 m). In vivo measurements of fluorescence in the 760 and 690 nm bands of vegetation in full sunlight are also presented. Measurements of plant fluorescence at the single-plant canopy level were obtained from greenhouse-grown bean plants subjected to a range of nitrogen treatments. The ratio of the fluorescence obtained from the two measurement bands showed statistically significant variation with respect to nitrogen treatments.

  13. Picosecond time-resolved absorption and fluorescence dynamics in the artificial bacteriorhodopsin pigment BR6.11.

    PubMed

    Brack, T L; Delaney, J K; Atkinson, G H; Albeck, A; Sheves, M; Ottolenghi, M

    1993-08-01

    The picosecond molecular dynamics in an artificial bacteriorhodopsin (BR) pigment containing a structurally modified all-trans retinal chromphore with a six-membered ring bridging the C11=C12-C13 positions (BR6.11) are measured by picosecond transient absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Time-dependent intensity and spectral changes in absorption in the 570-650-nm region are monitored for delays as long as 5 ns after the 7-ps, 573-nm excitation of BR6.11. Two intermediates, J6.11 and K6.11/1, both with enhanced absorption to the red (> 600 nm) of the BR6.11 spectrum are observed within approximately 50 ps. The J6.11 intermediate decays with a time constant of 12 +/- 3 ps to form K6.11/1. The K6.11/1 intermediate decays with an approximately 100-ps time constant to form a third intermediate, K6.11/2, which is observed through diminished 650-nm absorption (relative to that of K6.11/1). No other transient absorption changes are found during the remainder of the initial 5-ns period of the BR6.11 photoreaction. Fluorescence in the 650-900-nm region is observed from BR6.11, K6.11/1, and K6.11/2, but no emission assignable to J6.11 is found. The BR6.11 fluroescence spectrum has a approximately 725-nm maximum which is blue-shifted by approximately 15 nm relative to that of native BR-570 and is 4.2 +/- 1.5 times larger in intensity (same sample optical density). No differences in the profile of the fluorescence spectra of BR6.11 and the intermediates K6.11/1 and K6.11/2 are observed. Following ground-state depletion of the BR6.11 population, the time-resolved fluroescence intensity monitored at 725 nm increases with two time constants, 12 +/- 3 and approximately 100 ps, both of which correlate well with changes in the picosecond transient absorption data. The resonance Raman spectrum of ground-state BR6.11, measured with low-energy, 560-nm excitation, is significantly different from the spectrum of native BR-570, thus confirming that the

  14. An analysis of OH excited state absorption lines in DR 21 and K3-50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, K. N.; Doel, R. C.; Field, D.; Gray, M. D.; Walker, R. N. F.

    1992-10-01

    We present an analysis of the OH absorption line zones observed toward the compact H II regions DR 21 and K3-50. Using as parameters the kinetic and dust temperatures, the H2 number density and the ratio of OH-H2 number densities to the velocity gradient, the model quantitatively reproduces the absorption line data for the six main line transitions in 2 Pi3/2 J = 5/2, 7/2, and 9/2. Observed upper limits for the absorption or emission in the satellite lines of 2 Pi3/2 J = 5/2 are crucial in constraining the range of derived parameters. Physical conditions derived for DR 21 show that the kinetic temperature centers around 140 K, the H2 number density around 10 exp 7/cu cm, and that the OH column density in the excited state absorption zone lies between 1 x 10 exp 15/sq cm and 2 x 10 exp 15/sq cm. Including contributions from a J = 3/2 absorption zone, the total OH column density is more than a factor of 2 lower than estimates based upon LTE (Walmsley et al., 1986). The OH absorption zone in K3-50 tends toward higher density and displays a larger column density, while the kinetic temperature is similar. For both sources, the dust temperature is found to be significantly lower than the kinetic temperature.

  15. Resonance Fluorescence of an InGaAs Quantum Dot in a Planar Cavity Using Orthogonal Excitation and Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Disheng; Lander, Gary R; Flagg, Edward B

    2017-10-13

    The ability to perform simultaneous resonant excitation and fluorescence detection is important for quantum optical measurements of quantum dots (QDs). Resonant excitation without fluorescence detection - for example, a differential transmission measurement - can determine some properties of the emitting system, but does not allow applications or measurements based on the emitted photons. For example, the measurement of photon correlations, observation of the Mollow triplet, and realization of single photon sources all require collection of the fluorescence. Incoherent excitation with fluorescence detection - for example, above band-gap excitation - can be used to create single photon sources, but the disturbance of the environment due to the excitation reduces the indistinguishability of the photons. Single photon sources based on QDs will have to be resonantly excited to have high photon indistinguishability, and simultaneous collection of the photons will be necessary to make use of them. We demonstrate a method to resonantly excite a single QD embedded in a planar cavity by coupling the excitation beam into this cavity from the cleaved face of the sample while collecting the fluorescence along the sample's surface normal direction. By carefully matching the excitation beam to the waveguide mode of the cavity, the excitation light can couple into the cavity and interact with the QD. The scattered photons can couple to the Fabry-Perot mode of the cavity and escape in the surface normal direction. This method allows complete freedom in the detection polarization, but the excitation polarization is restricted by the propagation direction of the excitation beam. The fluorescence from the wetting layer provides a guide to align the collection path with respect to the excitation beam. The orthogonality of the excitation and detection modes enables resonant excitation of a single QD with negligible laser scattering background.

  16. Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence of Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higbie, J. M.; Perreault, J. D.; Acosta, V. M.; Belthangady, C.; Lebel, P.; Kim, M. H.; Nguyen, K.; Demas, V.; Bajaj, V.; Santori, C.

    2017-05-01

    Silicon-vacancy color centers in nanodiamonds are promising as fluorescent labels for biological applications, with a narrow, nonbleaching emission line at 738 nm. Two-photon excitation of this fluorescence offers the possibility of low-background detection at significant tissue depth with high three-dimensional spatial resolution. We measure the two-photon fluorescence cross section of a negatively charged silicon vacancy (Si -V- ) in ion-implanted bulk diamond to be 0.74 (19 )×10-50 cm4 s /photon at an excitation wavelength of 1040 nm. Compared to the diamond nitrogen-vacancy center, the expected detection threshold of a two-photon excited Si -V center is more than an order of magnitude lower, largely due to its much narrower linewidth. We also present measurements of two- and three-photon excitation spectra, finding an increase in the two-photon cross section with decreasing wavelength, and we discuss the physical interpretation of the spectra in the context of existing models of the Si -V energy-level structure.

  17. Role of excited state solvent fluctuations on time-dependent fluorescence Stokes shift

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tanping, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu; Kumar, Revati, E-mail: tanping@lsu.edu, E-mail: revatik@lsu.edu

    2015-11-07

    We explore the connection between the solvation dynamics of a chromophore upon photon excitation and equilibrium fluctuations of the solvent. Using molecular dynamics simulations, fluorescence Stokes shift for the tryptophan in Staphylococcus nuclease was examined using both nonequilibrium calculations and linear response theory. When the perturbed and unperturbed surfaces exhibit different solvent equilibrium fluctuations, the linear response approach on the former surface shows agreement with the nonequilibrium process. This agreement is excellent when the perturbed surface exhibits Gaussian statistics and qualitative in the case of an isomerization induced non-Gaussian statistics. However, the linear response theory on the unperturbed surface breaksmore » down even in the presence of Gaussian fluctuations. Experiments also provide evidence of the connection between the excited state solvent fluctuations and the total fluorescence shift. These observations indicate that the equilibrium statistics on the excited state surface characterize the relaxation dynamics of the fluorescence Stokes shift. Our studies specifically analyze the Gaussian fluctuations of the solvent in the complex protein environment and further confirm the role of solvent fluctuations on the excited state surface. The results are consistent with previous investigations, found in the literature, of solutes dissolved in liquids.« less

  18. Toward Fourier interferometry fluorescence excitation/emission imaging of malignant cells combined with photoacoustic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohen, Elli; Hirschberg, Joseph G.; Berry, John P.; Ozkutuk, Nuri; Ornek, Ceren; Monti, Marco; Leblanc, Roger M.; Schachtschabel, Dietrich O.; Haroon, Sumaira

    2003-10-01

    Dual excitation fluorescence imaging has been used as a first step towards multi-wavelength excitation/emission fluorescence spectral imaging. Target cells are transformed keratinocytes, and other osteosarcoma, human breast and color cancer cells. Mitochondrial membrane potential probes, e.g. TMRM (tetramethylrhodamine methyl ester), Mitotracker Green (Molecular Probes, Inc., Eugene OR,USA; a recently synthesized mitochondrial oxygen probe, [PRE,P1"- pyrene butyl)-2-rhodamine ester] allow dual excitation in the UV plus in teh blue-green spectral regions. Also, using the natural endogenous probe NAD(P)H, preliminary results indicate mitochondrial responses to metabolic challenges (e.g. glucose addition), plus changes in mitochonrial distribution and morphology. In terms of application to biomedicine (for diagnostiscs, prognostsics and drug trials) three parameters have been selected in addition to the natural probe NAD(P)H, i.e. vital fluorescence probing of mitochondria, lysosomes and Golgi apparatus. It is hoped that such a multiparameter approach will allow malignant cell characterization and grading. A new area being introduced is the use of similar methodology for biotechnical applications such as the study of the hydrogen-producing alga Chlamydomonas Reinhardtii, and possible agricultural applications, such as Saccharomyces yeast for oenology. Complementation by Photoacoustic Microscopy is also contemplated, to study the internal conversion component which follows the excitation by photons.

  19. In vivo assessment of wound re-epithelialization by UV fluorescence excitation imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Padilla-Martinez, Juan Pablo; Williams, Maura; Farinelli, William; Anderson, R. R.; Franco, Walfre

    2017-02-01

    Background and Objectives: We have previously demonstrated the efficacy of a non-invasive, non-contact, fast and simple but robust fluorescence imaging (u-FEI) method to monitor the healing of skin wounds in vitro. This system can image highly-proliferating cellular processes (295/340 nm excitation/emission wavelengths) to study epithelialization in a cultured wound model. The objective of the current work is to evaluate the suitability of u-FEI for monitoring wound re-epithelialization in vivo. Study Design: Full-thickness wounds were created in the tail of rats and imaged weekly using u-FEI at 295/340nm excitation/emission wavelengths. Histology was used to investigate the correlation between the spatial distribution and intensity of fluorescence and the extent of wound epithelialization. In addition, the expression of the nuclear protein Ki67 was used to confirm the association between the proliferation of keratinocyte cells and the intensity of fluorescence. Results: Keratinocytes forming neo-epidermis exhibited higher fluorescence intensity than the keratinocytes not involved in re-epithelialization. In full-thickness wounds the fluorescence first appeared at the wound edge where keratinocytes initiated the epithelialization process. Fluorescence intensity increased towards the center as the keratinocytes partially covered the wound. As the wound healed, fluorescence decreased at the edges and was present only at the center as the keratinocytes completely covered the wound at day 21. Histology demonstrated that changes in fluorescence intensity from the 295/340nm band corresponded to newly formed epidermis. Conclusions: u-FEI at 295/340nm allows visualization of proliferating keratinocyte cells during re-epithelialization of wounds in vivo, potentially providing a quantitative, objective and simple method for evaluating wound closure in the clinic.

  20. Excitation-emission matrices measurements of human cutaneous lesions: tool for fluorescence origin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhelyazkova, A.; Borisova, E.; Angelova, L.; Pavlova, E.; Keremedchiev, M.

    2013-11-01

    The light induced fluorescence (LIF) technique has the potential of providing real-time diagnosis of malignant and premalignant skin tissue; however, human skin is a multilayered and inhomogeneous organ with different optical properties that complicate the analysis of cutaneous fluorescence spectra. In spite of the difficulties related to the detection and analysis of fluorescent data from skin lesions, this technique is among the most widely applied techniques in laboratorial and pre-clinical investigations for early skin neoplasia diagnosis. The important point is to evaluate all sources of intrinsic fluorescence and find any significant alterations distinguishing the normal skin from a cancerous state of the tissue; this would make the autofluorescence signal obtained useful for the development of a non-invasive diagnostic tool for the dermatological practice. Our investigations presented here were based on ex vivo point-by-point measurements of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) from excised tumor lesions and the surrounding skin taken during the daily clinical practice of Queen Jiovanna- ISUL University Hospital, Sofia, the local Ethical Committee's approval having already been obtained. The fluorescence emission was measured between 300 nm and 800 nm using excitation in the 280-440 nm spectral range. In the process of excitation-emission matrices (EEM) measurements we could establish the origin of the autofluorescence and the compounds related by assigning the excitation and emission maxima obtained during the experiments. The EEM were compared for normal human skin, basal cell carcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, benign nevi and malignant melanoma lesions to obtain information for the most common skin malignancies and their precursors. The main spectral features and the applicability of the technique of autofluorescent spectroscopy of human skin in general as an initial diagnostic tool are discussed as well.

  1. Non-invasive intravital imaging of cellular differentiation with a bright red-excitable fluorescent protein

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Haynes, Russell D; Corbel, Stéphane Y; Li, Pengpeng; González-González, Emilio; Burg, John S; Ataie, Niloufar J; Lam, Amy J; Cranfill, Paula J; Baird, Michelle A; Davidson, Michael W; Ng, Ho-Leung; Garcia, K Christopher; Contag, Christopher H; Shen, Kang; Blau, Helen M; Lin, Michael Z

    2014-01-01

    A method for non-invasive visualization of genetically labelled cells in animal disease models with micron-level resolution would greatly facilitate development of cell-based therapies. Imaging of fluorescent proteins (FPs) using red excitation light in the “optical window” above 600 nm is one potential method for visualizing implanted cells. However, previous efforts to engineer FPs with peak excitation beyond 600 nm have resulted in undesirable reductions in brightness. Here we report three new red-excitable monomeric FPs obtained by structure-guided mutagenesis of mNeptune, previously the brightest monomeric FP when excited beyond 600 nm. Two of these, mNeptune2 and mNeptune2.5, demonstrate improved maturation and brighter fluorescence, while the third, mCardinal, has a red-shifted excitation spectrum without reduction in brightness. We show that mCardinal can be used to non-invasively and longitudinally visualize the differentiation of myoblasts and stem cells into myocytes in living mice with high anatomical detail. PMID:24633408

  2. Spatial distribution of fluorescent light emitted from neon and nitrogen excited by low energy electron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Krücken, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wieser, J.

    2006-11-01

    Side-view intensity profiles of fluorescent light were measured for neon and nitrogen excited with 12keV electron beams at gas pressures from 250to1400hPa. The intensity profiles were compared with theoretical profiles calculated using the CASINO program which performs Monte Carlo simulations of electron scattering. It was assumed that the spatial distribution of fluorescent intensity is directly proportional to the spatial distribution of energy loss by primary electrons. The comparison shows good correlation of experimental data and the results of numeric simulations.

  3. Fluorescence excited in a thunderstorm atmosphere by relativistic runaway electron avalanches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babich, L. P.; Bochkov, E. I.

    2017-05-01

    The spectrum and spatiotemporal evolution of the fluorescence of an atmospheric discharge developing in the regime of relativistic runaway electron avalanche (RREA) generation have been calculated without involving the relativistic feedback. The discharges generating narrow bipolar pulses, along with the discharges responsible for terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, are shown to be relatively dark. Nevertheless, the fluorescence excited by a discharge involving RREAs can be recorded with cameras used to record high-altitude optical phenomena. A possible connection between a certain class of optical phenomena observed at the tops of thunderclouds and RREA emission is pointed out.

  4. Self-absorption Effects on Alpha-Induced Atmospheric Nitrogen Fluorescence Yield

    SciTech Connect

    Bachelor, Paula P.; Jordan, David V.; Harper, Warren W.

    2009-12-01

    Nitrogen fluorescence induced by alpha, beta and gamma radiation can be used to detect the presence of radioactive contamination in the environment. Successful measurement of fluorescence yield involves a number of factors, including: known fluorescence signal rate during the measurement; the effective alpha spectrum of the radioactive sources used in the measurement; optical attenuation length of the fluorescence signal in air during the measurement; the absolute throughput of the instrumentation; calibration of the instrumentation; and radiation transport modeling of the "effective" array exposure rate given the spectrum of the alpha particles. Field testing of optical instrumentation was conducted to measuremore » the nitrogen fluorescence yield from the alpha radiation generated from americium-241 (241Am) decay. The 241Am test sources were prepared by direct evaporation of ~1 mCi in nitric acid solution, and some solids were visible on the surface of the sources. A laboratory study was conducted with lower activities of 241Am to determine whether the presence of solids on the surface of the sources prepared both by direct evaporation and by electrodeposition onto stainless steel disks produced sufficient self-absorption to cause a decrease in expected fluorescence. Alpha spectroscopy was used to determine the apparent activity of the sources versus the known activity deposited on the surface. Results from the self-absorption laboratory studies were used to correct the activity values in the model and calculate the nitrogen fluorescence generated by the 241Am during the field experiments.« less

  5. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-01-01

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community. PMID:24921725

  6. Parallel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime confocal microscopy for live cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Li, Yu; Peng, Leilei

    2014-05-05

    We present a novel excitation-emission multiplexed fluorescence lifetime microscopy (FLIM) method that surpasses current FLIM techniques in multiplexing capability. The method employs Fourier multiplexing to simultaneously acquire confocal fluorescence lifetime images of multiple excitation wavelength and emission color combinations at 44,000 pixels/sec. The system is built with low-cost CW laser sources and standard PMTs with versatile spectral configuration, which can be implemented as an add-on to commercial confocal microscopes. The Fourier lifetime confocal method allows fast multiplexed FLIM imaging, which makes it possible to monitor multiple biological processes in live cells. The low cost and compatibility with commercial systems could also make multiplexed FLIM more accessible to biological research community.

  7. Plastic lab-on-a-chip for fluorescence excitation with integrated organic semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Vannahme, Christoph; Klinkhammer, Sönke; Lemmer, Uli; Mappes, Timo

    2011-04-25

    Laser light excitation of fluorescent markers offers highly sensitive and specific analysis for bio-medical or chemical analysis. To profit from these advantages for applications in the field or at the point-of-care, a plastic lab-on-a-chip with integrated organic semiconductor lasers is presented here. First order distributed feedback lasers based on the organic semiconductor tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3) doped with the laser dye 4-dicyanomethylene-2-methyl-6-(p-dimethylaminostyril)-4H-pyrane (DCM), deep ultraviolet induced waveguides, and a nanostructured microfluidic channel are integrated into a poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) substrate. A simple and parallel fabrication process is used comprising thermal imprint, DUV exposure, evaporation of the laser material, and sealing by thermal bonding. The excitation of two fluorescent marker model systems including labeled antibodies with light emitted by integrated lasers is demonstrated.

  8. Thermal bleaching in single fluorescent molecules under two-photon excitation regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chirico, Giuseppe; Cannone, Fabio; Baldini, Giancarlo; Diaspro, Alberto

    2003-07-01

    Single molecule spectroscopy often requires the immobilization of the molecules onto solid or quasi-solid substrates and the use of relatively high excitation intensity We have studied the fluorescence emission of four common dyes used for bio-imaging studies, rhodamine 6G, fluorescein, pyrene and indo-1 at the single molecule level under two-photon excitation regime. We focus on two-photon excitation thermal effects on the stability of the single molecules, influencing the internal photo-dynamics and the total duration of the fluorescent emission. Single dye molecules, spread on a glass substrate by spin coating, show a constant fluorescence output till a sudden transition to a dark state very close to the background. The bleaching time that is found to vary in the series pyrene, Indo-1, fluorescein and rhodamine 6G from the fastest to the slowest one respectively, has a Gaussian distribution suggesting that bleaching is not due to photo-bleaching. Moreover it shows a correlation to the amount of absorbed power not re-irradiated as fluorescence and to the complexity of the molecule. These observations are interpreted as thermal bleaching where the temperature increase is induced by the two-photon excitation process. This study should be extended to different trapping media of interest in single molecule basic research and applications, such as silica and polyacrylamide gels or nanosctructured polyelectrolyte matrices. We think that the observed behavior and the correlations found to the molecular chemical and physical parameters, may be of some help for the design of molecules with switching on-off behavior of longer duration.

  9. Analysis of Spectral Features of Seawaterbiooptical Components Fluorescence from the Excitation-emission Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salyuk, P. A.; Nagorny, I. G.

    The paper presents the method for processing of excitation-emission matrix of sea water and the allocation of the spectral characteristics of different types of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and phytoplankton cells in seawater. The method consists of identification of regularly observed fluorescence peaks of CDOM in marine waters of different type and definition of the spectral ranges, where the predominant influence of these peaks are observed.

  10. Transient absorption study of two-photon excitation mechanism in the LH2 complex from purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Stepanenko, Ilya; Kompanetz, Viktor; Makhneva, Zoya; Chekalin, Sergey; Moskalenko, Andrei; Razjivin, Andrei

    2012-03-08

    The mechanism of two-photon excitation of a peripheral light-harvesting complex LH2 (B800-850) from purple bacterium Rhodobacter sphaeroides was explained on the basis of femtosecond transient absorption data. Fast bleaching of the B850 absorption band was measured under two-photon excitation by 1350 nm femtosecond pulses, showing fast subpicosecond arrival of excitation energy to B850 circular aggregates. Any spectral changes connected with the B800 absorption band of B800-BChl molecules were absent. A similar picture was observed under one-photon excitation of the LH2 complex by 675 nm femtosecond pulses. We believe these effects may be attributed to direct excitation of high-energy excitonic states of a B850 circular aggregate or its vibrational manifold in accordance with the model of Abe [Chem. Phys. 2001, 264, 355-363].

  11. Influence of different environments on the excited-state proton transfer and dual fluorescence of fisetin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guharay, Jayanti; Dennison, S. Moses; Sengupta, Pradeep K.

    1999-05-01

    The influence of different protic and aprotic solvent environments on the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) leading to a dual fluorescence behaviour of a biologically important, naturally occurring, polyhydroxyflavone, fisetin (3,3',4',7-tetrahydroxyflavone), has been investigated. The normal fluorescence band, in particular, is extremely sensitive to solvent polarity with νmax shifting from 24 510 cm -1 in dioxane ( ET(30)=36.0) to 20 790 cm -1 in methanol ( ET(30)=55.5). This is rationalized in terms of solvent dipolar relaxation process, which also accounts for the red edge excitation shifts (REES) observed in viscous environments such as glycerol at low temperatures. Significant solvent dependence of the tautomer fluorescence properties ( νmax, yield and decay kinetics) reveals the influence of external hydrogen bonding perturbation on the internal hydrogen bond of the molecule. These excited-state relaxation phenomena and their relevant parameters have been used to probe the microenvironment of fisetin in a membrane mimetic system, namely AOT reverse micelles in n-heptane at different water/surfactant molar ratio ( w0).

  12. Fluorescent molecular probes based on excited state prototropism in lipid bilayer membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Monalisa; Mishra, Ashok K.

    2012-03-01

    Excited state prototropism (ESPT) is observed in molecules having one or more ionizable protons, whose proton transfer efficiency is different in ground and excited states. The interaction of various ESPT molecules like naphthols and intramolecular ESPT (ESIPT) molecules like hydroxyflavones etc. with different microheterogeneous media have been studied in detail and excited state prototropism as a probe concept has been gaining ground. The fluorescence of different prototropic forms of such molecules, on partitioning to an organized medium like lipid bilayer membrane, often show sensitive response to the local environment with respect to the local structure, physical properties and dynamics. Our recent work using 1-naphthol as an ESPT fluorescent molecular probe has shown that the incorporation of monomeric bile salt molecules into lipid bilayer membranes composed from dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC, a lung surfactant) and dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), in solid gel and liquid crystalline phases, induce appreciable wetting of the bilayer up to the hydrocarbon core region, even at very low (<= 1 mM) concentrations of the bile salts. The incorporation and location of fisetin, an ESIPT molecule having antioxidant properties, in lipid bilayer membrane has been sensitively monitored from its intrinsic fluorescence behaviour.

  13. How to Collect National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Traceable Fluorescence Excitation and Emission Spectra.

    PubMed

    Gilmore, Adam Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Contemporary spectrofluorimeters comprise exciting light sources, excitation and emission monochromators, and detectors that without correction yield data not conforming to an ideal spectral response. The correction of the spectral properties of the exciting and emission light paths first requires calibration of the wavelength and spectral accuracy. The exciting beam path can be corrected up to the sample position using a spectrally corrected reference detection system. The corrected reference response accounts for both the spectral intensity and drift of the exciting light source relative to emission and/or transmission detector responses. The emission detection path must also be corrected for the combined spectral bias of the sample compartment optics, emission monochromator, and detector. There are several crucial issues associated with both excitation and emission correction including the requirement to account for spectral band-pass and resolution, optical band-pass or neutral density filters, and the position and direction of polarizing elements in the light paths. In addition, secondary correction factors are described including (1) subtraction of the solvent's fluorescence background, (2) removal of Rayleigh and Raman scattering lines, as well as (3) correcting for sample concentration-dependent inner-filter effects. The importance of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) traceable calibration and correction protocols is explained in light of valid intra- and interlaboratory studies and effective spectral qualitative and quantitative analyses including multivariate spectral modeling.

  14. Selective coherent perfect absorption of subradiant mode in ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials via antisymmetric excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Wei; Zhang, Caihong; Li, Chun; Zhou, Xiaoying; Jia, Xiaoqing; Feng, Zheng; Su, Juan; Jin, Biaobing

    2017-05-01

    We demonstrate that the subradiant mode in ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials can be exclusively excited under two-antisymmetric-beam illumination (or equivalently, at a node of the standing wave field), while the superradiant mode is fully suppressed due to their different mode symmetry. Coherent perfect absorption (CPA) with the Lorentzian lineshape can be achieved corresponding to the subradiant mode. A theoretical model is established to distinguish the different behaviors of these two modes and to elucidate the CPA condition. Terahertz ultrathin bi-layer metamaterials on flexible polyimide substrates are fabricated and tested, exhibiting excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. This work provides physical insight into how to selectively excite the antisymmetric subradiant mode via coherence incidence.

  15. First-Principle Calculation of Quasiparticle Excitations and Optical Absorption in NiO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Je-Luen; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Louie, Steven G.

    2001-03-01

    We present a first-principle study of the quasiparticle excitations and optical absorption spectrum in NiO. The ground state electronic structure is calculated with the generalized gradient approximation in density functional theory and ab initio pseudopotential. The quasiparticle energies are then computed employing the GW approximation. In addition to comparing to photoemisson result, comparison between the measured and calculated complex dielectric function helps to identify the onset of excitations in this system. We illustrate some subtleties of pseudopotential calculations: the effect of including 3 s and 3p electrons in Ni pseudopotential; the difference between using velocity and momentum operators in the RPA dielectric function. Finally, we discuss a recent effort to solve the Bethe-Salpeter equation for the optical spectrum in this spin polarized system to address the remaining discrepancy between theory and experiment.

  16. Observation of excited state absorption in the V-Cr Prussian blue analogue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedley, Luke; Horbury, Michael D.; Liedy, Florian; Johansson, J. Olof

    2017-11-01

    We present femtosecond transient transmission measurements of thin films of the VII/III-CrIII Prussian blue analogue (V-Cr PBA) in the spectral range 330-675 nm after exciting the ligand-to-metal charge-transfer transition (LMCT) at 400 nm. A global analysis including three decay-times of τ1 = 230 fs, τ2 = 1.38 ps and τ3 ≫ 2 ns could satisfactory describe the data. We observed an excited state absorption (ESA) at 345 nm, which was attributed to a charge-transfer transition from the 2E state on the Cr ions after fast intersystem crossing from the quartet manifold. An additional weak and short-lived ESA at 455 nm was also observed and was tentatively attributed to the initially populated 4LMCT state.

  17. Spoilage of foods monitored by native fluorescence spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Wang, Wubao; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    The modern food processing and storage environments require the real-time monitoring and rapid microbiological testing. Optical spectroscopy with selective excitation wavelengths can be the basis of a novel, rapid, reagent less, noncontact and non-destructive technique for monitoring the food spoilage. The native fluorescence spectra of muscle foods stored at 2-4°C (in refrigerator) and 20-24°C (in room temperature) were measured as a function of time with a selective excitation wavelength of 340nm. The contributions of the principal molecular components to the native fluorescence spectra of meat were measured spectra of each fluorophore: collagen, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), and flavin. The responsible components were extracted using a method namely Multivariate Curve Resolution with Alternating Least-Squares (MCR-ALS). The native fluorescence combined with MCR-ALS can be used directly on the surface of meat to produce biochemically interpretable "fingerprints", which reflects the microbial spoilage of foods involved with the metabolic processes. The results show that with time elapse, the emission from NADH in meat stored at 24°C increases much faster than that at 4°C. This is because multiplying of microorganisms and catabolism are accompanied by the generation of NADH. This study presents changes of relative content of NADH may be used as criterion for detection of spoilage degree of meat using native fluorescence spectroscopy.

  18. [Microsecond Pulsed Hollow Cathode Lamp as Enhanced Excitation Source of Hydride Generation Atomic Fluorescence Spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shuo

    2015-09-01

    The spectral, electrical and atomic fluorescence characteristics of As, Se, Sb and Pb hollow cathode lamps (HCLs) powered by a laboratory-built high current microsecond pulse (HCMP) power supply were studied, and the feasibility of using HCMP-HCLs as the excitation source of hydride generation atomic fluorescence spectrometry (HG-AFS) was evaluated. Under the HCMP power supply mode, the As, Se, Sb, Pb HCLs can maintain stable glow discharge at frequency of 100~1000 Hz, pulse width of 4.0~20 μs and pulse current up to 4.0 A. Relationship between the intensity of characteristic emission lines and HCMP power supply parameters, such as pulse current, power supply voltage, pulse width and frequency, was studied in detail. Compared with the conventional pulsed (CP) HCLs used in commercial AFS instruments, HCMP-HCLs have a narrower pulse width and much stronger pulse current. Under the optimized HCMP power supply parameters, the intensity of atomic emission lines of As, Se, Sb HCLs had sharp enhancement and that indicated their capacity of being a novel HG-AFS excitation source. However, the attenuation of atomic lines and enhancement of ionic lines negated such feasibility of HCMP-Pb HCL. Then the HG-AFS analytical capability of using the HCMP-As/Se/Sb HCLs excitation source was established and results showed that the HCMP-HCL is a promising excitation source for HG-AFS.

  19. Edge physics of the quantum spin Hall insulator from a quantum dot excited by optical absorption.

    PubMed

    Vasseur, Romain; Moore, Joel E

    2014-04-11

    The gapless edge modes of the quantum spin Hall insulator form a helical liquid in which the direction of motion along the edge is determined by the spin orientation of the electrons. In order to probe the Luttinger liquid physics of these edge states and their interaction with a magnetic (Kondo) impurity, we consider a setup where the helical liquid is tunnel coupled to a semiconductor quantum dot that is excited by optical absorption, thereby inducing an effective quantum quench of the tunneling. At low energy, the absorption spectrum is dominated by a power-law singularity. The corresponding exponent is directly related to the interaction strength (Luttinger parameter) and can be computed exactly using boundary conformal field theory thanks to the unique nature of the quantum spin Hall edge.

  20. Radiationless Transitions and Excited-State Absorption in Tunable Laser Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-09-01

    chromium - doped halide elpasolites K2 NaGaF 6 , K2 NaScF6 and Cs2NaYCl 6 , and on the laser-active TI0 (l) color center in KCI. Luminescence lifetime...Non-radiative transitions, transition metals, chromium , ¶SLWmER o E tunable lasers, high pressure, luminescence, color centers ൙. SECURITY O...quenching and excited-state absorption are major loss mechanisms. Low-crystal-field chromium complexes in ordered perovskites of cubic elpasolite structure

  1. Radiationless Transitions and Excited-State Absorption of Low-Field Chromium Complexes in Solids

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-20

    host-lattice modes and, in the case of the scandium compound with 5 % chromium concentration, of the a and tIg 2g localized modes. The local-mode...Radiationless transitions and excited-state Final report I/I/86-5/31/89 absorption of low-field chromium complexes 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER ( 1 in...complexes, chromium ; tunable lasers, high pressure,-photoluminescence 4. 26, AMTVrAC? (Cbm e @CAP N Igemem’ a IdoMit’ by block nambew) The continuation of a

  2. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopic characters of naphtho-homologated yy-DNA bases and effect of methanol solution and base pairing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Laibin; Li, Huifang; Li, Jilai; Chen, Xiaohua; Bu, Yuxiang

    2010-03-01

    A comprehensive theoretical study of electronic transitions of naphtho-homologated base analogs, namely, yy-T, yy-C, yy-A, and yy-G, was performed. The nature of the low-lying excited states is discussed, and the results are compared with those from experiment and also with those of y-bases. Geometrical characteristics of the lowest excited singlet pipi* and npi* states were explored using the CIS method, and the effects of methanol solution and paring with their complementary natural bases on the relevant absorption and emission spectra of these modified bases were examined. The calculated excitation and emission energies agree well with the measured data, where experimental results are available. In methanol solution, the fluorescence from yy-A and yy-G would be expected to occur around 539 and 562 nm, respectively, suggesting that yy-A is a green-colored fluorophore, whereas yy-G is a yellow-colored fluorophore. The methanol solution was found to red-shift both the absorption and emission maxima of yy-A, yy-T, and yy-C, but blue-shift those for yy-G. Generally, though base pairing has no significant effects on the absorption and fluorescence maxima of yy-A, yy-C, and yy-T, it blue-shifts those for yy-G. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. [Rapid identification of potato cultivars using NIR-excited fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Dai, Fen; Bergholt, Mads Sylvest; Benjamin, Arnold Julian Vinoj; Hong, Tian-Sheng; Zhiwei, Huang

    2014-03-01

    Potato is one of the most important food in the world. Rapid and noninvasive identification of potato cultivars plays a important role in the better use of varieties. In this study, The identification ability of optical spectroscopy techniques, including near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy, for invasive detection of potato cultivars was evaluated. A rapid NIR Raman spectroscopy system was applied to measure the composite Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy of 3 different species of potatoes (98 samples in total) under 785 nm laser light excitation. Then pure Raman and NIR fluorescence spectroscopy were abstracted from the composite spectroscopy, respectively. At last, the partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) was utilized to analyze and classify Raman spectra of 3 different types of potatoes. All the samples were divided into two sets at random: the calibration set (74samples) and prediction set (24 samples), the model was validated using a leave-one-out, cross-validation method. The results showed that both the NIR-excited fluorescence spectra and pure Raman spectra could be used to identify three cultivars of potatoes. The fluorescence spectrum could distinguish the Favorita variety well (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 0.86 and accuracy: 0.92), but the result for Diamant (sensitivity: 0.75, specificity: 0.75 and accuracy: 0. 75) and Granola (sensitivity: 0.16, specificity: 0.89 and accuracy: 0.71) cultivars identification were a bit poorer. We demonstrated that Raman spectroscopy uncovered the main biochemical compositions contained in potato species, and provided a better classification sensitivity, specificity and accuracy (sensitivity: 1, specificity: 1 and accuracy: 1 for all 3 potato cultivars identification) among the three types of potatoes as compared to fluorescence spectroscopy.

  4. Experimental recovery of intrinsic fluorescence and fluorophore concentration in the presence of hemoglobin: spectral effect of scattering and absorption on fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du Le, Vinh Nguyen; Patterson, Michael S.; Farrell, Thomas J.; Hayward, Joseph E.; Fang, Qiyin

    2015-12-01

    The ability to recover the intrinsic fluorescence of biological fluorophores is crucial to accurately identify the fluorophores and quantify their concentrations in the media. Although some studies have successfully retrieved the fluorescence spectral shape of known fluorophores, the techniques usually came with heavy computation costs and did not apply for strongly absorptive media, and the intrinsic fluorescence intensity and fluorophore concentration were not recovered. In this communication, an experimental approach was presented to recover intrinsic fluorescence and concentration of fluorescein in the presence of hemoglobin (Hb). The results indicated that the method was efficient in recovering the intrinsic fluorescence peak and fluorophore concentration with an error of 3% and 10%, respectively. The results also suggested that chromophores with irregular absorption spectra (e.g., Hb) have more profound effects on fluorescence spectral shape than chromophores with monotonic absorption and scattering spectra (e.g., black India ink and polystyrene microspheres).

  5. Two-photon excited fluorescence from a pseudoisocyanine-attached gold-coated tip via a thin tapered fiber under a weak continuous wave excitation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Fang; Takashima, Hideaki; Tanaka, Yoshito; Fujiwara, Hideki; Sasaki, Keiji

    2013-11-18

    A simple tapered fiber based photonic-plasmonic hybrid nanostructure composed of a thin tapered fiber and a pseudoisocyanine (PIC)-attached Au-coated tip was demonstrated. Using this simple hybrid nanostructure, we succeeded in observing two-photon excited fluorescence from the PIC dye molecules under a weak continuous wave excitation condition. From the results of the tip-fiber distance dependence and excitation polarization dependence, we found that using a thin tapered fiber and an Au-coated tip realized efficient coupling of the incident light (~95%) and LSP excitation at the Au-coated tip, suggesting the possibility of efficiently inducing two-photon excited fluorescence from the PIC dye molecules attached on the Au-coated tip. This simple photonic-plasmonic hybrid system is one of the promising tools for single photon sources, highly efficient plasmonic sensors, and integrated nonlinear plasmonic devices.

  6. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  7. Fluorescence Intrinsic Characterization of Excitation-Emission Matrix Using Multi-Dimensional Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi-Ying; Chang, Chia-Chi; Hsiao, Tzu-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy is a noninvasive method for tissue diagnosis and has become important in clinical use. However, the intrinsic characterization of EEM fluorescence remains unclear. Photobleaching and the complexity of the chemical compounds make it difficult to distinguish individual compounds due to overlapping features. Conventional studies use principal component analysis (PCA) for EEM fluorescence analysis, and the relationship between the EEM features extracted by PCA and diseases has been examined. The spectral features of different tissue constituents are not fully separable or clearly defined. Recently, a non-stationary method called multi-dimensional ensemble empirical mode decomposition (MEEMD) was introduced; this method can extract the intrinsic oscillations on multiple spatial scales without loss of information. The aim of this study was to propose a fluorescence spectroscopy system for EEM measurements and to describe a method for extracting the intrinsic characteristics of EEM by MEEMD. The results indicate that, although PCA provides the principal factor for the spectral features associated with chemical compounds, MEEMD can provide additional intrinsic features with more reliable mapping of the chemical compounds. MEEMD has the potential to extract intrinsic fluorescence features and improve the detection of biochemical changes. PMID:24240806

  8. Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Zhijian; Zou, Wenlong; Wu, Jianhong

    2017-10-01

    Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It's proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

  9. In situ phytoplankton absorption, fluorescence emission, and particulate backscattering spectra determined from reflectance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roesler, Collin S.; Pery, Mary Jane

    1995-01-01

    An inverse model was developed to extract the absortion and scattering (elastic and inelastic) properties of oceanic constituents from surface spectral reflectance measurements. In particular, phytoplankton spectral absorption coefficients, solar-stimulated chlorophyll a fluorescence spectra, and particle backscattering spectra were modeled. The model was tested on 35 reflectance spectra obtained from irradiance measurements in optically diverse ocean waters (0.07 to 25.35 mg/cu m range in surface chlorophyll a concentrations). The universality of the model was demonstrated by the accurate estimation of the spectral phytoplankton absorption coefficents over a range of 3 orders of magnitude (rho = 0.94 at 500 nm). Under most oceanic conditions (chlorophyll a less than 3 mg/cu m) the percent difference between measured and modeled phytoplankton absorption coefficents was less than 35%. Spectral variations in measured phytoplankton absorption spectra were well predicted by the inverse model. Modeled volume fluorescence was weakly correlated with measured chl a; fluorescence quantum yield varied from 0.008 to 0.09 as a function of environment and incident irradiance. Modeled particle backscattering coefficients were linearly related to total particle cross section over a twentyfold range in backscattering coefficents (rho = 0.996, n = 12).

  10. Excitation of surface plasmon polaritons by fluorescent light from organic nanofibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolewska, Elżbieta Karolina; Józefowski, Leszek; Kawalec, Tomasz; Leißner, Till; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Adam, Jost; Fiutowski, Jacek

    2017-11-01

    Micro- and nano-scale systems with defined active elements acting as local surface plasmons polariton (SPP) sources are crucial for the development of future plasmonic circuits. We demonstrate SPP excitation by fluorescent light from crystalline organic para-hexaphenylene nanofibers deposited on a dielectric/metal surface. We characterize the SPPs using angle-resolved leakage radiation spectroscopy, in the excitation wavelength range 420 - 675 nm, corresponding to the nanofiber photoluminescence band. The nanofiber arrangement's capability to act as an SPP coupler for coherent as well as non-coherent excitation indicates its prospect for future integrated systems. To support our experimental results, we investigate the proposed geometries by analytical calculations and finite-difference-time-domain (FDTD) modelling. The experimentally obtained angular leakage radiation peak positions can readily be predicted by our analytical calculations. Nevertheless, the experimental results exhibit a distinct asymmetry in the peak intensities. In agreement with our FDTD calculations, we address this asymmetrical SPP excitation to the nanofiber molecular orientation. The proposed structure's high flexibility, the ease of selective positioning of organic nanofibers, together with the gained insight into its photon-SPP coupling mechanism show great promise towards future local SPP excitation-based integrated devices.

  11. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge with excitation of high current and microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp: Ca atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gong, Zhen-bin; Liang, Feng; Yang, Peng-yuan; Jin, Qin-han; Huang, Ben-li

    2002-02-01

    A system of atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch (MPT) discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL) has been developed. The operation conditions for Ca atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry have been optimized. Compared with atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS) in argon microwave induced plasma (MIP) and MPT with the excitation of direct current and conventional pulsed HCL, the system with HCMP HCL excitation can improve AFS and ionic fluorescence spectrometry (IFS) detection limits in MPT atomizer and ionizer. Detection limits (3 sigma) with HCMP HCL-MPT-AFS/IFS are 10.1 ng.mL-1 for Ca I 422.7 nm, 14.6 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 393.4 nm, and 37.4 ng.mL-1 for Ca II 396.8 nm, respectively.

  12. Comment on ’Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a P-Terphenyl Crystal’

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-10

    8217 NO 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) Comment on "Single Pentacene Molecules Detected by Fluorescence Excitation in a p-Terphenyl Crystal" 12...8217 {Continue on reverse it necessary and identify by block numboer) Using h--,Ihly efficient Fluorescence excitation spectroscov of individual pentacene ...molecular impurities in p-terphenvl crystals, we have observed that some pentacene defects exhibit spcntaneous spectral jumps in their resonance frequency at

  13. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birdwell, Justin E.; Valsaraj, Kalliat T.

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores.

  14. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in fogwater by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Birdwell, J.E.; Valsaraj, K.T.

    2010-01-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) present in fogwater samples collected in southeastern Louisiana and central-eastern China has been characterized using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy. The goal of the study was to illustrate the utility of fluorescence for obtaining information on the large fraction of organic carbon in fogwaters (typically >40% by weight) that defies characterization in terms of specific chemical compounds without the difficulty inherent in obtaining sufficient fogwater volume to isolate DOM for assessment using other spectroscopic and chemical analyses. Based on the findings of previous studies using other characterization methods, it was anticipated that the unidentified organic carbon fraction would have characteristic peaks associated with humic substances and fluorescent amino acids. Both humic- and protein-like fluorophores were observed in the fogwater spectra and fluorescence-derived indices for the fogwater had similar values to those of soil and sediment porewater. Greater biological character was observed in samples with higher organic carbon concentrations. Fogwaters are shown to contain a mixture of terrestrially- and microbially-derived fluorescent organic material, which is expected to be derived from an array of different sources, such as suspended soil and dust particles, biogenic emissions and organic substances generated by atmospheric processes. The fluorescence results indicate that much of the unidentified organic carbon present in fogwater can be represented by humic-like and biologically-derived substances similar to those present in other aquatic systems, though it should be noted that fluorescent signatures representative of DOM produced by atmospheric processing of organic aerosols may be contributing to or masked by humic-like fluorophores. ?? 2010.

  15. Photobleaching response of different sources of chromophoric dissolved organic matter exposed to natural solar radiation using absorption and excitation-emission matrix spectra.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Liu, Xiaohan; Osburn, Christopher L; Wang, Mingzhu; Qin, Boqiang; Zhou, Yongqiang

    2013-01-01

    CDOM biogeochemical cycle is driven by several physical and biological processes such as river input, biogeneration and photobleaching that act as primary sinks and sources of CDOM. Watershed-derived allochthonous (WDA) and phytoplankton-derived autochthonous (PDA) CDOM were exposed to 9 days of natural solar radiation to assess the photobleaching response of different CDOM sources, using absorption and fluorescence (excitation-emission matrix) spectroscopy. Our results showed a marked decrease in total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) concentration under natural sunlight exposure for both WDA and PDA CDOM, indicating photoproduction of ammonium from TDN. In contrast, photobleaching caused a marked increase in total dissolved phosphorus (TDP) concentration for both WDA and PDA CDOM. Thus TDN:TDP ratios decreased significantly both for WDA and PDA CDOM, which partially explained the seasonal dynamic of TDN:TDP ratio in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching rate of CDOM absorption a(254), was 0.032 m/MJ for WDA CDOM and 0.051 m/MJ for PDA CDOM from days 0-9, indicating that phototransformations were initially more rapid for the newly produced CDOM from phytoplankton than for the river CDOM. Extrapolation of these values to the field indicated that 3.9%-5.1% CDOM at the water surface was photobleached and mineralized every day in summer in Lake Taihu. Photobleaching caused the increase of spectral slope, spectral slope ratio and molecular size, indicating the CDOM mean molecular weight decrease which was favorable to further microbial degradation of mineralization. Three fluorescent components were validated in parallel factor analysis models calculated separately for WDA and PDA CDOM. Our study suggests that the humic-like fluorescence materials could be rapidly and easily photobleached for WDA and PDA CDOM, but the protein-like fluorescence materials was not photobleached and even increased from the transformation of the humic-like fluorescence substance to the protein

  16. [Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy of CDOM from Yundang Lagoon and its indication for organic pollution].

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Jian-Fu; Guo, Wei-Dong; Deng, Xun; Zhang, Zhi-Ying; Xu, Jing; Huang, Ling-Feng

    2010-06-01

    Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) combined with absorption spectroscopy were applied to study the optical properties of CDOM samples from highly-polluted Yundang Lagoon in Xiamen in order to demonstrate the feasibility of using these spectral properties as a tracer of the degree of organic pollution in similar polluted coastal waters. Surface water samples were collected from 13 stations 4 times during April and May, 2008. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model was used to resolve the EEMs of CDOM. Five separate fluorescent components were identified, including two humic-like components (C1: 240, 325/422 nm; C5: 260, 380/474 nm), two protein-like components (C2: 225, 275/350 nm; C4: 240, 300/354 nm) and one xenobiotic-like component (C3: 225/342 nm), which could be used as a good tracer for the input of the anthropogenic organic, pollutants. The concentrations of component C3 and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) are much higher near the inlet of sewage discharge, demonstrating that the discharge of surrounding sewage is a major source of organic pollutants in Yundang Lagoon. CDOM absorption coefficient alpha (280) and the score of humic-like component C1 showed significant linear relationships with COD(Mn), and a strong positive correlation was also found between the score of protein-like component C2 and BOD5. This suggested that the optical properties of CDOM may provide a fast in-situ way to monitor the variation of the water quality in Yundang Lagoon and that of similar polluted coastal waters.

  17. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R; Esipova, Tatiana V; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J; Jarvis, Lesley A; Pogue, Brian W

    2016-05-21

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  18. Comparison of Cherenkov excited fluorescence and phosphorescence molecular sensing from tissue with external beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Huiyun; Zhang, Rongxiao; Gunn, Jason R.; Esipova, Tatiana V.; Vinogradov, Sergei; Gladstone, David J.; Jarvis, Lesley A.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-05-01

    Ionizing radiation delivered by a medical linear accelerator (LINAC) generates Cherenkov emission within the treated tissue. A fraction of this light, in the 600-900 nm wavelength region, propagates through centimeters of tissue and can be used to excite optical probes in vivo, enabling molecular sensing of tissue analytes. The success of isolating the emission signal from this Cherenkov excitation background is dependent on key factors such as: (i) the Stokes shift of the probe spectra; (ii) the excited state lifetime; (iii) the probe concentration; (iv) the depth below the tissue surface; and (v) the radiation dose used. Previous studies have exclusively focused on imaging phosphorescent dyes, rather than fluorescent dyes. However there are only a few biologically important phosphorescent dyes and yet in comparison there are thousands of biologically relevant fluorescent dyes. So in this study the focus was a study of efficacy of Cherenkov-excited luminescence using fluorescent commercial near-infrared probes, IRDye 680RD, IRDye 700DX, and IRDye 800CW, and comparing them to the well characterized phosphorescent probe Oxyphor PtG4, an oxygen sensitive dye. Each probe was excited by Cherenkov light from a 6 MV external radiation beam, and measured in continuous wave or time-gated modes. The detection was performed by spectrally resolving the luminescence signals, and measuring them with spectrometer-based separation on an ICCD detector. The results demonstrate that IRDye 700DX and PtG4 allowed for the maximal signal to noise ratio. In the case of the phosphorescent probe, PtG4, with emission decays on the microsecond (μs) time scale, time-gated acquisition was possible, and it allowed for higher efficacy in terms of the probe concentration and detection depth. Phantoms containing the probe at 5 mm depth could be detected at concentrations down to the nanoMolar range, and at depths into the tissue simulating phantom near 3 cm. In vivo studies showed that 5

  19. Use of image analysis to estimate anthocyanin and UV-excited fluorescent phenolic compound levels in strawberry fruit

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Yosuke; Nakayama, Masayoshi; Noguchi, Yuji; Horie, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Strawberry is rich in anthocyanins, which are responsible for the red color, and contains several colorless phenolic compounds. Among the colorless phenolic compounds, some, such as hydroxycinammic acid derivatives, emit blue-green fluorescence when excited with ultraviolet (UV) light. Here, we investigated the effectiveness of image analyses for estimating the levels of anthocyanins and UV-excited fluorescent phenolic compounds in fruit. The fruit skin and cut surface of 12 cultivars were photographed under visible and UV light conditions; colors were evaluated based on the color components of images. The levels of anthocyanins and UV-excited fluorescent compounds in each fruit were also evaluated by spectrophotometric and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses, respectively and relationships between these levels and the image data were investigated. Red depth of the fruits differed greatly among the cultivars and anthocyanin content was well estimated based on the color values of the cut surface images. Strong UV-excited fluorescence was observed on the cut surfaces of several cultivars, and the grayscale values of the UV-excited fluorescence images were markedly correlated with the levels of those fluorescent compounds as evaluated by HPLC analysis. These results indicate that image analyses can select promising genotypes rich in anthocyanins and fluorescent phenolic compounds. PMID:23853516

  20. Fluorescence spectroscopy using excitation and emission matrix for quantification of tissue native fluorophores and cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Binlin; Gayen, S. K.; Xu, M.

    2014-03-01

    Native fluorescence spectrum of normal and cancerous human prostate tissues is studied to distinguish between normal and cancerous tissues, and cancerous tissues at different cancer grade. The tissue samples were obtained from Cooperative Human Tissue Network (CHTN) and National Disease Research Interchange(NDRI). An excitation and emission matrix (EEM) was generated for each tissue sample by acquiring native fluorescence spectrum of the sample using multiple excitation wavelengths. The non-negative matrix factorization algorithm was used to generate fluorescence EEMs that correspond to the fluorophores in biological tissues, including tryptophan, collagen, elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and the background paraffin. We hypothesize that, as a consequence of metabolic changes associated with the development of cancer, the concentrations of NADH and FAD are different in normal and cancerous tissues, and also different for different cancer grades. We used the ratio of the abundances of FAD and NADH to distinguish between normal and cancerous tissues, and the tissue cancer grade. The FAD-to-NADH ratio was found to be the highest for normal tissue and decreased as the cancer grade increased.

  1. A Step Beyond BRET: Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL)

    PubMed Central

    Dragavon, Joseph; Sinow, Carolyn; Holland, Alexandra D.; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Theodorou, Ioanna; Samson, Chelsea; Blazquez, Samantha; Rogers, Kelly L.; Tournebize, Régis; Shorte, Spencer L.

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence by Unbound Excitation from Luminescence (FUEL) is a radiative excitation-emission process that produces increased signal and contrast enhancement in vitro and in vivo. FUEL shares many of the same underlying principles as Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET), yet greatly differs in the acceptable working distances between the luminescent source and the fluorescent entity. While BRET is effectively limited to a maximum of 2 times the Förster radius, commonly less than 14 nm, FUEL can occur at distances up to µm or even cm in the absence of an optical absorber. Here we expand upon the foundation and applicability of FUEL by reviewing the relevant principles behind the phenomenon and demonstrate its compatibility with a wide variety of fluorophores and fluorescent nanoparticles. Further, the utility of antibody-targeted FUEL is explored. The examples shown here provide evidence that FUEL can be utilized for applications where BRET is not possible, filling the spatial void that exists between BRET and traditional whole animal imaging. PMID:24894759

  2. Directional power absorption in helicon plasma sources excited by a half-helix antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afsharmanesh, Mohsen; Habibi, Morteza

    2017-10-01

    This paper deals with the investigation of the power absorption in helicon plasma excited through a half-helix antenna driven at 13.56 {{MHz}}. The simulations were carried out by means of a code, HELIC. They were carried out by taking into account different inhomogeneous radial density profiles and for a wide range of plasma densities, from {10}11 {{{cm}}}-3 to {10}13 {{{cm}}}-3. The magnetic field was 200, 400, 600 and 1000 {{G}}. A three-parameter function was used for generating various density profiles with different volume gradients, edge gradients and density widths. The density profile had a large effect on the efficient Trivelpiece-Gould (TG) and helicon mode excitation and antenna coupling to the plasma. The fraction of power deposition via the TG mode was extremely dependent on the plasma density near the plasma boundary. Interestingly, the obtained efficient parallel helicon wavelength was close to the anticipated value for Gaussian radial density profile. Power deposition was considerably asymmetric when the \\tfrac{n}{{B}0} ratio was more than a specific value for a determined density width. The longitudinal power absorption was symmetric at approximately {n}0={10}11 {{{cm}}}-3, irrespective of the magnetic field supposed. The asymmetry became more pronounced when the plasma density was {10}12 {{{cm}}}-3. The ratio of density width to the magnetic field was an important parameter in the power coupling. At high magnetic fields, the maximum of the power absorption was reached at higher plasma density widths. There was at least one combination of the plasma density, magnetic field and density width for which the RF power deposition at both side of the tube reached its maximum value.

  3. Adapting a compact confocal microscope system to a two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging architecture.

    PubMed

    Diaspro, A; Corosu, M; Ramoino, P; Robello, M

    1999-11-01

    Within the framework of a national National Institute of Physics of Matter (INFM) project, we have realised a two-photon excitation (TPE) fluorescence microscope based on a new generation commercial confocal scanning head. The core of the architecture is a mode-locked Ti:Sapphire laser (Tsunami 3960, Spectra Physics Inc., Mountain View, CA) pumped by a high-power (5 W, 532 nm) laser (Millennia V, Spectra Physics Inc.) and an ultracompact confocal scanning head, Nikon PCM2000 (Nikon Instruments, Florence, Italy) using a single-pinhole design. Three-dimensional point-spread function has been measured to define spatial resolution performances. The TPE microscope has been used with a wide range of excitable fluorescent molecules (DAPI, Fura-2, Indo-1, DiOC(6)(3), fluoresceine, Texas red) covering a single photon spectral range from UV to green. An example is reported on 3D imaging of the helical structure of the sperm head of the Octopus Eledone cirrhosa labelled with an UV excitable dye, i.e., DAPI. The system can be easily switched for operating both in conventional and two-photon mode. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Eliminating Unwanted Far-Field Excitation in Objective-Type TIRF. Part II. Combined Evanescent-Wave Excitation and Supercritical-Angle Fluorescence Detection Improves Optical Sectioning

    PubMed Central

    Brunstein, Maia; Hérault, Karine; Oheim, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Azimuthal beam scanning makes evanescent-wave (EW) excitation isotropic, thereby producing total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) images that are evenly lit. However, beam spinning does not fundamentally address the problem of propagating excitation light that is contaminating objective-type TIRF. Far-field excitation depends more on the specific objective than on cell scattering. As a consequence, the excitation impurities in objective-type TIRF are only weakly affected by changes of azimuthal or polar beam angle. These are the main results of the first part of this study (Eliminating unwanted far-field excitation in objective-type TIRF. Pt.1. Identifying sources of nonevanescent excitation light). This second part focuses on exactly where up beam in the illumination system stray light is generated that gives rise to nonevanescent components in TIRF. Using dark-field imaging of scattered excitation light we pinpoint the objective, intermediate lenses and, particularly, the beam scanner as the major sources of stray excitation. We study how adhesion-molecule coating and astrocytes or BON cells grown on the coverslip surface modify the dark-field signal. On flat and weakly scattering cells, most background comes from stray reflections produced far from the sample plane, in the beam scanner and the objective lens. On thick, optically dense cells roughly half of the scatter is generated by the sample itself. We finally show that combining objective-type EW excitation with supercritical-angle fluorescence (SAF) detection efficiently rejects the fluorescence originating from deeper sample regions. We demonstrate that SAF improves the surface selectivity of TIRF, even at shallow penetration depths. The coplanar microscopy scheme presented here merges the benefits of beam spinning EW excitation and SAF detection and provides the conditions for quantitative wide-field imaging of fluorophore dynamics at or near the plasma membrane. PMID:24606929

  5. Dual-wavelength excitation to reduce background fluorescence for fluorescence spectroscopic quantitation of erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX and protoporphyrin-IX from whole blood and oral mucosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hennig, Georg; Vogeser, Michael; Holdt, Lesca M.; Homann, Christian; Großmann, Michael; Stepp, Herbert; Gruber, Christian; Erdogan, Ilknur; Hasmüller, Stephan; Hasbargen, Uwe; Brittenham, Gary M.

    2014-02-01

    Erythrocyte zinc protoporphyrin-IX (ZnPP) and protoporphyrin-IX (PPIX) accumulate in a variety of disorders that restrict or disrupt the biosynthesis of heme, including iron deficiency and various porphyrias. We describe a reagent-free spectroscopic method based on dual-wavelength excitation that can measure simultaneously both ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence from unwashed whole blood while virtually eliminating background fluorescence. We further aim to quantify ZnPP and PPIX non-invasively from the intact oral mucosa using dual-wavelength excitation to reduce the strong tissue background fluorescence while retaining the faint porphyrin fluorescence signal originating from erythrocytes. Fluorescence spectroscopic measurements were made on 35 diluted EDTA blood samples using a custom front-face fluorometer. The difference spectrum between fluorescence at 425 nm and 407 nm excitation effectively eliminated background autofluorescence while retaining the characteristic porphyrin peaks. These peaks were evaluated quantitatively and the results compared to a reference HPLC-kit method. A modified instrument using a single 1000 μm fiber for light delivery and detection was used to record fluorescence spectra from oral mucosa. For blood measurements, the ZnPP and PPIX fluorescence intensities from the difference spectra correlated well with the reference method (ZnPP: Spearman's rho rs = 0.943, p < 0.0001; PPIX: rs = 0.959, p < 0.0001). In difference spectra from oral mucosa, background fluorescence was reduced significantly, while porphyrin signals remained observable. The dual-wavelength excitation method evaluates quantitatively the ZnPP/heme and PPIX/heme ratios from unwashed whole blood, simplifying clinical laboratory measurements. The difference technique reduces the background fluorescence from measurements on oral mucosa, allowing for future non-invasive quantitation of erythrocyte ZnPP and PPIX.

  6. Effects of solvent polarity on the absorption and fluorescence spectra of chlorogenic acid and caffeic acid compounds: determination of the dipole moments.

    PubMed

    Belay, Abebe; Libnedengel, Ermias; Kim, Hyung Kook; Hwang, Yoon-Hwae

    2016-02-01

    The effects of solvent polarity on absorption and fluorescence spectra of biologically active compounds (chlorogenic acid (CGA) and caffeic acids (CA)) have been investigated. In both spectra pronounced solvatochromic effects were observed with shift of emission peaks larger than the corresponding UV-vis electronic absorption spectra. From solvatochromic theory the ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined experimentally and theoretically. The differences between the excited and ground state dipole moment determined by Bakhshiev, Kawski-Chamma-Viallet and Reichardt equations are quite similar. The ground and excited-state dipole moments were determined by theoretical quantum chemical calculation using density function theory (DFT) method (Gaussian 09) and were also similar to the experimental results. The HOMO-LUMO energy band gaps for CGA and CFA were calculated and found to be 4.1119 and 1.8732 eV respectively. The results also indicated the CGA molecule is more stable than that of CFA. It was also observed that in both compounds the excited state possesses a higher dipole moment than that of the ground state. This confirms that the excited state of the hydroxycinnamic compounds is more polarized than that of the ground state and therefore is more sensitive to the solvent. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Novel xenon calibration scheme for two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, Drew; Scime, Earl; Short, Zachary, E-mail: zdshort@mix.wvu.edu

    Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF) measurements of neutral hydrogen and its isotopes are typically calibrated by performing TALIF measurements on krypton with the same diagnostic system and using the known ratio of the absorption cross sections [K. Niemi et al., J. Phys. D 34, 2330 (2001)]. Here we present the measurements of a new calibration method based on a ground state xenon scheme for which the fluorescent emission wavelength is nearly identical to that of hydrogen, thereby eliminating chromatic effects in the collection optics and simplifying detector calibration. We determine that the ratio of the TALIF cross sectionsmore » of xenon and hydrogen is 0.024 ± 0.001.« less

  8. Electrophoretically mediated microanalysis of leucine aminopeptidase using two-photon excited fluorescence detection on a microchip.

    PubMed

    Zugel, S A; Burke, B J; Regnier, F E; Lytle, F E

    2000-11-15

    Two-photon excited fluorescence detection was performed on a microfabricated electrophoresis chip. A calibration curve of the fluorescent tag beta-naphthylamine was performed, resulting in a sensitivity of 2.5 x 10(9) counts M(-1) corresponding to a detection limit of 60 nM. Additionally, leucine aminopeptidase was assayed on the chip using electrophoretically mediated microanalysis. The differential electroosmotic mobilities of the enzyme and substrate, L-leucine beta-naphthylamide, allowed for efficient mixing in an open channel, resulting in the detection of a 30 nM enzyme solution under constant potential. A zero potential incubation for 1 min yielded a calculated detection limit of 4 nM enzyme.

  9. Concentration, size, and excitation power effects on fluorescence from microdroplets and microparticles containing tryptophan and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fell, Nicholas F., Jr.; Pinnick, Ronald G.; Hill, Steven C.; Videen, Gorden W.; Niles, Stanley; Chang, Richard K.; Holler, Stephen; Pan, Yongle; Bottiger, Jerold R.; Bronk, Burt V.

    1999-01-01

    Our group has been developing a system for single-particle fluorescence detection of aerosolized agents. This paper describes the most recent steps in the evolution of this system. The effects of fluorophore concentrations, droplet size, and excitation power have also been investigated with microdroplets containing tryptophan in water to determine the effects of these parameters on our previous results. The vibrating orifice droplet generator was chosen for this study base don its ability to generate particles of well- known and reproducible size. The power levels required to reach saturation and photodegradation were determined. In addition, the collection of fluorescence emission was optimized through the use of a UV achromatic photographic lens. This arrangement permitted collection of images of the droplet stream. Finally, the use of a dual-beam, conditional firing scheme facilitated the collection of improved signal- to-noise single-shot spectra from individual biological particles.

  10. Single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF) for determination of cetane improver in diesel fuel.

    PubMed

    Insausti, Matías; Fernández Band, Beatriz S

    2015-04-05

    A highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric method has been developed for the determination of 2-ethylhexyl nitrate in diesel fuel. Usually, this compound is used as an additive in order to improve cetane number. The analytical method consists in building the chemometric model as a first step. Then, it is possible to quantify the analyte with only recording a single excitation-emission fluorescence spectrum (EEF), whose data are introduced in the chemometric model above mentioned. Another important characteristic of this method is that the fuel sample was used without any pre-treatment for EEF. This work provides an interest improvement to fluorescence techniques using the rapid and easily applicable EEF approach to analyze such complex matrices. Exploding EEF was the key to a successful determination, obtaining a detection limit of 0.00434% (v/v) and a limit of quantification of 0.01446% (v/v). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Fluorescence-based calculus detection using a 405-nm excitation wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brede, O.; Schelle, F.; Krueger, S.; Oehme, B.; Dehn, C.; Frentzen, M.; Braun, A.

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the difference of fluorescence signals of cement and calculus using a 405 nm excitation wavelength. A total number of 20 freshly extracted teeth was used. The light source used for this study was a blue LED with a wavelength of 405nm. For each tooth the spectra of calculus and cementum were measured separately. Fluorescence light was collimated into an optical fibre and spectrally analyzed using an echelle spectrometer (aryelle 200, Lasertechnik Berlin, Germany) with an additionally bandpass (fgb 67, Edmund Industrial Optics, Karlsruhe, Germany). From these 40 measurements the median values were calculated over the whole spectrum, leading to two different median spectra, one for calculus and one for cementum. For further statistical analysis we defined 8 areas of interest (AOI) in wavelength regions, showing remarkable differences in signal strength. In 7 AOIs the intensity of the calculus spectrum differed statistically significant from the intensity of the cementum spectrum (p < 0.05). A spectral difference could be shown between calculus and cement between 600nm and 700nm. Thus, we can conclude that fluorescence of calculus shows a significant difference to the fluorescence of cement. A differentiation over the intensity is possible as well as over the spectrum. Using a wavelength of 405nm, it is possible to distinguish between calculus and cement. These results could be used for further devices to develop a method for feedback controlled calculus removal.

  12. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  13. Mapping the local organization of cell membranes using excitation-polarization-resolved confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Kress, Alla; Wang, Xiao; Ranchon, Hubert; Savatier, Julien; Rigneault, Hervé; Ferrand, Patrick; Brasselet, Sophie

    2013-07-02

    Fluorescence anisotropy and linear dichroism imaging have been widely used for imaging biomolecular orientational distributions in protein aggregates, fibrillar structures of cells, and cell membranes. However, these techniques do not give access to complete orientational order information in a whole image, because their use is limited to parts of the sample where the average orientation of molecules is known a priori. Fluorescence anisotropy is also highly sensitive to depolarization mechanisms such as those induced by fluorescence energy transfer. A fully excitation-polarization-resolved fluorescence microscopy imaging that relies on the use of a tunable incident polarization and a nonpolarized detection is able to circumvent these limitations. We have developed such a technique in confocal epifluorescence microscopy, giving access to new regions of study in the complex and heterogeneous molecular organization of cell membranes. Using this technique, we demonstrate morphological changes at the subdiffraction scale in labeled COS-7 cell membranes whose cytoskeleton is perturbed. Molecular orientational order is also seen to be affected by cholesterol depletion, reflecting the strong interplay between lipid-packing regions and their nearby cytoskeleton. This noninvasive optical technique can reveal local organization in cell membranes when used as a complement to existing methods such as generalized polarization. Copyright © 2013 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Krasieva, Tatiana B; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L; Gratton, Enrico; Tromberg, Bruce J

    2013-03-01

    Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λ(ex)=1000  nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6 ± 0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5 ± 0.05 and 0.17 ± 0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo.

  15. In vivo Diagnosis of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Using 337-nm- Excited Laser-Induced Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanujam, N.; Mitchell, M. F.; Mahadevan, A.; Warren, S.; Thomsen, S.; Silva, E.; Richards-Kortum, R.

    1994-10-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence at 337-nm excitation was used in vivo to differentiate neoplastic [cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)], nonneoplastic abnormal (inflammation and human papilloma viral infection), and normal cervical tissues. A colposcope (low-magnification microscope used to view the cervix with reflected light) was used to identify 66 normal and 49 abnormal (5 inflammation, 21 human papilloma virus infection, and 23 CIN) sites on the cervix in 28 patients. These sites were then interrogated spectroscopically. A two-stage algorithm was developed to diagnose CIN. The first stage differentiated histologically abnormal tissues from colposcopically normal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 92%, 90%, and 88%, respectively. The second stage differentiated preneoplastic and neoplastic tissues from nonneoplastic abnormal tissues with a sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value of 87%, 73%, and 74%, respectively. Spectroscopic differences were consistent with a decrease in the absolute contribution of collagen fluorescence, an increase in the absolute contribution of oxyhemoglobin attenuation, and an increase in the relative contribution of reduced nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate [NAD(P)H] fluorescence as tissue progresses from normal to abnormal in the same patient. These results suggest that in vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of the cervix can be used to diagnose CIN at colposcopy.

  16. Continuous flow real-time PCR device using multi-channel fluorescence excitation and detection.

    PubMed

    Hatch, Andrew C; Ray, Tathagata; Lintecum, Kelly; Youngbull, Cody

    2014-02-07

    High throughput automation is greatly enhanced using techniques that employ conveyor belt strategies with un-interrupted streams of flow. We have developed a 'conveyor belt' analog for high throughput real-time quantitative Polymerase Chain Reaction (qPCR) using droplet emulsion technology. We developed a low power, portable device that employs LED and fiber optic fluorescence excitation in conjunction with a continuous flow thermal cycler to achieve multi-channel fluorescence detection for real-time fluorescence measurements. Continuously streaming fluid plugs or droplets pass through tubing wrapped around a two-temperature zone thermal block with each wrap of tubing fluorescently coupled to a 64-channel multi-anode PMT. This work demonstrates real-time qPCR of 0.1-10 μL droplets or fluid plugs over a range of 7 orders of magnitude concentration from 1 × 10(1) to 1 × 10(7). The real-time qPCR analysis allows dynamic range quantification as high as 1 × 10(7) copies per 10 μL reaction, with PCR efficiencies within the range of 90-110% based on serial dilution assays and a limit of detection of 10 copies per rxn. The combined functionality of continuous flow, low power thermal cycling, high throughput sample processing, and real-time qPCR improves the rates at which biological or environmental samples can be continuously sampled and analyzed.

  17. Two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging and spectroscopy of melanins in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Stringari, Chiara; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Abstract. Changes in the amounts of cellular eumelanin and pheomelanin have been associated with carcinogenesis. The goal of this work is to develop methods based on two-photon-excited-fluorescence (TPEF) for measuring relative concentrations of these compounds. We acquire TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000  nm) of melanin in vitro from melanoma cells, hair specimens, and in vivo from healthy volunteers. We find that the pheomelanin emission peaks at approximately 615 to 625 nm and eumelanin exhibits a broad maximum at 640 to 680 nm. Based on these data we define an optical melanin index (OMI) as the ratio of fluorescence intensities at 645 and 615 nm. The measured OMI for the MNT-1 melanoma cell line is 1.6±0.22 while the Mc1R gene knockdown lines MNT-46 and MNT-62 show substantially greater pheomelanin production (OMI=0.5±0.05 and 0.17±0.03, respectively). The measured values are in good agreement with chemistry-based melanin extraction methods. In order to better separate melanin fluorescence from other intrinsic fluorophores, we perform fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy of in vitro specimens. The relative concentrations of keratin, eumelanin, and pheomelanin components are resolved using a phasor approach for analyzing lifetime data. Our results suggest that a noninvasive TPEF index based on spectra and lifetime could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23235925

  18. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy for degradation monitoring of machinery lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sosnovski, Oleg; Suresh, Pooja; Dudelzak, Alexander E.; Green, Benjamin

    2018-02-01

    Lubrication oil is a vital component of heavy rotating machinery defining the machine's health, operational safety and effectiveness. Recently, the focus has been on developing sensors that provide real-time/online monitoring of oil condition/lubricity. Industrial practices and standards for assessing oil condition involve various analytical methods. Most these techniques are unsuitable for online applications. The paper presents the results of studying degradation of antioxidant additives in machinery lubricants using Fluorescence Excitation-Emission Matrix (EEM) Spectroscopy and Machine Learning techniques. EEM Spectroscopy is capable of rapid and even standoff sensing; it is potentially applicable to real-time online monitoring.

  19. Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence studies of excited-state proton-transfer reactions of proflavine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silvestri, S.; Laporta, P.

    1984-01-01

    Time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence studies of proflavine in aqueous solution are presented. The observation of a monoexponential fluorescence decay with a time constant decreasing with increasing pH and the presence of an anomalous red-shift in the fluorescence spectrum as a function of pH indicate the existence of a complex proton-transfer mechanism in the excited state. A reaction scheme is proposed and the corresponding proton-transfer rates are evaluated. An excited-state pK value of 12.85 is obtained for the equilibrium between the cationic form of proflavine and the same form dissociated at an amino group.

  20. Fluorescent optical position sensor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2005-11-15

    A fluorescent optical position sensor and method of operation. A small excitation source side-pumps a localized region of fluorescence at an unknown position along a fluorescent waveguide. As the fluorescent light travels down the waveguide, the intensity of fluorescent light decreases due to absorption. By measuring with one (or two) photodetectors the attenuated intensity of fluorescent light emitted from one (or both) ends of the waveguide, the position of the excitation source relative to the waveguide can be determined by comparing the measured light intensity to a calibrated response curve or mathematical model. Alternatively, excitation light can be pumped into an end of the waveguide, which generates an exponentially-decaying continuous source of fluorescent light along the length of the waveguide. The position of a photodetector oriented to view the side of the waveguide can be uniquely determined by measuring the intensity of the fluorescent light emitted radially at that location.

  1. Excitation laser energy dependence of surface-enhanced fluorescence showing plasmon-induced ultrafast electronic dynamics in dye molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Tamitake; Yamamoto, Yuko S.; Tamaru, Hiroharu; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Murase, Norio; Ozaki, Yukihiro

    2013-06-01

    We find unique properties accompanying surface-enhanced fluorescence (SEF) from dye molecules adsorbed on Ag nanoparticle aggregates, which generate surface-enhanced Raman scattering. The properties are observed in excitation laser energy dependence of SEF after excluding plasmonic spectral modulation in SEF. The unique properties are large blue shifts of fluorescence spectra, deviation of ratios between anti-Stokes SEF intensity and Stokes from those of normal fluorescence, super-broadening of Stokes spectra, and returning to original fluorescence by lower energy excitation. We elucidate that these properties are induced by electromagnetic enhancement of radiative decay rates exceeding the vibrational relaxation rates within an electronic excited state, which suggests that molecular electronic dynamics in strong plasmonic fields can be largely deviated from that in free space.

  2. Substituent and Solvent Effects on Excited State Charge Transfer Behavior of Highly Fluorescent Dyes Containing Thiophenylimidazole-Based Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santos, Javier; Bu, Xiu R.; Mintz, Eric A.

    2001-01-01

    The excited state charge transfer for a series of highly fluorescent dyes containing thiophenylimidazole moiety was investigated. These systems follow the Twisted Intramolecular Charge Transfer (TICT) model. Dual fluorescence was observed for each substituted dye. X-ray structures analysis reveals a twisted ground state geometry for the donor substituted aryl on the 4 and 5 position at the imidazole ring. The excited state charge transfer was modeled by a linear solvation energy relationship using Taft's pi and Dimroth's E(sub T)(30) as solvent parameters. There is linear relation between the energy of the fluorescence transition and solvent polarity. The degree of stabilization of the excited state charge transfer was found to be consistent with the intramolecular molecular charge transfer. Excited dipole moment was studied by utilizing the solvatochromic shift method.

  3. Determination of K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios in the elements between Tm( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, N.; Tıraşoğlu, E.; Apaydın, G.

    2008-04-01

    The K shell absorption jump factors and jump ratios have been measured in the elements between Tm ( Z = 69) and Os( Z = 76) without having any mass attenuation coefficient at the upper and lower energy branch of the K absorption edge. The jump factors and jump ratios for these elements have been determined by measuring K shell fluorescence parameters such as the total atomic absorption cross-sections, the K α X-ray production cross-sections, the intensity ratio of the K β and K α X-rays and the K shell fluorescence yields. We have performed the measurements for the calculations of these values in attenuation and direct excitation experimental geometry. The K X-ray photons are excited in the target using 123.6 keV gamma-rays from a strong 57Co source, and detected with an Ultra-LEGe solid state detector with a resolution 0.15 keV at 5.9 keV. The measured values have been compared with theoretical and others' experimental values. The results have been plotted versus atomic number.

  4. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications. PMID:28966933

  5. Visual Understanding of Light Absorption and Waveguiding in Standing Nanowires with 3D Fluorescence Confocal Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Frederiksen, Rune; Tutuncuoglu, Gozde; Matteini, Federico; Martinez, Karen L; Fontcuberta I Morral, Anna; Alarcon-Llado, Esther

    2017-09-20

    Semiconductor nanowires are promising building blocks for next-generation photonics. Indirect proofs of large absorption cross sections have been reported in nanostructures with subwavelength diameters, an effect that is even more prominent in vertically standing nanowires. In this work we provide a three-dimensional map of the light around vertical GaAs nanowires standing on a substrate by using fluorescence confocal microscopy, where the strong long-range disruption of the light path along the nanowire is illustrated. We find that the actual long-distance perturbation is much larger in size than calculated extinction cross sections. While the size of the perturbation remains similar, the intensity of the interaction changes dramatically over the visible spectrum. Numerical simulations allow us to distinguish the effects of scattering and absorption in the nanowire leading to these phenomena. This work provides a visual understanding of light absorption in semiconductor nanowire structures, which is of high interest for solar energy conversion applications.

  6. UV absorption in metal decorated boron nitride flakes: a theoretical analysis of excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chopra, Siddheshwar; Plasser, Felix

    2017-10-01

    The excited states of single metal atom (X = Co, Al and Cu) doped boron nitride flake (MBNF) B15N14H14-X and pristine boron nitride (B15N15H14) are studied by time-dependent density functional theory. The immediate effect of metal doping is a red shift of the onset of absorption from about 220 nm for pristine BNF to above 300 nm for all metal-doped variants with the biggest effect for MBNF-Co, which shows appreciable intensity even above 400 nm. These energy shifts are analysed by detailed wavefunction analysis protocols using visualisation methods, such as the natural transition orbital analysis and electron-hole correlation plots, as well as quantitative analysis of the exciton size and electron-hole populations. The analysis shows that the Co and Cu atoms provide strong contributions to the relevant states whereas the aluminium atom is only involved to a lesser extent.

  7. Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence and Ionization in a Graphite Furnace for the Determination of Metals and Nonmetals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butcher, David James

    1990-01-01

    Here is reported novel instrumentation for atomic spectrometry that combined the use of a pulsed laser system as the light source and an electrothermal atomizer as the atom cell. The main goal of the research was to develop instrumentation that was more sensitive for elemental analysis than commercially available instruments and could be used to determine elements in real sample matrices. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) in an electrothermal atomizer (ETA) was compared to ETA atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) for the determination of thallium, manganese, and lead in food and agricultural standard reference materials (SRMs). Compared to ETA AAS, ETA LEAFS has a longer linear dynamic range (LDR) (5-7 orders of magnitude compared to 2-3 orders of magnitude) and higher sensitivity (10 ^{-16} to 10^{ -14} g as compared to 10^{ -13} to 10^{-11} g). Consequently, ETA LEAFS allows elemental analysis to be done over a wider range of concentrations with less dilution steps. Thallium was accurately determined in biological samples by ETA LEAFS at amounts five to one hundred times below the ETA AAS detection limit. ETA AAS and ETA LEAFS were compared for the determination of lead and manganese, and in general, the accuracies and precisions of ETA AAS were the same, with typical precisions between 3% and 6%. Fluorine was determined using laser excited molecular fluorescence spectrometry (LEMOFS) in an ETA. Molecular fluorescence from magnesium fluoride was collected, and the detection limit of 0.3 pg fluorine was two to six orders of magnitude more sensitive than other methods commonly used for the determination of fluorine. Significant interferences from ions were observed, but the sensitivity was high enough that fluorine could be determined in freeze dried urine SRMs by diluting the samples by a factor of one hundred to remove the interferences. Laser enhanced ionization (LEI) in an ETA was used for the determination of metals. For thallium, indium

  8. Excitation of sensitized fluorescence of europium and curium in an aqueous solution of thenoyltrifluoroacetone by a nitrogen laser

    SciTech Connect

    Dem'yanova, T.A.; Stepanov, A.V.; Babaev, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    The fluorescence spectrum of trivalent europium in aqueous solutions of thenoyltrifluoroacetone, excited by a nitrogen laser with emission wavelength 337 nm, exhibits bands at 582, 593, 616, 650, and 695 nm. Two bands appear in the fluorescence spectrum of trivalent curium under the same conditions - at 598 and 607 nm. The times of quenching of the fluorescence of the ions of these elements were measured, both in H/sub 2/O medium and in D/sub 2/O. A linear relationship was found between the fluorescence intensity of europium and curium and their concentration in TTA solution. The limit of determination of europiummore » and curium by the fluorescent method with laser excitation using the bands at 615 and 607 nm proved equal to 0.3 and 0.07 ng/ml, respectively.« less

  9. Video-rate scanning two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy and ratio imaging with cameleons.

    PubMed Central

    Fan, G Y; Fujisaki, H; Miyawaki, A; Tsay, R K; Tsien, R Y; Ellisman, M H

    1999-01-01

    A video-rate (30 frames/s) scanning two-photon excitation microscope has been successfully tested. The microscope, based on a Nikon RCM 8000, incorporates a femtosecond pulsed laser with wavelength tunable from 690 to 1050 nm, prechirper optics for laser pulse-width compression, resonant galvanometer for video-rate point scanning, and a pair of nonconfocal detectors for fast emission ratioing. An increase in fluorescent emission of 1.75-fold is consistently obtained with the use of the prechirper optics. The nonconfocal detectors provide another 2.25-fold increase in detection efficiency. Ratio imaging and optical sectioning can therefore be performed more efficiently without confocal optics. Faster frame rates, at 60, 120, and 240 frames/s, can be achieved with proportionally reduced scan lines per frame. Useful two-photon images can be acquired at video rate with a laser power as low as 2.7 mW at specimen with the genetically modified green fluorescent proteins. Preliminary results obtained using this system confirm that the yellow "cameleons" exhibit similar optical properties as under one-photon excitation conditions. Dynamic two-photon images of cardiac myocytes and ratio images of yellow cameleon-2.1, -3.1, and -3.1nu are also presented. PMID:10233058

  10. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy analysis of landfill leachate DOM in coagulation-flocculation process.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Chuang; Dong, Xingwei

    2017-06-01

    Landfill leachate contains a variety of organic matters, some of which can be excited and emit fluorescence signal. In order to degrade these organic matters, the pretreatment of the leachate is needed, which can improve the degradation performance of post-treatment process. Coagulation-flocculation is one of the important pretreatment processes to treat landfill leachate. Assessing the chemical compositions of landfill leachate is helpful in the understanding of their sources and fates as well as the mechanistic behaviors in the water environment. The present work aimed to use fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy (EEMs) to characterize the chemical fractions of landfill leachate dissolved organic matter (DOM) in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Results showed that the DOM of landfill leachate tested in this study was identified resulting from microbial input, which included five typical characteristic peaks and four kinds of PARAFAC fractions. These fractions were mainly composed of hydrophobic macromolecule humic acid-like (HM-HA), hydrophilic intermediate molecular fulvic acid-like (HIM-FA), and hydrophilic small molecule protein-like substances (HSM-PS). HM-HA and HIM-FA were found to be easier to remove than HSM-PS. Further research on HSM-PS removal by coagulation-flocculation still needs to be improved.

  11. Impact of laser excitation intensity on deep UV fluorescence detection in microchip electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Philipp; Ludwig, Martin; Belder, Detlev

    2008-12-01

    A high intensity 266 nm continuous wave (cw-) laser developed for material processing was utilised as an excitation source for sensitive native fluorescence detection of unlabelled compounds in MCE. This 120 mW laser was attached via an optical fibre into a commercial epifluorescence microscope. With this MCE set-up we evaluated the impact of laser power on the S/N of aromatic compounds as well as of proteins. Compared with a previous work which used a 4 mW pulsed laser for excitation, improved S/N for small aromatics and to a lesser extent for proteins could be attained. The LOD of the system was determined down to 24 ng/mL for serotonin (113 nM), 24 ng/mL for propranolol (81 nM), 80 ng/mL for tryptophan (392 nM) and 80 ng/mL for an aromatic diol (475 nM). Sensitive protein detection was obtained at concentrations of 5 microg/mL for lysocyme, trypsinogen and chymotrypsinogen (340, 208 and 195 nM, respectively). Finally, a comparison of the cw- with a pulsed 266 nm laser, operating at the same average power, showed a higher attainable sensitivity of the cw-laser. This can be attributed to fluorescence saturation and photobleaching effects of the pulsed laser at high pulse energies.

  12. Femtosecond coherent nuclear dynamics of excited tetraphenylethylene: Ultrafast transient absorption and ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kayal, Surajit; Roy, Khokan; Umapathy, Siva

    2018-01-01

    Ultrafast torsional dynamics plays an important role in the photoinduced excited state dynamics. Tetraphenylethylene (TPE), a model system for the molecular motor, executes interesting torsional dynamics upon photoexcitation. The photoreaction of TPE involves ultrafast internal conversion via a nearly planar intermediate state (relaxed state) that further leads to a twisted zwitterionic state. Here, we report the photoinduced structural dynamics of excited TPE during the course of photoisomerization in the condensed phase by ultrafast Raman loss (URLS) and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. TA measurements on the S1 state reveal step-wise population relaxation from the Franck-Condon (FC) state → relaxed state → twisted state, while the URLS study provides insights on the vibrational dynamics during the course of the reaction. The TA spectral dynamics and vibrational Raman amplitudes within 1 ps reveal vibrational wave packet propagating from the FC state to the relaxed state. Fourier transformation of this oscillation leads to a ˜130 cm-1 low-frequency phenyl torsional mode. Two vibrational marker bands, Cet=Cet stretching (˜1512 cm-1) and Cph=Cph stretching (˜1584 cm-1) modes, appear immediately after photoexcitation in the URLS spectra. The initial red-shift of the Cph=Cph stretching mode with a time constant of ˜400 fs (in butyronitrile) is assigned to the rate of planarization of excited TPE. In addition, the Cet=Cet stretching mode shows initial blue-shift within 1 ps followed by frequency red-shift, suggesting that on the sub-picosecond time scale, structural relaxation is dominated by phenyl torsion rather than the central Cet=Cet twist. Furthermore, the effect of the solvent on the structural dynamics is discussed in the context of ultrafast nuclear dynamics and solute-solvent coupling.

  13. Femtosecond coherent nuclear dynamics of excited tetraphenylethylene: Ultrafast transient absorption and ultrafast Raman loss spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Kayal, Surajit; Roy, Khokan; Umapathy, Siva

    2018-01-14

    Ultrafast torsional dynamics plays an important role in the photoinduced excited state dynamics. Tetraphenylethylene (TPE), a model system for the molecular motor, executes interesting torsional dynamics upon photoexcitation. The photoreaction of TPE involves ultrafast internal conversion via a nearly planar intermediate state (relaxed state) that further leads to a twisted zwitterionic state. Here, we report the photoinduced structural dynamics of excited TPE during the course of photoisomerization in the condensed phase by ultrafast Raman loss (URLS) and femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy. TA measurements on the S 1 state reveal step-wise population relaxation from the Franck-Condon (FC) state → relaxed state → twisted state, while the URLS study provides insights on the vibrational dynamics during the course of the reaction. The TA spectral dynamics and vibrational Raman amplitudes within 1 ps reveal vibrational wave packet propagating from the FC state to the relaxed state. Fourier transformation of this oscillation leads to a ∼130 cm -1 low-frequency phenyl torsional mode. Two vibrational marker bands, C et =C et stretching (∼1512 cm -1 ) and C ph =C ph stretching (∼1584 cm -1 ) modes, appear immediately after photoexcitation in the URLS spectra. The initial red-shift of the C ph =C ph stretching mode with a time constant of ∼400 fs (in butyronitrile) is assigned to the rate of planarization of excited TPE. In addition, the C et =C et stretching mode shows initial blue-shift within 1 ps followed by frequency red-shift, suggesting that on the sub-picosecond time scale, structural relaxation is dominated by phenyl torsion rather than the central C et =C et twist. Furthermore, the effect of the solvent on the structural dynamics is discussed in the context of ultrafast nuclear dynamics and solute-solvent coupling.

  14. Transient absorption phenomena and related structural transformations in femtosecond laser-excited Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, Sergey I.

    2004-09-01

    Analysis of processes affecting transient optical absorption and photogeneration of electron-hole plasma in silicon pumped by an intense NIR or visible femtosecond laser pulse has been performed taking into account the most important electron-photon, electron-electron and electron-phonon interactions and, as a result, two main regimes of such laser-matter interaction have been revealed. The first regime is concerned with indirect interband optical absorption in Si, enhanced by a coherent shrinkage of its smallest indirect bandgap due to dynamic Franz-Keldysh effect (DFKE). The second regime takes place due to the critical renormalization of the Si direct bandgap along Λ-axis of its first Brillouin zone because of DFKE and the deformation potential electron-phonon interaction and occurs as intense direct single-photon excitation of electrons into one of the quadruplet of equivalent Λ-valleys in the lowest conduction band, which is split down due to the electron-phonon interaction.

  15. Polarized x-ray excitation for scatter reduction in x-ray fluorescence computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Vernekohl, Don; Tzoumas, Stratis; Zhao, Wei; Xing, Lei

    2018-05-25

    X-ray fluorescence computer tomography (XFCT) is a new molecular imaging modality which uses x-ray excitation to stimulate the emission of fluorescent photons in high atomic number contrast agents. Scatter contamination is one of the main challenges in XFCT imaging which limits the molecular sensitivity. When polarized x rays are used, it is possible to reduce the scatter contamination significantly by placing detectors perpendicular to the polarization direction. This study quantifies scatter contamination for polarized and unpolarized x-ray excitation and determines the advantages of scatter reduction. The amount of scatter in preclinical XFCT is quantified in Monte Carlo simulations. The fluorescent x rays are emitted isotropically, while scattered x rays propagate in polarization direction. The magnitude of scatter contamination is studied in XFCT simulations of a mouse phantom. In this study, the contrast agent gold is examined as an example, but a scatter reduction from polarized excitation is also expected for other elements. The scatter reduction capability is examined for different polarization intensities with a monoenergetic x-ray excitation energy of 82 keV. The study evaluates two different geometrical shapes of CZT detectors which are modeled with an energy resolution of 1 keV FWHM at an x-ray energy of 80 keV. Benefits of a detector placement perpendicular to the polarization direction are shown in iterative and analytic image reconstruction including scatter correction. The contrast to noise ratio (CNR) and the normalized mean square error (NMSE) are analyzed and compared for the reconstructed images. A substantial scatter reduction for common detector sizes was achieved for 100% and 80% linear polarization while lower polarization intensities provide a decreased scatter reduction. By placing the detector perpendicular to the polarization direction, a scatter reduction by factor up to 5.5 can be achieved for common detector sizes. The image

  16. Enhancement of light absorption in polyazomethines due to plasmon excitation on randomly distributed metal nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wróbel, P.; Antosiewicz, T. J.; Stefaniuk, T.; Ciesielski, A.; Iwan, A.; Wronkowska, A. A.; Wronkowski, A.; Szoplik, T.

    2015-05-01

    In photovoltaic devices, metal nanoparticles embedded in a semiconductor layer allow the enhancement of solar-toelectric energy conversion efficiency due to enhanced light absorption via a prolonged optical path, enhanced electric fields near the metallic inclusions, direct injection of hot electrons, or local heating. Here we pursue the first two avenues. In the first, light scattered at an angle beyond the critical angle for reflection is coupled into the semiconductor layer and confined within such planar waveguide up to possible exciton generation. In the second, light is trapped by the excitation of localized surface plasmons on metal nanoparticles leading to enhanced near-field plasmon-exciton coupling at the peak of the plasmon resonance. We report on results of a numerical experiment on light absorption in polymer- (fullerene derivative) blends, using the 3D FDTD method, where exact optical parameters of the materials involved are taken from our recent measurements. In simulations we investigate light absorption in randomly distributed metal nanoparticles dispersed in polyazomethine-(fullerene derivative) blends, which serve as active layers in bulkheterojunction polymer solar cells. In the study Ag and Al nanoparticles of different diameters and fill factors are diffused in two air-stable aromatic polyazomethines with different chemical structures (abbreviated S9POF and S15POF) mixed with phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) or [6,6]-phenyl-C71-butyric acid methyl ester (PC71BM). The mixtures are spin coated on a 100 nm thick Al layer deposited on a fused silica substrate. Optical constants of the active layers are taken from spectroscopic ellipsometry and reflectance measurements using a rotating analyzer type ellipsometer with auto-retarder performed in the wavelength range from 225 nm to 2200 nm. The permittivities of Ag and Al particles of diameters from 20 to 60 nm are assumed to be equal to those measured on 100 to 200 nm thick metal films.

  17. An excited-state intramolecular photon transfer fluorescence probe for localizable live cell imaging of cysteine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei; Chen, Wen; Liu, Si-Jia; Jiang, Jian-Hui

    2017-03-01

    Small molecule probes suitable for selective and specific fluorescence imaging of some important but low-concentration intracellular reactive sulfur species such as cysteine (Cys) pose a challenge in chemical biology. We present a readily available, fast-response fluorescence probe CHCQ-Ac, with 2-(5‧-chloro-2-hydroxyl-phenyl)-6-chloro-4(3 H)-quinazolinone (CHCQ) as the fluorophore and acrylate group as the functional moiety, that enables high-selectivity and high-sensitivity for detecting Cys in both solution and biological system. After specifically reacted with Cys, the probe undergoes a seven-membered intramolecular cyclization and released the fluorophore CHCQ with excited-state intramolecular photon transfer effect. A highly fluorescent, insoluble aggregate was then formed to facilitate high-sensitivity and high-resolution imaging. The results showed that probe CHCQ-Ac affords a remarkably large Stokes shift and can detect Cys under physiological pH condition with no interference from other analytes. Moreover, this probe was proved to have excellent chemical stability, low cytotoxicity and good cell permeability. Our design of this probe provides a novel potential tool to visualize and localize cysteine in bioimaging of live cells that would greatly help to explore various Cys-related physiological and pathological cellular processes in cell biology and diagnostics.

  18. Compact 3D printed module for fluorescence and label-free imaging using evanescent excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Vikas; Gupta, Shalini; Elangovan, Ravikrishnan

    2018-01-01

    Total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy is widely used for selective excitation and high-resolution imaging of fluorophores, and more recently label-free nanosized objects, with high vertical confinement near a liquid-solid interface. Traditionally, high numerical aperture objectives (>1.4) are used to simultaneously generate evanescent waves and collect fluorescence emission signals which limits their use to small area imaging (<0.1 mm2). Objective-based TIRFs are also expensive as they require dichroic mirrors and efficient notch filters to prevent specular reflection within the objective lenses. We have developed a compact 3D module called cTIRF that can generate evanescent waves in microscope glass slides via a planar waveguide illumination. The module can be attached as a fixture to any existing optical microscope, converting it into a TIRF and enabling high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) fluorescence imaging using any magnification objective. As the incidence optics is perpendicular to the detector, label-free evanescent scattering-based imaging of submicron objects can also be performed without using emission filters. SNR is significantly enhanced in this case as compared to cTIRF alone, as seen through our model experiments performed on latex beads and mammalian cells. Extreme flexibility and the low cost of our approach makes it scalable for limited resource settings.

  19. Diagnosis of basal cell carcinoma by two photon excited fluorescence combined with lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Shunping; Peng, Xiao; Liu, Lixin; Liu, Shaoxiong; Lu, Yuan; Qu, Junle

    2014-02-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of human skin cancer. The traditional diagnostic procedure of BCC is histological examination with haematoxylin and eosin staining of the tissue biopsy. In order to reduce complexity of the diagnosis procedure, a number of noninvasive optical methods have been applied in skin examination, for example, multiphoton tomography (MPT) and fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM). In this study, we explored two-photon optical tomography of human skin specimens using two-photon excited autofluorescence imaging and FLIM. There are a number of naturally endogenous fluorophores in skin sample, such as keratin, melanin, collagen, elastin, flavin and porphyrin. Confocal microscopy was used to obtain structures of the sample. Properties of epidermic and cancer cells were characterized by fluorescence emission spectra, as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging. Our results show that two-photon autofluorescence lifetime imaging can provide accurate optical biopsies with subcellular resolution and is potentially a quantitative optical diagnostic method in skin cancer diagnosis.

  20. Production and excitation-emission fluorescence properties of colored dissolved organic matter from marine tropical species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendoza, W. G.; Zika, R. G.

    2009-12-01

    Colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important key role in the photochemistry and biogeochemical cycling of carbon in the coastal region. Their distribution can vary in space and time due to supply of CDOM from different sources. To determine properties of fluorescence-CDOM produced by various marine tropical species, two species from each of the different marine communities were examined after incubation in the dark for forty-nine (49) days: seagrasses-Enhalus acoroides (EA), Thalassia testudinium (TT); corals-Pocillopora cylindrical (PC), Seriatopora hystrix (SH) ; mangroves- Avicennia marina (AM), Sonneratia alba (SA); brown algae-Hormophysa cuneiformis (HC), Sargassum sp.(SS). Average CDOM production is highest from mangrove species (218 QSU/g-sample/day), followed by seagrass (42 QSU/g-sample/day), brown alga (26 QSU/g-sample/day) then corals (19 QSU/g-sample/day).The fluorescence maximum at 312; 380-420 nm emission-excitation pair appears to be present in all species that is an identified humic-like signature. These results suggest that the production of the fluorescent CDOM fraction is a common phenomenon of tropical marine species and as such constitutes a major part of the marine CDOM pool in coastal regions.

  1. Fluorescence Spectroscopy Applied to Monitoring Biodiesel Degradation: Correlation with Acid Value and UV Absorption Analyses.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, Maydla Dos Santos; Passos, Wilson Espíndola; Lescanos, Caroline Honaiser; Pires de Oliveira, Ivan; Trindade, Magno Aparecido Gonçalves; Caires, Anderson Rodrigues Lima; Muzzi, Rozanna Marques

    2018-01-01

    The techniques used to monitor the quality of the biodiesel are intensely discussed in the literature, partly because of the different oil sources and their intrinsic physicochemical characteristics. This study aimed to monitor the thermal degradation of the fatty acid methyl esters of Sesamum indicum L. and Raphanus sativus L. biodiesels (SILB and RSLB, resp.). The results showed that both biodiesels present a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, ∼84% (SILB) and ∼90% (RSLB). The SILB had a high content of polyunsaturated linoleic fatty acid (18  :  2), about 49%, and the oleic monounsaturated (18  :  1), ∼34%. On the other hand, RSLB presented a considerable content of linolenic fatty acid (18  :  3), ∼11%. The biodiesel samples were thermal degraded at 110°C for 48 hours, and acid value, UV absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy analysis were carried out. The results revealed that both absorption and fluorescence presented a correlation with acid value as a function of degradation time by monitoring absorptions at 232 and 270 nm as well as the emission at 424 nm. Although the obtained correlation is not completely linear, a direct correlation was observed in both cases, revealing that both properties can be potentially used for monitoring the biodiesel degradation.

  2. Do fluorescence and transient absorption probe the same intramolecular charge transfer state of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile?

    SciTech Connect

    Gustavsson, Thomas; Coto, Pedro B.; Serrano-Andres, Luis

    2009-07-21

    We present here the results of time-resolved absorption and emission experiments for 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile in solution, which suggest that the fluorescent intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) state may differ from the twisted ICT (TICT) state observed in transient absorption.

  3. Laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry as a powerful tool for analytical applications and spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Igor B.

    1997-12-01

    Laser-excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry (LEAFS) with a novel diffusive tube electrothermal atomizer (ETA) has been used for the study of atomization and diffusion processes and for the direct trace analysis of complex matrices. A novel ETA was a graphite tube sealed by two graphite electrodes. A sample was introduced into the tube and the furnace assembly was heated. The vaporized sample diffused through the hot graphite and the atomic fraction of the vapor was excited by a tunable dye laser above the tube. Temporal behavior of atomic fluorescence of Cu, Ag, and Ni atoms, diffused through the furnace tube, was studied at different temperatures; the values for activation energies and diffusion coefficients were derived on the basis of the diffusion/vaporization kinetic model. The femtogram/nanogram concentrations of silver were determined in coastal Atlantic water and soil samples. Use of the new ETA resulted in significant reduction of matrix interferences, ultra-low limits of detection, good accuracy and precision. LEAFS coupled with laser ablation (LA) was studied in terms of its analytical and spectroscopic potential. Low concentrations of lead (0.15 ppm-750 ppm) in metallic matrices (copper, brass, steel, and zinc) were measured in a low pressure argon atmosphere. No matrix effect was observed, providing a universal calibration curve for all samples. A limit of detection of 22 ppb (0.5 fg) was achieved. Also, the lifetime of the metastable 6p21D level of lead was measured and found to be in good agreement with the literature data. A simple open-air LA-LEAFS system was used for the determination of cobalt in solid matrices (graphite, soil, and steel). The fluorescence of cobalt was excited from a level which was already populated in the ablation plasma and was monitored at the Stokes-shifted wavelength. Detection limits in the ppb to ppm range and linearity over four orders of magnitude were achieved. The resonance shadowgraph technique has been developed

  4. UV fluorescence excitation imaging of healing of wounds in skin: Evaluation of wound closure in organ culture model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Gutierrez-Herrera, Enoch; Ortega-Martinez, Antonio; Anderson, Richard Rox; Franco, Walfre

    2016-09-01

    Molecules native to tissue that fluoresce upon light excitation can serve as reporters of cellular activity and protein structure. In skin, the fluorescence ascribed to tryptophan is a marker of cellular proliferation, whereas the fluorescence ascribed to cross-links of collagen is a structural marker. In this work, we introduce and demonstrate a simple but robust optical method to image the functional process of epithelialization and the exposed dermal collagen in wound healing of human skin in an organ culture model. Non-closing non-grafted, partial closing non-grafted, and grafted wounds were created in ex vivo human skin and kept in culture. A wide-field UV fluorescence excitation imaging system was used to visualize epithelialization of the exposed dermis and quantitate wound area, closure, and gap. Histology (H&E staining) was also used to evaluate epithelialization. The endogenous fluorescence excitation of cross-links of collagen at 335 nm clearly shows the dermis missing epithelium, while the endogenous fluorescence excitation of tryptophan at 295 nm shows keratinocytes in higher proliferating state. The size of the non-closing wound was 11.4 ± 1.8 mm and remained constant during the observation period, while the partial-close wound reached 65.5 ± 4.9% closure by day 16. Evaluations of wound gaps using fluorescence excitation images and histology images are in agreement. We have established a fluorescence imaging method for studying epithelialization processes, evaluating keratinocyte proliferation, and quantitating closure during wound healing of skin in an organ culture model: the dermal fluorescence of pepsin-digestible collagen cross-links can be used to quantitate wound size, closure extents, and gaps; and, the epidermal fluorescence ascribed to tryptophan can be used to monitor and quantitate functional states of epithelialization. UV fluorescence excitation imaging has the potential to become a valuable tool for research, diagnostic

  5. Study on discrimination of oral cancer from normal using blood plasma based on fluorescence steady and excited state at excitation wavelength 280 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rekha, Pachaiappan; Aruna, Prakasa Rao; Ganesan, Singaravelu

    2016-03-01

    Many research works based on fluorescence spectroscopy have proven its potential in the diagnosis of various diseases using the spectral signatures of the native key fluorophores such as tryptophan, tyrosine, collagen, NADH, FAD and porphyrin. These fluorophores distribution, concentration and their conformation may be changed depending upon the pathological and metabolic conditions of cells and tissues. In this study, we have made an attempt to characterize the blood plasma of normal subject and oral cancer patients by native fluorescence spectroscopy at 280 nm excitation. Further, the fluorescence data were analyzed by employing the multivariate statistical method - linear discriminant analyses (LDA) using leaves one out cross validation method. The results illustrate the potential of fluorescence spectroscopy technique in the diagnosis of oral cancer using blood plasma.

  6. Temperature dependence of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. II. Elucidating the relaxation mechanism through ultrafast transient absorption and stimulated emission spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farr, Erik P.; Zho, Chen-Chen; Challa, Jagannadha R.; Schwartz, Benjamin J.

    2017-08-01

    The structure of the hydrated electron, particularly whether it exists primarily within a cavity or encompasses interior water molecules, has been the subject of much recent debate. In Paper I [C.-C. Zho et al., J. Chem. Phys. 147, 074503 (2017)], we found that mixed quantum/classical simulations with cavity and non-cavity pseudopotentials gave different predictions for the temperature dependence of the rate of the photoexcited hydrated electron's relaxation back to the ground state. In this paper, we measure the ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy of the photoexcited hydrated electron as a function of temperature to confront the predictions of our simulations. The ultrafast spectroscopy clearly shows faster relaxation dynamics at higher temperatures. In particular, the transient absorption data show a clear excess bleach beyond that of the equilibrium hydrated electron's ground-state absorption that can only be explained by stimulated emission. This stimulated emission component, which is consistent with the experimentally known fluorescence spectrum of the hydrated electron, decreases in both amplitude and lifetime as the temperature is increased. We use a kinetic model to globally fit the temperature-dependent transient absorption data at multiple temperatures ranging from 0 to 45 °C. We find the room-temperature lifetime of the excited-state hydrated electron to be 137 ±40 fs, in close agreement with recent time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (TRPES) experiments and in strong support of the "non-adiabatic" picture of the hydrated electron's excited-state relaxation. Moreover, we find that the excited-state lifetime is strongly temperature dependent, changing by slightly more than a factor of two over the 45 °C temperature range explored. This temperature dependence of the lifetime, along with a faster rate of ground-state cooling with increasing bulk temperature, should be directly observable by future TRPES experiments. Our data also suggest

  7. Excited-State Proton-Transfer-Induced Trapping Enhances the Fluorescence Emission of a Locked GFP Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The chemical locking of the central single bond in core chromophores of green fluorescent proteins (GFPs) influences their excited-state behavior in a distinct manner. Experimentally, it significantly enhances the fluorescence quantum yield of GFP chromophores with an ortho-hydroxyl group, while it has almost no effect on the photophysics of GFP chromophores with a para-hydroxyl group. To unravel the underlying physical reasons for this different behavior, we report static electronic structure calculations and nonadiabatic dynamics simulations on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer, cis–trans isomerization, and excited-state deactivation in a locked ortho-substituted GFP model chromophore (o-LHBI). On the basis of our previous and present results, we find that the S1 keto species is responsible for the fluorescence emission of the unlocked o-HBI and the locked o-LHBI species. Chemical locking does not change the parts of the S1 and S0 potential energy surfaces relevant to enol–keto tautomerization; hence, in both chromophores, there is an ultrafast excited-state intramolecular proton transfer that takes only 35 fs on average. However, the locking effectively hinders the S1 keto species from approaching the keto S1/S0 conical intersections so that most of trajectories are trapped in the S1 keto region for the entire 2 ps simulation time. Therefore, the fluorescence quantum yield of o-LHBI is enhanced compared with that of unlocked o-HBI, in which the S1 excited-state decay is efficient and ultrafast. In the case of the para-substituted GFP model chromophores p-HBI and p-LHBI, chemical locking hardly affects their efficient excited-state deactivation via cis–trans isomerization; thus, the fluorescence quantum yields in these chromophores remain very low. The insights gained from the present work may help to guide the design of new GFP chromophores with improved fluorescence emission and brightness. PMID:26744782

  8. A-TEEMTM, a new molecular fingerprinting technique: simultaneous absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quatela, Alessia; Gilmore, Adam M.; Steege Gall, Karen E.; Sandros, Marinella; Csatorday, Karoly; Siemiarczuk, Alex; (Ben Yang, Boqian; Camenen, Loïc

    2018-04-01

    We investigate the new simultaneous absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method for rapid and effective characterization of the varying components from a mixture. The absorbance-transmission and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix method uniquely facilitates correction of fluorescence inner-filter effects to yield quantitative fluorescence spectral information that is largely independent of component concentration. This is significant because it allows one to effectively monitor quantitative component changes using multivariate methods and to generate and evaluate spectral libraries. We present the use of this novel instrument in different fields: i.e. tracking changes in complex mixtures including natural water, wine as well as monitoring stability and aggregation of hormones for biotherapeutics.

  9. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence measurements of atomic nitrogen in a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagenaars, E.; Gans, T.; O'Connell, D.; Niemi, K.

    2012-08-01

    The first direct measurements of atomic nitrogen species in a radio-frequency atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) are presented. Atomic nitrogen radicals play a key role in new plasma medicine applications of APPJs. The measurements were performed with a two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic, using 206.65 nm laser photons for the excitation of ground-state N atoms and observing fluorescence light around 744 nm. The APPJ was run with a helium gas flow of 1 slm and varying small admixtures of molecular nitrogen of 0-0.7 vol%. A maximum in the measured N concentration was observed for an admixture of 0.25 vol% N2.

  10. Imaging electronic trap states in perovskite thin films with combined fluorescence and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Kai; Ma, Ying -Zhong; Simpson, Mary Jane; ...

    2016-04-22

    Charge carrier trapping degrades the performance of organometallic halide perovskite solar cells. To characterize the locations of electronic trap states in a heterogeneous photoactive layer, a spatially resolved approach is essential. Here, we report a comparative study on methylammonium lead tri-iodide perovskite thin films subject to different thermal annealing times using a combined photoluminescence (PL) and femtosecond transient absorption microscopy (TAM) approach to spatially map trap states. This approach coregisters the initially populated electronic excited states with the regions that recombine radiatively. Although the TAM images are relatively homogeneous for both samples, the corresponding PL images are highly structured. Themore » remarkable variation in the PL intensities as compared to transient absorption signal amplitude suggests spatially dependent PL quantum efficiency, indicative of trapping events. Furthermore, detailed analysis enables identification of two trapping regimes: a densely packed trapping region and a sparse trapping area that appear as unique spatial features in scaled PL maps.« less

  11. Highly Efficient Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence from an Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer System

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials have shown great potential for highly efficient organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). While the current molecular design of TADF materials primarily focuses on combining donor and acceptor units, we present a novel system based on the use of excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) to achieve efficient TADF without relying on the well-established donor–acceptor scheme. In an appropriately designed acridone-based compound with intramolecular hydrogen bonding, ESIPT leads to separation of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals, resulting in TADF emission with a photoluminescence quantum yield of nearly 60%. High external electroluminescence quantum efficiencies of up to 14% in OLEDs using this emitter prove that efficient triplet harvesting is possible with ESIPT-based TADF materials. This work will expand and accelerate the development of a wide variety of TADF materials for high performance OLEDs. PMID:28776019

  12. Simple fibre based dispersion management for two-photon excited fluorescence imaging through an endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Marti, Dominik; Andersen, Peter E.

    2018-02-01

    We want to implement two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy (TPEFM) into endoscopes, since TPEFM can provide relevant biomarkers for cancer staging and grading in hollow organs, endoscopically accessible through natural orifices. However, many obstacles must be overcome, among others the delivery of short laser pulses to the distal end of the endoscope. To this avail, we present imaging results using an all-fibre dispersion management scheme in a TPEFM setup. The scheme has been conceived by Jespersen et al. in 20101 and relies on the combination of a single mode fibre with normal and a higher order mode fibre with anomalous dispersion properties, fused in series using a long period grating. We show that using this fibre assembly, a simple and robust pulsed laser delivery system without any free-space optics, which is thus suitable for clinical use, can be realised.

  13. Imaging of surgical margin in pancreatic metastasis using two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jing; Hong, Zhipeng; Chen, Hong; Chen, Youting; Xu, Yahao; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Shi, Zheng; Chen, Jianxin

    2014-09-01

    Two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) microscopy, has become a powerful tool for imaging unstained tissue samples at subcellular level in biomedical research. The purpose of this study was to determine whether TPEF imaging of histological sections without H-E staining can be used to identify the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The typical features such as the significant increase of cancerous nests, the absence of pancreatic ductal, the appearance of cancer cells were observed to present the boundary between normal pancreas and pancreatic metastasis from RCC. These results correlated well with the corresponding histological outcomes. With the advent of clinically miniaturized TPEF microscopy and integrative endoscopy, TPEF microscopy has the potential application on surgical location of pancreatic metastasis from RCC in the near future.

  14. Effect of Solvation on Electron Detachment and Excitation Energies of a Green Fluorescent Protein Chromophore Variant.

    PubMed

    Bose, Samik; Chakrabarty, Suman; Ghosh, Debashree

    2016-05-19

    Hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) is applied to the fluorinated green fluorescent protein (GFP) chromophore (DFHBDI) in its deprotonated form to understand the solvatochromic shifts in its vertical detachment energy (VDE) and vertical excitation energy (VEE). This variant of the GFP chromophore becomes fluorescent in an RNA environment and has a wide range of applications in biomedical and biochemical fields. From microsolvation studies, we benchmark (with respect to full QM) the accuracy of our QM/MM calculations with effective fragment potential (EFP) as the MM method of choice. We show that while the solvatochromic shift in the VEE is minimal (0.1 eV blue shift) and its polarization component is only 0.03 eV, the effect of the solvent on the VDE is quite large (3.85 eV). We also show by accurate calculations on the solvatochromic shift of the VDE that polarization accounts for ∼0.23 eV and therefore cannot be neglected. The effect of the counterions on the VDE of the deprotonated chromophore in solvation is studied in detail, and a charge-smearing scheme is suggested for charged chromophores.

  15. Mapping of hemoglobin in erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts using two photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukara, Katarina; Jovanić, Svetlana; Drvenica, Ivana T.; Stančić, Ana; Ilić, Vesna; Rabasović, Mihailo D.; Pantelić, Dejan; Jelenković, Branislav; Bugarski, Branko; Krmpot, Aleksandar J.

    2017-02-01

    The present study describes utilization of two photon excitation fluorescence (2PE) microscopy for visualization of the hemoglobin in human and porcine erythrocytes and their empty membranes (i.e., ghosts). High-quality, label- and fixation-free visualization of hemoglobin was achieved at excitation wavelength 730 nm by detecting visible autofluorescence. Localization in the suspension and spatial distribution (i.e., mapping) of residual hemoglobin in erythrocyte ghosts has been resolved by 2PE. Prior to the 2PE mapping, the presence of residual hemoglobin in the bulk suspension of erythrocyte ghosts was confirmed by cyanmethemoglobin assay. 2PE analysis revealed that the distribution of hemoglobin in intact erythrocytes follows the cells' shape. Two types of erythrocytes, human and porcine, characterized with discocyte and echinocyte morphology, respectively, showed significant differences in hemoglobin distribution. The 2PE images have revealed that despite an extensive washing out procedure after gradual hypotonic hemolysis, a certain amount of hemoglobin localized on the intracellular side always remains bound to the membrane and cannot be eliminated. The obtained results open the possibility to use 2PE microscopy to examine hemoglobin distribution in erythrocytes and estimate the purity level of erythrocyte ghosts in biotechnological processes.

  16. Detection and Interpretation of Fluorescence Signals Generated by Excitable Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantino, Anthony J.

    Part 1: High-Sensitivity Amplifiers for Detecting Fluorescence . Monitoring electrical activity and Cai 2+ transients in biological tissues and individual cells increasingly utilizes optical sensors based on voltage-dependent and Cai 2+-dependent fluorescent dyes. However, achieving satisfactory signal-to-noise ratios (SNR) often requires increased illumination intensities and/or dye concentrations, which results in photo-toxicity, photo-bleaching and other adverse effects limiting the utility of optical recordings. The most challenging are the recordings from individual cardiac myocytes and neurons. Here we demonstrate that by optimizing a conventional transimpedance topology one can achieve a 10-20 fold increase of sensitivity with photodiode-based recording systems (dependent on application). We provide a detailed comparative analysis of the dynamic and noise characteristics of different transimpedance amplifier topologies as well as the example(s) of their practical implementation. Part 2: Light-Scattering Models for Interpretation of Fluorescence Data. Current interest in understanding light transport in cardiac tissue has been motivated in part by increased use of voltage-sensitive and Ca i2+-sensitive fluorescent probes to map electrical impulse propagation and Cai2+-transients in the heart. The fluorescent signals are recorded using such probes represent contributions from different layers of myocardial tissue and are greatly affected by light scattering. The interpretation of these signals thus requires deconvolution which would not be possible without detailed models of light transport in the respective tissue. Which involves the experimental measurements of the absorption, scattering, and anisotropy coefficients, mua, mu s, and g respectively. The aim of the second part of our thesis was to derive a new method for deriving these parameters from high spatial resolution measurements of forward-directed flux (FDF). To this end, we carried out high spatial

  17. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmas.

    PubMed

    Magee, R M; Galante, M E; McCarren, D; Scime, E E; Boivin, R L; Brooks, N H; Groebner, R J; Hill, D N; Porter, G D

    2012-10-01

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm(2)), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm(-1)) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman β transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer α emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  18. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmasa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Porter, G. D.

    2012-10-01

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm2), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm-1) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman β transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer α emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  19. Solvent effects on the fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption of a Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Yong; Xue, Yuxiong; Sheng, Ning; Rui, Guanghao; Lv, Changgui; He, Jun; Gu, Bing; Cui, Yiping

    2018-06-01

    The fluorescence and effective three-photon absorption (3PA) properties of Zn(II)-[meso-tetrakis(4-octyloxyphenyl)porphyrin] (labeled Zn(II)-porphyrin) dissolved in three different polar solvents were systematically investigated. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin were investigated by 1H NMR spectra, IR spectra, mass spectroscopy, and electronic absorption spectra. The fluorescence emission of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents excited at the wavelengths of 420 nm (Soret band) and 550 nm (Q-band) were analyzed. By performing Z-scan experiments with femtosecond laser pulses at a wavelength of 800 nm, the effective 3PA process of Zn(II)-porphyrin in three different solvents was observed and the underlying mechanism was discussed in detail. It is found that the fluorescence spectra slightly depend on the polarity of the solvent. Interestingly, the effective 3PA properties of Zn(II)-porphyrin strongly depend on the solvent polarity. The lower the solvent polarity is, the larger effective 3PA cross-section is. Low polar solvents are beneficial to applications of Zn(II)-porphyrin in optical limiting, photodynamic therapy, etc.

  20. Detection limits of 405 nm and 633 nm excited PpIX fluorescence for brain tumor detection during stereotactic biopsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markwardt, Niklas; Götz, Marcus; Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Hollnburger, Bastian; Sroka, Ronald; Stepp, Herbert; Zelenkov, Petr; Rühm, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    5-aminolevulinic-acid-(5-ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) fluorescence may be used to improve stereotactic brain tumor biopsies. In this study, the sensitivity of PpIX-based tumor detection has been investigated for two potential excitation wavelengths (405 nm, 633 nm). Using a 200 μm fiber in contact with semi-infinite optical phantoms containing ink and Lipovenös, PpIX detection limits of 4.0 nM and 200 nM (relating to 1 mW excitation power) were determined for 405 nm and 633 nm excitation, respectively. Hence, typical PpIX concentrations in glioblastomas of a few μM should be well detectable with both wavelengths. Additionally, blood layers of selected thicknesses were placed between fiber and phantom. Red excitation was shown to be considerably less affected by blood interference: A 50 μm blood layer, for instance, blocked the 405- nm-excited fluorescence completely, but reduced the 633-nm-excited signal by less than 50%. Ray tracing simulations demonstrated that - without blood layer - the sensitivity advantage of 405 nm rises for decreasing fluorescent volume from 50-fold to a maximum of 100-fold. However, at a tumor volume of 1 mm3, which is a typical biopsy sample size, the 633-nm-excited fluorescence signal is only reduced by about 10%. Further simulations revealed that with increasing fiber-tumor distance, the signal drops faster for 405 nm. This reduces the risk of detecting tumor tissue outside the needle's coverage, but diminishes the overlap between optically and mechanically sampled volumes. While 405 nm generally offers a higher sensitivity, 633 nm is more sensitive to distant tumors and considerably superior in case of blood-covered tumor tissue.

  1. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pixel-based absorption correction for dual-tracer fluorescence imaging of receptor binding potential

    PubMed Central

    Kanick, Stephen C.; Tichauer, Kenneth M.; Gunn, Jason; Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2014-01-01

    Ratiometric approaches to quantifying molecular concentrations have been used for decades in microscopy, but have rarely been exploited in vivo until recently. One dual-tracer approach can utilize an untargeted reference tracer to account for non-specific uptake of a receptor-targeted tracer, and ultimately estimate receptor binding potential quantitatively. However, interpretation of the relative dynamic distribution kinetics is confounded by differences in local tissue absorption at the wavelengths used for each tracer. This study simulated the influence of absorption on fluorescence emission intensity and depth sensitivity at typical near-infrared fluorophore wavelength bands near 700 and 800 nm in mouse skin in order to correct for these tissue optical differences in signal detection. Changes in blood volume [1-3%] and hemoglobin oxygen saturation [0-100%] were demonstrated to introduce substantial distortions to receptor binding estimates (error > 30%), whereas sampled depth was relatively insensitive to wavelength (error < 6%). In response, a pixel-by-pixel normalization of tracer inputs immediately post-injection was found to account for spatial heterogeneities in local absorption properties. Application of the pixel-based normalization method to an in vivo imaging study demonstrated significant improvement, as compared with a reference tissue normalization approach. PMID:25360349

  3. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC).

    PubMed

    Singh, Shatrughan; D'Sa, Eurico J; Swenson, Erick M

    2010-07-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) variability in Barataria Basin, Louisiana, USA,was examined by excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). CDOM optical properties of absorption and fluorescence at 355nm along an axial transect (36 stations) during March, April, and May 2008 showed an increasing trend from the marine end member to the upper basin with mean CDOM absorption of 11.06 + or - 5.01, 10.05 + or - 4.23, 11.67 + or - 6.03 (m(-)(1)) and fluorescence 0.80 + or - 0.37, 0.78 + or - 0.39, 0.75 + or - 0.51 (RU), respectively. PARAFAC analysis identified two terrestrial humic-like (component 1 and 2), one non-humic like (component 3), and one soil derived humic acid like (component 4) components. The spatial variation of the components showed an increasing trend from station 1 (near the mouth of basin) to station 36 (end member of bay; upper basin). Deviations from this increasing trend were observed at a bayou channel with very high chlorophyll-a concentrations especially for component 3 in May 2008 that suggested autochthonous production of CDOM. The variability of components with salinity indicated conservative mixing along the middle part of the transect. Component 1 and 4 were found to be relatively constant, while components 2 and 3 revealed an inverse relationship for the sampling period. Total organic carbon showed increasing trend for each of the components. An increase in humification and a decrease in fluorescence indices along the transect indicated an increase in terrestrial derived organic matter and reduced microbial activity from lower to upper basin. The use of these indices along with PARAFAC results improved dissolved organic matter characterization in the Barataria Basin. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement of the 4T2 state nonradiative lifetime in ruby

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gayen, S. K.; Wang, W. B.; Petricevic, V.; Dorsinville, R.; Alfano, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    In a picosecond excite-and-probe absorption measurement, a 527-nm picosecond pulse excites the 4T2 state of the Cr(3+) ion in ruby and a 3.4-micron picosecond probe pulse monitors the growth and decay of population in the 2E state as a function of pump-probe delay. From the growth of population in the metastable 2E state, an upper limit of 7 ps for the nonradiative lifetime of the 4T2 state is determined.

  5. Laser-excited fluorescence of rare earth elements in fluorite: Initial observations with a laser Raman microprobe

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burruss, R.C.; Ging, T.G.; Eppinger, R.G.; Samson, a.M.

    1992-01-01

    Fluorescence emission spectra of three samples of fluorite containing 226-867 ppm total rare earth elements (REE) were excited by visible and ultraviolet wavelength lines of an argon ion laser and recorded with a Raman microprobe spectrometer system. Narrow emission lines ( 0.9 for Eu2+ and 0.99 for Er3+. Detection limits for three micrometer spots are about 0.01 ppm Eu2+ and 0.07 ppm Er3+. These limits are less than chondrite abundance for Eu and Er, demonstrating the potential microprobe analytical applications of laser-excited fluorescence of REE in fluorite. However, application of this technique to common rock-forming minerals may be hampered by competition between fluorescence emission and radiationless energy transfer processes involving lattice phonons. ?? 1992.

  6. Detection of tropospheric OH and HO2 by laser-induced fluorescence at low pressure using the 308nm excitation of OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank

    1994-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy is a highly sensitive method for the direct in situ measurement of hydroxyl concentrations in the atmosphere. Its sensitivity and selectivity relies on the intense discrete UV-absorption lines of OH which are strongest around 282nm and 308nm. We have developed a LIF-instrument based on the low-pressure experiment (FAGE). However, we use 308nm instead of 282nm as excitation wavelength for OH, a concept that is also pursued by other groups. One advantage of the longer excitation wavelength is the higher detection sensitivity due to the about 6 times larger effective OH-fluorescence cross-section. Moreover, the O3/H2O-interference (OH self-generation by the laser) is about a factor of 200 smaller at 308nm than at 282nm. This keeps the interference level well below the projected detection limit of 10(exp 5) OH/cm(exp 3). Atmospheric HO2-radicals are detected by chemical conversion of HO2 into OH with NO.

  7. Fluorescence Excitation Models of Ammonia and Amidogen Radical (NH2) in Comets: Application to Comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawakita, Hideyo; Mumma, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Ammonia is a major reservoir of nitrogen atoms in cometary materials. However, detections of ammonia in comets are rare, with several achieved at radio wavelengths. A few more detections were obtained through near-infrared observations (around the 3 m wavelength region), but moderate relative velocity shifts are required to separate emission lines of cometary ammonia from telluric absorption lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. On the other hand, the amidogen radical (NH2 -- a photodissociation product of ammonia in the coma) also shows rovibrational emission lines in the 3 micron wavelength region. Thus, gas production rates for ammonia can be determined from the rovibrational emission lines of ammonia (directly) and amidogen radical (indirectly) simultaneously in the near-infrared. In this article, we present new fluorescence excitation models for cometary ammonia and amidogen radical in the near-infrared, and we apply these models to the near-infrared high-dispersion spectra of comet C/2004 Q2 (Machholz) to determine the mixing ratio of ammonia to water in the comet. Based on direct detection of NH3 lines, the mixing ratio of NH3/H2O is 0.46% +/- 0.03% in C/2004 Q2 (Machholz), in agreement with other results. The mixing ratio of ammonia determined from the NH2 observations (0.31% -- 0.79%) is consistent but has relatively larger error, owing to uncertainty in the photodissociation rates of ammonia. At the present level of accuracy, we confirm that NH3 could be the sole parent of NH2 in this comet.

  8. Optimal Spectral Regions For Laser Excited Fluorescence Diagnostics For Point Of Care Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaitkuviene, A.; Gėgžna, V.; Varanius, D.; Vaitkus, J.

    2011-09-01

    The tissue fluorescence gives the response of light emitting molecule signature, and characterizes the cell composition and peculiarities of metabolism. Both are useful for the biomedical diagnostics, as reported in previous our and others works. The present work demonstrates the results of application of laser excited autofluorescence for diagnostics of pathology in genital tissues, and the feasibility for the bedside at "point of care—off lab" application. A portable device using the USB spectrophotometer, micro laser (355 nm Nd:YAG, 0,5 ns pulse, repetition rate 10 kHz, output power 15 mW), three channel optical fiber and computer with diagnostic program was designed and ready for clinical trial to be used for cytology and biopsy specimen on site diagnostics, and for the endoscopy/puncture procedures. The biopsy and cytology samples, as well as intervertebral disc specimen were evaluated by pathology experts and the fluorescence spectra were investigated in the fresh and preserved specimens. The spectra were recorded in the spectral range 350-900 nm. At the initial stage the Gaussian components of spectra were found and the Mann-Whitney test was used for the groups' differentiation and the spectral regions for optimal diagnostics purpose were found. Then a formal dividing of spectra in the components or the definite width bands, where the main difference of the different group spectra was observed, was used to compare these groups. The ROC analysis based diagnostic algorithms were created for medical prognosis. The positive prognostic values and negative prediction values were determined for cervical Liquid PAP smear supernatant sediment diagnosis of being Cervicitis and Norma versus CIN2+. In a case of intervertebral disc the analysis allows to get the additional information about the disc degeneration status. All these results demonstrated an efficiency of the proposed procedure and the designed device could be tested at the point-of-care site or for

  9. Two-photon excited fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of melanin in vitro and in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasieva, Tatiana B.; Liu, Feng; Sun, Chung-Ho; Kong, Yu; Balu, Mihaela; Meyskens, Frank L.; Tromberg, Bruce J.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to detect early melanoma non-invasively would improve clinical outcome and reduce mortality. Recent advances in two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in vivo microscopy offer a powerful tool in early malignant melanoma diagnostics. The goal of this work was to develop a TPEF optical index for measuring relative concentrations of eumelanin and pheomelanin since ex vivo studies show that changes in this ratio have been associated with malignant transformation. We acquired TPEF emission spectra (λex=1000 nm) of melanin from several specimens, including human hair, malignant melanoma cell lines, and normal melanocytes and keratinocytes in different skin layers (epidermis, papillary dermis) in five healthy volunteers in vivo. We found that the pheomelanin emission peaks at around 620 nm and is blue-shifted from the eumelanin with broad maximum at 640-680nm. We defined "optical melanin index" (OMI) as a ratio of fluorescence signal intensities measured at 645 nm and 615nm. The measured OMI for a melanoma cell line MNT-1 was 1.6+/-0.2. The MNT-46 and MNT-62 lines (Mc1R gene knockdown) showed an anticipated change in melanins production ratio and had OMI of 0.55+/-0.05 and 0.17+/-0.02, respectively, which strongly correlated with HPLC data obtained for these lines. Average OMI measured for basal cells layers (melanocytes and keratinocytes) in normal human skin type I, II-III (not tanned and tanned) in vivo was 0.5, 1.05 and 1.16 respectively. We could not dependably detect the presence of pheomelanin in highly pigmented skin type V-VI. These data suggest that a non-invasive TPEF index could potentially be used for rapid melanin ratio characterization both in vitro and in vivo, including pigmented lesions.

  10. Some Secrets of Fluorescent Proteins: Distinct Bleaching in Various Mounting Fluids and Photoactivation of Cyan Fluorescent Proteins at YFP-Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A.

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. Methodology/Principal Findings When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique - the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10 - 15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength – a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Conclusions/Significance Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins

  11. Some secrets of fluorescent proteins: distinct bleaching in various mounting fluids and photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at YFP-excitation.

    PubMed

    Malkani, Naila; Schmid, Johannes A

    2011-04-07

    The use of spectrally distinct variants of green fluorescent protein (GFP) such as cyan or yellow mutants (CFP and YFP, respectively) is very common in all different fields of life sciences, e.g. for marking specific proteins or cells or to determine protein interactions. In the latter case, the quantum physical phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited by specific microscopy techniques to visualize proximity of proteins. When we applied a commonly used FRET microscopy technique--the increase in donor (CFP)-fluorescence after bleaching of acceptor fluorophores (YFP), we obtained good signals in live cells, but very weak signals for the same samples after fixation and mounting in commercial microscopy mounting fluids. This observation could be traced back to much faster bleaching of CFP in these mounting media. Strikingly, the opposite effect of the mounting fluid was observed for YFP and also for other proteins such as Cerulean, TFP or Venus. The changes in photostability of CFP and YFP were not caused by the fixation but directly dependent on the mounting fluid. Furthermore we made the interesting observation that the CFP-fluorescence intensity increases by about 10-15% after illumination at the YFP-excitation wavelength--a phenomenon, which was also observed for Cerulean. This photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins at the YFP-excitation can cause false-positive signals in the FRET-microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of a yellow FRET acceptor. Our results show that photostability of fluorescent proteins differs significantly for various media and that CFP bleaches significantly faster in commercial mounting fluids, while the opposite is observed for YFP and some other proteins. Moreover, we show that the FRET microscopy technique that is based on bleaching of the YFP is prone to artifacts due to photoactivation of cyan fluorescent proteins under these conditions.

  12. System and method for controlling depth of imaging in tissues using fluorescence microscopy under ultraviolet excitation following staining with fluorescing agents

    SciTech Connect

    Levenson, Richard; Demos, Stavros

    A method is disclosed for analyzing a thin tissue sample and adapted to be supported on a slide. The tissue sample may be placed on a slide and exposed to one or more different exogenous fluorophores excitable in a range of about 300 nm-200 nm, and having a useful emission band from about 350 nm-900 nm, and including one or more fluorescent dyes or fluorescently labeled molecular probes that accumulate in tissue or cellular components. The fluorophores may be excited with a first wavelength of UV light between about 200 nm-290 nm. An optical system collects emissions from the fluorophoresmore » at a second wavelength, different from the first wavelength, which are generated in response to the first wavelength of UV light, to produce an image for analysis.« less

  13. Excited state absorption spectra of dissolved and aggregated distyrylbenzene: A TD-DFT state and vibronic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, Eliezer Fernando; Shi, Junqing; Lavarda, Francisco Carlos; Lüer, Larry; Milián-Medina, Begoña; Gierschner, Johannes

    2017-07-01

    A time-dependent density functional theory study is performed to reveal the excited state absorption (ESA) features of distyrylbenzene (DSB), a prototype π-conjugated organic oligomer. Starting with a didactic insight to ESA based on simple molecular orbital and configuration considerations, the performance of various density functional theory functionals is tested to reveal the full vibronic ESA features of DSB at short and long probe delay times.

  14. Absorption, fluorescence, and acid-base equilibria of rhodamines in micellar media of sodium dodecyl sulfate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhova, Elena N.; Mchedlov-Petrossyan, Nikolay O.; Vodolazkaya, Natalya A.; Patsenker, Leonid D.; Doroshenko, Andrey O.; Marynin, Andriy I.; Krasovitskii, Boris M.

    2017-01-01

    Rhodamine dyes are widely used as molecular probes in different fields of science. The aim of this paper was to ascertain to what extent the structural peculiarities of the compounds influence their absorption, emission, and acid-base properties under unified conditions. The acid-base dissociation (HR+ ⇄ R + H+) of a series of rhodamine dyes was studied in sodium n-dodecylsulfate micellar solutions. In this media, the form R exists as a zwitterion R±. The indices of apparent ionization constants of fifteen rhodamine cations HR+ with different substituents in the xanthene moiety vary within the range of pKaapp = 5.04 to 5.53. The distinct dependence of emission of rhodamines bound to micelles on pH of bulk water opens the possibility of using them as fluorescent interfacial acid-base indicators.

  15. Visible light excitable Zn2+ fluorescent sensor derived from an intramolecular charge transfer fluorophore and its in vitro and in vivo application.

    PubMed

    Qian, Fang; Zhang, Changli; Zhang, Yumin; He, Weijiang; Gao, Xiang; Hu, Ping; Guo, Zijian

    2009-02-04

    The UV- and sensor-induced interferences to living systems pose a barrier for in vivo Zn(2+) imaging. In this work, an intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) fluorophore of smaller aromatic plane, 4-amino-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole, was adopted to construct visible light excited fluorescent Zn(2+) sensor, NBD-TPEA. This sensor demonstrates a visible ICT absorption band, a large Stokes shift, and biocompatibility. It emits weakly (Phi = 0.003) without pH dependence at pH 7.1-10.1, and the lambda(ex) and lambda(em) are 469 (epsilon(469) = 2.1 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1)) and 550 nm, respectively. The NBD-TPEA displays distinct selective Zn(2+)-amplified fluorescence (Phi = 0.046, epsilon(469) = 1.4 x 10(4) M(-1) cm(-1)) with emission shift from 550 to 534 nm, which can be ascribed to the synergic Zn(2+) coordination by the outer bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl)amine (BPA) and 4-amine. The Zn(2+) binding ratio of NBD-TPEA is 1:1. By comparison with its analogues NBD-BPA and NBD-PMA, which have no Zn(2+) affinity, the outer BPA in NBD-TPEA should be responsible for the Zn(2+)-induced photoinduced electron transfer blockage as well as for the enhanced Zn(2+) binding ability of 4-amine. Successful intracellular Zn(2+) imaging on living cells with NBD-TPEA staining exhibited a preferential accumulation at lysosome and Golgi with dual excitability at either 458 or 488 nm. The intact in vivo Zn(2+) fluorescence imaging on zebrafish embryo or larva stained with NBD-TPEA revealed two zygomorphic luminescent areas around its ventricle which could be related to the Zn(2+) storage for the zebrafish development. Moreover, high Zn(2+) concentration in the developing neuromasters of zebrafish can be visualized by confocal fluorescence imaging. This study demonstrates a novel strategy to construct visible light excited Zn(2+) fluorescent sensor based on ICT fluorophore other than xanthenone analogues. Current data show that NBD-TPEA staining can be a reliable approach for the intact in vivo Zn(2

  16. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semiarid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Wen, Zhidan; Li, Lin; Zang, Shuying; Shao, Tiantian; Li, Sijia; Du, Jia

    2016-03-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescent components in chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) for lakes in the semiarid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectra and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Two humic-like (C1 and C2) and protein-like (C3 and C4) components were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed under seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited a strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.628). Significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p < 0.01), a(280) (R2 = 0.77, 0.47, p < 0.01), a(350) (R2 = 0.76, 0.78, p < 0.01) and Fmax for two humic-like components (C1 and C2) were exhibited, respectively. A significant relationship (R2 = 0.930) was found between salinity and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC-extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results from this investigation demonstrate that the EEM-PARAFAC technique can be used to evaluate the seasonal dynamics of CDOM fluorescent components for inland waters in the semiarid regions of Northeast China, and to quantify CDOM components for other waters with similar environmental conditions.

  17. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  18. Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter in the Yangtze Estuary.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qiyuan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Hou, Jun; Ao, Yanhui

    2014-03-01

    The Yangtze Estuary is heavily influenced by coast-continent geochemical processes and anthropogenic activity; thus, the source and distribution of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the estuary are strongly impacted by these processes. Here, a series of samples were collected from across the Yangtze Estuary to investigate the source and spatial dynamics of CDOM and its components throughout the system. Three indices (a(355), spectral slope, and fluorescence) were then calculated and interpreted. The results indicated that the distribution of CDOM was dominated by allochthonous input, conservative mixing, and phase transfer. The contribution of biogenic CDOM to total CDOM increased with salinity, and three individual CDOM components were identified upon fluorescence excitation emission matrix spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis of the water samples: C1, corresponding to humic substance-like CDOM, C2, corresponding to tryptophan-like CDOM, and C3, corresponding to tyrosine-like CDOM. C1 primarily originated from a terrestrial source, C2 had widespread origins, none of which played a dominant role, and C3 mainly originated from allochthonous input in the medium salinity area. Unexpectedly, no marine humic-like component was found in the surface water of the Yangtze Estuary, possibly because turbidity decreased the depth of sunlight penetration, limiting production of this component.

  19. Analysis of nuclear resonance fluorescence excitation measured with LaBr3(Ce) detectors near 2 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omer, Mohamed; Negm, Hani; Ohgaki, Hideaki; Daito, Izuru; Hayakawa, Takehito; Bakr, Mahmoud; Zen, Heishun; Hori, Toshitada; Kii, Toshiteru; Masuda, Kai; Hajima, Ryoichi; Shizuma, Toshiyuki; Toyokawa, Hiroyuki; Kikuzawa, Nobuhiro

    2013-11-01

    The performance of LaBr3(Ce) to measure nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) excitations is discussed in terms of limits of detection and in comparison with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detectors near the 2 MeV region where many NRF excitation levels from special nuclear materials are located. The NRF experiment was performed at the High Intensity γ-ray Source (HIγS) facility. The incident γ-rays, of 2.12 MeV energy, hit a B4C target to excite the 11B nuclei to the first excitation level. The statistical-sensitive non-linear peak clipping (SNIP) algorithm was implemented to eliminate the background and enhance the limits of detection for the spectra measured with LaBr3(Ce). Both detection and determination limits were deduced from the experimental data.

  20. Investigating line- versus point-laser excitation for three-dimensional fluorescence imaging and tomography employing a trimodal imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Liji; Peter, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    The adoption of axially oriented line illumination patterns for fluorescence excitation in small animals for fluorescence surface imaging (FSI) and fluorescence optical tomography (FOT) is being investigated. A trimodal single-photon-emission-computed-tomography/computed-tomography/optical-tomography (SPECT-CT-OT) small animal imaging system is being modified for employment of point- and line-laser excitation sources. These sources can be arbitrarily positioned around the imaged object. The line source is set to illuminate the object along its entire axial direction. Comparative evaluation of point and line illumination patterns for FSI and FOT is provided involving phantom as well as mouse data. Given the trimodal setup, CT data are used to guide the optical approaches by providing boundary information. Furthermore, FOT results are also being compared to SPECT. Results show that line-laser illumination yields a larger axial field of view (FOV) in FSI mode, hence faster data acquisition, and practically acceptable FOT reconstruction throughout the whole animal. Also, superimposed SPECT and FOT data provide additional information on similarities as well as differences in the distribution and uptake of both probe types. Fused CT data enhance further the anatomical localization of the tracer distribution in vivo. The feasibility of line-laser excitation for three-dimensional fluorescence imaging and tomography is demonstrated for initiating further research, however, not with the intention to replace one by the other.

  1. Evidence and mechanism of efficient thermally activated delayed fluorescence promoted by delocalized excited states

    PubMed Central

    Hosokai, Takuya; Matsuzaki, Hiroyuki; Nakanotani, Hajime; Tokumaru, Katsumi; Tsutsui, Tetsuo; Furube, Akihiro; Nasu, Keirou; Nomura, Hiroko; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2017-01-01

    The design of organic compounds with nearly no gap between the first excited singlet (S1) and triplet (T1) states has been demonstrated to result in an efficient spin-flip transition from the T1 to S1 state, that is, reverse intersystem crossing (RISC), and facilitate light emission as thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF). However, many TADF molecules have shown that a relatively appreciable energy difference between the S1 and T1 states (~0.2 eV) could also result in a high RISC rate. We revealed from a comprehensive study of optical properties of TADF molecules that the formation of delocalized states is the key to efficient RISC and identified a chemical template for these materials. In addition, simple structural confinement further enhances RISC by suppressing structural relaxation in the triplet states. Our findings aid in designing advanced organic molecules with a high rate of RISC and, thus, achieving the maximum theoretical electroluminescence efficiency in organic light-emitting diodes. PMID:28508081

  2. Focused fluorescence excitation with time-reversed ultrasonically encoded light and imaging in thick scattering media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Puxiang; Suzuki, Yuta; Xu, Xiao; Wang, Lihong V.

    2013-07-01

    Scattering dominates light propagation in biological tissue, and therefore restricts both resolution and penetration depth in optical imaging within thick tissue. As photons travel into the diffusive regime, typically 1 mm beneath human skin, their trajectories transition from ballistic to diffusive due to the increased number of scattering events, which makes it impossible to focus, much less track, photon paths. Consequently, imaging methods that rely on controlled light illumination are ineffective in deep tissue. This problem has recently been addressed by a novel method capable of dynamically focusing light in thick scattering media via time reversal of ultrasonically encoded (TRUE) diffused light. Here, using photorefractive materials as phase conjugate mirrors, we show a direct visualization and dynamic control of optical focusing with this light delivery method, and demonstrate its application for focused fluorescence excitation and imaging in thick turbid media. These abilities are increasingly critical for understanding the dynamic interactions of light with biological matter and processes at different system levels, as well as their applications for biomedical diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Synthesis, crystal structure and DFT studies of a dual fluorescent ketamine: Structural changes in the ground and excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latha, V.; Balakrishnan, C.; Neelakantan, M. A.

    2015-07-01

    A fluorescent probe 2Z,2‧Z-3,3‧-(4,4‧-methylenebis(4,1-phenylene) bis(azanediyl))bis (1,3-diphenylprop-2-en-1-one) (L) was synthesized and characterized by IR, 1H NMR, ESI-mass, UV-visible and fluorescence spectral techniques. The single crystal analysis illustrates the existence of L in ketamine form. The crystal structure is stabilized by intramolecular and intermolecular hydrogen bonding. The thermal stability of L was studied by TG analysis. The fluorescence spectrum of L shows dual emission, and is due to excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) process. This is supported by the high Stokes shift value. Electronic structure calculations of L in the ground and excited state have been carried out using DFT and TD-DFT at B3LYP/6-31G (d,p) level, respectively. The vibrational spectrum was computed at this level and compared with experimental values. Major orbital contributions for the electronic transitions were assigned with the help of TD-DFT. The changes in the Mulliken charge, bond lengths and bond angles between the ground and excited states of the tautomers demonstrate that twisted intramolecular charge transfer (TICT) process occurs along with ESIPT in the excited state.

  4. UV fluorescence excitation spectroscopy as a non-invasive predictor of epidermal proliferation and clinical performance of cosmetic formulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidhof, Robert; Liebel, Frank; Hwang, Cheng; Ruvolo, Eduardo; Lyga, John

    2017-02-01

    The epidermis is the outermost layer of skin and is composed of cells primarily containing keratin. It consists of about ten layers of living cells (keratinocytes) and ten layers of dead cells (corneocytes). These cells are continually shed from the outside and replaced from the inside in a process called desquamation which is controlled by two biological events - proliferation and differentiation. One method to non-invasively study biological changes in the skin is using fluorescence excitation spectroscopy. Several characteristic excitation-emission peaks occur in skin that have been related to the epidermal and dermal composition. The magnitude of the peak that occurs at 295nm excitation (F295) has been linked to changes in skin proliferation, cell turnover, epidermal thickening, and skin aging. We hypothesize that changes in this fluorescent signal could be used to assess the potential activity of cosmetic anti-aging compounds to deliver a benefit to skin. Previous work with retinol and glycolic acid, two commonly used actives that effect epidermal proliferation and exfoliation, has demonstrated an increase in F295 (attributed to tryptophan excitation fluorescence). In this study we present the results of a placebo controlled study that aims to correlate changes in F295 with biological performance (epidermal thickening and Ki67 expression).

  5. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy for warm dense matter studies and ICF plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    The burning core of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasma at stagnation is surrounded by a shell of warm, dense matter whose properties are difficult both to model (due to a complex interplay of thermal, degeneracy, and strong coupling effects) and to diagnose (due to low emissivity and high opacity). We demonstrate a promising technique to study the warm dense shells of ICF plasmas based on the fluorescence emission of dopants or impurities in the shell material. This emission, which is driven by x-rays produced in the hot core, exhibits signature changes in response to compression and heating. High-resolution measurements of absorption and fluorescence features can refine our understanding of the electronic structure of material under high compression, improve our models of density-driven phenomena such as ionization potential depression and plasma polarization shifts, and help diagnose shell density, temperature, mass distribution, and residual motion in ICF plasmas at stagnation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science Early Career Research Program, Office of Fusion Energy Sciences under FWP-14-017426.

  6. Microscopic solvent structure of subcritical and supercritical methanol from ultraviolet/visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulgarevich, Dmitry S.; Sako, Takeshi; Sugeta, Tsutomu; Otake, Katsuto; Takebayashi, Yoshihiro; Kamizawa, Chiyoshi; Uesugi, Masayuki; Kato, Masahiro

    1999-09-01

    Ultraviolet/visible absorption and fluorescence spectroscopies at different temperatures and pressures were applied to investigate the microscopic solvent structures of subcritical and supercritical methanol using 4-nitroanisole, ethyl-(4-dimethylamino)benzoate, Reichardt's dye, and anthracene as the probe molecules. It was found that at temperatures higher than 150 °C the long winding chains of sequentially hydrogen-bonded methanol molecules were probably broken, but the small hydrogen-bonded aggregates possibly existed in methanol even at higher temperature. It was also found that the solvation process of the anthracene molecule in the S0-ground state obeyed the Langmuir adsorption model. However, in the case of fluorescence measurements in supercritical methanol, we detected deviations from the simple Langmuir adsorption model. These deviations were explained in terms of preferential solvation of the solvent molecules around photoexcited anthracene. Judging from the experimental results, it was concluded that the local density augmentation of the supercritical methanol around the nonpolar solute was a short-ranged effect, which did not correspond directly to the large isothermal compressibility of fluid near the critical point.

  7. Heavy Metals Effect on Cyanobacteria Synechocystis aquatilis Study Using Absorption, Fluorescence, Flow Cytometry, and Photothermal Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudkowiak, A.; Olejarz, B.; Łukasiewicz, J.; Banaszek, J.; Sikora, J.; Wiktorowicz, K.

    2011-04-01

    The toxic effect of six heavy metals on cyanobacteria Synechocystis aquatilis was studied by absorption, fluorescence, flow cytometry, and photothermal measurements. This study indicates that at the concentration used, the cyanobacteria are more sensitive to silver, copper, and mercury than to cadmium, lead, and zinc metals. Disregarding the decrease in the yields of the related radiative processes caused by photochemical processes and/or damage to phycobilisomes, no changes were detected in the efficiency of thermal deactivation processes within a few microseconds, which can indicate the lack of disturbances in the photosynthetic light reaction and the lack of damage to the photosystem caused by the heavy metal ions in the concentrations used. The results demonstrate that the relative values of fluorescence yield as well as promptly generated heat calculated for the metal-affected and unaffected (reference) bacteria are sensitive indicators of environmental pollution with heavy metal ions, whereas the complementary methods proposed could be used as a noninvasive and fast procedure for in vivo assessment of their toxicity.

  8. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio, E-mail: gallardo@emc.uji.es

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix.more » Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.« less

  9. Sensitivity enhancement of fluorescence detection in CE by coupling and conducting excitation light with tapered optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiupei; Huo, Feng; Yuan, Hongyan; Zhang, Bo; Xiao, Dan; Choi, Martin M F

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports the enhancement of sensitivity of detection for in-column fiber optic-induced fluorescence detection system in CE by tapered optical fiber (TOF). Two types of optical fiber, TOF and conventional cylindrical optical fiber (COF), were employed to construct the CE (TOF-CE and COF-CE) and were compared for sensitivity to riboflavin (RF). The fluorescence intensities from a RF sample with excitation light sources and fibers at various coupling angles were investigated. The fluorescence signal from TOF-CE was ca. ten times that of COF-CE. In addition, the detection performance of four excitation light source-fiber configurations including Laser-TOF, Laser-COF, LED-TOF, and LED-COF were compared. The LODs for RF were 0.21, 0.82, 0.80, and 7.5 nM, respectively, for the four excitation light source-fiber configurations. The results demonstrate that the sensitivity obtained by LED-TOF is close to that of Laser-COF. Both Laser-TOF and LED-TOF can greatly improve the sensitivity of detection in CE. TOF has the major attribute of collecting and focusing the excitation light intensity. Thus, the sensitivity obtained by LED-TOF without focusing lens is just same as that of LED-COF with a focusing lens. This demonstrates that the CE system can be further simplified by eliminating the focusing lens for excitation light. LED-TOF-CE and LED-COF-CE system were applied to the separation and determination of RF in real sample (green tea), respectively. The tapered fiber optic-induced fluorescence detection system in CE is an ideal tool for trace analysis. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. New Triplet Sensitization Routes for Photon Upconversion: Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Molecules, Inorganic Nanocrystals, and Singlet-to-Triplet Absorption.

    PubMed

    Yanai, Nobuhiro; Kimizuka, Nobuo

    2017-10-17

    Photon upconversion based on triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA-UC) has attracted much interest because of its possible applications to renewable energy production and biological fields. In particular, the UC of near-infrared (NIR) light to visible (vis) light is imperative to overcome the Shockley-Queisser limit of single-junction photovoltaic cells, and the efficiency of photocatalytic hydrogen production from water can also be improved with the aid of vis-to-ultraviolet (UV) UC. However, both processes have met limitations in the wavelength range, efficiency, and sensitivity for weak incident light. This Account describes recent breakthroughs that solve these major problems, new triplet sensitization routes to significantly enlarge the range of conversion wavelength by minimizing the energy loss during intersystem crossing (ISC) of triplet sensitizers or bypassing the ISC process. The photochemical processes of TTA-UC in general start with the absorption of longer wavelength incident light by triplet sensitizers, which generate the triplet states via ISC. This ISC inevitably accompanies the energy loss of hundreds of millielectronvolts, which significantly limits the TTA-UC with large anti-Stokes shifts. The small S 1 -T 1 gap of molecules showing thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) allows the sensitization of emitters with the highest T 1 and S 1 energy levels ever employed in TTA-UC, which results in efficient vis-to-UV UC. As alternatives to molecular sensitizers in the NIR region, inorganic nanocrystals with broad NIR absorption bands have recently been shown to work as effective sensitizers for NIR-to-vis TTA-UC. Their small exchange splitting minimizes the energy loss during triplet sensitization. The modification of nanocrystal surfaces with organic acceptors via coordination bonds allows efficient energy transfer between the components and succeeding TTA processes. To remove restrictions on the energy loss during ISC, molecules with direct

  11. Dermal absorption behavior of fluorescent molecules in nanoparticles on human and porcine skin models.

    PubMed

    Debotton, Nir; Badihi, Amit; Robinpour, Mano; Enk, Claes D; Benita, Simon

    2017-05-30

    The percutaneous passage of poorly skin absorbed molecules can be improved using nanocarriers, particularly biodegradable polymeric nanospheres (NSs) or nanocapsules (NCs). However, penetration of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by other factors than the nanocarrier properties. To gain insight information on the skin absorption of two fluorescent cargos, DiIC 18 (5) and coumarin-6 were incorporated in NSs or NCs and topically applied on various human and porcine skin samples. 3D imaging techniques suggest that NSs and NCs enhanced deep dermal penetration of both probes similarly, when applied on excised human skin irrespective of the nature of the cargo. However, when ex vivo pig skin was utilized, the cutaneous absorption of DiIC 18 (5) was more pronounced by means of PLGA NCs than NSs. In contrast, PLGA NSs noticeably improved the porcine skin penetration of coumarin-6, as compared to the NCs. Furthermore, the porcine skin results were reproducible when triplicated whereas from various human skin samples, as expected, the results were not sufficiently reproducible and large deviations were observed. The overall findings from this comprehensive comparison emphasize the potential of PLGA NCs or NSs to promote cutaneous bioavailability of encapsulated drugs, exhibiting different physicochemical properties but depending on the nature of the skin. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Real-time monitoring of river water quality using in-line continuous acquisition of fluorescence excitation and emission matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carstea, E.; Baker, A.; Johnson, R.; Reynolds, D. M.

    2009-12-01

    In-line fluorescence EEM monitoring has been performed over an eleven-day period for Bournbrook River, Birmingham, UK. River water was diverted to a portable laboratory via a continuous flow pump and filter system. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrices data was recorded every 3 minutes using a flow cell (1cm pathlength) coupled to a fiber optic probe. This real-time fluorescence EEM data (Excitation, 225-400 nm at 5 nm steps, emission, 280-500 nm at 2 nm steps) was collected 'in-line'and directly compared with the spectrophotometric properties and physical and chemical parameters of river water samples collected off-line at known time intervals. Over the monitoring period, minor pollution pulses from cross connections were detected and identified hourly along with a random diesel pollution event. This work addresses the practicalities of measuring and detecting fluorescence EEM in the field and discusses the potential of this technological approach for further understanding important hydrological and biogeochemical processes. Problems associated with fouling and system failure are also reported. Example of the data generated from the continuous fluorescence EEM monitoring.

  13. Quantitative X-ray fluorescence computed tomography for low-Z samples using an iterative absorption correction algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Rong; Limburg, Karin; Rohtla, Mehis

    2017-05-01

    X-ray fluorescence computed tomography is often used to measure trace element distributions within low-Z samples, using algorithms capable of X-ray absorption correction when sample self-absorption is not negligible. Its reconstruction is more complicated compared to transmission tomography, and therefore not widely used. We describe in this paper a very practical iterative method that uses widely available transmission tomography reconstruction software for fluorescence tomography. With this method, sample self-absorption can be corrected not only for the absorption within the measured layer but also for the absorption by material beyond that layer. By combining tomography with analysis for scanning X-ray fluorescence microscopy, absolute concentrations of trace elements can be obtained. By using widely shared software, we not only minimized the coding, took advantage of computing efficiency of fast Fourier transform in transmission tomography software, but also thereby accessed well-developed data processing tools coming with well-known and reliable software packages. The convergence of the iterations was also carefully studied for fluorescence of different attenuation lengths. As an example, fish eye lenses could provide valuable information about fish life-history and endured environmental conditions. Given the lens's spherical shape and sometimes the short distance from sample to detector for detecting low concentration trace elements, its tomography data are affected by absorption related to material beyond the measured layer but can be reconstructed well with our method. Fish eye lens tomography results are compared with sliced lens 2D fluorescence mapping with good agreement, and with tomography providing better spatial resolution.

  14. Fluorescence anisotropy of indole molecules under two-photon excitation in the spectral range of 485-510 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasin, M. E.; Tushkanov, V. I.; Smolin, A. G.; Vasyutinskii, O. S.

    2017-10-01

    Decay of polarized fluorescence in indole dissolved in propylene glycol under two-photon excitation by femtosecond laser pulses in the wavelength range of 485-510 nm has been studied. It is shown that under the experimental conditions used the fluorescence decay signal can be well described by a single excited state lifetime τf and a single rotation diffusion time τrot. By processing the data obtained, the times τf and τrot as well as anisotropy parameter r 0 characterizing the symmetry of two-photon excitation of indole molecules have been determined. Decreasing of the anisotropy parameter r0 down to zero under two-photon excitation energy higher than 5.1 eV has been observed. Interpretation of the obtained results have been done on the basis of ab initio quantum-mechanical computations. A model of energy relaxation under the condition of twophoton excitation of indole in a polar solvent has been discussed.

  15. Excited-state absorption in Er: BaY2F8 and Cs3Er2Br9 and comparison with Er: LiYF4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollnau, M.; Lüthy, W.; Weber, H. P.; Krämer, K.; Güdel, H. U.; McFarlane, R. A.

    1996-04-01

    The influence of Excited-State Absorption (ESA) on the green laser transition and the overlap of Ground-State Absorption (GSA) and ESA for 970 nm upconversion pumping in erbium is investigated in Er3+ : BaY2F8 and Cs3Er2Br9. Results are compared to Er3+ : LiYF4. In Er3+: BaY2F8, a good overlap between GSA and ESA is found at 969 nm in one polarization direction. The emission cross section at 550 nm is a factor of two smaller than in LiYF4. In Cs3Er2Br9, the smaller Stark splitting of the levels shifts the wavelengths of the green emission and ESA from4 I 1 3/2 off resonance. It enhances, however, ground-state reabsorption. The emission cross section at 550 nm is comparable to LiYF4. Upconversion leads to significant green fluorescence from2 H 9/2. A significant population of the4 I 11/2 level and ESA at 970 nm are not present under 800 nm pumping.

  16. Spectral characterization of biological aerosol particles using two-wavelength excited laser-induced fluorescence and elastic scattering measurements.

    PubMed

    Sivaprakasam, Vasanthi; Lin, Horn-Bond; Huston, Alan L; Eversole, Jay D

    2011-03-28

    A two-wavelength laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) instrument has been developed and used to characterize individual biological aerosol particles, including biological warfare (BW) agent surrogates. Fluorescence in discrete spectral bands from widely different species, and also from similar species under different growth conditions were measured and compared. The two-wavelength excitation approach was found to increase discrimination among several biological materials, and especially with respect to diesel exhaust particles, a common interferent for LIF BW detection systems. The spectral characteristics of a variety of biological materials and ambient air components have been studied as a function of aerosol particle size and incident fluence.

  17. Excitation-resolved wide-field fluorescence imaging of indocyanine green visualizes the microenvironment properties in vivo via solvatochromic shift (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaedu; Kim, Chang-Seok; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2016-03-01

    Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRF) is a powerful wide-field optical imaging tool that has a potential to visualize molecular-specific exogenous fluorescence agents, such as FDA approved Indocyanine Green (ICG), in thick tissue. Indeed, ICG is sensitive to biochemical environment such that it can be used to detect micro- or macroscopic environmental changes in tissue by solvatochromic shift that is defined by the dependence of absorption and emission spectra with the solvent polarity. For example, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) is a very powerful drug carrier that can penetrate biological barriers such as the skin, the membranes, and the blood-brain-barrier. In presence of DMSO, ICG in tissue shows the excitation blue shift. However, NIRF imaging of microenvironment dependent changes of ICG has been challenging for the following reasons. First, the Stoke's shift of ICG is too small to separate the excitation and emission spectra easily. Second, the solvatochromic shift of ICG is too small to be detected by conventional NIRF techniques. Last but not least, the multiple scattering in tissue degrades not only the spatial information but also the spectral contents by the red-shift. We developed a wavelength-swept laser-based NIRF system that can resolve the excitation shift of ICG in tissue such that DMSO can be indirectly visualized. We plan to conduct an in-vivo lymph-node drug-delivery study in a mouse model to show feasibility of the indirect imaging of the drug-carrier with the wavelength-swept-laser based NIRF system.

  18. Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter in Lake Tianmuhu and its catchment basin using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunlin; Yin, Yan; Feng, Longqing; Zhu, Guangwei; Shi, Zhiqiang; Liu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yuanzhi

    2011-10-15

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) is an important optically active substance that transports nutrients, heavy metals, and other pollutants from terrestrial to aquatic systems and is used as a measure of water quality. To investigate how the source and composition of CDOM changes in both space and time, we used chemical, spectroscopic, and fluorescence analyses to characterize CDOM in Lake Tianmuhu (a drinking water source) and its catchment in China. Parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) identified three individual fluorophore moieties that were attributed to humic-like and protein-like materials in 224 water samples collected between December 2008 and September 2009. The upstream rivers contained significantly higher concentrations of CDOM than did the lake water (a(350) of 4.27±2.51 and 2.32±0.59 m(-1), respectively), indicating that the rivers carried a substantial load of organic matter to the lake. Of the three main rivers that flow into Lake Tianmuhu, the Pingqiao River brought in the most CDOM from the catchment to the lake. CDOM absorption and the microbial and terrestrial humic-like components, but not the protein-like component, were significantly higher in the wet season than in other seasons, indicating that the frequency of rainfall and runoff could significantly impact the quantity and quality of CDOM collected from the catchment. The different relationships between the maximum fluorescence intensities of the three PARAFAC components, CDOM absorption, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration in riverine and lake water indicated the difference in the composition of CDOM between Lake Tianmuhu and the rivers that feed it. This study demonstrates the utility of combining excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and PARAFAC to study CDOM dynamics in inland waters. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Fluorescence and absorption properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in coastal surface waters of the northwestern Mediterranean Sea, influence of the Rhône River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Para, J.; Coble, P. G.; Charrière, B.; Tedetti, M.; Fontana, C.; Sempéré, R.

    2010-12-01

    Seawater samples were collected monthly in surface waters (2 and 5 m depths) of the Bay of Marseilles (northwestern Mediterranean Sea; 5°17'30" E, 43°14'30" N) during one year from November 2007 to December 2008 and studied for total organic carbon (TOC) as well as chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence). The annual mean value of surface CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm [aCDOM(350)] was very low (0.10 ± 0.02 m-1) in comparison to values usually found in coastal waters, and no significant seasonal trend in aCDOM(350) could be determined. By contrast, the spectral slope of CDOM absorption (SCDOM) was significantly higher (0.023 ± 0.003 nm-1) in summer than in fall and winter periods (0.017 ± 0.002 nm-1), reflecting either CDOM photobleaching or production in surface waters during stratified sunny periods. The CDOM fluorescence, assessed through excitation emission matrices (EEMs), was dominated by protein-like component (peak T; 1.30-21.94 QSU) and marine humic-like component (peak M; 0.55-5.82 QSU), while terrestrial humic-like fluorescence (peak C; 0.34-2.99 QSU) remained very low. This reflected a dominance of relatively fresh material from biological origin within the CDOM fluorescent pool. At the end of summer, surface CDOM fluorescence was very low and strongly blue shifted, reinforcing the hypothesis of CDOM photobleaching. Our results suggested that unusual Rhône River plume eastward intrusion events might reach Marseilles Bay within 2-3 days and induce local phytoplankton blooms and subsequent fluorescent CDOM production (peaks M and T) without adding terrestrial fluorescence signatures (peaks C and A). Besides Rhône River plumes, mixing events of the entire water column injected relative aged (peaks C and M) CDOM from the bottom into the surface and thus appeared also as an important source of CDOM in surface waters of the Marseilles Bay. Therefore, the assessment of CDOM optical properties

  20. Fluorescence and absorption properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in coastal surface waters of the Northwestern Mediterranean Sea (Bay of Marseilles, France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Para, J.; Coble, P. G.; Charrière, B.; Tedetti, M.; Fontana, C.; Sempéré, R.

    2010-07-01

    Seawater samples were collected in surface waters (2 and 5 m depths) of the Bay of Marseilles (Northwestern Mediterranean Sea; 5°17'30'' E, 43°14'30'' N) during one year from November 2007 to December 2008 and studied for total organic carbon (TOC) as well as chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) optical properties (absorbance and fluorescence). The annual mean value of surface CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm [aCDOM(350)] was very low (0.10 ± 0.02 m-1) with in comparison to values usually found in coastal waters, and no significant seasonal trend in aCDOM(350) could be determined. By contrast, the spectral slope of CDOM absorption (SCDOM) was significantly higher (0.023 ± 0.003 nm-1) in summer than in fall and winter periods (0.017 ± 0.002 nm-1), reflecting either CDOM photobleaching or production in surface waters during stratified sunny periods. The CDOM fluorescence, assessed through excitation emission matrices (EEMs), was dominated by protein-like component (peak T; 1.30-21.94 QSU) and marine humic-like component (peak M; 0.55-5.82 QSU), while terrestrial humic-like fluorescence (peak C; 0.34-2.99 QSU) remained very low. This reflected a dominance of relatively fresh material from biological origin within the CDOM fluorescent pool. At the end of summer, surface CDOM fluorescence was very low and strongly blue shifted, reinforcing the hypothesis of CDOM photobleaching. Our results suggested that unusual Rhône River plume eastward intrusion events may reach Marseilles Bay within 2-3 days and induce local phytoplankton blooms and subsequent fluorescent CDOM production (peaks M and T) without adding terrestrial fluorescence signatures (peak C). Besides Rhône River plumes, mixing events of the entire water column injected humic (peaks C and M) CDOM from the bottom into the surface and thus appeared also as an important source of CDOM in surface waters of the Marseilles Bay. Therefore, the assessment of CDOM optical properties, within the

  1. Light, Molecules, Action: Broadband UV-visible transient absorption studies of excited state dynamics in photoactive molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sension, Roseanne

    2015-03-01

    Broadband UV-visible transient absorption spectroscopy provides a powerful tool for the investigation of the dynamics of electronically excited molecules in the condensed phase. It is now possible to obtain transient spectra on a routine basis spanning the range from <300 nm to >800 nm with femtosecond time resolution. We have used this method to study the excited state dynamics and internal conversion of a range of molecular systems with potential application as optically powered molecular devices. The cyclohexadiene ring-opening reaction is the basis of a class of important optical switches and of the biological synthesis of previtamin D3. The ring-opening reaction is ultrafast, occurring on a picosecond to subpicosecond times scale depending on the substituents around the ring. These have a significant influence on the dynamics and electronic structure of the electronically excited molecule. The results of a series of transient absorption studies as a function of chromophore substitution and environment will be presented. The cis-trans isomerization of polyene molecules, especially substituted stilbenes, provides another important class of functional molecular transformations. Again the excited state dynamics can be ultrafast with photochemistry controlled by details of the curve crossings and conical intersections. Finally the photochemistry of the even more complex set of cobalamin chromophores with a photoalabile C-Co bond has been proposed as a tool for spatio-temporal control of molecule delivery including drug delivery. Broadband transient absorption spectroscopy has been used to investigate the ultrafast electronic dynamics of a range of cobalamin compounds with comparison to detailed theoretical calculations. The results of these studies will be presented.

  2. Microwave-assisted synthesis of water-soluble, fluorescent gold nanoclusters capped with small organic molecules and a revealing fluorescence and X-ray absorption study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmbrecht, C.; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, D.; Frank, W.

    2015-03-01

    Colourless solutions of blue light-emitting, water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNC) were synthesized from gold colloids under microwave irradiation using small organic molecules as ligands. Stabilized by 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (TPA) or l-glutamine (GLU), fluorescence quantum yields up to 5% were obtained. AuNC are considered to be very promising for biological labelling, optoelectronic devices and light-emitting materials but the structure-property relationships have still not been fully clarified. To expand the knowledge about the AuNC apart from their fluorescent properties they were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidating the oxidation state of the nanoclusters' gold atoms. Based on curve fitting of the XANES spectra in comparison to several gold references, optically transparent fluorescent AuNC are predicted to be ligand-stabilized Au5+ species. Additionally, their near edge structure compared with analogous results of polynuclear clusters known from the literature discloses an increasing intensity of the feature close to the absorption edge with decreasing cluster size. As a result, a linear relationship between the cluster size and the X-ray absorption coefficient can be established for the first time.Colourless solutions of blue light-emitting, water-soluble gold nanoclusters (AuNC) were synthesized from gold colloids under microwave irradiation using small organic molecules as ligands. Stabilized by 1,3,5-triaza-7-phosphaadamantane (TPA) or l-glutamine (GLU), fluorescence quantum yields up to 5% were obtained. AuNC are considered to be very promising for biological labelling, optoelectronic devices and light-emitting materials but the structure-property relationships have still not been fully clarified. To expand the knowledge about the AuNC apart from their fluorescent properties they were studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy elucidating the oxidation state of the nanoclusters' gold atoms. Based on curve fitting of the XANES

  3. Fluorescence excitation and imaging of single molecules near dielectric-coated and bare surfaces: a theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, Daniel

    2012-08-01

    Microscopic fluorescent samples of interest to cell and molecular biology are commonly embedded in an aqueous medium near a solid surface that is coated with a thin film such as a lipid multilayer, collagen, acrylamide, or a cell wall. Both excitation and emission of fluorescent single molecules near film-coated surfaces are strongly affected by the proximity of the coated surface, the film thickness, its refractive index and the fluorophore's orientation. For total internal reflection excitation, multiple reflections in the film can lead to resonance peaks in the evanescent intensity versus incidence angle curve. For emission, multiple reflections arising from the fluorophore's near field emission can create a distinct intensity pattern in both the back focal plane and the image plane of a high aperture objective. This theoretical analysis discusses how these features can be used to report film thickness and refractive index, and fluorophore axial position and orientation. © 2012 The Author Journal of Microscopy © 2012 Royal Microscopical Society.

  4. Bright blue-shifted fluorescent proteins with Cys in the GAF domain engineered from bacterial phytochromes: fluorescence mechanisms and excited-state dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hontani, Yusaku; Shcherbakova, Daria M; Baloban, Mikhail; Zhu, Jingyi; Verkhusha, Vladislav V; Kennis, John T M

    2016-11-18

    Near-infrared fluorescent proteins (NIR FPs) engineered from bacterial phytochromes (BphPs) are of great interest for in vivo imaging. They utilize biliverdin (BV) as a chromophore, which is a heme degradation product, and therefore they are straightforward to use in mammalian tissues. Here, we report on fluorescence properties of NIR FPs with key alterations in their BV binding sites. BphP1-FP, iRFP670 and iRFP682 have Cys residues in both PAS and GAF domains, rather than in the PAS domain alone as in wild-type BphPs. We found that NIR FP variants with Cys in the GAF or with Cys in both PAS and GAF show blue-shifted emission with long fluorescence lifetimes. In contrast, mutants with Cys in the PAS only or no Cys residues at all exhibit red-shifted emission with shorter lifetimes. Combining these results with previous biochemical and BphP1-FP structural data, we conclude that BV adducts bound to Cys in the GAF are the origin of bright blue-shifted fluorescence. We propose that the long fluorescence lifetime follows from (i) a sterically more constrained thioether linkage, leaving less mobility for ring A than in canonical BphPs, and (ii) that π-electron conjugation does not extend on ring A, making excited-state deactivation less sensitive to ring A mobility.

  5. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  6. [Characterizing chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu using excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC)].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yong-Qiang; Zhang, Yun-Lin; Niu, Cheng; Wang, Ming-Zhu

    2013-12-01

    Little is known about DOM characteristics in medium to large sized lakes located in the middle and lower reaches of Yangtze River, like Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu. Absorption, fluorescence and composition characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are presented using the absorption spectroscopy, the excitation-emission ma trices (EEMs) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) model based on the data collected in Sep-Oct. 2007 including 15, 9 and 10 samplings in Lake Honghu, Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu, respectively. CDOM absorption coefficient at 350 nm a(350) coefficient in Lake Honghu was significantly higher than those in Lake Donghu and Lake Liangzihu (t-test, p< 0. 001). A significant negative correlation was found between CDOM spectral slope in the wavelength range of 280-500 nm (S280-500) and a(350) (R2 =0. 781, p<0. 001). The mean value of S280-500 in Lake Honghu was significantly lower than those in Lake Donghu (t-test, pfluorescent components (C3, C4) were identified by PARAFAC model, among which significant positive correlations were found between C1 and C2 (R2 =0. 884, p<0. 001), C3 and C4 (R2 =0. 677, p<0.001), respectively, suggesting that the sources of the two humic-like components as well as the two protein-like components were similar. However, no significant correlation has been found between those 4 fluorescent components and DOC concentration. Th e fluorescenceindices of FI255 (HIX), Fl265, FI310 (BIX) and Fl370 in Lake Donghu were all significantly higher than those in Lake Liangzihu (t-test, p <0.05) and Lake Honghu (t-test, p<0. 01), indicating that the eutrophication status in Lake Donghu was higher than Lake Honghu and Lake Liangzihu.

  7. Laser-induced fluorescence at 488 nm excitation for detecting benign and malignant lesions in stomach mucosa.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Landulfo; Betiol Filho, João Angelo; Silveira, Fabricio Luiz; Zângaro, Renato Amaro; Pacheco, Marcos Tadeu T

    2008-01-01

    This work aims the detection of the histopathologic alterations of in vitro human gastric mucosa using spectral informations from laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (LIFS) technique with excitation at 488 nm (argon laser). A total of 108 biopsies with endoscopic diagnosis of gastritis and gastric cancer were obtained at the antral gastric region, from 35 patients with dyspeptic digestive complaints. The biopsies were collected during the endoscopic examination. On each biopsy fragment the autofluorescence spectrum was collected in two random points, through a fiber-optic catheter coupled to the excitation laser. The fluorescence emission spectra collected by the fibers were directed to the spectrograph and detected by the CCD camera. The spectra were then separated in groups (N, normal; LI, light inflammation; MI, moderated inflammation; CA, adenocarcinoma), based on the histopathology. The ratio between the emission wavelengths 550 and 600 nm was used as a diagnostic parameter. Analysis of fluorescence spectra was able to identify the normal tissue from adenocarcinoma lesions with 100% of sensibility and specificity. The ratio intensities between inflammation (light and moderated), although presented significantly statistical differences when compared to the normal mucosa, do not furnish enough sensibility and specificity for use as an identification method due to high variations. LIFS, with excitation of 488 nm, could be used in the differentiation of normal tissue and neoplasic lesions, assisting a less invasive diagnosis.

  8. Acceptor and Excitation Density Dependence of the Ultrafast Polaron Absorption Signal in Donor-Acceptor Organic Solar Cell Blends.

    PubMed

    Zarrabi, Nasim; Burn, Paul L; Meredith, Paul; Shaw, Paul E

    2016-07-21

    Transient absorption spectroscopy on organic semiconductor blends for solar cells typically shows efficient charge generation within ∼100 fs, accounting for the majority of the charge carriers. In this Letter, we show using transient absorption spectroscopy on blends containing a broad range of acceptor content (0.01-50% by weight) that the rise of the polaron signal is dependent on the acceptor concentration. For low acceptor content (<10% by weight), the polaron signal rises gradually over ∼1 ps with most polarons generated after 200 fs, while for higher acceptor concentrations (>10%) most polarons are generated within 200 fs. The rise time in blends with low acceptor content was also found to be sensitive to the pump fluence, decreasing with increasing excitation density. These results indicate that the sub-100 fs rise of the polaron signal is a natural consequence of both the high acceptor concentrations in many donor-acceptor blends and the high excitation densities needed for transient absorption spectroscopy, which results in a short average distance between the exciton and the donor-acceptor interface.

  9. Combined system for high-time-resolution dual-excitation fluorescence photometry and fluorescence imaging of calcium transients in single normal and diseased skeletal muscle fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uttenweiler, Dietmar; Wojciechowski, Reinhold; Makabe, Makoto; Veigel, Claudia; Fink, Rainer H.

    1994-12-01

    Fast photometric measurements and video-imaging of fluorescent indicators both are powerful tools in measuring the intracellular free calcium concentration of muscle and many other cells. as photometric systems yield a high temporal resolution, calcium imaging systems have high spatial but significantly reduced temporal resolution. Therefore we have developed an integrated system combining both methods and based mostly on standard components. As a common, sensitive Ca2+- indicator we used the fluorescent probe Fura-2, which is alternatingly excited for ratio measurements at 340/380 nm. We used a commercially available dual excitation photometric system (OSP-3; Olympus) for attaching a CCD-camera and a frame grabber board. To achieve the synchronization we had to design circuitries for external triggering, synchronization and accurate control of the filter changer, which we added to the system. Additionally, the software for a triggered image acquisition was developed. With this integrated setup one can easily switch between the fast photometric mode (ratio frequency 100 Hz) and the imaging mode (ratio frequency 4.17 Hz). The calcium images are correlated with the 25 times faster spot measurements and are analyzed by means of image processing. With this combined system we study release and uptake of calcium ions of normal and diseased skeletal muscle from mdx mice. Such a system will also be important for other cellular studies in which fluorescence indicators are used to monitor similar time dependent alterations as well as changes in cellular distributions of calcium.

  10. One- and two-photon absorption spectra of the yellow fluorescent protein citrine: effects of intramolecular electron-vibrational coupling and intermolecular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Fasheng; Zhao, Xinyi; Liang, WanZhen

    2018-04-01

    Both the vibrationally resolved and statistically averaged one-photon absorption (OPA) and two-photon absorption (TPA) spectra of the anionic form of chromophore (AC) in its micro-environment of yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) Citrine have been calculated. The result comparison has been made with those of the AC model compounds in vacuo and methanol solution, which allows us to allocate the individual contribution of the intramolecular electron-vibrational coupling, the electrostatic π-stacking interaction between Tyr203 and AC, and the interaction between AC and its micro-environment to the spectra. The results reveal that the non-Condon vibronic coupling effect is responsible for the blue shift of TPA absorption maximum compared with its OPA counterpart corresponding to S0 → S1, and that the π-stacking interaction between Tyr203 and AC alters the relative intensities of TPA maxima, which further enhances the higher-energy vibronic peaks and weakens the lowest-energy peak. The statically averaged OPA and TPA spectra calculated by quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) methods based on Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics simulation largely deviate the experimental spectral lineshapes, which further verifies the significant contribution of non-Condon vibronic coupling effect on the spectra. The interaction of individual amino acid residue or water close to AC+Tyr203 has different effects on the spectra, which may increase/decrease the excitation energy depending on its position and electronic property.

  11. A structural study of bone changes in knee osteoarthritis by synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence and X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sindhupakorn, Bura; Thienpratharn, Suwittaya; Kidkhunthod, Pinit

    2017-10-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by degeneration of articular cartilage and thickening of subchondral bone. The present study investigated the changing of biochemical components of cartilage and bone compared between normal and OA people. Using Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) techniquesincluding X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) were employed for the bone changes in kneeosteoarthritisstudies. The bone samples were collected from various osteoarthritis patients with both male and female in the ages range between 20 and 74 years old. SR-XRF results excited at 4240 eV for Ca elements show a majority three main groups, based on their XRF intensities, 20-36 years, 40-60 years and over 70 years, respectively. By employing XAS techniques, XANES features can be used to clearly explain in term of electronic transitions occurring in bone samples which are affected from osteoarthritis symptoms. Moreover, a structural change around Ca ions in bone samples is obviously obtained by EXAFS results indicating an increase of Ca-amorphous phase when the ages increase.

  12. Theoretical investigation for excitation light and fluorescence signal of fiber optical sensor using tapered fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yinquan; Ding, Liyun

    2011-10-24

    For fiber optical sensor made of tapered fiber tip, the effects of the geometrical parameters of tapered tip on two important factors have been investigated. One factor is the intensity of the evanescent wave into fluorescent layer through core-medium interface; the other is the intensity of fluorescence signal transmitted from fluorescent layer to measurement end. A dependence relation of the intensity of fluorescence signal transmitted from fluorescent layer to measurement end upon the geometrical parameters of tapered tip has been obtained. Theoretical results show that the intensity of the evanescent wave into fluorescent layer rises with the decrease of the end diameter of tapered tip, and the increase of the tip length; and the transmitted power of fluorescence signal increases linearly with the increase of the tip length due to the contribution of the side area of tapered tip. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  13. Calibration approach for fluorescence lifetime determination for applications using time-gated detection and finite pulse width excitation.

    PubMed

    Keller, Scott B; Dudley, Jonathan A; Binzel, Katherine; Jasensky, Joshua; de Pedro, Hector Michael; Frey, Eric W; Urayama, Paul

    2008-10-15

    Time-gated techniques are useful for the rapid sampling of excited-state (fluorescence) emission decays in the time domain. Gated detectors coupled with bright, economical, nanosecond-pulsed light sources like flashlamps and nitrogen lasers are an attractive combination for bioanalytical and biomedical applications. Here we present a calibration approach for lifetime determination that is noniterative and that does not assume a negligible instrument response function (i.e., a negligible excitation pulse width) as does most current rapid lifetime determination approaches. Analogous to a transducer-based sensor, signals from fluorophores of known lifetime (0.5-12 ns) serve as calibration references. A fast avalanche photodiode and a GHz-bandwidth digital oscilloscope is used to detect transient emission from reference samples excited using a nitrogen laser. We find that the normalized time-integrated emission signal is proportional to the lifetime, which can be determined with good reproducibility (typically <100 ps) even for data with poor signal-to-noise ratios ( approximately 20). Results are in good agreement with simulations. Additionally, a new time-gating scheme for fluorescence lifetime imaging applications is proposed. In conclusion, a calibration-based approach is a valuable analysis tool for the rapid determination of lifetime in applications using time-gated detection and finite pulse width excitation.

  14. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; Schirò, Giorgio; Adam, Virgile; Aquila, Andrew; Barends, Thomas R. M.; Boutet, Sébastien; Byrdin, Martin; Carbajo, Sergio; de La Mora, Eugenio; Doak, R. Bruce; Feliks, Mikolaj; Fieschi, Franck; Foucar, Lutz; Guillon, Virginia; Hilpert, Mario; Hunter, Mark S.; Jakobs, Stefan; Koglin, Jason E.; Kovacsova, Gabriela; Lane, Thomas J.; Lévy, Bernard; Liang, Mengning; Nass, Karol; Ridard, Jacqueline; Robinson, Joseph S.; Roome, Christopher M.; Ruckebusch, Cyril; Seaberg, Matthew; Thepaut, Michel; Cammarata, Marco; Demachy, Isabelle; Field, Martin; Shoeman, Robert L.; Bourgeois, Dominique; Colletier, Jacques-Philippe; Schlichting, Ilme; Weik, Martin

    2018-01-01

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecond timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.

  15. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    DOE PAGES

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce; ...

    2017-09-11

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here in this paper we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecondmore » timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.« less

  16. Chromophore twisting in the excited state of a photoswitchable fluorescent protein captured by time-resolved serial femtosecond crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Coquelle, Nicolas; Sliwa, Michel; Woodhouse, Joyce

    Chromophores absorb light in photosensitive proteins and thereby initiate fundamental biological processes such as photosynthesis, vision and biofluorescence. An important goal in their understanding is the provision of detailed structural descriptions of the ultrafast photochemical events that they undergo, in particular of the excited states that connect chemistry to biological function. Here in this paper we report on the structures of two excited states in the reversibly photoswitchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We populated the states through femtosecond illumination of rsEGFP2 in its non-fluorescent off state and observed their build-up (within less than one picosecond) and decay (on the several picosecondmore » timescale). Using an X-ray free-electron laser, we performed picosecond time-resolved crystallography and show that the hydroxybenzylidene imidazolinone chromophore in one of the excited states assumes a near-canonical twisted configuration halfway between the trans and cis isomers. This is in line with excited-state quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics and classical molecular dynamics simulations. Our new understanding of the structure around the twisted chromophore enabled the design of a mutant that displays a twofold increase in its off-to-on photoswitching quantum yield.« less

  17. Exactly soluble model of the time-resolved fluorescence return to thermal equilibrium in many-particle systems after excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czachor, Andrzej

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we consider the assembly of weakly interacting identical particles, where the occupation of single-particle energy-levels at thermal equilibrium is governed by statistics. The analytic form of the inter-energy-level jump matrix is derived and analytic solution of the related eigen-problem is given. It allows one to demonstrate the nature of decline in time of the energy emission (fluorescence, recombination) of such many-level system after excitation in a relatively simple and unifying way - as a multi-exponential de-excitation. For the system of L energy levels the number of the de-excitation lifetimes is L-1. The lifetimes depend on the energy level spectrum as a whole. Two- and three-level systems are considered in detail. The impact of the energy level degeneracy on the lifetimes is discussed.

  18. Effect of planar dielectric interfaces on fluorescence emission and detection. Evanescent excitation with high-aperture collection.

    PubMed Central

    Burghardt, T P; Thompson, N L

    1984-01-01

    We consider the effect of planar dielectric interfaces (e.g., solid/liquid) on the fluorescence emission of nearby probes. First, we derive an integral expression for the electric field radiated by an oscillating electric dipole when it is close to a dielectric interface. The electric field depends on the refractive indices of the interface, the orientation of the dipole, the distance from the dipole to the interface, and the position of observation. We numerically calculate the electric field intensity for a dipole on an interface, as a function of observation position. These results are applicable to fluorescent molecules excited by the evanescent field of a totally internally reflected laser beam and thus very close to a solid/liquid interface. Next, we derive an integral expression for the electric field radiated when a second dielectric interface is also close to the fluorescent molecule. We numerically calculate this intensity as observed through the second interface. These results are useful when the fluorescence is collected by a high-aperture microscope objective. Finally, we define and calculate a "dichroic factor," which describes the efficiency of collection, in the two-interface system, of polarized fluorescence. The limit when the first interface is removed is applicable for any high-aperture collection of polarized or unpolarized fluorescence. The limit when the second interface is removed has application in the collection of fluorescence with any aperture from molecules close to a dielectric interface. The results of this paper are required for the interpretation of order parameter measurements on fluorescent probes in supported phospholipid monolayers (Thompson, N.L., H. M. McConnell, and T. P. Burghardt, 1984, Biophys. J., 46:739-747). PMID:6518253

  19. Electrochemical immobilization of Fluorescent labelled probe molecules on a FTO surface for affinity detection based on photo-excited current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruyama, Tetsuya; Wakabayashi, Ryo; Cho, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Sho-taro

    2011-10-01

    Photo-excited current can be generated at a molecular interface between a photo-excited molecules and a semi-conductive material in appropriate condition. The system has been recognized for promoting photo-energy devices such as an organic dye sensitized solar-cell. The photo-current generated reactions are totally dependent on the interfacial energy reactions, which are in a highly fluctuated interfacial environment. The authors investigated the photo-excited current reaction to develop a smart affinity detection method. However, in order to perform both an affinity reaction and a photo-excited current reaction at a molecular interface, ordered fabrications of the functional (affinity, photo-excitation, etc.) molecules layer on a semi-conductive surface is required. In the present research, we would like to present the fabrication and functional performance of photo-excited current-based affinity assay device and its application for detection of endocrine disrupting chemicals. On the FTO surface, fluorescent pigment labelled affinity peptide was immobilized through the EC tag (electrochemical-tag) method. The modified FTO produced a current when it was irradiated with diode laser light. However, the photo current decreased drastically when estrogen (ES) coexisted in the reaction solution. In this case, immobilized affinity probe molecules formed a complex with ES and estrogen receptor (ER). The result strongly suggests that the photo-excited current transduction between probe molecule-labelled cyanine pigment and the FTO surface was partly inhibited by a complex that formed at the affinity oligo-peptide region in a probe molecule on the FTO electrode. The bound bulky complex may act as an impediment to perform smooth transduction of photo-excited current in the molecular interface. The present system is new type of photo-reaction-based analysis. This system can be used to perform simple high-sensitive homogeneous assays.

  20. Ligand-core NLO-phores: a combined experimental and theoretical approach to the two-photon absorption and two-photon excited emission properties of small-ligated silver nanoclusters.

    PubMed

    Russier-Antoine, Isabelle; Bertorelle, Franck; Calin, Nathalie; Sanader, Željka; Krstić, Marjan; Comby-Zerbino, Clothilde; Dugourd, Philippe; Brevet, Pierre-François; Bonačić-Koutecký, Vlasta; Antoine, Rodolphe

    2017-01-19

    We report a combined experimental and theoretical study of the two-photon absorption and excited emission properties of monodisperse ligand stabilized Ag 11 , Ag 15 and Ag 31 nanoclusters in aqueous solutions. The nanoclusters were synthesized using a cyclic reduction under oxidative conditions and separated by vertical gel electrophoresis. The two-photon absorption cross-sections of these protected noble metal nanoclusters measured within the biologically attractive 750-900 nm window are several orders of magnitude larger than that reported for commercially available standard organic dyes. The two-photon excited fluorescence spectra are also presented for excitation wavelengths within the same excitation spectral window. They exhibit size-tunability. Because the fundamental photophysical mechanisms underlying these multiphoton processes in ligand protected clusters with only a few metal atoms are not fully understood yet, a theoretical model is proposed to identify the key driving elements. Elements that regulate the dipole moments and the nonlinear optical properties are the nanocluster size, its structure and the charge distribution on both the metal core and the bound ligands. We coined this new class of NLO materials as "Ligand-Core" NLO-phores.

  1. Analysis of synthetic derivatives of peptide hormones by capillary zone electrophoresis and micellar electrokinetic chromatography with ultraviolet-absorption and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Solínová, Veronika; Kasicka, Václav; Koval, Dusan; Barth, Tomislav; Ciencialová, Alice; Záková, Lenka

    2004-08-25

    Capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE) and micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC) were used for the analysis of new synthetic derivatives of hypophysis neurohormones--vasopressin and oxytocin, and pancreatic hormone--human insulin (HI) and its octapeptide fragment, derivatized by fluorescent probe, 4-chloro-7-nitrobenzo[1,2,5]oxadiazol (NBD). The suitable composition of background electrolytes (BGEs) was selected on the basis of calculated pH dependence of effective charge of analyzed peptides. Basic ionogenic peptides were analyzed by CZE in the acidic BGE composed of 100 mM H3PO4, 50 mM Tris, pH 2.25. The ionogenic peptides with fluorescent label, NBD, were analyzed in 0.5 M acetic acid, pH 2.5. The best MEKC separation of non-ionogenic peptides was achieved in alkaline BGE, 20 mM Tris, 5 mM H3PO4, with micellar pseudophase formed by 50 mM sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS), pH 8.8. Selected characteristics (noise, detectability of substance, sensitivity of detector) of the UV-absorption detectors (single wavelength detector, multiple-wavelength photodiode array detector (PDA), both of them operating at constant wavelength 206 nm) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) detector (excitation/emission wavelength 488/520 nm) were determined. The detectability of peptides in the single wavelength detector was 1.3-6.0 micromol dm(-3) and in the PDA detector 1.6-3.1 micromol dm(-3). The LIF detection was more sensitive, the applied concentration of NBD derivative of insulin fragment in CZE analysis with LIF detection was three orders lower than in CZE with UV-absorption detector, and the detectability of this peptide was improved to 15.8 nmol dm(-3).

  2. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy for warm dense matter studies and ICF plasma diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, S. B.; Harding, E. C.; Knapp, P. F.; Gomez, M. R.; Nagayama, T.; Bailey, J. E.

    2018-05-01

    The burning core of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasma produces bright x-rays at stagnation that can directly diagnose core conditions essential for comparison to simulations and understanding fusion yields. These x-rays also backlight the surrounding shell of warm, dense matter, whose properties are critical to understanding the efficacy of the inertial confinement and global morphology. We show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra of mid-Z impurities or dopants in the warm dense shell can reveal the optical depth, temperature, and density of the shell and help constrain models of warm, dense matter. This is illustrated by the example of a high-resolution spectrum collected from an ICF plasma with a beryllium shell containing native iron impurities. Analysis of the iron K-edge provides model-independent diagnostics of the shell density (2.3 × 1024 e/cm3) and temperature (10 eV), while a 12-eV red shift in Kβ and 5-eV blue shift in the K-edge discriminate among models of warm dense matter: Both shifts are well described by a self-consistent field model based on density functional theory but are not fully consistent with isolated-atom models using ad-hoc density effects.

  3. Immunochemical Parameters of Some Commercial Conjugates for the Fluorescent Treponemal Antibody-Absorption Test

    PubMed Central

    Hunter, E. F.; Smith, J. F.; Lewis, J. S.; McGrew, B. E.; Schmale, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Fluorescein-labeled anti-human globulins were examined to determine the need for standardization of conjugates used in the fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) test. Twenty-one of 33 conjugates submitted by commercial manufacturers to the Reagents Control Activity, Venereal Disease Research Laboratory, for evaluation in the FTA-ABS test were available for study. Conjugates, after evaluation in FTA-ABS performance tests, were examined by immunoelectrophoresis, by titration against immunoglobulins G and M (IgG, IgM) with FTA-ABS techniques, and by the biuret protein and fluorescein diacetate methods for determining fluorescein to protein (F/P) ratios. The conjugates were predominately anti-IgG globulin with anti-light-chain activity. Differences were noted in the ability of some conjugates to detect IgM antibody. The F/P ratios of those conjugates that could be determined varied from 2.6 to 17.8 μg of fluorescein per mg of protein. The need to identify and standardize both the immunologic capabilities and the optimum F/P ratio for FTA-ABS test conjugates is presented. PMID:4564403

  4. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy for warm dense matter studies and ICF plasma diagnostics

    DOE PAGES

    Hansen, Stephanie B.; Harding, Eric C.; Knapp, Patrick F.; ...

    2018-03-07

    The burning core of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasma produces bright x-rays at stagnation that can directly diagnose core conditions essential for comparison to simulations and understanding fusion yields. These x-rays also backlight the surrounding shell of warm, dense matter, whose properties are critical to understanding the efficacy of the inertial confinement and global morphology. In this work, we show that the absorption and fluorescence spectra of mid-Z impurities or dopants in the warm dense shell can reveal the optical depth, temperature, and density of the shell and help constrain models of warm, dense matter. This is illustrated bymore » the example of a high-resolution spectrum collected from an ICF plasma with a beryllium shell containing native iron impurities. Lastly, analysis of the iron K-edge provides model-independent diagnostics of the shell density (2.3 × 10 24 e/cm 3) and temperature (10 eV), while a 12-eV red shift in Kβ and 5-eV blue shift in the K-edge discriminate among models of warm dense matter: Both shifts are well described by a self-consistent field model based on density functional theory but are not fully consistent with isolated-atom models using ad-hoc density effects.« less

  5. Americium characterization by X-ray fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy in plutonium uranium mixed oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Claude; Cozzo, Cedric; Martin, Matthias; Grolimund, Daniel; Mieszczynski, Cyprian

    2013-06-01

    Plutonium uranium mixed oxide (MOX) fuels are currently used in nuclear reactors. The actinides in these fuels need to be analyzed after irradiation for assessing their behaviour with regard to their environment and the coolant. In this work the study of the atomic structure and next-neighbour environment of Am in the (Pu,U)O2 lattice in an irradiated (60 MW d kg-1) MOX sample was performed employing micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF) and micro-X-ray absorption fine structure (µ-XAFS) spectroscopy. The chemical bonds, valences and stoichiometry of Am (˜0.66 wt%) are determined from the experimental data gained for the irradiated fuel material examined in its peripheral zone (rim) of the fuel. In the irradiated sample Am builds up as Am3+ species within an [AmO8]13- coordination environment (e.g. >90%) and no (<10%) Am(IV) or (V) can be detected in the rim zone. The occurrence of americium dioxide is avoided by the redox buffering activity of the uranium dioxide matrix.

  6. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice

    PubMed Central

    Feeks, James A.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2017-01-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina. PMID:28663886

  7. Adaptive optics two-photon excited fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy of exogenous fluorophores in mice.

    PubMed

    Feeks, James A; Hunter, Jennifer J

    2017-05-01

    In vivo cellular scale fluorescence lifetime imaging of the mouse retina has the potential to be a sensitive marker of retinal cell health. In this study, we demonstrate fluorescence lifetime imaging of extrinsic fluorophores using adaptive optics fluorescence lifetime imaging ophthalmoscopy (AOFLIO). We recorded AOFLIO images of inner retinal cells labeled with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and capillaries labeled with fluorescein. We demonstrate that AOFLIO can be used to differentiate spectrally overlapping fluorophores in the retina. With further refinements, AOFLIO could be used to assess retinal health in early stages of degeneration by utilizing lifetime-based sensors or even fluorophores native to the retina.

  8. [Vermicomposting of different organic materials and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic characterization of their dissolved organic matter].

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Wang, Dong-sheng; Liu, Man-qiang; Hu, Feng; Li, Hui-xin; Huang, Zhong-yang; Chang, Yi-jun; Jiao, Jia-guo

    2015-10-01

    In this experiment, different proportions of the cattle manure, tea-leaf, herb and mushroom residues, were used as food for earthworm (Eisenia fetida) to study the growth of the earth-worm. Then the characteristics and transformation of nutrient content and three-dimensional excitation emission matrix fluorescence (3DEEM) of dissolved organic matter (DOM) during vermistabilization were investigated by means of chemical and spectroscopic methods. The result showed that the mixture of different ratios of cattle manure with herb residue, and cattle manure with tea-leaf were conducive to the growth of earthworm, while the materials compounded with mushroom residue inhibited the growth of earthworm. With the increasing time of verimcomposting, the pH in vermicompost tended to be circumneutral and weakly acidic, and there were increases in electrical conductivity, and the contents of total nitrogen, total phosphorus, available nitrogen, and available phosphorus, while the total potassium and available potassium increased first and then decreased, and the organic matter content decreased. 3DEEM and fluorescence regional integration results indicated that, the fluorescence of protein-like fluorescence peaks declined significantly, while the intensity of humic-like fluorescence peak increased significantly in DOM. Vermicomposting process might change the compositions of DOM with elevated concentrations of humic acid and fulvic acid in the organics. In all, this study suggested the suitability of 3DEEM for monitoring the organics transformation and assessing the maturity in the vermicomposting.

  9. Seasonal characterization of CDOM for lakes in semi-arid regions of Northeast China using excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Y.; Song, K.; Wen, Z.; Li, L.; Zang, S.; Shao, T.; Li, S.; Du, J.

    2015-04-01

    The seasonal characteristics of fluorescence components in CDOM for lakes in the semi-arid region of Northeast China were examined by excitation-emission matrices fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC). Two humic-like peaks C1 (Ex/Em = 230, 300/425 nm) and C2 (Ex/Em = 255, 350/460 nm) and two protein-like B (Ex/Em = 220, 275/320 nm) and T (Ex/Em = 225, 290/360 nm) peaks were identified using PARAFAC. The average fluorescence intensity of the four components differed with seasonal variation from June and August 2013 to February and April 2014. The total fluorescence intensity significantly varied from 2.54 ± 0.68 nm-1 in June to the mean value 1.93 ± 0.70 nm-1 in August 2013, and then increased to 2.34 ± 0.92 nm-1 in February and reduced to the lowest 1.57 ± 0.55 nm-1 in April 2014. In general, the fluorescence intensity was dominated by peak C1, indicating that most part of CDOM for inland waters being investigated in this study was originated from phytoplankton degradation. The lowest C2 represents only a small portion of CDOM from terrestrial imported organic matter to water bodies through rainwash and soil leaching. The two protein-like intensities (B and T) formed in situ through microbial activity have almost the same intensity. Especially, in August 2013 and February 2014, the two protein-like peaks showed obviously difference from other seasons and the highest C1 (1.02 nm-1) was present in February 2014. Components 1 and 2 exhibited strong linear correlation (R2 = 0.633). There were significantly positive linear relationships between CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R2 = 0.72, 0.46, p < 0.01), a(280) (R2 = 0.77, 0.47, p < 0.01), a(350) (R2 = 0.76, 0.78, p < 0.01) and Fmax for two humic-like components (C1 and C2), respectively. A close relationship (R2 = 0.931) was found between salinity and DOC. However, almost no obvious correlation was found between salinity and EEM-PARAFAC extracted components except for C3 (R2 = 0.469). Results

  10. Characterization of CDOM from urban waters in Northern-Northeastern China using excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ying; Song, Kaishan; Li, Sijia; Ma, Jianhang; Wen, Zhidan

    2016-08-01

    Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) plays an important role in aquatic systems, but high concentrations of organic materials are considered pollutants. The fluorescent component characteristics of CDOM in urban waters sampled from Northern and Northeastern China were examined by excitation-emission matrix fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (EEM-PARAFAC) to investigate the source and compositional changes of CDOM on both space and pollution levels. One humic-like (C1), one tryptophan-like component (C2), and one tyrosine-like component (C3) were identified by PARAFAC. Mean fluorescence intensities of the three CDOM components varied spatially and by pollution level in cities of Northern and Northeastern China during July-August, 2013 and 2014. Principal components analysis (PCA) was conducted to identify the relative distribution of all water samples. Cluster analysis (CA) was also used to categorize the samples into groups of similar pollution levels within a study area. Strong positive linear relationships were revealed between the CDOM absorption coefficients a(254) (R (2) = 0.89, p < 0.01); a(355) (R (2) = 0.94, p < 0.01); and the fluorescence intensity (F max) for the humic-like C1 component. A positive linear relationship (R (2) = 0.77) was also exhibited between dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and the F max for the humic-like C1 component, but a relatively weak correlation (R (2) = 0.56) was detected between DOC and the F max for the tryptophan-like component (C2). A strong positive correlation was observed between the F max for the tryptophan-like component (C2) and total nitrogen (TN) (R (2) = 0.78), but moderate correlations were observed with ammonium-N (NH4-N) (R (2) = 0.68), and chemical oxygen demand (CODMn) (R (2) = 0.52). Therefore, the fluorescence intensities of CDOM components can be applied to monitor water quality in real time compared to that of traditional approaches. These results demonstrate

  11. Chiral capillary electrophoresis with UV-excited fluorescence detection for the enantioselective analysis of 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl-derivatized amino acids.

    PubMed

    Prior, Amir; Coliva, Giulia; de Jong, Gerhardus J; Somsen, Govert W

    2018-05-29

    The potential of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with ultraviolet (UV)-excited fluorescence detection for sensitive chiral analysis of amino acids (AAs) was investigated. DL-AAs were derivatized with 9-fluorenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC)-Cl to allow their fluorescence detection and enhance enantioseparation. Fluorescence detection was achieved employing optical fibers, leading UV excitation light (< 300 nm) from a Xe-Hg lamp to the capillary window, and fluorescence emission to a spectrograph equipped with a charge-coupled device (CCD). Signal averaging over time and emission wavelength intervals was carried out to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the FMOC-AAs. A background electrolyte (BGE) of 40 mM sodium tetraborate (pH 9.5), containing 15% isopropanol (v/v), 30 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and 30 mM β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), was found optimal for AA chemo- and enantioseparation. Enantioresolutions of 1.0 or higher were achieved for 16 proteinogenic DL-AAs. Limits of detection (LODs) were in the 10-100-nM range (injected concentration) for the D-AA enantiomers, except for FMOC-D-tryptophan (536 nM) which showed intramolecular fluorescence quenching. Linearity (R 2  > 0.997) and repeatability for peak height (relative standard deviations (RSDs) < 7.0%; n = 5) and electrophoretic mobility (RSDs < 0.6%; n = 5) of individual AA enantiomers were established for chiral analysis of DL-AA mixtures. The applicability of the method was investigated by the analysis of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Next to L-AAs, endogenous levels of D-glutamine and D-aspartic acid could be measured in CSF revealing enantiomeric ratios of 0.35 and 19.6%, respectively. This indicates the method's potential for the analysis of low concentrations of D-AAs in presence of abundant L-AAs.

  12. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  13. Abnormal photothermal effect of laser radiation on highly defect oxide bronze nanoparticles under the sub-threshold excitation of absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, P.; Kotvanova, M.; Omelchenko, A.

    2017-05-01

    The mechanism of abnormal photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on nanoparticles of oxide bronzes has been proposed in this paper. The basic features of the observed effect are: a) sub-threshold absorption of laser radiation by the excitation of donor-like levels formed in the energy gap due to superficial defects of the oxide bronze nano-crystals; b) an interband radiationless transition of energy of excitation on deep triplet levels and c) consequent recombination occurring at the plasmon absorption. K or Na atoms thermally intercalated to the octahedral crystal structure of TiO2 in the wave SHS combustion generate acceptor levels in the gap. The prepared oxide bronzes of the non-stoichiometric composition NaxTiO2 and KxTiO2 were examined by high resolution TEM, and then grinded in a planetary mill with powerful dispersion energy density up to 4000 J/g. This made it possible to obtain nanoparticles about 50 nm with high surface defect density (1017-1019 cm-2 at a depth of 10 nm). High photo-thermal effect of laser radiation on the defect nanocrystals observed after its impregnation into cartilaginous tissue exceeds 7 times in comparison with the intact ones.

  14. A reagentless enzymatic fluorescent biosensor for glucose based on upconverting glasses, as excitation source, and chemically modified glucose oxidase.

    PubMed

    Del Barrio, Melisa; Cases, Rafael; Cebolla, Vicente; Hirsch, Thomas; de Marcos, Susana; Wilhelm, Stefan; Galbán, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Upon near-infrared excitation Tm(3+)+Yb(3+) doped fluorohafnate glasses present upconversion properties and emit visible light. This property permits to use these glasses (UCG) as excitation sources for fluorescent optical biosensors. Taking this into account, in this work a fluorescent biosensor for glucose determination is designed and evaluated. The biosensor combines the UCG and the fluorescence of the enzyme glucose oxidase chemically modified with a fluorescein derivative (GOx-FS), whose intensity is modified during the enzymatic reaction with glucose. Optical parameters have been optimized and a mathematical model describing the behavior of the analytical signal is suggested. Working in FIA mode, the biosensor responds to glucose concentrations up to, at least, 15mM with a limit of detection of 1.9mM. The biosensor has a minimum lifetime of 9 days and has been applied to glucose determination in drinks. The applicability of the sensor was tested by glucose determination in two fruit juices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of Indium Tin Oxide Film Using Argon Fluroide (ArF) Laser-Excited Atomic Fluorescence of Ablated Plumes.

    PubMed

    Ho, Sut Kam; Garcia, Dario Machado

    2017-04-01

    A two-pulse laser-excited atomic fluorescence (LEAF) technique at 193 nm wavelength was applied to the analysis of indium tin oxide (ITO) layer on polyethylene terephthalate (PET) film. Fluorescence emissions from analytes were induced from plumes generated by first laser pulse. Using this approach, non-selective LEAF can be accomplished for simultaneous multi-element analysis and it overcomes the handicap of strict requirement for laser excitation wavelength. In this study, experimental conditions including laser fluences, times for gating and time delay between pulses were optimized to reveal high sensitivity with minimal sample destruction and penetration. With weak laser fluences of 100 and 125 mJ/cm 2 for 355 and 193 nm pulses, detection limits were estimated to be 0.10% and 0.43% for Sn and In, respectively. In addition, the relation between fluorescence emissions and number of laser shots was investigated; reproducible results were obtained for Sn and In. It shows the feasibility of depth profiling by this technique. Morphologies of samples were characterized at various laser fluences and number of shots to examine the accurate penetration. Images of craters were also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results demonstrate the imperceptible destructiveness of film after laser shot. With such weak laser fluences and minimal destructiveness, this LEAF technique is suitable for thin-film analysis.

  16. New Rh 2 (II,II) Complexes for Solar Energy Applications: Panchromatic Absorption and Excited-State Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Whittemore, Tyler J.; Sayre, Hannah J.; Xue, Congcong

    In this work, the new heteroleptic paddlewheel complexes cis-[Rh 2(μ-form) 2(μ-np) 2][BF 4] 2, where form = p-ditolylformamidinate (DTolF) or p-difluorobenzylformamidinate (F-form) and np = 1,8-napthyridyine, and cis-Rh 2(μ-form) 2(μ-npCOO) 2 (npCOO – = 1,8-naphthyridine-2-carboxylate), were synthesized and characterized. The complexes absorb strongly throughout the ultraviolet (λ max = 300 nm, ε = 20 300 M –1 cm –1) and visible regions (λ max = 640 nm ε = 3500 M –1 cm –1), making them potentially useful new dyes with panchromatic light absorption for solar energy conversion applications. Ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption and time-resolved infrared spectroscopies were usedmore » to characterize the identity and dynamics of the excited states, where singlet and triplet Rh 2/form-to-naphthyridine, metal/ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (ML-LCT) excited states were observed in all four complexes. The npCOO – complexes exhibit red-shifted absorption profiles extending into the near-IR and undergo photoinitiated electron transfer to generate reduced methyl viologen, a species that persists in the presence of a sacrificial donor. The energy of the triplet excited state of each complex was estimated from energy-transfer quenching experiments using a series of organic triplet donors (E( 3ππ*) from 1.83 to 0.78 eV). The singlet reduction (+0.6 V vs Ag/AgCl) potentials, and singlet and triplet oxidation potentials (-1.1 and -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl, respectively) were determined. Finally, based on the excited-state lifetimes and redox properties, these complexes represent a new class of light absorbers with potential application as dyes for charge injection into semiconductor solar cells and in sensitizer-catalyst assemblies for photocatalysis that operate with irradiation from the ultraviolet to ~800 nm.« less

  17. New Rh 2 (II,II) Complexes for Solar Energy Applications: Panchromatic Absorption and Excited-State Reactivity

    DOE PAGES

    Whittemore, Tyler J.; Sayre, Hannah J.; Xue, Congcong; ...

    2017-10-04

    In this work, the new heteroleptic paddlewheel complexes cis-[Rh 2(μ-form) 2(μ-np) 2][BF 4] 2, where form = p-ditolylformamidinate (DTolF) or p-difluorobenzylformamidinate (F-form) and np = 1,8-napthyridyine, and cis-Rh 2(μ-form) 2(μ-npCOO) 2 (npCOO – = 1,8-naphthyridine-2-carboxylate), were synthesized and characterized. The complexes absorb strongly throughout the ultraviolet (λ max = 300 nm, ε = 20 300 M –1 cm –1) and visible regions (λ max = 640 nm ε = 3500 M –1 cm –1), making them potentially useful new dyes with panchromatic light absorption for solar energy conversion applications. Ultrafast and nanosecond transient absorption and time-resolved infrared spectroscopies were usedmore » to characterize the identity and dynamics of the excited states, where singlet and triplet Rh 2/form-to-naphthyridine, metal/ligand-to-ligand charge-transfer (ML-LCT) excited states were observed in all four complexes. The npCOO – complexes exhibit red-shifted absorption profiles extending into the near-IR and undergo photoinitiated electron transfer to generate reduced methyl viologen, a species that persists in the presence of a sacrificial donor. The energy of the triplet excited state of each complex was estimated from energy-transfer quenching experiments using a series of organic triplet donors (E( 3ππ*) from 1.83 to 0.78 eV). The singlet reduction (+0.6 V vs Ag/AgCl) potentials, and singlet and triplet oxidation potentials (-1.1 and -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl, respectively) were determined. Finally, based on the excited-state lifetimes and redox properties, these complexes represent a new class of light absorbers with potential application as dyes for charge injection into semiconductor solar cells and in sensitizer-catalyst assemblies for photocatalysis that operate with irradiation from the ultraviolet to ~800 nm.« less

  18. X-ray absorption fine structure and X-ray excited optical luminescence studies of II-VI semiconducting nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Michael Wayne

    2010-06-01

    Various II-VI semiconducting nanomaterials such as ZnO-ZnS nanoribbons (NRs), CdSxSe1-x nanostructures, ZnS:Mn NRs, ZnS:Mn,Eu nanoprsims (NPs), ZnO:Mn nanopowders, and ZnO:Co nanopowders were synthesized for study. These materials were characterized by techniques such as scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, element dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, selected area electron diffraction, and X-ray diffraction. The electronic and optical properties of these nanomaterials were studied by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) techniques, using tuneable soft X-rays from a synchrotron light source. The complementary nature ofthe XAFS and XEOL techniques give site, element and chemical specific measurements which allow a better understanding of the interplay and role of each element in the system. Chemical vapour deposition (CVD) of ZnS powder in a limited oxygen environment resulted in side-by-side biaxial ZnO-ZnS NR heterostructures. The resulting NRs contained distinct wurtzite ZnS and wurtzite ZnO components with widths of 10--100 nm and 20 --500 nm, respectively and a uniform interface region of 5-15 nm. XAFS and XEOL measurements revealed the luminescence of ZnO-ZnS NRs is from the ZnO component. The luminescence of CdSxSe1-x nanostructures is shown to be dependent on the S to Se ratio, with the band-gap emission being tunable between that of pure CdS and CdSe. Excitation of the CdSxSe 1-x nanostructures by X-ray in XEOL has revealed new de-excitation channels which show a defect emission band not seen by laser excitation. CVD of Mn2+ doped ZnS results in nanostructures with luminescence dominated by the yellow Mn2+ emission due to energy transfer from the ZnS host to the Mn dopant sites. The addition of EuCl3 to the reactants in the CVD process results in a change in morphology from NR to NP. Zn1-xMnxO and Zn1-xCOxO nanopowders were prepared by sol-gel methods at dopant concentrations

  19. Picosecond sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy with applications to excited state proton transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Van Kuiken, Benjamin E.; Ross, Matthew R.; Strader, Matthew L.; ...

    2017-05-08

    Picosecond X-ray absorption (XA) spectroscopy at the S K-edge (~2.4 keV) is demonstrated and used to monitor excited state dynamics in a small organosulfur molecule (2-Thiopyridone, 2TP) following optical excitation. Multiple studies have reported that the thione (2TP) is converted into the thiol (2-Mercaptopyridine, 2MP) following photoexcitation. However, the timescale and photochemical pathway of this reaction remain uncertain. In this work, time-resolved XA spectroscopy at the S K-edge is used to monitor the formation and decay of two transient species following 400nm excitation of 2TP dissolved in acetonitrile. The first transient species forms within the instrument response time (70 ps)more » and decays within 6 ns. The second transient species forms on a timescale of ~400 ps and decays on a 15 ns timescale. Time-dependent density functional theory is used to identify the first and second transient species as the lowestlying triplet states of 2TP and 2MP, respectively. This study demonstrates transient S K-edge XA spectroscopy as a sensitive and viable probe of time-evolving charge dynamics near sulfur sites in small molecules with future applications towards studying complex biological and material systems.« less

  20. Application of Temperature-Dependent Fluorescent Dyes to the Measurement of Millimeter Wave Absorption in Water Applied to Biomedical Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Popenko, Oleksandr

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity of the organic dyes solutions was used for noncontact measurement of the electromagnetic millimeter wave absorption in water. By using two different dyes with opposite temperature effects, local temperature increase in the capillary that is placed inside a rectangular waveguide in which millimeter waves propagate was defined. The application of this noncontact temperature sensing is a simple and novel method to detect temperature change in small biological objects. PMID:25435859

  1. Application of temperature-dependent fluorescent dyes to the measurement of millimeter wave absorption in water applied to biomedical experiments.

    PubMed

    Kuzkova, Nataliia; Popenko, Oleksandr; Yakunov, Andrey

    2014-01-01

    Temperature sensitivity of the fluorescence intensity of the organic dyes solutions was used for noncontact measurement of the electromagnetic millimeter wave absorption in water. By using two different dyes with opposite temperature effects, local temperature increase in the capillary that is placed inside a rectangular waveguide in which millimeter waves propagate was defined. The application of this noncontact temperature sensing is a simple and novel method to detect temperature change in small biological objects.

  2. Forensic analysis of laser printed ink by X-ray fluorescence and laser-excited plume fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Cai, Bruno Yue; Tsoi, Yeuk Ki; Yuen, Ronald; Leung, Kelvin S Y; Cheung, Nai-Ho

    2013-05-07

    We demonstrated a minimally destructive two-tier approach for multielement forensic analysis of laser-printed ink. The printed document was first screened using a portable-X-ray fluorescence (XRF) probe. If the results were not conclusive, a laser microprobe was then deployed. The laser probe was based on a two-pulse scheme: the first laser pulse ablated a thin layer of the printed ink; the second laser pulse at 193 nm induced multianalytes in the desorbed ink to fluoresce. We analyzed four brands of black toners. The toners were printed on paper in the form of patches or letters or overprinted on another ink. The XRF probe could sort the four brands if the printed letters were larger than font 20. It could not tell the printing sequence in the case of overprints. The laser probe was more discriminatory; it could sort the toner brands and reveal the overprint sequence regardless of font size while the sampled area was not visibly different from neighboring areas even under the microscope. In terms of general analytical performance, the laser probe featured tens of micrometer lateral resolution and tens to hundreds of nm depth resolution and atto-mole mass detection limits. It could handle samples of arbitrary size and shape and was air compatible, and no sample pretreatment was necessary. It will prove useful whenever high-resolution and high sensitivity 3D elemental mapping is required.

  3. UV spectroscopy including ISM line absorption: of the exciting star of Abell 35

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, M.; Rauch, T.; Werner, K.; Kruk, J. W.

    Reliable spectral analysis that is based on high-resolution UV observations requires an adequate, simultaneous modeling of the interstellar line absorption and reddening. In the case of the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 35, BD-22 3467, we demonstrate our current standard spectral-analysis method that is based on the Tübingen NLTE Model-Atmosphere Package (TMAP). We present an on- going spectral analysis of FUSE and HST/STIS observations of BD-22 3467.

  4. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuteriummore » plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.« less

  5. Tunable emission and excited state absorption induced optical limiting in Tb2(MoO4)3: Sm3+/Eu3+ nanophosphors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mani, Kamal P.; Sreekanth, Perumbilavil; Vimal, G.; Biju, P. R.; Unnikrishnan, N. V.; Ittyachen, M. A.; Philip, Reji; Joseph, Cyriac

    2016-12-01

    Photoluminescence properties and optical limiting behavior of pure and Sm3+/Eu3+ doped Tb2(MoO4)3 nanophosphors are investigated. The prepared nanophosphors exhibit excellent emission when excited by UV light. Color-tunable emissions in Tb2-xSmx(MoO4)3 and Tb2-xEux(MoO4)3 are realized by employing different excitation wavelengths or by controlling the doping concentration of Sm3+ and Eu3+. Luminescence quantum yield and CIE chromatic coordinates of the prepared phosphors were also presented. Optical limiting properties of the samples are investigated by open aperture Z-scan technique using 5 ns laser pulses at 532 nm. Numerical fitting of the measured Z-scan data to the relevant nonlinear transmission equations reveals that the nonlinear absorption is arising from strong excited state absorption, along with weak absorption saturation and it is found that the optical nonlinearity of Tb2(MoO4)3 increases with Sm3+/Eu3+doping. Parameters such as saturation fluence, excited state absorption cross section and ground state absorption cross section of the samples have been determined numerically, from which the figure of merit for nonlinear absorption is calculated. The excited state absorption cross-section of the samples is found to be one order of magnitude higher than that of the ground state absorption cross-section, indicating strong reverse saturable absorption. These results indicate that Sm3+/Eu3+ doped Tb2(MoO4)3 nanophosphors are efficient media for UV/n-UV pumped LEDs, and are also potential candidates for designing efficient optical limiting devices for the protection of human eyes and sensitive optical detectors from harmful laser radiation.

  6. Two-photon excitation spectrum of light-harvesting complex II and fluorescence upconversion after one- and two-photon excitation of the carotenoids

    SciTech Connect

    Walla, P.J.; Yom, J.; Krueger, B.P.

    2000-05-18

    The two-photon excitation (TPE) spectrum of light-harvesting complex II (LHC II) has been measured in the spectral region of 1,000--1,600 nm, corresponding to one-photon wavelengths of 500--800 nm. The authors observed a band with an origin at {approximately}2 x 660 nm (ca. 15,100 {+-} 300 cm{sup {minus}1}) and a maximum at {approximately}2 x 600 nm. The line shape and origin of this band strongly suggest that the observed signal is due to the two-photon-allowed S{sub 1} state of the energy-transferring carotenoids (Car ) in LHC II. The authors also report the time dependence of the upconverted chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence aftermore » TPE at the maximum of the observed band. Surprisingly, a fast rise of 250 {+-} 50 fs followed by a multiexponential decay on the picosecond time scale was observed. This result provides strong indication that there is a fast energy transfer even from the dipole-forbidden Car S{sub 1} state to the Chl's. The sub picosecond energy transfer from the Car S{sub 1} state is likely a consequence of the large number of energy-accepting Chls in van der Waals contact with the central Car's in LHC II. They also present upconversion data of the Car S{sub 2}, Chl a, and Chl b fluorescence observed after one-photon excitation into the dipole-allowed Car S{sub 2} state. The lifetime of the Car S{sub 2} state is {approximately}120 {+-} 30 fs. With the observed time constants they are able to calculate quantum yields for the different possible pathways contributing to the overall Car to Chl energy transfer in LHC II.« less

  7. Excitation wavelength dependence of the fluorescence kinetics in Photosystem I particles from Synechocystis PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus.

    PubMed

    Gobets, Bas; van Stokkum, Ivo H M; van Mourik, Frank; Dekker, Jan P; van Grondelle, Rienk

    2003-12-01

    The excitation-wavelength dependence of the excited-state dynamics of monomeric and trimeric Photosystem I (PSI) particles from Synechocystis PCC 6803 as well as trimeric PSI particles from Synechococcus elongatus has been studied at room temperature using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. For aselective (400 nm), carotenoid (505 nm), and bulk chlorophyll (approximately 650 nm) excitation in all species, a downhill energy-transfer component is observed, corresponding to a lifetime of 3.4-5.5 ps. For selective red excitation (702-719 nm) in all species, a significantly faster, an approximately 1-ps, uphill transfer component was recorded. In Synechococcus PSI, an additional approximately 10-ps downhill energy-transfer component is found for all wavelengths of excitation, except 719 nm. Each of the species exhibits its own characteristic trap spectrum, the shape of which is independent of the wavelength of excitation. This trap spectrum decays in approximately 23 ps in both monomeric and trimeric Synechocystis PSI and in approximately 35 ps in trimeric Synechococcus PSI. The data were simulated based on the 2.5 A structural model of PSI of Synechococcus elongatus using the Förster equation for energy transfer, and using the 0.6-1-ps charge-separation time and the value of 1.2-1.3 for the index of refraction that were obtained from the dynamics of a hypothetical PSI particle without red chls. The experimentally obtained lifetimes and spectra were reproduced well by assigning three of the chlorophyll-a (chla) dimers observed in the structure to the C708/C702RT pool of red chls present in PSI from both species. Essential for the simulation of the dynamics of Synechococcus PSI is the assignment of the single chla trimer in the structure to the C719/C708RT pool present in this species.

  8. Extracting diagnostic stromal organization features based on intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Xie, Shusen; Hong, Zhibin; Jiang, Xingshan

    2009-03-01

    Intrinsic two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) and second-harmonic generation (SHG) signals are shown to differentiate between normal and neoplastic human esophageal stroma. It was found that TPEF and SHG signals from normal and neoplastic stroma exhibit different organization features, providing quantitative information about the biomorphology and biochemistry of tissue. By comparing normal with neoplastic stroma, there were significant differences in collagen-related changes, elastin-related changes, and alteration in proportions of matrix molecules, giving insight into the stromal changes associated with cancer progression and providing substantial potential to be applied in vivo to the clinical diagnosis of epithelial precancers and cancers.

  9. A Wavelength Modulated, Continuum Excited Furnance Atomic Fluorescence System for the Determination of Wear Metals in Jet Engine Lubricating Oils.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-01-01

    ting Oils 6. PERFORMING 04G. REPORT NUMBER -7 AUTHOR(s) 8 . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s) O /Thomna-s F. Wynn, Jr: Capt, USAF 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION...EXCITED FURNACE ATOMIC FLUORESCENCE SYSTEM FOR THE DETERMINATION OF WEAR METALS IN JET ENGINE LUBRICATING OILS \\Ac ces-.ic’flr For DDC TL3 Unp-nnounced...DETERMINATION OF WEAR METALS IN JET ENGINE LUBRICATING OILS By Thomas F. Wynn, Jr. March, 1980 Chairman: James D. Winefordner Major Department: Chemistry A

  10. Temperature dependent fluorescence spectra arise from change in excited-state intramolecular proton transfer potential of 4‧-N,N-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone-doped acetonitrile crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Kazuki; Yamamoto, Norifumi; Hino, Kazuyuki; Sekiya, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    The effect of intermolecular interaction on excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) in 4‧-N,N-dimethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (DMHF) doped in acetonitrile crystals was investigated by measuring the temperature dependence of fluorescence excitation and fluorescence spectra. A solid/solid phase transition of DMHF-doped acetonitrile crystals occurred in the temperature between 210 and 218 K. Significant differences in the spectral profiles and shifts in the fluorescence spectra were observed in the low- and high-temperature regions of the phase transition. The temperature dependence of the ESIPT potential of DMHF is discussed.

  11. Excitation wavelength dependence of excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction of 4'-N,N-diethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone in room temperature ionic liquids studied by optical Kerr gate fluorescence measurement.

    PubMed

    Suda, Kayo; Terazima, Masahide; Sato, Hirofumi; Kimura, Yoshifumi

    2013-10-17

    Excited state intramolecular proton transfer reactions (ESIPT) of 4'-N,N-diethylamino-3-hydroxyflavone (DEAHF) in ionic liquids have been studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence measurements at different excitation wavelengths. Steady-state measurements show the relative yield of the tautomeric form to the normal form of DEAHF decreases as excitation wavelength is increased from 380 to 450 nm. The decrease in yield is significant in ionic liquids that have cations with long alkyl chains. The extent of the decrease is correlated with the number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chains. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements using optical Kerr gate spectroscopy show that ESIPT rate has a strong excitation wavelength dependence. There is a large difference between the spectra at a 200 ps delay from different excitation wavelengths in each ionic liquid. The difference is pronounced in ionic liquids having a long alkyl chain. The equilibrium constant in the electronic excited state obtained at a 200 ps delay and the average reaction rate are also correlated with the alkyl chain length. Considering the results of the steady-state fluorescence and time-resolved measurements, the excitation wavelength dependence of ESIPT is explained by state selective excitation due to the difference of the solvation, and the number of alkyl chain carbon atoms is found to be a good indicator of the effect of inhomogeneity for this reaction.

  12. Absorption and fluorescence properties of the eastern Bering Sea in the summer with special reference to the influence of a Cold Pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Sa, E. J.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H.; Mouw, C.

    2013-12-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are reported for the inner shelf, slope waters and outer shelf regions of the eastern Bering Sea during the summer of 2008, when a warm, thermally stratified surface mixed layer lay over a Cold Pool (< 2 °C) that occupied the entire middle shelf. CDOM absorption at 355 nm (ag355) and its spectral slope (S) in conjunction with excitation emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed large variability in the characteristics of CDOM in different regions of the Bering Sea. PARAFAC analysis aided in the identification of three humic-like (components 1, 2 and 5) and two protein-like (a tyrosine-like component 3, and a tryptophan-like component 4) components. In the extensive shelf region, average absorption coefficients at 355 nm (ag355 m-1) and DOC concentrations (μM) were highest in the inner shelf (0.342 ± 0.11 m-1, 92.67 ± 14.60 μM) and lower in the middle (0.226 ± 0.05 m-1, 78.38 ± 10.64 μM) and outer (0.176 ± 0.05 m-1, 80.73 ± 18.11 μM) shelves, respectively. Mean spectral slopes S were elevated in the middle shelf (24.38 ± 2.25 μm-1) especially in the surface waters (26.87 ± 2.39 μm-1) indicating high rates of photodegradation in the highly stratified surface mixed layer, which intensified northwards in the northern middle shelf likely contributing to greater light penetration and to phytoplankton blooms at deeper depths. The fluorescent humic-like components 1, 2, and 5 were most elevated in the inner shelf most likely from riverine inputs. Measurements at depth in slope waters (> 250 m) revealed low values of ag355 (0.155 ± 0.03 m-1) and S (15.45 ± 1.78 μm-1) indicative of microbial degradation of CDOM in deep waters. DOC concentrations, however were not significantly different suggesting CDOM sources and sinks to be uncoupled from DOC. Along the productive "green belt" in the outer shelf/slope region, absorption and

  13. Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter of the eastern Bering Sea in the summer with special reference to the influence of a cold pool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Sa, E. J.; Goes, J. I.; Gomes, H.; Mouw, C.

    2014-06-01

    The absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) are reported for the inner shelf, slope waters and outer shelf regions of the eastern Bering Sea during the summer of 2008, when a warm, thermally stratified surface mixed layer lay over a cold pool (< 2 °C) that occupied the entire middle shelf. CDOM absorption at 355 nm (ag355) and its spectral slope (S) in conjunction with excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) revealed large variability in the characteristics of CDOM in different regions of the Bering Sea. PARAFAC analysis aided in the identification of three humic-like (components one, two and five) and two protein-like (a tyrosine-like component three, and a tryptophan-like component four) components. In the extensive shelf region, average absorption coefficients at 355 nm (ag355, m-1) and DOC concentrations (μM) were highest in the inner shelf (0.342 ± 0.11 m-1, 92.67 ± 14.60 μM) and lower in the middle (0.226 ± 0.05 m-1, 78.38 ± 10.64 μM) and outer (0.185 ± 0.05 m-1, 79.24 ± 18.01 μM) shelves, respectively. DOC concentrations, however were not significantly different, suggesting CDOM sources and sinks to be uncoupled from DOC. Mean spectral slopes S were elevated in the middle shelf (24.38 ± 2.25 μm-1) especially in the surface waters (26.87 ± 2.39 μm-1) indicating high rates of photodegradation in the highly stratified surface mixed layer, which intensified northwards in the northern middle shelf likely contributing to greater light penetration and to phytoplankton blooms at deeper depths. The fluorescent humic-like components one, two, and five were most elevated in the inner shelf most likely from riverine inputs. Along the productive "green belt" in the outer shelf/slope region, absorption and fluorescence properties indicated the presence of fresh and degraded autochthonous DOM. Near the Unimak Pass region of the Aleutian Islands, low DOC and ag355

  14. Measuring the Quenching of no Fluorescence Produced from the Excitation of Photo-Fragmented Nitrobenzene Using a Picosecond Laser.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lue, Christopher J.; Tanjaroon, Chakree; Johnson, J. Bruce; Reeve, Scott W.; Allen, Susan D.

    2013-06-01

    The military is interested in using spectroscopic methods to detect nitroaromatic compounds related to explosives. Upon absorption of a UV photon, nitrobenzene can dissociate into C_6H_5O and NO. Wynn, et al. have shown that looking at NO fluorescence from the photodissociated nitrobenzene could be a possible detection method. However, the fluorescence can easily be quenched by molecular oxygen and other constituents in air. We have measured fluorescence lifetimes of the nascent NO resulting from photo-fragmented nitrobenzene using a pulsed picosecond tunable laser (pulse width ≈15 ps) by means of a two-color process. In the two-color process, photons of a particular energy dissociated the nitrobenzene while photons of a different energy probed the A^2Σ^+← X^2Π_{(1/2,3/2)} NO band system between 225-260 nm. We have performed the measurements with different background pressures of He, N_2, and air. We present the results of these measurements which indicate considerable quenching of the NO fluorescence due to oxygen. Wynn, C. M.; Palmacci, S.; Kunz, R. R.; and Rothschild, M.Opt. Express, OSA, 2010, 18, 5399-5406

  15. Quantification of zinc-porphyrin in dry-cured ham products by spectroscopic methods Comparison of absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Kristoffer; Adamsen, Christina E; Laursen, Jens; Olsen, Karsten; Møller, Jens K S

    2008-03-01

    Zinc-protoporphyrin (Zn-pp), which has been identified as the major pigment in certain dry-cured meat products, was extracted with acetone/water (75%) and isolated from the following meat products: Parma ham, Iberian ham and dry-cured ham with added nitrite. The quantification of Zn-pp by electron absorption, fluorescence and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy was compared (concentration range used [Zn-pp]=0.8-9.7μM). All three hams were found to contain Zn-pp, and the results show no significant difference among the content of Zn-pp quantified by fluorescence, absorbance and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for Parma ham and Iberian ham. All three methods can be used for quantification of Zn-pp in acetone/water extracts of different ham types if the content is higher than 1.0ppm. For dry-cured ham with added nitrite, XRF was not applicable due to the low content of Zn-pp (<0.1ppm). In addition, XRF spectroscopy provides further information regarding other trace elements and can therefore be advantageous in this aspect. This study also focused on XRF determination of Fe in the extracts and as no detectable Fe was found in the three types of ham extracts investigated (limit of detection; Fe⩽1.8ppm), it allows the conclusion that iron containing pigments, e.g., heme, do not contribute to the noticeable red colour observed in some of the extracts.

  16. Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET) Velocimetry in Flow and Combustion Diagnostics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R.; Stauffer, Hans U.; Roy, Sukesh; Danehy, Paul M.; Gord, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Selective Two-Photon Absorptive Resonance Femtosecond-Laser Electronic-Excitation Tagging (STARFLEET), a non-seeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and non-reactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25-nm 100-fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 µJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and non-reactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities and further demonstrate the significantly less-intrusive nature of STARFLEET.

  17. An accurate and efficient method to predict the electronic excitation energies of BODIPY fluorescent dyes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-Nan; Jin, Jun-Ling; Geng, Yun; Sun, Shi-Ling; Xu, Hong-Liang; Lu, Ying-Hua; Su, Zhong-Min

    2013-03-15

    Recently, the extreme learning machine neural network (ELMNN) as a valid computing method has been proposed to predict the nonlinear optical property successfully (Wang et al., J. Comput. Chem. 2012, 33, 231). In this work, first, we follow this line of work to predict the electronic excitation energies using the ELMNN method. Significantly, the root mean square deviation of the predicted electronic excitation energies of 90 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY) derivatives between the predicted and experimental values has been reduced to 0.13 eV. Second, four groups of molecule descriptors are considered when building the computing models. The results show that the quantum chemical descriptions have the closest intrinsic relation with the electronic excitation energy values. Finally, a user-friendly web server (EEEBPre: Prediction of electronic excitation energies for BODIPY dyes), which is freely accessible to public at the web site: http://202.198.129.218, has been built for prediction. This web server can return the predicted electronic excitation energy values of BODIPY dyes that are high consistent with the experimental values. We hope that this web server would be helpful to theoretical and experimental chemists in related research. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. New Homogeneous Standards by Atomic Layer Deposition for Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence and Absorption Spectroscopies.

    SciTech Connect

    Butterworth, A.L.; Becker, N.; Gainsforth, Z.

    2012-03-13

    Quantification of synchrotron XRF analyses is typically done through comparisons with measurements on the NIST SRM 1832/1833 thin film standards. Unfortunately, these standards are inhomogeneous on small scales at the tens of percent level. We are synthesizing new homogeneous multilayer standards using the Atomic Layer Deposition technique and characterizing them using multiple analytical methods, including ellipsometry, Rutherford Back Scattering at Evans Analytical, Synchrotron X-ray Fluorescence (SXRF) at Advanced Photon Source (APS) Beamline 13-ID, Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) at Advanced Light Source (ALS) Beamlines 11.0.2 and 5.3.2.1 and by electron microscopy techniques. Our motivation for developing much-needed cross-calibration of synchrotronmore » techniques is borne from coordinated analyses of particles captured in the aerogel of the NASA Stardust Interstellar Dust Collector (SIDC). The Stardust Interstellar Dust Preliminary Examination (ISPE) team have characterized three sub-nanogram, {approx}1{micro}m-sized fragments considered as candidates to be the first contemporary interstellar dust ever collected, based on their chemistries and trajectories. The candidates were analyzed in small wedges of aerogel in which they were extracted from the larger collector, using high sensitivity, high spatial resolution >3 keV synchrotron x-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (SXRF) and <2 keV synchrotron x-ray transmission microscopy (STXM) during Stardust ISPE. The ISPE synchrotron techniques have complementary capabilities. Hard X-ray SXRF is sensitive to sub-fg mass of elements Z {ge} 20 (calcium) and has a spatial resolution as low as 90nm. X-ray Diffraction data were collected simultaneously with SXRF data. Soft X-ray STXM at ALS beamline 11.0.2 can detect fg-mass of most elements, including cosmochemically important oxygen, magnesium, aluminum and silicon, which are invisible to SXRF in this application. ALS beamline 11.0.2 has spatial

  19. Design and evaluation of excitation light source device for fluorescence endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Hyun Soo

    2009-06-01

    This study aims at designing and evaluating light source devices that can stably generate light with various wavelengths in order to make possible PDD using a photosensitizer and diagnosis using auto-fluorescence. The light source was a Xenon lamp and filter wheel, composed of an optical output control through Iris and filters with several wavelength bands. It also makes the inducement of auto-fluorescence possible because it is designed to generate a wavelength band of 380-420nm, 430-480nm, and 480-560nm. The transmission part of the light source was developed to enhance the efficiency of light transmission. To evaluate this light source, the characteristics of light output and wavelength band were verified. To validate the capability of this device as PDD, the detection of auto-fluorescence using mouse models was performed.

  20. Time-resolved UV-excited microarray reader for fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orellana, Adelina; Hokkanen, Ari P.; Pastinen, Tomi; Takkinen, Kristina; Soderlund, Hans

    2001-05-01

    Analytical systems based on immunochemistry are largely used in medical diagnostics and in biotechnology. There is a significant pressure to develop the present assay formats to become easier to use, faster, and less reagent consuming. Further developments towards high density array--like multianalyte measurement systems would be valuable. To this aim we have studied the applicability of fluorescence resonance energy transfer and time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer in immunoassays on microspots and in microwells. We have used engineered recombinant antibodies detecting the pentameric protein CRP as a model analyte system, and tested different assay formats. We describe also the construction of a time-resolved scanning epifluorometer with which we could measure the FRET interaction between the slow fluorescence decay from europium chelates and its energy transfer to the rapidly decaying fluorophore Cy5.

  1. Temperature determination of resonantly excited plasmonic branched gold nanoparticles by X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Van de Broek, Bieke; Grandjean, Didier; Trekker, Jesse; Ye, Jian; Verstreken, Kris; Maes, Guido; Borghs, Gustaaf; Nikitenko, Sergey; Lagae, Liesbet; Bartic, Carmen; Temst, Kristiaan; Van Bael, Margriet J

    2011-09-05

    The fields of bioscience and nanomedicine demand precise thermometry for nanoparticle heat characterization down to the nanoscale regime. Since current methods often use indirect and less accurate techniques to determine the nanoparticle temperature, there is a pressing need for a direct and reliable element-specific method. In-situ extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy is used to determine the thermo-optical properties of plasmonic branched gold nanoparticles upon resonant laser illumination. With EXAFS, the direct determination of the nanoparticle temperature increase upon laser illumination is possible via the thermal influence on the gold lattice parameters. More specifically, using the change of the Debye-Waller term representing the lattice disorder, the temperature increase is selectively measured within the plasmonic branched nanoparticles upon resonant laser illumination. In addition, the signal intensity shows that the nanoparticle concentration in the beam more than doubles during laser illumination, thereby demonstrating that photothermal heating is a dynamic process. A comparable temperature increase is measured in the nanoparticle suspension using a thermocouple. This good correspondence between the temperature at the level of the nanoparticle and at the level of the suspension points to an efficient heat transfer between the nanoparticle and the surrounding medium, thus confirming the potential of branched gold nanoparticles for hyperthermia applications. This work demonstrates that X-ray absorption spectroscopy-based nanothermometry could be a valuable tool in the fast-growing number of applications of plasmonic nanoparticles, particularly in life sciences and medicine. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. [Atomic/ionic fluorescence in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp-europium atomic/ionic fluorescence spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Gong, Z; Liang, F; Yang, P; Jin, Q; Huang, B

    1999-06-01

    Eu atomic and ionic fluorescence spectrometry in microwave plasma torch discharge excited by high current microsecond pulsed hollow cathode lamp (HCMP HCL-MPT AFS/IFS) was studied. Operating conditions were optimized. The best detection limits for AFS and IFS obtained with a desolvated ultrasonic nebulization system were 42.0 ng/mL for Eu I 462.7 nm and 21.8 ng/mL for Eu II 381.97 nm, respectively, both were better than those given by the instruction manual of a Baird ICP AFS-2000 spectrometer using pneumatic concentric nebulizer with desolvation for AFS, but were significantly higher than those obtained by using the Baird spectrometer with a mini-monochromator and a ultrasonic nebulzer system.

  3. Electronically excited states of vitamin B12 and methylcobalamin: theoretical analysis of absorption, CD, and MCD data.

    PubMed

    Solheim, Harald; Kornobis, Karina; Ruud, Kenneth; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2011-02-03

    Linear and quadratic response time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) has been applied to investigate absorption (Abs), circular dichroism (CD), and magnetic CD (MCD) spectra of cyanocobalamin (CNCbl) and methylcobalamin (MeCbl). Although electronically excited states of both cobalamins have been probed by applying different experimental techniques, their exact nature remains poorly understood from an electronic structure point of view. Recent theoretical studies have revealed a lot of relevant information about their properties but also left some unresolved issues related to the nature of individual transitions. In this contribution, not only Abs but also CD and MCD spectra of both cobalamins were computed for direct comparison with experiment. The results were evaluated with respect to the choice of exchange-correlation functional, basis set, and the environment (gas phase or solvent) used in the calculation. Taking into account the complexity of the CNCbl and MeCbl systems, reliable agreement between theory and experiment was achieved based on calculations employing the BP86 functional, particularly for the low-energy α/β bands. This spectral range has been traditionally interpreted as a vibrational progression associated with a single electronic excitation, but according to the present analysis for both cobalamins, these bands are best interpreted as consisting of multiple electronic transitions.

  4. Theory of Transient Excited State Absorptions in Pentacene and Derivatives: Triplet-Triplet Biexciton versus Free Triplets.

    PubMed

    Khan, Souratosh; Mazumdar, Sumit

    2017-12-07

    Recent experiments in several singlet-fission materials have found that the triplet-triplet biexciton either is the primary product of photoexcitation or has a much longer lifetime than believed until now. It thus becomes essential to determine the difference in the spectroscopic signatures of the bound triplet-triplet and free triplets to distinguish between them optically. We report calculations of excited state absorptions (ESAs) from the singlet and triplet excitons and from the triplet-triplet biexciton for a pentacene crystal with the herringbone structure and for nanocrystals of bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl) (TIPS)-pentacene. The triplet-triplet biexciton absorbs in both the visible and the near-infrared (NIR), while the monomer free triplet absorbs only in the visible. The intensity of the NIR absorption depends on the extent of intermolecular coupling, in agreement with observations in TIPS-pentacene nanocrystals. We predict additional weak ESA from the triplet-triplet but not from the triplet, at still lower energy.

  5. Protonation of Excited State Pyrene-1-Carboxylate by Phosphate and Organic Acids in Aqueous Solution Studied by Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zelent, Bogumil; Vanderkooi, Jane M.; Coleman, Ryan G.; Gryczynski, Ignacy; Gryczynski, Zygmunt

    2006-01-01

    Pyrene-1-carboxylic acid has a pK of 4.0 in the ground state and 8.1 in the singlet electronic excited state. In the pH range of physiological interest (pH ∼5–8), the ground state compound is largely ionized as pyrene-1-carboxylate, but protonation of the excited state molecule occurs when a proton donor reacts with the carboxylate during the excited state lifetime of the fluorophore. Both forms of the pyrene derivatives are fluorescent, and in this work the protonation reaction was measured by monitoring steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence. The rate of protonation of pyrene-COO− by acetic, chloroacetic, lactic, and cacodylic acids is a function of ΔpK, as predicted by Marcus theory. The rate of proton transfer from these acids saturates at high concentration, as expected for the existence of an encounter complex. Trihydrogen-phosphate is a much better proton donor than dihydrogen- and monohydrogen-phosphate, as can be seen by the pH dependence. The proton-donating ability of phosphate does not saturate at high concentrations, but increases with increasing phosphate concentration. We suggest that enhanced rate of proton transfer at high phosphate concentrations may be due to the dual proton donating and accepting nature of phosphate, in analogy to the Grotthuss mechanism for proton transfer in water. It is suggested that in molecular structures containing multiple phosphates, such as membrane surfaces and DNA, proton transfer rates will be enhanced by this mechanism. PMID:16920831

  6. Can we Predict Quantum Yields Using Excited State Density Functional Theory for New Families of Fluorescent Dyes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Alexander W.; Lin, Zhou; Shepherd, James J.; Van Voorhis, Troy

    2016-06-01

    For a fluorescent dye, the quantum yield characterizes the efficiency of energy transfer from the absorbed light to the emitted fluorescence. In the screening among potential families of dyes, those with higher quantum yields are expected to have more advantages. From the perspective of theoreticians, an efficient prediction of the quantum yield using a universal excited state electronic structure theory is in demand but still challenging. The most representative examples for such excited state theory include time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) and restricted open-shell Kohn-Sham (ROKS). In the present study, we explore the possibility of predicting the quantum yields for conventional and new families of organic dyes using a combination of TDDFT and ROKS. We focus on radiative (kr) and nonradiative (knr) rates for the decay of the first singlet excited state (S_1) into the ground state (S_0) in accordance with Kasha's rule. M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950). For each dye compound, kr is calculated with the S_1-S_0 energy gap and transition dipole moment obtained using ROKS and TDDFT respectively at the relaxed S_1 geometry. Our predicted kr agrees well with the experimental value, so long as the order of energy levels is correctly predicted. Evaluation of knr is less straightforward as multiple processes are involved. Our study focuses on the S_1-T_1 intersystem crossing (ISC) and the S_1-S_0 internal conversion (IC): we investigate the properties that allow us to model the knr value using a Marcus-like expression, such as the Stokes shift, the reorganization energy, and the S_1-T_1 and S_1-S_0 energy gaps. Taking these factors into consideration, we compare our results with those obtained using the actual Marcus theory and provide explanation for discrepancy. T. Kowalczyk, T. Tsuchimochi, L. Top, P.-T. Chen, and T. Van Voorhis, J. Chem. Phys., 138, 164101 (2013). M. Kasha, Discuss. Faraday Soc., 9, 14 (1950).

  7. Hydrological and Biogeochemical Controls on Absorption and Fluorescence of Dissolved Organic Matter in the Northern South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Guo, Weidong; Li, Yan; Stubbins, Aron; Li, Yizhen; Song, Guodong; Wang, Lei; Cheng, Yuanyue

    2017-12-01

    The Kuroshio intrusion from the West Philippine Sea (WPS) and mesoscale eddies are important hydrological features in the northern South China Sea (SCS). In this study, absorption and fluorescence of dissolved organic matter (CDOM and FDOM) were determined to assess the impact of these hydrological features on DOM dynamics in the SCS. DOM in the upper 100 m of the northern SCS had higher absorption, fluorescence, and degree of humification than in the Kuroshio Current of the WPS. The results of an isopycnal mixing model showed that CDOM and humic-like FDOM inventories in the upper 100 m of the SCS were modulated by the Kuroshio intrusion. However, protein-like FDOM was influenced by in situ processes. This basic trend was modified by mesoscale eddies, three of which were encountered during the fieldwork (one warm eddy and two cold eddies). DOM optical properties inside the warm eddy resembled those of DOM in the WPS, indicating that warm eddies could derive from the Kuroshio Current through Luzon Strait. DOM at the center of cold eddies was enriched in humic-like fluorescence and had lower spectral slopes than in eddy-free waters, suggesting inputs of humic-rich DOM from upwelling and enhanced productivity inside the eddy. Excess CDOM and FDOM in northern SCS intermediate water led to export to the Pacific Ocean interior, potentially delivering refractory carbon to the deep ocean. This study demonstrated that DOM optical properties are promising tools to study active marginal sea-open ocean interactions.

  8. Effect of detergents on the physicochemical properties of skin stratum corneum: a two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bloksgaard, M; Brewer, J R; Pashkovski, E; Ananthapadmanabhan, K P; Sørensen, J A; Bagatolli, L A

    2014-02-01

    Understanding the structural and dynamical features of skin is critical for advancing innovation in personal care and drug discovery. Synthetic detergent mixtures used in commercially available body wash products are thought to be less aggressive towards the skin barrier when compared to conventional detergents. The aim of this work is to comparatively characterize the effect of a mild synthetic cleanser mixture (SCM) and sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) on the hydration state of the intercellular lipid matrix and on proton activity of excised skin stratum corneum (SC). Experiments were performed using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy. Fluorescent images of fluorescence reporters sensitive to proton activity and hydration of SC were obtained in excised skin and examined in the presence and absence of SCM and SDS detergents. Hydration of the intercellular lipid matrix to a depth of 10 μm into the SC was increased upon treatment with SCM, whereas SDS shows this effect only at the very surface of SC. The proton activity of SC remained unaffected by treatment with either detergent. While our study indicates that the SC is very resistant to external stimuli, it also shows that, in contrast to the response to SDS, SCM to some extent modulates the in-depth hydration properties of the intercellular lipid matrix within excised skin SC. © 2013 Society of Cosmetic Scientists and the Société Française de Cosmétologie.

  9. Energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence determination of cadmium in uranium matrix using Cd Kα line excited by continuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Sangita; Misra, N. L.; Aggarwal, S. K.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-06-01

    An energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence method for determination of cadmium (Cd) in uranium (U) matrix using continuum source of excitation was developed. Calibration and sample solutions of cadmium, with and without uranium were prepared by mixing different volumes of standard solutions of cadmium and uranyl nitrate, both prepared in suprapure nitric acid. The concentration of Cd in calibration solutions and samples was in the range of 6 to 90 µg/mL whereas the concentration of Cd with respect to U ranged from 90 to 700 µg/g of U. From the calibration solutions and samples containing uranium, the major matrix uranium was selectively extracted using 30% tri-n-butyl phosphate in dodecane. Fixed volumes (1.5 mL) of aqueous phases thus obtained were taken directly in specially designed in-house fabricated leak proof Perspex sample cells for the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence measurements and calibration plots were made by plotting Cd Kα intensity against respective Cd concentration. For the calibration solutions not having uranium, the energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectra were measured without any extraction and Cd calibration plots were made accordingly. The results obtained showed a precision of 2% (1 σ) and the results deviated from the expected values by < 4% on average.

  10. X-ray excitation fluorescence spectra of the Eu2+-stabilized VK center in alkaline-earth fluoride mixed-crystal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawano, K.; Ohya, T.; Tsurumi, T.; Katoh, K.; Nakata, R.

    1999-11-01

    X-ray excitation fluorescence spectra were investigated for MF2:Eu (M=Ca, Sr, and Ba) and their mixed-crystal systems, Ca1-xSrxF2 and Sr1-xBaxF2 with the same fluorite structure. The UV recombination fluorescence band of the VK center associated with blue emission due to the f-d transition of Eu2+ ions was observed with changing mixture ratios x at room temperature. Two sets of weak spectra due to f-f transitions of Eu3+ ions also appeared in the 500-600-nm wavelength region. The peak wavelengths and the integrated intensities of the observed fluorescence were investigated as a function of the Eu concentration as well as the mixture ratio. For the blue emission of Eu2+, pulsed x-ray excitation resulted in shorter lifetimes (500-800 ns) than optical excitation, suggesting energy transfers between the excited states of VK centers and Eu2+. A kinematical fluorescence mechanism was proposed, taking into account the formation of a close pair of a hopping VK center and an immobile Eu2+ ion followed by an energy transfer from the former to the latter. Based on the calculated fluorescence decay curves best fitted to the response curves by x-ray pulse excitation, the energy transfer rates from VK centers to Eu2+ were estimated.

  11. A bright cyan-excitable orange fluorescent protein facilitates dual-emission microscopy and enhances bioluminescence imaging in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Jun; Oh, Young-Hee; Sens, Alex; Ataie, Niloufar; Dana, Hod; Macklin, John J.; Laviv, Tal; Welf, Erik S.; Dean, Kevin M.; Zhang, Feijie; Kim, Benjamin B.; Tang, Clement Tran; Hu, Michelle; Baird, Michelle A.; Davidson, Michael W.; Kay, Mark A.; Fiolka, Reto; Yasuda, Ryohei; Kim, Douglas S.; Ng, Ho-Leung; Lin, Michael Z.

    2016-01-01

    Orange-red fluorescent proteins (FPs) are widely used in biomedical research for multiplexed epifluorescence microscopy with GFP-based probes, but their different excitation requirements make multiplexing with new advanced microscopy methods difficult. Separately, orange-red FPs are useful for deep-tissue imaging in mammals due to the relative tissue transmissibility of orange-red light, but their dependence on illumination limits their sensitivity as reporters in deep tissues. Here we describe CyOFP1, a bright engineered orange-red FP that is excitable by cyan light. We show that CyOFP1 enables single-excitation multiplexed imaging with GFP-based probes in single-photon and two-photon microscopy, including time-lapse imaging in light-sheet systems. CyOFP1 also serves as an efficient acceptor for resonance energy transfer from the highly catalytic blue-emitting luciferase NanoLuc. An optimized fusion of CyOFP1 and NanoLuc, called Antares, functions as a highly sensitive bioluminescent reporter in vivo, producing substantially brighter signals from deep tissues than firefly luciferase and other bioluminescent proteins. PMID:27240196

  12. Computational studies on the excited state properties of citrinin and application in fluorescence analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Citrinin is a mycotoxin of increasing concern that is produced by fungi associated with maize, red yeast rice, and other agricultural commodities. A comprehensive time-dependent density functional study on the excited state properties of citrinin was conducted to identify parameters for reliable det...

  13. Measurement of the dipole moments of excited states and photochemical transients by microwave dielectric absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Fessenden, R.W.; Carton, P.M.; Shimamori, H.

    1982-09-16

    Time-resolved changes in microwave dielectric absorption have been used to study transients formed by laser flash photolysis. Details of the method and apparatus are given. Applications both to the measurements of the dipole moments of transients and to decay kinetics are given. The dipole moments of the lowest triplet states of a number of aromatic compounds (mostly ketones) have been measured in benzene solution at room temperature. States of n..pi..* character generally possess smaller dipole moments than the corresponding ground states while states of ..pi pi..* character (for example, fluorenone) have larger values than the ground state. The triplets ofmore » 4-(dimethylamino)benzaldehyde and 4,4'-bis(dimethylamino)benzophenone have rather high values of dipole moment (10.5 and 8.4 D, respectively) showing their charge-transfer character. The triplet state of benzil was found to have zero or near-zero dipole moment, thus confirming that the triplet state is of a transstructure. 7 figures, 1 table.« less

  14. Laser-excited luminescence and absorption study of mixed valence for K 2Pt(CN) 4—K 2Pt(CN) 6 crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasi Viswanath, A.; Smith, Wayne L.; Patterson, H.

    1982-04-01

    Crystals of K 2Pt(CN) 6 doped with Pt(CN) 2-4 show an absorption band at 337 nm which is assigned as a mixed-valence (MV) transition from Pt (II) to Pt(IV). From a Hush model analysis, the absorption band is interpreted to be class II in the Day—Robin scheme. When the MV band is laser excited at 337 nm, emmision is observed from Pt(CN) 2-4 clusters.

  15. Enhanced Emission from Single Isolated Gold Quantum Dots Investigated Using Two-Photon-Excited Fluorescence Near-Field Scanning Optical Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Abeyasinghe, Neranga; Kumar, Santosh; Sun, Kai; Mansfield, John F; Jin, Rongchao; Goodson, Theodore

    2016-12-21

    New approaches in molecular nanoscopy are greatly desired for interrogation of biological, organic, and inorganic objects with sizes below the diffraction limit. Our current work investigates emergent monolayer-protected gold quantum dots (nanoclusters, NCs) composed of 25 Au atoms by utilizing two-photon-excited fluorescence (TPEF) near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM) at single NC concentrations. Here, we demonstrate an approach to synthesize and isolate single NCs on solid glass substrates. Subsequent investigation of the NCs using TPEF NSOM reveals that, even when they are separated by distances of several tens of nanometers, we can excite and interrogate single NCs individually. Interestingly, we observe an enhanced two-photon absorption (TPA) cross section for single Au 25 NCs that can be attributed to few-atom local field effects and to local field-induced microscopic cascading, indicating their potential for use in ultrasensitive sensing, disease diagnostics, cancer cell therapy, and molecular computers. Finally, we report room-temperature aperture-based TPEF NSOM imaging of these NCs for the first time at 30 nm point resolution, which is a ∼5-fold improvement compared to the previous best result for the same technique. This report unveils the unique combination of an unusually large TPA cross section and the high photostability of Au NCs to (non-destructively) investigate stable isolated single NCs using TPEF NSOM. This is the first reported optical study of monolayer-protected single quantum clusters, opening some very promising opportunities in spectroscopy of nanosized objects, bioimaging, ultrasensitive sensing, molecular computers, and high-density data storage.

  16. Assessment of phytoplankton class abundance using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix by parallel factor analysis and nonnegative least squares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rongguo; Chen, Xiaona; Wu, Zhenzhen; Yao, Peng; Shi, Xiaoyong

    2015-07-01

    The feasibility of using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) along with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and nonnegative least squares (NNLS) method for the differentiation of phytoplankton taxonomic groups was investigated. Forty-one phytoplankton species belonging to 28 genera of five divisions were studied. First, the PARAFAC model was applied to EEMs, and 15 fluorescence components were generated. Second, 15 fluorescence components were found to have a strong discriminating capability based on Bayesian discriminant analysis (BDA). Third, all spectra of the fluorescence component compositions for the 41 phytoplankton species were spectrographically sorted into 61 reference spectra using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and then, the reference spectra were used to establish a database. Finally, the phytoplankton taxonomic groups was differentiated by the reference spectra database using the NNLS method. The five phytoplankton groups were differentiated with the correct discrimination ratios (CDRs) of 100% for single-species samples at the division level. The CDRs for the mixtures were above 91% for the dominant phytoplankton species and above 73% for the subdominant phytoplankton species. Sixteen of the 85 field samples collected from the Changjiang River estuary were analyzed by both HPLC-CHEMTAX and the fluorometric technique developed. The results of both methods reveal that Bacillariophyta was the dominant algal group in these 16 samples and that the subdominant algal groups comprised Dinophyta, Chlorophyta and Cryptophyta. The differentiation results by the fluorometric technique were in good agreement with those from HPLC-CHEMTAX. The results indicate that the fluorometric technique could differentiate algal taxonomic groups accurately at the division level.

  17. In Situ Determination of Illegal Drugs in Oral Fluid by Portable Capillary Electrophoresis with Deep UV Excited Fluorescence Detection.

    PubMed

    Saar-Reismaa, Piret; Erme, Enn; Vaher, Merike; Kulp, Maria; Kaljurand, Mihkel; Mazina-Šinkar, Jekaterina

    2018-05-15

    The present study demonstrates the potential of a portable capillary electrophoresis (CE) instrument, coupled to deep UV fluorescence detector (FD) with a 230-255 nm excitation wavelength range, for the determination of the abuse of illegal drugs in oral fluids in situ. CE was introduced in this study due its exceptional power of separation and resolution, short analysis time, and ability for miniaturization for on-site assessment of different substances. The deep UV fluorescence detector was equipped with five interchangeable emission filters, in the emission wavelength range from 278 to 600 nm, and was successfully employed for determination of natively fluorescing illegal drugs, such as cocaine, cocaethylene, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA), 3,4-methylenedioxeamphetamine (MDA), 3,4-methylenedioxy- N-ethylamphetamine (MDEA), para-methoxyamphetamine (PMA), para-methoxy- N-methylamphetamine (PMMA), amphetamine (AMP), methamphetamine (METH), tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD). The developed FD showed impressive sensitivity. The instrumental detection limit was 0.5 μg/L for MDMA. It also showed broad linearity, up to 50 mg/L for MDMA. The noise CV% was 1.1% for an empty capillary and 0.6% for a capillary filled with acetonitrile. The portable CE-FD with developed electrophoretic methodologies was successfully utilized for the determination of illegal abuse of drugs during "Weekend" 2016 and 2017 Music Festivals (Estonia). Moreover, CE-FD can be employed for detection of other natively fluorescing compounds in the proposed range (e.g., for different phenolic compounds, BTEX, naphthalene derivatives, and others), significantly widening the applicability of developed CE-FD instrument.

  18. Fano Description of Single-Hydrocarbon Fluorescence Excited by a Scanning Tunneling Microscope.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Jörg; Doppagne, Benjamin; Scheurer, Fabrice; Schull, Guillaume

    2018-06-13

    The detection of fluorescence with submolecular resolution enables the exploration of spatially varying photon yields and vibronic properties at the single-molecule level. By placing individual polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon molecules into the plasmon cavity formed by the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope and a NaCl-covered Ag(111) surface, molecular light emission spectra are obtained that unravel vibrational progression. In addition, light spectra unveil a signature of the molecule even when the tunneling current is injected well separated from the molecular emitter. This signature exhibits a distance-dependent Fano profile that reflects the subtle interplay between inelastic tunneling electrons, the molecular exciton and localized plasmons in at-distance as well as on-molecule fluorescence. The presented findings open the path to luminescence of a different class of molecules than investigated before and contribute to the understanding of single-molecule luminescence at surfaces in a unified picture.

  19. Acetone photophysics at 282 nm excitation at elevated pressure and temperature. II: Fluorescence modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartwig, Jason; Raju, Mandhapati; Sung, Chih-Jen

    2017-07-01

    This is the second in a series of two papers that presents an updated fluorescence model and compares with the new experimental data reported in the first paper, as well as the available literature data, to extend the range of acetone photophysics to elevated pressure and temperature conditions. This work elucidates the complete acetone photophysical model in terms of each and every competing radiative and non-radiative rate. The acetone fluorescence model is then thoroughly examined and optimized based on disparity with recently conducted elevated pressure and temperature photophysical calibration experiments. The current work offers insight into the competition between non-radiative and vibrational energy decay rates at elevated temperature and pressure and proposes a global optimization of model parameters from the photophysical model developed by Thurber (Acetone Laser-Induced Fluorescence for Temperature and Multiparameter Imaging in Gaseous Flows. PhD thesis, Stanford University Mechanical Engineering Department, 1999). The collisional constants of proportionality, which govern vibrational relaxation, are shown to be temperature dependent at elevated pressures. A new oxygen quenching rate is proposed which takes into account collisions with oxygen as well as the oxygen-assisted intersystem crossing component. Additionally, global trends in ketone photophysics are presented and discussed.

  20. Characterization of dissolved organic matter in a submerged membrane bioreactor by using three-dimensional excitation and emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiwei; Wu, Zhichao; Tang, Shujuan

    2009-04-01

    Three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize dissolved organic matter (DOM) in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR). Three fluorescence peaks could be identified from the EEM fluorescence spectra of the DOM samples in the MBR. Two peaks were associated with the protein-like fluorophores, and the third was related to the visible humic acid-like fluorophores. Only two main peaks were observed in the EEM fluorescence spectra of the extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) samples, which were due to the fluorescence of protein-like and humic acid-like matters, respectively. However, the EEM fluorescence spectra of membrane foulants were observed to have three peaks. It was also found that the dominant fluorescence substances in membrane foulants were protein-like substances, which might be due to the retention of proteins in the DOM and/or EPS in the MBR by the fine pores of the membrane. Quantitative analysis of the fluorescence spectra including peak locations, fluorescence intensity, and different peak intensity ratios and the fluorescence regional integration (FRI) analysis were also carried out in order to better understand the similarities and differences among the EEM spectra of the DOM, EPS, and membrane foulant samples and to further provide an insight into membrane fouling caused by the fluorescence substances in the DOM in submerged MBRs.

  1. Dynamics of Carotenoids Probed by Femtosecond Absorption, Fluorescence, and Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshizawa, M.; Kosumi, D.; Komukai, M.; Yanagi, K.; Hashimoto, H.

    Ultrafast optical responses in β-carotene and lycopene depend on the pump wavelength. Excess vibrational energy induced by the photoexcitation remains longer than several picoseconds in the excited states and slows down the relaxation kinetics.

  2. Absorption, fluorescence and second harmonic generation in Cr3+-doped BiB3O6 glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznik, W.; Fuks-Janczarek, I.; Wojciechowski, A.; Kityk, I. V.; Kiisk, V.; Majchrowski, A.; Jaroszewicz, L. R.; Brik, M. G.; Nagy, G. U. L.

    2015-06-01

    Synthesis, spectral properties and photoinduced nonlinear optical effects of chromium-doped BiB3O6 glass are studied in the present paper. Absorption, excitation and time resolved luminescence spectra are presented and luminescence decay behavior is discussed. Detailed analysis of the obtained spectra (assignment of the most prominent spectral features in terms of the corresponding Cr3+ energy levels, crystal field strength Dq, Racah parameters B and C) was performed. A weak photostimulated second harmonic generation signal was found to increase drastically due to poling by proton implantation in the investigated sample.

  3. The dependence of the ultrafast relaxation kinetics of the S2 and S1 states in β-carotene homologs and lycopene on conjugation length studied by femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosumi, Daisuke; Fujiwara, Masazumi; Fujii, Ritsuko; Cogdell, Richard J.; Hashimoto, Hideki; Yoshizawa, Masayuki

    2009-06-01

    The ultrafast relaxation kinetics of all-trans-β-carotene homologs with varying numbers of conjugated double bonds n(n =7-15) and lycopene (n =11) has been investigated using femtosecond time-resolved absorption and Kerr-gate fluorescence spectroscopies, both carried out under identical excitation conditions. The nonradiative relaxation rates of the optically allowed S2(1Bu+1) state were precisely determined by the time-resolved fluorescence. The kinetics of the optically forbidden S1(2Ag-1) state were observed by the time-resolved absorption measurements. The dependence of the S1 relaxation rates upon the conjugation length is adequately described by application of the energy gap law. In contrast to this, the nonradiative relaxation rates of S2 have a minimum at n =9 and show a reverse energy gap law dependence for values of n above 11. This anomalous behavior of the S2 relaxation rates can be explained by the presence of an intermediate state (here called the Sx state) located between the S2 and S1 states at large values of n (such as n =11). The presence of such an intermediate state would then result in the following sequential relaxation pathway S2→Sx→S1→S0. A model based on conical intersections between the potential energy curves of these excited singlet states can readily explain the measured relationships between the decay rates and the energy gaps.

  4. Absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in rare gas matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, J. J.; Balling, L. C.

    1980-10-01

    Pulsed-dye-laser excitation has been used to investigate the optical absorption and emission spectra of Li atoms trapped in Ar, Kr, and Xe matrices at 10 °K. Attempts to stabilize Li atoms in a Ne matrix at 2 °K were unsuccessful. Results for all three rare gases were qualitatively the same. White light absorption scans showed a single absorption with three peaks centered near the free-atom 2s→2p transition wavelength. The intensity of fluorescence produced by dye-laser excitation within this absorption band was measured as a function of emission wavelength. Excitation of the longest- and shortest-wavelength absorption peaks produced identical emission profiles, but no distinct fluorescence signal was detected when the laser was tuned to the central absorption peaks, indicating that the apparent absorption triplet is actually the superposition of a singlet and a doublet absorption originating from two different trapping sites. No additional absorption bands were detected.

  5. Spectroscopic characterization of C7H3(+) and C7H3˙: electronic absorption and fluorescence in 6 K neon matrices.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Arghya; Fulara, Jan; Dietsche, Rainer; Maier, John P

    2014-04-21

    Mass selective deposition of C7H3(+) (m/z = 87) into solid neon reveals the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 electronic absorption system of hepta-1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenylium cation B(+) [H2CCCCCCCH](+) with an origin band at 441.3 nm, 1(1)A'←X(1)A' transition of 2,4-pentadiynylium,1-ethynyl cation C(+) [HCCCHCCCCH](+) starting at 414.6 nm and the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 one of cyclopropenylium,1,3-butadiynyl cation A(+) [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)](+) with an onset at 322.2 nm. Vibrationally resolved fluorescence was observed for isomer B(+) upon laser excitation of the absorption bands in the 1(1)A1←X(1)A1 transition. After neutralization of the cations in the matrix five absorption systems of the C7H3 neutral radicals starting at 530.3, 479.4, 482.3, 325.0 and 302.5 nm were detected. These were identified as the 1(2)A'←X(2)A' and 2(2)A'←X(2)A' electronic transitions of 2-(buta-1,3-diynyl)cycloprop-2yl-1-1ylidene E˙ [HCCCCC<(C=CH2)]˙, 1(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 1,2,3,4,5,6-heptahexaenyl B˙ [H2CCCCCCCH]˙, 3(2)B1←X(2)B1 of 3-buta-1,3-diynyl-cyclopropenyl A˙ [HCCCCC<(CH=CH)]˙ and 2(2)B1←X(2)A2 transition of 1,2-divinylidene-cyclopropanyl radical F˙ [HCC-cyc-(CCHC)-CCH]˙, respectively. The assignment is based on calculated vertical excitation energies using the CASPT2 method. Comparison of the calculated harmonic vibrational frequencies with those inferred from the spectra supports the assignment.

  6. In-focal-plane characterization of excitation distribution for quantitative fluorescence microscopy applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Klaus; Brülisauer, Martina; ćaǧin, Emine; Bertsch, Dietmar; Lüthi, Stefan; Heeb, Peter; Stärker, Ulrich; Bernard, André

    2017-06-01

    The applications of fluorescence microscopy span medical diagnostics, bioengineering and biomaterial analytics. Full exploitation of fluorescent microscopy is hampered by imperfections in illumination, detection and filtering. Mainly, errors stem from deviations induced by real-world components inducing spatial or angular variations of propagation properties along the optical path, and they can be addressed through consistent and accurate calibration. For many applications, uniform signal to noise ratio (SNR) over the imaging area is required. Homogeneous SNR can be achieved by quantifying and compensating for the signal bias. We present a method to quantitatively characterize novel reference materials as a calibration reference for biomaterials analytics. The reference materials under investigation comprise thin layers of fluorophores embedded in polymer matrices. These layers are highly homogeneous in their fluorescence response, where cumulative variations do not exceed 1% over the field of view (1.5 x 1.1 mm). An automated and reproducible measurement methodology, enabling sufficient correction for measurement artefacts, is reported. The measurement setup is equipped with an autofocus system, ensuring that the measured film quality is not artificially increased by out-of-focus reduction of the system modulation transfer function. The quantitative characterization method is suitable for analysis of modified bio-materials, especially through patterned protein decoration. The imaging method presented here can be used to statistically analyze protein patterns, thereby increasing both precision and throughput. Further, the method can be developed to include a reference emitter and detector pair on the image surface of the reference object, in order to provide traceable measurements.

  7. Multivariate methods on the excitation emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopic data of diesel-kerosene mixtures: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Divya, O; Mishra, Ashok K

    2007-05-29

    Quantitative determination of kerosene fraction present in diesel has been carried out based on excitation emission matrix fluorescence (EEMF) along with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) and N-way partial least squares regression (N-PLS). EEMF is a simple, sensitive and nondestructive method suitable for the analysis of multifluorophoric mixtures. Calibration models consisting of varying compositions of diesel and kerosene were constructed and their validation was carried out using leave-one-out cross validation method. The accuracy of the model was evaluated through the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) for the PARAFAC, N-PLS and unfold PLS methods. N-PLS was found to be a better method compared to PARAFAC and unfold PLS method because of its low RMSEP values.

  8. Excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy in conjunction with multiway analysis for PAH detection in complex matrices.

    PubMed

    Nahorniak, Michelle L; Booksh, Karl S

    2006-12-01

    A field portable, single exposure excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometer has been constructed and used in conjunction with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) to determine the sub part per billion (ppb) concentrations of several aqueous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as benzo(k)fluoranthene and benzo(a)pyrene, in various matrices including aqueous motor oil extract and asphalt leachate. Multiway methods like PARAFAC are essential to resolve the analyte signature from the ubiquitous background in environmental samples. With multiway data and PARAFAC analysis it is shown that reliable concentration determinations can be achieved with minimal standards in spite of the large convoluting fluorescence background signal. Thus, rapid fieldable EEM analyses may prove to be a good screening method for tracking pollutants and prioritizing sampling and analysis by more complete but time consuming and labor intensive EPA methods.

  9. Excited state complex formation between methyl glyoxal and some aromatic bio-molecules: a fluorescence quenching study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Mandal, A.; Mukherjee, S.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorescence quenching of some important aromatic bio-molecules (ABM) such as 3-aminophthalhydrazide (luminol), tryptophan (Try), phenylalanine and tyrosine (Tyr) by methyl glyoxal (MG) has been studied employing different spectroscopic techniques. The interaction of MG with ABM in the excited state has been analysed using Stern-Volmer (S-V) mechanism. In the case of MG-luminol system time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) technique has also been applied to explain the S-V mechanism. The bimolecular rate constants obtained are found to be higher than the rate constant for diffusion controlled process. A plausible explanation of the quenching mechanism has been discussed on the basis of hydrogen bonding, charge transfer and energy transfer interaction between the colliding species.

  10. 3D-resolved fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging using temporal focusing wide-field two-photon excitation

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejin; Tzeranis, Dimitrios S.; Cha, Jae Won; Clémenceau, Philippe; de Jong, Sander J. G.; van Geest, Lambertus K.; Moon, Joong Ho; Yannas, Ioannis V.; So, Peter T. C.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescence and phosphorescence lifetime imaging are powerful techniques for studying intracellular protein interactions and for diagnosing tissue pathophysiology. While lifetime-resolved microscopy has long been in the repertoire of the biophotonics community, current implementations fall short in terms of simultaneously providing 3D resolution, high throughput, and good tissue penetration. This report describes a new highly efficient lifetime-resolved imaging method that combines temporal focusing wide-field multiphoton excitation and simultaneous acquisition of lifetime information in frequency domain using a nanosecond gated imager from a 3D-resolved plane. This approach is scalable allowing fast volumetric imaging limited only by the available laser peak power. The accuracy and performance of the proposed method is demonstrated in several imaging studies important for understanding peripheral nerve regeneration processes. Most importantly, the parallelism of this approach may enhance the imaging speed of long lifetime processes such as phosphorescence by several orders of magnitude. PMID:23187477

  11. Simplifications of the RELIEF flow tagging system for laboratory use. [Raman Excitation plus Laser Induced Electronic Fluorescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lempert, Walter R.; Zhang, Boying; Miles, Richard B.; Diskin, Glenn

    1991-01-01

    The use of an O2:He stimulated Raman cell to generate the Stokes beam for the Raman vibrational pumping step of the RELIEF (Raman Excitation plus Laser-Induced Electronic Fluorescence) flow tagging method is reported. Use of the Raman cell rather than a dye laser provides pump and Stokes beams which are automatically frequency matched and temporally and spatially overlapped. The Nd:YAG pump laser is operated multilongitudinal mode, which eliminates the need for injection seeding, resulting in decreased operation complexity and improved stability with respect to acoustic noise. Results are presented for 1st Stokes conversion efficiency and stimulated Brillouin backscattering loss and are compared to the case of pure O2. Scanning CARS measurements of the Q-branch lineshape for both pure O2 and the O2:He mixture are also presented.

  12. Solute-Solvent Charge-Transfer Excitations and Optical Absorption of Hydrated Hydroxide from Time-Dependent Density-Functional Theory.

    PubMed

    Opalka, Daniel; Sprik, Michiel

    2014-06-10

    The electronic structure of simple hydrated ions represents one of the most challenging problems in electronic-structure theory. Spectroscopic experiments identified the lowest excited state of the solvated hydroxide as a charge-transfer-to-solvent (CTTS) state. In the present work we report computations of the absorption spectrum of the solvated hydroxide ion, treating both solvent and solute strictly at the same level of theory. The average absorption spectrum up to 25 eV has been computed for samples taken from periodic ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The experimentally observed CTTS state near the onset of the absorption threshold has been analyzed at the generalized-gradient approximation (GGA) and with a hybrid density-functional. Based on results for the lowest excitation energies computed with the HSE hybrid functional and a Davidson diagonalization scheme, the CTTS transition has been found 0.6 eV below the first absorption band of liquid water. The transfer of an electron to the solvent can be assigned to an excitation from the solute 2pπ orbitals, which are subject to a small energetic splitting due to the asymmetric solvent environment, to the significantly delocalized lowest unoccupied orbital of the solvent. The distribution of the centers of the excited state shows that CTTS along the OH(-) axis of the hydroxide ion is avoided. Furthermore, our simulations indicate that the systematic error arising in the calculated spectrum at the GGA originates from a poor description of the valence band energies in the solution.

  13. Comparison of genetically encoded calcium indicators for monitoring action potentials in mammalian brain by two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Podor, Borbala; Hu, Yi-ling; Ohkura, Masamichi; Nakai, Junichi; Croll, Roger; Fine, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Imaging calcium transients associated with neuronal activity has yielded important insights into neural physiology. Genetically encoded calcium indicators (GECIs) offer conspicuous potential advantages for this purpose, including exquisite targeting. While the catalogue of available GECIs is steadily growing, many newly developed sensors that appear promising in vitro or in model cells appear to be less useful when expressed in mammalian neurons. We have, therefore, evaluated the performance of GECIs from two of the most promising families of sensors, G-CaMPs [Nat. Biotechnol. 19(2), 137–141 (2001)11175727] and GECOs [Science 333(6051), 1888–1891 (2011)21903779], for monitoring action potentials in rat brain. Specifically, we used two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy to compare calcium transients detected by G-CaMP3; GCaMP6f; G-CaMP7; Green-GECO1.0, 1.1 and 1.2; Blue-GECO; Red-GECO; Rex-GECO0.9; Rex-GECO1; Carmine-GECO; Orange-GECO; and Yellow-GECO1s. After optimizing excitation wavelengths, we monitored fluorescence signals associated with increasing numbers of action potentials evoked by current injection in CA1 pyramidal neurons in rat organotypic hippocampal slices. Some GECIs, particularly Green-GECO1.2, GCaMP6f, and G-CaMP7, were able to detect single action potentials with high reliability. By virtue of greatest sensitivity and fast kinetics, G-CaMP7 may be the best currently available GECI for monitoring calcium transients in mammalian neurons. PMID:26158004

  14. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectroscopy of the X(1)A' --> A(1)A'' system of CHI and CDI.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chong; Ebben, Carlena; Reid, Scott A

    2009-11-26

    We report on the first detailed studies of the spectroscopy of an iodocarbene, measuring fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the X1A' --> A1A'' system of :CHI and the deuterated isotopomer :CDI. Due to similar bending and C-I stretching frequencies in the upper state, fluorescence excitation spectra of :CHI show polyads composed of members of the 2(0)(n-x)3(0)x progressions with x = 0-3. For :CDI, only progressions with x = 0, 1 are observed. Extrapolation of the 20n term energies for both isotopomers to a common origin places the electronic origin of the X1A' --> A1A'' system near 10500 cm-1, in good agreement with theoretical predictions. Rotational analysis of the 16 observed bands for CHI and 13 observed bands for :CDI yields rotational constants for the upper and lower states that are also in good agreement with theory. To investigate the controversial issue of the ground state multiplicity of :CHI, we measured single vibronic level emission spectra from many A1A'' levels. These spectra show conclusively that the ground state is a singlet, as for both isotopomers the ã3A'' origin is observed, lying well above the origin of the X1A' state. At energies above the ã3A'' origin, the spin-orbit mixing is so severe that few vibrational assignments can be made. Analysis of the emission spectra provides a lower limit on the singlet-triplet gap of 4.1 kcal mol-1, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions.

  15. Study of the Many Fluorescent Lines and the Absorption Variability in GX 301-2 with XMM-Newton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuerst, F.; Suchy, S.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Barragan, L.; Wilms, J.; Pottschmidt, K.; Caballero, I.; Kretschmar, P.; Ferrigno, C.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2011-01-01

    We present an in-depth study of the High Mass X-ray Binary (HMXB) GX 301-2 during its pre-periastron flare using data from the XMM-Newton satellite. The energy spectrum shows a power law continuum absorbed by a large equivalent hydrogen column on the order of 10(exp 24)/ sq cm and a prominent Fe K-alpha fluorescent emission line. Besides the Fe K-alpha line, evidence for Fe K-Beta, Ni K-alpha, Ni K-Beta, S K-alpha, Ar K-alpha, Ca K-alpha, and Cr K-alpha fluorescent lines is found. The observed line strengths are consistent with fluorescence in a cold absorber. This is the first time that Cr K-alpha is seen in emission in the X-ray spectrum of a HMXB. In addition to the modulation by the strong pulse period of approx 685 sec the source is highly variable and shows different states of activity. We perform time-resolved as well as pulse-to-pulse resolved spectroscopy to investigate differences between these states of activity. We find that fluorescent line fluxes are strongly variable and generally follow the overall flux. The N-H value is variable by a factor of 2, but not correlated to continuum normalization. We find an interval of low flux in the light curve in which the pulsations cease almost completely, without any indication of an increasing absorption column. We investigate this dip in detail and argue that it is most likely that during the dip the accretion ceased and the afterglow of the fluorescent iron accounted for the main portion of the X-ray flux. A similar dip was found earlier in RXTE data, and we compare our findings to these results.

  16. Plant-Stress Measurements Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence Excitation: Poland Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Gene Capelle; Steve Jones

    1999-05-01

    Bechtel Nevada's Special Technologies Laboratory (STL) has been involved in remote sensing for many years, and in April 1995 STL began to study the use of active remote sensing for detecting plant stress. This work was motivated by the need to detect subsurface contamination, with the supposition that this could be accomplished by remote measurement of optical signatures from the overgrowing vegetation. The project has been a cooperative DOE/Disney effort, in which basic optical signature measurements (primarily fluorescence) were done at the Disney greenhouse facilities at Epcot Center in Florida, using instrumentation developed by STL on DOE funding. The primarymore » instrument is a LIFI system, which had originally been developed for detection of surface uranium contamination at DOE sites. To deal specifically with the plant stress measurements, a LIFS system was built that utilizes the same laser, but captures the complete fluorescence spectrum from blue to red wavelengths. This system had continued to evolve, and the version in existence in September 1997 was sent to Poland, accompanied by two people from STL, for the purpose of making the measurements described in this report.« less

  17. Design considerations for highly effective fluorescence excitation and detection optical systems for molecular diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasper, Axel; Van Hille, Herbert; Kuk, Sola

    2018-02-01

    Modern instruments for molecular diagnostics are continuously optimized for diagnostic accuracy, versatility and throughput. The latest progress in LED technology together with tailored optics solutions allows developing highly efficient photonics engines perfectly adapted to the sample under test. Super-bright chip-on-board LED light sources are a key component for such instruments providing maximum luminous intensities in a multitude of narrow spectral bands. In particular the combination of white LEDs with other narrow band LEDs allows achieving optimum efficiency outperforming traditional Xenon light sources in terms of energy consumption, heat dissipation in the system, and switching time between spectral channels. Maximum sensitivity of the diagnostic system can only be achieved with an optimized optics system for the illumination and imaging of the sample. The illumination beam path must be designed for optimum homogeneity across the field while precisely limiting the angular distribution of the excitation light. This is a necessity for avoiding spill-over to the detection beam path and guaranteeing the efficiency of the spectral filtering. The imaging optics must combine high spatial resolution, high light collection efficiency and optimized suppression of excitation light for good signal-to-noise ratio. In order to achieve minimum cross-talk between individual wells in the sample, the optics design must also consider the generation of stray light and the formation of ghost images. We discuss what parameters and limitations have to be considered in an integrated system design approach covering the full path from the light source to the detector.

  18. Effects of substituents in silyl groups on the absorption, fluorescence and structural properties of 1,3,6,8-tetrasilylpyrenes.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Hajime; Suzuki, Tsubasa; Segi, Masahito

    2018-05-09

    1,3,6,8-Tetrasilylpyrenes and related germyl and stannyl derivatives were synthesized, and their absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic and structural properties were elucidated. The results show that the UV-vis absorption maxima of these substances in CH2Cl2 solutions shift to longer wavelengths as the size of the alkyl groups and numbers of phenyl groups on silicon increase. Fluorescence quantum yields of tetrasilylpyrenes in cyclohexane are larger than that of pyrene, and a pentamethyldisilyl derivative has an emission efficiency of 0.79. Except in the case of the SiMe2H derivative, excimer emission was not observed in concentrated solutions of these substances. The SiMe2H and SiMe3 derivatives were shown to form CT complexes with tetracyanoethylene in CH2Cl2 solutions. The calculated energy barriers for rotation of the silyl groups about the Si-C bond increase as the steric bulk of the silyl group increases. 29Si NMR chemical shifts were found to depend on the sizes of the alkyl groups and numbers of phenyl groups. Data arising from theoretical calculations suggest that the silyl groups act as electron-donating groups, and the donating ability of the groups decreases in the order SiR3 > GeR3 > SnR3.

  19. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Geon Joon; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan; Kim, Jun Young; Jang, Siun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2015-01-01

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated water (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.

  20. Optical and structural properties of plasma-treated Cordyceps bassiana spores as studied by circular dichroism, absorption, and fluorescence spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon, E-mail: gjlee@kw.ac.kr; Sim, Geon Bo; Choi, Eun Ha

    To understand the killing mechanism of fungal spores by plasma treatment, the optical, structural, and biological properties of the insect pathogenic fungus Cordyceps bassiana spores were studied. A nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was used to treat the spores in aqueous solution. Optical emission spectra of the APPJ acquired in air indicated emission peaks corresponding to hydroxyl radicals and atomic oxygen. When the APPJ entered the aqueous solution, additional reactive species were derived from the interaction of plasma radicals with the aqueous solution. Fluorescence and absorption spectroscopy confirmed the generation of hydroxyl radicals and hydrogen peroxide in the plasma-activated watermore » (PAW). Spore counting showed that plasma treatment significantly reduced spore viability. Absorption spectroscopy, circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy, and agarose gel electrophoresis of the DNA extracted from plasma-treated spores showed a reduction in spore DNA content. The magnitude of the dip in the CD spectrum was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, indicating that plasma treatment causes structural modifications and/or damage to cellular components. Tryptophan fluorescence intensity was lower in the plasma-treated spores than in the control, suggesting that plasma treatment modified cell wall proteins. Changes in spore viability and DNA content were attributed to structural modification of the cell wall by reactive species coming from the APPJ and the PAW. Our results provided evidence that the plasma radicals and the derived reactive species play critical roles in fungal spore inactivation.« less

  1. 340nm UV LED excitation in time-resolved fluorescence system for europium-based immunoassays detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodenko, Olga; Fodgaard, Henrik; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    2017-02-01

    In immunoassay analyzers for in-vitro diagnostics, Xenon flash lamps have been widely used as excitation light sources. Recent advancements in UV LED technology and its advantages over the flash lamps such as smaller footprint, better wall-plug efficiency, narrow emission spectrum, and no significant afterglow, have made them attractive light sources for gated detection systems. In this paper, we report on the implementation of a 340 nm UV LED based time-resolved fluorescence system based on europium chelate as a fluorescent marker. The system performance was tested with the immunoassay based on the cardiac marker, TnI. The same signal-to-noise ratio as for the flash lamp based system was obtained, operating the LED below specified maximum current. The background counts of the system and its main contributors were measured and analyzed. The background of the system of the LED based unit was improved by 39% compared to that of the Xenon flash lamp based unit, due to the LEDs narrower emission spectrum and longer pulse width. Key parameters of the LED system are discussed to further optimize the signal-to-noise ratio and signal-to-background, and hence the sensitivity of the instrument.

  2. Identification and quantification of ciprofloxacin in urine through excitation-emission fluorescence and three-way PARAFAC calibration.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L A; Sánchez, M S; Giménez, D

    2009-05-29

    Due to the second-order advantage, calibration models based on parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) decomposition of three-way data are becoming important in routine analysis. This work studies the possibility of fitting PARAFAC models with excitation-emission fluorescence data for the determination of ciprofloxacin in human urine. The finally chosen PARAFAC decomposition is built with calibration samples spiked with ciprofloxacin, and with other series of urine samples that were also spiked. One of the series of samples has also another drug because the patient was taking mesalazine. The mesalazine is a fluorescent substance that interferes with the ciprofloxacin. Finally, the procedure is applied to samples of a patient who was being treated with ciprofloxacin. The trueness has been established by the regression "predicted concentration versus added concentration". The recovery factor is 88.3% for ciprofloxacin in urine, and the mean of the absolute value of the relative errors is 4.2% for 46 test samples. The multivariate sensitivity of the fit calibration model is evaluated by a regression between the loadings of PARAFAC linked to ciprofloxacin versus the true concentration in spiked samples. The multivariate capability of discrimination is near 8 microg L(-1) when the probabilities of false non-compliance and false compliance are fixed at 5%.

  3. Green analytical determination of emerging pollutants in environmental waters using excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence data and multivariate calibration.

    PubMed

    Hurtado-Sánchez, María Del Carmen; Lozano, Valeria A; Rodríguez-Cáceres, María Isabel; Durán-Merás, Isabel; Escandar, Graciela M

    2015-03-01

    An eco-friendly strategy for the simultaneous quantification of three emerging pharmaceutical contaminants is presented. The proposed analytical method, which involves photochemically induced fluorescence matrix data combined with second-order chemometric analysis, was used for the determination of carbamazepine, ofloxacin and piroxicam in water samples of different complexity without the need of chromatographic separation. Excitation-emission photoinduced fluorescence matrices were obtained after UV irradiation, and processed with second-order algorithms. Only one of the tested algorithms was able to overcome the strong spectral overlapping among the studied pollutants and allowed their successful quantitation in very interferent media. The method sensitivity in superficial and underground water samples was enhanced by a simple solid-phase extraction with C18 membranes, which was successful for the extraction/preconcentration of the pollutants at trace levels. Detection limits in preconcentrated (1:125) real water samples ranged from 0.04 to 0.3 ng mL(-1). Relative prediction errors around 10% were achieved. The proposed strategy is significantly simpler and greener than liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods, without compromising the analytical quality of the results. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Characterizing fluorescent dissolved organic matter in a membrane bioreactor via excitation-emission matrix combined with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Maqbool, Tahir; Quang, Viet Ly; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we successfully tracked the dynamic changes in different constitutes of bound extracellular polymeric substances (bEPS), soluble microbial products (SMP), and permeate during the operation of bench scale membrane bioreactors (MBRs) via fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Three fluorescent groups were identified, including two protein-like (tryptophan-like C1 and tyrosine-like C2) and one microbial humic-like components (C3). In bEPS, protein-like components were consistently more dominant than C3 during the MBR operation, while their relative abundance in SMP depended on aeration intensities. C1 of bEPS exhibited a linear correlation (R(2)=0.738; p<0.01) with bEPS amounts in sludge, and C2 was closely related to the stability of sludge. The protein-like components were more greatly responsible for membrane fouling. Our study suggests that EEM-PARAFAC can be a promising monitoring tool to provide further insight into process evaluation and membrane fouling during MBR operation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Intramolecular charge transfer of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile probed by time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption: No evidence for two ICT states and a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} reaction intermediate

    SciTech Connect

    Zachariasse, Klaas A.; Druzhinin, Sergey I.; Senyushkina, Tamara

    2009-12-14

    For the double exponential fluorescence decays of the locally excited (LE) and intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) states of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile (DMABN) in acetonitrile (MeCN) the same times {tau}{sub 1} and {tau}{sub 2} are observed. This means that the reversible LE<-->ICT reaction, starting from the initially excited LE state, can be adequately described by a two state mechanism. The most important factor responsible for the sometimes experimentally observed differences in the nanosecond decay time, with {tau}{sub 1}(LE)<{tau}{sub 1}(ICT), is photoproduct formation. By employing a global analysis of the LE and ICT fluorescence response functions with a time resolution of 0.5 ps/channel inmore » 1200 channels reliable kinetic and thermodynamic data can be obtained. The arguments presented in the literature in favor of a {pi}{sigma}* state with a bent CN group as an intermediate in the ICT reaction of DMABN are discussed. From the appearance of an excited state absorption (ESA) band in the spectral region between 700 and 800 nm in MeCN for N,N-dimethylanilines with CN, Br, F, CF{sub 3}, and C(=O)OC{sub 2}H{sub 2} p-substituents, it is concluded that this ESA band cannot be attributed to a {pi}{sigma}{sup *} state, as only the C-C{identical_to}N group can undergo the required 120 deg. bending.« less

  6. Investigation of excited states populations density of Hall thruster plasma in three dimensions by laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivoruchko, D. D.; Skrylev, A. V.

    2018-01-01

    The article deals with investigation of the excited states populations distribution of a low-temperature xenon plasma in the thruster with closed electron drift at 300 W operating conditions were investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) over the 350-1100 nm range. Seven xenon ions (Xe II) transitions were analyzed, while for neutral atoms (Xe I) just three transitions were explored, since the majority of Xe I emission falls into the ultraviolet or infrared part of the spectrum and are difficult to measure. The necessary spontaneous emission probabilities (Einstein coefficients) were calculated. Measurements of the excited state distribution were made for points (volume of about 12 mm3) all over the plane perpendicular to thruster axis in four positions on it (5, 10, 50 and 100 mm). Measured LIF signal intensity have differences for each location of researched point (due to anisotropy of thruster plume), however the structure of states populations distribution persisted at plume and is violated at the thruster exit plane and cathode area. Measured distributions show that for describing plasma of Hall thruster one needs to use a multilevel kinetic model, classic model can be used just for far plume region or for specific electron transitions.

  7. Comparison of femtosecond- and nanosecond-two-photon-absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic oxygen in atmospheric-pressure plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Jacob B.; Sands, Brian; Scofield, James; Gord, James R.; Roy, Sukesh

    2017-05-01

    Absolute number densities of atomic species produced by nanosecond (ns)-duration, repetitively pulsed electric discharges are measured by two-photon-absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). Unique to this work is the development of femtosecond-laser-based TALIF (fs-TALIF) that offers a number of advantages over more conventional nanosecond (ns)-pulse-duration laser techniques, such as higher-fidelity quenching rate measurements over a wide pressure range, significantly reduced photolytic interference (including photo-dissociation and photo-ionization), ability to collect two-dimensional images of atomic-species number densities with high spatial resolution aided by higher signal level, and efficient and accurate measurements of atomic-species number densities due to the higher repetition rates of the laser. For full quantification of these advantages, atomic-oxygen TALIF signals are collected from an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet employing both ns- and fs-duration laser-excitation pulses and the results are compared and contrasted.

  8. Seasonal variation in chromophoric dissolved organic matter and relationships among fluorescent components, absorption coefficients and dissolved organic carbon in the Bohai Sea, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Wen-Zhuo; Zhang, Hong-Hai; Zhang, Jing; Yang, Gui-Peng

    2018-04-01

    The absorption coefficient and fluorescent components of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in the Bohai Sea (BS), Yellow Sea (YS), and East China Sea (ECS) in spring and autumn were analyzed in this study. Excitation-emission matrices (EEMs) combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) identified three components, namely, humic-like C1, tyrosine-like C2 and tryptophan-like C3. The seasonal variations in the vertical patterns of the CDOM absorption coefficient (aCDOM(355)) and fluorescent components were influenced by the seasonal water mass except for the terrestrial input. The relationship between aCDOM(355) and dissolved organic matter (DOC) was attributed to their own mixing behavior. The correlation of the fluorescent components with DOC was disturbed by other non-conservative processes during the export of CDOM to the open ocean. The different chemical compositions and origins of DOC and CDOM led to variability in carbon-specific CDOM absorption (a*CDOM(355)) and fluorescent component ratios (ICn/IC1). The relationship between a*CDOM(355) and aCDOM(355) demonstrated that dissolved organic matter (DOM) in the BS, but not in the ECS, highly contributed non-absorbing DOC to the total DOC concentration. The photodegradation of dominant terrestrially derived CDOM in the ECS contributed to the positive relationship between a*CDOM(355) and ICn/IC1. By contrast, the abundant autochthonous CDOM in the YS was negatively correlated with ICn/IC1 in autumn. Our established box models showed that water exchange is a potentially important source of the aromatic components in the BS, YS, and ECS. Hence, the seasonal variations in water exchange might contribute to the variability of CDOM chemical composition in the BS, YS, and ECS, and significantly influence the structure and function of their ecosystems.

  9. In vivo nanoparticle-mediated radiopharmaceutical-excited fluorescence molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhenhua; Qu, Yawei; Wang, Kun; Zhang, Xiaojun; Zha, Jiali; Song, Tianming; Bao, Chengpeng; Liu, Haixiao; Wang, Zhongliang; Wang, Jing; Liu, Zhongyu; Liu, Haifeng; Tian, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cerenkov luminescence imaging utilizes visible photons emitted from radiopharmaceuticals to achieve in vivo optical molecular-derived signals. Since Cerenkov radiation is weak, non-optimum for tissue penetration and continuous regardless of biological interactions, it is challenging to detect this signal with a diagnostic dose. Therefore, it is challenging to achieve useful activated optical imaging for the acquisition of direct molecular information. Here we introduce a novel imaging strategy, which converts γ and Cerenkov radiation from radioisotopes into fluorescence through europium oxide nanoparticles. After a series of imaging studies, we demonstrate that this approach provides strong optical signals with high signal-to-background ratios, an ideal tissue penetration spectrum and activatable imaging ability. In comparison with present imaging techniques, it detects tumour lesions with low radioactive tracer uptake or small tumour lesions more effectively. We believe it will facilitate the development of nuclear and optical molecular imaging for new, highly sensitive imaging applications. PMID:26123615

  10. [Absorption and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in rainwater and sources analysis in summer and winter season].

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Jiang, Tao; WeiI, Shi-Qiang; Lu, Song; Yan, Jin-Long; Wang, Qi-Lei; Gao, Jie

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed at evaluating the variability of the optical properties including UV-Vis and fluorescence characteristics of dissolved organic matter (DOM) from rainwater in summer and winter seasons. UV-Vis and fluorescence spectroscopy, together with Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model and fire events map, were conducted to characterize DOM and investigate its sources and contributions. The results showed that as compared with aquatic and soil DOM, rainwater DOM showed similar spectral characteristics, suggesting DOM in precipitation was also an important contributor to DOM pool in terrestrial and aquatic systems. The concentrations of DOC in rainwater were 0.88-12.80 mg x L(-1), and the CDOM concentrations were 3.17-21.11 mg x L(-1). Differences of DOM samples between summer and winter were significant (P < 0.05). In comparison to summer, DOM samples in winter had lower molecular weight and aromaticity, and also lower humification. Input of DOM in winter was predominantly derived from local and short-distance distances, while non-special scattering sources were identified as the main contributors in summer. Although absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy could be used to identify DOM composition and sources, there were obvious differences in spectra and sources analysis between rainwater DOM and the others from other sources. Thus, the classic differentiation method by "allochthonous (terrigenous) and autochthonous (authigenic)" is possibly too simple and arbitrary for characterization of DOM in rainwater.

  11. One trinucleus dimethine cyanine dye: Experimental and theoretical studies on molecular structure as well as absorption and fluorescence properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, D. D.; Wang, L. Y.; Su, J. J.; Zhang, X. F.; Lei, Y. B.; Zhai, G. H.; Wen, Z. Y.

    2013-05-01

    A kind of trinucleus dimethine cyanine dye: 1-methyl-2,6-bis[2-(furan-2-yl)vinyl]pyridinium iodide (1) was synthesized and characterized by 1H NMR, 13C NMR, IR, MS, UV-Vis spectroscopy and elemental analysis. The crystals of dye 1, obtained from slow evaporation of solvent acetone, crystallized in the triclinic space group P - 1 with a = 9.6501(16) Å, b = 10.2308(17) Å, c = 10.7341(17) Å, V = 887.2(3) Å3, and Z = 2 (at 298(2) K), and it was stabilized by the hydrogen bonds and intermolecular face-to-face π⋯π aromatic stacking interactions. Crystallographic, IR, 1H NMR and UV-Vis data of dye 1 were compared with the results of density functional theory (DFT) method, and the calculated molecular geometries, vibrational bands, 1H NMR chemical shifts and UV-Vis maximum absorption were consistent with the experimental results. The fluorescence spectra were predicted in four different solvents with CIS/PCM methods. Compared with experimental values, the absolute deviations of emission maxima were -17.4 nm in chloroform, 6.3 nm in DMSO, 4.9 nm in methanol, and 6.8 nm in water, respectively. And the experimental fluorescence spectra were nicely reproduced by the simulated fluorescence spectra for each solvent.

  12. How does the plasmonic enhancement of molecular absorption depend on the energy gap between molecular excitation and plasmon modes: a mixed TDDFT/FDTD investigation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jin; Li, Guang; Liang, WanZhen

    2015-07-14

    A real-time time-dependent density functional theory coupled with the classical electrodynamics finite difference time domain technique is employed to systematically investigate the optical properties of hybrid systems composed of silver nanoparticles (NPs) and organic adsorbates. The results demonstrate that the molecular absorption spectra throughout the whole energy range can be enhanced by the surface plasmon resonance of Ag NPs; however, the absorption enhancement ratio (AER) for each absorption band differs significantly from the others, leading to the quite different spectral profiles of the hybrid complexes in contrast to those of isolated molecules or sole NPs. Detailed investigations reveal that the AER is sensitive to the energy gap between the molecular excitation and plasmon modes. As anticipated, two separate absorption bands, corresponding to the isolated molecules and sole NPs, have been observed at a large energy gap. When the energy gap approaches zero, the molecular excitation strongly couples with the plasmon mode to form the hybrid exciton band, which possesses the significantly enhanced absorption intensity, a red-shifted peak position, a surprising strongly asymmetric shape of the absorption band, and the nonlinear Fano effect. Furthermore, the dependence of surface localized fields and the scattering response functions (SRFs) on the geometrical parameters of NPs, the NP-molecule separation distance, and the external-field polarizations has also been depicted.

  13. The influence of visible light and inorganic pigments on fluorescence excitation emission spectra of egg-, casein- and collagen-based painting media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevin, A.; Anglos, D.; Cather, S.; Burnstock, A.

    2008-07-01

    Spectrofluorimetric analysis of proteinaceous binding media is particularly promising because proteins employed in paintings are often fluorescent and media from different sources have significantly different fluorescence spectral profiles. Protein-based binding media derived from eggs, milk and animal tissue have been used for painting and for conservation, but their analysis using non-destructive techniques is complicated by interferences with pigments, their degradation and their low concentration. Changes in the fluorescence excitation emission spectra of films of binding media following artificial ageing to an equivalent of 50 and 100 years of museum lighting include the reduction of bands ascribed to tyrosine, tryptophan and Maillard reaction products and an increase in fluorescent photodegradation. Fluorescence of naturally aged paint is dependent on the nature of the pigment present and, with egg-based media, in comparison with un-pigmented films, emissions ascribed to amino acids are more pronounced.

  14. Multi-Photon Absorption Spectra: A Comparison Between Transmittance Change and Fluorescence Methods

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-21

    AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0134 multi-photon absorption spectra Cleber Mendonca INSTITUTO DE FISICA DE SAO CARLOS Final Report 05/21/2015 DISTRIBUTION A...5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Instituto de Fisica de Sao Carlos - Universidade de Sao Paulo Av

  15. Efficiency of the intermolecular interaction of salicylic acid neutral form and monoanion with Cd2 + ion studied by methods of absorption and fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrik, N. L.; Mulloev, N. U.

    2018-02-01

    The methods of absorption and fluorescence were used to study the efficiency of the interaction between salicylic acid derivatives SAD (neutral SA form and SA monoanion) and Cd2 + ions (in CdBr2 salt) within the range pH = 1.5 ÷ 8. The efficiency was determined from the change in both the absorption band contour and the fluorescence intensity of various SAD forms. It has been established that depending on the SAD form, the addition of CdBr2 to a starting solution leads to the formation of additional absorption for both the shorter wave lengths in the absorption spectrum of the neutral form (at pH < 3) and the longer wave lengths in the absorption spectrum for the HSal- monoanion (at pH > 4). In the fluorescence spectra, the intensity was observed to increase for the neutral SAD form (at pH < 3) and to decrease for the HSal- monoanion (at pH > 4) after addition of CdBr2. The spectral changes were interpreted in the framework of common notions about the effect of three physicochemical factors that determine the interaction between the SAD and the Cd2 + ion and affect the parameters of absorption and fluorescence spectra. These factors are: (1) the decrease in pH after addition of CdBr2 to the SAD solution, (2) the decrease in the efficiency of the H-bonding of SAD molecules to the water ones, and (3) the existence of electrostatic ion-ion interaction between the HSal- monoanion and the Cd2 + ion. The bimolecular fluorescence quenching constants Kq of HSal- monoanion fluorescence quenching by the Cd2 + ion appeared to be substantially less than those of the quenching which would follow either the dynamic (diffusion) or the concentration (static) mechanisms.

  16. Comparison of line-peak and line-scanning excitation in two-color laser-induced-fluorescence thermometry of OH.

    PubMed

    Kostka, Stanislav; Roy, Sukesh; Lakusta, Patrick J; Meyer, Terrence R; Renfro, Michael W; Gord, James R; Branam, Richard

    2009-11-10

    Two-line laser-induced-fluorescence (LIF) thermometry is commonly employed to generate instantaneous planar maps of temperature in unsteady flames. The use of line scanning to extract the ratio of integrated intensities is less common because it precludes instantaneous measurements. Recent advances in the energy output of high-speed, ultraviolet, optical parameter oscillators have made possible the rapid scanning of molecular rovibrational transitions and, hence, the potential to extract information on gas-phase temperatures. In the current study, two-line OH LIF thermometry is performed in a well-calibrated reacting flow for the purpose of comparing the relative accuracy of various line-pair selections from the literature and quantifying the differences between peak-intensity and spectrally integrated line ratios. Investigated are the effects of collisional quenching, laser absorption, and the integration width for partial scanning of closely spaced lines on the measured temperatures. Data from excitation scans are compared with theoretical line shapes, and experimentally derived temperatures are compared with numerical predictions that were previously validated using coherent anti-Stokes-Raman scattering. Ratios of four pairs of transitions in the A2Sigma+<--X2Pi (1,0) band of OH are collected in an atmospheric-pressure, near-adiabatic hydrogen-air flame over a wide range of equivalence ratios--from 0.4 to 1.4. It is observed that measured temperatures based on the ratio of Q1(14)/Q1(5) transition lines result in the best accuracy and that line scanning improves the measurement accuracy by as much as threefold at low-equivalence-ratio, low-temperature conditions. These results provide a comprehensive analysis of the procedures required to ensure accurate two-line LIF measurements in reacting flows over a wide range of conditions.

  17. Migration test of Bisphenol A from polycarbonate cups using excitation-emission fluorescence data with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Spagnuolo, M L; Marini, F; Sarabia, L A; Ortiz, M C

    2017-05-15

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the most largely produced chemical in the world; it is used to make plastics and epoxy resins. The endocrine disruptor potential of BPA is well known, but recent researches suggest a relationship between chronic exposure to BPA, genotoxic activity and epigenetic modifications. The main source of exposure to BPA includes food contact materials (FCM). Thus simple and robust test methods are needed to improve the migration test of BPA. In this work, a non-separative, easy, fast and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric method based on the second order calibration of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices (EEMs) was proposed for the determination of BPA. For the first time, molecular fluorescence was used to identify unequivocally and quantify BPA. Trilinearity of the data tensor guarantees the uniqueness of the solution obtained through parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC), so one factor of the decomposition matches up with BPA even if other fluorophores are in the test sample. The effect of four experimental factors of the procedure on the figures of merit and the unequivocally identification was investigated by means of a D-optimal design and PARAFAC calibration. The method is linear and accurate in the range 0-720µgL -1 . The decision limit CCα and detection capability CCβ are 6.63µgL -1 and 18.85µgL -1 respectively (with probabilities of false positive and false negative fixed at 0.05). Finally the proposed method was applied to carry out a migration test from two polycarbonate cups, using 3% (w/v) acetic acid in aqueous solution as food simulant. The migrated amount of BPA was found to be 688.7µgL -1 (n=5) for the first cup and 710.5µgL -1 (n=4) for the second one, above the specific migration limit set by EFSA (European Food Safety Authority). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Long-depth imaging of specific gene expressions in whole-mount mouse embryos with single-photon excitation confocal fluorescence microscopy and FISH.

    PubMed

    Palmes-Saloma, C; Saloma, C

    2000-07-01

    Long-depth imaging of specific gene expression in the midgestation whole-mount mouse embryo (WME) is demonstrated with single-photon excitation (1PE) confocal fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence in situ hybridization. Expression domains of Pax-6 mRNA transcripts were labeled with an in situ hybridization probe that is a RNA sequence complementary to the cloned gene fragment and were rendered visible using two fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies that fluoresce at peak wavelengths of lambda(F) = 0.525 microm and lambda(F) = 0. 580 microm, respectively. Distributions of Pax-6 mRNA domains as deep as 1000 microm in the day 9.5 WME were imaged with a long-working-distance (13.6 mm) objective lens (magnification 5x). The scattering problem posed by the optically thick WME sample is alleviated by careful control of the detector pinhole size and the application of simple but fast postdetection image enhancement techniques, such as space and wavelength averaging to produce high-quality fluorescence images. A three-dimensional reconstruction that clearly shows the Pax-6 mRNA expression domains in the forebrain, diencephalon, optic cup, and spinal cord of the day 9.5 WME is obtained. The advantages of 1PE confocal fluorescence imaging over two-photon excitation fluorescence imaging are discussed for the case of long-depth imaging in highly scattering media. Imaging in midgestation WMEs at optical depths of more than 350 microm has not yet been realized with two-photon fluorescence excitation. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. A new visible-light-excitable ICT-CHEF-mediated fluorescence 'turn-on' probe for the selective detection of Cd(2+) in a mixed aqueous system with live-cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Goswami, Shyamaprosad; Aich, Krishnendu; Das, Sangita; Das Mukhopadhyay, Chitrangada; Sarkar, Deblina; Mondal, Tapan Kumar

    2015-03-28

    A new quinoline based sensor was developed and applied for the selective detection of Cd(2+) both in vitro and in vivo. The designed probe displays a straightforward approach for the selective detection of Cd(2+) with a prominent fluorescence enhancement along with a large red shift (∼38 nm), which may be because of the CHEF (chelation-enhanced fluorescence) and ICT (internal charge transfer) processes after interaction with Cd(2+). The interference from other biologically important competing metal ions, particularly Zn(2+), has not been observed. The visible-light excitability of the probe merits in the viewpoint of its biological application. The probe enables the detection of intracellular Cd(2+) with non-cytotoxic effects, which was demonstrated with the live RAW cells. The experimentally observed change in the structure and electronic properties of the sensor after the addition of Cd(2+) were modelled by the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) computational calculations, respectively. Moreover, the test strip experiment with this sensor exhibits both absorption and fluorescence color changes when exposed to Cd(2+) in a mixed aqueous solution, which also makes the probe more useful. The minimum limit of detection of Cd(2+) by the probe was in the range of 9.9 × 10(-8) M level.

  20. Large Fluorescence Response by Alcohol from a Bis(benzoxazole)-Zinc(II) Complex: The Role of Excited State Intramolecular Proton Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Junfeng; Chu, Qinghui; Liu, Xiumin; Wesdemiotis, Chrys

    2013-01-01

    The formation of a bis(HBO) anion is known to turn-on the fluorescence to give red emission, via controlling the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT). The poor stability of the formed anion, however, hampered its application. The anion stability is found to be greatly improved by attaching the anion to Zn2+ cation (i.e. forming zinc complex), whose emission is at λem ≈ 550 and 760 nm. Interestingly, addition of methanol to the zinc complex induces a remarkable red fluorescence (λem ≈ 630 nm, ϕfl ≈ 0.8). With the aid of spectroscopic studies (1H NMR, UV-vis, fluorescence, and mass spectra), the structures of the zinc complexes are characterized. The emission species is identified as a dimer-like structure. The study thus reveals an effective fluorescence switching mechanism that could further advance the application of ESIPT-based sensors. PMID:23514312

  1. Two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence of atomic oxygen in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Takezawa, Kei; Oda, Tetsuji

    2009-08-01

    Atomic oxygen is measured in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge using time-resolved two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence. The discharge occurs in a 14 mm point-to-plane gap in dry air. After the discharge pulse, the atomic oxygen density decreases at a rate of 5×104 s-1. Simultaneously, ozone density increases at almost the same rate, where the ozone density is measured using laser absorption method. This agreement between the increasing rate of atomic oxygen and decreasing rate of ozone proves that ozone is mainly produced by the well-known three-body reaction, O+O2+M→O3+M. No other process for ozone production such as O2(v)+O2→O3+O is observed. The spatial distribution of atomic oxygen density is in agreement with that of the secondary streamer luminous intensity. This agreement indicates that atomic oxygen is mainly produced in the secondary streamer channels, not in the primary streamer channels.

  2. The multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments and its applications to the analysis of fluorescence excitation-emission spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bao Qiong; Wang, Xue; Li Xu, Min; Zhai, Hong Lin; Chen, Jing; Liu, Jin Jin

    2018-01-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy with an excitation-emission matrix (EEM) is a fast and inexpensive technique and has been applied to the detection of a very wide range of analytes. However, serious scattering and overlapping signals hinder the applications of EEM spectra. In this contribution, the multi-resolution capability of Tchebichef moments was investigated in depth and applied to the analysis of two EEM data sets (data set 1 consisted of valine-tyrosine-valine, tryptophan-glycine and phenylalanine, and data set 2 included vitamin B1, vitamin B2 and vitamin B6) for the first time. By means of the Tchebichef moments with different orders, the different information in the EEM spectra can be represented. It is owing to this multi-resolution capability that the overlapping problem was solved, and the information of chemicals and scatterings were separated. The obtained results demonstrated that the Tchebichef moment method is very effective, which provides a promising tool for the analysis of EEM spectra. It is expected that the applications of Tchebichef moment method could be developed and extended in complex systems such as biological fluids, food, environment and others to deal with the practical problems (overlapped peaks, unknown interferences, baseline drifts, and so on) with other spectra.

  3. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy for rapid identification and quality evaluation of cell culture media components.

    PubMed

    Li, Boyan; Ryan, Paul W; Shanahan, Michael; Leister, Kirk J; Ryder, Alan G

    2011-11-01

    The application of fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy to the quantitative analysis of complex, aqueous solutions of cell culture media components was investigated. These components, yeastolate, phytone, recombinant human insulin, eRDF basal medium, and four different chemically defined (CD) media, are used for the formulation of basal and feed media employed in the production of recombinant proteins using a Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell based process. The comprehensive analysis (either identification or quality assessment) of these materials using chromatographic methods is time consuming and expensive and is not suitable for high-throughput quality control. The use of EEM in conjunction with multiway chemometric methods provided a rapid, nondestructive analytical method suitable for the screening of large numbers of samples. Here we used multiway robust principal component analysis (MROBPCA) in conjunction with n-way partial least squares discriminant analysis (NPLS-DA) to develop a robust routine for both the identification and quality evaluation of these important cell culture materials. These methods are applicable to a wide range of complex mixtures because they do not rely on any predetermined compositional or property information, thus making them potentially very useful for sample handling, tracking, and quality assessment in biopharmaceutical industries.

  4. Cooling and Laser-Induced Fluorescence of Electronically-Excited He2 in a Supersonic Microcavity Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Rui; Mironov, Andrey; Houlahan, Thomas, Jr.; Eden, J. Gary; LaboratoryOptical Physics; Engineering Team

    2016-09-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) resulting from transitions between different electronic states of helium dimers generated within a microcavity plasma jet was studied with rotational resolution. In particular, the d3Σu+ , e3Πg and f3Σu+ states, all having electronic energies above 24 eV, are populated by a microplasma in 4 bar of helium gas and rotationally cooled through supersonic expansion. Analysis of two dimensional maps (spectrograms) of dimer emission spectra as a function of distance from the nozzle orifice indicates collisional coupling during the expansion between the lowest rotational levels of the e3Πg , f3Σu+ states and high rotational levels (around N=11) of the d3Σu+ state (all of which are in the v = 0 vibrational state). In an attempt to verify the coupling, a scanning dye laser (centered near 596 nm) pumps the b3Πg -> f3Σu+ transition of the molecule several hundred micrometers downstream of the nozzle. As a result, the emission intensities of relevant rotational lines are observed to be enhanced. This research shows the potential of utilizing microcavity plasma jets as a tool to study and manipulate the collisional dynamics of highly-excited diatomic molecules.

  5. Endogenous Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Provides Label-Free Visualization of the Inflammatory Response in the Rodent Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Uckermann, Ortrud; Galli, Roberta; Beiermeister, Rudolf; Sitoci-Ficici, Kerim-Hakan; Later, Robert; Leipnitz, Elke; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Koch, Edmund; Schackert, Gabriele; Steiner, Gerald; Kirsch, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Activation of CNS resident microglia and invasion of external macrophages plays a central role in spinal cord injuries and diseases. Multiphoton microscopy based on intrinsic tissue properties offers the possibility of label-free imaging and has the potential to be applied in vivo. In this work, we analyzed cellular structures displaying endogenous two-photon excited fluorescence (TPEF) in the pathologic spinal cord. It was compared qualitatively and quantitatively to Iba1 and CD68 immunohistochemical staining in two models: rat spinal cord injury and mouse encephalomyelitis. The extent of tissue damage was retrieved by coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation imaging. The pattern of CD68-positive cells representing postinjury activated microglia/macrophages was colocalized to the TPEF signal. Iba1-positive microglia were found in areas lacking any TPEF signal. In peripheral areas of inflammation, we found similar numbers of CD68-positive microglia/macrophages and TPEF-positive structures while the number of Iba1-positive cells was significantly higher. Therefore, we conclude that multiphoton imaging of unstained spinal cord tissue enables retrieving the extent of microglia activation by acquisition of endogenous TPEF. Future application of this technique in vivo will enable monitoring inflammatory responses of the nervous system allowing new insights into degenerative and regenerative processes. PMID:26355949

  6. Monitoring the Behavior of Emerging Contaminants in Wastewater-Impacted Rivers Based on the Use of Fluorescence Excitation Emission Matrixes (EEM).

    PubMed

    Sgroi, Massimiliano; Roccaro, Paolo; Korshin, Gregory V; Vagliasindi, Federico G A

    2017-04-18

    This study investigated the applicability of fluorescence indexes based on the interpretation of excitation emission matrices (EEMs) by PARAFAC analysis and by selecting fluorescence intensities at a priori defined excitation/emission pairs as surrogates for monitoring the behavior of emerging organic compounds (EOCs) in two catchment basins impacted by wastewater discharges. Relevant EOC and EEM data were obtained for a 90 km stretch of the Simeto River, the main river in Sicily, and the smaller San Leonardo River, which was investigated for a 17 km stretch. The use of fluorescence indexes developed by these two different approaches resulted in similar observations. Changes of the fluorescence indexes that correspond to a group of humic-like fluorescing species were determined to be highly correlated with the concentrations of recalcitrant contaminants such as sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and carbamazepine, which are typical wastewater markers in river water. Changes of the fluorescence indexes related to tyrosine-like substances were well correlated with the concentrations of ibuprofen and caffeine, anthropogenic indicators of untreated wastewater discharges. Chemical oxygen demand and dissolved organic carbon concentrations were correlated with humic-like fluorescence indexes. The observed correlations were site-specific and characterized by different regression parameters for every collection event. Caffeine and carbamazepine showed correlations with florescence indexes in the San Leonardo River and in the alluvial plain stretch of the Simeto River, whereas sucralose, sulfamethoxazole and ibuprofen have always been well correlated in all the investigated river stretches. However, when data of different collection events from river stretches where correlations were observed were combined, good linear correlations were obtained for data sets generated via the normalization of the measured concentrations by the average value for the corresponding collection event

  7. Flash lamp-excited time-resolved fluorescence microscope suppresses autofluorescence in water concentrates to deliver an 11-fold increase in signal-to-noise ratio.

    PubMed

    Connally, Russell; Veal, Duncan; Piper, James

    2004-01-01

    The ubiquity of naturally fluorescing components (autofluorophores) encountered in most biological samples hinders the detection and identification of labeled targets through fluorescence-based techniques. Time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) is a technique by which the effects of autofluorescence are reduced by using specific fluorescent labels with long fluorescence lifetimes (compared with autofluorophores) in conjunction with time-gated detection. A time-resolved fluorescence microscope (TRFM) is described that is based on a standard epifluorescence microscope modified by the addition of a pulsed excitation source and an image-intensified time-gateable CCD camera. The choice of pulsed excitation source for TRFM has a large impact on the price and performance of the instrument. A flash lamp with rapid discharge characteristics was selected for our instrument because of the high spectral energy in the UV region and short pulse length. However, the flash output decayed with an approximate lifetime of 18 micros and the TRFM required a long-lived lanthanide chelate label to ensure that probe fluorescence was visible after decay of the flash plasma. We synthesized a recently reported fluorescent chelate (BHHCT) and conjugated it to a monoclonal antibody directed against the waterborne parasite Giardia lamblia. For a 600-nm bandpass filter set and a gate delay of 60 micros, the TRFM provided an 11.3-fold improvement in the signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) of labeled Giardia over background. A smaller gain in an SNR of 9.69-fold was achieved with a 420-nm longpass filter set; however, the final contrast ratio between labeled cyst and background was higher (11.3 versus 8.5). Despite the decay characteristics of the light pulse, flash lamps have many practical advantages compared with optical chopper wheels and modulated lasers for applications in TRFM.

  8. Direct on-strip analysis of size- and time-resolved aerosol impactor samples using laser induced fluorescence spectra excited at 263 and 351 nm.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chuji; Pan, Yong-Le; James, Deryck; Wetmore, Alan E; Redding, Brandon

    2014-04-11

    We report a novel atmospheric aerosol characterization technique, in which dual wavelength UV laser induced fluorescence (LIF) spectrometry marries an eight-stage rotating drum impactor (RDI), namely UV-LIF-RDI, to achieve size- and time-resolved analysis of aerosol particles on-strip. The UV-LIF-RDI technique measured LIF spectra via direct laser beam illumination onto the particles that were impacted on a RDI strip with a spatial resolution of 1.2mm, equivalent to an averaged time resolution in the aerosol sampling of 3.6 h. Excited by a 263 nm or 351 nm laser, more than 2000 LIF spectra within a 3-week aerosol collection time period were obtained from the eight individual RDI strips that collected particles in eight different sizes ranging from 0.09 to 10 μm in Djibouti. Based on the known fluorescence database from atmospheric aerosols in the US, the LIF spectra obtained from the Djibouti aerosol samples were found to be dominated by fluorescence clusters 2, 5, and 8 (peaked at 330, 370, and 475 nm) when excited at 263 nm and by fluorescence clusters 1, 2, 5, and 6 (peaked at 390 and 460 nm) when excited at 351 nm. Size- and time-dependent variations of the fluorescence spectra revealed some size and time evolution behavior of organic and biological aerosols from the atmosphere in Djibouti. Moreover, this analytical technique could locate the possible sources and chemical compositions contributing to these fluorescence clusters. Advantages, limitations, and future developments of this new aerosol analysis technique are also discussed. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  9. Evaluation of natural organic matter changes from Lake Hohloh by three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy during TiO(2)/UV process.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Sergio; Marín, Juan M; Restrepo, Gloria; Frimmel, Fritz H

    2014-03-15

    This study shows the changes of natural organic matter (NOM) from Lake Hohloh, (Black Forest, Germany) during heterogeneous photocatalysis with TiO2 (TiO2/UV). The effect of pH on the adsorption of NOM onto TiO2 in the dark and TiO2/UV degradation of NOM was followed using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. At pH values between 4 and 9, the NOM was adsorbed onto TiO2 in the dark with a greater decrease in the fluorescence intensity and in the spectral shapes, especially under acidic pH conditions. However, at pH = 10 there was not adsorption on NOM which led to a negligible changes the fluorescence intensity. A significant high linear correlation was observed between the DOC adsorption onto TiO2 and the maximum fluorescence intensity. Additionally, the NOM adsorption onto TiO2 and its TiO2/UV degradation shifted the fluorescence maxima toward shorter wavelengths in the EEM contour plots, with a decrease in aromaticity. These changes were accompanied by a substantial decrease in the organically bound halogens adsorbable on activated carbon (AOXFP) and the trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP). Thus, the decrease in maximum fluorescence intensity can be used as an indicator of AOXFP and TTHMFP removal efficiency. Therefore, fluorescence spectroscopy is a robust analytical technique for evaluate TiO2/UV removal of NOM. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. On the optimization, and the intensity dependence, of the excitation rate for the absorption of two-photons due to the direct permanent dipole moment excitation mechanism

    SciTech Connect

    Meath, William J., E-mail: wmeath@uwo.ca

    2016-07-15

    A model two-level dipolar molecule, and the rotating wave approximation and perturbation theory, are used to investigate the optimization and the laser intensity dependence of the two-photon excitation rate via the direct permanent dipole mechanism. The rate is proportional to the square of the laser intensity I only for small intensities and times when perturbation theory is applicable. An improvement on perturbation theory is provided by a small time RWA result for the rate which is not proportional to I{sup 2}; rather it is proportional to the square of an effective intensity I{sub eff}. For each laser intensity the optimummore » RWA excitation rate as a function of time, for low intensities, is proportional to I, not I{sup 2}, and for high intensities it is proportional to I{sub eff}. For a given two-photon transition the laser-molecule coupling optimizes for an intensity I{sub max} which, for example, leads to a maximum possible excitation rate as a function of time. The validity of the RWA results of this paper, and the importance of including the effects of virtual excited states, are also discussed briefly.« less

  11. Improving confocal microscopy with solid-state semiconductor excitation sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, Nelson L.

    To efficiently excite the fluorescent dyes used in imaging biological samples with a confocal microscope, the wavelengths of the exciting laser must be near the fluorochrome absorption peak. However, this causes imaging problems when the fluorochrome absorption and emission spectra overlap significantly, i.e. have small Stokes shifts, which is the case for most fluorochromes that emit in the red to infrared. As a result, the reflected laser excitation cannot be distinguished from the information-containing fluorescence signal. However, cryogenically cooling the exciting laser diode enabled the laser emission wavelengths to be tuned to shorter wavelengths, decreasing the interference between the laser and the fluorochrome's fluorescence. This reduced the amount of reflected laser light in the confocal image. However, the cooled laser diode's shorter wavelength signal resulted in slightly less efficient fluorochrome excitation. Spectrophotometric analysis showed that as the laser diodes were cooled, their output power increased, which more than compensated for the lower fluorochrome excitation and resulted in significantly more intense fluorescence. Thus, by tuning the laser diode emission wavelengths away from the fluorescence signal, less reflected laser light and more fluorescence information reached the detector, creating images with better signal to noise ratios. Additionally, new, high, luminous flux, light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are now powerful enough to create confocal fluorescence signals comparable to those produced by the traditional laser excitation sources in fluorescence confocal microscopes. The broader LED spectral response effectively excited the fluorochrome, yet was spectrally limited enough for standard filter sets to separate the LED excitation from the fluorochrome fluorescence signal. Spectrophotometric analysis of the excitation and fluorescence spectra of several fluorochromes showed that high-powered, LED-induced fluorescence contained the

  12. Absorption and fluorescence properties of chromophoric dissolved organic matter: implications for the monitoring of water quality in a large subtropical reservoir.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaohan; Zhang, Yunlin; Shi, Kun; Zhu, Guangwei; Xu, Hai; Zhu, Mengyuan

    2014-12-01

    The development of techniques for real-time monitoring of water quality is of great importance for effectively managing inland water resources. In this study, we first analyzed the absorption and fluorescence properties in a large subtropical reservoir and then used a chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) fluorescence monitoring sensor to predict several water quality parameters including the total nitrogen (TN), total phosphorus (TP), chemical oxygen demand (COD), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and CDOM fluorescence parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) components in the reservoir. The CDOM absorption coefficient at 254 nm (a(254)), the humic-like component (C1), and the tryptophan-like component (C3) decreased significantly along a gradient from the northwest to the lake center, northeast, southwest, and southeast region in the reservoir. However, no significant spatial difference was found for the tyrosine-like component (C2), which contributed only four marked peaks. A highly significant linear correlation was found between the a(254) and CDOM concentration measured using the CDOM fluorescence sensor (r(2) = 0.865, n = 76, p < 0.001), indicating that CDOM concentrations could act as a proxy for the CDOM absorption coefficient measured in the laboratory. Significant correlations were also found between the CDOM concentration and TN, TP, COD, DOC, and the maximum fluorescence intensity of C1, suggesting that the real-time monitoring of CDOM concentrations could be used to predict these water quality parameters and trace the humic-like fluorescence substance in clear aquatic ecosystems with DOC <2 mg/L and total suspended matter (TSM) concentrations <15 mg/L. These results demonstrate that the CDOM fluorescence sensor is a useful tool for on-line water quality monitoring if the empirical relationship between the CDOM concentration measured using the CDOM fluorescence sensor and the water quality parameters is calibrated and validated.

  13. The fluorescent treponemal antibody-absorption (FTA-ABS) test for syphilis.

    PubMed

    Hunter, E F

    1975-01-01

    The FTA test was developed at a time when immunofluorescence procedures were not well-defined. Through technique control and research, a modification of the FTA test, the FTA-ABS, has attained a position as one of the leading treponemal tests to confirm the reagin tests for syphilis. In this review of the FTA-ABS test, attention has been focused on reagent development, with the anticipation that reagent standardization may soon become a reality. The T. pallidum antigen obtained by extracting infected rabbit testicular tissue has evolved from a preparation in which the treponemes remained in the initial extracting fluid to a reagent that can be free of rabbit tissue and globulin. These washed antigen preparations improve visibility of the treponemes on the microscope slide, reduce background fluorescence, and reduce or prevent from occurring nonspecific reactions that are a result of tissue and globulin components. Both washed and nonwashed antigens are available commercially, and, to date, little differentiation has appeared on the product label. The predominant immunoglobulin that reacts with T. pallidum in the indirect fluorescent antibody tests appears to be IgG. This is the major immunoglobulin detected in the FTA-ABS test. IgM, although increased in early syphilis, is also increased in other clinical conditions. Several reports suggest that adult IgM detection in the present FTA-ABS test would be nonspecific. Until specific IgM antibody in adult syphilis can be detected without a risk to test specificity, the conjugate for the FTA-ABS test should continue to be an anti-IgG reagent. Class-specific, anti-IgG reagents are more expensive than other reagents; however, their use may eliminate the problem of nonspecificity resulting from IgM detection. Additionally, micromethods can be used to reduce cost, and this possibility should be investigated. The sorbent that contains an antigen to the Reiter treponeme may or may not specifically absorb the reactivity that

  14. The absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra of α and β-F, Cl, Br-naphthalenes in crystalline matrixes at 77 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, T.; Milea, I.; Abdolrahman, P. M.

    1984-03-01

    The paper studies the absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence spectra of α and β-F, Cl, Br-naphtalenes (α, β-F, Cl,BrN) in different matrixes at 77 K and different concentrations. From these spectra one obtaines the vibrational frequences.

  15. Mercury in Environmental and Biological Samples Using Online Combustion with Sequential Atomic Absorption and Fluorescence Measurements: A Direct Comparison of Two Fundamental Techniques in Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cizdziel, James V.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory experiment, students quantitatively determine the concentration of an element (mercury) in an environmental or biological sample while comparing and contrasting the fundamental techniques of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS) and atomic fluorescence spectrometry (AFS). A mercury analyzer based on sample combustion,…

  16. Intraocular light scatter, reflections, fluorescence and absorption: what we see in the slit lamp.

    PubMed

    van den Berg, Thomas J T P

    2018-01-01

    Much knowledge has been collected over the past 20 years about light scattering in the eye- in particular in the eye lens- and its visual effect, called straylight. It is the purpose of this review to discuss how these insights can be applied to understanding the slit lamp image. The slit lamp image mainly results from back scattering, whereas the effects on vision result mainly from forward scatter. Forward scatter originates from particles of about wavelength size distributed throughout the lens. Most of the slit lamp image originates from small particle scatter (Rayleigh scatter). For a population of middle aged lenses it will be shown that both these scatter components remove around 10% of the light from the direct beam. For slit lamp observation close to the reflection angles, zones of discontinuity (Wasserspalten) at anterior and posterior parts of the lens show up as rough surface reflections. All these light scatter effects increase with age, but the correlations with age, and also between the different components, are weak. For retro-illumination imaging it will be argued that the density or opacity seen in areas of cortical or posterior subcapsular cataract show up because of light scattering, not because of light loss. NOTES: (1) Light scatter must not be confused with aberrations. Light penetrating the eye is divided into two parts: a relatively small part is scattered, and removed from the direct beam. Most of the light is not scattered, but continues as the direct beam. This non-scattered part is the basis for functional imaging, but its quality is under the control of aberrations. Aberrations deflect light mainly over small angles (<1°), whereas light scatter is important because of the straylight effects over large angles (>1°), causing problems like glare and hazy vision. (2) The slit lamp image in older lenses and nuclear cataract is strongly influenced by absorption. However, this effect is greatly exaggerated by the light path lengths

  17. Multiple-photon excitation of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Peng; Balili, R.; Beaumariage, J.; Mukherjee, S.; Snoke, D.; Dutt, M. V. Gurudev

    2018-04-01

    We report the observation of multiphoton photoluminescence excitation (PLE) below the resonant energies of nitrogen vacancy (NV) centers in diamond. The quadratic and cubic dependence of the integrated fluorescence intensity as a function of excitation power indicates a two-photon excitation pathway for the NV- charge state and a three-photon process involved for the neutral NV0 charge state, respectively. Comparing the total multiphoton energy with its single-photon equivalent, the PLE spectra follows the absorption spectrum of single photon excitation. We also observed that the efficiency of photoluminescence for different charge states, as well as the decay time constant, was dependent on the excitation wavelength and power.

  18. Spectroscopic identification of individual fluorophores using photoluminescence excitation spectra.

    PubMed

    Czerski, J; Colomb, W; Cannataro, F; Sarkar, S K

    2018-01-25

    The identity of a fluorophore can be ambiguous if other fluorophores or nonspecific fluorescent impurities have overlapping emission spectra. The presence of overlapping spectra makes it difficult to differentiate fluorescent species using discrete detection channels and unmixing of spectra. The unique absorption and emission signatures of fluorophores provide an opportunity for spectroscopic identification. However, absorption spectroscopy may be affected by scattering, whereas fluorescence emission spectroscopy suffers from signal loss by gratings or other dispersive optics. Photoluminescence excitation spectra, where excitation is varied and emission is detected at a fixed wavelength, allows hyperspectral imaging with a single emission filter for high signal-to-background ratio without any moving optics on the emission side. We report a high throughput method for measuring the photoluminescence excitation spectra of individual fluorophores using a tunable supercontinuum laser and prism-type total internal reflection fluorescence microscope. We used the system to measure and sort the photoluminescence excitation spectra of individual Alexa dyes, fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs), and fluorescent polystyrene beads. We used a Gaussian mixture model with maximum likelihood estimation to objectively separate the spectra. Finally, we spectroscopically identified different species of fluorescent nanodiamonds with overlapping spectra and characterized the heterogeneity of fluorescent nanodiamonds of varying size. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  19. An excited state intramolecular proton transfer dye based fluorescence turn-on probe for fast detection of thiols and its applications in bioimaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Li, Haoyang; Zhu, Ruitao; Ren, Yuehong; Shi, Qinghua; Wang, Song; Guo, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In this study, a new fluorescent probe 2-(2‧-hydroxy-5‧-N-maleimide phenyl)-benzothiazole (probe 1), was designed and synthesized by linking the excited state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) fluorophore to the maleimide group for selective detection of thiols in aqueous solution. The fluorescence of probe 1 is strongly quenched by maleimide group through the photo-induced electron transfer (PET) mechanism, but after reaction with thiol, the fluorescence of ESIPT fluorophore is restored, affording a large Stokes shifts. Upon addition of cysteine (Cys), probe 1 exhibited a fast response time (complete within 30 s) and a high signal-to-noise ratio (up to 23-fold). It showed a high selectivity and excellent sensitivity to thiols over other relevant biological species, with a detection limit of 3.78 × 10- 8 M (S/N = 3). Moreover, the probe was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in living cells.

  20. Time-resolved infrared fluorescence from 2ν 1 and 2ν 8 modes of CF 2Cl 2 excited by a CO 2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vatsa, R. K.; Kumar, Awadhesh; Naik, P. D.; Rama Rao, K. V. S.; Mittal, J. P.

    1993-04-01

    Infrared fluorescence has been observed from the overtones and combination bands of ν 1 and ν 8 on pumping either of these modes of CF 2Cl 2 by a CO 2 laser. Excitation of the ν 8 mode gives fluorescence from 2ν 1/(ν 1 + ν 6) and 2ν 8 modes at 4.6 and 5.4 μm, respectively. The intensity of 4.6 μm fluorescence showed a quadratic dependence on the pressure of CF 2Cl 2. A decay rate constant of (2.76±0.55)×10 4 s -1 Torr -1 was obtained for this emission band and it has been assigned to intermode energy outflow from the ν 1 and ν 6 modes. The possible pathways of populating the ν 1 and ν 6 modes are discussed.

  1. Strategies for laser-induced fluorescence detection of nitric oxide in high-pressure flames. II. A-X(0,1) excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bessler, Wolfgang G.; Schulz, Christof; Lee, Tonghun; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2003-04-01

    A-X(0,1) excitation is a promising new approach for NO laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) diagnostics at elevated pressures and temperatures. We present what to our knowledge are the first detailed spectroscopic investigations within this excitation band using wavelength-resolved LIF measurements in premixed methane/air flames at pressures between 1 and 60 bar and a range of fuel/air ratios. Interference from O2 LIF is a significant problem in lean flames for NO LIF measurements, and pressure broadening and quenching lead to increased interference with increased pressure. Three different excitation schemes are identified that maximize NO/O2 LIF signal ratios, thereby minimizing the O2 interference. The NO LIF signal strength, interference by hot molecular oxygen, and temperature dependence of the three schemes are investigated.

  2. Simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging: A method for aligning an AFM-tip with an excitation beam using a 2D galvanometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moores, A. N.; Cadby, A. J.

    2018-02-01

    Correlative fluorescence and atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging is a highly attractive technique for use in biological imaging, enabling force and mechanical measurements of particular structures whose locations are known due to the specificity of fluorescence imaging. The ability to perform these two measurements simultaneously (rather than consecutively with post-processing correlation) is highly valuable because it would allow the mechanical properties of a structure to be tracked over time as changes in the sample occur. We present an instrument which allows simultaneous AFM and fluorescence imaging by aligning an incident fluorescence excitation beam with an AFM-tip. Alignment was performed by calibrating a 2D galvanometer present in the excitation beam path and using it to reposition the incident beam. Two programs were developed (one manual and one automated) which correlate sample features between the AFM and fluorescence images, calculating the distance required to translate the incident beam towards the AFM-tip. Using this method, we were able to obtain beam-tip alignment (and therefore field-of-view alignment) from an offset of >15 μm to within one micron in two iterations of the program. With the program running alongside data acquisition for real-time feedback between AFM and optical images, this offset was maintained over a time period of several hours. Not only does this eliminate the need to image large areas with both techniques to ensure that fields-of-view overlap, but it also raises the possibility of using this instrument for tip-enhanced fluorescence applications, a technique in which super-resolution images have previously been achieved.

  3. Molecular Imaging for Breast Cancer Using Magnetic Resonance-Guided Positron Emission Mammography and Excitation-Resolved Near-Infrared Fluorescence Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jaedu

    The aim of this work is to develop novel breast-specific molecular imaging techniques for management of breast cancer. In this dissertation, we describe two novel molecular imaging approaches for breast cancer management. In Part I, we introduce our multimodal molecular imaging approach for breast cancer therapy monitoring using magnetic resonance imaging and positron emission mammography (MR/PEM). We have focused on the therapy monitoring technique for aggressive cancer molecular subtypes, which is challenging due to time constraint. Breast cancer therapy planning relies on a fast and accurate monitoring of functional and anatomical change. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept of sequential dual-modal magnetic resonance and positron emission mammography (MR/PEM) for the cancer therapy monitoring. We have developed dedicated breast coils with breast compression mechanism equipped with MR-compatible PEM detector heads. We have designed a fiducial marker that allows straightforward image registration of data obtained from MRI and PEM. We propose an optimal multimodal imaging procedure for MR/PEM. In Part II, we have focused on the development of a novel intraoperative near-infrared fluorescence imaging system (NIRF) for image-guided breast cancer surgery. Conventional spectrally-resolved NIRF systems are unable to resolve various NIR fluorescence dyes for the following reasons. First, the fluorescence spectra of viable NIR fluorescence dyes are heavily overlapping. Second, conventional emission-resolved NIRF suffers from a trade-off between the fluence rate and the spectral resolution. Third, the multiple scattering in tissue degrades not only the spatial information but also the spectral contents by the red-shift. We develop a wavelength-swept laser-based NIRF system that can resolve the excitation shift of various NIR fluorescence dyes without substantial loss of the fluence rate. A linear ratiometric model is employed to measure the relative shift of the excitation

  4. Quantitative Measurement of Protease-Activity with Correction of Probe Delivery and Tissue Absorption Effects

    PubMed Central

    Salthouse, Christopher D.; Reynolds, Fred; Tam, Jenny M.; Josephson, Lee; Mahmood, Umar

    2009-01-01

    Proteases play important roles in a variety of pathologies from heart disease to cancer. Quantitative measurement of protease activity is possible using a novel spectrally matched dual fluorophore probe and a small animal lifetime imager. The recorded fluorescence from an activatable fluorophore, one that changes its fluorescent amplitude after biological target interaction, is also influenced by other factors including imaging probe delivery and optical tissue absorption of excitation and emission light. Fluorescence from a second spectrally matched constant (non-activatable) fluorophore on each nanoparticle platform can be used to correct for both probe delivery and tissue absorption. The fluorescence from each fluorophore is separated using fluorescence lifetime methods. PMID:20161242

  5. Insight into the heterogeneous adsorption of humic acid fluorescent components on multi-walled carbon nanotubes by excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenghu; Liu, Yangzhi; Cen, Qiulin; Zhu, Yaxian; Zhang, Yong

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneous adsorption behavior of commercial humic acid (HA) on pristine and functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) was investigated by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and parallel factor (EEM- PARAFAC) analysis. The kinetics, isotherms, thermodynamics and mechanisms of adsorption of HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs were the focus of the present study. Three humic-like fluorescent components were distinguished, including one carboxylic-like fluorophore C1 (λ ex /λ em = (250, 310) nm/428nm), and two phenolic-like fluorophores, C2 (λ ex /λ em = (300, 460) nm/552nm) and C3 (λ ex /λ em = (270, 375) nm/520nm). The Lagergren pseudo-second-order model can be used to describe the adsorption kinetics of the HA fluorescent components. In addition, both the Freundlich and Langmuir models can be suitably employed to describe the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components onto MWCNTs with significantly high correlation coefficients (R 2 > 0.94, P< 0.05). The dissimilarity in the adsorption affinity (K d ) and nonlinear adsorption degree from the HA fluorescent components to MWCNTs was clearly observed. The adsorption mechanism suggested that the π-π electron donor-acceptor (EDA) interaction played an important role in the interaction between HA fluorescent components and the three MWCNTs. Furthermore, the values of the thermodynamic parameters, including the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG°), enthalpy change (ΔH°) and entropy change (ΔS°), showed that the adsorption of the HA fluorescent components on MWCNTs was spontaneous and exothermic. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Tracking variations in fluorescent-dissolved organic matter in an aerobic submerged membrane bioreactor using excitation-emission matrix spectra combined with parallel factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Shin, Jaewon; Kang, Minsun; Cho, Jinwoo

    2014-08-01

    In this study, the variations in the fluorescent components of dissolved organic matter (DOM) were tracked for an aerobic submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) at three different operation stages (cake layer formation, condensation, and after cleaning). The fluorescent DOM was characterized using excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC). Non-aromatic carbon structures appear to be actively involved in the membrane fouling for the cake layer formation stage as revealed by much higher UV-absorbing DOM per organic carbon found in the effluent versus those inside the reactor. Four fluorescent components were successfully identified from the reactor and the effluent DOMs by EEM-PARAFAC modeling. Among those in the reactor, microbial humic-like fluorescence was the most abundant component at the cake layer formation stage and tryptophan-like fluorescence at the condensation stage. In contrast to the reactor, relatively similar composition of the PARAFAC components was exhibited for the effluent at all three stages. Tryptophan-like fluorescence displayed the largest difference between the reactor and the effluent, suggesting that this component could be a good tracer for membrane fouling. It appears that the fluorescent DOM was involved in membrane fouling by cake layer formation rather than by internal pore adsorption because its difference between the reactor and the effluent was the highest among all the four components, even after the membrane cleaning. Our study provided an insight into the fate and the behavior fluorescent DOM components for an MBR system, which could be an indicator of the membrane fouling.

  7. Fluorescence detection of white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy: towards element-sensitive projections of local atomic structure

    PubMed Central

    Korecki, P.; Tolkiehn, M.; Dąbrowski, K. M.; Novikov, D. V.

    2011-01-01

    Projections of the atomic structure around Nb atoms in a LiNbO3 single crystal were obtained from a white-beam X-ray absorption anisotropy (XAA) pattern detected using Nb K fluorescence. This kind of anisotropy results from the interference of X-rays inside a sample and, owing to the short coherence length of a white beam, is visible only at small angles around interatomic directions. Consequently, the main features of the recorded XAA corresponded to distorted real-space projections of dense-packed atomic planes and atomic rows. A quantitative analysis of XAA was carried out using a wavelet transform and allowed well resolved projections of Nb atoms to be obtained up to distances of 10 Å. The signal of nearest O atoms was detected indirectly by a comparison with model calculations. The measurement of white-beam XAA using characteristic radiation indicates the possibility of obtaining element-sensitive projections of the local atomic structure in more complex samples. PMID:21997909

  8. Catalog of total excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps with synchronous fluorescence spectra of homologated fluorescent pesticides in large use in Morocco: development of a spectrometric low cost and direct analysis as an alert method in case of massive contamination of soils and waters by fluorescent pesticides.

    PubMed

    Foudeil, S; Hassoun, H; Lamhasni, T; Ait Lyazidi, S; Benyaich, F; Haddad, M; Choukrad, M; Boughdad, A; Bounakhla, M; Bounouira, H; Duarte, R M B O; Cachada, A; Duarte, A C

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this research is to develop a direct spectrometric approach to monitor soils and waters, at a lower cost than the widely used chromatographic techniques; a spectrometric approach that is effective, reliable, fast, easy to implement, and without any use of organic solvents whose utilization is subject to law limitation. It could be suitable at least as an alert method in case of massive contamination. Here, we present for the first time a catalog of excitation-emission and total synchronous fluorescence maps that may be considered as fingerprints of a series of homologated pesticides, in large use in Morocco, aiming at a direct detection of their remains in agricultural soils and neighboring waters. After a large survey among farmers, agricultural workers and product distributors in two important agricultural regions of Morocco (Doukkala-Abda and Sebou basin), 48 commercial pesticides, which are fluorescent, were chosen. A multi-component spectral database of these targeted commercial pesticides was elaborated. For each pesticide, dissolved in water at the lowest concentration giving a no-noise fluorescence spectrum, the total excitation-emission matrix (TEEM), the total synchronous fluorescence matrix (TSFM) in addition to synchronous fluorescence spectra (SFS) at those offsets giving the highest fluorescence intensity were recorded. To test this preliminary multi-component database, two real soil samples, collected at a wheat field and at a vine field in the region of Doukkala, were analyzed. Remains of the commercial Pirimor (Carbamate) and Atlantis (Sulfonylurea) were identified by comparison of the recorded TEEM, TSFM, and SFS to those of the preliminary catalog at one hand, and on the basis of the results of a field pre-survey. The developed approach seems satisfactory, and the fluorimetric fingerprint database is under extension to a higher number of fluorescent pesticides in common use among the Moroccan agricultural regions.

  9. Elucidating the Nature of the Excited State of a Heteroleptic Copper Photosensitizer by using Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Garrido-Barros, Pablo; Gimbert-Suriñach, Carolina; Picón, Antonio; Liu, Cunming; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Karnahl, Michael; Llobet, Antoni

    2018-04-25

    We report the light-induced electronic and geometric changes taking place within a heteroleptic Cu I photosensitizer, namely [(xant)Cu(Me 2 phenPh 2 )]PF 6 (xant=xantphos, Me 2 phenPh 2 =bathocuproine), by time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the ps-μs time regime. Time-resolved X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis enabled the elucidation of the electronic and structural configuration of the copper center in the excited state as well as its decay dynamics in different solvent conditions with and without triethylamine acting as a sacrificial electron donor. A three-fold decrease in the decay lifetime of the excited state is observed in the presence of triethylamine, showing the feasibility of the reductive quenching pathway in the latter case. A prominent pre-edge feature is observed in the XANES spectrum of the excited state upon metal to charge ligand transfer transition, showing an increased hybridization of the 3d states with the ligand p orbitals in the tetrahedron around the Cu center. EXAFS and density functional theory illustrate a significant shortening of the Cu-N and an elongation of the Cu-P bonds together with a decrease in the torsional angle between the xantphos and bathocuproine ligand. This study provides mechanistic time-resolved understanding for the development of improved heteroleptic Cu I photosensitizers, which can be used for the light-driven production of hydrogen from water. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. [Study on optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) in rainwater by fluorescence excitation-emission matrix and absorbance spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yuan-yue; Guo, Wei-dong; Long, Ai-min; Chen, Shao-yong

    2010-09-01

    The optical characteristics of chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) were determined in rain samples collected in Xiamen Island, during a rainy season in 2007, using fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectroscopy associated with UV-Vis absorbance spectra. Results showed that the absorbance spectra of CDOM in rain samples decreased exponentially with wavelength. The absorbance coefficient at 300 nm [a(300)] ranged from 0.27 to 3.45 m(-1), which would be used as an index of CDOM abundance, and the mean value was 1.08 m(-1). The content of earlier stage of precipitation events was higher than that of later stage of precipitation events, which implied that anthropogenic sources or atmospheric pollution or air mass types were important contributors to CDOM levels in precipitation. EEMs spectra showed 4 types of fluorescence signals (2 humic-like fluorescence peaks and 2 protein-like fluorescence peaks) in rainwater samples, and there were significant positive correlations of peak A with C and peak B with S, showing their same sources or some relationship of the two humic-like substance and the two protein-like substance. The strong positive correlations of the two humic-like fluorescence peaks with a(300), suggested that the chromophores responsible for absorbance might be the same as fluorophores responsible for fluorescence. Results showed that the presence of highly absorbing and fluorescing CDOM in rainwater is of significant importance in atmospheric chemistry and might play a previously unrecognized role in the wavelength dependent spectral attenuation of solar radiation by atmospheric waters.

  11. Characterization of organic membrane foulants in a submerged membrane bioreactor with pre-ozonation using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; You, Shi-jie

    2011-02-01

    This study focuses on organic membrane foulants in a submerged membrane bioreactor (MBR) process with pre-ozonation compared to an individual MBR using three-dimensional excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence spectroscopy. While the influent was continuously ozonated at a normal dosage, preferable organic matter removal was achieved in subsequent MBR, and trans-membrane pressure increased at a much lower rate than that of the individual MBR. EEM fluorescence spectroscopy was employed to characterize the dissolved organic matter (DOM) samples, extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) samples and membrane foulants. Four main peaks could be identified from the EEM fluorescence spectra of the DOM samples in both MBRs. Two peaks were associated with the protein-like fluorophores, and the other ones were related to the humic-like fluorophores. The results indicated that pre-ozonation decreased fluorescence intensities of all peaks in the EEM spectra of influent DOM especially for protein-like substances and caused red shifts of all fluorescence peaks to different extents. The peak intensities of the protein-like substances represented by Peak T(1) and T(2) in EPS spectra were obviously decreased as a result of pre-ozonation. Both external and internal fouling could be effectively mitigated by the pre-ozonation. The most primary component of external foulants was humic acid-like substance (Peak C) in the MBR with pre-ozonation and protein-like substance (Peak T(1)) in the individual MBR, respectively. The content decrease of protein-like substances and structural change of humic-like substances were observed in external foulants from EEM fluorescence spectra due to pre-ozonation. However, it could be seen that ozonation resulted in significant reduction of intensities but little location shift of all peaks in EEM fluorescence spectra of internal foulants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis of yellow and red fluorescent 1,3a,6a-triazapentalenes and the theoretical investigation of their optical properties† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: the experimental details for the synthesis of the triazapentalenes and the fluorescent cell staining, the absorption and fluorescence spectra, and the 1H and 13C NMR spectra. Also given are the molecular orbitals, the natural charges, the dipole moments, and the Cartesian coordinates of the triazapentalenes (1a, 1b, 1g, 1e, and 1f). See DOI: 10.1039/c4sc02780a Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Osawa, Ayumi; Mera, Akane; Tano, Fumi; Chuman, Yoshiro; Sakuda, Eri; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Kitamura, Noboru

    2015-01-01

    To expand the originally developed fluorescent 1,3a,6a-triazapentalenes as fluorescent labelling reagents, the fluorescence wavelength of the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalenes was extended to the red color region. Based on the noteworthy correlation of the fluorescence wavelength with the inductive effect of the 2-substituent, electron-deficient 2-(2-cyano-4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-1,3a,6a-triazapentalene and 2-(2,6-dicyano-4-methoxycarbonylphenyl)-1,3a,6a-triazapentalene were synthesized. The former exhibited yellow fluorescence and the latter exhibited red fluorescence, and both compounds exhibited large Stokes shifts, and the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalene system enabled the same fluorescent chromophore to cover the entire region of visible wavelengths. The potential applications of the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalenes as fluorescent probes in the fields of the life sciences were investigated, and the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalene system was clearly proven to be useful as a fluorescent reagent for live cell imaging. Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the optical properties of the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalenes. These calculations revealed that the excitation involves a significant charge-transfer from the 1,3a,6a-triazapentalene skeleton to the 2-substituent. The calculated absorption and fluorescence wavelengths showed a good correlation with the experimental ones, and thus the system could enable the theoretical design of substituents with the desired optical properties. PMID:29560196

  13. Robust and economical multi-sample, multi-wavelength UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detector for biological and chemical contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Peter J.; Hoehl, Melanie M.; Macarthur, James B.; Sims, Peter A.; Ma, Hongshen; Slocum, Alexander H.

    2012-09-01

    We present a portable multi-channel, multi-sample UV/vis absorption and fluorescence detection device, which has no moving parts, can operate wirelessly and on batteries, interfaces with smart mobile phones or tablets, and has the sensitivity of commercial instruments costing an order of magnitude more. We use UV absorption to measure the concentration of ethylene glycol in water solutions at all levels above those deemed unsafe by the United States Food and Drug Administration; in addition we use fluorescence to measure the concentration of d-glucose. Both wavelengths can be used concurrently to increase measurement robustness and increase detection sensitivity. Our small robust economical device can be deployed in the absence of laboratory infrastructure, and therefore may find applications immediately following natural disasters, and in more general deployment for much broader-based testing of food, agricultural and household products to prevent outbreaks of poisoning and disease.

  14. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source.

    PubMed

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S N; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R

    2013-09-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years.

  15. A new on-axis micro-spectrophotometer for combining Raman, fluorescence and UV/Vis absorption spectroscopy with macromolecular crystallography at the Swiss Light Source

    PubMed Central

    Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian S. N.; Thominet, Vincent; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Fuchs, Martin R.

    2013-01-01

    The combination of X-ray diffraction experiments with optical methods such as Raman, UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy greatly enhances and complements the specificity of the obtained information. The upgraded version of the in situ on-axis micro-spectrophotometer, MS2, at the macromolecular crystallography beamline X10SA of the Swiss Light Source is presented. The instrument newly supports Raman and resonance Raman spectroscopy, in addition to the previously available UV/Vis absorption and fluorescence modes. With the recent upgrades of the spectral bandwidth, instrument stability, detection efficiency and control software, the application range of the instrument and its ease of operation were greatly improved. Its on-axis geometry with collinear X-ray and optical axes to ensure optimal control of the overlap of sample volumes probed by each technique is still unique amongst comparable facilities worldwide and the instrument has now been in general user operation for over two years. PMID:23955041

  16. Simultaneous imaging of fuel vapor mass fraction and gas-phase temperature inside gasoline sprays using two-line excitation tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Zigan, Lars; Trost, Johannes; Leipertz, Alfred

    2016-02-20

    This paper reports for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, on the simultaneous imaging of the gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction distribution in a direct-injection spark-ignition (DISI) spray under engine-relevant conditions using tracer planar laser-induced fluorescence (TPLIF). For measurements in the spray, the fluorescence tracer 3-pentanone is added to the nonfluorescent surrogate fuel iso-octane, which is excited quasi-simultaneously by two different excimer lasers for two-line excitation LIF. The gas-phase temperature of the mixture of fuel vapor and surrounding gas and the fuel vapor mass fraction can be calculated from the two LIF signals. The measurements are conducted in a high-temperature, high-pressure injection chamber. The fluorescence calibration of the tracer was executed in a flow cell and extended significantly compared to the existing database. A detailed error analysis for both calibration and measurement is provided. Simultaneous single-shot gas-phase temperature and fuel vapor mass fraction fields are processed for the assessment of cyclic spray fluctuations.

  17. Application of novel low-intensity nonscanning fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy for monitoring excited state dynamics in individual chloroplasts and living cells of photosynthetic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Hann-Jörg; Petrášek, Zdeněk; Kemnitz, Klaus

    2006-10-01

    Picosecond fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) provides a most valuable tool to analyze the primary processes of photosynthesis in individual cells and chloroplasts of living cells. In order to obtain correct lifetimes of the excited states, the peak intensity of the exciting laser pulses as well as the average intensity has to be sufficiently low to avoid distortions of the kinetics by processes such as singlet-singlet annihilation, closing of the reaction centers or photoinhibition. In the present study this requirement is achieved by non-scanning wide-field FLIM based on time- and space-correlated single-photon counting (TSCSPC) using a novel microchannel plate photomultiplier with quadrant anode (QA-MCP) that allows parallel acquisition of time-resolved images under minimally invasive low-excitation conditions. The potential of the wide-field TCSPC method is demonstrated by presenting results obtained from measurements of the fluorescence dynamics in individual chloroplasts of moss leaves and living cells of the chlorophyll d-containing cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina.

  18. Details of the Collagen and Elastin Architecture in the Human Limbal Conjunctiva, Tenon's Capsule and Sclera Revealed by Two-Photon Excited Fluorescence Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Park, Choul Yong; Marando, Catherine M; Liao, Jason A; Lee, Jimmy K; Kwon, Jiwon; Chuck, Roy S

    2016-10-01

    To investigate the architecture and distribution of collagen and elastin in human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera. The limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera of human donor corneal buttons were imaged with an inverted two-photon excited fluorescence microscope. No fixation process was necessary. The laser (Ti:sapphire) was tuned at 850 nm for two-photon excitation. Backscatter signals of second harmonic generation (SHG) and autofluorescence (AF) were collected through a 425/30-nm and a 525/45-nm emission filter, respectively. Multiple, consecutive, and overlapping (z-stack) images were acquired. Collagen signals were collected with SHG, whereas elastin signals were collected with AF. The size and density of collagen bundles varied widely depending on depth: increasing from conjunctiva to sclera. In superficial image planes, collagen bundles were <10 μm in width, in a loose, disorganized arrangement. In deeper image planes (episclera and superficial sclera), collagen bundles were thicker (near 100 μm in width) and densely packed. Comparatively, elastin fibers were thinner and sparse. The orientation of elastin fibers was independent of collagen fibers in superficial layers; but in deep sclera, elastin fibers wove through collagen interbundle gaps. At the limbus, both collagen and elastin fibers were relatively compact and were distributed perpendicular to the limbal annulus. Two-photon excited fluorescence microscopy has enabled us to understand in greater detail the collagen and elastin architecture of the human limbal conjunctiva, Tenon's capsule, and sclera.

  19. Two-photon excitation in chip electrophoresis enabling label-free fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer chips.

    PubMed

    Geissler, David; Belder, Detlev

    2015-12-01

    One of the most commonly employed detection methods in microfluidic research is fluorescence detection, due to its ease of integration and excellent sensitivity. Many analytes though do not show luminescence when excited in the visible light spectrum, require suitable dyes. Deep-ultraviolet (UV) excitation (<300 nm) allows label-free detection of a broader range of analytes but also mandates the use of expensive fused silica glass, which is transparent to UV light. Herein, we report the first application of label-free deep UV fluorescence detection in non-UV transparent full-body polymer microfluidic devices. This was achieved by means of two-photon excitation in the visible range (λex = 532 nm). Issues associated with the low optical transmittance of plastics in the UV range were successfully circumvented in this way. The technique was investigated by application to microchip electrophoresis of small aromatic compounds. Various polymers, such as poly(methyl methacrylate), cyclic olefin polymer, and copolymer as well as poly(dimethylsiloxane) were investigated and compared with respect to achievable LOD and ruggedness against photodamage. To demonstrate the applicability of the technique, the method was also applied to the determination of serotonin and tryptamine in fruit samples. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Solid phase excitation-emission fluorescence method for the classification of complex substances: Cortex Phellodendri and other traditional Chinese medicines as examples.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yao; Ni, Yongnian; Kokot, Serge

    2012-09-13

    A novel, simple and direct fluorescence method for analysis of complex substances and their potential substitutes has been researched and developed. Measurements involved excitation and emission (EEM) fluorescence spectra of powdered, complex, medicinal herbs, Cortex Phellodendri Chinensis (CPC) and the similar Cortex Phellodendri Amurensis (CPA); these substances were compared and discriminated from each other and the potentially adulterated samples (Caulis mahoniae (CM) and David poplar bark (DPB)). Different chemometrics methods were applied for resolution of the complex spectra, and the excitation spectra were found to be the most informative; only the rank-ordering PROMETHEE method was able to classify the samples with single ingredients (CPA, CPC, CM) or those with binary mixtures (CPA/CPC, CPA/CM, CPC/CM). Interestingly, it was essential to use the geometrical analysis for interactive aid (GAIA) display for a full understanding of the classification results. However, these two methods, like the other chemometrics models, were unable to classify composite spectral matrices consisting of data from samples of single ingredients and binary mixtures; this suggested that the excitation spectra of the different samples were very similar. However, the method is useful for classification of single-ingredient samples and, separately, their binary mixtures; it may also be applied for similar classification work with other complex substances.

  1. Cob(I)alamin: insight into the nature of electronically excited states elucidated via quantum chemical computations and analysis of absorption, CD and MCD data.

    PubMed

    Kornobis, Karina; Ruud, Kenneth; Kozlowski, Pawel M

    2013-02-07

    The nature of electronically excited states of the super-reduced form of vitamin B(12) (i.e., cob(I)alamin or B(12s)), a ubiquitous B(12) intermediate, was investigated by performing quantum-chemical calculations within the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) framework and by establishing their correspondence to experimental data. Using response theory, the electronic absorption (Abs), circular dichroism (CD) and magnetic CD (MCD) spectra of cob(I)alamin were simulated and directly compared with experiment. Several issues have been taken into considerations while performing the TD-DFT calculations, such as strong dependence on the applied exchange-correlation (XC) functional or structural simplification imposed on the cob(I)alamin. In addition, the low-lying transitions were also validated by performing CASSCF/MC-XQDPT2 calculations. By comparing computational results with existing experimental data a new level of understanding of electronic excitations has been established at the molecular level. The present study extends and confirms conclusions reached for other cobalamins. In particular, the better performance of the BP86 functional, rather than hybrid-type, was observed in terms of the excitations associated with both Co d and corrin π localized transitions. In addition, the lowest energy band was associated with multiple metal-to-ligand charge transfer excitations as opposed to the commonly assumed view of a single π → π* transition followed by vibrational progression. Finally, the use of the full cob(I)alamin structure, instead of simplified molecular models, shed new light on the spectral analyses of cobalamin systems and revealed new challenges of this approach related to long-range charge transfer excitations involving side chains.

  2. Copper uptake, intracellular localization, and speciation in marine microalgae measured by synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence and absorption microspectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Adams, Merrin S.; Dillon, Carolyn T.; Vogt, Stefan; ...

    2016-07-20

    Metal toxicity to aquatic organisms depends on the speciation of the metal and its binding to the critical receptor site(s) (biotic ligand) of the organism. The intracellular nature of the biot