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Sample records for absorption index cai

  1. Performance assessment of the cellulose absorption index (CAI) method for estimating crop residue cover

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accurate and quick field estimation of crop residues are important for carbon sequestration and biofuel production programs. Landscape-scale assessment of this vital information has promoted the use of remote sensing technology. The cellulose absorption index (CAI) technique has outperformed other ...

  2. E-CAI: a novel server to estimate an expected value of Codon Adaptation Index (eCAI)

    PubMed Central

    Puigbò, Pere; Bravo, Ignacio G; Garcia-Vallvé, Santiago

    2008-01-01

    Background The Codon Adaptation Index (CAI) is a measure of the synonymous codon usage bias for a DNA or RNA sequence. It quantifies the similarity between the synonymous codon usage of a gene and the synonymous codon frequency of a reference set. Extreme values in the nucleotide or in the amino acid composition have a large impact on differential preference for synonymous codons. It is thence essential to define the limits for the expected value of CAI on the basis of sequence composition in order to properly interpret the CAI and provide statistical support to CAI analyses. Though several freely available programs calculate the CAI for a given DNA sequence, none of them corrects for compositional biases or provides confidence intervals for CAI values. Results The E-CAI server, available at , is a web-application that calculates an expected value of CAI for a set of query sequences by generating random sequences with G+C and amino acid content similar to those of the input. An executable file, a tutorial, a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) section and several examples are also available. To exemplify the use of the E-CAI server, we have analysed the codon adaptation of human mitochondrial genes that codify a subunit of the mitochondrial respiratory chain (excluding those genes that lack a prokaryotic orthologue) and are encoded in the nuclear genome. It is assumed that these genes were transferred from the proto-mitochondrial to the nuclear genome and that its codon usage was then ameliorated. Conclusion The E-CAI server provides a direct threshold value for discerning whether the differences in CAI are statistically significant or whether they are merely artifacts that arise from internal biases in the G+C composition and/or amino acid composition of the query sequences. PMID:18230160

  3. Skinner and CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Harry N.

    1984-01-01

    The author cites comments of B.F. Skinner supporting the benefits of carefully constructed computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs. Preliminary studies on military populations suggesting the value of CAI are discussed, as is the collection of information about software. (CL)

  4. Developing Large CAI Packages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Mary Jac M.; Smith, Lynn H.

    1983-01-01

    When developing large computer-assisted instructional (CAI) courseware packages, it is suggested that there be more attentive planning to the overall package design before actual lesson development is begun. This process has been simplified by modifying the systems approach used to develop single CAI lessons, followed by planning for the…

  5. Current Issues in CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Duncan N.

    A great deal of research has been done on instructional strategies and concepts of individualized instruction in computer-assisted instruction (CAI). Individualizing instruction within CAI can be defined in terms of an input output process which includes a stimulus array, cognitive processes, and response requirements. Research in these areas of…

  6. CAI Terminal Characteristics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braun, Peter

    The bewildering number of available terminals which are offered to CAI users presents a rather formidable problem of which one to choose. This article surveys what appear to be evolving standards for terminals. The usefulness of these terminals for CAI purposes is discussed, together with the best known prototype exhibiting the particular feature.…

  7. Enhanced refractive index without absorption in semiconductor quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Nan; Shui, Tao; Qian, Biqi; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2015-07-01

    We investigate the absorptive-dispersive properties of a weak probe field in a ladder-type quantum dot. It is found that the enhanced refraction index without absorption can be easily controlled via adjusting properly the corresponding parameters of the system. Our scheme may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in dispersion compensation and solid-state quantum communication for quantum information processing.

  8. Experience with the CAIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tighe, Michael F.

    1986-01-01

    Intermetrics' experience is that the Ada package construct, which allows separation of specification and implementation allows specification of a CAIS that is transportable across varying hardware and software bases. Additionally, the CAIS is an excellent basis for providing operating system functionality to Ada applications. By allowing the Byron APSE to be moved easily from system to system, and allowing significant re-writes of underlying code. Ada and the CAIS provide portability as well as transparency to change at the application operating system interface level.

  9. Carbon, CAIs and chondrules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, R. D.; Russell, S. S.

    1994-01-01

    It has been shown that C is present in CAI's and chondrules. It can be distinguished from matrix C both by its thermal stability and isotopic composition, which implies that it was not introduced after parent body accretion. It is concluded that C must have been present in the chondrule and CAI precursor material. Therefore any models of chondrule and CAI formation and inferences drawn about solar system conditions during these events must take into account the consequences of the presence of C on inclusion chemistry, mineralogy, and oxidation state.

  10. The CAIS 2 Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue; Thall, Richard

    1986-01-01

    The Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) is a proposed MIL-STD intended to promote the portability of Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) tools written in Ada. The standardized interfaces define a virtual operating system, from which portable tools derive their basic services, e.g., file management, input/output, communications, and process control. In the Ada world, such a virtual operating system is called a Kernel Ada Programming Support Environment (KAPSE). The CAIS is a standardized interface between KAPSEs and tools. The CAIS has been proposed as a starting point for standard interfaces to be used in the NASA Software Support Environment (SSE) for the Space Station Program. The status of the CAIS standardization effort and plans for further development are described.

  11. NALDA (Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis) CAI (computer aided instruction)

    SciTech Connect

    Handler, B.H. ); France, P.A.; Frey, S.C.; Gaubas, N.F.; Hyland, K.J.; Lindsey, A.M.; Manley, D.O. ); Hunnum, W.H. ); Smith, D.L. )

    1990-07-01

    Data Systems Engineering Organization (DSEO) personnel developed a prototype computer aided instruction CAI system for the Naval Aviation Logistics Data Analysis (NALDA) system. The objective of this project was to provide a CAI prototype that could be used as an enhancement to existing NALDA training. The CAI prototype project was performed in phases. The task undertaken in Phase I was to analyze the problem and the alternative solutions and to develop a set of recommendations on how best to proceed. The findings from Phase I are documented in Recommended CAI Approach for the NALDA System (Duncan et al., 1987). In Phase II, a structured design and specifications were developed, and a prototype CAI system was created. A report, NALDA CAI Prototype: Phase II Final Report, was written to record the findings and results of Phase II. NALDA CAI: Recommendations for an Advanced Instructional Model, is comprised of related papers encompassing research on computer aided instruction CAI, newly developing training technologies, instructional systems development, and an Advanced Instructional Model. These topics were selected because of their relevancy to the CAI needs of NALDA. These papers provide general background information on various aspects of CAI and give a broad overview of new technologies and their impact on the future design and development of training programs. The paper within have been index separately elsewhere.

  12. Water absorption in a refractive index model for bacterial spores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegrist, K. M.; Thrush, E.; Airola, M.; Carr, A. K.; Limsui, D. M.; Boggs, N. T.; Thomas, M. E.; Carter, C. C.

    2009-05-01

    The complexity of biological agents can make it difficult to identify the important factors impacting scattering characteristics among variables such as size, shape, internal structure and biochemical composition, particle aggregation, and sample additives. This difficulty is exacerbated by the environmentally interactive nature of biological organisms. In particular, bacterial spores equilibrate with environmental humidity by absorption/desorption of water which can affect both the complex refractive index and the size/shape distributions of particles - two factors upon which scattering characteristics depend critically. Therefore accurate analysis of experimental data for determination of refractive index must take account of particle water content. First, spectral transmission measurements to determine visible refractive index done on suspensions of bacterial spores must account for water (or other solvent) uptake. Second, realistic calculations of aerosol scattering cross sections should consider effects of atmospheric humidity on particle water content, size and shape. In this work we demonstrate a method for determining refractive index of bacterial spores bacillus atropheus (BG), bacillus thuringiensis (BT) and bacillus anthracis Sterne (BAs) which accounts for these effects. Visible index is found from transmission measurements on aqueous and DMSO suspensions of particles, using an anomalous diffraction approximation. A simplified version of the anomalous diffraction theory is used to eliminate the need for knowledge of particle size. Results using this approach indicate the technique can be useful in determining the visible refractive index of particles when size and shape distributions are not well known but fall within the region of validity of anomalous dispersion theory.

  13. CAI Update: So You Want to Do CAI?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Carole

    1979-01-01

    Provides necessary characteristics to consider when selecting a CAI system plus a list of costs and capabilities available with the better known CAI systems. Characteristics of major CAI systems are presented in three categories--large/maxi, mini, and micro systems--in chart form. (JEG)

  14. Skill Specific CAI Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavine, Roberta Z.; Fechter, Sharon Ahern

    Advantages of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) for grammar-oriented exercises are considered, and a learning module to help the student prepare for the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) exam is described. The exercises are modeled on the TOEFL exam: the student is given a sentence, one part of which is incorrect and is asked to…

  15. Maxi CAI with a Micro.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerhold, George; And Others

    This paper describes an effective microprocessor-based CAI system which has been repeatedly tested by a large number of students and edited accordingly. Tasks not suitable for microprocessor based systems (authoring, testing, and debugging) were handled on larger multi-terminal systems. This approach requires that the CAI language used on the…

  16. CAI: VS CBE Languages. Authoring, How Soon?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagley, Carole A.

    This paper gives a view of CAI (computer assisted instruction), computers in education, CAI author languages, and concepts for authoring. Distinctions are drawn among CAI, CBE (computer based education), CMI (computer managed instruction), and CGM (computer managed materials), and the functions of each are described. CAI has been slow in coming…

  17. Refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography based on Fabry-Perot interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Woodruff, S.D.

    1984-06-19

    A refractive index and absorption detector are disclosed for liquid chromatography. It is based in part on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and is used for the improved detection of refractive index and absorption. It includes a Fabry-Perot interferometer having a normally fixed first partially reflecting mirror and a movable second partially reflecting mirror. A chromatographic flow-cell is positioned between the mirrors along the optical axis of a monochromatic laser beam passing through the interferometer. A means for deriving information about the interference fringes coming out of the interferometer is used with a mini-computer to compute the refractive index of the specimen injected into the flow cell. The minicomputer continuously scans the interferometer for continuous refractive index readings and outputs the continuous results of the scans on a chart recorder. The absorption of the specimen can concurrently be scanned by including a second optical path for an excitation laser which will not interfere with the first laser, but will affect the specimen so that absorption properties can be detected. By first scanning for the refractive index of the specimen, and then immediately adding the excitation laser and subsequently scanning for the refractive index again, the absorption of the specimen can be computed and recorded. 10 figs.

  18. Refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography based on Fabry-Perot interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Woodruff, Steven D.

    1984-06-19

    A refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography. It is based in part on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and is used for the improved detection of refractive index and absorption. It includes a Fabry-Perot interferometer having a normally fixed first partially reflecting mirror and a movable second partially reflecting mirror. A chromatographic flow-cell is positioned between the mirrors along the optical axis of a monochromatic laser beam passing through the interferometer. A means for deriving information about the interference fringes coming out of the interferometer is used with a mini-computer to compute the refractive index of the specimen injected into the flow cell. The minicomputer continuously scans the interferometer for continuous refractive index readings and outputs the continuous results of the scans on a chart recorder. The absorption of the specimen can concurrently be scanned by including a second optical path for an excitation laser which will not interfere with the first laser, but will affect the specimen so that absorption properties can be detected. By first scanning for the refractive index of the specimen, and then immediately adding the excitation laser and subsequently scanning for the refractive index again, the absorption of the specimen can be computed and recorded.

  19. CAI in Thermodynamics at the USAF Academy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byerley, Aaron R.; Winn, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    Illustrates computer assisted instruction (CAI) at the United States Air Force (USAF) academy by presenting a sample CAI session involving thermodynamics. Comments on evaluation of the program. Future plans are included. (JN)

  20. CAI in Advanced Literature Class.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, Norman

    1981-01-01

    Ways that computer assisted instruction (CAI) can be useful in teaching English at upperclass and graduate levels are considered, with illustrations from PLATO lessons that have been composed and programmed. One lesson takes advantage of PLATO's graphic design capabilities, which enabled the teacher to design the runic figures and to show them in…

  1. Teacher's Handbook for CAI Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Suppes, Patrick; And Others

    The handbooks for the most widely used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) courses now available on computer terminals at the Institute for Mathematical Studies in the Social Sciences at Stanford University are presented. Handbooks are included for the following courses: Strands Drill-and-practice (arithmetic fundamentals for fourth grade), Logic…

  2. Flexible Teaching Methods for CAI Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammel, D. G.

    Although much progress has been made in the ten years that computer-assisted instruction (CAI) has been researched, two major problems still exist. One is the high cost of CAI; the other is its lack of flexibility. The former problem will abate with improved technology and the creation of educational CAI utility systems. One possible solution to…

  3. Enhanced refractive index without absorption in four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Chengxian; Wang, Zhiping; Yu, Benli

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the absorptive-dispersive properties of a weak probe field in a four-level asymmetrical double semiconductor quantum well. It is found that the enhanced refraction index without absorption can be easily controlled via adjusting properly the corresponding parameters of the system. Our scheme may provide some new possibilities for technological applications in dispersion compensation and solid-state quantum communication for quantum information processing.

  4. Spectral absorption index in hyperspectral image analysis for predicting moisture contents in pork longissimus dorsi muscles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Ji; Sun, Da-Wen; Pu, Hongbin

    2016-04-15

    Spectral absorption index was proposed to extract the morphological features of the spectral curves in pork meat samples (longissimus dorsi) under the conditions including fresh, frozen-thawed, heated-dehydrated and brined-dehydrated. Savitzky-Golay (SG) smoothing and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used for calibrating both the spectral reflectance and absorbance values. The absorption values were better than the reflectance values and the calibrated spectra by MSC were better than the raw and SG smoothing corrected spectra in building moisture content predictive models. The optimized partial least square regression (PLSR) model attained good results with the MSC calibrated spectral absorption values based on the spectral absorption index features (R(2)P=0.952, RMSEP=1.396) and the optimal wavelengths selected by regression coefficients (R(2)P=0.966, RMSEP=0.855), respectively. The models proved spectral absorption index was promising in spectral analysis to predict moisture content in pork samples using HSI techniques for the first time. PMID:26617026

  5. Time-resolved refractive index and absorption mapping of light-plasma filaments in water.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Stefano; Gopal, Amrutha; Tatarakis, Michael; Couairon, Arnaud; Tamosauskas, Gintaras; Piskarskas, Rimtautas; Dubietis, Audrius; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    By means of a quantitative shadowgraphic method, we performed a space-time characterization of the refractive index variation and transient absorption induced by a light-plasma filament generated by a 120 fs laser pulse in water. The formation and evolution of the plasma channel in the proximity of the nonlinear focus were observed with a 23 fs time resolution. PMID:18157267

  6. Photoinduced absorption and refractive-index induction in phosphosilicate fibres by radiation at 193 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Rybaltovsky, A A; Sokolov, V O; Plotnichenko, V G; Lanin, Aleksei V; Semenov, S L; Dianov, Evgenii M; Gur'yanov, A N; Khopin, V F

    2007-04-30

    The photoinduced room-temperature-stable increase in the refractive index by {approx}5x10{sup -4} at a wavelength of 1.55 {mu}m was observed in phosphosilicate fibres without their preliminary loading with molecular hydrogen. It is shown that irradiation of preliminary hydrogen-loaded fibres by an ArF laser at 193 nm enhances the efficiency of refractive-index induction by an order of magnitude. The induced-absorption spectra of preforms with a phosphosilicate glass core and optical fibres fabricated from them are studied in a broad spectral range from 150 to 5000 nm. The intense induced-absorption band ({approx}800 cm{sup -1}) at 180 nm is found, which strongly affects the formation of the induced refractive index. The quantum-chemical model of a defect related to this band is proposed. (optical fibres)

  7. Two-photon-induced excited-state absorption in high-index fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shensky, William M., III; Cohanoschi, Ion; Sevian, Armen; Hagan, David J.; Van Stryland, Eric W.

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the nonlinear optical properties of a high-index (n = 1.82) glass that is used as the core material in a commercially available fiber optic inverter, which is a coherent fiber bundle twisted 180 degrees to produce an inverted image. We have determined through open aperture Z-scan the two-photon absorption coefficient of the glass to be 0.8 cm/GW using 23 ps pulses (FWHM) at 532 nm, far from the linear absorption edge of 320 nm. For 5 ns (FWHM) pulses the nonlinear absorption is much larger, and is dominated by two-photon induced excited-state absorption. These effects contribute to the nanosecond optical limiting response that we have observed for the inverter using an F/5 focusing geometry.

  8. VLBI survey of compact broad absorption line quasars with balnicity index BI = 0

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegłowski, M.; Kunert-Bajraszewska, M.; Roskowiński, C.

    2015-06-01

    We present high-resolution observations, using both the European VLBI Network (EVN) at 1.7 GHz and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) at 5 and 8.4 GHz, to image radio structures of 14 compact sources classified as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars based on the absorption index (AI). All sources but one were resolved, with the majority showing core-jet morphology typical for radio-loud quasars. We discuss in detail the most interesting cases. The high radio luminosities and small linear sizes of the observed objects indicate they are strong young active galactic nuclei. Nevertheless, the distribution of the radio-loudness parameter, log RI, of a larger sample of AI quasars shows that the objects observed by us constitute the most luminous, small subgroup of the AI population. Additionally, we report that for the radio-loudness parameter, the distribution of AI quasars and that for those selected using the traditional balnicity index differ significantly. Strong absorption is connected with lower log RI and thus probably larger viewing angles. Since the AI quasars have on average larger log RI, the orientation can mean that we see them less absorbed. However, we suggest that the orientation is not the only parameter that affects the detected absorption. That the strong absorption is associated with the weak radio emission is equally important and worth exploring.

  9. Index of Refraction and Absorption Coefficient Spectra of Paratellurite in the Terahertz Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unferdorben, Márta; Buzády, Andrea; Hebling, János; Kiss, Krisztián; Hajdara, Ivett; Kovács, László; Péter, Ágnes; Pálfalvi, László

    2016-07-01

    Index of refraction and absorption coefficient spectra of pure paratellurite (α-TeO2) crystal as a potential material for terahertz (THz) applications were determined in the 0.25-2 THz frequency range at room temperature by THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS). The investigation was performed with beam polarization both parallel (extraordinary polarization) and perpendicular (ordinary polarization) to the optical axis [001] of the crystal. Similarly to the visible spectral range, positive birefringence was observed in the THz range as well. It was shown that the values of the refractive index for extraordinary polarization are higher and show significantly larger dispersion than for the ordinary one. The absorption coefficient values are also larger for extraordinary polarization. The measured values were fitted by theoretical curves derived from the complex dielectric function containing independent terms of Lorentz oscillators due to phonon-polariton resonances. The results are compared with earlier publications, and the observed significant discrepancies are discussed.

  10. Organic reactions increasing the absorption index of atmospheric sulfuric acid aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, B.; Esteve, W.

    2005-02-01

    Unlike most environments present at Earth's surface atmospheric aerosols can be favorable to organic reactions. Among them, the acid-catalyzed aldol condensation of aldehydes and ketones produces light-absorbing compounds. In this work the increase of the absorption index of sulfuric acid solutions 50-96 wt. % resulting from the uptake of gas-phase acetaldehyde, acetone, and 2-butanone (methyl ethyl ketone), has been measured in the near UV and visible range. Our results indicate that the absorption index between 200 and 500 nm for stratospheric sulfuric aerosols exposed to 100 pptV of acetaldehyde (1 pptV = 10-12 v/v) would increase by four orders of magnitude over a two-year lifetime. Rough estimates based on previous radiative calculations suggest that this reaction could result in an increase of the radiative forcing of sulfate aerosols of the order of 0.01 W m-2, and that these processes are worth further investigation.

  11. Specific absorption rate analysis of broadband mobile antenna with negative index metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Touhidul; Faruque, Mohammad Rashed Iqbal; Islam, Mohammad Tariqul

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a negative index metamaterial-inspired printed mobile wireless antenna that can support most mobile applications such as GSM, UMTS, Bluetooth and WLAN frequency bands. The antenna consists of a semi-circular patch, a 50Ω microstrip feed line and metamaterial ground plane. The antenna occupies a very small space of 37 × 47 × 0.508 mm3, making it suitable for mobile wireless application. The perceptible novelty shown in this proposed antenna is that reduction of specific absorption rate using the negative index metamaterial ground plane. The proposed antenna reduced 72.11 and 75.53 % of specific absorption rate at 1.8 and 2.4 GHz, respectively.

  12. The Evolutionary Development of CAI Hardware.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stifle, John E.

    After six years of research in computer assisted instruction (CAI) using PLATO III, a decision was made at the University of Illinois to develop a larger system as a national CAI resource. This document describes the design specifications and problems in the development of PLATO IV, a system which is capable of accomodating up to 4,000 terminals…

  13. Computers for Your Classroom: CAI and CMI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, David B.; Bozeman, William C.

    1981-01-01

    The availability of compact, low-cost computer systems provides a means of assisting classroom teachers in the performance of their duties. Computer-assisted instruction (CAI) and computer-managed instruction (CMI) are two applications of computer technology with which school administrators should become familiar. CAI is a teaching medium in which…

  14. CAI Systems Past, Present, and Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feingold, Samuel L.

    In considering the development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems over the past eleven years, one can see a pattern of interaction between advances in computer hardware and software and continuing efforts to solve the basic problems of CAI: problems of achieving a natural-language capability, of keeping the cost low, and of making…

  15. A risk management approach to CAIS development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Hal; Kerner, Judy; Alden, Tony; Belz, Frank; Tadman, Frank

    1986-01-01

    The proposed DoD standard Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS) was developed as a framework set of interfaces that will support the transportability and interoperability of tools in the support environments of the future. While the current CAIS version is a promising start toward fulfilling those goals and current prototypes provide adequate testbeds for investigations in support of completing specifications for a full CAIS, there are many reasons why the proposed CAIS might fail to become a usable product and the foundation of next-generation (1990'S) project support environments such as NASA's Space Station software support environment. The most critical threats to the viability and acceptance of the CAIS include performance issues (especially in piggybacked implementations), transportability, and security requirements. To make the situation worse, the solution to some of these threats appears to be at conflict with the solutions to others.

  16. Photosynthetic bark: Use of chlorophyll absorption continuum index to estimate Boswellia papyrifera bark chlorophyll content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girma, Atkilt; Skidmore, Andrew K.; de Bie, C. A. J. M.; Bongers, Frans; Schlerf, Martin

    2013-08-01

    Quantification of chlorophyll content provides useful insight into the physiological performance of plants. Several leaf chlorophyll estimation techniques, using hyperspectral instruments, are available. However, to our knowledge, a non-destructive bark chlorophyll estimation technique is not available. We set out to assess Boswellia papyrifera tree bark chlorophyll content and to provide an appropriate bark chlorophyll estimation technique using hyperspectral remote sensing techniques. In contrast to the leaves, the bark of B. papyrifera has several outer layers masking the inner photosynthetic bark layer. Thus, our interest includes understanding how much light energy is transmitted to the photosynthetic inner bark and to what extent the inner photosynthetic bark chlorophyll activity could be remotely sensed during both the wet and the dry season. In this study, chlorophyll estimation using the chlorophyll absorption continuum index (CACI) yielded a higher R2 (0.87) than others indices and methods, such as the use of single band, simple ratios, normalized differences, and conventional red edge position (REP) based estimation techniques. The chlorophyll absorption continuum index approach considers the increase or widening in area of the chlorophyll absorption region, attributed to high concentrations of chlorophyll causing spectral shifts in both the yellow and the red edge. During the wet season B. papyrifera trees contain more bark layers than during the dry season. Having less bark layers during the dry season (leaf off condition) is an advantage for the plants as then their inner photosynthetic bark is more exposed to light, enabling them to trap light energy. It is concluded that B. papyrifera bark chlorophyll content can be reliably estimated using the chlorophyll absorption continuum index analysis. Further research on the use of bark signatures is recommended, in order to discriminate the deciduous B. papyrifera from other species during the dry season.

  17. Effect of hydrogenic impurity on linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Kangxian; Zhang, Zhongmin; Mou, Sen; Xiao, Bo

    2015-05-01

    The analytical expressions of linear and nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes in a quantum dot with a hydrogenic impurity are obtained by using the compact-density-matrix approach and iterative method. The wave functions and the energy levels are obtained by using the variational method. Numerical results show that the optical absorption coefficients and refractive index changes are strongly affected by the hydrogenic impurity.

  18. Photoinduced refractive index change and absorption bleaching in poly(methylphenylsilane) under varied atmospheres.

    SciTech Connect

    Potter, Barrett George, Jr.; Simmons-Potter, Kelly; Chandra, Haripin; Thomes, William Joseph, Jr.; Jamison, Gregory Marks

    2005-06-01

    Polysilane materials exhibit large photo-induced refractive index changes under low incident optical fluences, making them attractive candidates for applications in which rapid patterning of photonic device structures is desired immediately prior to their use. This agile fabrication strategy for integrated photonics inherently requires that optical exposure, and associated material response, occurs in nonlaboratory environments, motivating the study of environmental conditions on the photoinduced response of the material. The present work examines the impact of atmosphere on the photosensitive response of poly(methylphenylsilane) (PMPS) thin films in terms of both photoinduced absorption change and refractive index modification. Material was subjected to UV light exposure resonant with the lowest energy optical transition associated with the conjugated Si-Si backbone. Exposures were performed in both aerobic and anaerobic atmospheres (oxygen, air, nitrogen, and 5% H{sub 2}/95% N{sub 2}). The results clearly demonstrate that the photosensitive response of this model polysilane material was dramatically affected by local environment, exhibiting a photoinduced refractive index change, when exposed under an oxygen containing atmosphere, that was twice that observed under anaerobic conditions. This effect is discussed in terms of photo-oxidation processes within the polysilane structure and in the context of the need for predictable photosensitive refractive index change in varied photoimprinting environments.

  19. Systemic absorption of topical steroids. Metabolic effects as an index of mild hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Garden, J M; Freinkel, R K

    1986-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether the commonly used treatment of psoriasis with potent topical glucocorticoids results in hypercortisolism and whether metabolic changes might provide a means for monitoring pharmacologic effects of excessive systemic absorption of glucocorticoids. Plasma cortisol, glucose, and insulin and circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes were assessed under controlled conditions in five otherwise healthy patients with psoriasis (40% to 85% involvement) treated with topical desoximetasone, without occlusion. In all patients, there were rapid and sustained suppression of endogenous cortisol production, twofold to threefold increases in fasting insulin levels indicating insulin resistance, and elevated levels of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Two patients also experienced reduced glucose tolerance. These findings suggest that application of potent corticosteroids to large areas of diseased skin results in sufficient systemic absorption to cause not only adrenal suppression but some degree of hypercortisolism with greater frequency and rapidity than has been suggested. Prospective monitoring of insulin-glucose relationships as a sensitive index of the metabolic effects of glucocorticoids may provide a means of assessing excess systemic absorption that is not predictable on the basis of adrenal suppression or circulating levels of the drug. Such prediction could have particular relevance in anticipating adverse clinical effects in the treatment of chronic skin disorders with potent topical glucocorticoids. PMID:3527074

  20. CAIs in Semarkona (LL3.0)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishra, R. K.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.; Marhas, K. K.

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, Aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the first forming solids of the Solar system. Their observed abundance, mean size, and mineralogy vary quite significantly between different groups of chondrites. These differences may reflect the dynamics and distinct cosmochemical conditions present in the region(s) of the protoplanetary disk from which each type likely accreted. Only about 11 such objects have been found in L and LL type while another 57 have been found in H type ordinary chondrites, compared to thousands in carbonaceous chondrites. At issue is whether the rare CAIs contained in ordinary chondrites truly reflect a distinct population from the inclusions commonly found in other chondrite types. Semarkona (LL3.00) (fall, 691 g) is the most pristine chondrite available in our meteorite collection. Here we report petrography and mineralogy of 3 CAIs from Semarkona

  1. Simplified Tutorial Programming for Interactive CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jelden, D. L.

    A validated instructional model generated on a large mainframe computer by the military was modified to a microcomputer format for use in programming tutorial computer assisted instruction (CAI) materials, and a simplified, compatible system of generating programs was identified--CP/M and MP/M from Digital Research Corporation. In order to…

  2. The Relevance of AI Research to CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kearsley, Greg P.

    This article provides a tutorial introduction to Artificial Intelligence (AI) research for those involved in Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI). The general theme is that much of the current work in AI, particularly in the areas of natural language understanding systems, rule induction, programming languages, and socratic systems, has important…

  3. Man-Computer Communications and CAI.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunka, S.

    A variety of direct and indirect instructional activities during the last ten years have employed computers. Within Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) programs, the following broad classes of instructional strategies have been generally accepted: tutorial, drill and practice, review, testing, remediation and diagnosis, problem solving, and…

  4. Magnesium Isotopic Composition of CAIs and Chondrules from CBb Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gounelle, M.; Young, E. D.; Shahar, A.; Kearsley, A.

    2006-03-01

    We measured magnesium isotope ratios in 17 chondrules and 3 CAIs from the CBb chondrites HH 237 and QUE 94411 by LA-MC-ICPMS. We find no detectable 26Al excesses in the three CAIs and approximately normal (chondritic) d25Mg in CAIs and chondrules.

  5. Characterizing Protein Complexes with UV absorption, Light Scattering, and Refractive Index Detection.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trainoff, Steven

    2009-03-01

    Many modern pharmaceuticals and naturally occurring biomolecules consist of complexes of proteins and polyethylene glycol or carbohydrates. In the case of vaccine development, these complexes are often used to induce or amplify immune responses. For protein therapeutics they are used to modify solubility and function, or to control the rate of degradation and elimination of a drug from the body. Characterizing the stoichiometry of these complexes is an important industrial problem that presents a formidable challenge to analytical instrument designers. Traditional analytical methods, such as using florescent tagging, chemical assays, and mass spectrometry perturb the system so dramatically that the complexes are often destroyed or uncontrollably modified by the measurement. A solution to this problem consists of fractionating the samples and then measuring the fractions using sequential non-invasive detectors that are sensitive to different components of the complex. We present results using UV absorption, which is primarily sensitive to the protein fraction, Light Scattering, which measures the total weight average molar mass, and Refractive Index detection, which measures the net concentration. We also present a solution of the problem inter-detector band-broadening problem that has heretofore made this approach impractical. Presented will be instrumentation and an analysis method that overcome these obstacles and make this technique a reliable and robust way of non-invasively characterizing these industrially important compounds.

  6. Quantitative Models of CAI Rim Layer Growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1995-09-01

    Many hypotheses have been proposed to account for the ~50 micrometer-thick layer sequences (Wark-Lovering rims) that typically surround coarse-grained Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs), but to date no consensus has emerged on how these rims formed. A two-step process-- flash heating of CAIs to produce a refractory residue on the margins of CAIs [1,2,3], followed by reaction and diffusion between CAIs or the refractory residue and an external medium rich in Mg, Si and other ferromagnesian and volatile elements to form the layers [3,4,5]-- may have formed the rims. We have tested the second step of this process quantitatively, and show that many, but not all, of the layering characteristics of CAI rims in the Vigarano, Leoville, and Efremovka CV3 chondrites can be explained by steady-state reaction and diffusion between CAIs and an external medium rich in Mg and Si. Moreover, observed variations in the details of the layering from one CAI to another can be explained primarily by differences in the identity and composition of the external medium, which appears to have included vapor alone, vapor + olivine, and olivine +/- clinopyroxene +/- vapor. An idealized layer sequence for CAI rims in Vigarano, Leoville, and Efremovka can be represented as MSF|S|AM|D|O, where MSF = melilite (M) + spinel (S) + fassaite (F) in the interior of CAIs; S = spinel-rich layer; AM = a layer consisting either of anorthite (A) alone, or M alone, or both A and M; D = a clinopyroxene layer consisting mainly of aluminous diopside (D) that is zoned to fassaite towards the CAI; and O = olivine-rich layer, composed mainly of individually zoned olivine grains that apparently pre-existed layer formation [3]. A or M are absent between the S and D layers in roughly half of the rims. The O layer varies considerably in thickness (0-60 micrometers thick) and in porosity from rim to rim, with olivine grains either tightly intergrown to form a compact layer or arranged loosely on the outer surfaces of the CAIs

  7. NONLINEAR COLOR-METALLICITY RELATIONS OF GLOBULAR CLUSTERS. V. NONLINEAR ABSORPTION-LINE INDEX VERSUS METALLICITY RELATIONS AND BIMODAL INDEX DISTRIBUTIONS OF M31 GLOBULAR CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sooyoung; Yoon, Suk-Jin; Chung, Chul; Lee, Young-Wook; Caldwell, Nelson; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Kang, Yongbeom; Rey, Soo-Chang

    2013-05-10

    Recent spectroscopy on the globular cluster (GC) system of M31 with unprecedented precision witnessed a clear bimodality in absorption-line index distributions of old GCs. Such division of extragalactic GCs, so far asserted mainly by photometric color bimodality, has been viewed as the presence of merely two distinct metallicity subgroups within individual galaxies and forms a critical backbone of various galaxy formation theories. Given that spectroscopy is a more detailed probe into stellar population than photometry, the discovery of index bimodality may point to the very existence of dual GC populations. However, here we show that the observed spectroscopic dichotomy of M31 GCs emerges due to the nonlinear nature of metallicity-to-index conversion and thus one does not necessarily have to invoke two separate GC subsystems. We take this as a close analogy to the recent view that metallicity-color nonlinearity is primarily responsible for observed GC color bimodality. We also demonstrate that the metallicity-sensitive magnesium line displays non-negligible metallicity-index nonlinearity and Balmer lines show rather strong nonlinearity. This gives rise to bimodal index distributions, which are routinely interpreted as bimodal metallicity distributions, not considering metallicity-index nonlinearity. Our findings give a new insight into the constitution of M31's GC system, which could change much of the current thought on the formation of GC systems and their host galaxies.

  8. Analyzing the effect of absorption and refractive index on image formation in high numerical aperture transmission microscopy of single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coe, Ryan L.; Seibel, Eric J.

    2013-02-01

    Transmission bright-field microscopy is the clinical mainstay for disease diagnosis where image contrast is provided by absorptive and refractive index differences between tissue and the surrounding media. Different microscopy techniques often assume one of the two contrast mechanisms is negligible as a means to better understand the tissue scattering processes. This particular work provides better understanding of the role of refractive index and absorption within Optical Projection Tomographic Microscopy (OPTM) through the development of a generalized computational model based upon the Finite-Difference Time-Domain method. The model mimics OPTM by simulating axial scanning of the objective focal plane through the cell to produce projection images. These projection images, acquired from circumferential positions around the cell, are reconstructed into isometric three-dimensional images using the filtered backprojection normally employed in Computed Tomography (CT). The model provides a platform to analyze all aspects of bright-field microscopes, such as the degree of refractive index matching and the numerical aperture, which can be varied from air-immersion to high NA oil-immersion. In this preliminary work, the model is used to understand the effects of absorption and refraction on image formation using micro-shells and idealized nuclei. Analysis of absorption and refractive index separately provides the opportunity to better assess their role together as a complex refractive index for improved interpretation of bright-field scattering, essential for OPTM image reconstruction. This simulation, as well as ones in the future looking at other effects, will be used to optimize OPTM imaging parameters and triage efforts to further improve the overall system design.

  9. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  10. Phase-dependent high refractive index without absorption in a four-level inverted-Y atomic system

    SciTech Connect

    Zhi-Qiang Zeng; Fu-Ti Liu; Yu-Ping Wang; Zeng-Hui Gao

    2015-01-31

    We consider a closed four-level inverted-Y system in the presence and the absence of a microwave field. It is found that due to the quantum coherence between the two lower levels, either induced by the spontaneous decay or by the microwave field, the refraction – absorption properties of the system can be modulated by controlling the relative phase of the applied fields in both driven ways. In particular, by properly setting the values of the relative phase, the desirable high index of refraction without absorption can be achieved. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Evaluation of an inexpensive calcium absorption index in healthy older men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium absorption is an important determinant of calcium retention and bone metabolism. However, most methods of measuring calcium absorption, including the well-established dual stable isotope method, are costly and cumbersome to implement. We evaluated eleven healthy subjects age 54-74 to determ...

  12. Measurement of particle optical absorption, imaginary refractive index, mass concentration, and size at First International LAAP Workshop.

    PubMed

    Clarke, A D; Waggoner, A P

    1982-02-01

    The modified integrating plate method was used in conjunction with ancillary equipment to obtain the absorption coefficient, specific absorption, and single-scattering albedo for a variety of generated aerosols. A computer driven multichannel optical particle counter also provided real-time output for particle size distributions. Size segregated sampling was done for appropriate aerosols, and inferences made on values for the complex refractive index. A new technique (paper in preparation) was also used for samples having low values of absorption, and results for these samples are included. These results are considered the most accurate and take precedence over values obtained by the original method (retained for completeness and inter-comparison purposes). PMID:20372469

  13. Research on TRIZ and CAIs Application Problems for Technology Innovation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangdong; Li, Qinghai; Bai, Zhonghang; Geng, Lixiao

    In order to realize application of invent problem solve theory (TRIZ) and computer aided innovation software (CAIs) , need to solve some key problems, such as the mode choice of technology innovation, establishment of technology innovation organization network(TION), and achievement of innovative process based on TRIZ and CAIs, etc.. This paper shows that the demands for TRIZ and CAIs according to the characteristics and existing problem of the manufacturing enterprises. Have explained that the manufacturing enterprises need to set up an open TION of enterprise leading type, and achieve the longitudinal cooperation innovation with institution of higher learning. The process of technology innovation based on TRIZ and CAIs has been set up from researching and developing point of view. Application of TRIZ and CAIs in FY Company has been summarized. The application effect of TRIZ and CAIs has been explained using technology innovation of the close goggle valve product.

  14. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  15. Spectral Similarity Assessment Based on a Spectrum Reflectance-Absorption Index and Simplified Curve Patterns for Hyperspectral Remote Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dan; Liu, Jun; Huang, Junyi; Li, Huali; Liu, Ping; Chen, Huijuan; Qian, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Hyperspectral images possess properties such as rich spectral information, narrow bandwidth, and large numbers of bands. Finding effective methods to retrieve land features from an image by using similarity assessment indices with specific spectral characteristics is an important research question. This paper reports a novel hyperspectral image similarity assessment index based on spectral curve patterns and a reflection-absorption index. First, some spectral reflection-absorption features are extracted to restrict the subsequent curve simplification. Then, the improved Douglas-Peucker algorithm is employed to simplify all spectral curves without setting the thresholds. Finally, the simplified curves with the feature points are matched, and the similarities among the spectral curves are calculated using the matched points. The Airborne Visible Infrared Imaging Spectrometer (AVIRIS) and Reflective Optics System Imaging Spectrometer (ROSIS) hyperspectral image datasets are then selected to test the effect of the proposed index. The practical experiments indicate that the proposed index can achieve higher precision and fewer points than the traditional spectral information divergence and spectral angle match. PMID:26821030

  16. Physical properties of CAI-rich asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanga, P.; Devogele, M.; Cellino, A.; Pinilla-Alonso, N.; Campins, H.; Bus, S. J.

    2015-12-01

    Some L-type asteroids (collectively called "Barbarians") are known to exhibit an anomalous polarimetric behavior, whose origin - still to be elucidated - can be related to compositional and/or scattering effects. The fact that these asteroids belong to the same taxonomic class (following the De Meo 2009 classification, including NIR) implies that composition must play a role. Sunshine et al. 2008 showed that these asteroids contain high amounts of CAIs, possibly hinting to a formation in an early proto-planetary environment, very rich in refractory material. On the base of this evidence, we started an observational campaign to increase the data coverage of these objects, by obtaining new NIR spectra, photometric and polarimetric measurements. Our first results show that the peculiar features are not restricted to polarimetry. In particular we show the existence of an anomalous distribution of the rotation periods, and a possible relation between CAI abundance and albedos determined by WISE. We tentatively discuss a possible scenario justifying the different observed features.

  17. Comparison of Gosat CAI and SPOT Vgt Ndvi Data with Different Season and Land Cover in East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Y.; Wang, X.; Guo, M.; Tani, H.

    2011-08-01

    The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) has become one of the most widely used indices in remote sensing applications in a variety of fields. Many studies have compared the NDVI values for different satellite sensors. Nowadays, the Greenhouse Gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) was successfully launched on January 23, 2009. It is used to monitor greenhouse gases on the Earth's surface and also has a sensor, the Cloud Aerosol Imager (CAI), that senses red and near infrared spectrums. It can also process NDVI data. Therefore, we are first compare GOSAT CAI and SPOT VGT NDVI data in different seasonal and land cover in East Asian, to explore the relationship between the two types of datasets, and to discuss the possibility of extending SPOT VGT data using GOSAT CAI NDVI data for the same area. We used GOSAT CAI Level 3 data to derive 10-day composite NDVI values for the East Asia region for November 2009 and January, April and July 2010 using the maximum value composite (MVC) method. We compared these values with 10-day composite SPOT VGT NDVI data for the same period. The results show that the correlation coefficients of regression analysis generally revealed a strong correlation between NDVI from the two sensors in November 2009 and January, April and July 2010 (0.88, 0.85, 0.77 and 0.74, respectively). The differences place may be affected by cloud cover. From the combined analysis of seasonal changes and land cover, we found that the correlations between the SPOT VGT and the GOSAT CAI NDVI data are less affected by seasonal change and the SPOT VGT data is more sensitive to high vegetation coverage than the GOSAT CAI data. In the future, through continued monitoring and processing by cloud removal technology, the accuracy of GOSAT CAI NDVI data will be further improved and thus be more widely used.

  18. Titanium Isotopes in CAIs -- Heterogeneities in the Early Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, I.; Schönbächler, M.; Halliday, A. N.

    2009-03-01

    We present Ti isotope data for CAIs from Allende and Efremovka. The new data demonstrate that n-rich isotopes, e.g., 50Ti, 62Ni, and 96Zr, are correlated in CAIs and that the n-rich addition was heteogeneously distributed in the early solar system.

  19. Light-absorbing aldol condensation products in acidic aerosols: Spectra, kinetics, and contribution to the absorption index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozière, Barbara; Esteve, William

    The radiative properties of aerosols that are transparent to light in the near-UV and visible, such as sulfate aerosols, can be dramatically modified when mixed with absorbing material such as soot. In a previous work we had shown that the aldol condensation of carbonyl compounds produces light-absorbing compounds in sulfuric acid solutions. In this work we report the spectroscopic and kinetic parameters necessary to estimate the effects of these reactions on the absorption index of sulfuric acid aerosols in the atmosphere. The absorption spectra obtained from the reactions of six different carbonyl compounds (acetaldehyde, acetone, propanal, butanal, 2-butanone, and trifluoroacetone) and their mixtures were compared over 190-1100 nm. The results indicated that most carbonyl compounds should be able to undergo aldol condensation. The products are oligomers absorbing light in the 300-500 nm region where few other compounds absorb, making them important for the radiative properties of aerosols. Kinetic experiments in 96-75 wt% H 2SO 4 solutions and between 273 and 314 K gave an activation energy for the rate constant of formation of the aldol products of acetaldehyde of -(70±15) kJ mol -1 in 96 wt% solution and showed that the effect of acid concentration was exponential. A complete expression for this rate constant is proposed where the absolute value in 96 wt% H 2SO 4 and at 298 K is scaled to the Henry's law coefficient for acetaldehyde and the absorption cross-section for the aldol products assumed in this work. The absorption index of stratospheric sulfuric acid aerosols after a 2-year residence time was estimated to 2×10 -4, optically equivalent to a content of 0.5% of soot and potentially significant for the radiative forcing of these aerosols and for satellite observations in channels where the aldol products absorb.

  20. Metamorphism of an Efremovka Type B CAI and Comparison with Other Settings of Alteration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fagan, T. J.; Aragane, H.; Enokido, Y.; Brearley, A. J.

    2015-07-01

    Primary minerals in a type B CAI from Efremovka are partially altered to feldspathoids, Fe-spinel and secondary anorthite. The extent of recrystallization is not as great as in typical Allende CAIs, but metamorphism has affected Efremovka CAIs.

  1. Determination of the ground albedo and the index of absorption of atmospheric particulates by remote sensing. II - Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    A hemispherical radiometer has been used to obtain spectrally narrow-band measurements of the downward hemispheric diffuse and total (global) flux densities at varying solar zenith angles on 14 days over Tucson. Data are presented which illustrate the effects of temporally varying atmospheric conditions as well as clear stable conditions on the ratio of the diffuse to direct solar radiation at the earth's surface. The ground albedo and the effective imaginary term of the complex refractive index of atmospheric particulates are derived from the diffuse-direct ratio measurements on seven clear stable days at two wavelengths using the statistical procedure described by King and Herman (1979). Results indicate that the downwelling diffuse radiation field in the midvisible region in Tucson can be adequately described by Mie scattering theory if the ground albedo is 0.279 + or - 0.100 and the index of absorption is 0.0306 + or - 0.0082.

  2. Creation and Distribution of CAIs in the Protoplanetary Nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.; Davis, S. S.; Dobrovolskis, A. R.

    2003-01-01

    CaAl rich refractory mineral inclusions (CAIs) found at 1 - 10% mass fraction in primitive chondrites appear to be several million years older than the dominant (chondrule) components in the same parent bodies. A prevalent concern is that it is difficult to retain CAIs for this long against gas-drag-induced radial drift into the sun. We assess a hot inner (turbulent) nebula context for CAI formation, using analytical models of nebula evolution and particle diffusion. We show that outward radial diffusion in a weakly turbulent nebula can prevent significant numbers of CAI-size particles from being lost into the sun for times of 1 - 3 x 10(exp 6) years. To match the CAI abundances quantitatively, we advocate an enhancement of the inner hot nebula in silicate-forming material, due to rapid inward migration of very primitive, silicate and carbon rich, meter-sized objects. 'Combustion' of the carbon into CO would make the CAI formation environment more reduced than solar, as certain observations imply. Abundant CO might also play a role in mass-independent chemical fractionation of oxygen isotopes as seen in CAIs and associated primitive, high-temperature condensates.

  3. New Titanium Isotope Data for Allende and Efremovka CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leya, Ingo; Schönbächler, Maria; Krähenbühl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2009-09-01

    We measured the titanium (Ti) isotope composition, i.e., 50Ti/47Ti, 48Ti/47Ti, and 46Ti/47Ti, in five calcium-rich-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) from the oxidized CV3 chondrite Allende and in two CAIs from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. Our data indicate that CAIs are enriched in 50Ti/47Ti and 46Ti/47Ti and are slightly depleted in 48Ti/47Ti compared to normal Ti defined by ordinary chondrites, eucrites, ureilites, mesosiderites, Earth, Moon, and Mars. Some CAIs have an additional 50Ti excess of ~8ɛ relative to bulk carbonaceous chondrites, which are enriched in 50Ti by ~2ɛ relative to terrestrial values, leading to a total excess of ~10ɛ. This additional 50Ti excess is correlated with nucleosynthetic anomalies found in 62Ni and 96Zr, all indicating an origin from a neutron-rich stellar source. Bulk carbonaceous chondrites show a similar trend, however, the extent of the anomalies is either less than or similar to the smallest anomalies seen in CAIs. Mass balance calculations suggest that bulk Allende Ti possibly consists of a mixture of at least two Ti components, anomalous Ti located in CAIs and a normal component possibly for matrix and chondrules. This argues for a heterogeneous distribution of Ti isotopes in the solar system. The finding that anomalous Ti is concentrated in CAIs suggests that CAIs formed in a specific region of the solar system and were, after their formation, not homogeneously redistributed within the solar system. Combining the CAI data with improved model predictions for early solar system irradiation effects indicates that a local production scenario for the relatively short lived radionuclides can be excluded, because the production of, e.g., 10Be, 26Al, and 41Ca, would result in a significant collateral shift in Ti isotopes, which is not seen in the measured data.

  4. Urinary excretion of magnesium and calcium as an index of absorption is not affected by lactose intake in healthy adults.

    PubMed

    Brink, E J; van Beresteijn, E C; Dekker, P R; Beynen, A C

    1993-05-01

    The effect of lactose on the urinary excretion of Mg and Ca, as an index of absorption, was studied in a double-blind, crossover study during three 1-week periods. Twenty-four healthy, lactose-tolerant, adult volunteers maintained their habitual diets with the exception that all lactose-containing dairy products in the diet were replaced by 600 g/d of three specially prepared dairy products. These products were based on either lactose-enriched cow's milk or lactose-enriched, lactase (EC 3.2.1.23)-treated cow's milk, with or without added Mg, and were given in turn during 1 week. Lactose intake was increased by 127 mmol/d (46 g/d) while taking the lactose-enriched products. While taking the Mg-enriched products, Mg intake was increased by 2.8 mmol/d (69 mg/d) which was equivalent to 17% of the habitual Mg intake. Apart from the lactose and Mg intake, nutrient intake was comparable during the three dietary periods. Urinary excretions of Mg and Ca were used as indicators for their absorption. Mg supplementation significantly increased urinary Mg excretion by 0.97 mmol/d (equivalent to an increase of 18%, P < 0.001), indicating that urinary Mg excretion is a valid indicator for intestinal Mg absorption. Hydrolysis of lactose did not affect urinary excretion of Mg and Ca, which implies that lactose intake does not affect the absorption of Mg and Ca in healthy adults. PMID:8329360

  5. Astrophysics of CAI formation as revealed by silicon isotope LA-MC-ICPMS of an igneous CAI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahar, Anat; Young, Edward D.

    2007-05-01

    Silicon isotope ratios of a typical CAI from the Leoville carbonaceous chondrite, obtained in situ by laser ablation MC-ICPMS, together with existing 25Mg/ 24Mg data, reveal a detailed picture of the astrophysical setting of CAI melting and subsequent heating. Models for the chemical and isotopic effects of evaporation of the molten CAI are used to produce a univariant relationship between PH 2 and time during melting. The result shows that this CAI was molten for a cumulative time of no more than 70 days and probably less than 15 days depending on temperature. The object could have been molten for an integrated time of just a few hours if isotope ratio zoning was eliminated after melting by high subsolidus temperatures (e.g., > 1300 K) for ˜ 500 yr. In all cases subsolidus heating sufficient to produce diffusion-limited isotope fractionation at the margin of the solidified CAI is required. These stable isotope data point to a two-stage history for this igneous CAI involving melting for a cumulative timescale of hours to months followed by subsolidus heating for years to hundreds of years. The thermobarometric history deduced from combining Si and Mg isotope ratio data implicates thermal processing in the disk, perhaps by passage through shockwaves, following melting. This study underscores the direct link between the meaning of stable isotope ratio zoning, or lack thereof, and the inferred astrophysical setting of melting and subsequent processing of CAIs.

  6. The role of absorption and dispersion in resonant tunnelling through a negative index medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golla, D.; Deb, S.; Dutta Gupta, S.

    2011-01-01

    We study resonant tunneling through a layered medium with a passive negative index medium (NIM) slab as a constituent layer. Using a causal model for susceptibilities with the parameters of a recently reported metamaterial [G. Dolling, C. Enkrich, M. Wegener, C.M. Soukoulis, S. Linden, Opt. Lett. 31, 1800 (2006)] we show that resonant tunnelling and the associated delay are mostly suppressed. This is in sharp contrast with the naive approach of retaining phase velocity dispersion with arbitrary low losses, predicting sharp resonances with large associated delays. This is shown to be a nontrivial issue because of the necessity of losses for NIM behaviour, while their presence spoils the quality factor of the resonant devices.

  7. Fiber-optic temperature sensor based on interaction of temperature-dependent refractive index and absorption of germanium film.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Li, Yulin

    2011-01-10

    The interaction of a large temperature-dependent refractive index and a temperature-dependent absorption of semiconductor materials at 1550 nm can be used to build a very sensitive, film coated fiber-optic temperature probe. We developed a sensor model for the optical fiber-germanium film sensor. A temperature sensitivity of reflectivity change of 0.0012/°C, corresponding to 0.1°C considering a moderate signal processing system, over 100°C within the temperature regime of -20°C to 120°C, has been demonstrated by experimental tests of the novel sensor. The potential sensitivity and further applications of the sensor are discussed. PMID:21221150

  8. A CAI in the Ivuna CI1 Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, David R.; Zolensky, M.; Martinez, J.; Mikouchi, T.; Ohsumi, K.; Hagiya, K.; Satake, W.; Le, L.; Ross, D.; Peslier, A.

    2011-01-01

    We have recently discovered the first well-preserved calcium aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) in a CI1 chondrite (Ivuna). Previously, all CI1 chondrites were thought to be devoid of preserved CAI and chondrules due to the near total aqueous alteration to which their parent body (bodies) have been subjected. The CAI is roughly spherical, but with a slight teardrop geometry and a maximum diameter of 170 microns (fig. 1). It lacks any Wark-Lovering Rim. Incipient aqueous alteration, and probably shock, have rendered large portions of the CAI poorly crystalline. It is extremely fine-grained, with only a few grains exceeding 10 microns. We have performed electron microprobe analyses (EPMA), FEG-SEM imaging and element mapping, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) and synchrotron X-ray diffraction (SXRD) in order to determine the fundamental characteristics of this apparently unique object.

  9. Systematic study of Ge1-xSnx absorption coefficient and refractive index for the device applications of Si-based optoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tran, Huong; Du, Wei; Ghetmiri, Seyed A.; Mosleh, Aboozar; Sun, Greg; Soref, Richard A.; Margetis, Joe; Tolle, John; Li, Baohua; Naseem, Hameed A.; Yu, Shui-Qing

    2016-03-01

    The absorption coefficient and refractive index of Ge1-xSnx alloys (x from 0% to 10%) were characterized for the wavelength range from 1500 to 2500 nm via spectroscopic ellipsometry at room temperature. By applying physical models to fit the obtained data, two empirical formulae with extracted constants and coefficients were developed: (1) Absorption coefficient. The absorption regarding Urbach tail, indirect and direct bandgap transitions were comprehensively taken into account; (2) refractive index. The Sellmeier coefficients associated with dispersion relationship were extracted. In these formulae, the Sn composition and strain percentage were the input parameters, by inputting which the spectral absorption coefficient and spectral refractive index can be obtained. Since the absorption coefficient is key information to determine the performance of the photodetectors including operation wavelength range, responsivity, and specific detectivity, and the refractive index is very useful for the design of the anti-reflection coating for photodetectors and the layer structure for waveguides, the developed formulae could simplify the optoelectronic device design process due to their parameter-based expressions.

  10. Dispersion of nonlinear refractive index in layered WS2 and WSe2 semiconductor films induced by two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ningning; Li, Yuanxin; Zhang, Saifeng; McEvoy, Niall; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Cui, Yun; Zhang, Long; Duesberg, Georg S; Wang, Jun

    2016-09-01

    Both the nonlinear absorption and nonlinear refraction properties of WS2 and WSe2 semiconductor films have been characterized by using Z-scan technique with femtosecond pulses at the wavelength of 1040 nm. It is found that these films have two-photon absorption response with the nonlinear absorption coefficient of ∼103  cm GW-1, and a dispersion of nonlinear refractive index in the WS2 films that translated from positive in the monolayer to negative in bulk materials. PMID:27607941

  11. Simulations of the Aerosol Index and the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth and Comparisons with OMI Retrievals During ARCTAS-2008 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm, useful for observing the presence of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, from aerosol simulations conducted with the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running online the GEOS-5 Atmospheric GCM. The model simulates five aerosol types: dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate aerosol and can be run in replay or data assimilation modes. In the assimilation mode, information's provided by the space-based MODIS and MISR sensors constrains the model aerosol state. Aerosol optical properties are then derived from the simulated mass concentration and the Al is determined at the OMI footprint using the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. In parallel, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. We have focused our study during ARCTAS (June - July 2008), a period with a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. Our ultimate goal is to use OMI measurements as independent validation for our MODIS/MISR assimilation. Towards this goal we document the limitation of OMI aerosol absorption measurements on a global scale, in particular sensitivity to aerosol vertical profile and cloud contamination effects, deriving the appropriate averaging kernels. More specifically, model simulated (full) column integrated AAOD is compared with model derived Al, this way identifying those regions and conditions under which OMI cannot detect absorbing aerosols. Making use of ATrain cloud measurements from MODIS, C1oudSat and CALIPSO we also investigate the global impact on clouds on OMI derived Al, and the extent to which GEOS-5 clouds can offer a first order representation of these effects.

  12. Index to Computer Assisted Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lekan, Helen A., Ed.

    The computer assisted instruction (CAI) programs and projects described in this index are listed by subject matter. The index gives the program name, author, source, description, prerequisites, level of instruction, type of student, average completion time, logic and program, purpose for which program was designed, supplementary…

  13. NEW TITANIUM ISOTOPE DATA FOR ALLENDE AND EFREMOVKA CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Leya, Ingo; Schoenbaechler, Maria; Kraehenbuehl, Urs; Halliday, Alex N.

    2009-09-10

    We measured the titanium (Ti) isotope composition, i.e., {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti, in five calcium-rich-aluminum-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) from the oxidized CV3 chondrite Allende and in two CAIs from the reduced CV3 chondrite Efremovka. Our data indicate that CAIs are enriched in {sup 50}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and {sup 46}Ti/{sup 47}Ti and are slightly depleted in {sup 48}Ti/{sup 47}Ti compared to normal Ti defined by ordinary chondrites, eucrites, ureilites, mesosiderites, Earth, Moon, and Mars. Some CAIs have an additional {sup 50}Ti excess of {approx}8{epsilon} relative to bulk carbonaceous chondrites, which are enriched in {sup 50}Ti by {approx}2{epsilon} relative to terrestrial values, leading to a total excess of {approx}10{epsilon}. This additional {sup 50}Ti excess is correlated with nucleosynthetic anomalies found in {sup 62}Ni and {sup 96}Zr, all indicating an origin from a neutron-rich stellar source. Bulk carbonaceous chondrites show a similar trend, however, the extent of the anomalies is either less than or similar to the smallest anomalies seen in CAIs. Mass balance calculations suggest that bulk Allende Ti possibly consists of a mixture of at least two Ti components, anomalous Ti located in CAIs and a normal component possibly for matrix and chondrules. This argues for a heterogeneous distribution of Ti isotopes in the solar system. The finding that anomalous Ti is concentrated in CAIs suggests that CAIs formed in a specific region of the solar system and were, after their formation, not homogeneously redistributed within the solar system. Combining the CAI data with improved model predictions for early solar system irradiation effects indicates that a local production scenario for the relatively short lived radionuclides can be excluded, because the production of, e.g., {sup 10}Be, {sup 26}Al, and {sup 41}Ca, would result in a significant collateral shift in Ti isotopes, which is not seen in the

  14. Using the OMI aerosol index and absorption aerosol optical depth to evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Randles, C. A.; Govindaraju, R.; Torres, O.; Campbell, J.; Spurr, R.

    2015-05-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV aerosol index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI and aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). MERRAero is based on a version of the GEOS-5 model that is radiatively coupled to the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) aerosol module and includes assimilation of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensor. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR), aerosol retrievals from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain potential misplacement of plume height by the model. By sampling dust, biomass burning and pollution events in 2007 we have compared model-produced AI and AAOD with the corresponding OMI products, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols was deficient. As a result of this study over the Saharan dust region, we have obtained a new set of dust aerosol optical properties that retains consistency with the MODIS AOD data that were assimilated, while resulting in better agreement with aerosol absorption measurements from OMI. The analysis conducted over the southern African and South American biomass burning regions indicates that revising the spectrally dependent aerosol absorption properties in the near-UV region improves the modeled-observed AI comparisons

  15. Using the OMI Aerosol Index and Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth to Evaluate the NASA MERRA Aerosol Reanalysis.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard, V.; da Silva, A. M., Jr.; Colarco, P. R.; Darmenov, A.; Govindaraju, R.

    2014-12-01

    A radiative transfer interface has been developed to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) from the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) aerosol assimilated fields. The purpose of this work is to use the AI derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) measurements as independent validation for the Modern Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications Aerosol Reanalysis (MERRAero). In this presentation we show comparisons of model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements during several months of 2007 characterized by a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. In parallel, model produced Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) were compared to OMI AAOD for the same period, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Since AI is dependent on aerosol concentration, optical properties and altitude of the aerosol layer, we make use of complementary observations to fully diagnose the model, including AOD from the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors, aerosol retrievals from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and attenuated backscatter coefficients from the Cloud-Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) mission to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  16. Numerical simulation and validation of SI-CAI hybrid combustion in a CAI/HCCI gasoline engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinyan; Xie, Hui; Xie, Liyan; Zhang, Lianfang; Li, Le; Chen, Tao; Zhao, Hua

    2013-02-01

    SI-CAI hybrid combustion, also known as spark-assisted compression ignition (SACI), is a promising concept to extend the operating range of CAI (Controlled Auto-Ignition) and achieve the smooth transition between spark ignition (SI) and CAI in the gasoline engine. In this study, a SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) has been constructed on the basis of the 3-Zones Extended Coherent Flame Model (ECFM3Z). An ignition model is included to initiate the ECFM3Z calculation and induce the flame propagation. In order to precisely depict the subsequent auto-ignition process of the unburned fuel and air mixture independently after the initiation of flame propagation, the tabulated chemistry concept is adopted to describe the auto-ignition chemistry. The methodology for extracting tabulated parameters from the chemical kinetics calculations is developed so that both cool flame reactions and main auto-ignition combustion can be well captured under a wider range of thermodynamic conditions. The SI-CAI hybrid combustion model (HCM) is then applied in the three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (3-D CFD) engine simulation. The simulation results are compared with the experimental data obtained from a single cylinder VVA engine. The detailed analysis of the simulations demonstrates that the SI-CAI hybrid combustion process is characterised with the early flame propagation and subsequent multi-site auto-ignition around the main flame front, which is consistent with the optical results reported by other researchers. Besides, the systematic study of the in-cylinder condition reveals the influence mechanism of the early flame propagation on the subsequent auto-ignition.

  17. Spectral reflectance of conodonts: A step toward quantitative color alteration and thermal maturity indexes

    SciTech Connect

    Deaton, B.C.; Nestell, M.; Balsam, W.L.

    1996-07-01

    Changes in the color of conodonts have long been used to assess thermal maturity. Color is a subjective measure, and color changes in conodonts are related to a subjective scale, the conodont alteration index or CAI. In this paper, we propose a simple, nondestructive method for objectively determining CAI and relating CAI to thermal maturity, the spectral reflectance of conodonts (SRC). The diffuse reflectance of about 30 large conodont fragments arranged on a barium-sulfate slide was determined with a total reflectance spectrophotometer in the wavelength range of 300-850 nm. By examining conodonts that ranged form a CAI of 1 to a CAI of 6 we found that the average slope of the reflectance curve from 550 to 800 nm is a good proxy for CAI. A second-order regression equation estimates CAI from this slope with high accuracy (correlation coefficient = 0.99). These estimates appear most accurate for a CAI of 1 to a CAI of 4, where the slopes change most rapidly, but give reasonable results up to a CAI of 6. Based on the results of our analysis of two samples with known thermal maturities form the Valles Caldera region of New Mexico, we propose a preliminary relationship among SRC slope, CAI, and in-situ alteration temperature.

  18. Use of Selected Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in Health Classes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poehler, David L.

    A pilot project examined the effectiveness of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in teaching selected concepts of health and fitness: coronary risk, lifestyle, and nutrition as related to weight control. A convenience sample of 58 students from two Concepts of Health and Fitness classes were randomly assigned to two groups, both of which used…

  19. Effects of Logo and CAI Environments on Cognition and Creativity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clements, Douglas H.

    1986-01-01

    This study assessed the effects of learning logo computer programing and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on specific cognitive skills, metacognitive skills, creativity, and achievement. The programing group scored significantly higher on measures of operational competence, two of three measures of metacognitive skills, and a measure of…

  20. MONIFORMS as Authoring Aids for the PLATO IV CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulz, Russel E.

    An analysis of portions of the HumRRO (Human Resources Research Organization) developed computer-assisted instruction (CAI) course in COBOL programing, and a survey of representatives from Advanced Research Project Agency (ARPA) PLATO IV installations indicated a need for authoring aids that could be prepared and programed easily and quickly. The…

  1. Introductory CAI Dialogue in Differential Calculus for Freshman Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalman, C. S.; And Others

    1974-01-01

    A project on computer based dialogue for freshmen is described and evaluated. The dialogue utilizes a CAI language written in Fortran that allows a designer to easily write and edit questions at his own desk without the use of a terminal. (Author/DT)

  2. An Intelligent CAI Monitor and Generative Tutor. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koffman, Elliot B.; And Others

    Design techniques for generative computer-assisted-instructional (CAI) systems are described in this report. These are systems capable of generating problems for students and of deriving and monitoring solutions; problem difficulty, instructional pace, and depth of monitoring are all individually tailored and parts of the solution algorithms can…

  3. CAI for the Developmentally Handicapped: Nine Years of Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallworth, H. J.; Brebner, Ann

    Initiated nine years ago by the University of Calgary Faculty of Education Computer Applications Unit in cooperation with the nearby Vocational and Rehabilitation Research Institute (VRRI), this project uses computer assisted instruction (CAI) to teach social and vocational skills to developmentally handicapped young adults, many of whom also have…

  4. Distribution and Origin of 36Cl In Allende CAIs

    SciTech Connect

    Matzel, J P; Jacobsen, B; Hutcheon, I D; Krot, A N; Nagashima, K; Yin, Q; Ramon, E C; Weber, P; Wasserburg, G J

    2009-12-11

    The abundance of short-lived radionuclides (SLRs) in early solar system materials provide key information about their nucleosynthetic origin and can constrain the timing of early solar system events. Excesses of {sup 36}S ({sup 36}S*) correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S ratios provide direct evidence for in situ decay of {sup 36}Cl ({tau}{sub 1/2} {approx} 0.3 Ma) and have been reported in sodalite (Na{sub 8}Al{sub 6}Si{sub 6}O{sub 24}Cl{sub 2}) and wadalite (Ca{sub 6}Al{sub 5}Si{sub 2}O{sub 16}Cl{sub 3}) in CAIs and chondrules from the Allende and Ningqiang CV carbonaceous chondrites. While previous studies demonstrate unequivocally that {sup 36}Cl was extant in the early solar system, no consensus on the origin or initial abundance of {sup 36}Cl has emerged. Understanding the origin of {sup 36}Cl, as well as the reported variation in the initial {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio, requires addressing when, where and how chlorine was incorporated into CAIs and chondrules. These factors are key to distinguishing between stellar nucleosynthesis or energetic particle irradiation for the origin of {sup 36}Cl. Wadalite is a chlorine-rich secondary mineral with structural and chemical affinities to grossular. The high chlorine ({approx}12 wt%) and very low sulfur content (<<0.01 wt%) make wadalite ideal for studies of the {sup 36}Cl-{sup 36}S system. Wadalite is present in Allende CAIs exclusively in the interior regions either in veins crosscutting melilite or in zones between melilite and anorthite associated with intergrowths of grossular, monticellite, and wollastonite. Wadalite and sodalite most likely resulted from open-system alteration of primary minerals with a chlorine-rich fluid phase. We recently reported large {sup 36}S* correlated with {sup 35}Cl/{sup 34}S in wadalite in Allende Type B CAI AJEF, yielding a ({sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl){sub 0} ratio of (1.7 {+-} 0.3) x 10{sup -5}. This value is the highest reported {sup 36}Cl/{sup 35}Cl ratio and is {approx}5 times

  5. The isotopic homogeneity in the early solar system: Revisiting the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozima, M.; Yamada, A.

    2009-12-01

    Since the first discovery of the mass-independently fractionated oxygen isotopes in anhydrous, high temperature Ca-Al rich inclusion minerals in carbonaceous meteorites (CAIs) by Clayton et al. (1), their common occurrence in primitive meteorites has generally been regarded to reflect some fundamental process prevalent in the early solar nebula. The CAI oxygen isotopic composition is uniquely characterized by (i) large mass independent isotopic fractionation and (ii) their isotopic data in an oxygen three isotope plot (δ17O - δ18O (δ17O ≡ {(17O/16O)/(17O/16O)SMOW - 1} × 1000) yield nearly a straight line with a slope 1.0. In establishing these characteristics, ion microprobe analyses has played a central role, especially an isotopic mapping technique (isotopography) was crucial (e.g., 2). The extraordinary oxygen isotopic ratio in CAIs is widely attributed to the self-shielding absorption of UV radiation in CO, one of the dominant chemical compounds in the early solar nebula (3). However, the self-shielding scenario necessarily leads to the unusual prediction that a mean solar oxygen isotopic composition differs from most of planetary bodies including Earth, Moon, and Mars. If the self-shielding process were indeed responsible to the CAI oxygen isotopic anomaly, this would require a fundamental revision of the current theory of the origin of the solar system, which generally assumes the initial total vaporization of nebula material to give rise to isotopic homogenization. The GENESIS mission launched in 2001(4), which collected oxygen in the solar wind was hoped to resolve the isotopic composition of the Sun. However, because of difficulties in correcting for instrumental and more importantly for intrinsic isotopic fractionation between the SW and the Sun, a final answer is yet to be seen (5). Here, we show on the basis of the oxygen isotopic fractionation systematics that the self shielding hypothesis cannot explain the key characteristics of the CAI oxygen

  6. Effectiveness of CAI Package on Achievement in Physics of IX Standard Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maheswari, I. Uma; Ramakrishnan, N.

    2015-01-01

    The present study is an experimental one in nature, to find out the effectiveness of CAI package on in Physics of IX std. students. For this purpose a CAI package was developed and validated. The validated CAI package formed an independent variable of this study. The dependent variable is students' achievements in physics content. In order to find…

  7. Harvard University Computer-Aided Instruction (CAI) Laboratory. Technical Report Number 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stolurow, Lawrence M.; Peterson, Theodore I.

    This report is a detailed description of the Harvard CAI Laboratory, including its history, organization, functions, staffing, programs and support. Discussed are materials relating to CAI in general, such as psychological research, modes of instruction, advantages and implementation of CAI. Reviewed also are specific projects of this facility. A…

  8. Observations from a prototype implementation of the Common APSE Interface Set (CAIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcclimens, M.; Bowerman, R.; Howell, C.; Gill, H.; Hutchison, R.

    1985-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS), its purpose, and its history. The paper describes an internal research and development effort at the Mitre Corporation to implement a prototype version of the current CAIS specification and to rehost existing Ada software development tools onto the CAIS prototype. Based on this effort, observations are made on the maturity and functionality of the CAIS. These observations support the government's current policy of publicizing the CAIS specification as a baseline for public review in support of its evolution into a standard which can be mandated for use as Ada is today.

  9. CAIs in CO3 Meteorites: Parent Body or Nebular Alteration?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenwood, R. C.; Hutchison, R.; Huss, G. R.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    1992-07-01

    It is widely held that alteration of Ca Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in CV3 and CO3 meteorites occurred in the nebula (Hashimoto 1992). The CO3 chondrites, however, appear to define a metamorphic sequence dominated by parent body, and not nebular, metamorphic effects (Scott and Jones, 1990). To investigate the effects of metamorphism on CAIs we have studied inclusions from 4 CO chondrites: Colony (3.0), Felix (3.2), Lance (3.4), and Warrenton (3.6). In a section of Colony (74 mm^2) 81 CAIs, 30-870 micrometers long, comprise 52 nodular spinel-rich inclusions (fragments of Type-A CAI composed largely of spinel), 12 spinel-pyroxene inclusions, 10 melilite-rich inclusions, 2 hibonite-only inclusions, 2 CaAl4O7-bearing inclusions, and 3 spinel-pyroxene- olivine inclusions. Although a find, CAIs in Colony are relatively fresh, melilite in particular being little altered. In 79% of the spinel-bearing inclusions, spinel has <2wt% FeO, which otherwise ranges to 34.8%. Mg isotopic compositions were determined in 5 selected Colony inclusion; evidence of ^26Mg* from decay of ^26Al was found in 4 CAI. A hibonite-only inclusion has the largest ^26Mg* excess, delta^26Mg 32o/oo. Data show no evidence of isotopic disturbance and define a linear array with slope ^26Mg* /^27Al = (3.4+- 0.6) x 10^-5, like that obtained by Davis and Hinton (1986) in a hibonite-bearing spherule from Ornans. Despite Al/Mg ratios of up to 1500, CaAl4O7 in one inclusion shows no evidence of ^26Mg*; ^26Mg* < 4 x 10^-6. All three melilite-bearing inclusions from Colony C21 (angstrom k(sub)8.3-14.3), C56 (angstrom k(sub)10.5-16) and C62 (angstrom k(sub)15-21) show evidence of radiogenic ^26Mg*. Excess ^26Mg positively correlates with the Al/Mg ratios but the data do not define a unique initial value of ^26Al/^27Al. Data for melilite in C21, in particular, show evidence for disturbance of the Al-Mg system, as is common for Allende CAI (Podosek et al. 1991). Melilites in C56 in contrast show no evidence of

  10. Replacement textures in CAI and implications regarding planetary metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meeker, G. P.; Wasserburg, G. J.; Armstrong, J. T.

    1983-01-01

    Formation by a secondary metamorphic event, rather than primary crystallization from a melt or a sequential nebular condensation, is indicated by textural and chemical features of five coarse grained, Ca- and Al-rich inclusions (CAI) from the Allende meteorite which contain embayed pyroxene surrounded by melilite. It is suggested that the most probable environment for a metamorphic process (requiring the addition of Ca derived from calcite or from the introduction of a fluid phase) is that of a small planetary body, rather than the solar nebula. These results are compatible with O isotopic heterogeneities within CAI, and offer a mechanism for the production of lower temperature alteration phases, together with the rim phases found in these inclusions.

  11. Oxygen Isotope Measurements of a Rare Murchison Type A CAI and Its Rim

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, J. I.; Hutcheon, I. D.; Jacobsen, B.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2013-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from CV chondrites commonly show oxygen isotope heterogeneity among different mineral phases within individual inclusions reflecting the complex history of CAIs in both the solar nebula and/or parent bodies. The degree of isotopic exchange is typically mineral-specific, yielding O-16-rich spinel, hibonite and pyroxene and O-16-depleted melilite and anorthite. Recent work demonstrated large and systematic variations in oxygen isotope composition within the margin and Wark-Lovering rim of an Allende Type A CAI. These variations suggest that some CV CAIs formed from several oxygen reservoirs and may reflect transport between distinct regions of the solar nebula or varying gas composition near the proto-Sun. Oxygen isotope compositions of CAIs from other, less-altered chondrites show less intra-CAI variability and 16O-rich compositions. The record of intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability in CM chondrites, which commonly show evidence for low-temperature aqueous alteration, is less clear, in part because the most common CAIs found in CM chondrites are mineralogically simple (hibonite +/- spinel or spinel +/- pyroxene) and are composed of minerals less susceptible to O-isotopic exchange. No measurements of the oxygen isotope compositions of rims on CAIs in CM chondrites have been reported. Here, we present oxygen isotope data from a rare, Type A CAI from the Murchison meteorite, MUM-1. The data were collected from melilite, hibonite, perovskite and spinel in a traverse into the interior of the CAI and from pyroxene, melilite, anorthite, and spinel in the Wark-Lovering rim. Our objectives were to (1) document any evidence for intra-CAI oxygen isotope variability; (2) determine the isotopic composition of the rim minerals and compare their composition(s) to the CAI interior; and (3) compare the MUM-1 data to oxygen isotope zoning profiles measured from CAIs in other chondrites.

  12. Silicon Isotopic Fractionation of CAI-like Vacuum Evaporation Residues

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, K; Kita, N; Mendybaev, R; Richter, F; Davis, A; Valley, J

    2009-06-18

    Calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are often enriched in the heavy isotopes of magnesium and silicon relative to bulk solar system materials. It is likely that these isotopic enrichments resulted from evaporative mass loss of magnesium and silicon from early solar system condensates while they were molten during one or more high-temperature reheating events. Quantitative interpretation of these enrichments requires laboratory determinations of the evaporation kinetics and associated isotopic fractionation effects for these elements. The experimental data for the kinetics of evaporation of magnesium and silicon and the evaporative isotopic fractionation of magnesium is reasonably complete for Type B CAI liquids (Richter et al., 2002, 2007a). However, the isotopic fractionation factor for silicon evaporating from such liquids has not been as extensively studied. Here we report new ion microprobe silicon isotopic measurements of residual glass from partial evaporation of Type B CAI liquids into vacuum. The silicon isotopic fractionation is reported as a kinetic fractionation factor, {alpha}{sub Si}, corresponding to the ratio of the silicon isotopic composition of the evaporation flux to that of the residual silicate liquid. For CAI-like melts, we find that {alpha}{sub Si} = 0.98985 {+-} 0.00044 (2{sigma}) for {sup 29}Si/{sup 28}Si with no resolvable variation with temperature over the temperature range of the experiments, 1600-1900 C. This value is different from what has been reported for evaporation of liquid Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} (Davis et al., 1990) and of a melt with CI chondritic proportions of the major elements (Wang et al., 2001). There appears to be some compositional control on {alpha}{sub Si}, whereas no compositional effects have been reported for {alpha}{sub Mg}. We use the values of {alpha}Si and {alpha}Mg, to calculate the chemical compositions of the unevaporated precursors of a number of isotopically fractionated CAIs from CV chondrites whose

  13. Primary Reverse Oxygen-Isotope Evolution of Pyroxene in Compact Type A CAIs from the Efremovka and NWA-3118 CV3 Chondrites: Insights into Internal CAI Mixing Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacPherson, G. J.; Nagashima, K.; Ivanova, M. A.; Krot, A. N.

    2012-03-01

    ^1^6O-depleted Ti-Al-rich pyroxenes in compact Type A CAIs reflect the composition of the perovsites from which they first formed. Perovsite apparently exchanged oxygen very early, prior to melilite exchange and to initial melting of the CAIs.

  14. Absorption edge and the refractive index dispersion of carbon-nickel composite films at different annealing temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalouji, Vali; Elahi, Seyed Mohammad; Solaymani, Shahram; Ghaderi, Atefeh

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the optical properties of carbon-nickel films annealed at different temperatures 300, 500, 800 and 1000 ° C, with a special emphasis on the absorption edge, were investigated. The optical transmittance spectra in the wavelength range 300-1000nm were used to compute the absorption coefficient. The optical dispersion parameters were calculated according to Wemple and DiDomenico (WDD) single-oscillator model. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements of carbon-nickel films exhibit two main peaks at about 2.5 and 3.3eV which correspond to the fundamental indirect and direct gap, respectively. The field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) showed that the absorption edge in the films was controlled by the nanoparticle size. The films annealed at 500 ° C have minimum indirect optical band gap and maximum disorder.

  15. Simultaneous nonlinear absorption and index effects in the propagation of intense TEA CO2 laser pulses through CDF3.

    PubMed

    Galarneau, P; Niu, Z Y; Yergeau, F; Chin, S L; Evans, D K; McAlpine, R D

    1985-09-01

    Changes in the beam profile of the CO2 laser 10R(26) line, caused by transmission through, and absorption by, CDF3 were studied using an array of pyroelectric detectors. During the propagation of the laser beam through CDF3, nonlinear absorption and self-defocusing of the beam have both been determined from measurements of the effect on the exit beam of fluence, radiant energy, CDF3 pressure, transmission cell length, and distance from the exit of the cell to the detector array. PMID:18223958

  16. Building an unbiased sample of quiescent galaxies up to z=2.5 based on the Mg(UV) absorption index

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez Sánchez, H.; Eliche-Moral, M. Carmen; Pérez-González, P. G.; Esquej, P.; Alcalde-Pampliega, B.; SHARDS Team

    2015-05-01

    Samples of ``red & dead" galaxies selected through traditional color-based techniques usually suffer from contamination by strongly dust obscured sources. We are using GTC/OSIRIS data from the SHARDS project on the GOODSN field to define unbiased samples of really quiescent massive galaxies at different redshifts up to z=2.5. By measuring the Mg(UV) absorption index in the pseudo-spectra of these galaxies, we intend to determine the redshift evolution of the characteristic age of their stellar populations to shed some light into their assembly epoch.

  17. Oxygen Isotope Variations at the Margin of a CAI Records Circulation Within the Solar Nebula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Simon, Steven B.; Matzel, Jennifer E. P.; Ramon, Erick C.; Weber, Peter K.; Grossman, Lawrence; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2011-03-01

    Micrometer-scale analyses of a calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusion (CAI) and the characteristic mineral bands mantling the CAI reveal that the outer parts of this primitive object have a large range of oxygen isotope compositions. The variations are systematic; the relative abundance of 16O first decreases toward the CAI margin, approaching a planetary-like isotopic composition, then shifts to extremely 16O-rich compositions through the surrounding rim. The variability implies that CAIs probably formed from several oxygen reservoirs. The observations support early and short-lived fluctuations of the environment in which CAIs formed, either because of transport of the CAIs themselves to distinct regions of the solar nebula or because of varying gas composition near the proto-Sun.

  18. Absorption coefficient and relative refractive index change for a double δ-doped GaAs MIGFET-like structure: Electric and magnetic field effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Orozco, J. C.; Rodríguez-Magdaleno, K. A.; Suárez-López, J. R.; Duque, C. A.; Restrepo, R. L.

    2016-04-01

    In this work we present theoretical results for the electronic structure as well as for the absorption coefficient and relative refractive index change for an asymmetric double δ-doped like confining potential in the active region of a Multiple Independent Gate Field Effect Transistor (MIGFET) system. We model the potential profile as a double δ-doped like potential profile between two Schottky (parabolic) potential barriers that are just the main characteristics of the MIGFET configuration. We investigate the effect of external electromagnetic fields in this kind of quantum structures, in particular we applied a homogeneous constant electric field in the growth direction z as well as a homogeneous constant magnetic field in the x-direction. In general we conclude that by applying electromagnetic fields we can modulate the resonant peaks of the absorption coefficient as well as their energy position. Also with such probes it is possible to control the nodes and amplitude of the relative refractive index changes related to resonant intersubband optical transitions.

  19. Coordinated Oxygen Isotopic and Petrologic Studies of CAIS Record Varying Composition of Protosolar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Justin I.; Matzel, J. E. P.; Simon, S. B.; Weber, P. K.; Grossman, L.; Ross, D. K.; Hutcheon, I. D.

    2012-01-01

    Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) record the O-isotope composition of Solar nebular gas from which they grew [1]. High spatial resolution O-isotope measurements afforded by ion microprobe analysis across the rims and margin of CAIs reveal systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 and suggest formation from a diversity of nebular environments [2-4]. This heterogeneity has been explained by isotopic mixing between the O-16-rich Solar reservoir [6] and a second O-16-poor reservoir (probably nebular gas) with a "planetary-like" isotopic composition [e.g., 1, 6-7], but the mechanism and location(s) where these events occur within the protoplanetary disk remain uncertain. The orientation of large and systematic variations in (Delta)O-17 reported by [3] for a compact Type A CAI from the Efremovka reduced CV3 chondrite differs dramatically from reports by [4] of a similar CAI, A37 from the Allende oxidized CV3 chondrite. Both studies conclude that CAIs were exposed to distinct, nebular O-isotope reservoirs, implying the transfer of CAIs among different settings within the protoplanetary disk [4]. To test this hypothesis further and the extent of intra-CAI O-isotopic variation, a pristine compact Type A CAI, Ef-1 from Efremovka, and a Type B2 CAI, TS4 from Allende were studied. Our new results are equally intriguing because, collectively, O-isotopic zoning patterns in the CAIs indicate a progressive and cyclic record. The results imply that CAIs were commonly exposed to multiple environments of distinct gas during their formation. Numerical models help constrain conditions and duration of these events.

  20. Simultaneous detection of the absorption spectrum and refractive index ratio with a spectrophotometer: monitoring contaminants in bioethanol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kontturi, V.; Hyvärinen, S.; García, A.; Carmona, R.; Murzin, D. Yu; Mikkola, J.-P.; Peiponen, K.-E.

    2011-05-01

    The optical properties of a biofuel resulting from the fungi-treated lignocellulosic biomass in an ethanol matrix were studied. The matrix simulates the case that the bioethanol is contaminated by sugars, water and colour pigments that reduce the quality of the biofuel and compromise the combustion process. It is suggested that by applying a spectrophotometer only, it is possible to obtain valid information, i.e. the spectral features of the contaminants as well as the refractive index ratio of bioethanol. This allows for simultaneous purity and density detection of biomass-derived liquids or liquid biofuels, in comparison to a reference representing an ideal bioethanol (pure ethyl alcohol, ethanol of 99.5% purity (v/v)).

  1. The Vibrio cholerae quorum-sensing autoinducer CAI-1: analysis of the biosynthetic enzyme CqsA

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, R.; Bolitho, M; Higgins, D; Lu, W; Ng, W; Jeffrey, P; Rabinowitz, J; Semmelhack, M; Hughson, F; Bassler, B

    2009-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the bacterium that causes the disease cholera, controls virulence factor production and biofilm development in response to two extracellular quorum-sensing molecules, called autoinducers. The strongest autoinducer, called CAI-1 (for cholera autoinducer-1), was previously identified as (S)-3-hydroxytridecan-4-one. Biosynthesis of CAI-1 requires the enzyme CqsA. Here, we determine the CqsA reaction mechanism, identify the CqsA substrates as (S)-2-aminobutyrate and decanoyl coenzyme A, and demonstrate that the product of the reaction is 3-aminotridecan-4-one, dubbed amino-CAI-1. CqsA produces amino-CAI-1 by a pyridoxal phosphate-dependent acyl-CoA transferase reaction. Amino-CAI-1 is converted to CAI-1 in a subsequent step via a CqsA-independent mechanism. Consistent with this, we find cells release {ge}100 times more CAI-1 than amino-CAI-1. Nonetheless, V. cholerae responds to amino-CAI-1 as well as CAI-1, whereas other CAI-1 variants do not elicit a quorum-sensing response. Thus, both CAI-1 and amino-CAI-1 have potential as lead molecules in the development of an anticholera treatment.

  2. The Graphics Terminal Display System; a Powerful General-Purpose CAI Package.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornbeck, Frederick W., Brock, Lynn

    The Graphic Terminal Display System (GTDS) was created to support research and development in computer-assisted instruction (CAI). The system uses an IBM 360/50 computer and interfaces with a large-screen graphics display terminal, a random-access slide projector, and a speech synthesizer. An authoring language, GRAIL, was developed for CAI, and…

  3. Knowledge-Based CAI: CINS for Individualized Curriculum Sequencing. Final Technical Report No. 290.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wescourt, Keith T.; And Others

    This report describes research on the Curriculum Information Network (CIN) paradigm for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in technical subjects. The CIN concept was first conceived and implemented in the BASIC Instructional Program (BIP). The primary objective of CIN-based CAI and the BIP project has been to develop procedures for providing each…

  4. Less Equals More: Coaching/Prompting CAI as a Tool Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Ted L.

    Recent reviews of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in various journals suggest that the technological and economic barriers to its adoption and use may be overcome in the very near future, and that CAI will be feasible in a number of educational settings. Computer hardware costs have dropped dramatically in recent years, and a variety of…

  5. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment. Technical Report 75-7.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    A study to test the effects of learner control of the sequencing of instructional tasks when using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems is described. Using a series of CAI modules to teach the COBOL programing language to military personnel, students were able to control various aspects of their learning environment. Among the research…

  6. Curricular and Computer System Compatibility of CAI Programs for Multi-University Use.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Keith A.

    A brief introduction to developmental efforts in computer assisted instruction (CAI) at Pennsylvania State University is followed by a description of a program of mobile CAI facilities inaugurated in 1970 as part of the inservice continuing education program for teachers. The paper includes very brief descriptions of the graduate level courses…

  7. Audio-Tutorial and CAI Aids for Problem Solving in Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lower, Stephen K.

    1970-01-01

    Starting from a successful audio-tutorial program, the author initiated a computer assisted tutorial program in solving chemistry problems. Discusses the advantages of computer assisted instruction (CAI) over audiotapes and the advantages of both over conventional instructional methods. Presents a flow chart of a CAI program on a calorimetry…

  8. CAI-BASIC: A Program to Teach the Programming Language BASIC.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barry, Thomas Anthony

    A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program was designed which fulfills the objectives of teaching a simple programing language, interpreting student responses, and executing and editing student programs. The CAI-BASIC program is written in FORTRAN IV and executes on IBM-2741 terminals while running under a time-sharing system on an IBM-360-70…

  9. Petrological Investigations of CAIs from Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Lorenz, C. A.; Korochantseva, E. V.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2010-03-01

    Several new big CAIs were extracted from the Efremovka and NWA 3118 CV3 chondrites to analyze petrology, chemistry and isotopic compositions. Here we report preliminary results on mineralogy, petrology and bulk chemistry of two CAIs, of Type B1 and of Type A.

  10. Learning with Computers: Implementation of an Integrated Learning System for Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas State Dept. of Criminal Justice, Huntsville. Windham School System.

    This publication provides information on implementation of an integrated learning system for computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in adult learning environments. The first of the document's nine chapters is an introduction to computer-delivered instruction that addresses the appropriateness of computers in instruction and types of CAI activities.…

  11. Effects of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) on Secondary School Students' Performance in Biology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mudasiru Olalere; Afolabi, Adedeji Olufemi

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on secondary school students' performance in biology. Also, the influence of gender on the performance of students exposed to CAI in individualised or cooperative learning settings package was examined. The research was a quasi experimental involving a 3 x 2 factorial…

  12. An Object-Oriented Architecture for a Web-Based CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakabayashi, Kiyoshi; Hoshide, Takahide; Seshimo, Hitoshi; Fukuhara, Yoshimi

    This paper describes the design and implementation of an object-oriented World Wide Web-based CAI (Computer-Assisted Instruction) system. The goal of the design is to provide a flexible CAI/ITS (Intelligent Tutoring System) framework with full extendibility and reusability, as well as to exploit Web-based software technologies such as JAVA, ASP (a…

  13. Distribution of vanadium and melting of opaque assemblages in Efremovka CAI's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.

    1993-03-01

    A petrographic and chemical study of compact Type A CAI's from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite strongly suggests that the opaque assemblages (OA's) that they contain were molten at temperatures below the CAI silicate solidus, and that the V-rich magnetite presently observed in association with OA's formed by in situ oxidation of their FeNi.

  14. Computer-Aided Technical Training Using Electronic Equipment On-Line with the CAI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggett, Geoffrey; And Others

    This report describes an experimental course in the operation and troubleshooting of a communications transceiver, the AN/URC-32, in which the transceiver is used as part of an instructional station in a CAI system. The transceiver and the CAI system are hard-wired together to form a single training system. The system is presently operating in the…

  15. Distribution of vanadium and melting of opaque assemblages in Efremovka CAI's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.

    1993-01-01

    A petrographic and chemical study of compact Type A CAI's from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite strongly suggests that the opaque assemblages (OA's) that they contain were molten at temperatures below the CAI silicate solidus, and that the V-rich magnetite presently observed in association with OA's formed by in situ oxidation of their FeNi.

  16. A Study of Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) over Classroom Lecture (CRL) at ICS Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaousar, Tayyeba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of CAI vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with classroom lecture and computer-assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of CAI and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypotheses of…

  17. CAI in New York City: Report on the First Year's Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, Cornelius F.

    1969-01-01

    "The nation's largest CAI operation in a public school system concluded its first full year of operation in June, 1969. The results indicate a very definite success for education's most closely watched use of technology. Three major criteria for success of such a project are 1) acceptance of CAI by the schools and their pupils, 2) per pupil costs…

  18. A Multi-Media CAI Terminal Based upon a Microprocessor with Applications for the Handicapped.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brebner, Ann; Hallworth, H. J.

    The design of the CAI interface described is based on the microprocessor in order to meet three basic requirements for providing appropriate instruction to the developmentally handicapped: (1) portability, so that CAI can be taken into the customary learning environment; (2) reliability; and (3) flexibility, to permit use of new input and output…

  19. Nebular History of the Allende FoB CAI SJ101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petaev, M. I.; Jacobsen, S. B.

    2009-03-01

    We compare petrologic and chemical characteristics of a unique FoB CAI SJ101 with the results of thermodynamic modeling of condensation of its precursors in a system of solar composition and speculate about nebular formation history of this CAI.

  20. INAA of CAIs from the Maralinga CK4 chondrite: Effects of parent body thermal metamorphism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindstrom, D. J.; Keller, L. P.; Martinez, R. R.

    1993-01-01

    Maralinga is an anomalous CK4 carbonaceous chondrite which contains numerous Ca-, Al-rich inclusions (CAI's) unlike the other members of the CK group. These CAI's are characterized by abundant green hercynitic spinel intergrown with plagioclase and high-Ca clinopyroxene, and a total lack of melilite. Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) was used to further characterize the meteorite, with special focus on the CAI's. High sensitivity INAA was done on eight sample disks about 100-150 microns in diameter obtained from a normal 30 micron thin section with a diamond microcoring device. The CAI's are enriched by 60-70X bulk meteorite values in Zn, suggesting that the substantial exchange of Fe for Mg that made the spinel in the CAI's hercynitic also allowed efficient scavenging of Zn from the rest of the meteorite during parent body thermal metamorphism. Less mobile elements appear to have maintained their initial heterogeneity.

  1. Compound CAIs Containing Zr-Y-Sc-Rich Inclusions from NWA 3118 and Efremovka CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, M. A.; Krot, A. N.; Nagashima, K.; Lorenz, C. A.; Logan, M. A. V.; Kononkova, N. N.; MacPherson, G. J.

    2011-03-01

    CAIs enriched in Zr, Sc and Y provide important records of the refractory element fractionation in the early solar nebula. We discribed mineralogy, petrology and oxygen isotopes of two Zr-rich CAIs from NWA 3118 and from Efremovka.

  2. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Carbon Aerosols and Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M. S.; Martin, R.; van Donkelaar, A.; Buchard, V.; Torres, O.; Ridley, D. A.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2015-12-01

    Absorption of solar radiation by aerosols plays a major role in radiative forcing and atmospheric photochemistry. Many atmospheric chemistry models tend to overestimate tropospheric OH concentrations compared to observations. Accurately representing aerosol absorption in the UV could help rectify the discrepancies between simulated and observed OH concentrations. We develop a simulation of the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI), using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI). Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.4 to -1.0) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We implement optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), into GEOS-Chem and evaluate the simulation with observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The spectral dependence of absorption after adding BrC to the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with Absorbing Angstrom Exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.7 in the UV to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. The addition of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.60 to -0.08 over North Africa in January, from -0.40 to -0.003 over South Asia in April, from -1.0 to -0.24 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.34 over South America in September. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining ozone photolysis frequencies (J(O(1D))) and tropospheric OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases J(O(1D)) and OH by up to 35% over biomass burning regions, and reduces the global bias in OH.

  3. Two Generations of Sodic Metasomatism in an Allende Type B CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-Aluminum rich inclusions (CAI) in Allende, along with other chondritic compo-nents, experienced variable amounts and types of alter-ation of their mineralogy and chemistry. In CAIs, one of the principal types of alteration led to the depo-sition of nepheline and sodalite. Here we extend initial obervations of alteration in an Allende CAI, focus-ing on occurences of nepheline and a nepheline-like phase with unusally high Ca (referred to as "calcic nepheline" in this abstract). Detailed petrographic and microchemical observations of alteration phases in an Allende Type B CAI (TS4) show that two separate generations of "nepheline", with very distinct composi-tions, crystallized around the margins and in the interi-or of this CAI. We use observations of micro-faults as potential temporal markers, in order to place constraints on the timing of alteration events in Allende. These observa-tions of micro-faulting that truncate and offset one gen-eration of "nepheline" indicate that some "nepheline" crystallized before incorporation of the CAI into the Allende parent-body. Some of the sodic metasomatism in some Allende CAIs occurred prior to Allende par-ent-body assembly. The earlier generation of "calcic-nepheline" has a very distinctive, calcium-rich compo-sition, and the second generation is low in calcium, and matches the compositions of nephelines found in near-by altered chondrules, and in the Allende matrix.

  4. Effects of Computer-assisted Instruction (CAI) on 11th Graders' Attitudes to Biology and CAI and Understanding of Reproduction in Plants and Animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soyibo, Kola; Hudson, Ann

    2000-02-01

    This study investigated whether the use of the combination of the lecture, discussion and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) significantly improved the experimental students' attitudes to biology and the computer/CAI and their understanding of reproduction in plants and animals. The sample comprised 77 Jamaican grade 11 female students from two traditional high schools in Kingston. Attitudes to a biology questionnaire, attitudes to the computer/CAI questionnaire and a biology achievement test (BAT) were used for data collection. The results indicated that the experimental subjects' post-test attitudes to biology and the computer/CAI were significantly better than those of the control group subjects taught with the lecture and discussion methods; the experimental subjects significantly outscored the control group subjects on the post-test BAT; there were significant differences in their post-test BAT means based on their attitudes to biology in favour of experimental subjects with highly favourable attitudes to biology, but there were no significant differences in their means attributable to their post-test attitudes to the computer/CAI; there was a positive statistically significant but weak relationship between the experimental subjects' post-test attitudes to biology and their post-test BAT scores.

  5. Microstructural Investigation of a Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, J.; Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.; Simon, J. I.

    2015-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi-layered mineral sequences that surround many CAIs. These rim layers consist of the primary minerals found in the CAI interiors, but vary in their mineralogy. Several models for their origin have been proposed including condensation, reaction with a nebular gas, evaporation, or combinations of these. However, there still is little consensus on how and when the rims formed. Here, we describe the microstructure and mineralogy of a WL rim on a type B CAI from the Vigarano CV(sub red) chondrite using FIB/TEM to better understand the astrophysical significance of WL rim formation.

  6. Further Investigations of Minor Element Distributions in Spinels in Type B CAIs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, D. J.; McKeegan, K. D.

    2004-03-01

    We have measured minor element concentrations in spinels from type B CAIs in Efremovka and Allende. We find a correlation of V and Ti that supports previous interpretations of additional remelting and crystallization events for these objects.

  7. Interpreting the ultraviolet aerosol index observed with the OMI satellite instrument to understand absorption by organic aerosols: implications for atmospheric oxidation and direct radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; van Donkelaar, Aaron; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-03-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Ångström exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30 % over South America in September, up to 20 % over southern Africa in July, and up to 15 % over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years

  8. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index observed with the OMI satellite instrument to understand absorption by organic aerosols: implications for atmospheric oxidation and direct radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, M. S.; Martin, R. V.; van Donkelaar, A.; Buchard, V.; Torres, O.; Ridley, D. A.; Spurr, R. J. D.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite observations of the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOS-Chem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The addition of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after adding BrC to the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with Absorbing Angstrom Exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 35 % over South America in September, up to 25 % over southern Africa in July, and up to 20 % over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  9. Interpreting the Ultraviolet Aerosol Index Observed with the OMI Satellite Instrument to Understand Absorption by Organic Aerosols: Implications for Atmospheric Oxidation and Direct Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, Melanie S.; Martin, Randall V.; Donkelaar, Aaron van; Buchard, Virginie; Torres, Omar; Ridley, David A.; Spurr, Robert J. D.

    2016-01-01

    Satellite observations of the ultraviolet aerosol index (UVAI) are sensitive to absorption of solar radiation by aerosols; this absorption affects photolysis frequencies and radiative forcing. We develop a global simulation of the UVAI using the 3-D chemical transport model GEOSChem coupled with the Vector Linearized Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer model (VLIDORT). The simulation is applied to interpret UVAI observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) for the year 2007. Simulated and observed values are highly consistent in regions where mineral dust dominates the UVAI, but a large negative bias (-0.32 to -0.97) exists between simulated and observed values in biomass burning regions. We determine effective optical properties for absorbing organic aerosol, known as brown carbon (BrC), and implement them into GEOS-Chem to better represent observed UVAI values over biomass burning regions. The inclusion of absorbing BrC decreases the mean bias between simulated and OMI UVAI values from -0.57 to -0.09 over West Africa in January, from -0.32 to +0.0002 over South Asia in April, from -0.97 to -0.22 over southern Africa in July, and from -0.50 to +0.33 over South America in September. The spectral dependence of absorption after including BrC in the model is broadly consistent with reported observations for biomass burning aerosol, with absorbing Angstrom exponent (AAE) values ranging from 2.9 in the ultraviolet (UV) to 1.3 across the UV-Near IR spectrum. We assess the effect of the additional UV absorption by BrC on atmospheric photochemistry by examining tropospheric hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations in GEOS-Chem. The inclusion of BrC decreases OH by up to 30% over South America in September, up to 20% over southern Africa in July, and up to 15% over other biomass burning regions. Global annual mean OH concentrations in GEOS-Chem decrease due to the presence of absorbing BrC, increasing the methyl chloroform lifetime from 5.62 to 5.68 years, thus

  10. Tungsten and hafnium distribution in calcium aluminum inclusions (CAIs) from Allende and Efremovka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humayun, Munir; Simon, Steven B.; Grossman, Lawrence

    2007-09-01

    Recent 182Hf- 182W age determinations on Allende Ca-, Al-rich refractory inclusions (CAIs) and on iron meteorites indicate that CAIs have initial ɛ182W (-3.47 ± 0.20, 2 σ) identical to that of magmatic iron meteorites after correction of cosmogenic 182W burn-out (-3.47 ± 0.35, 2 σ). Either the Allende CAIs were isotopically disturbed or the differentiation of magmatic irons (groups IIAB, IID, IIIAB, and IVB) all occurred <1 m.y. after CAI formation. To assess the extent of isotopic disturbance, we have analyzed the elemental distribution of Hf and W in two CAIs, Ef2 from Efremovka (CV3 reduced), and Golfball from Allende (CV3 oxidized). Fassaite is the sole host of Hf (10-25 ppm) and, therefore, of radiogenic W in CAIs, with 180Hf/ 184W > 10 3, which is lowered by the ubiquitous presence of metal inclusions to 180Hf/ 184W > 10 in bulk fassaite. Metal alloy (Ni ˜ 50%) is the sole host of W (˜500 ppm) in Ef2, while opaque assemblages (OAs) and secondary veins are the hosts of W in Golfball. A large metal alloy grain from Ef2, EM2, has 180Hf/ 184W < 0.006. Melilite has both Hf and W below detection limits (<0.01 ppm), but the presence of numerous metallic inclusions or OAs makes melilite a carrier for W, with 180Hf/ 184W < 1 in bulk melilite. Secondary processes had little impact on the 182Hf- 182W systematics of Ef2, but a vein cross-cutting fassaite in Golfball has >100 ppm W with no detectable Pt or S. This vein provides evidence for transport of oxidized W in the CAI. Because of the ubiquitous distribution of OAs, interpretations of the 182Hf- 182W isochron reported for Allende CAIs include: (i) all W in the OAs was derived by alteration of CAI metal, or (ii) at least some of the W in OAs may have been equilibrated with radiogenic W during metamorphism of Allende. Since (ii) cannot be ruled out, new 182Hf- 182W determinations on CAIs from reduced CV3 chondrites are needed to firmly establish the initial W isotopic composition of the solar system.

  11. Effects of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) on 11th Graders' Attitudes to Biology and CAI and Understanding of Reproduction in Plants and Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soyibo, Kola; Hudson, Ann

    2000-01-01

    Investigates whether the use of the combination of lecture, discussion, and computer-assisted instruction (CAI) significantly improved students' attitudes toward biology and their understanding of reproduction in plants and animals. Studies grade 11 Jamaican female students (n=77) from two traditional high schools in Kingston. (Contains 19…

  12. Correlates of aldosterone-induced increases in Cai2+ and Isc suggest that Cai2+ is the second messenger for stimulation of apical membrane conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Petzel, D; Ganz, M B; Nestler, E J; Lewis, J J; Goldenring, J; Akcicek, F; Hayslett, J P

    1992-01-01

    Studies were performed on monolayers of cultured A6 cells, grown on permeable filters, to determine the second messenger system involved in the aldosterone-induced increase in electrogenic sodium transport. Addition of aldosterone (1 microM) to the solution bathing the basal surface of cells caused both an increase in Isc and threefold transient rise in intracellular calcium Cai2+ after a delay of approximately 60 min. Because both events were inhibited by actinomycin D and cyclohexamide, they appeared to require transcriptional and translational processes. Addition of BAPTA to the bathing media to chelate Cai2+ reduced Isc and the delayed Cai2+ transient; 50 microM BAPTA inhibited Isc and the rise in Cai2+ by greater than 80%. Further studies suggested that the action of aldosterone to increase Isc may be dependent on a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase, because W-7 and trifluoperazine reduced the aldosterone-induced Isc in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these observations suggest that calcium is a second messenger for the action of aldosterone on sodium transport, and suggest, for the first time, that agonists which bind to intracellular receptors can utilize, via delayed processes dependent on de novo transcription and translation, intracellular second messenger systems to regulate target cell function. PMID:1729267

  13. Aerosols in GEOS-5: simulations of the UV Aerosol Index and the Aerosol Absorption Optical Depth and comparisons with OMI retrievals.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchard-Marchant, Virginie; da Silva, Arlindo; Colarco, Peter; Darmenov, Anton; Govindaraju, Ravi

    2013-04-01

    GEOS-5 is the latest version of the NASA Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO) earth system model. GEOS-5 contains components for atmospheric circulation and composition (including data assimilation), ocean circulation and biogeochemistry, and land surface processes. In addition to traditional meteorological parameters, GEOS-5 includes modules representing the atmospheric composition, most notably aerosols and tropospheric/stratospheric chemical constituents, taking explicit account of the impact of these constituents on the radiative processes of the atmosphere. The assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) in GEOS-5 involves very careful cloud screening and homogenization of the observing system by means of a Neural Net scheme that translates MODIS radiances into AERONET calibrated AOD. These measurements are further quality controlled using an adaptive buddy check scheme, and assimilated using the Local Displacement Ensemble (LDE) methodology. For this analysis, GEOS-5 runs at a nominal 50km horizontal resolution with 72 vertical layers (top at ~85km). GEOS-5 is driven by daily biomass burning emissions derived from MODIS fire radiative power retrievals. We present a summary of our efforts to simulate the UV Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm from aerosol simulations by performing a radiative transfer calculation. We have compared model produced AI with the corresponding OMI measurements, identifying regions where the model representation of absorbing aerosols were deficient. Separately, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. Making use of CALIPSO measurements we have also investigated the impact of the altitude of the aerosol layer on OMI derived AI trying to ascertain misplacement of plume height by the model.

  14. Search for extinct 36Cl: Vigarano CAIs, the Pink Angel from Allende, and a Ningqiang chondrule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakashima, Daisuke; Ott, Ulrich; Hoppe, Peter; El Goresy, Ahmed

    2008-12-01

    We have searched for excesses of 36S derived from the decay of extinct 36Cl in sodalite, a secondary Cl-rich mineral, in Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) from the Vigarano and Allende CV3 chondrites and in a chondrule from the Ningqiang carbonaceous chondrite. The presence of sodalite in two CAIs from Vigarano and its absence from surrounding CAI fragments suggests sodalite formation after CAI fragmentation. As for sodalite in the Allende Pink Angel CAI, oxygen isotopic compositions have been interpreted as indicative of high temperature interactions, thus suggesting formation prior to accretion to the parent body, probably in a nebular setting. Sodalite in the Ningqiang chondrule is considered to have formed via alkali-Ca exchange, which is believed to have occurred before accretion to the parent body. Sodalites in the Vigarano CAIs and in the Ningqiang chondrule show no clear evidence for the presence of radiogenic 36S. The inferred 2 σ upper limits for 36Cl/ 35Cl at the time of sodalite formation are 1.6 × 10 -6 (Vigarano CAIs) and 3.3 × 10 -6 (Ningqiang chondrule), respectively. In the Pink Angel CAI sodalite exhibits small 36S excesses which weakly correlate with 35Cl/ 34S ratios. The inferred 36Cl/ 35Cl ratio of (1.8 ± 2.2) × 10 -6 (2 σ error) is lower than that found by Hsu et al. [Hsu, W., Guan, Y., Leshin, L. A., Ushikubo, T. and Wasserburg, G. J. (2006) A late episode of irradiation in the early solar system: Evidence from extinct 36Cl and 26Al in meteorites. Astrophys. J. 640, 525-529], thus indicative of heterogeneous distribution of 36Cl in this CAI. Spallation reactions induced by energetic particles from the young Sun are suggested for the origin of 36Cl, similar to the case of 10Be. While 10Be appears to be present in roughly equal abundance in all studied CAIs, our study indicates the level of 36Cl abundances to be variable so that there seems to be no simple relationship between 10Be and 36Cl. This would be expected if trapped cosmic rays rather

  15. Experimental Determination of Li, Be and B Partitioning During CAI Crystallization

    SciTech Connect

    Ryerson, F J; Brenan, J M; Phinney, D L

    2005-01-12

    The main focus of the work is to develop a better understanding of the distribution of the elements B, Be and Li in melilite, fassaitic clinop clinopy-roxene, anorthite and spinel, which are the primary constituents of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs). These elements are the parent or decay products of short-lived nuclides (specifically, {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be) formed by cosmic ray spallation reactions on silicon and oxygen. Recent observations suggest that some CAIs contain ''fossil'' {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be in the form of ''excess'' amounts of their decay products (B and Li). The exact timing of {sup 7}Be and {sup 10}Be production is unknown, but if it occurred early in CAI history, it could constrain the birthplace of CAIs to be within a limited region near the infant sun. Other interpretations are possible, however, and bear little significance to early CAI genesis. In order to interpret the anomalies as being ''primary'', and thus originating at high temperature, information on the intermineral partitioning of both parent and daughter elements is required.

  16. The ethnoecology of Caiçara metapopulations (Atlantic Forest, Brazil): ecological concepts and questions

    PubMed Central

    Begossi, Alpina

    2006-01-01

    The Atlantic Forest is represented on the coast of Brazil by approximately 7,5% of remnants, much of these concentrated on the country's SE coast. Within these southeastern remnants, we still find the coastal Caiçaras who descend from Native Indians and Portuguese Colonizers. The maintenance of such populations, and their existence in spite of the deforestation that occurred on the Atlantic Forest coast, deserves especial attention and analysis. In this study, I address, in particular, the Caiçaras who live on the coast of São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro States, illustrating with examples of coastal inhabitants from other areas, such as Bahia State (NE coast) and of other forested areas (riverine caboclos of the Amazon). The major focus of this study, based on previous research, performed since 1986 in several populations or villages of the Atlantic Forest coast, is to understand the resilience of the Caiçaras, which is analyzed using ecological concepts, such as metapopulation, resilience and adaptive cycles. The Caiçara populations are located on islands (Búzios, Comprida, Grande, Ilhabela, Jaguanum, Gipóia) and on the coast (Bertioga, Puruba, Picinguaba, among others). Information gathered about the Caiçaras regarding the economic cycles of the local regions, along with ecological, historical and economic data available, are used to understand such resilience, and are complemented with comparative examples from the Brazilian Amazon and with variables such as the local restrictions imposed by environmental governmental agencies. PMID:17010204

  17. The Formation Of The First Solids In The Solar System: An Investigation Of CAI Diversity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taillifet, Esther; Baillié, K.; Charnoz, S.; Aléon, J.

    2012-10-01

    Chondritic meteorites are primitive bodies and therefore an important source of information on the first moments of planets formation. Chondrites contain several materials especially calcium and aluminum rich inclusions (CAIs), known to be the oldest objects of the solar system (4.567 Gyr - Amelin et al., 2002; Connelly et al., 2008) and thus the first solids to be formed. CAIs appear in various textures, sizes and compositions in chondrites. Though, all of them should have formed at high temperature (1300-1800 K) in the same region of the solar nebula by condensation from the gas (e.g. Grossman, 1972; Yoneda & Grossman, 1995; Petaev & Wood, 1998; Ebel & Grossman 2000). To answer this problem we study the CAI formation within the solar nebula using numerical simulations. For this work we developed a self consistent thermodynamical model of the solar nebula (see associated talk from Baillié et. al ) based on previous works (Calvet et. al, 1991; Hueso & Guillot, 2005; Dullemond, Dominik and Natta, 2001). Using this model, we simulate the young system with Lagrangian Implicit Disk Transport code (LIDT - Charnoz et. al, 2010). We will focus on the very first instants of the CAIs within the few years following their condensation. We will report our first results in terms of thermal history and investigate if turbulence-driven transport may explain the CAI diversity.

  18. Mineralogy and Petrology of EK-459-5-1, A Type B1 CAI from Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (CAIs) are a type of coarse-grained clast composed of Ca-, Al-, and Mg-rich silicates and oxides found in chondrite meteorites. Type B (CAIs) are exclusively found in the CV chondrite meteorites and are the most well studied type of inclusion found in chondritic meteorites. Type B1 CAIs are distinguished by a nearly monomineralic rim of melilite that surrounds an interior predominantly composed of melilite, fassaite (Ti and Al-rich clinopyroxene), anorthite, and spinel with varying amounts of other minor primary and secondary phases. The formation of Type B CAIs has received considerable attention in the course of CAI research and quantitative models, experimental results and observations from Type B inclusions remain largely in disagreement. Recent experimental results and quantitative models have shown that the formation of B1 mantles could have occurred by the evaporative loss of Si and Mg during the crystallization of these objects. However, comparative studies suggest that the lower bulk SiO2 compositions in B1s result in more prior melilite crystallization before the onset of fassaite and anorthite crystallization leading to the formation of thick melilite rich rims in B1 inclusions. Detailed petrographic and cosmochemical studies of these inclusions will further our understanding of these complex objects.

  19. A FIB/TEM Study of a Complex Wark-Lovering Rim on a Vigarano CAI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.

    2013-01-01

    Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multilayered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs). Several processes have been proposed for WL rim formation, including condensation, flash-heating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these [e.g. 1-7], but no consensus exists. Our previous coordinated transmission electron microscope (TEM) and NanoSIMS O isotopic measurements showed that a WL rim experienced flash heating events in a nebular environment with planetary O isotopic composition, distinct from the (16)O-rich formation environment [6]. Our efforts have focused on CAIs from the CV(sub red) chondrites, especially Vigarano, because these have escaped much of the parent body alteration effects that are common in CAIs from CV(sub ox) group.

  20. Deriving High Resolution UV Aerosol Optical Depth over East Asia using CAI-OMI Joint Retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Go, S.; Kim, J.; KIM, M.; Lee, S.

    2015-12-01

    Monitoring aerosols using near UV spectral region have been successfully performed over decades by Ozong Monitoring Instruments (OMI) with benefit of strong aerosol signal over continuous dark surface reflectance, both land and ocean. However, because of big foot print of OMI, the cloud contamination error was a big issue in the UV aerosol algorithm. In the present study, high resolution UV aerosol optical depth (AOD) over East Asia was derived by collaborating the Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite/Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation (GOSAT/TANSO)-Cloud and Aerosol Imager (CAI) and OMI together. AOD of 0.1 degree grid resolution was retrieved using CAI band 1 (380nm) by bring OMI lv.2 aerosol type, single scattering albedo, and aerosol layer peak height in 1 degree grid resolution. Collocation of the two dataset within the 0.5 degree grid with time difference of OMI and CAI less than 5 minute was selected. Selected region becomes wider as it goes to the higher latitude. Also, calculated degradation factor of 1.57 was applied to CAI band1 (380nm) by comparing normalized radiance and Lambertian Equivalent Reflectivity (LER) of both sensors. The calculated degradation factor was reasonable over dark scene, but inconsistent over cirrus cloud and bright area. Then, surface reflectance was developed by compositing CAI LER minimum data over three month period, since the infrequent sampling rate associated with the three-day recursion period of GOSAT and the narrow CAI swath of 1000 km. To retrieve AOD, look up table (LUT) was generated using radiative transfer model VLIDORT NGST. Finally, the retrieved AOD was validated with AERONET ground based measurement data during the Dragon-NE Asia campaign in 2012.

  1. Verification of new cloud discrimination algorithm using GOSAT TANSO-CAI in the Amazon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oishi, Y.; Ishida, H.; Nakajima, T. Y.

    2015-12-01

    Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) was launched in 2009 to measure the global atmospheric CO2 and CH4 concentrations. GOSAT is equipped with two sensors: the Thermal And Near-infrared Sensor for carbon Observation-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and the Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-CAI). The presence of clouds in the instantaneous field-of-view (IFOV) of the FTS leads to incorrect estimates of the concentrations. Thus, the FTS data which are suspected to be cloud-contaminated must be identified using a CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and rejected. Conversely, overestimation of clouds leads to reduce the amount of the FTS data which can be used to estimate the greenhouse gases concentrations. It becomes a serious problem in the region of tropical rainforest such as the Amazon, where there are very few remaining FTS data by cloud cover. The preparation for the launch of the GOSAT-2 in fiscal 2017 has been progressing. To improve the accuracy of estimates of the greenhouse gases concentrations, we need to refine the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm. For the reason, a new cloud discrimination algorithm using support vector machines (SVM) was developed. Visual inspections can use the locally optimized thresholds, though the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm uses the common thresholds all over the world. Thus, it is certain that the accuracy of visual inspections is better than these algorithms in the limited region without areas such as ice and snow, where it is difficult to discriminate between clouds and ground surfaces. In this study we evaluated the accuracy of the new cloud discrimination algorithm by comparing with the existing CAI cloud discrimination algorithm and visual inspections of the same CAI images in the Amazon. We will present our latest results.

  2. Arginine oscillation explains Na+ independence in the substrate/product antiporter CaiT

    PubMed Central

    Kalayil, Sissy; Schulze, Sabrina; Kühlbrandt, Werner

    2013-01-01

    Most secondary-active transporters transport their substrates using an electrochemical ion gradient. In contrast, the carnitine transporter (CaiT) is an ion-independent, l-carnitine/γ-butyrobetaine antiporter belonging to the betaine/carnitine/choline transporter family of secondary transporters. Recently determined crystal structures of CaiT from Escherichia coli and Proteus mirabilis revealed an inverted five-transmembrane-helix repeat similar to that in the amino acid/Na+ symporter LeuT. The ion independence of CaiT makes it unique in this family. Here we show that mutations of arginine 262 (R262) make CaiT Na+-dependent. The transport activity of R262 mutants increased by 30–40% in the presence of a membrane potential, indicating substrate/Na+ cotransport. Structural and biochemical characterization revealed that R262 plays a crucial role in substrate binding by stabilizing the partly unwound TM1′ helix. Modeling CaiT from P. mirabilis in the outward-open and closed states on the corresponding structures of the related symporter BetP reveals alternating orientations of the buried R262 sidechain, which mimic sodium binding and unbinding in the Na+-coupled substrate symporters. We propose that a similar mechanism is operative in other Na+/H+-independent transporters, in which a positively charged amino acid replaces the cotransported cation. The oscillation of the R262 sidechain in CaiT indicates how a positive charge triggers the change between outward-open and inward-open conformations as a unifying critical step in LeuT-type transporters. PMID:24101465

  3. High expression of CAI2, a 9p21-embedded long non-coding RNA, contributes to advanced stage neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Barnhill, Lisa M.; Williams, Richard T.; Cohen, Olga; Kim, Youngjin; Batova, Ayse; Mielke, Jenna A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Bao, Lei; Yu, Alice L.; Diccianni, Mitchell B.

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a pediatric cancer with significant genomic and biological heterogeneity. p16 and ARF, two important tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 9p21, are inactivated commonly in most cancers but paradoxically overexpressed in neuroblastoma. Here we report that exon γ in p16 is also part of an undescribed long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that we have termed CAI2 (CDKN2A/ARF Intron 2 lncRNA). CAI2 is a single exon gene with a poly A signal located in but independent of the p16/ARF exon 3. CAI2 is expressed at very low levels in normal tissue but is highly expressed in most tumor cell lines with an intact 9p21 locus. Concordant expression of CAI2 with p16 and ARF in normal tissue along with the ability of CAI2 to induce p16 expression suggested that CAI2 may regulate p16 and/or ARF. In neuroblastoma cells transformed by serial passage in vitro, leading to more rapid proliferation, CAI2, p16 and ARF expression all increased dramatically. A similar relationship was also observed in primary neuroblastomas where CAI2 expression was significantly higher in advanced stage neuroblastoma, independently of MYCN amplification. Consistent with its association with high risk disease, CAI2 expression was also significantly associated with poor clinical outcomes, although this effect was reduced when adjusted for MYCN amplification. Taken together, our findings suggested that CAI2 contributes to the paradoxical overexpression of p16 in neuroblastoma, where CAI2 may offer a useful biomarker of high-risk disease. PMID:25028366

  4. The effects of gender and cooperative learning with CAI on college students' computer science achievement and attitudes toward computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Ching-Heng

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of gender and cooperative learning with CAI on college students' computer science achievement and attitudes toward computers, when the effects of computer ownership, prior computer instruction, previous software and programming experience were controlled. The participants were 155 undergraduates enrolled in introductory computer courses at two colleges in North Taiwan during the Fall 1996 semester. Before the treatment period, they were asked to fill out the Background Data Form, instructed with cooperative learning strategy, and trained on cooperative and individual learning with CAI. During the treatment period, they were randomly assigned to the treatment (78 students) or the control group (77 students). The treatment group students used a CAI program on computer numbering, encoding, and hardware systems with their partner throughout all six CAI sessions. The control group students used the same CAI program individually within the six CAI sessions. After the 6-week treatment period, both groups were posttested by a 40-item multiple-choice Computer Science Achievement Test (CSAT) and a 30-item Computer Attitude Scale (CAS). Data for both posttests were collected from 153 students (77 in the treatment, 76 in the control group; 62 males, 91 females) and analyzed by MANCOVA and follow-up univariate hierarchical MRC analyses for ANCOVAs. Based on the covariate-adjusted CSAT scores, the results indicated that students using CAI cooperatively had a significantly higher mean than those using CAI individually. Neither gender nor interaction effects were found. Regarding the covariate-adjusted CAS scores, the results showed that males had a significantly higher mean than females. No treatment or interaction effects were found. Due to the higher computer achievement resulted from cooperative learning with CAI, this study suggested that instructors apply cooperative learning strategy in CAI settings in computer courses

  5. Processing of refractory meteorite inclusions (CAIs) in parent-body atmospheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Podolak, Morris; Bunch, T. E.; Cassen, Pat; Reynolds, Ray T.; Chang, S.

    1990-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in refractory meteorites are shown to have been subject to partial melting during a suitably high gas density/small scale height regime arising during gasdynamic deceleration in a temporary atmosphere around an accreting parent body. The presence of dust in such an atmosphere would have increased the pressure gradient with height, lowering the boiloff rate, and permitting dust particles to become trapped in the partially melted material. CAIs may therefore be studied as probes of a primitive atmosphere.

  6. Stable Magnesium Isotope Variation in Melilite Mantle of Allende Type B1 CAI EK 459-5-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Jeffcoat, C. R.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.

    2014-01-01

    Ca-Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) are the earliest formed crystalline material in our solar system and they record early Solar System processes. Here we present petrographic and delta Mg-25 data of melilite mantles in a Type B1 CAI that records early solar nebular processes.

  7. The Interplay between Different Forms of CAI and Students' Preferences of Learning Environment in the Secondary Science Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, Chun-Yen; Tsai, Chin-Chung

    2005-01-01

    This evaluation study investigated the effects of a teacher-centered versus student-centered computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on 10th graders' earth science student learning outcomes. This study also explored whether the effects of different forms of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on student learning outcomes were influenced by student…

  8. Gender Role, Gender Identity and Sexual Orientation in CAIS ("XY-Women") Compared With Subfertile and Infertile 46,XX Women.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Franziska; Fliegner, Maike; Krupp, Kerstin; Rall, Katharina; Brucker, Sara; Richter-Appelt, Hertha

    2016-01-01

    The perception of gender development of individuals with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (CAIS) as unambiguously female has recently been challenged in both qualitative data and case reports of male gender identity. The aim of the mixed-method study presented was to examine the self-perception of CAIS individuals regarding different aspects of gender and to identify commonalities and differences in comparison with subfertile and infertile XX-chromosomal women with diagnoses of Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser syndrome (MRKHS) and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). The study sample comprised 11 participants with CAIS, 49 with MRKHS, and 55 with PCOS. Gender identity was assessed by means of a multidimensional instrument, which showed significant differences between the CAIS group and the XX-chromosomal women. Other-than-female gender roles and neither-female-nor-male sexes/genders were reported only by individuals with CAIS. The percentage with a not exclusively androphile sexual orientation was unexceptionally high in the CAIS group compared to the prevalence in "normative" women and the clinical groups. The findings support the assumption made by Meyer-Bahlburg ( 2010 ) that gender outcome in people with CAIS is more variable than generally stated. Parents and professionals should thus be open to courses of gender development other than typically female in individuals with CAIS. PMID:26133743

  9. Learner Control of Instructional Sequencing Within an Adaptive Tutorial CAI Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seidel, Robert J.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    This study was designed to test effects of a specified degree of learner control over the sequencing of instructional materials in a self contained tutorial CAI course in COBOL programming. Findings describe contributions and interactions of learner controlled variables with respect to instructional effectiveness and efficiency. (RAO)

  10. Role of Computer Assisted Instruction (CAI) in an Introductory Computer Concepts Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skudrna, Vincent J.

    1997-01-01

    Discusses the role of computer assisted instruction (CAI) in undergraduate education via a survey of related literature and specific applications. Describes an undergraduate computer concepts course and includes appendices of instructions, flowcharts, programs, sample student work in accounting, COBOL instructional model, decision logic in a…

  11. C.A.I. as a Means for Educational Justice in Primary Schools: A Greek Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raptis, Nicos

    This study examines the effects of computer assisted instruction (CAI) on the inequalities in education among children of less privileged backgrounds. A natural science lesson was taught to 116 children at the fifth level of the Greek primary school. Subjects went to two different public schools, one of which was in a privileged area, and the…

  12. A Pseudo-Language for Creating CAI Programs on APL Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gucker, Edward J.

    1973-01-01

    Encourages the use of APL as a language for computer assisted instruction (CAI) instead of such languages as BASIC or COURSEWRITER. Describes a set of APL functions that can simulate to some extent the features of COURSEWRITER, while permitting a more experienced course author to use the full mathematical power of APL. (Author/JF)

  13. Assessing the Impact of Computer-Assisted Instruction (CAI) in Undergraduate Latin American Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child, Jack

    This paper assesses the impact of using computer-assisted instruction (CAI) in three American University undergraduate classes, a General Education survey course on Latin America (taught in English), and two Spanish language courses. The courses utilized both commercial software programs and software programs authored by faculty using Macintosh…

  14. CAI for the Visually Handicapped: Promising Collaboration Between Two and Four-Year Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkinson, William K.; And Others

    This report describes the efforts of the Office of Research and Extension of the North Carolina State University (NCSU) School of Education to develop vocal computer-assisted instruction (CAI) tutorials for blind junior college students, the rationale behind those efforts, the costs and means of funding for the project, and suggested ways in which…

  15. 35 Secondary V Students Comment on Their Experience With C.A.I. (Preliminary Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gateau, Bernard

    An instrument has been designed and used to quantify the degree of student dissatisfaction with computer-assisted instruction (CAI) experiences. The instrument, entitled PERPI-LPI, was derived from the service test Perceptions Etudiantes de la Relation Professeur-Etudiants (Student Observations on the Teacher-Student Relationship). It measures the…

  16. On the Design and Development of Pedagogy-First CAI Tools for CS Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vadaparty, K.; And Others

    This paper presents the implications of an ongoing project on the design and development of multimedia instructional material for teaching and learning computer science topics at both graduate and undergraduate levels. Important pedagogical requirements that CAI software should satisfy include: (1) animation of the changes in tree topologies; (2)…

  17. Evaluation of Title I CAI Programs at Minnesota State Correctional Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandman, Richard S.; Welch, Wayne W.

    Three Minnesota correctional institutions used computer-assisted instruction (CAI) on PLATO terminals to improve reading and mathematics skills: (1) the State Reformatory for Men, St. Cloud (males, ages 17-21); (2) the Minnesota Home School, Sauk Centre (males and females, ages 12-18); and (3) the State Training School, Red Wing (males, ages…

  18. Web Pages: An Effective Method of Providing CAI Resource Material in Histology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, Michelle

    2001-01-01

    Presents research that introduces computer-aided instruction (CAI) resource material as an integral part of the second-year histology course at the University of Natal Medical School. Describes the ease with which this software can be developed, using limited resources and available skills, while providing students with valuable learning…

  19. Computer-Assisted Instruction in Engineering Dynamics. CAI-Systems Memo Number 18.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheldon, John W.

    A 90-minute computer-assisted instruction (CAI) unit course supplemented by a 1-hour lecture on the dynamic nature of three-dimensional rotations and Euler angles was given to 29 undergraduate engineering students. The area of Euler angles was selected because it is essential to problem-working in three-dimensional rotations of a rigid body, yet…

  20. The Anatomy and Bulk Composition of CAI Rims in the Vigarano (CV3) Chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruzicka, A.; Boynton, W. V.

    1993-07-01

    A striking feature of Ca,Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) in chondrites is the presence of mineralogical layers that typically form rim sequences up to 50 micrometers thick [1]. Many ideas regarding the origin of CAI rims have been proposed, but none are entirely satisfactory. The detailed mineralogy and bulk compositions of relatively unaltered CAI rims in the Vigarano (CV3) chondrite described here provide constraints on hypotheses of rim formation. Rim Mineralogy: CAIs in Vigarano consist of melilite (mel)- and spinel (sp)- rich varieties, both of which are rimmed [2]. Around mel-rich objects, the layer sequence is CAI interior --> sp-rich layer (sometimes absent) --> mel/anorthite (anor) layer --> Ti-Al-rich clinopyroxene (Tpx) layer --> Al- diopside (Al-diop) layer --> olivine (ol) +/- Al-diop layer --> host matrix. The sequence around sp-rich objects differs from this in that the mel/anor layer is absent. Both the sp-rich layer around mel-cored CAIs and the cores of sp-rich CAIs in Vigarano are largely comprised of a fine-grained (<=1 micrometer) intergrowth of sp, Tpx, and minor mel and perovskite. These intergrowths are typically so fine grained that little internal texture is discernible. Mixing calculations suggest the presence of ~10 vol% Tpx in the sp-rich layer of two mel-cored CAIs, and the presence of ~35 vol% Tpx within one sp-cored CAI. The mel/anor layer is sometimes monomineralic, consisting of mel alone, or bimineralic, consisting of both mel and anor. Where bimineralic, anor typically occurs in the outer part of the layer. In places, anor (An(sub)99-100) has partially altered to nepheline and voids. Rim mel is systematically less gehlenitic than mel in the CAI interiors, especially compared to mel in the interior adjacent to the rims. The Tpx layer (>2 and up to 15 wt% TiO2) and Al-diop layer (<2 wt% TiO2) are monomineralic and show chemical zoning trends radial to the CAIs. Moving outward, TiO2 and Al2O3 generally decrease, while SiO2 and Mg

  1. A Cross-National CAI Tool To Support Learning Operations Decision-Making and Market Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mockler, Robert J.; Afanasiev, Mikhail Y.; Dologite, Dorothy G.

    1999-01-01

    Describes bicultural (United States and Russia) development of a computer-aided instruction (CAI) tool to learn management decision-making using information systems technologies. The program has been used with undergraduate and graduate students in both countries; it integrates free and controlled market concepts and combines traditional computer…

  2. Implementing CAI at San Juan College: Toward the Campus of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, John B.

    In 1991, a study was conducted at San Juan College (SJC) to examine existing research, issues, and faculty attitudes and needs regarding computer-assisted instruction (CAI). A faculty needs assessment survey was prepared and conducted, a review of the research literature was undertaken, and initial guidelines were drafted for the utilization of…

  3. An ion microprobe study of CAIs from CO3 meteorites. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Russell, S. S.; Greenwood, R. C.; Fahey, A. J.; Huss, G. R.; Wasserburg, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    When attempting to interpret the history of Ca, Al-rich inclusions (CAIs) it is often difficult to distinguish between primary features inherited from the nebula and those produced during secondary processing on the parent body. We have undertaken a systematic study of CAIs from 10 CO chondrites, believed to represent a metamorphic sequence with the goal of distinguishing primary and secondary features. ALHA 77307 (3.0), Colony (3.0), Kainsaz (3.1), Felix (3.2), ALH 82101 (3.3), Ornans (3.3), Lance (3.4), ALHA 77003 (3.5), Warrenton (3.6), and Isna (3.7) were examined by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and optical microscopy. We have identified 141 CAIs within these samples, and studied in detail the petrology of 34 inclusions. The primary phases in the lower petrologic types are spinel, melilite, and hibonite. Perovskite, FeS, ilmenite, anorthite, kirschsteinite, and metallic Fe are present as minor phases. Melilite becomes less abundant in higher petrologic types and was not detected in chondrites of type 3.5 and above, confirming previous reports that this mineral easily breaks down during heating. Iron, an element that would not be expected to condense at high temperatures, has a lower abundance in spinel from low-petrologic-type meteorites than those of higher grade, and CaTiO3 is replaced by FeTiO3 in meteorites of higher petrologic type. The abundance of CAIs is similar in each meteorite. Eight inclusions have been analyzed by ion probe. The results are summarized. The results obtained to date show that CAIs in CO meteorites, like those from other meteorite classes, contain Mg* and that Mg in some inclusions has been redistributed.

  4. Chronology of chrondrule and CAI formation: Mg-Al isotopic evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macpherson, G. J.; Davis, A. M.

    1994-01-01

    Details of the chondrule and Ca-Al-rich inclusion (CAI) formation during the earliest history of the solar system are imperfectly known. Because CAI's are more 'refractory' than ferromagnesian chondrules and have the lowest recorded initial Sr-87/Sr-86 ratios of any solar system materials, the expectation is that CAI's formed earlier than chondrules. But it is not known, for example, if CAI formation had stopped by the time chondrule formation began. Conventional (absolute) age-dating techniques cannot adequately resolve small age differences (less than 10(exp 6) years) between objects of such antiquity. One approach has been to look at systematic differences in the daughter products of short-lived radionuclides such as Al-26 and I-129. Unfortunately, neither system appears to be 'well-behaved.' One possible reason for this circumstance is that later secondary events have partially reset the isotopic systems, but a viable alternative continues to be large-scale (nebular) heterogeneity in initial isotopic abundances, which would of course render the systems nearly useless as chronometers. In the past two years the nature of this problem has been redefined somewhat. Examination of the Al-Mg isotopic database for all CAI's suggests that the vast majority of inclusions originally had the same initial Al-26/Al-27 abundance ratio, and that the ill-behaved isotopic systematics now observed are the results of later partial reequilibration due to thermal processing. Isotopic heterogeneities did exist in the nebula, as demonstrated by the existence of so-called FUN inclusions in CV3 chondrites and isotopically anomalous hibonite grains in CM2 chondrites, which had little or no live Al-26 at the time of their formation. But, among the population of CV3 inclusions at least, FUN inclusions appear to have been a relatively minor nebular component.

  5. Synchronizing the Absolute and Relative Clocks: Pb-Pb and Al-Mg Systematics in CAIs from the Allende and NWA 2364 CV3 Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouvier, A.; Wadhwa, M.

    2009-03-01

    A Pb-Pb internal isochron of a type-B CAI from the NWA 2364 CV3 chondrite gives an absolute age of 4568.6 ± 0.2 Ma which contrasts with previous internal Pb-Pb ages of CAIs from Allende and Efremovka. Al-Mg systematics are also reported for CV3 CAIs.

  6. Forensic Identification of Automobile Window Glass Manufacturers in Japan Based on the Refractive Index, X-ray Fluorescence, and X-ray Absorption Fine Structure.

    PubMed

    Funatsuki, Atsushi; Takaoka, Masaki; Shiota, Kenji; Kokubu, Daisuke; Suzuki, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, 3 automobile window glass manufacturers were identified based on refractive index, XRF, and XAFS analyses. The samples were classified into the corresponding groups using XRF, which should be the first step for identification. Samples having different manufacturing times showed differences in the refractive index. Based on XAFS, the amplitude of the EXAFS spectra and the intensities of Fourier transforms differed between manufacturers. In the scheme for manufacturer identification proposed in this study, performing XRF and refractive index studies is the first step. The concentrations of CeO2, MgO, Al2O3, and K2O allowed us to distinguish among manufacturers. Secondly, for samples containing cerium, we discriminated between manufacturer based on the amplitude of the EXAFS spectra and the intensities of Fourier transforms. As a result, the manufacturers of the 75 samples used in this study were multilaterally identified. PMID:26860567

  7. Compound ultrarefractory CAI-bearing inclusions from CV3 carbonaceous chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, Marina A.; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; MacPherson, Glenn J.

    2012-12-01

    Abstract-Two compound calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), 3N from the oxidized CV chondrite Northwest Africa (NWA) 3118 and 33E from the reduced CV chondrite Efremovka, contain ultrarefractory (UR) inclusions. 3N is a forsterite-bearing type B (FoB) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> that encloses UR inclusion 3N-24 composed of Zr,Sc,Y-rich oxides, Y-rich perovskite, and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopside. 33E contains a fluffy type A (FTA) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and UR <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 33E-1, surrounded by Wark-Lovering rim layers of spinel, Al-diopside, and forsterite, and a common forsterite-rich accretionary rim. 33E-1 is composed of Zr,Sc,Y-rich oxides, Y-rich perovskite, Zr,Sc,Y-rich pyroxenes (Al,Ti-diopside, Sc-rich pyroxene), and gehlenite. 3N-24's UR oxides and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopsides are 16O-poor (Δ17O approximately -2‰ to -5‰). Spinel in 3N-24 and spinel and Al-diopside in the FoB <span class="hlt">CAI</span> are 16O-rich (Δ17O approximately -23 ± 2‰). 33E-1's UR oxides and Zr,Sc-rich Al,Ti-diopsides are 16O-depleted (Δ17O approximately -2‰ to -5‰) vs. Al,Ti-diopside of the FTA <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and spinel (Δ17O approximately -23 ± 2‰), and Wark-Lovering rim Al,Ti-diopside (Δ17O approximately -7‰ to -19‰). We infer that the inclusions experienced multistage formation in nebular regions with different oxygen-isotope compositions. 3N-24 and 33E-1's precursors formed by evaporation/condensation above 1600 °C. 3N and 33E's precursors formed by condensation and melting (3N only) at significantly lower temperatures. 3N-24 and 3N's precursors aggregated into a compound object and experienced partial melting and thermal annealing. 33E-1 and 33E avoided melting prior to and after aggregation. They acquired Wark-Lovering and common forsterite-rich accretionary rims, probably by condensation, followed by thermal annealing. We suggest 3N-24 and 33E-1 originated in a 16O-rich gaseous reservoir and subsequently experienced isotope exchange in a 16O-poor gaseous reservoir. Mechanism and timing of oxygen-isotope exchange remain</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSAES..64..139C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JSAES..64..139C"><span id="translatedtitle">Conodont color alteration <span class="hlt">index</span> and upper Paleozoic thermal history of the Amazonas Basin, Brazil</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cardoso, Cassiane Negreiros; Sanz-López, Javier; Blanco-Ferrera, Silvia; Lemos, Valesca Brasil; Scomazzon, Ana Karina</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>The conodont color alteration <span class="hlt">index</span> (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) was determined in elements from core samples of the Frasnian Barreirinha Formation (one well) and of the Pennsylvanian-Permian Tapajós Group (twenty three wells and one limestone quarry) in the Amazonas Basin. The thermal history of the basin is analyzed using the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> value distribution represented in maps and stratigraphic sections through correlation schemes, and in conjunction with previously published data. The pattern of palaeotemperatures for <span class="hlt">CAI</span> values of 1.5-3 is coincident with organic matter maturation under a sedimentary overburden providing diagenetic conditions in the oil/gas window. Locally, conodonts show metamorphism (<span class="hlt">CAI</span> value of 6-7) in relation to the intrusion of diabase bodies in beds including high geothermal gradient evaporites. Microtextural alteration on the surface conodonts commonly shows several types of overgrowth microtextures developed in diagenetic conditions. Locally, recrystallization in conodonts with a high <span class="hlt">CAI</span> value is congruent with contact metamorphism in relation to Mesozoic intrusions. The <span class="hlt">CAI</span> values of 1.5 or 2 observed close to the surface in several areas of the basin may be interpreted in relation to a high thermal palaeogradient derived from the magmatic episode or/and to the local denudation of the upper part of the Paleozoic succession prior to this thermal event.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22399410','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22399410"><span id="translatedtitle">Linear and nonlinear optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes in GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}N double quantum wells operating at 1.55 μm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dakhlaoui, Hassen</p> <p>2015-04-07</p> <p>In the present paper, the linear and nonlinear optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes between the ground and the first excited states in double GaN/Al{sub x}Ga{sub (1−x)}N quantum wells are studied theoretically. The electronic energy levels and their corresponding wave functions are obtained by solving Schrödinger-Poisson equations self-consistently within the effective mass approximation. The obtained results show that the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes can be red- and blue-shifted through varying the left quantum well width and the aluminum concentration x{sub b2} of the central barrier, respectively. These structural parameters are found to present optimum values for carrying out the transition of 0.8 eV (1.55 μm). Furthermore, we show that the desired transition can also be achieved by replacing the GaN in the left quantum well with Al{sub y}Ga{sub (1−y)}N and by varying the aluminum concentration y{sub Al}. The obtained results give a new degree of freedom in optoelectronic device applications such as optical fiber telecommunications operating at (1.55 μm)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750022313','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19750022313"><span id="translatedtitle">Alternative communication network designs for an operational Plato 4 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mobley, R. E., Jr.; Eastwood, L. F., Jr.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>The cost of alternative communications networks for the dissemination of PLATO IV computer-aided instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) was studied. Four communication techniques are compared: leased telephone lines, satellite communication, UHF TV, and low-power microwave radio. For each network design, costs per student contact hour are computed. These costs are derived as functions of student population density, a parameter which can be calculated from census data for one potential market for <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, the public primary and secondary schools. Calculating costs in this way allows one to determine which of the four communications alternatives can serve this market least expensively for any given area in the U.S. The analysis indicates that radio distribution techniques are cost optimum over a wide range of conditions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858367','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15858367"><span id="translatedtitle">Germination of white radish, buckwheat and qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span> under low pressure in closed environment.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hinokuchi, Tsutomu; Oshima, Satoshi; Hashimoto, Hirofumi</p> <p>2004-11-01</p> <p>In order to cultivate plants under low pressure in closed environment, the germination rate of seeds of white radish was investigated under low pressure, low oxygen partial pressure and condition of pure oxygen. The result of these experiments showed that the germination rate was affected by the oxygen partial pressure. From this fact, it is possible to lower the total pressure by using only the pure oxygen in germination. Furthermore, the germination rates of seeds of buckwheat and qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span> were also investigated in pure oxygen for the comparison. Consequently, though tendency in germination rate of white radish was similar to qing-geng-<span class="hlt">cai</span>, it was different from buckwheat. PMID:15858367</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Geokh.....1307F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991Geokh.....1307F"><span id="translatedtitle">Metal phase in a B1-type <span class="hlt">CAI</span> fragment of the CV Efremovka chondrite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fisenko, A. V.; Ignatenko, K. I.; Lavrukhina, A. K.</p> <p>1991-09-01</p> <p>Results are presented from petrographical, mineralogical, and chemical analyses of metal particles in two B1-type <span class="hlt">CAI</span> fragments obtained from the Efremovka CV chondrite. The fragments were found to have a broken outer border consisting mainly of grains of Ca phosphates and a Fe/Ni phase. Both fragments are associated with V2O3-rich pyroxene. All individual particles and veins of the fragments are made up from high-Ni tenite, sometimes enriched in V. It is suggested that all features of the metal phase of this chondrite are a consequence of oxidation, or of partial evaporation of the metal followed by its oxidation, and that the characteristics of the metal phase of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> phase of the Efremovka chondrite may correspond to those of the protomatter of some fremdlings, such as the Allende chondrite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5273..341O','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2004SPIE.5273..341O"><span id="translatedtitle">Z-scan theoretical and experimental studies for accurate measurements of the nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of optical glasses near damage threshold</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Olivier, Thomas; Billard, Franck; Akhouayri, Hassan</p> <p>2004-06-01</p> <p>Self-focusing is one of the dramatic phenomena that may occur during the propagation of a high power laser beam in a nonlinear material. This phenomenon leads to a degradation of the wave front and may also lead to a photoinduced damage of the material. Realistic simulations of the propagation of high power laser beams require an accurate knowledge of the nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> γ. In the particular case of fused silica and in the nanosecond regime, it seems that electronic mechanisms as well as electrostriction and thermal effects can lead to a significant refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> variation. Compared to the different methods used to measure this parmeter, the Z-scan method is simple, offers a good sensitivity and may give absolute measurements if the incident beam is accurately studied. However, this method requires a very good knowledge of the incident beam and of its propagation inside a nonlinear sample. We used a split-step propagation algorithm to simlate Z-scan curves for arbitrary beam shape, sample thickness and nonlinear phase shift. According to our simulations and a rigorous analysis of the Z-scan measured signal, it appears that some abusive approximations lead to very important errors. Thus, by reducing possible errors on the interpretation of Z-scan experimental studies, we performed accurate measurements of the nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of fused silica that show the significant contribution of nanosecond mechanisms.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011928','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19940011928"><span id="translatedtitle">Limited subsolidus diffusion in type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: Evidence from Ti distribution in spinel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Meeker, G. P.; Quick, J. E.; Paque, Julie M.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>Most models of calcium aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) have focused on early stages of formation by equilibrium crystallization of a homogeneous liquid. Less is known about the subsolidus cooling history of <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. Chemical and isotopic heterogeneties on a scale of tens to hundreds of micrometers (e.g. MacPherson et al. (1989) and Podosek, et al. (1991)) suggest fairly rapid cooling with a minimum of subsolidus diffusion. However, transmission electron microscopy indicates that solid state diffusion may have been an important process at a smaller scale (Barber et al. 1984). If so, chemical evidence for diffusion could provide constraints on cooling times and temperatures. With this in mind, we have begun an investigation of the Ti distribution in spinels from two type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> from Allende to determine if post-crystallization diffusion was a significant process. The type B1 <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, 3529Z and 5241 have been described by Podosek et al. (1991) and by El Goresy et al. (1985) and MacPherson et al. (1989). We have analyzed spinels in these inclusions using the electron microprobe. These spinels are generally euhedral, range in size from less than 10 to 15 micron and are poikilitically enclosed by millimeter-sized pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite. Analyses were obtained from both the mantles and cores of the inclusions. Compositions of pyroxene in the vicinity of individual spinel grains were obtained by analyzing at least two points on opposite sides of the spinel and averaging the compositions. The pyroxene analyses were obtained within 15 microns of the spinel-pyroxene interface. No compositional gradients were observed within single spinel crystals. Ti concentrations in spinels included within pyroxene, melilite, and anorthite are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007LPI....38.1781S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007LPI....38.1781S"><span id="translatedtitle">Al-26 and Be-10 in Efremovka and Acfer <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>: Constraints on the Origin of Short-lived Radionuclides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, G.; Chaussidon, M.; Bischoff, A.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>In this abstract we present aluminum-26 and beryllium-10 abundances in Efremovka and Acfer <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. These measurements help us to constrain the origin of short-lived radionuclides aluminum-26, beryllium-10.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186361','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25186361"><span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structures of hydrates of simple inorganic salts. II. Water-rich calcium bromide and iodide hydrates: CaBr2 · 9H2O, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 8H2O, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 7H2O and <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 · 6.5H2O.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hennings, Erik; Schmidt, Horst; Voigt, Wolfgang</p> <p>2014-09-01</p> <p>Single crystals of calcium bromide enneahydrate, CaBr(2) · 9H2O, calcium iodide octahydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 8H2O, calcium iodide heptahydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 7H2O, and calcium iodide 6.5-hydrate, <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 6.5H2O, were grown from their aqueous solutions at and below room temperature according to the solid-liquid phase diagram. The crystal structure of <span class="hlt">CaI</span>(2) · 6.5H2O was redetermined. All four structures are built up from distorted Ca(H2O)8 antiprisms. The antiprisms of the iodide hydrate structures are connected either via trigonal-plane-sharing or edge-sharing, forming dimeric units. The antiprisms in calcium bromide enneahydrate are monomeric. PMID:25186361</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop....6K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop....6K"><span id="translatedtitle">Mineralogy and isotope chemistry of FUN (fractionation and nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krot, Alexander</p> <p></p> <p>To understand the origin and formation conditions of FUN (Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) Ca,Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), and their significance for constraining the origin of 26Al and O-isotopic compositions of the primordial dust and gas in the early Solar System, we propose to study mineralogy, petrology, oxidation state of Ti, trace element abundances, and O-, Mg-, Si-, Ca-, and Ti- isotope compositions of FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> previously identified in CV and CR chondrites. Twelve out of ~20 FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> known will be available for mineralogical study and isotope measurements; these include 1623-5, C1, EK1-4-1, CG-14, BG82DH8, B7F6, B7H10, BG82HB1, KT-1, AXCAI-2771, TE, and Gao-Guenie (b) #3. We will also search for additional FUN and F inclusions among Allende and Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent fractionation effects in Mg. This interdisciplinary research will be done in collaboration with I. Hutcheon (NanoSIMS), G. Huss (SIMS), S. Sutton (XANES), R. Mendybaev and A. Davis (evaporation experiments), F. Ciesla (modeling of evolution of O-isotope reservoirs in the solar nebula), and B. Meyer (modeling of Galactic chemical evolution of O-isotope compositions of dust and gas in the protosolar molecular cloud, and of stellar origin of short-lived radionuclides). The research proposed here is highly relevant to the Science Goals and Objectives of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems Program, specifically ascertain the content, origin, and history of the solar system, and the potential for life elsewhere and increase the understanding of the chemical origin of the Solar System and the processes by which its planets and small bodies have evolved to their present states¿. Our interdisciplinary research (mineralogical and isotopic studies of the earliest solar-system solids, and astrophysical modeling) is designed to understand the origin of 26Al-poor <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent isotope fractionation effects, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop.1106K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011oss..prop.1106K"><span id="translatedtitle">Mineralogy and isotope chemistry of FUN (fractionation and nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krot, Alexander</p> <p></p> <p>To understand the origin and formation conditions of FUN (Fractionation and Unidentified Nuclear isotope effects) and F (fractionation) Ca,Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>), and their significance for constraining the origin of 26Al and O-isotopic compositions of the primordial dust and gas in the early Solar System, we propose to study mineralogy, petrology, oxidation state of Ti, trace element abundances, and O-, Mg-, Si-, Ca-, and Ti- isotope compositions of FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> previously identified in CV and CR chondrites. Twelve out of ~20 FUN and F <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> known will be available for mineralogical study and isotope measurements; these include 1623-5, C1, EK1-4-1, CG-14, BG82DH8, B7F6, B7H10, BG82HB1, KT-1, AXCAI-2771, TE, and Gao-Guenie (b) #3. We will also search for additional FUN and F inclusions among Allende and Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent fractionation effects in Mg. This interdisciplinary research will be done in collaboration with I. Hutcheon (NanoSIMS), G. Huss (SIMS), S. Sutton (XANES), R. Mendybaev and A. Davis (evaporation experiments), F. Ciesla (modeling of evolution of O-isotope reservoirs in the solar nebula), and B. Meyer (modeling of Galactic chemical evolution of O-isotope compositions of dust and gas in the protosolar molecular cloud, and of stellar origin of short-lived radionuclides). The research proposed here is highly relevant to the Science Goals and Objectives of NASA and the Origins of Solar Systems Program, specifically ascertain the content, origin, and history of the solar system, and the potential for life elsewhere and increase the understanding of the chemical origin of the Solar System and the processes by which its planets and small bodies have evolved to their present states. Our interdisciplinary research (mineralogical and isotopic studies of the earliest solar-system solids, and astrophysical modeling) is designed to understand the origin of 26Al-poor <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with large mass-dependent isotope fractionation effects, and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090020501','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20090020501"><span id="translatedtitle">Rare Earth Element Measurements of Melilite and Fassaite in Allende <span class="hlt">Cai</span> by Nanosims</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ito, M.; Messenger, Scott</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The rare earth elements (REEs) are concentrated in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> by approx. 20 times the chondritic average [e.g., 1]. The REEs in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> are important to understand processes of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation including the role of volatilization, condensation, and fractional crystallization [1,2]. REE measurements are a well established application of ion microprobes [e.g., 3]. However the spatial resolution of REE measurements by ion microprobe (approx.20 m) is not adequate to resolve heterogeneous distributions of REEs among/within minerals. We have developed methods for measuring REE with the NanoSIMS 50L at smaller spatial scales. Here we present our initial measurements of REEs in melilite and fassaite in an Allende Type-A <span class="hlt">CAI</span> with the JSC NanoSIMS 50L. We found that the key parameters for accurate REE abundance measurements differ between the NanoSIMS and conventional SIMS, in particular the oxide-to-element ratios, the relative sensitivity factors, the energy distributions, and requisite energy offset. Our REE abundance measurements of the 100 ppm REE diopside glass standards yielded good reproducibility and accuracy, 0.5-2.5 % and 5-25 %, respectively. We determined abundances and spatial distributions of REEs in core and rim within single crystals of fassaite, and adjacent melilite with 5-10 m spatial resolution. The REE abundances in fassaite core and rim are 20-100 times CI abundance but show a large negative Eu anomaly, exhibiting a well-defined Group III pattern. This is consistent with previous work [4]. On the other hand, adjacent melilite shows modified Group II pattern with no strong depletions of Eu and Yb, and no Tm positive anomaly. REE abundances (2-10 x CI) were lower than that of fassaite. These patterns suggest that fassaite crystallized first followed by a crystallization of melilite from the residual melt. In future work, we will carry out a correlated study of O and Mg isotopes and REEs of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> in order to better understand the nature and timescales of its</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26PSL.440...62A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016E%26PSL.440...62A"><span id="translatedtitle">Oxygen isotopes in the early protoplanetary disk inferred from pyroxene in a classical type B <span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Aléon, Jérôme</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>A major unanswered question in solar system formation is the origin of the oxygen isotopic dichotomy between the Sun and the planets. Individual Calcium-Aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) from CV chondrites exhibit almost the full isotopic range, but how their composition evolved is still unclear, which prevents robust astrochemical conclusions. A key issue is notably the yet unsolved origin of the 16O-rich isotopic composition of pyroxene in type B <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. Here, I report an in-situ oxygen isotope study of the archetypal type B <span class="hlt">CAI</span> USNM-3529-Z from Allende with emphasis on the isotopic composition of pyroxene and its isotopic and petrographic relationships with other major minerals. The O isotopic composition of pyroxene is correlated with indicators of magmatic growth, indicating that the pyroxene evolved from a 16O-poor composition and became progressively enriched in 16O during its crystallization, contrary to the long held assumption that pyroxene was initially 16O-rich. This variation is well explained by isotopic exchange between a 16O-poor partial melt having the isotopic composition of melilite and a 16O-rich gas having the isotopic composition of spinel, during pyroxene crystallization. The isotopic evolution of 3529-Z is consistent with formation in an initially 16O-rich environment where spinel and gehlenitic melilite crystallized, followed by a 16O-depletion associated with melilite partial melting and recrystallization and finally a return to the initial 16O-rich environment before pyroxene crystallization. This strongly suggests that the environment of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation was globally 16O-rich, with local 16O-depletions systematically associated with high temperature events. The Al/Mg isotopic systematics of 3529-Z further indicates that this suite of isotopic changes occurred in the first 150 000 yr of the solar system, during the main <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation period. A new astrophysical setting is proposed, where the 16O-depletion occurs in an optically thin surface</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_7");'>7</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li class="active"><span>9</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_9 --> <div id="page_10" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="181"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.145..206K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014GeCoA.145..206K"><span id="translatedtitle">Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions with fractionation and unknown nuclear effects (FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>): I. Mineralogy, petrology, and oxygen isotopic compositions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Wasserburg, Gerald J.; Huss, Gary R.; Papanastassiou, Dimitri; Davis, Andrew M.; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Bizzarro, Martin</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p>We present a detailed characterization of the mineralogy, petrology, and oxygen isotopic compositions of twelve FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, including C1 and EK1-4-1 from Allende (CV), that were previously shown to have large isotopic fractionation patterns for magnesium and oxygen, and large isotopic anomalies of several elements. The other samples show more modest patterns of isotopic fractionation and have smaller but significant isotopic anomalies. All FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> studied are coarse-grained igneous inclusions: Type B, forsterite-bearing Type B, compact Type A, and hibonite-rich. Some inclusions consist of two mineralogically distinct lithologies, forsterite-rich and forsterite-free/poor. All the CV FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> experienced postcrystallization open-system iron-alkali-halogen metasomatic alteration resulting in the formation of secondary minerals commonly observed in non-FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from CV chondrites. The CR FUN <span class="hlt">CAI</span> GG#3 shows no evidence for alteration. In all samples, clear evidence of oxygen isotopic fractionation was found. Most samples were initially 16O-rich. On a three-oxygen isotope diagram, various minerals in each FUN <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (spinel, forsterite, hibonite, dmisteinbergite, most fassaite grains, and melilite (only in GG#3)), define mass-dependent fractionation lines with a similar slope of ∼0.5. The different inclusions have different Δ17O values ranging from ∼-25‰ to ∼-16‰. Melilite and plagioclase in the CV FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> have 16O-poor compositions (Δ17O ∼-3‰) and plot near the intercept of the Allende <span class="hlt">CAI</span> line and the terrestrial fractionation line. We infer that mass-dependent fractionation effects of oxygen isotopes in FUN <span class="hlt">CAI</span> minerals are due to evaporation during melt crystallization. Differences in Δ17O values of mass-dependent fractionation lines defined by minerals in individual FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> are inferred to reflect differences in Δ17O values of their precursors. Differences in δ18O values of minerals defining the mass-dependent fractionation lines in several FUN <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/944372','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/944372"><span id="translatedtitle">OXYGEN ISOTOPIC COMPOSITIONS OF THE ALLENDE TYPE C <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>: EVIDENCE FOR ISOTOPIC EXCHANGE DURING NEBULAR MELTING AND ASTEROIDAL THERMAL METAMORPHISM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Krot, A N; Chaussidon, M; Yurimoto, H; Sakamoto, N; Nagashima, K; Hutcheon, I D; MacPherson, G J</p> <p>2008-02-21</p> <p>Based on the mineralogy and petrography, coarse-grained, igneous, anorthite-rich (Type C) calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) in the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Allende have been recently divided into three groups: (i) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with melilite and Al,Ti-diopside of massive and lacy textures (coarse grains with numerous rounded inclusions of anorthite) in a fine-grained anorthite groundmass (6-1-72, 100, 160), (ii) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> CG5 with massive melilite, Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite, and (iii) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> associated with chondrule material: either containing chondrule fragments in their peripheries (ABC, TS26) or surrounded by chondrule-like, igneous rims (93) (Krot et al., 2007a,b). Here, we report in situ oxygen isotopic measurements of primary (melilite, spinel, Al,Ti-diopside, anorthite) and secondary (grossular, monticellite, forsterite) minerals in these <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. Spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -25{per_thousand} to -20{per_thousand}), massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -20{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}) and fine-grained anorthite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -15{per_thousand} to -2{per_thousand}) in 100, 160 and 6-1-72 are {sup 16}O-enriched relative spinel and coarse-grained Al,Ti-diopside and anorthite in ABC, 93 and TS26 ({Delta}{sup 17}O ranges from -20{per_thousand} to -15{per_thousand}, from -15{per_thousand} to -5{per_thousand}, and from -5{per_thousand} to 0{per_thousand}, respectively). In 6-1-72, massive and lacy Al,Ti-diopside grains are {sup 16}O-depleted ({Delta}{sup 17}O {approx} -13{per_thousand}) relative to spinel ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -23{per_thousand}). Melilite is the most {sup 16}O-depleted mineral in all Allende Type C <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. In <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 100, melilite and secondary grossular, monticellite and forsterite (minerals replacing melilite) are similarly {sup 16}O-depleted, whereas grossular in <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 160 is {sup 16}O-enriched ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -10{per_thousand} to -6{per_thousand}) relative to melilite ({Delta}{sup 17}O = -5{per_thousand} to -3{per_thousand}). We infer</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150018570','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20150018570"><span id="translatedtitle">Characterization of Meteorites by Focused Ion Beam Sectioning: Recent Applications to <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and Primitive Meteorite Matrices</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Christoffersen, Roy; Keller, Lindsay P.; Han, Jangmi; Rahman, Zia; Berger, Eve L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning has revolutionized preparation of meteorite samples for characterization by analytical transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and other techniques. Although FIB is not "non-destructive" in the purest sense, each extracted section amounts to no more than nanograms (approximately 500 cubic microns) removed intact from locations precisely controlled by SEM imaging and analysis. Physical alteration of surrounding material by ion damage, fracture or sputter contamination effects is localized to within a few micrometers around the lift-out point. This leaves adjacent material intact for coordinate geochemical analysis by SIMS, microdrill extraction/TIMS and other techniques. After lift out, FIB sections can be quantitatively analyzed by electron microprobe prior to final thinning, synchrotron x-ray techniques, and by the full range of state-of-the-art analytical field-emission scanning transmission electron microscope (FE-STEM) techniques once thinning is complete. Multiple meteorite studies supported by FIB/FE-STEM are currently underway at NASA-JSC, including coordinated analysis of refractory phase assemblages in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and fine-grained matrices in carbonaceous chondrites. FIB sectioning of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> has uncovered epitaxial and other overgrowth relations between corundum-hibonite-spinel consistent with hibonite preceding corundum and/or spinel in non-equilibrium condensation sequences at combinations of higher gas pressures, dust-gas enrichments or significant nebular transport. For all of these cases, the ability of FIB to allow for coordination with spatially-associated isotopic data by SIMS provides immense value for constraining the formation scenarios of the particular <span class="hlt">CAI</span> assemblage. For carbonaceous chondrites matrix material, FIB has allowed us to obtain intact continuous sections of the immediate outer surface of Murchison (CM2) after it has been experimentally ion processed to simulate solar wind space weathering. The surface</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009gdca.conf..321C&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009gdca.conf..321C&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Problem Solving Process Research of Everyone Involved in Innovation Based on <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Tao; Shao, Yunfei; Tang, Xiaowo</p> <p></p> <p>It is very important that non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee serve as innovators under the requirements of everyone involved in innovation. According the view of this paper, it is feasible and necessary to build everyone involved in innovation problem solving process under Total Innovation Management (TIM) based on the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ). The tools under the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> technology: How TO mode and science effects database could be very useful for all employee especially non-technical department and bottom line for innovation. The problem solving process put forward in the paper focus on non-technical department personnel especially bottom line employee for innovation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28Q.335C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28Q.335C"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal Histories of PGE-rich Metal Particles in a Vigarano <span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Casanova, I.; Grossman, L.</p> <p>1993-07-01</p> <p>Metal particles in Vigarano 1623-8, a Type B2 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> [1], underwent virtually no sulfidation, as is typical of opaque assemblages from Ca, Al-rich inclusions in the reduced CV3 chondrites [2]. In this study, we have identified two large metal grains (M1 and M2) with chemical and mineralogical features that may indicate cooling under different conditions and are, therefore, difficult to understand in the environment of a single <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> thermal evolution. M1 is an almost spherical, kamacite+taenite-bearing particle included in a fassaite grain of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> host; a 17.5 micrometer-long (0.5 micrometer steps) microprobe traverse along M1 shows that Ni and Ru contents in the taenite (31.5 and 1.1 wt%, respectively) are uniform, and differ from those in the adjacent kamacite (Ni=4.5, Ru=0.7 wt%). M2 is a 20 micrometer, irregularly-shaped taenite particle, embedded in a fine-grained (spinel-rich) portion of 1623-8. It has a homogeneous composition with 10.5 wt% Ni, 0.4% Co, 0.7% Re, 0.6% Pt and high concentrations of Ru (6.5 wt%), Os (4.3 wt%) and Ir (8.2 wt%), as previously recognized by [1]. The composition of M2 is such that it should have undergone exsolution at 800 = T >= 600 degrees C (according to experimental data by [3]) to form at least two (alpha+gamma-NiFe), or probably three (+epsilon-RuFe) different phases. Lack of exsolution features in this large grain is therefore indicative of equilibration at relatively high temperatures (T>600 degrees C) followed by rapid cooling. Other metal particles of similar bulk compositions in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from the Leoville chondrite (also a reduced CV3) show extensive exsolution features that have been interpreted as the result of low- temperature equilibration of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and their constituents after incorporation into their parent body [4, 5]. The relatively high equilibration temperature of M2 is, however, inconsistent with the existence of kamacite in M1. From the phase relations in the Fe-Ni binary, a grain like M1, with 25 wt% bulk Ni</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100005633','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20100005633"><span id="translatedtitle">FIB-NanoSIMS-TEM Coordinated Study of a Wark-Lovering Rim in a Vigarano Type A <span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Cai, A.; Ito, M.; Keller, L. P.; Ross, D. K.; Nakamura-Messenger, K.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>Wark-Lovering (WL) rims are thin multi layered mineral sequences that surround most Ca, Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>). Unaltered WL rims are composed of the same primary high temperature minerals as <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, such as melilite, spinel, pyroxene, hibonite, perovskite, anorthite and olivine. It is still unclear whether the rim minerals represent a different generation formed by a separate event from their associated <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> or are a byproduct of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation. Several models have been proposed for the origins of WL rims including condensation, flashheating, reaction of a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> with a Mg-Si-rich reservoir (nebular gas or solid); on the basis of mineralogy, abundances of trace elements, O and Mg isotopic studies. Detailed mineralogical characterizations of WL rims at micrometer to nanometer scales have been obtained by TEM observations, but so far no coordinated isotopic - mineralogical studies have been performed. Thus, we have applied an O isotopic imaging technique by NanoSIMS 50L to investigate heterogeneous distributions of O isotopic ratios in minerals within a cross section of a WL rim prepared using a focused ion beam (FIB) instrument. After the isotopic measurements, we determine the detailed mineralogy and microstructure of the same WL FIB section to gain insight into its petrogenesis. Here we present preliminary results from O isotopic and elemental maps by NanoSIMS and mineralogical analysis by FE-SEM of a FIB section of a WL rim in the Vigarano reduced CV3 chondrite.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/907835','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/907835"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on the Origin of Chondrules and <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from Short-Lived and Long-Lived Radionuclides</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Kita, N T; Huss, G R; Tachibana, S; Amelin, Y; Nyquist, L E; Hutcheon, I D</p> <p>2005-10-24</p> <p>The high time resolution Pb-Pb ages and short-lived nuclide based relative ages for <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and chondrules are reviewed. The solar system started at 4567.2 {+-} 0.6Ma inferred from the high precision Pb-Pb ages of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. Time scales of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> ({le}0.1Myr), chondrules (1-3Myr), and early asteroidal differentiation ({ge}3Myr) inferred from {sup 26}Al relative ages are comparable to the time scale estimated from astronomical observations of young star; proto star, classical T Tauri star and week-lined T Tauri star, respectively. Pb-Pb ages of chondrules also indicate chondrule formation occur within 1-3 Myr after <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. Mn-Cr isochron ages of chondrules are similar to or within 2 Myr after <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation. Chondrules from different classes of chondrites show the same range of {sup 26}Al ages in spite of their different oxygen isotopes, indicating that chondrule formed in the localized environment. The {sup 26}Al ages of chondrules in each chondrite class show a hint of correlation with their chemical compositions, which implies the process of elemental fractionation during chondrule formation events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2500149','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2500149"><span id="translatedtitle">HIV-1 Capsid Assembly Inhibitor (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) Peptide: Structural Preferences and Delivery into Human Embryonic Lung Cells and Lymphocytes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Braun, Klaus; Frank, Martin; Pipkorn, Rüdiger; Reed, Jennifer; Spring, Herbert; Debus, Jürgen; Didinger, Bernd; von der Lieth, Claus-Wilhelm; Wiessler, Manfred; Waldeck, Waldemar</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>The Human immunodeficiency virus 1 derived capsid assembly inhibitor peptide (HIV-1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-peptide) is a promising lead candidate for anti-HIV drug development. Its drawback, however, is that it cannot permeate cells directly. Here we report the transport of the pharmacologically active <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-peptide into human lymphocytes and Human Embryonic Lung cells (HEL) using the BioShuttle platform. Generally, the transfer of pharmacologically active substances across membranes, demonstrated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), could lead to a loss of function by changing the molecule's structure. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and circular dichroism (CD) studies suggest that the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-peptide has an intrinsic capacity to form a helical structure, which seems to be critical for the pharmacological effect as revealed by intensive docking calculations and comparison with control peptides. This coupling of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-peptide to a BioShuttle-molecule additionally improved its solubility. Under the conditions described, the HIV-1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> peptide was transported into living cells and could be localized in the vicinity of the mitochondria. PMID:18695744</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15746387','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15746387"><span id="translatedtitle">Supra-canonical 26Al/27Al and the residence time of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> in the solar protoplanetary disk.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Young, Edward D; Simon, Justin I; Galy, Albert; Russell, Sara S; Tonui, Eric; Lovera, Oscar</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>The canonical initial 26Al/27Al ratio of 4.5 x 10(-5) has been a fiducial marker for the beginning of the solar system. Laser ablation and whole-rock multiple-collector inductively coupled plasma-source mass spectrometry magnesium isotope analyses of calcium- and aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) from CV3 meteorites demonstrate that some <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> had initial 26Al/27Al values at least 25% greater than canonical and that the canonical initial 26Al/27Al cannot mark the beginning of solar system formation. Using rates of Mg diffusion in minerals, we find that the canonical initial 26Al/27Al is instead the culmination of thousands of brief high-temperature events incurred by <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> during a 10(5)-year residence time in the solar protoplanetary disk. PMID:15746387</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006945','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890006945"><span id="translatedtitle">Extending the granularity of representation and control for the MIL-STD <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> 1.0 node model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Rogers, Kathy L.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>The Common APSE (Ada 1 Program Support Environment) Interface Set (<span class="hlt">CAIS</span>) (DoD85) node model provides an excellent baseline for interfaces in a single-host development environment. To encompass the entire spectrum of computing, however, the <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> model should be extended in four areas. It should provide the interface between the engineering workstation and the host system throughout the entire lifecycle of the system. It should provide a basis for communication and integration functions needed by distributed host environments. It should provide common interfaces for communications mechanisms to and among target processors. It should provide facilities for integration, validation, and verification of test beds extending to distributed systems on geographically separate processors with heterogeneous instruction set architectures (ISAS). Additions to the PROCESS NODE model to extend the <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> into these four areas are proposed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21624269','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21624269"><span id="translatedtitle">[Demotion and promotion of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Jing and the Medicine School's establishment and abolition three times in the North Song dynasty].</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Li, Yu-Qing</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">CAI</span> Jing was appointed the prime minister in the Chongning period of Song Hui-tsung. The Medical School was moved to the Imperial College from Taichang Temple. It used a 3-year education system and divided graduates into three grades. The preferential policies promised top students as 8 or 9-rank official position, which attracted a lot of intellectuals into the field of medicine. <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Jing was demoted three times respectively in the fifth year of the Chongning period, the third year of the Daguan period and the second year of the Zhenghe period, and was promoted again after each demotion. Influenced by changes of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Jing's position and relative policies, the Medical School was also established and abolished three times. PMID:21624269</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012818','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140012818"><span id="translatedtitle">In Situ Trace Element Analysis of an Allende Type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: EK-459-5-1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A.; Lapen, T. J.; Andreasen, R.; Righter, M.; Ross, D. K.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Variations in refractory major and trace element composition of calcium, aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) provide constraints on physical and chemical conditions and processes in the earliest stages of the Solar System. Previous work indicates that <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> have experienced complex histories involving, in many cases, multiple episodes of condensation, evaporation, and partial melting. We have analyzed major and trace element abundances in two core to rim transects of the melilite mantle as well as interior major phases of a Type B1 <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (EK-459-5-1) from Allende by electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) and laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) to investigate the behavior of key trace elements with a primary focus on the REEs Tm and Yb.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107209','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=107209"><span id="translatedtitle">Regulation of the Carnitine Pathway in Escherichia coli: Investigation of the <span class="hlt">cai</span>-fix Divergent Promoter Region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Buchet, Anne; Eichler, Knut; Mandrand-Berthelot, Marie-Andrée</p> <p>1998-01-01</p> <p>The divergent structural operons <span class="hlt">cai</span>TABCDE and fixABCX of Escherichia coli are required for anaerobic carnitine metabolism. Transcriptional monocopy lacZ fusion studies showed that both operons are coexpressed during anaerobic growth in the presence of carnitine, respond to common environmental stimuli (like glucose and nitrate), and are modulated positively by the same general regulators, CRP and FNR, and negatively by H-NS. Overproduction of the <span class="hlt">Cai</span>F specific regulatory protein mediating the carnitine signal restored induction in an fnr mutant, corresponding to its role as the primary target for anaerobiosis. Transcript analysis identified two divergent transcription start points initiating 289 bp apart. DNase I footprinting revealed three sites with various affinities for the binding of the cAMP-CRP complex inside this regulatory region. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments indicated that previously reported perfect CRP motif 1, centered at −41.5 of the <span class="hlt">cai</span> transcriptional start site, plays a direct role in the sole <span class="hlt">cai</span> activation. In contrast, mutation in CRP site 2, positioned at −69.5 of the fix promoter, caused only a threefold reduction in fix expression. Thus, the role of the third CRP site, located at −126.5 of fix, might be to reinforce the action of site 2. A critical 50-bp cis-acting sequence overlapping the fix mRNA start site was found, by deletion analysis, to be necessary for <span class="hlt">cai</span> transcription. This region is thought to be involved in transduction of the signal mediated by the <span class="hlt">Cai</span>F regulator. PMID:9573142</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120001852','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20120001852"><span id="translatedtitle">Ca-Fe and Alkali-Halide Alteration of an Allende Type B <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: Aqueous Alteration in Nebular or Asteroidal Settings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ross, D. K.; Simon, J. I.; Simon, S. B.; Grossman, L.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Ca-Fe and alkali-halide alteration of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> is often attributed to aqueous alteration by fluids circulating on asteroidal parent bodies after the various chondritic components have been assembled, although debate continues about the roles of asteroidal vs. nebular modification processes [1-7]. Here we report de-tailed observations of alteration products in a large Type B2 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, TS4 from Allende, one of the oxidized subgroup of CV3s, and propose a speculative model for aqueous alteration of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> in a nebular setting. Ca-Fe alteration in this <span class="hlt">CAI</span> consists predominantly of end-member hedenbergite, end-member andradite, and compositionally variable, magnesian high-Ca pyroxene. These phases are strongly concentrated in an unusual "nodule" enclosed within the interior of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (Fig. 1). The Ca, Fe-rich nodule superficially resembles a clast that pre-dated and was engulfed by the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, but closer inspection shows that relic spinel grains are enclosed in the nodule, and corroded <span class="hlt">CAI</span> primary phases interfinger with the Fe-rich phases at the nodule s margins. This <span class="hlt">CAI</span> also contains abundant sodalite and nepheline (alkali-halide) alteration that occurs around the rims of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, but also penetrates more deeply into the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. The two types of alteration (Ca-Fe and alkali-halide) are adjacent, and very fine-grained Fe-rich phases are associated with sodalite-rich regions. Both types of alteration appear to be replacive; if that is true, it would require substantial introduction of Fe, and transport of elements (Ti, Al and Mg) out of the nodule, and introduction of Na and Cl into alkali-halide rich zones. Parts of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> have been extensively metasomatized.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160002651','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160002651"><span id="translatedtitle">Calcium and Titanium Isotope Fractionation in <span class="hlt">CAIS</span>: Tracers of Condensation and Inheritance in the Early Solar Protoplanetary Disk</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Simon, J. I.; Jordan, M. K.; Tappa, M. J.; Kohl, I. E.; Young, E. D.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The chemical and isotopic compositions of calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) can be used to understand the conditions present in the protoplantary disk where they formed. The isotopic compositions of these early-formed nebular materials are largely controlled by chemical volatility. The isotopic effects of evaporation/sublimation, which are well explained by both theory and experimental work, lead to enrichments of the heavy isotopes that are often exhibited by the moderately refractory elements Mg and Si. Less well understood are the isotopic effects of condensation, which limits our ability to determine whether a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> is a primary condensate and/or retains any evidence of its primordial formation history.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010679','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010679"><span id="translatedtitle">Microstructures of Hibonite From an ALH A77307 (CO3.0) <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: Evidence for Evaporative Loss of Calcium</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Han, Jangmi; Brearley, Adrian J.; Keller, Lindsay P.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Hibonite is a comparatively rare, primary phase found in some <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from different chondrite groups and is also common in Wark-Lovering rims [1]. Hibonite is predicted to be one of the earliest refractory phases to form by equilibrium condensation from a cooling gas of solar composition [2] and, therefore, can be a potential recorder of very early solar system processes. In this study, we describe the microstructures of hibonite from one <span class="hlt">CAI</span> in ALH A77307 (CO3.0) using FIB/TEM techniques in order to reconstruct its formational history.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+weight+AND+loss&pg=5&id=EJ528590','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=exercise+AND+weight+AND+loss&pg=5&id=EJ528590"><span id="translatedtitle">A One Year Post-program Assessment of a Computer-Assisted Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) Weight Management Program for Industrial Employees: Lessons Learned.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dennison, Kathryn F.; And Others</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>This study examined whether a computer-assisted instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) nutrition program would help employees maintain weight loss and dietary intake improvements over time. Subjects received either no nutrition education, education with microcomputer use, or education without microcomputers. Posttesting found greater weight loss for <span class="hlt">CAI</span> participants,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED503459.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED503459.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) versus Class Room Lecture (RL) for Computer Science at ICS Level</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kausar, Tayyaba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with class room lecture and computer assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypothesis of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102933.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1102933.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Comparative Study to Evaluate the Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) versus Class Room Lecture (CRL) for Computer Science at ICS Level</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kausar, Tayyaba; Choudhry, Bushra Naoreen; Gujjar, Aijaz Ahmed</p> <p>2008-01-01</p> <p>This study was aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> vs. classroom lecture for computer science at ICS level. The objectives were to compare the learning effects of two groups with class room lecture and computer assisted instruction studying the same curriculum and the effects of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and CRL in terms of cognitive development. Hypothesis of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010652','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20140010652"><span id="translatedtitle">A FIB/TEM/Nanosims Study of a Wark-Lovering Rim on an Allende <span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Keller, L. P.; Needham, A. W.; Messenger, S.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Ca- Al-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) are commonly surrounded by Wark-Lovering (WL) rims - thin (approx. 50 micrometers) multilayered sequences - whose mineralogy is dominated by high temperature minerals similar to those that occur in the cores of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> [1]. The origins of these WL rims involved high temperature events in the early nebula such as condensation, flashheating or reaction with a nebular reservoir, or combinations of these processes. These rims formed after <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation but prior to accretion into their parent bodies. We have undertaken a coordinated mineralogical and isotopic study of WL rims to determine the formation conditions of the individual layers and to constrain the isotopic reservoirs they interacted with during their history. We focus here on the spinel layer, the first-formed highest- temperature layer in the WL rim sequence. Results and Discussion: We have performed mineralogical, chemical and isotopic analyses of an unusual ultrarefractory inclusion from the Allende CV3 chondrite (SHAL) consisting of an approx. 500 micrometers long single crystal of hibonite and co-existing coarsegrained perovskite. SHAL is partially surrounded by WL rim. We previously reported on the mineralogy, isotopic compositions and trace elements in SHAL [2-4]. The spinel layer in the WL rim is present only on the hibonite and terminates abruptly at the contact with the coarse perovskite. This simple observation shows that the spinel layer is not a condensate in this case (otherwise spinel would have condensed on the perovskite as well). The spinel layer appears to have formed by gas-phase corrosion of the hibonite by Mg-rich vapors such that the spinel layer grew at the expense of the hibonite. We also found that the spinel layer has the same 16Orich composition as the hibonite. The spinel layer is polycrystalline and individual crystals do not show a crystallographic relationship with the hibonite. An Al-diopside layer overlies the spinel layer, and is present on both</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_8");'>8</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li class="active"><span>10</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_10 --> <div id="page_11" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="201"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED505173.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED505173.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Computer-Assisted Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) in Language Arts: Investigating the Influence of Teacher Knowledge and Attitudes on the Learning Environment</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Davis, Jamie M.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>The integration of Computer-Assisted Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) into the language arts classroom can greatly assist teachers meet the needs of diverse literacy learners. However, this new technology does not come without some concerns, including but not limited to ease of implementation, funding for new hardware and software, appropriate teacher support,…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26159472','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26159472"><span id="translatedtitle">Changes in flavour and microbial diversity during natural fermentation of suan-<span class="hlt">cai</span>, a traditional food made in Northeast China.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wu, Rina; Yu, Meiling; Liu, Xiaoyu; Meng, Lingshuai; Wang, Qianqian; Xue, Yating; Wu, Junrui; Yue, Xiqing</p> <p>2015-10-15</p> <p>We measured changes in the main physical and chemical properties, flavour compounds and microbial diversity in suan-<span class="hlt">cai</span> during natural fermentation. The results showed that the pH and concentration of soluble protein initially decreased but were then maintained at a stable level; the concentration of nitrite increased in the initial fermentation stage and after reaching a peak it decreased significantly to a low level by the end of fermentation. Suan-<span class="hlt">cai</span> was rich in 17 free amino acids. All of the free amino acids increased in concentration to different degrees, except histidine. Total free amino acids reached their highest levels in the mid-fermentation stage. The 17 volatile flavour components identified at the start of fermentation increased to 57 by the mid-fermentation stage; esters and aldehydes were in the greatest diversity and abundance, contributing most to the aroma of suan-<span class="hlt">cai</span>. Bacteria were more abundant and diverse than fungi in suan-<span class="hlt">cai</span>; 14 bacterial species were identified from the genera Leuconostoc, Bacillus, Pseudomonas and Lactobacillus. The predominant fungal species identified were Debaryomyces hansenii, Candida tropicalis and Penicillium expansum. PMID:26159472</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26832141"><span id="translatedtitle">Phenotypic diversity and correlation between white-opaque switching and the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> microsatellite locus in Candida albicans.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Hu, Jian; Guan, Guobo; Dai, Yu; Tao, Li; Zhang, Jianzhong; Li, Houmin; Huang, Guanghua</p> <p>2016-08-01</p> <p>Candida albicans is a commensal fungal pathogen that is often found as part of the human microbial flora. The aim of the present study was to establish a relationship between diverse genotypes and phenotypes of clinical isolates of C. albicans. Totally 231 clinical isolates were collected and used for genotyping and phenotypic switching analysis. Based on the microsatellite locus (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) genotyping assay, 65 different genotypes were identified, and some dominant types were found in certain human niches. For example, the genotypes of 30-44 and 30-45 were enriched in vaginal infection samples. C. albicans has a number of morphological forms including the single-celled yeasts, multicellular filaments, white, and opaque cell types. The relationship between the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> genotype and the ability to undergo phenotypic switching was examined in the clinical isolates. We found that the strains with longer CAA/G repeats in both alleles of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> locus were more opaque competent. We also discovered that some MTL heterozygous (a/alpha) isolates could undergo white-opaque switching when grown on regular culture medium (containing glucose as the sole carbon source). Our study establishes a link between phenotypic switching and genotypes of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> microsatellite locus in clinical isolates of C. albicans. PMID:26832141</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22knowledge+management%22&pg=6&id=EJ1062828','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22knowledge+management%22&pg=6&id=EJ1062828"><span id="translatedtitle">From Corporate Social Responsibility, through Entrepreneurial Orientation, to Knowledge Sharing: A Study in <span class="hlt">Cai</span> Luong (Renovated Theatre) Theatre Companies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Tuan, Luu Trong</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Purpose: This paper aims to examine the role of antecedents such as corporate social responsibility (CSR) and entrepreneurial orientation in the chain effect to knowledge sharing among members of <span class="hlt">Cai</span> Luong theatre companies in the Vietnamese context. Knowledge sharing contributes to the depth of the knowledge pool of both the individuals and the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED077195.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED077195.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">A Model Driven Question-Answering System for a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Environment. Final Report (July 1970 to May 1972).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brown, John S.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>A question answering system which permits a computer-assisted instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) student greater initiative in the variety of questions he can ask is described. A method is presented to represent the dynamic processes of a subject matter area by augmented finite state automata, which permits efficient inferencing about dynamic processes and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2784433','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2784433"><span id="translatedtitle">Hunting and use of terrestrial fauna used by <span class="hlt">Cai</span>çaras from the Atlantic Forest coast (Brazil)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Background The Brazilian Atlantic Forest is considered one of the hotspots for conservation, comprising remnants of rain forest along the eastern Brazilian coast. Its native inhabitants in the Southeastern coast include the <span class="hlt">Cai</span>çaras (descendants from Amerindians and European colonizers), with a deep knowledge on the natural resources used for their livelihood. Methods We studied the use of the terrestrial fauna in three <span class="hlt">Cai</span>çara communities, through open-ended interviews with 116 native residents. Data were checked through systematic observations and collection of zoological material. Results The dependence on the terrestrial fauna by <span class="hlt">Cai</span>çaras is especially for food and medicine. The main species used are Didelphis spp., Dasyprocta azarae, Dasypus novemcinctus, and small birds (several species of Turdidae). Contrasting with a high dependency on terrestrial fauna resources by native Amazonians, the <span class="hlt">Cai</span>çaras do not show a constant dependency on these resources. Nevertheless, the occasional hunting of native animals represents a complimentary source of animal protein. Conclusion Indigenous or local knowledge on native resources is important in order to promote local development in a sustainable way, and can help to conserve biodiversity, particularly if the resource is sporadically used and not commercially exploited. PMID:19930595</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LPI....41.2255N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LPI....41.2255N"><span id="translatedtitle">Micron Scale Oxygen Isotope Heterogeneity in Anorthite of A Forsterite-bearing Type B <span class="hlt">CAI</span> E60 from Efremovka</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nagashima, K.; Krot, A. N.; Huss, G. R.; Yurimoto, H.</p> <p>2010-03-01</p> <p>Oxygen isotope imaging with UH Cameca ims 1280+SCAPS isotope microscope of a Fo-B <span class="hlt">CAI</span> E60 from Efremovka revealed complex distributions of O-isotopes in anorthite supporting isotopic exchange with 16O-poor gas during remelting and recrystallization.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SciEd..89..707C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SciEd..89..707C"><span id="translatedtitle">The interplay between different forms of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and students' preferences of learning environment in the secondary science class</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chang, Chun-Yen; Tsai, Chin-Chung</p> <p>2005-09-01</p> <p>This evaluation study investigated the effects of a teacher-centered versus student-centered computer-assisted instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) on 10th graders' earth science student learning outcomes. This study also explored whether the effects of different forms of computer-assisted instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) on student learning outcomes were influenced by student preferences of learning environment (PLE). A total of 347 10th-grade senior high school students participated in this nonequivalent control group quasiexperiment. During a one-week period, one group of students (n = 216) were taught by a teacher-centered <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (TCCAI) model whereas the other group of students (n = 131) were subject to a student-centered <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (SCCAI) method. Results showed that (a) no statistically significant difference on students' earth science achievement was found for either group; (b) TCCAI group had significantly better attitudes toward earth science than did the SCCAI group; furthermore (c) a significant PLE-treatment interaction was found on student attitudes toward the subject matter, where the teacher-centered instructional approach seemed to enhance more positive attitudes of less constructivist-oriented learning preferences students, whereas the student-centered method was more beneficial to more constructivist-oriented learning preferences students on their attitudes toward earth science in a computer-assisted learning environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED532902.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED532902.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Investigating Learning Achievements of Thai High School Students in a Sequences and Series Lesson Delivered on <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-Based Materials</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chundang, Ungsana; Singhaprink, Wipawaan; Pongpullponsak, Adisak; Tantipisalkul, Tasanee; Praekhaow, Puchong</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The current experimental research aims to investigate students' learning outcomes in classes in which the interactive <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (computer-assisted instruction)-based materials were implemented. It also aims to compare the learning outcomes of the students based on regions in which their school is located. The participants were 326 Matthayom-4 students…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.A41I0176K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AGUFM.A41I0176K"><span id="translatedtitle">GOSAT CO2 retrieval results using TANSO-<span class="hlt">CAI</span> aerosol information over East Asia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>KIM, M.; Kim, W.; Jung, Y.; Lee, S.; Kim, J.; Lee, H.; Boesch, H.; Goo, T. Y.</p> <p>2015-12-01</p> <p>In the satellite remote sensing of CO2, incorrect aerosol information could induce large errors as previous studies suggested. Many factors, such as, aerosol type, wavelength dependency of AOD, aerosol polarization effect and etc. have been main error sources. Due to these aerosol effects, large number of data retrieved are screened out in quality control, or retrieval errors tend to increase if not screened out, especially in East Asia where aerosol concentrations are fairly high. To reduce these aerosol induced errors, a CO2 retrieval algorithm using the simultaneous TANSO-<span class="hlt">CAI</span> aerosol information is developed. This algorithm adopts AOD and aerosol type information as a priori information from the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> aerosol retrieval algorithm. The CO2 retrieval algorithm based on optimal estimation method and VLIDORT, a vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer model. The CO2 algorithm, developed with various state vectors to find accurate CO2 concentration, shows reasonable results when compared with other dataset. This study concentrates on the validation of retrieved results with the ground-based TCCON measurements in East Asia and the comparison with the previous retrieval from ACOS, NIES, and UoL. Although, the retrieved CO2 concentration is lower than previous results by ppm's, it shows similar trend and high correlation with previous results. Retrieved data and TCCON measurements data are compared at three stations of Tsukuba, Saga, Anmyeondo in East Asia, with the collocation criteria of ±2°in latitude/longitude and ±1 hours of GOSAT passing time. Compared results also show similar trend with good correlation. Based on the TCCON comparison results, bias correction equation is calculated and applied to the East Asia data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=content+AND+based+AND+image+AND+retrieval&pg=2&id=EJ565473','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=content+AND+based+AND+image+AND+retrieval&pg=2&id=EJ565473"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Images.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rasmussen, Edie M.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Focuses on access to digital image collections by means of manual and automatic <span class="hlt">indexing</span>. Contains six sections: (1) Studies of Image Systems and their Use; (2) Approaches to <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Images; (3) Image Attributes; (4) Concept-Based <span class="hlt">Indexing</span>; (5) Content-Based <span class="hlt">Indexing</span>; and (6) Browsing in Image Retrieval. Contains 105 references. (AEF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015M%26PS...50.1512I&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015M%26PS...50.1512I&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">A compound Ca-, Al-rich inclusion from CV3 chondrite Northwest Africa 3118: Implications for understanding processes during <span class="hlt">CAI</span> formation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ivanova, Marina A.; Lorenz, Cyril A.; Krot, Alexander N.; MacPherson, Glenn J.</p> <p>2015-09-01</p> <p>A calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion 3N from the Northwest Africa (NWA) 3118 CV3 carbonaceous chondrite is a unique cm-sized compound object, primarily a forsterite-bearing type B (FoB) <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, that encloses at least 26 smaller <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> of different types, including compact type A (CTA), B, C, and an ultra-refractory inclusion. Relative to typical type A and B <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> found elsewhere, the bulk compositions of the types A and B <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> within 3N more closely match the bulk compositions predicted by equilibrium condensation of a gas of solar composition. Being trapped within the FoB melt may have protected them from melt evaporation that affected most "stand-alone" <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. 3N originated either as an aggregate of many smaller (mostly types A, B, C) <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> plus accreted Fo-bearing material (like an amoeboid olivine aggregate) which experienced partial melting of the whole, or else as a FoB melt droplet that collided with and trapped many smaller solid <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. In the former case, 3N recorded the earliest accretion of pebble-sized bodies known. In the latter case, the presence of a large number of individual refractory inclusions within 3N suggests a very high local density of refractory solids in the immediate region of the host <span class="hlt">CAI</span> during the brief time while it was melted. Collisions would have occurred on time scales of hours at most, assuming a melt solidification interval for the host <span class="hlt">CAI</span> of 300-400 °C (maximum) and a cooling rate of ~10 °C/h.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009GeCoA..73.5100P&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2009GeCoA..73.5100P&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Petrologic study of SJ101, a new forsterite-bearing <span class="hlt">CAI</span> from the Allende CV3 chondrite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Petaev, Michail I.; Jacobsen, Stein B.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The forsterite-bearing Type B (FoB) <span class="hlt">CAI</span> SJ101 consists of three major structural units: (1) light patches of sector-zoned, poikilitic Al-rich clinopyroxene (Cpx) with numerous inclusions of small spinel grains and aggregates and subordinate amounts of Mg-rich melilite (Mel) and anorthite (An) (Sp-Cpx lithology), (2) dark sinuous bands of Al-rich clinopyroxene with large (up to ˜300 × 60 μm) poikilitically enclosed euhedral forsterite (Fo) crystals (Fo-Cpx lithology), and (3) the external Cpx-Sp-An rim overlying the entire inclusion. The two major lithologies are always separated by a transition zone of clinopyroxene poikilitically enclosing both forsterite and spinel. The patches of the Sp-Cpx lithology exhibit significant textural and mineralogical variability that is size-dependent. Small patches typically consist of Cpx and spinel with minor remnants of melilite and/or its alteration products. Large patches contain Mel-An-rich cores with either equigranular-ophitic-subophitic or 'lacy' textures reminiscent of those in Types B or C <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, respectively. All silicates poikilitically enclose numerous spinel grains of identical habit. Both melilite and anorthite gradually disappear toward the boundary with the Fo-Cpx lithology. Neither the evaporation mantle of Al-rich melilite typical of other FoBs nor the Wark-Lovering rim is present. Secondary minerals include grossular, monticellite, magnetite, and a few grains of wollastonite, andradite, and nepheline. Being a rather typical FoB mineralogically and chemically, texturally SJ101 differs from other FoBs in displaying the nearly complete segregation of forsterite from spinel which occur only in the Fo-Cpx and Sp-Cpx lithologies, respectively. The complex, convoluted internal structure of SJ101 suggests that the coarse-grained Sp-An-Mel-Cpx cores and Fo-Cpx lithology represent the precursor materials of FoBs, proto-<span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and Fo-rich accretionary rims. While the inferred chemistry and mineralogy of the Fo-rich rims</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950012911&hterms=Fractionation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DFractionation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19950012911&hterms=Fractionation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3DFractionation"><span id="translatedtitle">Heating during solar nebula formation and Mg isotopic fractionation in precursor grains of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and chondrules</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Sasaki, S.; Nagahara, H.; Kitagami, K.; Nakagawa, Y.</p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>In some Ca-Al-rich inclusion (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) grains, mass-dependent isotopic fractionations of Mg, Si, and O are observed and large Mg isotopic fractionation is interpreted to have been produced by cosmochemical processes such as evaporation and condensation. Mass-dependent Mg isotopic fractionation was found in olivine chondrules of Allende meteorites. Presented is an approximate formula for the temperature of the solar nebula that depends on heliocentric distance and the initial gas distribution. Shock heating during solar nebula formation can cause evaporative fractionation within interstellar grains involved in a gas at the inner zone (a less than 3 AU) of the disk. Alternatively collision of late-accreting gas blobs might cause similar heating if Sigma(sub s) and Sigma are large enough. Since the grain size is small, the solid/gas mass ratio is low and solar (low P(sub O2)), and the ambient gas pressure is low, this heating event could not produce chondrules themselves. Chondrule formation should proceed around the disk midplane after dust grains would grow and sediment to increase the solid/gas ratio there. The heating source there is uncertain, but transient rapid accretion through the disk could release a large amount of heat, which would be observed as FU Orionis events.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16929642','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16929642"><span id="translatedtitle">Organic pollution and salt intrusion in <span class="hlt">Cai</span> Nuoc District, Ca Mau Province, Vietnam.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tho, Nguyen; Vromant, Nico; Hung, Nguyen Thanh; Hens, Luc</p> <p>2006-07-01</p> <p>In Ca Mau, Vietnam, farmers converted from rice to shrimp farming, while ignoring the degradation of the aquatic environment. We assessed the seasonal variations in organic pollution of the surface water and salt intrusion in one district and assessed the difference in chemical characteristics of the surface water of shrimp ponds and canals. Several variables reflecting salinity and organic pollution were measured in the wet and dry season. The results show that in the dry season salinity increased to 37.36-42.73 g l(-1) and COD and suspended solids increased to a maximum of 268.7 mg l(-1) and 1312.0 mg l(-1), respectively. In the wet season salinity values of 8.16 to 10.60 g l(-1) were recorded, indicating that salinity could no longer be washed out completely in this season. It is concluded that salinity and suspended solids in the aquatic environment in the <span class="hlt">Cai</span> Nuoc district are increased by shrimp monoculture, whereas organic pollution is contributed by human population pressure. PMID:16929642</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38...53K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010cosp...38...53K"><span id="translatedtitle">Instrument Status and Level 1 Data Processing of TANSO-FTS and <span class="hlt">CAI</span> on GOSAT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuze, Akihiko; Nakajima, Masakatsu; Suto, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kei</p> <p></p> <p>The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) observes carbon dioxide (CO2 ) and methane (CH4 ) globally from space. It was launched on January 23, 2009 from Tanegashima Space Cen-ter. Since February 7, 2009, the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) and Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) have been continuously operated. They acquire global data every three days. For the first six months after the launch, on-orbit function, performance, calibration, and validation have been checked-out. The brief summary of instrument design, pre-launch test results, observation plan (grid and sun glint observation and special target mode), onboard calibration schemes, and the initial on-orbit results of radiometric, geometric and spectroscopic performances are presented. TANSO-FTS Level 1A and 1B data processing algorithm and its updates on the ground are also presented. In addition we will show recent on-orbit instrument status such as pointing accuracy, interferogram quality, and radiometric accuracy and vicarious calibration results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17033296','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17033296"><span id="translatedtitle">Cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ostlund, Richard E</p> <p>2002-03-01</p> <p>Cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994Metic..29..461E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1994Metic..29..461E"><span id="translatedtitle">Efremovka E49: A compact type-A <span class="hlt">CAI</span> containing a partially molten spinel-melilite-diopside xenolith</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>El Goresy, A.; Zinner, E. K.</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>Eframovka E49 is a triangular 2-mm segment from a Compact Type A (CTA) inclusion with large portions of intact core and rim sequence. It is probably a fragment from an originally round approximately equal to 4-mm Ca-Al rich Inclusion (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>). The core consists of two lithologically different assemblages: (1) The major portion of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> contains melilite sprinkled with rare spinel, perovskite, and the new Ca-Ti silicate. It is covered by a six-layer rim consisting of (from the interior outward): two layers of Zr- and Y-rich perovskite, spinel, Al-diopside, diopside, and forsteritic olivine. (2) A 650-micron wide complex xenolith contains coarse spinel, melilite, perovskite, and metal in its interior, surrounded by a broad shell of Al-diopside, diopside, and minor fassaite and anorthite, and in the rim fassaite yields Al-diopside yields diopside. Coarse spinels abundantly display resorbtion outlines and some of the grains have been broken down to several amoeboid fragments floating in the eutectic assemblage. All these textures are evidence of local melting of the xenolith followed by fast cooling. No such features are observed in the host <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. Since melting is confined to the xenolith, the melt event must have predated its capture into the core of E49. Ion microprobe trace-element studies reveal distinct differences between Rare Earth Element (REE) abundances in perovskites in the xenolith and the host <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. Perovskites in the xenolith display REE patterns with prominent Yb and small Ce excesses and large Eu depletions. Perovskites in the xenolith show higher abundances of Nb, Zr, and V. Magnesium in xenolith and the host is almost unfractionated. Excesses of Mg-26 are found both in the xenolith and the host with data points plotting along a line with a slope of 4 x 105. This is in accord with the petrographic interpretation and indicates that the melting of the xenolith and its capture in E49 took place early.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006IJCEM...7...41C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006IJCEM...7...41C"><span id="translatedtitle">Numerical Investigation Into Effect of Fuel Injection Timing on <span class="hlt">CAI</span>/HCCI Combustion in a Four-Stroke GDI Engine</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cao, Li; Zhao, Hua; Jiang, Xi; Kalian, Navin</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>The Controlled Auto-Ignition (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) combustion, also known as Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), was achieved by trapping residuals with early exhaust valve closure in conjunction with direct injection. Multi-cycle 3D engine simulations have been carried out for parametric study on four different injection timings in order to better understand the effects of injection timings on in-cylinder mixing and <span class="hlt">CAI</span> combustion. The full engine cycle simulation including complete gas exchange and combustion processes was carried out over several cycles in order to obtain the stable cycle for analysis. The combustion models used in the present study are the Shell auto-ignition model and the characteristic-time combustion model, which were modified to take the high level of EGR into consideration. A liquid sheet breakup spray model was used for the droplet breakup processes. The analyses show that the injection timing plays an important role in affecting the in-cylinder air/fuel mixing and mixture temperature, which in turn affects the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> combustion and engine performance.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850054072&hterms=Plus+prizes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DTitle%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPlus%2Bprizes','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19850054072&hterms=Plus+prizes&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DTitle%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3DPlus%2Bprizes"><span id="translatedtitle">Willy: A prize noble Ur-Fremdling - Its history and implications for the formation of Fremdlinge and <span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Armstrong, J. T.; El Goresy, A.; Wasserburg, G. J.</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>The structure and composition of Willy, a 150-micron-diameter Fremdling in <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 5241 from the Allende meteorite, are investigated using optical, secondary-electron, and electron-backscatter microscopy and electron-microprobe analysis. The results are presented in diagrams, maps, tables, graphs, and micrographs and compared with those for other Allende Fremdlinge. Willy is found to have a concentric-zone structure comprising a complex porous core of magnetite, metal, sulfide, scheelite, and other minor phases; a compact magnetite-apatite mantle; a thin (20 microns or less) reaction-assemblage zone; and a dense outer rim of fassaite with minor spinel. A multistage formation sequence involving changes in T and fO2 and preceding the introduction of Willy into the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (which itself preceded <span class="hlt">CAI</span> spinel and silicate formation) is postulated, and it is inferred from the apparent lack of post-capture recrystallization that Willy has not been subjected to temperatures in excess of 600 C and may represent the precursor material for many other Fremdlinge.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_9");'>9</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li class="active"><span>11</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_11 --> <div id="page_12" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="221"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459365','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4459365"><span id="translatedtitle">Crystal structures of coordination polymers from <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2 and proline</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Lamberts, Kevin; Englert, Ulli</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Completing our reports concerning the reaction products from calcium halides and the amino acid proline, two different solids were found for the reaction of l- and dl-proline with <span class="hlt">CaI</span>2. The enanti­opure amino acid yields the one-dimensional coordination polymer catena-poly[[aqua-μ3-l-proline-tetra-μ2-l-proline-dicalcium] tetra­iodide 1.7-hydrate], {[Ca2(C5H9NO2)5(H2O)]I4·1.7H2O}n, (1), with two independent Ca2+ cations in characteristic seven- and eightfold coordination. Five symmetry-independent zwitterionic l-proline mol­ecules bridge the metal sites into a cationic polymer. Racemic proline forms with Ca2+ cations heterochiral chains of the one-dimensional polymer catena-poly[[di­aquadi-μ2-dl-proline-calcium] diiodide], {[Ca(C5H9NO2)2(H2O)2]I2}n, (2). The centrosymmetric structure is built by one Ca2+ cation that is bridged towards its symmetry equivalents by two zwitterionic proline mol­ecules. In both structures, the iodide ions remain non-coordinating and hydrogen bonds are formed between these counter-anions, the amino groups, coordinating and co-crystallized water mol­ecules. While the overall composition of (1) and (2) is in line with other structures from calcium halides and amino acids, the diversity of the carboxyl­ate coordination geometry is quite surprising. PMID:26090148</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611347K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014EGUGA..1611347K"><span id="translatedtitle">Developments of global greenhouse gas retrieval algorithm using Aerosol information from GOSAT-<span class="hlt">CAI</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Woogyung; kim, Jhoon; Jung, Yeonjin; lee, Hanlim; Boesch, Hartmut</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Human activities have resulted in increasing atmospheric CO2 concentration since the beginning of Industrial Revolution to reaching CO2 concentration over 400 ppm at Mauna Loa observatory for the first time. (IPCC, 2007). However, our current knowledge of carbon cycle is still insufficient due to lack of observations. Satellite measurement is one of the most effective approaches to improve the accuracy of carbon source and sink estimates by monitoring the global CO2 distributions with high spatio-temporal resolutions (Rayner and O'Brien, 2001; Houweling et al., 2004). Currently, GOSAT has provided valuable information to observe global CO2 trend, enables our extended understanding of CO2 and preparation for future satellite plan. However, due to its physical limitation, GOSAT CO2 retrieval results have low spatial resolution and cannot cover wide area. Another obstruction of GOSAT CO2 retrieval is low data availability mainly due to contamination by clouds and aerosols. Especially, in East Asia, one of the most important aerosol source areas, it is hard to have successful retrieval result due to high aerosol concentration. The main purpose of this study is to improve data availability of GOSAT CO2 retrieval. In this study, current state of CO2 retrieval algorithm development is introduced and preliminary results are shown. This algorithm is based on optimal estimation method and utilized VLIDORT the vector discrete ordinate radiative transfer model. This proto type algorithm, developed from various combinations of state vectors to find accurate CO2 concentration, shows reasonable result. Especially the aerosol retrieval algorithm using GOSAT-<span class="hlt">CAI</span> measurements, which provide aerosol information for the same area with GOSAT-FTS measurements, are utilized as input data of CO2 retrieval. Other CO2 retrieval algorithms use chemical transport model result or climatologically expected values as aerosol information which is the main reason of low data availability. With</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......222B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1998PhDT.......222B"><span id="translatedtitle">An investigative study into the effectiveness of using computer-aided instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) as a laboratory component of college-level biology: A case study</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Barrett, Joan Beverly</p> <p></p> <p>Community colleges serve the most diverse student populations in higher education. They consist of non-traditional, part-time, older, intermittent, and mobile students of different races, ethnic backgrounds, language preferences, physical and mental abilities, and learning style preferences. Students who are academically challenged may have diverse learning characteristics that are not compatible with the more traditional approaches to the delivery of instruction. With this need come new ways of solving the dilemma, such as Computer-aided Instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>). This case study investigated the use of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> as a laboratory component of college-level biology in a small, rural community college setting. The intent was to begin to fill a void that seems to exist in the literature regarding the role of the faculty in the development and use of <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. In particular, the investigator was seeking to understand the practice and its effectiveness, especially in helping the under prepared student. The case study approach was chosen to examine a specific phenomenon within a single institution. Ethnographic techniques, such as interviewing, documentary analysis, life's experiences, and participant observations were used to collect data about the phenomena being studied. Results showed that the faculty was primarily self-motivated and self-taught in their use of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> as a teaching and learning tool. The importance of faculty leadership and collegiality was evident. Findings showed the faculty confident that expectations of helping students who have difficulties with mathematical concepts have been met and that <span class="hlt">CAI</span> is becoming the most valuable of learning tools. In a traditional college classroom, or practice, time is the constant (semesters) and competence is the variable. In the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> laboratory time became the variable and competence the constant. The use of <span class="hlt">CAI</span> also eliminated hazardous chemicals that were routinely used in the more traditional lab. Outcomes showed that annual savings</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeCoA.153..183F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015GeCoA.153..183F"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence for an early nitrogen isotopic evolution in the solar nebula from volatile analyses of a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> from the CV3 chondrite NWA 8616</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Füri, Evelyn; Chaussidon, Marc; Marty, Bernard</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>Nitrogen and noble gas (Ne-Ar) abundances and isotope ratios, determined by CO2 laser extraction static mass spectrometry analysis, as well as Al-Mg and O isotope data from secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses, are reported for a type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusion (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) from the CV3 chondrite NWA 8616. The high (26Al/27Al)i ratio of (5.06 ± 0.50) × 10-5 dates the last melting event of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> at 39-99+109ka after "time zero", limiting the period during which high-temperature exchanges between the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and the nebular gas could have occurred to a very short time interval. Partial isotopic exchange with a 16O-poor reservoir resulted in Δ17O > -5‰ for melilite and anorthite, whereas spinel and Al-Ti-pyroxene retain the inferred original 16O-rich signature of the solar nebula (Δ17O ⩽ -20‰). The low 20Ne/22Ne (⩽0.83) and 36Ar/38Ar (⩽0.75) ratios of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> rule out the presence of any trapped planetary or solar noble gases. Cosmogenic 21Ne and 38Ar abundances are consistent with a cosmic ray exposure (CRE) age of ∼14 to 20 Ma, assuming CR fluxes similar to modern ones, without any evidence for pre-irradiation of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> before incorporation into the meteorite parent body. Strikingly, the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> contains 1.4-3.4 ppm N with a δ15N value of +8‰ to +30‰. Even after correcting the measured δ15N values for cosmogenic 15N produced in situ, the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> is highly enriched in 15N compared to the protosolar nebula (δ15NPSN = -383 ± 8‰; Marty et al., 2011), implying that the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-forming region was contaminated by 15N-rich material within the first 0.15 Ma of Solar System history, or, alternatively, that the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> was ejected into the outer Solar System where it interacted with a 15N-rich reservoir.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.374...11S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013E%26PSL.374...11S"><span id="translatedtitle">Constraints on 10Be and 41Ca distribution in the early solar system from 26Al and 10Be studies of Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Srinivasan, Gopalan; Chaussidon, Marc</p> <p>2013-07-01</p> <p>Three refractory coarse grained <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from the Efremovka CV3 chondrite, one (E65) previously shown to have formed with live 41Ca, were studied by ion microprobe for their 26Al-26Mg and 10Be-10B systematic in order to better understand the origin of 10Be. The high precision Al-Mg data and the inferred 26Al/27Al values attest that the precursors of the three <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> evolved in the solar nebula over a period of few hundred thousand years before last melting-crystallization events. The initial 10Be/9Be ratios and δ10B values defined by the 10Be isochrons for the three Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> are similar within errors. The <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 10Be abundance in published data underscores the large range for initial 10Be/9Be ratios. This is contrary to the relatively small range of 26Al/27Al variations in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> around the canonical ratio. Two models that could explain the origin of this large 10Be/9Be range are assessed from the collateral variations predicted for the initial δ10B values: (i) closed system decay of 10Be from a "canonical" 10Be/9Be ratio and (ii) formation of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from a mixture of solid precursors and nebula gas irradiated during up to a few hundred thousand years. The second scenario is shown to be the most consistent with the data. This shows that the major fraction of 10Be in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> was produced by irradiation of refractory grains, while contributions of galactic cosmic rays trapping and early solar wind irradiation are less dominant. The case for 10Be production by solar cosmic rays irradiation of solid refractory precursors poses a conundrum for 41Ca because the latter is easily produced by irradiation and should be more abundant than what is observed in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. 10Be production by irradiation from solar energetic particles requires high 41Ca abundance in early solar system, however, this is not observed in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15473646','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15473646"><span id="translatedtitle">Genotypic differences in effects of cadmium exposure on plant growth and contents of cadmium and elements in 14 cultivars of bai <span class="hlt">cai</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Sun, Guang-Wen; Fang, Xue-Zhi; Qian, Qiong-Qiu; Yang, Xiao-E</p> <p>2004-05-01</p> <p>Fourteen cultivars of bai <span class="hlt">cai</span> (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis var. communis) were grown in the nutrient solutions containing 0-0.5 microg mL(-1) of cadmium (Cd) to investigate genotypic differences in the effects of Cd exposure on the plant growth and uptake and distribution of Cd in bai <span class="hlt">cai</span> plants. The Cd exposure significantly reduced the dry and fresh weights of roots and shoots, the dry weight ratio of shoot/root (S/R), total biomass, and chlorophyll content (SPAD value). Cd concentrations in bai <span class="hlt">cai</span> ranged from 13.3 to 74.9 microg g(-1) DW in shoots and from 163.1 to 574.7 microg g(-1) DW in roots under Cd exposure, respectively. The considerable genotypic differences of Cd concentrations and accumulations in both shoots and roots were observed among 14 bai <span class="hlt">cai</span> cultivars. Moreover, Cd mainly accumulated in the roots. Cd also caused the changes of uptake and distribution of nutrients in bai <span class="hlt">cai</span> and under the influence of cadmium, the concentration of potassium (K) decreased in shoot and increased in root. However, the concentrations of magnesium (Mg), phosphorus (P), manganese (Mn), boron (B), and iron (Fe) increased in shoots and decreased in roots. In addition, Cd exposure resulted in an increase in calcium (Ca), sulphur (S), and zinc (Zn) concentrations in both shoots and roots but had no significant effects on the whole uptake of the examined mineral nutrients except for S. PMID:15473646</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1078/','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2005/1078/"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermal maturity patterns (<span class="hlt">CAI</span> and %Ro) in the Ordovician and Devonian rocks of the Appalachian basin in West Virginia</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Repetski, John E.; Ryder, Robert T.; Avary, Katharine Lee; Trippi, Michael H.</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p>The objective of this study is to enhance existing thermal maturity maps in West Virginia by establishing: 1) new subsurface <span class="hlt">CAI</span> data points for the Ordovician and Devonian and 2) new %Ro and Rock Eval subsurface data points for Middle and Upper Devonian black shale units. Thermal maturity values for the Ordovician and Devonian strata are of major interest because they contain the source rocks for most of the oil and natural gas resources in the basin. Thermal maturity patterns of the Middle Ordovician Trenton Limestone are evaluated here because they closely approximate those of the overlying Ordovician Utica Shale that is believed to be the source rock for the regional oil and gas accumulation in Lower Silurian sandstones (Ryder and others, 1998) and for natural gas fields in fractured dolomite reservoirs of the Ordovician Black River-Trenton Limestones. Improved <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-based thermal maturity maps of the Ordovician are important to identify areas of optimum gas generation from the Utica Shale and to provide constraints for interpreting the origin of oil and gas in the Lower Silurian regional accumulation and Ordovician Black River-Trenton fields. Thermal maturity maps of the Devonian will better constrain burial history-petroleum generation models of the Utica Shale, as well as place limitations on the origin of regional oil and gas accumulations in Upper Devonian sandstone and Middle to Upper Devonian black shale.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4177982','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4177982"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">INDEXING</span> MECHANISM</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kock, L.J.</p> <p>1959-09-22</p> <p>A device is presented for loading and unloading fuel elements containing material fissionable by neutrons of thermal energy. The device comprises a combination of mechanical features Including a base, a lever pivotally attached to the base, an <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> plate on the base parallel to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed In rows, each aperture having a keyway, an <span class="hlt">Index</span> pin movably disposed to the plane of lever rotation and having a plurality of apertures, the apertures being disposed in rows, each aperture having a keyway, an <span class="hlt">index</span> pin movably disposed on the lever normal to the plane rotation, a key on the pin, a sleeve on the lever spaced from and parallel to the <span class="hlt">index</span> pin, a pair of pulleys and a cable disposed between them, an open collar rotatably attached to the sleeve and linked to one of the pulleys, a pin extending from the collar, and a bearing movably mounted in the sleeve and having at least two longitudinal grooves in the outside surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Ocgy...55..339L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015Ocgy...55..339L"><span id="translatedtitle">Dissolved, particulate, and sedimentary organic matter in the <span class="hlt">Cai</span> River basin (Nha Trang Bay of the South China Sea)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Lobus, N. V.; Peresypkin, V. I.; Shulga, N. A.; Drozdova, A. N.; Gusev, E. S.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>The data were obtained on the content of organic carbon in the water, particulate matter, and bottom sediments of the <span class="hlt">Cai</span> River and its tributaries (the basin of Nha Trang Bay). The surface waters of the considered basin contained OM mainly in a dissolved form (DOC/POC = 3). The fraction of Corg in particulate matter amounted to 4.9% on average. Based on the analysis of n-alkanes in bottom sediments, three OM types—autochthonous, mixed, and mainly terrigenous genesis—were distinguished. These types are alternated in series in the lengthwise profile of the river. All the OM types are in close relation to the peculiarities of sedimentation and hydrodynamics of the waters in the treated aquatic area. The geochemical indices (Pr/Ph, OEP17-19, and CPI values) represent the influence of oxidative conditions on OM formation and the intense microbiological transformation of its autochthonous component.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4833730','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/4833730"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> ANALYZER</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.</p> <p>1961-11-14</p> <p>A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED267762.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED267762.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">The Effects of Video-Only, <span class="hlt">CAI</span> Only, and Interactive Video Instructional Systems on Learner Performance and Attitude: An Exploratory Study.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Dalton, David W.; Hannafin, Michael J.</p> <p></p> <p>This study compared the effects of interactive video instruction on learner performance and attitude with the effects of conventional computer assisted instruction (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) and stand-alone video. Based on pretest scores, 134 junior high industrial arts students designated as relatively high or low in prior achievement were randomly assigned to one of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26522496','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26522496"><span id="translatedtitle">The contribution of the androgen receptor (AR) in human spatial learning and memory: A study in women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (<span class="hlt">CAIS</span>).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Mueller, S C; Verwilst, T; Van Branteghem, A; T'Sjoen, G; Cools, M</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>Few studies have examined the impact of androgen insensitivity on human spatial learning and memory. In the present study, we tested 11 women with complete androgen insensitivity syndrome (<span class="hlt">CAIS</span>), a rare genetic disorder characterized by complete absence of AR activity, and compared their performance against 20 comparison males and 19 comparison females on a virtual analog of the Morris Water Maze task. The results replicated a main sex effect showing that men relative to women were faster in finding the hidden platform and had reduced heading error. Furthermore, findings indicated that mean performance of women with <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> was between control women and control men, though the differences were not statistically significant. Effect size estimates (and corresponding confidence intervals) of spatial learning trials showed little difference between women with <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> and control women but <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> women differed from men, but not women, on two variables, latency to find the platform and first-move latency. No differences between groups were present during visible platform trials or the probe trial, a measure of spatial memory. Moreover, groups also did not differ on estimates of IQ and variability of performance. The findings are discussed in relation to androgen insensitivity in human spatial learning and memory. PMID:26522496</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LPI....40.2495W','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009LPI....40.2495W"><span id="translatedtitle">Evidence of Disturbance in the 26Al-26Mg Systematics of the Efremovka E60 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: Implications for the High-Resolution Chronology of the Early Solar System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wadhwa, M.; Janney, P. E.; Krot, A. N.</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>We report results of a laser ablation MC-ICPMS study of the Efremovka E60 <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. Our data indicate that the 26Al-26Mg systematics in E60 are disturbed and we present the chronological implications of this finding.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008LPI....39.2486D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008LPI....39.2486D"><span id="translatedtitle">In-Situ UV-Laser Fluorination Oxygen Isotopic Analyses of an Efremovka <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and Matrix: Implications for Oxygen Isotopic Exchange in the Solar Nebula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Dyl, K. A.; Young, E. D.; Krot, A. N.</p> <p>2008-03-01</p> <p>Using a UV-laser ablation fluorination system, we obtained high-precision in situ data for E44 and surrounding matrix. The 16O-rich anorthite and solid-state diffusion calculations indicate that this process may be important to the evolution of oxygen in this <span class="hlt">CAI</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....9292C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....9292C"><span id="translatedtitle">B and Mg isotopic variations in Leoville mrs-06 type B1 <span class="hlt">cai</span>:origin of 10Be and 26Al</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chaussidon, M.; Robert, F.; Russel, S. S.; Gounelle, M.; Ash, R. D.</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>The finding [1-3] in Ca-Al-rich refractory inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) of primitive chondrites of traces of the in situ decay of radioactive 10Be (half-life 1.5Myr) indicates that irradiation of the protosolar nebula by the young Sun in its T-Tauri phase has produced significant amounts of the Li-Be-B elements. This irradiation may have produced also some or all of the short-lived 26Al (half-life 0.7Myr) and 41Ca (half-life 0.1Myr) previously detected in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. To constrain the origin of 10Be and 10Al it is important to look for coupled variations in the 10Be/9Be and 26Al/27Al ratios in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> and to understand the processes responsible for these variations (e.g. variations in the fluences of irradiation, secondary perturbations of the <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, ...) We have thus studied the Li and B isotopic compositions and the Be/Li and Be/B concentration ratios in one <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (MRS-06) from the Leoville CV3 chondrite in which large variations of the Mg isotopic compositions showing both the in situ decay of 26Al and the secondary redistribution of Mg isotopes have been observed [4]. The results show large variations for the Li and B isotopic compositions (^7Li/^6Li ranging from 11.02±0.21 to 11.82±0.07, and 10B/11B ratios ranging from 0.2457±0.0053 to 0.2980±0.0085). The ^7Li/^6Li ratio tend to decrease towards the rim of the inclusion. The 10B/11B ratios are positively correlated with the ^9Be/11B ratios indicating the in situ decay of 10Be. However perturbations of the 10Be/B system are observed. They would correspond to an event which occurred approximately 2Myr after the formation of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and the irradiation of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> precursors which is responsible for the 10Be observed in the core of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. These perturbations seem compatible with those observed for the 26Al/Mg system but they might be due to an irradiation of the already-formed, isolated <span class="hlt">CAI</span> which would have resulted in increased 10Be/^9Be ratios and low ^7Li/^6Li ratios in the margin of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>. [1] McKeegan K. D. et al. (2000</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070009991','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20070009991"><span id="translatedtitle">Isotopic Measurements in <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with the Nanosims: Implications to the understanding of the Formation process of Ca, Al-Rich Inclusions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Ito, M.; Messenger, S.; Walker, Robert M.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>Ca, Al-rich Inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) preserve evidence of thermal events that they experienced during their formation in the early solar system. Most <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from CV and CO chondrites are characterized by large variations in O-isotopic compositions of primary minerals, with spinel, hibonite, and pyroxene being more O-16-rich than melilite and anorthite, with delta 17, O-18 = approx. -40%o (DELTA O-17 = delta O-17 - 0.52 x delta O-18 = approx. - 20%o ). These anomalous compositions cannot be accounted for by standard mass dependent fractionation and diffusive process of those minerals. It requires the presence of an anomalous oxygen reservoir of nucleosynthetic origin or mass independent fractionations before the formation of <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> in the early solar system. The CAMECA NanoSIMS is a new generation ion microprobe that offers high sensitivity isotopic measurements with sub 100 nm spatial resolution. The NanoSIMS has significantly improved abilities in the study of presolar grains in various kind of meteorites and the decay products of extinct nuclides in ancient solar system matter. This instrument promises significant improvements over other conventional ion probes in the precision isotopic characterization of sub-micron scales. We report the results of our first O isotopic measurements of various <span class="hlt">CAI</span> minerals from EK1-6-3 and 7R19-1(a) utilizing the JSC NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe. We evaluate the measurement conditions, the instrumental mass fractionation factor (IMF) for O isotopic measurement and the accuracy of the isotopic ratio through the analysis of a San Carlos olivine standard and <span class="hlt">CAI</span> sample of 7R19-1(a).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=257042','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=257042"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of Spectral Indices for Crop Residue Cover Estimation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The quantification of surficial crop residue (non-photosynthetic vegetation) cover is important for assessing agricultural tillage practices, rangeland health, and brush fire hazards. The Cellulose <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> <span class="hlt">Index</span> (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue <span class="hlt">Index</span> (SINDRI) are two...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002GeCoA..66.1459E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2002GeCoA..66.1459E"><span id="translatedtitle">Efremovka 101.1: a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> with ultrarefractory REE patterns and enormous enrichments of Sc, Zr, and Y in Fassaite and Perovskite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>El Goresy, A.; Zinner, E.; Matsunami, S.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Lin, Y.; Nazarov, M.</p> <p>2002-04-01</p> <p>Inclusion 101.1 from the CV3 carbonaceous chondrite Efremovka is a compact Type A Ca-Al-rich inclusion (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) highly enriched in ultrarefractory (UR) oxides. It is the first complete <span class="hlt">CAI</span> with a UR rare earth element (REE) pattern found in a CV3 chondrite. The inclusion is petrographically complex and was formed in a multistage process. It consists of several lithologically unrelated units. The core contains abundant Y- and Zr-perovskite, Sc- and Zr-rich fassaite, and metallic FeNi enclosed in melilite. All mineral species (except spinel) in all lithological units exhibit the same basic UR REE pattern. Four different populations of perovskites are distinguished by different Y/Zr ratios. A few of the perovskites have Y/Zr ratios similar to those obtained from crystal/liquid fractionation experiments. Perovskites from the other three populations have either chondritic, lower than chondritic Y/Zr ratios or extremely low Zr contents. Ca isotopic ratios differ among three perovskites from different populations, demonstrating a variety of sources and formational processes. Most fassaites crystallized in situ through reaction between the <span class="hlt">CAI</span> liquid and preexisting perovskites. This process induced redistribution of Zr, Y, Sc, and V between perovskite and fassaite, thus overprinting the original abundances in perovskite. Fassaite reaction rims around FeNi metals are also encountered. They are enriched in V, which was gained from the metal through oxidation of V in metal during fassaite crystallization. The relative abundances of Zr, Y, and Sc in perovskites are complementary to the abundances of these elements in Sc- and Zr-fassaite, indicating subsolidus partitioning of these elements between the two phases. Perovskites are enriched in Y and depleted in Sc and Zr in comparison to fassaites. The core contains two complete captured <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>, several sinuous fragments, and fine-grained polygonal refractory fragments. An assemblage of andradite-wollastonite-hedenbergite and pure</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/880103','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/880103"><span id="translatedtitle">Distributed Bragg Reflectors With Reduced Optical <span class="hlt">Absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Klem, John F.</p> <p>2005-08-16</p> <p>A new class of distributed Bragg reflectors has been developed. These distributed Bragg reflectors comprise interlayers positioned between sets of high-<span class="hlt">index</span> and low-<span class="hlt">index</span> quarter-wave plates. The presence of these interlayers is to reduce photon <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resulting from spatially indirect photon-assisted electronic transitions between the high-<span class="hlt">index</span> and low-<span class="hlt">index</span> quarter wave plates. The distributed Bragg reflectors have applications for use in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers for use at 1.55 .mu.m and at other wavelengths of interest.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2233515','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2233515"><span id="translatedtitle">The development and evaluation of an adaptable computer aided instruction(<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) program for acquiring problem solving skills in biochemistry on the WWW: The "BioChem Thinker".</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hershkovitz, B.</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>BioChem Thinker is a <span class="hlt">CAI</span> program that was developed to enhance problem solving skills and ability to integrate knowledge in biochemistry for medical and dental students. The program runs on a WWW browser. BioChem Thinker is adaptable, it enables the teacher to create a new problem solving assignment, or edit existing assignments without in-depth knowledge of computer programming. This provides teachers with greater independence and flexibility so as to be able to adapt the program to their own course requirements. The program was implemented and evaluated in the 3rd year biochemistry course of The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School. The tool used to develop Biochem Thinker can be utilized to develop similar <span class="hlt">CAI</span> in other biomedical areas. PMID:9357717</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_10");'>10</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li class="active"><span>12</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_12 --> <div id="page_13" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="241"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160002232','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160002232"><span id="translatedtitle">New Petrology, Mineral Chemistry and Stable MG Isotope Compositions of an Allende <span class="hlt">CAI</span>: EK-459-7-2</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Jeffcoat, C. R.; Kerekgyarto, A. G.; Lapen, T. J.; Righter, M.; Simon, J. I.; Ross, D. K.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) are the key to understanding physical and chemical conditions in the nascent solar nebula. These inclusions have the oldest radiometric ages of solar system materials and are composed of phases that are predicted to condense early from a gas of solar composition. Thus, their chemistry and textures record conditions and processes in the earliest stages of development of the solar nebula. Type B inclusions are typically larger and more coarse grained than other types with substantial evidence that many of them were at least partially molten. Type B inclusions are further subdivided into Type B1 (possess thick melilite mantle) and Type B2 (lack melilite mantle). Despite being extensively studied, the origin of the melilite mantles of Type B1 inclusions remains uncertain. We present petrologic and chemical data for a Type B inclusion, EK-459-7-2, that bears features found in both Type B1 and B2 inclusions and likely represents an intermediate between the two types. Detailed studies of more of these intermediate objects may help to constrain models for Type B1 rim formation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7474E..0IK','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7474E..0IK"><span id="translatedtitle">On-orbit performance and level 1 data processing of TANSO-FTS and <span class="hlt">CAI</span> on GOSAT</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuze, Akihiko; Suto, Hiroshi; Shiomi, Kei; Nakajima, Masakatsu; Hamazaki, Takashi</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) monitors carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) globally from space. It is a joint project of Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), Ministry of the Environment (MOE) and National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES). GOSAT is placed in a sun-synchronous orbit of 666km and 12:48 local time, with an inclination angle of 98 deg. It was launched on January 23, 2009 from Tanegashima Space Center. There are two instruments on GOSAT. The Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observation Fourier- Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) detects the Short wave infrared (SWIR) reflected on the earth's surface as well as the thermal infrared (TIR) radiated from the ground and the atmosphere. TANSO-FTS is capable of detecting wide spectral coverage; three narrow bands (0.76, 1.6, and 2 μm) and a wide band (5.5-14.3 μm) with 0.27 cm-1 spectral resolution. The TANSO Cloud and Aerosol Imager (TANSO-<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) is a radiometer of ultraviolet (UV), visible, and SWIR to correct cloud and aerosol interference. For three months after the launch, the on-orbit function and performance have been checked out. Now level 1A (raw interferogram) and level 2B (spectra) are now being processed and provided regularly with calibration data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4518292','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4518292"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-<span class="hlt">index</span> semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015NatCo...6E7591K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015NatCo...6E7591K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L.</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-<span class="hlt">index</span> semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26184335','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26184335"><span id="translatedtitle">Creating semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Kim, Soo Jin; Fan, Pengyu; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The optical properties of semiconductors are typically considered intrinsic and fixed. Here we leverage the rapid developments in the field of optical metamaterials to create ultrathin semiconductor metafilms with designer <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. We show how such metafilms can be constructed by placing one or more types of high-<span class="hlt">index</span> semiconductor antennas into a dense array with subwavelength spacings. It is argued that the large <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross-section of semiconductor antennas and their weak near-field coupling open a unique opportunity to create strongly absorbing metafilms whose spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties directly reflect those of the individual antennas. Using experiments and simulations, we demonstrate that near-unity <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at one or more target wavelengths of interest can be achieved in a sub-50-nm-thick metafilm using judiciously sized and spaced Ge nanobeams. The ability to create semiconductor metafilms with custom <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra opens up new design strategies for planar optoelectronic devices and solar cells. PMID:26184335</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9330E..1DW','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015SPIE.9330E..1DW"><span id="translatedtitle">Computed tomography of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> by low-coherence interferometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Wang, Yi; Ma, Zhenhe; Zhou, Hongxian</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present a 3D imaging system for simultaneously imaging the distributions of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> using a transmission Fourier-domain low-coherence interferometer. The forward-scattering light travelling through a sample interferes with a reference light beam. The projections of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> within the sample are calculated from measured interference fringes. We acquire the projections at sufficient angular views and reconstruct the distributions of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> using the filter back-projection algorithm. The proposed method is experimentally verified by using a plastic tube phantom.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28Q.344E','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993Metic..28Q.344E"><span id="translatedtitle">Efremovka 101.1: A Primitive <span class="hlt">CAI</span> with Superrefractory REE Patterns and Enormous Enrichments of Sc, Zr, and Y in Fassaite and Perovskite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>El Goresy, A.; Zinner, E. K.; Matsunami, S.; Palme, H.; Spettel, B.; Lin, Y.; Nazarov, M.</p> <p>1993-07-01</p> <p>A fragment (30 mg) consisting of two inclusions (101.1 and 101.2) was separated from the Efremovka (CV3) meteorite. 101.1 is an unusual Type A <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, whereas 101.2 consists of Cr-spinel and fassaite. INAA of the whole fragment revealed 16% MgO reflecting significant contributions from 101.2. Refractory lithophile elements in the bulk fragment have CI-enrichment factors of ~14 with two times enrichment factors for Ca, Eu, and Yb. <span class="hlt">CAI</span> 101.1 (1.6 mm) contains more than 90% gehlenitic melilite (Ak(sub)1- Ak(sub)32) in its core. It is surrounded by a 5 layer rim sequence (~40 micrometers thick) consisting of spinel -->Al- diopside + fassaite (<= 0.7% Sc2O3) -->forsterite (Fo(sub)97- Fo(sub)100) --> diopside --> forsterite. Two small complete <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with a two layer sequence (diopside + anorthite) are contained within the core. Numerous layered sinuous inclusions presumably rim sequence fragments also consisting of diopside + anorthite, are locally crowded in the core. The melilite core is sprinkled with fassaite, perovskite, FeNi, and OsRu-rich metal blebs. Fassaite grains (<= 30 micrometers) contain enormous concentrations in Sc (up to 12.9% Sc2O3) and Zr (up to 5.4% ZrO2). Fassaite rims around FeNi blebs are rich in V (up to 5.4% V2O3) and are zoned with decreasing Sc-, Zr-, and V-concents from the metal cores to the outer fassaite rims. Sc2O3 and ZrO2 concentrations in fassaite display a positive correlation with a correlation coeffient of 0.88. This coherent behavior is a result of a complex cation substitution involving Mg, Ti, Sc, Zr, and V. A coupled substitution is demonstrated by the excellent linear correlation between Mg^2++Ti^4+(y) and Sc^3++Zr^4++Ti^3++V^3+(x) satisfying the equation y = 0.70-0.66x and having a linear regression coefficient of 0.84. Ti^3+/Ti^tot varies between 0.27 and 1. In contrast to fassaites, perovskites are generally depleted in Sc and Zr and enriched in Y (<=1.4% Y2O3). The assemblage andradite+wollastonite+ Fe^degree/or FeNi metal was</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fuzzy+AND+measure+AND+theory&id=ED032915','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=fuzzy+AND+measure+AND+theory&id=ED032915"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Consistency and Quality.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Zunde, Pranas; Dexter, Margaret E.</p> <p></p> <p>A measure of <span class="hlt">indexing</span> consistency is developed based on the concept of 'fuzzy sets'. It assigns a higher consistency value if <span class="hlt">indexers</span> agree on the more important terms than if they agree on less important terms. Measures of the quality of an <span class="hlt">indexer</span>'s work and exhaustivity of <span class="hlt">indexing</span> are also proposed. Experimental data on <span class="hlt">indexing</span> consistency…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyS...91d3001G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhyS...91d3001G"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced squeezing by <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grünwald, P.; Vogel, W.</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> is usually expected to be detrimental to quantum coherence effects. However, there have been few studies into the situation for complex <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. We consider the resonance fluorescence of excitons in a semiconductor quantum well. The creation of excitons requires <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the incoming pump-laser light. Thus, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum of the medium acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. Surprisingly, <span class="hlt">absorption</span> can even improve quantum effects, as is demonstrated for the squeezing of the resonance fluorescence of the quantum-well system. This effect can be explained by an improved phase matching due to <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">D-xylose <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003606.htm D-xylose <span class="hlt">absorption</span> To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. D-xylose <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is a laboratory test to determine ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=228416','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=228416"><span id="translatedtitle">Improved Remotely-Sensed Estimates of Crop Residue Cover by Incorporating Soils Information</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Remote sensing allows for the rapid determination of crop residue cover. The Cellulose <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> <span class="hlt">Index</span> (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) has been shown to more accurately estimate residue cover and non-photosynthetic vegetation than other indices. <span class="hlt">CAI</span> is useful as values are linear areal mixtures of soil and residue spectra...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ability+AND+burn&pg=3&id=ED229789','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ability+AND+burn&pg=3&id=ED229789"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CAI</span> Invention Strategies.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Rodrigues, Raymond J.; Rodrigues, Dawn</p> <p></p> <p>Prewriting programs using computers fall into two broad categories: interactive and noninteractive. An early example of a noninteractive program is that of Ellen Nold, called "Cinnamon." Its purpose was to present the student with a series of content questions. In answering such questions, the student would be accumulating a set of data that could…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED087423.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED087423.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CAI</span> In Chicago.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Litman, George H.</p> <p></p> <p>A computer-assisted instructional system has been implemented in 21 elementary schools in Chicago. The system runs on a UNIVAC 418-III computer which processes concurrently the reading, language arts, and mathematics drill and practice strand programs of the Computer Curriculum Corporation. All students participating qualified under the Elementary…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080033606&hterms=geosciences&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dgeosciences','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20080033606&hterms=geosciences&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D60%26Ntt%3Dgeosciences"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> and Radiative Forcing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Stier, Philip; Seinfeld, J. H.; Kinne, Stefan; Boucher, Olivier</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>We present a comprehensive examination of aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> with a focus on evaluating the sensitivity of the global distribution of aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> to key uncertainties in the process representation. For this purpose we extended the comprehensive aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM by effective medium approximations for the calculation of aerosol effective refractive indices, updated black carbon refractive indices, new cloud radiative properties considering the effect of aerosol inclusions, as well as by modules for the calculation of long-wave aerosol radiative properties and instantaneous aerosol forcing. The evaluation of the simulated aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> optical depth with the AERONET sun-photometer network shows a good agreement in the large scale global patterns. On a regional basis it becomes evident that the update of the BC refractive indices to Bond and Bergstrom (2006) significantly improves the previous underestimation of the aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> optical depth. In the global annual-mean, <span class="hlt">absorption</span> acts to reduce the shortwave anthropogenic aerosol top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing clear-sky from -0.79 to -0.53 W m(sup -2) (33%) and all-sky from -0.47 to -0.13W m(sup -2 (72%). Our results confirm that basic assumptions about the BC refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> play a key role for aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and radiative forcing. The effect of the usage of more accurate effective medium approximations is comparably small. We demonstrate that the diversity in the AeroCom land-surface albedo fields contributes to the uncertainty in the simulated anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcings: the usage of an upper versus lower bound of the AeroCom land albedos introduces a global annual-mean TOA forcing range of 0.19W m(sup -2) (36%) clear-sky and of 0.12W m(sup -2) (92%) all-sky. The consideration of black carbon inclusions on cloud radiative properties results in a small global annual-mean all-sky <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of 0.05W m(sup -2) and a positive TOA forcing perturbation of 0</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872707','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/872707"><span id="translatedtitle">Nucleic acid <span class="hlt">indexing</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen</p> <p>1999-01-01</p> <p>A restriction site <span class="hlt">indexing</span> method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor <span class="hlt">indexing</span> sequences complementary to fragment <span class="hlt">indexing</span> sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial <span class="hlt">indexing</span> facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/873713','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/873713"><span id="translatedtitle">Nucleic acid <span class="hlt">indexing</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Guilfoyle, Richard A.; Guo, Zhen</p> <p>2001-01-01</p> <p>A restriction site <span class="hlt">indexing</span> method for selectively amplifying any fragment generated by a Class II restriction enzyme includes adaptors specific to fragment ends containing adaptor <span class="hlt">indexing</span> sequences complementary to fragment <span class="hlt">indexing</span> sequences near the termini of fragments generated by Class II enzyme cleavage. A method for combinatorial <span class="hlt">indexing</span> facilitates amplification of restriction fragments whose sequence is not known.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830000241&hterms=Construction+management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DConstruction%2Bmanagement','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19830000241&hterms=Construction+management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3DConstruction%2Bmanagement"><span id="translatedtitle">KSC Construction Cost <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Brown, J. A.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Kennedy Space Center cost <span class="hlt">Index</span> aids in conceptual design cost estimates. Report discusses development of KSC Cost <span class="hlt">Index</span> since January 1974. <span class="hlt">Index</span> since January 1974. <span class="hlt">Index</span> provides management, design engineers, and estimators an up-to-data reference for local labor and material process. Also provides mount and rate of change in these costs used to predict future construction costs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016M%26PS...51..818I','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016M%26PS...51..818I"><span id="translatedtitle">Rare earth element measurements and mapping of minerals in the Allende <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, 7R19-1, by NanoSIMS ion microprobe</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Ito, Motoo; Messenger, Scott</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We have established analytical procedures for quantitative rare earth element (REE) measurements by NanoSIMS 50L ion microprobe with 2-10 μm spatial resolution. Measurements are performed by multidetection using energy filtering under several static magnetic field settings. Relative sensitivity factors and REE oxide/REE element secondary ion ratios that we determined for the NanoSIMS match values previously determined for other ion microprobes. REE measurements of 100 ppm REE glass standards yielded reproducibility and accuracy of 0.5-2.5% and 5-15%, respectively. REE measurements of minerals of an Allende type-A <span class="hlt">CAI</span>, 7R19-1, were performed using three different methods: spot analysis, line profile, and imaging. These data are in excellent agreement with previous REE measurements of this inclusion by IMS-3f ion microprobe. The higher spatial resolution NanoSIMS measurements provide additional insight into the formation process of this <span class="hlt">CAI</span> and offer a promising new tool for analysis of fine-grained and complexly zoned materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016MNRAS.457.2043B&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016MNRAS.457.2043B&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">A new titanium oxide <span class="hlt">index</span> in the visual band</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bidaran, Bahar; Mirtorabi, Mohammad Taghi; Azizi, Fatemeh</p> <p>2016-04-01</p> <p>We introduce a new colour <span class="hlt">index</span> consisting of two spectral bandwidths to measure the titanium oxide (TiO) <span class="hlt">absorption</span> band strength centred at 567 nm. Based on the most up-to-date line list for TiO, we regenerate a grid of synthesized spectra and investigate the temperature sensitivity of the <span class="hlt">index</span>. The new <span class="hlt">index</span> behaves similarly to the older TiO <span class="hlt">index</span> of Wing, in that it decreases monotonically from the coolest atmosphere with Teff = 2800 up to Teff = 4000 where the TiO molecules disassociate. To further examine the feasibility of the new <span class="hlt">index</span>, we reproduce the calibration using a list of observed high-resolution spectra and we find similar results. This <span class="hlt">index</span> extends the TiO <span class="hlt">absorption</span> band capability to measure the effective temperatures of late K to M stars to the visual spectrum, where it is more accessible to small telescopes for long-term dedicated observation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016GeCoA.189...70K&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2016GeCoA.189...70K&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">A link between oxygen, calcium and titanium isotopes in 26Al-poor hibonite-rich <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from Murchison and implications for the heterogeneity of dust reservoirs in the solar nebula</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kööp, Levke; Davis, Andrew M.; Nakashima, Daisuke; Park, Changkun; Krot, Alexander N.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Tenner, Travis J.; Heck, Philipp R.; Kita, Noriko T.</p> <p>2016-09-01</p> <p>PLACs (platy hibonite crystals) and related hibonite-rich calcium-, aluminum-rich inclusions (<span class="hlt">CAIs</span>; hereafter collectively referred to as PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>) have the largest nucleosynthetic isotope anomalies of all materials believed to have formed in the solar system. Most PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> have low inferred initial 26Al/27Al ratios and could have formed prior to injection or widespread distribution of 26Al in the solar nebula. In this study, we report 26Al-26Mg systematics combined with oxygen, calcium, and titanium isotopic compositions for a large number of newly separated PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> from the Murchison CM2 chondrite (32 <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> studied for oxygen, 26 of these also for 26Al-26Mg, calcium and titanium). Our results confirm (1) the large range of nucleosynthetic anomalies in 50Ti and 48Ca (our data range from -70‰ to +170‰ and -60‰ to +80‰, respectively), (2) the substantial range of Δ17O values (-28‰ to -17‰, with Δ17O = δ17O - 0.52 × δ18O), and (3) general 26Al-depletion in PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>. The multielement approach reveals a relationship between Δ17O and the degree of variability in 50Ti and 48Ca: PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span> with the highest Δ17O (∼-17‰) show large positive and negative 50Ti and 48Ca anomalies, while those with the lowest Δ17O (∼-28‰) have small to no anomalies in 50Ti and 48Ca. These observations could suggest a physical link between anomalous 48Ca and 50Ti carriers and an 16O-poor reservoir. We suggest that the solar nebula was isotopically heterogeneous shortly after collapse of the protosolar molecular cloud, and that the primordial dust reservoir, in which anomalous carrier phases were heterogeneously distributed, was 16O-poor (Δ17O ⩾ -17‰) relative to the primordial gaseous (CO + H2O) reservoir (Δ17O < -35‰). However, other models such as CO self-shielding in the protoplanetary disk are also considered to explain the link between oxygen and calcium and titanium isotopes in PLAC-like <span class="hlt">CAIs</span>.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_11");'>11</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li class="active"><span>13</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_13 --> <div id="page_14" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="261"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950005945','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19950005945"><span id="translatedtitle">CENDI <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Workshop</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1994-01-01</p> <p>The CENDI <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Workshop held at NASA Headquarters, Two Independence Square, 300 E Street, Washington, DC, on September 21-22, 1994 focused on the following topics: machine aided <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, <span class="hlt">indexing</span> quality, an <span class="hlt">indexing</span> pilot project, the MedIndEx Prototype, Department of Energy/Office of Scientific and Technical Information <span class="hlt">indexing</span> activities, high-tech coding structures, category <span class="hlt">indexing</span> schemes, and the Government Information Locator Service. This publication consists mostly of viewgraphs related to the above noted topics. In an appendix is a description of the Government Information Locator Service.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4225569','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4225569"><span id="translatedtitle">Occupation and educational inequalities in laryngeal cancer: the use of a job <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Background Previous studies tried to assess the association between socioeconomic status and laryngeal cancer. Alcohol and tobacco consumption explain already a large part of the social inequalities. Occupational exposures might explain a part of the remaining but the components and pathways of the socioeconomic contribution have yet to be fully disentangled. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of occupation using different occupational indices, differentiating between physical, psycho-social and toxic exposures and trying to summarize the occupational burden into one variable. Methods A population-based case–control study conducted in Germany in 1998–2000 included 208 male cases and 702 controls. Information on occupational history, smoking, alcohol consumption and education was collected with face-to-face interviews. A recently developed job-classification <span class="hlt">index</span> was used to account for the occupational burden. A sub-<span class="hlt">index</span> focussed on jobs involving potentially carcinogenic agents (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) for the upper aero digestive tract. Results When adjusted for smoking and alcohol consumption, higher odds ratios (ORs) were found for lower education. This OR decreased after further adjustment using the physical and psycho-social job indices (OR = 3.2, 95%-CI: 1.5-6.8), similar to the OR using the sub-<span class="hlt">index</span> <span class="hlt">CAI</span> (OR = 3.0, 95%-CI: 1.4-6.5). Conclusions The use of an easily applicable control variable, simply constructed on standard occupational job classifications, provides the possibility to differentiate between educational and occupational contributions. Such an <span class="hlt">index</span> might indirectly reflect the effect of carcinogenic agents, which are not collected in many studies. PMID:24246148</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007196.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007196.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Body mass <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007196.htm Body mass <span class="hlt">index</span> To use the sharing features on this ... your height is to figure out your body mass <span class="hlt">index</span> (BMI). You and your health care provider ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmi_tbl.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmi_tbl.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Body Mass <span class="hlt">Index</span> Table</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Families ( We Can! ) Health Professional Resources Body Mass <span class="hlt">Index</span> Table 1 for BMI greater than 35, go ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16521772','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16521772"><span id="translatedtitle">Experimental comparison between speech transmission <span class="hlt">index</span>, rapid speech transmission <span class="hlt">index</span>, and speech intelligibility <span class="hlt">index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Larm, Petra; Hongisto, Valtteri</p> <p>2006-02-01</p> <p>During the acoustical design of, e.g., auditoria or open-plan offices, it is important to know how speech can be perceived in various parts of the room. Different objective methods have been developed to measure and predict speech intelligibility, and these have been extensively used in various spaces. In this study, two such methods were compared, the speech transmission <span class="hlt">index</span> (STI) and the speech intelligibility <span class="hlt">index</span> (SII). Also the simplification of the STI, the room acoustics speech transmission <span class="hlt">index</span> (RASTI), was considered. These quantities are all based on determining an apparent speech-to-noise ratio on selected frequency bands and summing them using a specific weighting. For comparison, some data were needed on the possible differences of these methods resulting from the calculation scheme and also measuring equipment. Their prediction accuracy was also of interest. Measurements were made in a laboratory having adjustable noise level and <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, and in a real auditorium. It was found that the measurement equipment, especially the selection of the loudspeaker, can greatly affect the accuracy of the results. The prediction accuracy of the RASTI was found acceptable, if the input values for the prediction are accurately known, even though the studied space was not ideally diffuse. PMID:16521772</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863004','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863004"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">absorption</span> surface panel</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Santala, Teuvo J.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A composite metal of aluminum and nickel is used to form an economical solar <span class="hlt">absorption</span> surface for a collector plate wherein an intermetallic compound of the aluminum and nickel provides a surface morphology with high <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> and relatively low infrared emittance along with good durability.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeCoA.183..176H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016GeCoA.183..176H"><span id="translatedtitle">Microstructural constraints on complex thermal histories of refractory <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-like objects in an amoeboid olivine aggregate from the ALHA77307 CO3.0 chondrite</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Han, Jangmi; Brearley, Adrian J.</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>We have carried out a FIB/TEM study of refractory <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-like objects in one AOA from the ALHA77307 CO3.0 chondrite. The <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-like objects in the AOA consist of a zoned sequence with a spinel-rich core through an intergrowth layer of spinel and Al-Ti-rich diopside to a diopside rim. The spinel-rich core consists of polycrystalline aggregates of spinel and ±minor melilite showing equilibrated grain boundary textures. The intergrowth layer contains fine-grained diopside and spinel with minor anorthite with highly curved and embayed grain boundaries. The diopside rim consists of polycrystalline aggregates of diopside. The compositions of pyroxene change significantly outward from Al-Ti-rich diopside in contact with the spinel-rich core to Al-Ti-poor diopside next to the surrounding olivine of the AOA. Overall microstructural and chemical characteristics suggest that the spinel-rich core formed under equilibrium conditions whereas the intergrowth layer is the result of reactions that occurred under conditions that departed significantly from equilibrium. The remarkable changes in formation conditions of the <span class="hlt">CAI</span>-like objects may have been achieved by transport and injection of refractory objects into a region of a partially-condensed, Ca,Ti-saturated gas which reacted with spinel and melilite to form Al-Ti-rich diopside. Crystallographically-oriented TiO2 nanoparticles decorate the grain boundaries between spinel grains and between spinel and Al-Ti-rich diopside grains. During the disequilibrium back-reaction of spinel with a partially-condensed, Ca,Ti-saturated gas, metastable TiO2 nanoparticles may have condensed by an epitaxial nucleation mechanism and grown on the surface of spinel. These TiO2 nanoparticles are disordered intergrowths of the two TiO2 polymorphs, anatase and rutile. These nanoparticles are inferred to have nucleated as anatase that underwent partial transformation into rutile. The local presence of the TiO2 nanoparticles and intergrowth of anatase and</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=236946','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=236946"><span id="translatedtitle">California Nitrogen <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The California N <span class="hlt">Index</span> User Manual is designed to help you become accustomed to the software environment in which the N <span class="hlt">Index</span> runs. This manual will use an example scenario to demonstrate how to use the N <span class="hlt">Index</span> to assess nitrogen losses. The objective of this theoretical example is to guide you towa...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=index&pg=2&id=EJ997592','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=index&pg=2&id=EJ997592"><span id="translatedtitle">The Europe 2020 <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Pasimeni, Paolo</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>This paper presents a new <span class="hlt">index</span> to quantify, measure and monitor the progress towards the objectives of the Europe 2020 strategy. This <span class="hlt">index</span> is based on a set of relevant, accepted, credible, easy to monitor and robust indicators presented by the European Commission at the time the strategy was launched. The internal analysis of the <span class="hlt">index</span> shows…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4083416','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4083416"><span id="translatedtitle">Petawatt laser <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounded</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at low laser power and low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatCo...5E4149L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatCo...5E4149L"><span id="translatedtitle">Petawatt laser <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounded</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.</p> <p>2014-06-01</p> <p>The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at low laser power and low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1296607','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1296607"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of drugs.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Wester, R C; Maibach, H I</p> <p>1992-10-01</p> <p>The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> because they predict <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. PMID:1296607</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040084821','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20040084821"><span id="translatedtitle">Quasar <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Studies</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Mushotzky, Richard (Technical Monitor); Elvis, Martin</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The aim of the proposal is to investigate the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties of a sample of inter-mediate redshift quasars. The main goals of the project are: Measure the redshift and the column density of the X-ray absorbers; test the correlation between <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and redshift suggested by ROSAT and ASCA data; constrain the absorber ionization status and metallicity; constrain the absorber dust content and composition through the comparison between the amount of X-ray <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and optical dust extinction. Unanticipated low energy cut-offs where discovered in ROSAT spectra of quasars and confirmed by ASCA, BeppoSAX and Chandra. In most cases it was not possible to constrain adequately the redshift of the absorber from the X-ray data alone. Two possibilities remain open: a) <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at the quasar redshift; and b) intervening <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The evidences in favour of intrinsic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> are all indirect. Sensitive XMM observations can discriminate between these different scenarios. If the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is at the quasar redshift we can study whether the quasar environment evolves with the Cosmic time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dolphin&pg=6&id=ED287161','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=dolphin&pg=6&id=ED287161"><span id="translatedtitle">Cost-Benefit Analysis for ECIA Chapter 1 and State DPPF Programs Comparing Groups Receiving Regular Program Instruction and Groups Receiving Computer Assisted Instruction/Computer Management System (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>/CMS). 1986-87.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chamberlain, Ed</p> <p></p> <p>A cost benefit study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of a computer assisted instruction/computer management system (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>/CMS) as an alternative to conventional methods of teaching reading within Chapter 1 and DPPF funded programs of the Columbus (Ohio) Public Schools. The Chapter 1 funded Compensatory Language Experiences and Reading…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080005998','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20080005998"><span id="translatedtitle">Compounds affecting cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Hua, Duy H. (Inventor); Koo, Sung I. (Inventor); Noh, Sang K. (Inventor)</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>A class of novel compounds is described for use in affecting lymphatic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of cholesterol. Compounds of particular interest are defined by Formula I: ##STR1## or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865074','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865074"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> heat pump system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Grossman, Gershon</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>The efficiency of an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6135356','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6135356"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> heat pump system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Grossman, G.</p> <p>1982-06-16</p> <p>The efficiency of an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump system is improved by conducting liquid from a second stage evaporator thereof to an auxiliary heat exchanger positioned downstream of a primary heat exchanger in the desorber of the system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1412501','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=1412501"><span id="translatedtitle">Dipeptide <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in man</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Hellier, M. D.; Holdsworth, C. D.; McColl, I.; Perrett, D.</p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>A quantitative perfusion method has been used to study intestinal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of two dipeptides—glycyl-glycine and glycyl-l-alanine—in normal subjects. In each case, the constituent amino acids were absorbed faster when presented as dipeptides than as free amino acids, suggesting intact dipeptide transport. During <span class="hlt">absorption</span> constituent amino acids were measured within the lumen and it is suggested that these represent amino acids which have diffused back to the lumen after <span class="hlt">absorption</span> as dipeptide. Portal blood analyses during <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of a third dipeptide, glycyl-l-lysine, have shown that this dipeptide, known to be transported intact from the intestinal lumen, is hydrolysed to its constitutent amino acids before it reaches portal venous blood. PMID:4652039</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867114','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/867114"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> measurement system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Draggoo, Vaughn G.; Morton, Richard G.; Sawicki, Richard H.; Bissinger, Horst D.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The system of the present invention contemplates a non-intrusive method for measuring the temperature rise of optical elements under high laser power optical loading to determine the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient. The method comprises irradiating the optical element with a high average power laser beam, viewing the optical element with an infrared camera to determine the temperature across the optical element and calculating the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the optical element from the temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/982795','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/982795"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward</p> <p>2004-08-31</p> <p>A new class of solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings are also disclosed.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_12");'>12</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li class="active"><span>14</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_14 --> <div id="page_15" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="281"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/985342','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/985342"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Mahoney, Alan R.; Reed, Scott T.; Ashley, Carol S.; Martinez, F. Edward</p> <p>2003-10-14</p> <p>A new class of solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings are disclosed. These coatings comprise a structured metallic overlayer such that the overlayer has a sub-micron structure designed to efficiently absorb solar radiation, while retaining low thermal emissivity for infrared thermal radiation. A sol-gel layer protects the structured metallic overlayer from mechanical, thermal, and environmental degradation. Processes for producing such solar selective <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coatings are also disclosed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866945','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866945"><span id="translatedtitle">Seven-effect <span class="hlt">absorption</span> refrigeration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>DeVault, Robert C.; Biermann, Wendell J.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>A seven-effect <span class="hlt">absorption</span> refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7073841','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7073841"><span id="translatedtitle">Seven-effect <span class="hlt">absorption</span> refrigeration</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>DeVault, R.C.; Biermann, W.J.</p> <p>1989-05-09</p> <p>A seven-effect <span class="hlt">absorption</span> refrigeration cycle is disclosed utilizing three <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuits. In addition, a heat exchanger is used for heating the generator of the low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the medium <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit. A heat exchanger is also provided for heating the generator of the medium <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with heat rejected from the condenser and absorber of the high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit. If desired, another heat exchanger can also be provided for heating the evaporator of the high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit with rejected heat from either the condenser or absorber of the low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> circuit. 1 fig.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=super+AND+computers&pg=6&id=ED138296','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=super+AND+computers&pg=6&id=ED138296"><span id="translatedtitle">EMMSE Media <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.</p> <p></p> <p>This <span class="hlt">index</span> provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The <span class="hlt">index</span> is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=volume&pg=6&id=EJ915335','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=volume&pg=6&id=EJ915335"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploring Volumetrically <span class="hlt">Indexed</span> Cups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Jones, Dustin L.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically <span class="hlt">indexed</span>; that is to say, the volume of cup "n" is equal to "n" times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically <span class="hlt">indexed</span> cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142881&keyword=XML&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=74025436&CFTOKEN=65522823','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142881&keyword=XML&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=74025436&CFTOKEN=65522823"><span id="translatedtitle">HUMAN USE <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> (FUTURE)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use <span class="hlt">index</span> (also known as U-<span class="hlt">index</span>) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142880&keyword=XML&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=74025436&CFTOKEN=65522823','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=142880&keyword=XML&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=74025436&CFTOKEN=65522823"><span id="translatedtitle">HUMAN USE <span class="hlt">INDEX</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use <span class="hlt">index</span> (also known as U-<span class="hlt">index</span>) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drought+AND+california&id=ED362285','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=drought+AND+california&id=ED362285"><span id="translatedtitle">Children's Stress <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Sherman, Dianne, Ed.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>This double issue of the "ZPG Reporter" focuses on the theme of ZPG's Children's Stress <span class="hlt">Index</span>", the first national survey of children's well-being based on population- related pressures. Using an extensive list of social, economic, and environmental factors that affect the lives of children, the <span class="hlt">index</span> ranks 828 cities, counties, and metropolitan…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....2920G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003EAEJA.....2920G"><span id="translatedtitle">Drought Frequency <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gonzalez, J.; Valdes, J. B.</p> <p>2003-04-01</p> <p>Droughts are related with prolonged time periods during moisture is significantly below normal situation. Drought <span class="hlt">indexes</span> try to scale the main drought features based on similar definitions. The Standard Precipitation <span class="hlt">Index</span> (SPI) is a well-known <span class="hlt">index</span>, which for a given aggregation-time measures the deviation from the normality of the precipitation. One of the SPI weak points in the representation of drought phenomenon is that drought duration should be analyzed by using different aggregation-times. In this work, a new <span class="hlt">index</span> is presented, which simultaneously characterize droughts based on the deviation from the normal precipitation regime and the drought persistence, both from the statistical point of view. The new <span class="hlt">index</span> does not require aggregation at different time-lengths. Instead droughts are treated as multivariate events, whose dimensionality depends on the duration. Probabilistic events with different dimensionalities are compared on a common dimension of interest. In this case the dimension chosen is the mean frequency of recurrence. The derived <span class="hlt">index</span>, named Drought Frequency <span class="hlt">Index</span> (DFI) may be used to characterize historical droughts or current situation. It can be apply not only over precipitation but also over flows or other hydroclimatic variables. The new <span class="hlt">index</span> was applied to several places in USA and Spain both for precipitation and flow historical sequences, and compared with SPI. The DFI allows the representation of the main drought characteristics in a single value, based on the stochastic feature of the phenomenon, and scaled on the mean frequency of recurrence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=coastline&pg=6&id=ED257512','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=coastline&pg=6&id=ED257512"><span id="translatedtitle">Transfer <span class="hlt">Index</span>: One Definition.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Heinselman, James L.</p> <p></p> <p>A transfer <span class="hlt">index</span> of the proportion of students in California's community colleges transferring to the University of California (UC) and the California State University (CSU) system for fall 1982, 1983, and 1984 is presented in this report. Introductory material provides one definition of an appropriate <span class="hlt">index</span> of transfer rates, i.e., the ratio of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fog&pg=3&id=ED154337','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Fog&pg=3&id=ED154337"><span id="translatedtitle">A Computer Calculated <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Brown, Francis J.</p> <p></p> <p>The Gunning Fog <span class="hlt">Index</span> of readability indicates both the average length of words and the difficult words (three or more syllables) in written material. This document describes a business communication course at Wayne State University in which students calculate the Gunning Fog <span class="hlt">Index</span> of two of their writing assignments with the aid of the…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866788','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866788"><span id="translatedtitle">Gradient <span class="hlt">index</span> retroreflector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Layne, Clyde B.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A retroreflector is formed of a graded <span class="hlt">index</span> lens with a reflective coating at one end. The lens has a length of an odd multiple of a quarter period thereof. Hexagonally shaped graded <span class="hlt">index</span> lenses may be closely packed in an array to form a retroreflecting surface.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DPPCP8060L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014APS..DPPCP8060L"><span id="translatedtitle">Petawatt laser <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounded</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew</p> <p>2014-10-01</p> <p>The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at low laser power and low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20013416','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20013416"><span id="translatedtitle">Prediction of the furnace heat <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by utilizing thermomechanical analysis for various kinds of coal firing</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Ishinomori, T.; Watanabe, S.; Kiga, T.; Wall, T.F.; Gupta, R.P.; Gupta, S.K.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>In order to predict the furnace heat <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, which is sensitive to coal properties, an attempt to make a model universally applicable for any kind of pulverized coal fired boiler is in progress. First of all, the heat <span class="hlt">absorption</span> rates on to furnace wall were surveyed for 600MWe pulverized coal fired boiler, and they were ranked into four levels by indicating a furnace heat <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">index</span> (FHAI). Some ash composition is relatively well related to the FHAI, while a new <span class="hlt">index</span> from thermomechanical analysis (TMA) offers a good prediction of the furnace heat <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1014802','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1014802"><span id="translatedtitle">Refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of glass and its dipersion for visible light.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Smith, D. Y.; Karstens, W.</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>The classification of optical glass and empirical relations between the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and its dispersion are discussed in terms of moments of the glass's IR and UV <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra. The observed linear dependence of <span class="hlt">index</span> on dispersion within glass families is shown to arise primarily from the approximately linear superposition of the electronic <span class="hlt">absorptions</span> of glass former and glass modifiers. The binary classification into crown and flint glasses is also based primarily on electronic spectra: Crown glasses are 'wide-gap' materials with excitation energies greater than {approx}12.4 eV, while flint glasses are their 'narrow-gap' counterpart.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205703','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25205703"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> from soil.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Andersen, Rosa Marie; Coman, Garrett; Blickenstaff, Nicholas R; Maibach, Howard I</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>Abstract Some natural sites, as a result of contaminants emitted into the air and subsequently deposited in soil or accidental industrial release, have high levels of organic and non-organic chemicals in soil. In occupational and recreation settings, these could be potential sources of percutaneous exposure to humans. When investigating percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> from soil - in vitro or vivo - soil load, particle size, layering, soil "age" time, along with the methods of performing the experiment and analyzing the results must be taken into consideration. Skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> from soil is generally reduced compared with uptake from water/acetone. However, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of some compounds, e.g., pentachlorophenol, chlorodane and PCB 1254, are similar. Lipophilic compounds like dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, benzo[A]pyrene, and metals have the tendency to form reservoirs in skin. Thus, one should take caution in interpreting results directly from in vitro studies for risk assessment; in vivo validations are often required for the most relevant risk assessment. PMID:25205703</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6748089','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6748089"><span id="translatedtitle">Dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> potential of industrial chemicals: Criteria for skin notation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fiserova-Bergerova, V.; Pierce, J.T.; Droz, P.O. )</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>A dermal penetration rate (flux), predicted from physical properties of 132 chemicals, is suggested as an <span class="hlt">index</span> of the dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> potential of industrial chemicals. The prediction is designed for organic nonelectrolytes. Two reference values are recommended as criteria for skin notation: (1) dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> potential, which relates to dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> raising the dose of nonvolatile chemicals or biological levels of volatile chemicals 30% above those observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only--dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of chemicals belonging to this category should be considered when data obtained by biological monitoring are interpreted; and (2) dermal toxicity potential, which relates to dermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> that triples biological levels as compared with levels observed during inhalation exposure to TLV-TWA only. Chemicals belonging in this category should carry a skin notation. The toxicity criteria may not be valid for chemicals whose TLVs are based on preventing irritation and discomfort.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2080638','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2080638"><span id="translatedtitle">The effect of some beverage extracts on intestinal iron <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>el-Shobaki, F A; Saleh, Z A; Saleh, N</p> <p>1990-12-01</p> <p>The effect of some beverage extracts namely anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, karkade and tea, on the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of iron was tested in tied-off intestinal segments of rats. The rate of intestinal iron <span class="hlt">absorption</span> was calculated in terms of an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">index</span>. The tannin, phytic acid and ascorbic acid contents of these beverages were analysed. The results show that anise, mint, caraway, cumin, tilia, liquorice, arranged in decreasing order of their effect, promoted the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of iron. Karkade did not exert an appreciable effect while tea inhibited <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The results are discussed in relation to the content of these beverages of tannins, phytic or ascorbic acids. It is recommended to offer these beverages to children and also to adults as a preventive agent to iron deficiency anemia. Also can be used for the preparation of bioavailable medicinal iron. PMID:2080638</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780010557','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780010557"><span id="translatedtitle">A plant canopy light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> model with application to wheat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>From the light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> model the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light in the photosynthetically active region of the spectrum was calculated for a Penjamo wheat crop for several situations including: (1) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the incident radiation by a canopy having a four layer structure; (2) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light by the individual layers within a four layer canopy and by the underlying soil; (3) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light by each vegetative canopy layer for variable sun angle; and (4) the cumulative solar energy absorbed by the developing wheat canopy as it progresses from a single layer through its growth stages to a three layer canopy. This calculation was also presented as a function of the leaf area <span class="hlt">index</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6154.1592S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2006SPIE.6154.1592S"><span id="translatedtitle">Novel high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids for 193nm immersion lithography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Santillan, Julius; Otoguro, Akihiko; Itani, Toshiro; Fujii, Kiyoshi; Kagayama, Akifumi; Nakano, Takashi; Nakayama, Norio; Tamatani, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Shin</p> <p>2006-03-01</p> <p>Despite the early skepticism towards the use of 193-nm immersion lithography as the next step in satisfying Moore's law, it continuous to meet expectations on its feasibility in achieving 65-nm nodes and possibly beyond. And with implementation underway, interest in extending its capability for smaller pattern sizes such as the 32-nm node continues to grow. In this paper, we will discuss the optical, physical and lithographic properties of newly developed high <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids of low <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient, 'Babylon' and 'Delphi'. As evaluated in a spectroscopic ellipsometer in the 193.39nm wavelength, the 'Babylon' and 'Delphi' high <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids were evaluated to have a refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of 1.64 and 1.63 with an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient of 0.05/cm and 0.08/cm, respectively. Lithographic evaluation results using a 193-nm 2-beam interferometric exposure tool show the imaging capability of both high <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids to be 32-nm half pitch lines and spaces.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_13");'>13</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li class="active"><span>15</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_15 --> <div id="page_16" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="301"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvL.114w6801J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhRvL.114w6801J"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiplasmon <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> in Graphene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jablan, Marinko; Chang, Darrick E.</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>We show that graphene possesses a strong nonlinear optical response in the form of multiplasmon <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, with exciting implications in classical and quantum nonlinear optics. Specifically, we predict that graphene nanoribbons can be used as saturable absorbers with low saturation intensity in the far-infrared and terahertz spectrum. Moreover, we predict that two-plasmon <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and extreme localization of plasmon fields in graphene nanodisks can lead to a plasmon blockade effect, in which a single quantized plasmon strongly suppresses the possibility of exciting a second plasmon.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.111n4101A','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013PhRvL.111n4101A"><span id="translatedtitle">Chaotic Systems with <span class="hlt">Absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Altmann, Eduardo G.; Portela, Jefferson S. E.; Tél, Tamás</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions Dq obtained without taking <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D1 in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865075','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865075"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> heat pump system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Grossman, Gershon; Perez-Blanco, Horacio</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>An improvement in an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483930','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24483930"><span id="translatedtitle">All-semiconductor negative-<span class="hlt">index</span> plasmonic absorbers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Law, S; Roberts, C; Kilpatrick, T; Yu, L; Ribaudo, T; Shaner, E A; Podolskiy, V; Wasserman, D</p> <p>2014-01-10</p> <p>We demonstrate epitaxially grown all-semiconductor thin-film midinfrared plasmonic absorbers and show that <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in these structures is linked to the excitation of highly confined negative-<span class="hlt">index</span> surface plasmon polaritons. Strong (>98%) <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is experimentally observed, and the spectral position and intensity of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resonances are studied by reflection and transmission spectroscopy. Numerical models as well as an analytical description of the excited guided modes in our structures are presented, showing agreement with experiment. The structures investigated demonstrate a wavelength-flexible, all-semiconductor, plasmonic architecture with potential for both sensing applications and enhanced interaction of midinfrared radiation with integrated semiconductor optoelectronic elements. PMID:24483930</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7273E..26B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7273E..26B"><span id="translatedtitle">High-<span class="hlt">index</span> nanocomposite photoresist for 193-nm lithography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bae, Woo Jin; Trikeriotis, Makros; Rodriguez, Robert; Zettel, Michael F.; Piscani, Emil; Ober, Christopher K.; Giannelis, Emmanuel P.; Zimmerman, Paul</p> <p>2009-03-01</p> <p>In immersion lithography, high <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids are used to increase the numerical aperture (NA) of the imaging system and decrease the minimum printable feature size. Water has been used in first generation immersion lithography at 193 nm to reach the 45 nm node, but to reach the 38 and 32 nm nodes, fluids and resists with a higher <span class="hlt">index</span> than water are needed. A critical issue hindering the implementation of 193i at the 32 nm node is the availability of high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> (n > 1.8) and low optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> fluids and resists. It is critical to note that high <span class="hlt">index</span> resists are necessary only when a high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> fluid is in use. High <span class="hlt">index</span> resist improves the depth of focus (DOF) even without high <span class="hlt">index</span> fluids. In this study, high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> nanoparticles have been synthesized and introduced into a resist matrix to increase the overall refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. The strategy followed is to synthesize PGMEA-soluble nanoparticles and then disperse them into a 193 nm resist. High <span class="hlt">index</span> nanoparticles 1-2 nm in diameter were synthesized by a combination of hydrolysis and sol-gel methods. A ligand exchange method was used, allowing the surface of the nanoparticles to be modified with photoresist-friendly moieties to help them disperse uniformly in the resist matrix. The refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and ultraviolet absorbance were measured to evaluate the quality of next generation immersion lithography resist materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhA.122..685H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016ApPhA.122..685H"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in silicon metamaterials waveguide structure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Hamouche, Houria; Shabat, Mohammed M.</p> <p>2016-07-01</p> <p>Metamaterial waveguide structures for silicon solar cells are a novel approach to antireflection coating structures that can be used for the achievement of high <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in silicon solar cells. This paper investigates numerically the possibility of improving the performance of a planar waveguide silicon solar cell by incorporating a pair of silicon nitride/metamaterial layer between a semi-infinite glass cover layer and a semi-infinite silicon substrate layer. The optimized layer thicknesses of the pair are determined under the solar spectrum AM1.5 by the effective average reflectance method. The transmission and reflection coefficients are derived by the transfer matrix method for values of metamaterial's refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> in visible and near-infrared radiation. In addition, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient is examined for several angles of incidence of the transverse electric polarized (TE), transverse magnetic polarized (TM) and the total (TE&TM) guided waves. Numerical results provide an extremely high <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The <span class="hlt">absorptivity</span> of the structure achieves greater than 98 %.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880045700&hterms=mai&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dmai','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880045700&hterms=mai&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3Dmai"><span id="translatedtitle">Use of calibration targets in the measurement of 2.22-micron mineral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> features in Thematic Mapper data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Elvidge, Christopher D.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A mineral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">index</span> (MAI) has been developed to separate leaf water and mineral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the 2.22-micron Thematic Mapper band. The MAI uses three baselines to estimate and subtract the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> attributable to vegetation. Digital number data from calibration targets devoid of vegetation are used to establish the positions of the baselines in Thematic Mapper data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22acousto+optic%22&id=EJ829066','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22acousto+optic%22&id=EJ829066"><span id="translatedtitle">Two-Phonon <span class="hlt">Absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hamilton, M. W.</p> <p>2007-01-01</p> <p>A nonlinear aspect of the acousto-optic interaction that is analogous to multi-photon <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is discussed. An experiment is described in which the second-order acousto-optically scattered intensity is measured and found to scale with the square of the acoustic intensity. This experiment using a commercially available acousto-optic modulator is…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyU...58..512M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015PhyU...58..512M"><span id="translatedtitle">Total <span class="hlt">absorption</span> Cherenkov spectrometers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Malinovski, E. I.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>A short review of 50 years of work done with Cherenkov detectors in laboratories at the Lebedev Physical Institute is presented. The report considers some issues concerning the use of Cherenkov total <span class="hlt">absorption</span> counters based on lead glass and heavy crystals in accelerator experiments.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150091','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27150091"><span id="translatedtitle">Cholesterol <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> and Metabolism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Howles, Philip N</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Inhibitors of cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> have been sought for decades as a means to treat and prevent cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) associated with hypercholesterolemia. Ezetimibe is the one clear success story in this regard, and other compounds with similar efficacy continue to be sought. In the last decade, the laboratory mouse, with all its genetic power, has become the premier experimental model for discovering the mechanisms underlying cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and has become a critical tool for preclinical testing of potential pharmaceutical entities. This chapter briefly reviews the history of cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> research and the various gene candidates that have come under consideration as drug targets. The most common and versatile method of measuring cholesterol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is described in detail along with important considerations when interpreting results, and an alternative method is also presented. In recent years, reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) has become an area of intense new interest for drug discovery since this process is now considered another key to reducing CVD risk. The ultimate measure of RCT is sterol excretion and a detailed description is given for measuring neutral and acidic fecal sterols and interpreting the results. PMID:27150091</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=203130','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=203130"><span id="translatedtitle">Lipids: <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> and transport</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Due to the hydrophobic nature of lipids, dietary fat is handled differently than protein or carbohydrate with respect with digestion and <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Dietary fats are broken down throughout the gastrointestinal system. A unique group of enzymes and cofactors allows this process to proceed in an eff...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=200832','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=200832"><span id="translatedtitle">ZINC <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> BY INFANTS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Zinc is a vital mineral in human nutrition, and rare cases of overt zinc deficiency are well described in term and preterm infants. A variety of methods have been developed to assess zinc <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, retention, and balance in humans, either using mass (metabolic) balance or stable isotope-based METH...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9741E..0PH','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016SPIE.9741E..0PH"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> driven focus shift</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Harrop, N.; Wolf, S.; Maerten, O.; Dudek, K.; Ballach, S.; Kramer, R.</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Modern high brilliance near infrared lasers have seen a tremendous growth in applications throughout the world. Increased productivity has been achieved by higher laser power and increased brilliance of lasers. Positive impacts on the performance and costs of parts are opposed to threats on process stability and quality, namely shift of focus position over time. A high initial process quality will be reduced by contamination of optics, eventually leading to a focus shift or even destruction of the optics. Focus analysis at full power of multi-kilowatt high brilliance lasers is a very demanding task because of high power densities in the spot and the high power load on optical elements. With the newly developed high power projection optics, the High-Power Micro-Spot Monitor High Brilliance (HP-MSM-HB) is able to measure focus diameter as low as 20 μm at power levels up to 10 kW at very low internal focus shift. A main driving factor behind thermally induced focus shift is the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> level of the optical element. A newly developed measuring system is designed to determine the relative <span class="hlt">absorption</span> level in reference to a gold standard. Test results presented show a direct correlation between <span class="hlt">absorption</span> levels and focus shift. The ability to determine the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> level of optical elements as well as their performance at full processing power before they are put to use, enables a high level of quality assurance for optics manufacturers and processing head manufacturers alike.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820024318','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19820024318"><span id="translatedtitle">NASA 1981 photography <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">index</span> of representative photographs is presented. Color transparencies and black and white glossies of major launches, Mariner spacecraft, Pioneer spacecraft, planets and other space phenomena, Skylab, space shuttle, Viking spacecraft, and Voyager spacecraft are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJMES..42..272J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2011IJMES..42..272J"><span id="translatedtitle">Exploring volumetrically <span class="hlt">indexed</span> cups</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jones, Dustin L.</p> <p>2011-03-01</p> <p>This article was inspired by a set of 12 cylindrical cups, which are volumetrically <span class="hlt">indexed</span>; that is to say, the volume of cup n is equal to n times the volume of cup 1. Various sets of volumetrically <span class="hlt">indexed</span> cylindrical cups are explored. I demonstrate how this children's toy is ripe for mathematical investigation, with connections to geometry, algebra and differential calculus. Students with an understanding of these topics should be able to complete the analysis and related exercises contained herein.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900007273','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19900007273"><span id="translatedtitle">JSC document <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The Johnson Space Center (JSC) document <span class="hlt">index</span> is intended to provide a single source listing of all published JSC-numbered documents their authors, and the designated offices of prime responsibility (OPR's) by mail code at the time of publication. The <span class="hlt">index</span> contains documents which have been received and processed by the JSC Technical Library as of January 13, 1988. Other JSC-numbered documents which are controlled but not available through the JSC Library are also listed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3123378','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3123378"><span id="translatedtitle">Lipoxygenase inhibitors suppress IL-2 synthesis: relationship with rise of [<span class="hlt">Ca++]i</span> and the events dependent on protein kinase C activation.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Dornand, J; Sekkat, C; Mani, J C; Gerber, M</p> <p>1987-11-01</p> <p>The present study was performed in an attempt to understand the mechanism involved in the inhibition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) synthesis by lipoxygenase (LO) pathway inhibitors. Using the two IL-2-producing lymphoid cell lines, (Jurkat and EL4 cells), we showed first that the inhibitory effect of the phenolic compounds tested (NDGA, BHA and caffeic acid) acted on lymphoid cells themselves and not on eventual monocytic or granulocytic contaminant cells. Secondly, these inhibitors were demonstrated as exerting their effect on two levels: they affected the events controlled by both second messengers implicated in T cell activation, namely rise of intracellular free calcium concentration [( <span class="hlt">Ca++]i</span>) and protein kinase C (PKC) activation. For this purpose, LO inhibitor effects have been compared: (a) on IL-2 production by the two different lines: Jurkat cells, which need both signals, and EL4 cells, which require only PKC activation for the induction of this production; and (b) on the events induced by the different ways of Jurkat cell activation: PHA (or anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody) versus calcium ionophore. These results are discussed with respect to an eventual involvement of arachidonic acid [AA] derivatives in IL-2 synthesis. PMID:3123378</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960051331','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960051331"><span id="translatedtitle">New generic <span class="hlt">indexing</span> technology</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Freeston, Michael</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>There has been no fundamental change in the dynamic <span class="hlt">indexing</span> methods supporting database systems since the invention of the B-tree twenty-five years ago. And yet the whole classical approach to dynamic database <span class="hlt">indexing</span> has long since become inappropriate and increasingly inadequate. We are moving rapidly from the conventional one-dimensional world of fixed-structure text and numbers to a multi-dimensional world of variable structures, objects and images, in space and time. But, even before leaving the confines of conventional database <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, the situation is highly unsatisfactory. In fact, our research has led us to question the basic assumptions of conventional database <span class="hlt">indexing</span>. We have spent the past ten years studying the properties of multi-dimensional <span class="hlt">indexing</span> methods, and in this paper we draw the strands of a number of developments together - some quite old, some very new, to show how we now have the basis for a new generic <span class="hlt">indexing</span> technology for the next generation of database systems.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24g4206Y','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015ChPhB..24g4206Y"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> enhancement and sensing properties of Ag diamond nanoantenna arrays</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Yuan, Yu-Yang; Yuan, Zong-Heng; Li, Xiao-Nan; Wu, Jun; Zhang, Wen-Tao; Ye, Song</p> <p>2015-07-01</p> <p>Noble metal nanoantenna could effectively enhance light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and increase detection sensitivity. In this paper, we propose a periodic Ag diamond nanoantenna array to increase the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of thin-film solar cells and to improve the detection sensitivity via localized surface plasmon resonance. The effect of nanoantenna arrays on the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancement is theoretically investigated using the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method with manipulating the spectral response by geometrical parameters of nanoantennas. A maximum <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancement factor of 1.51 has been achieved in this study. In addition, the relation between resonant wavelength (intensity reflectivity) and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> is discussed in detail. When detecting the environmental <span class="hlt">index</span> using resonant wavelengths, a maximum detection sensitivity of about 837 nm/RIU (refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> unit) and a resolution of about 10-3 RIU can be achieved. Moreover, when using the reflectivity, the sensitivity can be as high as 0.93 AU/RIU. Furthermore, we also have theoretically studied the effectiveness of nanoantennas in distinguishing chemical reagents, solution concentrations, and solution allocation ratios by detecting refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. From the results presented in this paper, we conclude that this work might be useful for biosensor detection and other types of detections. Project supported by the International Scientific and Technological Cooperation Projects of Guizhou Province, China (Grant No. 20117035) and the Program for Innovative Research Team of Guilin University of Electronic Technology, China (Grant No. IRTGUET).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f2005S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016PhRvD..93f2005S"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of ion-beam sputtered amorphous silicon coatings</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Steinlechner, Jessica; Martin, Iain W.; Bassiri, Riccardo; Bell, Angus; Fejer, Martin M.; Hough, Jim; Markosyan, Ashot; Route, Roger K.; Rowan, Sheila; Tornasi, Zeno</p> <p>2016-03-01</p> <p>Low mechanical loss at low temperatures and a high <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction should make silicon optimally suited for thermal noise reduction in highly reflective mirror coatings for gravitational wave detectors. However, due to high optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, amorphous silicon (aSi) is unsuitable for being used as a direct high-<span class="hlt">index</span> coating material to replace tantala. A possible solution is a multimaterial design, which enables exploitation of the excellent mechanical properties of aSi in the lower coating layers. The possible number of aSi layers increases with <span class="hlt">absorption</span> reduction. In this work, the optimum heat treatment temperature of aSi deposited via ion-beam sputtering was investigated and found to be 450 °C . For this temperature, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> after deposition of a single layer of aSi at 1064 nm and 1550 nm was reduced by more than 80%.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_14");'>14</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li class="active"><span>16</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_16 --> <div id="page_17" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="321"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1051.photos.046686p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/al1051.photos.046686p/"><span id="translatedtitle">69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> TOWER BUILDING, <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> TOWER ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>69. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> TOWER BUILDING, <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> TOWER UNDER CONSTRUCTION. (DATE UNKNOWN). - United States Nitrate Plant No. 2, Reservation Road, Muscle Shoals, Muscle Shoals, Colbert County, AL</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24138240','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24138240"><span id="translatedtitle">Chaotic systems with <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Altmann, Eduardo G; Portela, Jefferson S E; Tél, Tamás</p> <p>2013-10-01</p> <p>Motivated by applications in optics and acoustics we develop a dynamical-system approach to describe <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in chaotic systems. We introduce an operator formalism from which we obtain (i) a general formula for the escape rate κ in terms of the natural conditionally invariant measure of the system, (ii) an increased multifractality when compared to the spectrum of dimensions D(q) obtained without taking <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and return times into account, and (iii) a generalization of the Kantz-Grassberger formula that expresses D(1) in terms of κ, the positive Lyapunov exponent, the average return time, and a new quantity, the reflection rate. Simulations in the cardioid billiard confirm these results. PMID:24138240</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12547224','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12547224"><span id="translatedtitle">Pathways of iron <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Conrad, Marcel E; Umbreit, Jay N</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>Iron is vital for all living organisms but excess iron can be lethal because it facilitates free radical formation. Thus iron <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is carefully regulated to maintain an equilibrium between <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and body loss of iron. In countries where meat is a significant part of the diet, most body iron is derived from dietary heme because heme binds few of the dietary chelators that bind inorganic iron. Uptake of heme into enterocytes occurs as a metalloporphyrin in an endosomal process. Intracellular iron is released from heme by heme oxygenase to enter plasma as inorganic iron. Ferric iron is absorbed via a beta(3) integrin and mobilferrin pathway (IMP) which is unshared with other nutritional metals. Ferrous iron uptake is facilitated by a DMT-1 pathway which is shared with manganese. In the iron deficient gut, large quantities of both mobilferrin and DMT-1 are found in goblet cells and intraluminal mucins suggesting that they are secreted with mucin into the intestinal lumen to bind iron to facilitate uptake by the cells. In the cytoplasm, IMP and DMT associate in a large protein complex called paraferritin which serves as a ferrireductase. Paraferritin solublizes iron binding proteins and reduces iron to make iron available for production of iron containing proteins such as heme. Iron uptake by intestinal <span class="hlt">absorptive</span> cells is regulated by the iron concentration within the cell. Except in hemochromatosis it remains in equilibrium with total body stores via transferrin receptors on the basolateral membrane of <span class="hlt">absorptive</span> cells. Increased intracellular iron either up-regulates or satiates iron binding proteins on regulatory proteins to alter their location in the intestinal mucosa. PMID:12547224</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21408540','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21408540"><span id="translatedtitle">Giant Kerr nonlinearities using refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> enhancement</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yavuz, D. D.; Sikes, D. E.</p> <p>2010-03-15</p> <p>By utilizing refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> enhancement with vanishing <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, a scheme is suggested that achieves giant Kerr nonlinearities between two weak laser beams. One application of this scheme is discussed and an all-optical distributed Bragg reflector is proposed that works at very low light levels.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/826638','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/826638"><span id="translatedtitle">Relic Neutrino <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Eberle, b</p> <p>2004-01-28</p> <p>Resonant annihilation of extremely high-energy cosmic neutrinos on big-bang relic anti-neutrinos (and vice versa) into Z-bosons leads to sizable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> dips in the neutrino flux to be observed at Earth. The high-energy edges of these dips are fixed, via the resonance energies, by the neutrino masses alone. Their depths are determined by the cosmic neutrino background density, by the cosmological parameters determining the expansion rate of the universe, and by the large redshift history of the cosmic neutrino sources. We investigate the possibility of determining the existence of the cosmic neutrino background within the next decade from a measurement of these <span class="hlt">absorption</span> dips in the neutrino flux. As a by-product, we study the prospects to infer the absolute neutrino mass scale. We find that, with the presently planned neutrino detectors (ANITA, Auger, EUSO, OWL, RICE, and SalSA) operating in the relevant energy regime above 10{sup 21} eV, relic neutrino <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectroscopy becomes a realistic possibility. It requires, however, the existence of extremely powerful neutrino sources, which should be opaque to nucleons and high-energy photons to evade present constraints. Furthermore, the neutrino mass spectrum must be quasi-degenerate to optimize the dip, which implies m{sub {nu}} 0.1 eV for the lightest neutrino. With a second generation of neutrino detectors, these demanding requirements can be relaxed considerably.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmicalc.htm','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="http://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/BMI/bmicalc.htm"><span id="translatedtitle">Calculate Your Body Mass <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... Can! ) Health Professional Resources Calculate Your Body Mass <span class="hlt">Index</span> Body mass <span class="hlt">index</span> (BMI) is a measure of body fat based ... to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SEARCH | SITE <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> | ACCESSIBILITY | PRIVACY STATEMENT | FOIA | OIG | CONTACT US National ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720014426','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19720014426"><span id="translatedtitle">Quarantine document system <span class="hlt">indexing</span> procedure</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1972-01-01</p> <p>The Quarantine Document System (QDS) is described including the <span class="hlt">indexing</span> procedures and thesaurus of <span class="hlt">indexing</span> terms. The QDS consists of these functional elements: acquisition, cataloging, <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, storage, and retrieval. A complete listing of the collection, and the thesaurus are included.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....10.1773C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010ACP....10.1773C"><span id="translatedtitle">Light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by organic carbon from wood combustion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Y.; Bond, T. C.</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While black carbon (BC) is highly absorbing, some organic carbon (OC) also has significant <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, especially at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to positive direct aerosol radiative forcing. Quantification of that <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is necessary so that radiative-transfer models can evaluate the net radiative effect of OC. In this work, we examine <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble OC contributes to light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> comes from OC that is extractable only by methanol. <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> spectra of water-soluble OC are similar to literature reports. We compare spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating OC with higher <span class="hlt">absorption</span>; changing wood temperature from a devolatilizing state of 210 °C to a near-flaming state of 360 °C causes about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at visible wavelengths. A clear-sky radiative transfer model suggests that, despite the <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, both high-temperature and low-temperature OC result in negative top-of-atmosphere radiative forcing over a surface with an albedo of 0.19 and positive radiative forcing over bright surfaces. Unless <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by real ambient aerosol is higher than that measured here, it probably affects global average clear-sky forcing very little, but could be important in energy balances over bright surfaces.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20972058','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20972058"><span id="translatedtitle">Sustainability <span class="hlt">index</span> for Taipei</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lee, Y.-J. . E-mail: yungjaanlee@pchome.com.tw; Huang Chingming . E-mail: michael@everwin.com.tw</p> <p>2007-08-15</p> <p>Sustainability indicators are an effective means of determining whether a city is moving towards sustainable development (SD). After considering the characteristics of Taipei, Taiwan, discussions with experts, scholars and government departments and an exhaustive literature review, this study selected 51 sustainability indicators corresponding to the socio-economic characteristic of Taipei City. Such indicators should be regarded as a basis for assessing SD in Taipei City. The 51 indicators are classified into economic, social, environmental and institutional dimensions. Furthermore, statistical data is adopted to identify the trend of SD from 1994 to 2004. Moreover, the sustainability <span class="hlt">index</span> is calculated for the four dimensions and for Taipei as a whole. Analysis results demonstrate that social and environmental indicators are moving towards SD, while economic and institutional dimensions are performing relatively poorly. However, since 2002, the economic sustainability <span class="hlt">index</span> has gradually moved towards SD. Overall, the Taipei sustainability <span class="hlt">index</span> indicates a gradual trend towards sustainable development during the past 11 years.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015176','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70015176"><span id="translatedtitle">Beyond the Kubler <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Eberl, D.D.; Velde, B.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>The value of peak width at half-height for the illite 001 XRD reflection is known as the Kubler <span class="hlt">index</span> or the illite "crystallinity' <span class="hlt">index</span>. This measurement, which has been related to the degree of metamorphism of very low-grade, pelitic rocks, is a function of at least two crystal-chemical factors: 1) illite X-ray scattering domain size; and 2) illite structural distortions (especially swelling). Reynolds' NEWMOD computer program is used to construct a grid with which these two contributions to illite peak width can be determined independently from measurements of the 001 peak width at half-height and the Srodon intensity ratio. This method yields more information about changes undergone by illite during metamorphism than application of the Kubler <span class="hlt">index</span> method alone. -Authors</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lithium&pg=4&id=EJ181472','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lithium&pg=4&id=EJ181472"><span id="translatedtitle">Corrosion Problems in <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Chillers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Stetson, Bruce</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> chillers use a lithium bromide solution as the medium of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and water as the refrigerant. Discussed are corrosion and related problems, tests and remedies, and cleaning procedures. (Author/MLF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21325834','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21325834"><span id="translatedtitle">Fabrication of multi-layered <span class="hlt">absorption</span> structure for high quantum efficiency photon detectors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fujii, Go; Fukuda, Daiji; Numata, Takayuki; Yoshizawa, Akio; Tsuchida, Hidemi; Fujino, Hidetoshi; Ishii, Hiroyuki; Itatani, Taro; Zama, Tatsuya; Inoue, Shuichiro</p> <p>2009-12-16</p> <p>We report on some efforts to improve a quantum efficiency of titanium-based optical superconducting transition edge sensors using the multi-layered <span class="hlt">absorption</span> structure for maximizing photon <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the Ti layer. Using complex refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> values of each film measured by a Spectroscopic Ellipsometry, we designed and optimized by a simulation code. An <span class="hlt">absorption</span> measurement of fabricated structure was in good agreement with the design and was higher than 99% at optimized wavelength of 1550 nm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2538220','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2538220"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> of endemicity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Swaroop, Satya</p> <p>1957-01-01</p> <p>The author discusses the difficulties involved in defining the term “endemicity”, and suggests a new approach to the problem—namely, the establishment of indices of endemicity, based on such data as are usually collected by national health administrations (mortality and morbidity rates, spleen-rates, case incidence in seaports, etc.). Examples are given of the calculation of the endemicity <span class="hlt">index</span> for a number of diseases from different types of data obtained from various countries. An important advantage of the endemicity <span class="hlt">index</span> is that it provides an easy means of studying the geographical pattern of endemic foci of disease. PMID:13479767</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sound+AND+absorption&id=ED026842','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=sound+AND+absorption&id=ED026842"><span id="translatedtitle">Acoustic <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Characteristics of People.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kingsbury, H. F.; Wallace, W. J.</p> <p>1968-01-01</p> <p>The acoustic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> characteristics of informally dressed college students in typical classroom seating are shown to differ substantially from data for formally dressed audiences in upholstered seating. <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> data, expressed as sabins per person or <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient per square foot, shows that there is considerable variation between…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6509322','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6509322"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation flux enhancement and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in thin films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dixit, V.; Lodenquai, J.; Mctavish, J.</p> <p>1984-03-01</p> <p>Flux enhancement of (solar) radiation in dielectric thin films with textured upper surfaces and diffuse, perfectly reflecting lower surfaces is investigated. In the case of a completely rough surface, considered as a set of randomly oriented smooth microscopic surfaces or facets, the flux enhancement is shown to be n-squared in the absence of <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, where n is the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of the film. In cases when the upper surface is not completely rough but may be approximated by a set of facets whose orientations follow a Gaussian distribution, the enhancement is studied numerically and is found to be generally less than n-squared. <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> is examined, and a general expression for the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> efficiency of the thin film is derived. Numerical results for efficiency versus <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient are presented. 8 references.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6702033','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6702033"><span id="translatedtitle">Radiation flux enhancement and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in thin film</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Dixit, V.; Lodenquai, J.; McTavish, J.</p> <p>1984-03-01</p> <p>Flux enhancement of (solar) radiation in dielectric thin films with textured upper surfaces ad diffuse, perfectly reflecting lower surfaces is investigated. In the case of a completely rough surface, considered as a set of randomly oriented smooth microscopic surfaces or facets, the flux enhancement is shown to be n/sup 2/ in the absence of <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, where n is the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of the film. In cases when the upper surface is not completely rough but may be approximated by a set of facets whose orientations follow a Gaussian distribution, the enhancement is studied numerically and is found to be generally less than n/sup 2/. <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> is examined, and a general expression for the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> efficiency of the thin film is derived. Numerical results for efficiency versus <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficiet are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160004053','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20160004053"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Voltages and Insulation Resistance in Ceramic Capacitors with Cracks</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Teverovsky, Alexander</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Time dependence of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> voltages (Vabs) in different types of low-voltage X5R and X7R ceramic capacitors was monitored for a maximum duration of hundred hours after polarization. To evaluate the effect of mechanical defects on Vabs, cracks in the dielectric were introduced either mechanically or by thermal shock. The maximum <span class="hlt">absorption</span> voltage, time to roll-off, and the rate of voltage decrease are shown to depend on the crack-related leakage currents and insulation resistance in the parts. A simple model that is based on the Dow equivalent circuit for capacitors with <span class="hlt">absorption</span> has been developed to assess the insulation resistance of capacitors. Standard measurements of the insulation resistance, contrary to the measurements based on Vabs, are not sensitive to the presence of mechanical defects and fail to reveal capacitors with cracks. <span class="hlt">Index</span> Terms: Ceramic capacitor, insulation resistance, dielectric <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, cracking.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LTP....41..760D','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015LTP....41..760D"><span id="translatedtitle">Graded-<span class="hlt">index</span> magnonics</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Davies, C. S.; Kruglyak, V. V.</p> <p>2015-10-01</p> <p>The wave solutions of the Landau-Lifshitz equation (spin waves) are characterized by some of the most complex and peculiar dispersion relations among all waves. For example, the spin-wave ("magnonic") dispersion can range from the parabolic law (typical for a quantum-mechanical electron) at short wavelengths to the nonanalytical linear type (typical for light and acoustic phonons) at long wavelengths. Moreover, the long-wavelength magnonic dispersion has a gap and is inherently anisotropic, being naturally negative for a range of relative orientations between the effective field and the spin-wave wave vector. Nonuniformities in the effective field and magnetization configurations enable the guiding and steering of spin waves in a deliberate manner and therefore represent landscapes of graded refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> (graded magnonic <span class="hlt">index</span>). By analogy to the fields of graded-<span class="hlt">index</span> photonics and transformation optics, the studies of spin waves in graded magnonic landscapes can be united under the umbrella of the graded-<span class="hlt">index</span> magnonics theme and are reviewed here with focus on the challenges and opportunities ahead of this exciting research direction.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=application+AND+index+AND+refraction&id=EJ300392','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=application+AND+index+AND+refraction&id=EJ300392"><span id="translatedtitle">Gradient Refractive <span class="hlt">Index</span> Lenses.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Morton, N.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Describes the nature of gradient refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> (GRIN) lenses, focusing on refraction in these materials, focal length of a thin Wood lens, and on manufacturing of such lenses. Indicates that GRIN lenses of small cross section are in limited production with applications suggested for optical communication and photocopying fields. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770013458','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19770013458"><span id="translatedtitle">Space Photography 1977 <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>An <span class="hlt">index</span> is provided to representative photographs and transparencies available from NASA. Subjects include spacecraft, astronauts, lunar surface, planets and outer space phenomena, earth observations, and aviation. High altitude aircraft infrared photographs are included along with artists' conceptions of space shuttle and space colonies.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_15");'>15</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li class="active"><span>17</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_17 --> <div id="page_18" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="341"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Forbes&pg=2&id=EJ603328','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Forbes&pg=2&id=EJ603328"><span id="translatedtitle">The Misery <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Bracey, Gerald W.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>U.S. taxpayers score lower on the "Forbes" Misery <span class="hlt">Index</span> than taxpayers of other industrialized nations. A recent report concludes that public-school students challenge their schools more than private-school counterparts. Low birth weight and demographic factors (gender, poverty, and race) affect Florida's burgeoning special-education placements.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ914571.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ914571.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> for Inclusion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Smith, Allister</p> <p>2005-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Index</span> for Inclusion is a programme to assist in developing learning and participation in schools. It was written by Tony Booth and Mel Ainscow from the Centre for Studies on Inclusive Education, UK. Central Normal School was pleased to have the opportunity to trial this programme.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987STIN...8829218H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987STIN...8829218H"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> heat pumps</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huhtinen, M.; Heikkilae, M.; Andersson, R.</p> <p>1987-03-01</p> <p>The aim of the study was to analyze the technical and economic feasibility of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pumps in Finland. The work was done as a case study: the technical and economic analyses have been carried out for six different cases, where in each the suitable size and type of the heat pump plant and the auxiliary components and connections were specified. The study also detailed the costs concerning the procurement, installation and test runs of the machinery, as well as the savings in energy costs incurred by the introduction of the plant. Conclusions were drawn of the economic viability of the applications studied. The following cases were analyzed: heat recovery from flue gases and productin of district heat in plants using peat, natural gas, and municipal wastes as a fuel. Heat recovery in the pulp and paper industry for the upgrading of pressure of secondary steam and for the heating of white liquor and combustion and drying the air. Heat recovery in a peat-fulled heat and power plant from flue gases that have been used for the drying of peat. According to the study, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump suits best to the production of district heat, when the heat source is the primary energy is steam produced by the boiler. Included in the flue as condensing is the purification of flue gases. Accordingly, benefit is gained on two levels in thick applications. In heat and power plants the use of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pumps is less economical, due to the fact that the steam used by the pump reduces the production of electricity, which is rated clearly higher than heat.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhRvC..26...22C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1982PhRvC..26...22C"><span id="translatedtitle">Scattering with <span class="hlt">absorptive</span> interaction</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Cassing, W.; Stingl, M.; Weiguny, A.</p> <p>1982-07-01</p> <p>The S matrix for a wide class of complex and nonlocal potentials is studied, with special attention given to the motion of singularities in the complex k plane as a function of the imaginary coupling strength. Modifications of Levinson's theorem are obtained and discussed. Analytic approximations to the S matrix in the vicinity of narrow resonances are exhibited and compared to numerical results of resonating-group calculations. The problem of defining resonances in the case of complex interactions is discussed, making contact with the usual analysis of scattering in terms of Argand diagrams. NUCLEAR REACTIONS Scattering theory, S matrix for <span class="hlt">absorptive</span> potentials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7001490','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7001490"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> hygrometer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gersh, M.E.; Bien, F.; Bernstein, L.S.</p> <p>1986-12-09</p> <p>An ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined. 5 figs.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866075','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/866075"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> hygrometer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Gersh, Michael E.; Bien, Fritz; Bernstein, Lawrence S.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>An ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> hygrometer is provided including a source of pulsed ultraviolet radiation for providing radiation in a first wavelength region where water absorbs significantly and in a second proximate wavelength region where water absorbs weakly. Ultraviolet radiation in the first and second regions which has been transmitted through a sample path of atmosphere is detected. The intensity of the radiation transmitted in each of the first and second regions is compared and from this comparison the amount of water in the sample path is determined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874282','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/874282"><span id="translatedtitle">Fiber optic refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> monitor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Weiss, Jonathan David</p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A sensor for measuring the change in refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the <span class="hlt">index</span> of the liquid is significantly less than the <span class="hlt">index</span> of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its <span class="hlt">index</span> is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ACPD....920471C','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009ACPD....920471C"><span id="translatedtitle">Light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by organic carbon from wood combustion</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Chen, Y.; Bond, T. C.</p> <p>2009-09-01</p> <p>Carbonaceous aerosols affect the radiative balance of the Earth by absorbing and scattering light. While BC is highly absorbing, some organic compounds also have significant <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, which is greater at near-ultraviolet and blue wavelengths. To the extent that OC absorbs visible light, it may be a non-negligible contributor to direct aerosol radiative forcing. In this work, we examine <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by primary OC emitted from solid fuel pyrolysis. We provide <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of this material, which can be related to the imaginary refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. This material has polar character but is not fully water-soluble: more than 92% was extractable by methanol or acetone, compared with 73% for water and 52% for hexane. Water-soluble organic carbon contributed to light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at both ultraviolet and visible wavelengths. However, a larger portion came from organic carbon that is extractable only by methanol. The spectra of water-soluble organic carbon are similar to others in the literature. We compared spectra for material generated with different wood type, wood size and pyrolysis temperature. Higher wood temperature is the main factor creating organic aerosol with higher <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, causing about a factor of four increase in mass-normalized <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at visible wavelengths. A simple model suggests that, despite the <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, both high-temperature and low-temperature carbon have negative climate forcing over a surface with average albedo.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015A%26A...575A..44G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015A%26A...575A..44G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">The HI <span class="hlt">absorption</span> "Zoo"</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Geréb, K.; Maccagni, F. M.; Morganti, R.; Oosterloo, T. A.</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>We present an analysis of the H I 21 cm <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in a sample of 101 flux-selected radio AGN (S1.4 GHz> 50 mJy) observed with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope (WSRT). We detect H I <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in 32 objects (30% of the sample). In a previous paper, we performed a spectral stacking analysis on the radio sources, while here we characterize the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of the individual detections using the recently presented busy function. The H I <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra show a broad variety of widths, shapes, and kinematical properties. The full width half maximum (FWHM) of the busy function fits of the detected H I lines lies in the range 32 km s-1<FWHM< 570 km s-1, whereas the full width at 20% of the peak <span class="hlt">absorption</span> (FW20) lies in the range 63 km s-1<FW20< 825 km s-1. The width and asymmetry of the profiles allows us to identify three groups: narrow lines (FWHM< 100 km s-1), intermediate widths (100 km s-1<FWHM< 200 km s-1), and broad profiles (FWHM> 200 km s-1). We study the kinematical and radio source properties of each group, with the goal of identifying different morphological structures of H I. Narrow lines mostly lie at the systemic velocity and are likely produced by regularly rotating H I disks or gas clouds. More H I disks can be present among galaxies with lines of intermediate widths; however, the H I in these sources is more unsettled. We study the asymmetry parameter and blueshift/redshift distribution of the lines as a function of their width. We find a trend for which narrow profiles are also symmetric, while broad lines are the most asymmetric. Among the broadest lines, more lines appear blueshifted than redshifted, similarly to what was found by previous studies. Interestingly, symmetric broad lines are absent from the sample. We argue that if a profile is broad, it is also asymmetric and shifted relative to the systemic velocity because it is tracing unsettled H I gas. In particular, besides three of the broadest (up to FW20 = 825 km s-1</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993InfPh..34..117H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993InfPh..34..117H"><span id="translatedtitle">Interband and intraband contributions to refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and dispersion in narrow-gap semiconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Herrmann, K. H.; Melzer, V.; Müller, U.</p> <p>1993-04-01</p> <p>This review covers experimental methods and results for the determination of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. It discusses various empirical relations between refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and energy gap (Moss relation, Ravindra and Gopal formulae and the Wemple DiDomenico approach). Effects of free carriers and temperature are included. Finally, the Kramers-Kronig transformation of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> or reflection spectra is considered.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21435760','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21435760"><span id="translatedtitle">The tree BVOC <span class="hlt">index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Simpson, J R; McPherson, E G</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>Urban trees can produce a number of benefits, among them improved air quality. Biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) emitted by some species are ozone precursors. Modifying future tree planting to favor lower-emitting species can reduce these emissions and aid air management districts in meeting federally mandated emissions reductions for these compounds. Changes in BVOC emissions are calculated as the result of transitioning to a lower-emitting species mix in future planting. A simplified method for calculating the emissions reduction and a Tree BVOC <span class="hlt">index</span> based on the calculated reduction is described. An example illustrates the use of the <span class="hlt">index</span> as a tool for implementation and monitoring of a tree program designed to reduce BVOC emissions as a control measure being developed as part of the State Implementation Plan (SIP) for the Sacramento Federal Nonattainment Area. PMID:21435760</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70039048','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70039048"><span id="translatedtitle">Abstracting and <span class="hlt">indexing</span> guide</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>U.S. Department of the Interior; Office of Water Resources Research</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>These instructions have been prepared for those who abstract and <span class="hlt">index</span> scientific and technical documents for the Water Resources Scientific Information Center (WRSIC). With the recent publication growth in all fields, information centers have undertaken the task of keeping the various scientific communities aware of current and past developments. An abstract with carefully selected <span class="hlt">index</span> terms offers the user of WRSIC services a more rapid means for deciding whether a document is pertinent to his needs and professional interests, thus saving him the time necessary to scan the complete work. These means also provide WRSIC with a document representation or surrogate which is more easily stored and manipulated to produce various services. Authors are asked to accept the responsibility for preparing abstracts of their own papers to facilitate quick evaluation, announcement, and dissemination to the scientific community.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937352','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4937352"><span id="translatedtitle">Variable Lifting <span class="hlt">Index</span> (VLI)</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Waters, Thomas; Occhipinti, Enrico; Colombini, Daniela; Alvarez-Casado, Enrique; Fox, Robert</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>Objective: We seek to develop a new approach for analyzing the physical demands of highly variable lifting tasks through an adaptation of the Revised NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) Lifting Equation (RNLE) into a Variable Lifting <span class="hlt">Index</span> (VLI). Background: There are many jobs that contain individual lifts that vary from lift to lift due to the task requirements. The NIOSH Lifting Equation is not suitable in its present form to analyze variable lifting tasks. Method: In extending the prior work on the VLI, two procedures are presented to allow users to analyze variable lifting tasks. One approach involves the sampling of lifting tasks performed by a worker over a shift and the calculation of the Frequency Independent Lift <span class="hlt">Index</span> (FILI) for each sampled lift and the aggregation of the FILI values into six categories. The Composite Lift <span class="hlt">Index</span> (CLI) equation is used with lifting <span class="hlt">index</span> (LI) category frequency data to calculate the VLI. The second approach employs a detailed systematic collection of lifting task data from production and/or organizational sources. The data are organized into simplified task parameter categories and further aggregated into six FILI categories, which also use the CLI equation to calculate the VLI. Results: The two procedures will allow practitioners to systematically employ the VLI method to a variety of work situations where highly variable lifting tasks are performed. Conclusions: The scientific basis for the VLI procedure is similar to that for the CLI originally presented by NIOSH; however, the VLI method remains to be validated. Application: The VLI method allows an analyst to assess highly variable manual lifting jobs in which the task characteristics vary from lift to lift during a shift. PMID:26646300</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1983EOSTr..64R.122.&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=1983EOSTr..64R.122.&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">New weather <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the University of Delaware have refined the wind-chill factor, a common measurement of weather discomfort, into a new misery register called the weather stress <span class="hlt">index</span>. In addition to the mix of temperature and wind speed data used to calculate wind chill, the recipe for the <span class="hlt">index</span> adds two new ingredients—humidity and a dash of benchmark statistics—to estimate human reaction to weather conditions. NOAA says that the weather stress <span class="hlt">index</span> estimates human reaction to weather conditions and that the reaction depends on variations from the ‘normal’ conditions in the locality involved.Discomfort criteria for New Orleans, La., and Bismarck, N.D., for example, differ drastically. According to NOAA, when it's the middle of winter and it's -10°C with a relative humidity of 80% and 24 km/h winds, persons in New Orleans would be highly stressed while those in Bismarck wouldn't bat an eye.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014SPIE.9119E..0EA&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2014SPIE.9119E..0EA&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> of cyber integrity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Anderson, Gustave</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>Unfortunately, there is no metric, nor set of metrics, that are both general enough to encompass all possible types of applications yet specific enough to capture the application and attack specific details. As a result we are left with ad-hoc methods for generating evaluations of the security of our systems. Current state of the art methods for evaluating the security of systems include penetration testing and cyber evaluation tests. For these evaluations, security professionals simulate an attack from malicious outsiders and malicious insiders. These evaluations are very productive and are able to discover potential vulnerabilities resulting from improper system configuration, hardware and software flaws, or operational weaknesses. We therefore propose the <span class="hlt">index</span> of cyber integrity (ICI), which is modeled after the <span class="hlt">index</span> of biological integrity (IBI) to provide a holistic measure of the health of a system under test in a cyber-environment. The ICI provides a broad base measure through a collection of application and system specific metrics. In this paper, following the example of the IBI, we demonstrate how a multi-metric <span class="hlt">index</span> may be used as a holistic measure of the health of a system under test in a cyber-environment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LNCS.6124..180H','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010LNCS.6124..180H"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Similar DNA Sequences</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Huang, Songbo; Lam, T. W.; Sung, W. K.; Tam, S. L.; Yiu, S. M.</p> <p></p> <p>To study the genetic variations of a species, one basic operation is to search for occurrences of patterns in a large number of very similar genomic sequences. To build an <span class="hlt">indexing</span> data structure on the concatenation of all sequences may require a lot of memory. In this paper, we propose a new scheme to <span class="hlt">index</span> highly similar sequences by taking advantage of the similarity among the sequences. To store r sequences with k common segments, our <span class="hlt">index</span> requires only O(n + NlogN) bits of memory, where n is the total length of the common segments and N is the total length of the distinct regions in all texts. The total length of all sequences is rn + N, and any scheme to store these sequences requires Ω(n + N) bits. Searching for a pattern P of length m takes O(m + m logN + m log(rk)psc(P) + occlogn), where psc(P) is the number of prefixes of P that appear as a suffix of some common segments and occ is the number of occurrences of P in all sequences. In practice, rk ≤ N, and psc(P) is usually a small constant. We have implemented our solution and evaluated our solution using real DNA sequences. The experiments show that the memory requirement of our solution is much less than that required by BWT built on the concatenation of all sequences. When compared to the other existing solution (RLCSA), we use less memory with faster searching time.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780009924','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780009924"><span id="translatedtitle">Differential optoacoustic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> detector</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Shumate, M. S. (Inventor)</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A differential optoacoustic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> detector employed two tapered cells in tandem or in parallel. When operated in tandem, two mirrors were used at one end remote from the source of the beam of light directed into one cell back through the other, and a lens to focus the light beam into the one cell at a principal focus half way between the reflecting mirror. Each cell was tapered to conform to the shape of the beam so that the volume of one was the same as for the other, and the volume of each received maximum illumination. The axes of the cells were placed as close to each other as possible in order to connect a differential pressure detector to the cells with connecting passages of minimum length. An alternative arrangement employed a beam splitter and two lenses to operate the cells in parallel.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890018801','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19890018801"><span id="translatedtitle">Cloud <span class="hlt">absorption</span> radiometer</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Strange, M. G.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>The Cloud <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Radiometer (CAR) was developed to measure spectrally how light is scattered by clouds and to determine the single scattering albedo, important to meteorology and climate studies, with unprecedented accuracy. This measurement is based on ratios of downwelling to upwelling radiation within clouds, and so is not strongly dependent upon absolute radiometric calibration of the instrument. The CAR has a 5-inch aperture and 1 degree IFOV, and spatially scans in a plane orthogonal to the flight vector from the zenith to nadir at 1.7 revolutions per second. Incoming light is measured in 13 spectral bands, using silicon, germanium, and indium-antimonide detectors. Data from each channel is digitally recorded in flight with 10-bit (0.1 percent) resolution. The instrument incorporates several novel features. These features are briefly detailed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020080175','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20020080175"><span id="translatedtitle">Analyzing Water's Optical <span class="hlt">Absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>2002-01-01</p> <p>A cooperative agreement between World Precision Instruments (WPI), Inc., and Stennis Space Center has led the UltraPath(TM) device, which provides a more efficient method for analyzing the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of water samples at sea. UltraPath is a unique, high-performance absorbance spectrophotometer with user-selectable light path lengths. It is an ideal tool for any study requiring precise and highly sensitive spectroscopic determination of analytes, either in the laboratory or the field. As a low-cost, rugged, and portable system capable of high- sensitivity measurements in widely divergent waters, UltraPath will help scientists examine the role that coastal ocean environments play in the global carbon cycle. UltraPath(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc. LWCC(TM) is a trademark of World Precision Instruments, Inc.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=programmable+AND+calculator&pg=5&id=EJ114899','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=programmable+AND+calculator&pg=5&id=EJ114899"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">CAI</span> on a Programmable Calculator</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Schlaphoff, Carl W.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>This article describes a procedure for presenting routine practice problems on a programable calculator with attached teletype. The program uses a random number generator to write problems, gives feedback and assigns grades according to the procedures outlined (and flow-charted) by the author. (SD)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_16");'>16</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li class="active"><span>18</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_18 --> <div id="page_19" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="361"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3422856','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3422856"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in preterm infants.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>West, D P; Halket, J M; Harvey, D R; Hadgraft, J; Solomon, L M; Harper, J I</p> <p>1987-11-01</p> <p>The skin of preterm infants varies considerably in its level of maturity. To understand skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in premature infants better, we report a technique for the assessment of percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at various gestational and postnatal ages using stable, isotope-labeled (13C6) benzoic acid. Our results indicate that in the preterm infant, this method detects enhanced skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the first postnatal days, which declines over three weeks to that expected of a full-term infant. This approach also indicates an inverse relationship between gestational age and skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, as well as postnatal age and skin <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The reported technique is a safe and noninvasive method using a model skin penetrant for the study of percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in preterm infants from which basic data may be derived to add to our understanding of skin barrier function. PMID:3422856</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2670211','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2670211"><span id="translatedtitle">The great contribution: <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus, <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue, and <span class="hlt">Index</span>Cat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Greenberg, Stephen J.; Gallagher, Patricia E.</p> <p>2009-01-01</p> <p>Objective: The systematic <span class="hlt">indexing</span> of medical literature by the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office (now the National Library of Medicine) has been called “America's greatest contribution to medical knowledge.” In the 1870s, the library launched two <span class="hlt">indexes</span>: the <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus and the <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue of the Library of the Surgeon-General's Office. <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus is better remembered today as the forerunner of MEDLINE, but <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus began as the junior partner of what the library saw as its major publication, the <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue. However, the <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue had been largely overlooked by many medical librarians until 2004, when the National Library of Medicine released <span class="hlt">Index</span>Cat, the online version of <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue. Access to this huge amount of material raised new questions: What was the coverage of the <span class="hlt">Index</span>-Catalogue? How did it compare and overlap with the <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus? Method: Over 1,000 randomly generated <span class="hlt">Index</span> Medicus citations were cross-referenced in <span class="hlt">Index</span>Cat. Results: Inclusion, form, content, authority control, and subject headings were evaluated, revealing that the relationship between the two publications was neither simple nor static through time. In addition, the authors found interesting anomalies that shed light on how medical literature was selected and <span class="hlt">indexed</span> in “America's greatest contribution to medical knowledge.” PMID:19404501</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4094155','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4094155"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Fibre Level and Fibre Source on Gut Morphology and Micro-environment in Local (Mong <span class="hlt">Cai</span>) and Exotic (Landrace×Yorkshire) Pigs</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Ngoc, T. T. B.; Hong, T. T. T.; Len, N. T.; Lindberg, J. E.</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>The effect of genotype, fibre level and fibre source on gut morphology, environment and microflora was studied using 18 Mong <span class="hlt">Cai</span> (MC) and 18 Landrace×Yorkshire (LY) pigs, aged around 60 d. The diets were based on maize, rice bran, soybean meal, fish meal and soybean oil, and cassava residue (CR) or brewer’s grain (BG) as fibrous ingredient sources in the high-fibre diets (HF). A low-fibre diet (LF), containing around 200 g NDF/kg dry matter (DM), was formulated without CR and BG as feed ingredients. The HF diets (HF-CR and HF-BG) were formulated to contain around 270 g NDF/kg DM. The experiment was arranged according to a 2×3 factorial completely randomized design with six replications, and lasted 30 d. Crypt density in ileum was lowest (p<0.05) and villus height in jejunum and ileum were the greatest (p<0.05) in pigs fed diet HF-BG. Villus width in ileum was greatest in pigs fed diets HF-CR and HF-BG (p<0.05). Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) counts in stomach were greatest (p<0.05) and E. coli counts in ileum and colon were lowest (p<0.05) in pigs fed diet HF-CR. The concentration of total organic acids in ileum, caecum and colon were greatest (p<0.05), and pH in ileum and colon were lowest (p<0.05) in pigs fed diet HF-CR. Crypt density in ileum was lowest, and villus height in ileum and villus width in jejunum and ileum was greatest in LY pigs (p<0.05). LAB counts in stomach and ileum were greatest, and E. coli counts in ileum were lowest in MC pigs (p<0.05). The concentration of total organic acids in ileum, caecum and colon were greatest (p<0.05) and pH lowest (p<0.05) in MC pigs. PMID:25049538</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wa0175.photos.168866p/','SCIGOV-HHH'); return false;" href="//www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/item/wa0175.photos.168866p/"><span id="translatedtitle">29. TRACK LAYOUT, <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> TO DRAWINGS AND <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> TO MATERIALS, ...</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.loc.gov/pictures/collection/hh/">Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>29. TRACK LAYOUT, <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> TO DRAWINGS AND <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> TO MATERIALS, REED & STEM ARCHITECTS, ST. PAUL, NEW YORK, 1909 (Burlington Northern Collection, Seattle, Washington) - Union Passenger Station Concourse, 1713 Pacific Avenue, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986PhDT........55B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1986PhDT........55B"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> in Liquid Semiconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Bell, Florian Gene</p> <p></p> <p>An infrared <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cell has been developed which is suitable for high temperature liquids which have <span class="hlt">absorptions</span> in the range .1-10('3) cm('-1). The cell is constructed by clamping a gasket between two flat optical windows. This unique design allows the use of any optical windows chemically compatible with the liquid. The long -wavelength limit of the measurements is therefore limited only by the choice of the optical windows. The thickness of the cell can easily be set during assembly, and can be varied from 50 (mu)m to .5 cm. Measurements of the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> edge were performed on the liquid alloy Se(,1-x)Tl(,x) for x = 0, .001, .002, .003, .005, .007, and .009, from the melting point up to 475(DEGREES)C. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> was found to be exponential in the photon energy over the experimental range from 0.3 eV to 1.2 eV. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> increased linearly with concentration according to the empirical relation (alpha)(,T)(h(nu)) = (alpha)(,1) + (alpha)(,2)x, and the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> (alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the absence of T1. (alpha)(,1) also agreed with the measured <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in 100% Se at corresponding temperatures and energies. The excess <span class="hlt">absorption</span> defined by (DELTA)(alpha) = (alpha)(,T)(h(nu))-(alpha)(,1) was interpreted as the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> associated with Tl and was found to be thermally activated with an activation energy E(,t) = 0.5 eV. The exponential edge is explained as <span class="hlt">absorption</span> on atoms immersed in strong electric fields surrounding ions. The strong fields give rise to an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> tail similar to the Franz-Keldysh effect. A simple calculation is performed which is based on the Dow-Redfield theory of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in an electric field with excitonic effects included. The excess <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at low photon energies is proportional to the square of the concentration of ions, which are proposed to exist in the liquid according to the relation C(,i) (PROPORTIONAL) x(' 1/2)(.)e('-E)t('/kT), which is the origin of the thermal activation</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/971436','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/971436"><span id="translatedtitle">X-ray <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Spectroscopy</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.</p> <p>2009-07-09</p> <p>This review gives a brief description of the theory and application of X-ray <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectroscopy, both X-ray <span class="hlt">absorption</span> near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray <span class="hlt">absorption</span> fine structure (EXAFS), especially, pertaining to photosynthesis. The advantages and limitations of the methods are discussed. Recent advances in extended EXAFS and polarized EXAFS using oriented membranes and single crystals are explained. Developments in theory in understanding the XANES spectra are described. The application of X-ray <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectroscopy to the study of the Mn4Ca cluster in Photosystem II is presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740020015&hterms=mineral+wool+insulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmineral%2Bwool%2Binsulation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740020015&hterms=mineral+wool+insulation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D10%26Ntt%3Dmineral%2Bwool%2Binsulation"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimization of the acoustic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients of certain functional absorbents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pocsa, V.; Biborosch, L.; Veres, A.; Halpert, E.; Lorian, R.; Botos, T.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>The sound <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients of some functional absorbents (mineral wool plates) are determined by the reverberation chamber method. The influence of the angle of inclination of the sound absorbing material with respect to the surface to be treated is analyzed as well as the influence of the covering <span class="hlt">index</span>, defined as the ratio of the designed area of a plate and the area of the treated surface belonging to another plate. As compared with the conventional method of applying sound-absorbing plates, the analyzed structures have a higher technological and economical efficiency. The optimum structure corresponds to an angle of inclination of 15 deg and a covering <span class="hlt">index</span> of 0.8.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScI...87b3904S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016RScI...87b3904S"><span id="translatedtitle">Photothermal method for <span class="hlt">absorption</span> measurements in anisotropic crystals</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Stubenvoll, M.; Schäfer, B.; Mann, K.; Novak, O.</p> <p>2016-02-01</p> <p>A measurement system for quantitative determination of both surface and bulk contributions to the photo-thermal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> has been extended to anisotropic optical media. It bases upon a highly sensitive Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor, accomplishing precise on-line monitoring of wavefront deformations of a collimated test beam transmitted perpendicularly through the laser-irradiated side of a cuboid sample. Caused by the temperature dependence of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> as well as thermal expansion, the initially plane wavefront of the test beam is distorted. Sign and magnitude depend on <span class="hlt">index</span> change and expansion. By comparison with thermal theory, a calibration of the measurement is possible, yielding a quantitative absolute measure of bulk and surface <span class="hlt">absorption</span> losses from the transient wavefront distortion. Results for KTP and BBO single crystals are presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20935789','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20935789"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span>-coefficient-determination method for particulate materials.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Lindberg, J D; Douglass, R E; Garvey, D M</p> <p>1994-07-01</p> <p>A method is presented for determining the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient, or the imaginary refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>, of particulate material that has been collected from aerosols or hydrosols by means of filtration. The method, based on the Kubelka-Munk theory of diffuse reflectance, is nondestructive and requires no other knowledge of the sample than the amount present, the specific gravity, and an estimate of the real <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction. The theoretical development of the method is discussed along with an analysis of photometric and gravimetric errors. We test the method by comparing results obtained for powdered didymium glass with measurements made before the glass was crushed. An example of the method's application to the determination of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient of atmospheric dust at UV, visible, and near-IR wavelengths is also presented. PMID:20935789</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046799','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1046799"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> Sets and Vectorization</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Keasler, J A</p> <p>2012-03-27</p> <p>Vectorization is data parallelism (SIMD, SIMT, etc.) - extension of ISA enabling the same instruction to be performed on multiple data items simultaeously. Many/most CPUs support vectorization in some form. Vectorization is difficult to enable, but can yield large efficiency gains. Extra programmer effort is required because: (1) not all algorithms can be vectorized (regular algorithm structure and fine-grain parallelism must be used); (2) most CPUs have data alignment restrictions for load/store operations (obey or risk incorrect code); (3) special directives are often needed to enable vectorization; and (4) vector instructions are architecture-specific. Vectorization is the best way to optimize for power and performance due to reduced clock cycles. When data is organized properly, a vector load instruction (i.e. movaps) can replace 'normal' load instructions (i.e. movsd). Vector operations can potentially have a smaller footprint in the instruction cache when fewer instructions need to be executed. Hybrid <span class="hlt">index</span> sets insulate users from architecture specific details. We have applied hybrid <span class="hlt">index</span> sets to achieve optimal vectorization. We can extend this concept to handle other programming models.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890841','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4890841"><span id="translatedtitle">Body Mass <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Nuttall, Frank Q.</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>The body mass <span class="hlt">index</span> (BMI) is the metric currently in use for defining anthropometric height/weight characteristics in adults and for classifying (categorizing) them into groups. The common interpretation is that it represents an <span class="hlt">index</span> of an individual’s fatness. It also is widely used as a risk factor for the development of or the prevalence of several health issues. In addition, it is widely used in determining public health policies.The BMI has been useful in population-based studies by virtue of its wide acceptance in defining specific categories of body mass as a health issue. However, it is increasingly clear that BMI is a rather poor indicator of percent of body fat. Importantly, the BMI also does not capture information on the mass of fat in different body sites. The latter is related not only to untoward health issues but to social issues as well. Lastly, current evidence indicates there is a wide range of BMIs over which mortality risk is modest, and this is age related. All of these issues are discussed in this brief review. PMID:27340299</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=292117','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=292117"><span id="translatedtitle">Intestinal folate <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Strum, Williamson; Nixon, Peter F.; Bertino, Joseph B.; Binder, Henry J.</p> <p>1971-01-01</p> <p>Intestinal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the monoglutamate form of the principal dietary and circulating folate compound, 5-methyltetrahydrofolic acid (5-MTHF), was studied in the rat utilizing a synthetic highly purified radiolabeled diastereoisomer. Chromatography confirmed that the compound was not altered after transfer from the mucosa to the serosa. Accumulation against a concentration gradient was not observed in duodenal, jejunal, or ileal segments at 5-MTHF concentration from 0.5 to 500 nmoles/liter. Unidirectional transmural flux determination also did not indicate a significant net flux. Mucosal to serosal transfer of 5-MTHF was similar in all segments of the intestine and increased in a linear fashion with increased initial mucosal concentrations. Further, no alteration in 5-MTHF transfer was found when studied in the presence of metabolic inhibitors or folate compounds. These results indicate that 5-MTHF is not absorbed by the rat small intestine by a carrier-mediated system and suggest that 5-MTHF transfer most likely represents diffusion. Images PMID:5564397</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583115','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21583115"><span id="translatedtitle">NH AND Mg <span class="hlt">INDEX</span> TRENDS IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Serven, Jedidiah; Worthey, Guy; Toloba, Elisa; Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia</p> <p>2011-06-15</p> <p>We examine the spectrum in the vicinity of the NH3360 <span class="hlt">index</span> of Davidge and Clark, which was defined to measure the NH <span class="hlt">absorption</span> around 3360 A and shows almost no trend with velocity dispersion, unlike other N-sensitive indices, which show a strong trend. Computing the effect of individual elements on the integrated spectrum with synthetic stellar population integrated spectra, we find that, while being well correlated with nitrogen abundance, NH3360 is almost equally well anti-correlated with Mg abundance. This prompts the definition of two new indices, Mg3334, which is mostly sensitive to magnesium, and NH3375, which is mostly sensitive to nitrogen. Rather surprisingly, we find that the new NH3375 <span class="hlt">index</span> shows a trend versus optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> feature indices that is as shallow as the NH3360 <span class="hlt">index</span>. We hypothesize that the lack of a strong <span class="hlt">index</span> trend in these near-UV indices is due to the presence of an old metal-poor component of the galactic population. Comparison of observed <span class="hlt">index</span> trends and those predicted by models shows that a modest fraction of an old, metal-poor stellar population could easily account for the observed flat trend in these near-UV indices while still allowing substantial N abundance increase in the larger galaxies.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lookup&pg=4&id=EJ343915','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lookup&pg=4&id=EJ343915"><span id="translatedtitle">An Introduction to Voice <span class="hlt">Indexing</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Chandler, James G.</p> <p>1986-01-01</p> <p>Uses and sources of voice <span class="hlt">indexing</span> (a look-up feature for recorded materials) are discussed. Voice <span class="hlt">indexing</span> enables a blind user of audiocassettes to find specific sections of recorded text independently. A procedure for sequential voice <span class="hlt">indexing</span> on a two-track or four-track cassette recorder is described. (JW)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970023923','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19970023923"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> in Cloudy Atmospheres</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Harshvardhan; Ridgway, William; Ramaswamy, V.; Freidenreich, S. M.; Batey, Michael</p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>The theoretical computations used to compute spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of solar radiation are discussed. Radiative properties relevant to the cloud <span class="hlt">absorption</span> problem are presented and placed in the context of radiative forcing. Implications for future measuring programs and the effect of horizontal inhomogeneities are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780004665','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19780004665"><span id="translatedtitle">Atlas of Infrared <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Lines</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Park, J. H.</p> <p>1977-01-01</p> <p>This atlas of infrared <span class="hlt">absorption</span> line contains <span class="hlt">absorption</span> line parameters (line strength vs. wavenumber) from 500 to 7000 cm(exp-1) for 15 gases: H2O, CO2, O3, N2O, CO, CH4, O2, SO2, NO, NO2, NH3, HCl, HF, HNO3 and CH3Cl.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20068797','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20068797"><span id="translatedtitle">Hot tube atomic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrochemistry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Woodriff, R; Stone, R W</p> <p>1968-07-01</p> <p>A small, commercially available atomic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> instrument is used with a heated graphite tube for the atomic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> analysis of liquid and solid silver samples. Operating conditions of the furnace are described and a sensitivity of about 5 ng of silver is reported. PMID:20068797</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/documents/fullText/ACC0471.pdf','DOE-RDACC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/documents/fullText/ACC0471.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Subgap <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> in Conjugated Polymers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/accomplishments/fieldedsearch.html">DOE R&D Accomplishments Database</a></p> <p>Sinclair, M.; Seager, C. H.; McBranch, D.; Heeger, A. J; Baker, G. L.</p> <p>1991-01-01</p> <p>Along with X{sup (3)}, the magnitude of the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the transparent window below the principal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> edge is an important parameter which will ultimately determine the utility of conjugated polymers in active integrated optical devices. With an <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> sensitivity of < 10{sup {minus}5}, Photothermal Deflection Spectroscopy (PDS) is ideal for determining the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients of thin films of transparent'' materials. We have used PDS to measure the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra of the conjugated polymers poly(1,4-phenylene-vinylene) (and derivitives) and polydiacetylene-4BCMU in the spectral region from 0.55 eV to 3 eV. Our spectra show that the shape of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> edge varies considerably from polymer to polymer, with polydiacetylene-4BCMU having the steepest <span class="hlt">absorption</span> edge. The minimum <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients measured varied somewhat with sample age and quality, but were typically in the range 1 cm{sup {minus}1} to 10 cm{sup {minus}1}. In the region below 1 eV, overtones of C-H stretching modes were observed, indicating that further improvements in transparency in this spectral region might be achieved via deuteration of fluorination.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910043554&hterms=bass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dbass','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19910043554&hterms=bass&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D90%26Ntt%3Dbass"><span id="translatedtitle">Atmospheric <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of sound - Update</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Bass, H. E.; Sutherland, L. C.; Zuckerwar, A. J.</p> <p>1990-01-01</p> <p>Best current expressions for the vibrational relaxation times of oxygen and nitrogen in the atmosphere are used to compute total <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The resulting graphs of total <span class="hlt">absorption</span> as a function of frequency for different humidities should be used in lieu of the graph published earlier by Evans et al (1972).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1142....1F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009AIPC.1142....1F"><span id="translatedtitle">Increase of Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> through optical irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fumarel, R.; Murgoi, Gabriela; Albert, P.; Hurduc, Anca; Pascu, M. L.</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>The increase/modification of the Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> by neoplastic tissue exposure to optical radiation emitted between 400-2000 nm was studied; Cisplatinumum molecules do not absorb between 400 nm-2 □m. Doppler ultrasonography indicates that, following exposure, the living tissue local micro-vascularisation increases in a controlled and reversible way. The increase in the Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> may be produced by accelerating the intracellular hydrolyze processes due to the water molecules <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the near infrared. The irradiation makes possible the use of Cisplatinumum doses 10 times lower than in conventional chemotherapy; this generates lower secondary effects (kidney toxicity) while increasing the drug antineoplastic effect.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_17");'>17</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li class="active"><span>19</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_19 --> <div id="page_20" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="381"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21316815','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21316815"><span id="translatedtitle">Increase of Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> through optical irradiation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Fumarel, R.; Murgoi, Gabriela; Albert, P.; Hurduc, Anca; Pascu, M. L.</p> <p>2009-06-19</p> <p>The increase/modification of the Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> by neoplastic tissue exposure to optical radiation emitted between 400-2000 nm was studied; Cisplatinumum molecules do not absorb between 400 nm-2 {open_square}m. Doppler ultrasonography indicates that, following exposure, the living tissue local micro-vascularisation increases in a controlled and reversible way. The increase in the Cisplatinum therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> may be produced by accelerating the intracellular hydrolyze processes due to the water molecules <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the near infrared. The irradiation makes possible the use of Cisplatinumum doses 10 times lower than in conventional chemotherapy; this generates lower secondary effects (kidney toxicity) while increasing the drug antineoplastic effect.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007Prama..68..435B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2007Prama..68..435B"><span id="translatedtitle">Measurements of photoinduced refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes in bacteriorhodopsin films</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Banyal, Ravinder Kumar; Raghavendra Prasad, B.</p> <p>2007-03-01</p> <p>We report the pump--probe measurements of nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes in photochromic bacteriorhodopsin films. The photoinduced <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is caused by pump beam at 532 nm and the accompanying refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> changes are studied using a probe beam at 633 nm. The proposed technique is based on a convenient and accurate determination of optical path difference using digital interferometry-based local fringe shift. The results are presented for the wild-type as well as genetically modified D96N variant of the bacteriorhodopsin.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089373','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22089373"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of silicon nanowires</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Xu, T.; Lambert, Y.; Krzeminski, C.; Grandidier, B.; Stievenard, D.; Leveque, G.; Akjouj, A.; Pennec, Y.; Djafari-Rouhani, B.</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>We report on simulations and measurements of the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of silicon nanowires (NWs) versus their diameter. We first address the simulation of the optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> based on two different theoretical methods: the first one, based on the Green function formalism, is useful to calculate the scattering and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties of a single or a finite set of NWs. The second one, based on the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method, is well-adapted to deal with a periodic set of NWs. In both cases, an increase of the onset energy for the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is found with increasing diameter. Such effect is experimentally illustrated, when photoconductivity measurements are performed on single tapered Si nanowires connected between a set of several electrodes. An increase of the nanowire diameter reveals a spectral shift of the photocurrent intensity peak towards lower photon energies that allow to tune the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> onset from the ultraviolet radiations to the visible light spectrum.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930044363&hterms=HOCl&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DHOCl','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19930044363&hterms=HOCl&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3DHOCl"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum of HOCl</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Burkholder, James B.</p> <p>1993-01-01</p> <p>The room temperature UV <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum of HOCl was measured over the wavelength range 200 to 380 nm with a diode array spectrometer. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum was identified from UV <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra recorded following UV photolysis of equilibrium mixtures of Cl2O/H2O/HOCl. The HOCl spectrum is continuous with a maximum at 242 nm and a secondary peak at 304 nm. The measured <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross section at 242 nm was (2.1 +/- 0.3) x 10 exp -19/sq cm (2 sigma error limits). These results are in excellent agreement with the work of Knauth et al. (1979) but in poor agreement with the more recent measurements of Mishalanie et al. (1986) and Permien et al. (1988). An HOCl nu2 infrared band intensity of 230 +/- 35/sq cm atm was determined based on this UV <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross section. The present results are compared with these previous measurements and the discrepancies are discussed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27137717','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27137717"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of lapatinib on oral digoxin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in patients.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Koch, Kevin M; Smith, Deborah A; Botbyl, Jeff; Arya, Nikita; Briley, Linda P; Cartee, Leanne; White, Jane Holshouser; Beyer, Jennifer; Dar, Mohammed M; Chung, Hyun Choel; Chu, Quincy; Bang, Yung-Jue</p> <p>2015-11-01</p> <p>The potential for an interaction between lapatinib and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the P-glycoprotein (ABCB1) substrate digoxin at a therapeutic dose in breast cancer patients was characterized. Seventeen women with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer received a single oral 0.5-mg dose of digoxin on days 1 and 9 and oral lapatinib 1500 mg once daily on days 2 through 9. Digoxin pharmacokinetic parameters were determined on day 1 (digoxin administration alone) and on day 9 (coadministration of lapatinib and digoxin), and parameters were compared to determine the effects of lapatinib on digoxin <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Concomitant medications that could affect ABCB1 were accounted for. Lapatinib 1500 mg/day increased digoxin <span class="hlt">absorption</span> approximately 80%, implicating lapatinib inhibition of intestinal ABCB1-mediated efflux. In summary, coadministration of lapatinib with narrow therapeutic <span class="hlt">index</span> drugs that are substrates of ABCB1 should be undertaken with caution and dose adjustment should be considered. PMID:27137717</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863235','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/863235"><span id="translatedtitle">Gas-<span class="hlt">absorption</span> process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Stephenson, Michael J.; Eby, Robert S.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>This invention is an improved gas-<span class="hlt">absorption</span> process for the recovery of a desired component from a feed-gas mixture containing the same. In the preferred form of the invention, the process operations are conducted in a closed-loop system including a gas-liquid contacting column having upper, intermediate, and lower contacting zones. A liquid absorbent for the desired component is circulated through the loop, being passed downwardly through the column, regenerated, withdrawn from a reboiler, and then recycled to the column. A novel technique is employed to concentrate the desired component in a narrow section of the intermediate zone. This technique comprises maintaining the temperature of the liquid-phase input to the intermediate zone at a sufficiently lower value than that of the gas-phase input to the zone to effect condensation of a major part of the absorbent-vapor upflow to the section. This establishes a steep temperature gradient in the section. The stripping factors below this section are selected to ensure that virtually all of the gases in the downflowing absorbent from the section are desorbed. The stripping factors above the section are selected to ensure re-dissolution of the desired component but not the less-soluble diluent gases. As a result, a peak concentration of the desired component is established in the section, and gas rich in that component can be withdrawn therefrom. The new process provides important advantages. The chief advantage is that the process operations can be conducted in a single column in which the contacting zones operate at essentially the same pressure.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760041714&hterms=egan&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Degan','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19760041714&hterms=egan&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Degan"><span id="translatedtitle">Complex refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of Martian dust - Mariner 9 ultraviolet observations</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Pang, K.; Ajello, J. M.; Hord, C. W.; Egan, W. G.</p> <p>1976-01-01</p> <p>Mariner 9 ultraviolet spectrometer observations of the 1971 dust clouds obscuring the surface of Mars have been analyzed by matching the observed dust phase function with Mie scattering calculations for size distributions of homogeneous and isotropic material. Preliminary results indicate an effective particle radius of not less than 0.2. The real component of the <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction is not less than 1.8 at both 268 and 305 nm; corresponding values for the imagery component are 0.02 and 0.01. These values are consistent with those found by Mead (1970) for the visible and near-visible wavelengths. The refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> and the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient increase rapidly with decreasing wavelength in going from the visible to the ultraviolet, indicating the presence of an ultraviolet <span class="hlt">absorption</span> band which may shield organisms from ultraviolet irradiation.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2972429','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2972429"><span id="translatedtitle">SCARF SOCIAL FUNCTIONING <span class="hlt">INDEX</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Padmavathi, R.; Thara, R.; Srinivasan, Latha; Kumar, Shuba</p> <p>1995-01-01</p> <p>Several instruments measuring social functioning have been developed in the last four decades, as a result of the increasing interest in community care of the chronic mentally ill. SCARF Social Functioning <span class="hlt">Index</span> (SSFI) was developed to meet the pressing need for an instrument which was easy to administer and which could be used by all mental health professionals. The SSFI comprises four main sections: self concern, occupational role, role in the family and other social roles. Each section has several subsections covering different areas of social functioning. Validity and reliability have been established for a group of normals, patients suffering from schizophrenia and from Hansen's disease. Internal consistencies of these factors were high Factor analysis derived four main factors, which included nearly all items of the SSFI. This paper reports on the development and standardization of the instrument. PMID:21743742</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2203799','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2203799"><span id="translatedtitle">Disease Severity <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Maloney, Clifford J.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>Workers studying several diseases have devised severity levels under the term “disease staging” to facilitate both research on the disease and the choice of treatment for individual patients. These categories are usually ad hoc, and hence neither widely accepted nor susceptable to improvement with increasing knowledge. Other workers have developed quantitative assays of the sensitivity of biological organisms under the term bioassay. The present paper applies an adaptation of bioassay to the assessment of the degree of sickness severity of individual patients. In practice using the <span class="hlt">index</span> requires only a simple table look-up. The feasibility and suitability of the technique were tested on records of 908 metastatic breast cancer patients which happened to be available. Study of other data is highly desirable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27512505','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27512505"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid shallow breathing <span class="hlt">index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A; Pillai, Lalitha V; Arabi, Yaseen M</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing <span class="hlt">index</span> (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000116199','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20000116199"><span id="translatedtitle">A Windshear Hazard <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Proctor, Fred H.; Hinton, David A.; Bowles, Roland L.</p> <p>2000-01-01</p> <p>An aircraft exposed to hazardous low-level windshear may suffer a critical loss of airspeed and altitude, thus endangering its ability to remain airborne. In order to characterize this hazard, a nondimensional <span class="hlt">index</span> was developed based oil aerodynamic principals and understanding of windshear phenomena, 'This paper reviews the development and application of the Bowles F-tactor. which is now used by onboard sensors for the detection of hazardous windshear. It was developed and tested during NASA/I:AA's airborne windshear program and is now required for FAA certification of onboard radar windshear detection systems. Reviewed in this paper are: 1) definition of windshear and description of atmospheric phenomena that may cause hazardous windshear. 2) derivation and discussion of the F-factor. 3) development of the F-factor hazard threshold, 4) its testing during field deployments, and 5) its use in accident reconstructions,</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25461063','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25461063"><span id="translatedtitle">Traffic air quality <span class="hlt">index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Bagieński, Zbigniew</p> <p>2015-02-01</p> <p>Vehicle emissions are responsible for a considerable share of urban air pollution concentrations. The traffic air quality <span class="hlt">index</span> (TAQI) is proposed as a useful tool for evaluating air quality near roadways. The TAQI associates air quality with the equivalent emission from traffic sources and with street structure (roadway structure) as anthropogenic factors. The paper presents a method of determining the TAQI and defines the degrees of harmfulness of emitted pollution. It proposes a classification specifying a potential threat to human health based on the TAQI value and shows an example of calculating the TAQI value for real urban streets. It also considers the role that car traffic plays in creating a local UHI. PMID:25461063</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4966218','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4966218"><span id="translatedtitle">Rapid shallow breathing <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Karthika, Manjush; Al Enezi, Farhan A.; Pillai, Lalitha V.; Arabi, Yaseen M.</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>Predicting successful liberation of patients from mechanical ventilation has been a focus of interest to clinicians practicing in intensive care. Various weaning indices have been investigated to identify an optimal weaning window. Among them, the rapid shallow breathing <span class="hlt">index</span> (RSBI) has gained wide use due to its simple technique and avoidance of calculation of complex pulmonary mechanics. Since its first description, several modifications have been suggested, such as the serial measurements and the rate of change of RSBI, to further improve its predictive value. The objective of this paper is to review the utility of RSBI in predicting weaning success. In addition, the use of RSBI in specific patient populations and the reported modifications of RSBI technique that attempt to improve the utility of RSBI are also reviewed. PMID:27512505</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/481276','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/481276"><span id="translatedtitle">Dermal toxicity evaluation of neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Sets (<span class="hlt">CAIS</span>) with an overview of the dermal toxicity of vesicant agents and their degradation products. Final report, January-September 1995</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Olajos, E.J.; Cameron, K.P.; Way, R.A.; Manthei, J.H.; Heitkamp, D.H.</p> <p>1996-10-01</p> <p>Acute dermal toxicity (limit test) and skin irritation studies were conducted in New Zealand white rabbits to ascertain the systemic toxicity and skin-injury potential of chemically-neutralized Chemical Agent Identification Sets (<span class="hlt">CAIS</span>). Studies also included the assessment of oxidant/solvent systems and solvent induced toxicity. The toxicity limit test consisted of a 24-hr occluded exposure to 1.0 ml/kg of `test article.` Dermal irritation studies were based on a 4-hr occluded exposure to 0.5 ml of `test article.` Chemical neutralization of <span class="hlt">CAIS</span> resulted in complex product solutions (wastestreams) containing ppm levels of agent and an array of degradation products. Findings from the skin irritation testing of wastestreams and oxidant/solvent systems indicate that wastestream-induced skin effects (edema and erythema) were equivalent to or less in severity than the skin effects produced by exposure to oxidant/solvent systems. Systemic effects were not observed in 4/5 wastestream-exposed groups; however, 2/5 wastestream-treated groups exhibited systemic effects. Lethality was noted in only 1/5 wastestream-treated groups. Limit test data indicate that agents (HD, HN, or L) were destroyed by reaction with oxidant to less toxic materials.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880043217&hterms=desertification&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Ddesertification%2523','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880043217&hterms=desertification&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Ddesertification%2523"><span id="translatedtitle">Relative sensitivity of Normalized Difference Vegetation <span class="hlt">Index</span> (NDVI) and Microwave Polarization Difference <span class="hlt">Index</span> (MPDI) for vegetation and desertification monitoring</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Becker, Francois; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p>A simple equation relating the Microwave Polarization Difference <span class="hlt">Index</span> (MPDI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation <span class="hlt">Index</span> (NDVI) is proposed which represents well data obtained from Nimbus 7/SMMR at 37 GHz and NOAA/AVHRR Channels 1 and 2. It is found that there is a limit which is characteristic of a particular type of cover for which both indices are equally sensitive to the variation of vegetation, and below which MPDI is more efficient than NDVI. The results provide insight into the relationship between water content and chlorophyll <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at pixel size scales.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AtmEn.105..191J','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015AtmEn.105..191J"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo</p> <p>2015-03-01</p> <p>In this study, the influences of water solubility and light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can be estimated to range from -0.07 to -0.49 W/m2 for core-shell mixing and from -0.09 to -0.47 W/m2 for homogeneous mixing under the simulation conditions (RH = 60%). The light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties of WSOC showed the mass <span class="hlt">absorption</span> efficiency (MAE) of WSOC can be estimated 0.43-0.5 m2/g, which accounts for 5-10% of the MAE of elemental carbon (EC). The effect on MAE of increasing the imaginary refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of WSOC was also calculated, and it was found that increasing the imaginary refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> by 0.001i enhanced WSOC aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by approximately 0.02 m2/g. Finally, the sensitivity test results revealed that changes in the fine mode fraction (FMF) and in the geometric mean diameter of the accumulation mode play important roles in estimating RF during hygroscopic growth.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009mcgb.conf...25K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009mcgb.conf...25K"><span id="translatedtitle">Efficient <span class="hlt">Index</span> for Handwritten Text</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kamel, Ibrahim</p> <p></p> <p>This paper deals with one of the new emerging multimedia data types, namely, handwritten cursive text. The paper presents two <span class="hlt">indexing</span> methods for searching a collection of cursive handwriting. The first <span class="hlt">index</span>, word-level <span class="hlt">index</span>, treats word as pictogram and uses global features for retrieval. The word-level <span class="hlt">index</span> is suitable for large collection of cursive text. While the second one, called stroke-level <span class="hlt">index</span>, treats the word as a set of strokes. The stroke-level <span class="hlt">index</span> is more accurate, but more costly than the word level <span class="hlt">index</span>. Each word (or stroke) can be described with a set of features and, thus, can be stored as points in the feature space. The Karhunen-Loeve transform is then used to minimize the number of features used (data dimensionality) and thus the <span class="hlt">index</span> size. Feature vectors are stored in an R-tree. We implemented both <span class="hlt">indexes</span> and carried many simulation experiments to measure the effectiveness and the cost of the search algorithm. The proposed <span class="hlt">indexes</span> achieve substantial saving in the search time over the sequential search. Moreover, the proposed <span class="hlt">indexes</span> improve the matching rate up to 46% over the sequential search.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=275311','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=275311"><span id="translatedtitle">Assessment of spectral indicies for crop residue cover estimation</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The quantification of surficial crop residue cover is important for assessing agricultural tillage practices, rangeland health, and brush fire hazards. The Cellulose <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> <span class="hlt">Index</span> (<span class="hlt">CAI</span>) and the Shortwave Infrared Normalized Difference Residue <span class="hlt">Index</span> (SINDRI) are two spectral indices that have show...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5324766','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/5324766"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar <span class="hlt">index</span> generation and delivery</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Lantz, L.J.</p> <p>1980-01-01</p> <p>The Solar <span class="hlt">Index</span>, or, more completely defined as the Service Hot Water Solar <span class="hlt">Index</span>, was conceptualized during the spring of 1978. The purpose was to enhance public awareness to solar energy usability. Basically, the Solar <span class="hlt">Index</span> represents the percentage of energy that solar would provide in order to heat an 80 gallon service hot water load for a given location and day. The <span class="hlt">Index</span> is computed by utilizing SOLCOST, a computer program, which also has applications to space heating, cooling, and heat pump systems and which supplies economic analyses for such solar energy systems. The <span class="hlt">Index</span> is generated for approximately 68 geographic locations in the country on a daily basis. The definition of the <span class="hlt">Index</span>, how the project came to be, what it is at the present time and a plan for the future are described. Also presented are the models used for the generation of the <span class="hlt">Index</span>, a discussion of the primary tool of implementation (the SOLCOST program) and future efforts.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000719&hterms=potassium+citrate&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpotassium%2Bcitrate','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20050000719&hterms=potassium+citrate&qs=N%3D0%26Ntk%3DAll%26Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntt%3Dpotassium%2Bcitrate"><span id="translatedtitle">Gastrointestinal citrate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in nephrolithiasis</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Fegan, J.; Khan, R.; Poindexter, J.; Pak, C. Y.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>Gastrointestinal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of citrate was measured in stone patients with idiopathic hypocitraturia to determine if citrate malabsorption could account for low urinary citrate. Citrate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> was measured directly from recovery of orally administered potassium citrate (40 mEq.) in the intestinal lavage fluid, using an intestinal washout technique. In 7 stone patients citrate <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, serum citrate levels, peak citrate concentration in serum and area under the curve were not significantly different from those of 7 normal subjects. Citrate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> was rapid and efficient in both groups, with 96 to 98% absorbed within 3 hours. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of citrate was less efficient from a tablet preparation of potassium citrate than from a liquid preparation, probably due to a delayed release of citrate from wax matrix. However, citrate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> from solid potassium citrate was still high at 91%, compared to 98% for a liquid preparation. Thus, hypocitraturia is unlikely to be due to an impaired gastrointestinal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of citrate in stone patients without overt bowel disease.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_18");'>18</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li class="active"><span>20</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_20 --> <div id="page_21" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="401"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3345970','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3345970"><span id="translatedtitle">Percutaneous <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of Octopirox.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Black, J G; Kamat, V B</p> <p>1988-01-01</p> <p> containing 1% Octopirox is 29,400, so that the possibility of systemic effects due to <span class="hlt">absorption</span> through the skin is remote. PMID:3345970</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..DPP.RO113F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1999APS..DPP.RO113F"><span id="translatedtitle">Resonant <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> of Bessel Beams</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fan, J.; Parra, E.; Milchberg, H. M.</p> <p>1999-11-01</p> <p>We report the first observation of enhanced laser-plasma optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in a subcritical density plasma resulting from spatial resonances, here in the laser breakdown of a gas with a Bessel beam. The enhancement in <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is directly correlated to enhancements both in confinement of laser radiation to the plasma and in its heating. Under certain conditions, azimuthal asymmetry in the laser beam is essential for efficient gas breakdown. Simulations of this <span class="hlt">absorption</span> consistently explain the experimental observations. This work is supported by the National Science Foundation (PHY-9515509) and the US Department of Energy (DEF G0297 ER 41039).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1048692','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/1048692"><span id="translatedtitle">Applied Parallel Metadata <span class="hlt">Indexing</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Jacobi, Michael R</p> <p>2012-08-01</p> <p>The GPFS Archive is parallel archive is a parallel archive used by hundreds of users in the Turquoise collaboration network. It houses 4+ petabytes of data in more than 170 million files. Currently, users must navigate the file system to retrieve their data, requiring them to remember file paths and names. A better solution might allow users to tag data with meaningful labels and searach the archive using standard and user-defined metadata, while maintaining security. last summer, I developed the backend to a tool that adheres to these design goals. The backend works by importing GPFS metadata into a MongoDB cluster, which is then <span class="hlt">indexed</span> on each attribute. This summer, the author implemented security and developed the user interfae for the search tool. To meet security requirements, each database table is associated with a single user, which only stores records that the user may read, and requires a set of credentials to access. The interface to the search tool is implemented using FUSE (Filesystem in USErspace). FUSE is an intermediate layer that intercepts file system calls and allows the developer to redefine how those calls behave. In the case of this tool, FUSE interfaces with MongoDB to issue queries and populate output. A FUSE implementation is desirable because it allows users to interact with the search tool using commands they are already familiar with. These security and interface additions are essential for a usable product.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940003959&hterms=technical+files&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtechnical%2Bfiles','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19940003959&hterms=technical+files&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D20%26Ntt%3Dtechnical%2Bfiles"><span id="translatedtitle">NASA Uniform Files <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>This handbook is a guide for the use of all personnel engaged in handling NASA files. It is issued in accordance with the regulations of the National Archives and Records Administration, in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 36, Part 1224, Files Management; and the Federal Information Resources Management Regulation, Subpart 201-45.108, Files Management. It is intended to provide a standardized classification and filing scheme to achieve maximum uniformity and ease in maintaining and using agency records. It is a framework for consistent organization of information in an arrangement that will be useful to current and future researchers. The NASA Uniform Files <span class="hlt">Index</span> coding structure is composed of the subject classification table used for NASA management directives and the subject groups in the NASA scientific and technical information system. It is designed to correlate files throughout NASA and it is anticipated that it may be useful with automated filing systems. It is expected that in the conversion of current files to this arrangement it will be necessary to add tertiary subjects and make further subdivisions under the existing categories. Established primary and secondary subject categories may not be changed arbitrarily. Proposals for additional subject categories of NASA-wide applicability, and suggestions for improvement in this handbook, should be addressed to the Records Program Manager at the pertinent installation who will forward it to the NASA Records Management Office, Code NTR, for approval. This handbook is issued in loose-leaf form and will be revised by page changes.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JQSRT.148..141P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014JQSRT.148..141P"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of fractal parameters on <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties of soot in the infrared region</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Prasanna, S.; Rivière, Ph.; Soufiani, A.</p> <p>2014-11-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> coefficient of soot aggregates in the infrared region is investigated using multi-sphere T matrix algorithm. As the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of soot is relatively high, the interaction between neighboring particles is important and Rayleigh approximation is invalid. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross section of soot is much higher than the Rayleigh approximation prediction. The effect of fractal parameters, dimension Df and prefactor kf, on <span class="hlt">absorption</span> can be substantial and varies strongly with optical size parameter x and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> m. Families of fractal structures having similar <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cross sections have been identified. It is noted that the fractal structures from the same family have similar particle distance correlation functions. Following this, an empirical model for <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of soot as a function of m, x and fractal parameters has been developed. The model successfully predicts the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> within ±5% for various fractal structures. Compared to Rayleigh approximation, the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancement can be as high as 200% at low temperatures and 120% at high temperatures. Effects of fractal parameters on <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancement are important for low temperature applications but are not significant at high temperatures. This is mainly due to high refractive indices of soot at long wavelengths and shift of emitted radiation towards short wavelengths with increase in temperature.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5010511','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5010511"><span id="translatedtitle">The rediscovery of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chillers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Katzel, J.</p> <p>1992-04-23</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> chillers are back - and for two very good reasons: they are environmentally sound and, in many cases, economically attractive. One factor fueling this resurgence is the outlook for natural gas, the energy source of most <span class="hlt">absorption</span> systems. Deregulation has spurred exploration, and forecasts indicate an abundant supply and relatively low prices through 2050. Threats of global warming and depletion of the ozone layer also are forces driving the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chiller market. Being a good corporate citizen today means minimizing or eliminating the use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), the basis of many refrigerants used in mechanical chillers. Even as chemical and chiller manufacturers alike work to develop substitute refrigerants, the perfect alternative has yet to be found. <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> units are free of these problems, a benefit that appeals to many people.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26675155','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26675155"><span id="translatedtitle">Empathic Features and <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> in Fantasy Role-Playing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Rivers, Anissa; Wickramasekera, Ian E; Pekala, Ronald J; Rivers, Jennifer A</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>This study examined the levels of empathy and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of individuals who regularly play fantasy and science fiction role-playing games. A hypothesis was developed that higher levels of empathy would be found in individuals who fantasy role-play based upon previous research in hypnosis such as J. R. Hilgard's (1970) imaginative involvement hypothesis, research into the "fantasy prone" personality type (Wilson & Barber, 1981), and the empathic involvement hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003). The participants in the current study were 127 fantasy role-players who volunteered and completed the Davis Interpersonal Reactivity <span class="hlt">Index</span> (empathy) and the Tellegen <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Scale (<span class="hlt">absorption</span>). The results demonstrated that those who play fantasy role-playing games scored significantly higher than the comparison group on the IRI scale of empathy, confirming the hypothesis that fantasy role-players report experiencing higher levels of empathic involvement with others. Correlational analysis between the measures demonstrated a significant positive correlation between empathy and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> (r = .43, p < .001). These results collectively suggest that fantasy role-players have a uniquely empathically-imaginative style. The results also confirm and extend previous findings on the relationship between empathy and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> as predicted by the Empathic Involvement Hypothesis (Wickramasekera II & Szlyk, 2003). PMID:26675155</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780063411&hterms=radiation+plant+growth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dradiation%2Bplant%2Bgrowth','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19780063411&hterms=radiation+plant+growth&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D30%26Ntt%3Dradiation%2Bplant%2Bgrowth"><span id="translatedtitle">Plant canopy light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> model with application to wheat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chance, J. E.; Lemaster, E. W.</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> model (LAM) for vegetative plant canopies has been derived from the Suits reflectance model. From the LAM the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light in the photosynthetically active region of the spectrum (400-700 nm) has been calculated for a Penjamo wheat crop for several situations including (a) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the incident radiation by a canopy of LAI 3.1 having a four-layer structure, (b) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light by the individual layers within a four-layer canopy and by the underlying soil, (c) the percent <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light by each vegetative canopy layer for variable sun angle, and (d) the cumulative solar energy absorbed by the developing wheat canopy as it progresses from a single layer through its growth stages to a three-layer canopy. This calculation is also presented as a function of the leaf area <span class="hlt">index</span> and is shown to be in agreement with experimental data reported by Kanemasu on Plainsman V wheat.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19399146','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19399146"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> and quasiguided mode analysis of organic solar cells with photonic crystal photoactive layers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Tumbleston, John R; Ko, Doo-Hyun; Samulski, Edward T; Lopez, Rene</p> <p>2009-04-27</p> <p>We analyze optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancements and quasiguided mode properties of organic solar cells with highly ordered nanostructured photoactive layers comprised of the bulk heterojunction blend, poly-3-hexylthiophene/[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and a low <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction conducting material (LICM). This photonic crystal geometry is capable of enhancing spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by approximately 17% in part due to the excitation of quasiguided modes near the band edge of P3HT:PCBM. A nanostructure thickness between 200 nm and 300 nm is determined to be optimal, while the LICM must have an <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction approximately 0.3 lower than P3HT:PCBM to produce <span class="hlt">absorption</span> enhancements. Quasiguided modes that differ in lifetime by an order of magnitude are also identified and yield <span class="hlt">absorption</span> that is concentrated in the P3HT:PCBM flash layer. PMID:19399146</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840012065','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19840012065"><span id="translatedtitle">Aeronautical Engineering: 1983 cumulative <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>This bibliography is a cumulative <span class="hlt">index</span> to the abstracts contained in NASA SP-7037 (158) through NASA SP-7037 (169) of Aeronautical Engineering: A Continuing Bibliography. NASA SP-7037 and its supplements have been compiled through the cooperative efforts of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This cumulative <span class="hlt">index</span> includes subject, personal author, corporate source, contract, report number, and accession number <span class="hlt">indexes</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880036973&hterms=librarian&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dlibrarian','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19880036973&hterms=librarian&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dlibrarian"><span id="translatedtitle">Computer aided <span class="hlt">indexing</span> at NASA</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Buchan, Ronald L.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>The application of computer technology to the construction of the NASA Thesaurus and in NASA Lexical Dictionary development is discussed in a brief overview. Consideration is given to the printed and online versions of the Thesaurus, retrospective <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, the NASA RECON frequency command, demand <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, lists of terms by category, and the STAR and IAA annual subject <span class="hlt">indexes</span>. The evolution of computer methods in the Lexical Dictionary program is traced, from DOD and DOE subject switching to LCSH machine-aided <span class="hlt">indexing</span> and current techniques for handling natural language (e.g., the elimination of verbs to facilitate breakdown of sentences into words and phrases).</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1084999.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/EJ1084999.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Malaysian Education <span class="hlt">Index</span> (MEI): An Online <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> and Repository System</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Kabilan, Muhammad Kamarul; Ismail, Hairul Nizam; Yaakub, Rohizani; Yusof, Najeemah Mohd; Idros, Sharifah Noraidah Syed; Umar, Irfan Naufal; Arshad, Muhammad Rafie Mohd.; Idrus, Rosnah; Rahman, Habsah Abdul</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>This "Project Sheet" describes an on-going project that is being carried out by a group of educational researchers, computer science researchers and librarians from Universiti Sains Malaysia, Penang. The Malaysian Education <span class="hlt">Index</span> (MEI) has two main functions--(1) Online <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> System, and (2) Online Repository System. In this brief…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24751773','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24751773"><span id="translatedtitle">Light management for photovoltaics using high-<span class="hlt">index</span> nanostructures.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Brongersma, Mark L; Cui, Yi; Fan, Shanhui</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>High-performance photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into clean electrical power, and transparent dielectrics or conductive oxides as antireflection coatings. A common feature of these materials is their high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. Whereas high-<span class="hlt">index</span> materials in a planar form tend to produce a strong, undesired reflection of sunlight, high-<span class="hlt">index</span> nanostructures afford new ways to manipulate light at a subwavelength scale. For example, nanoscale wires, particles and voids support strong optical resonances that can enhance and effectively control light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and scattering processes. As such, they provide ideal building blocks for novel, broadband antireflection coatings, light-trapping layers and super-absorbing films. This Review discusses some of the recent developments in the design and implementation of such photonic elements in thin-film photovoltaic cells. PMID:24751773</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatMa..13..451B','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014NatMa..13..451B"><span id="translatedtitle">Light management for photovoltaics using high-<span class="hlt">index</span> nanostructures</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Brongersma, Mark L.; Cui, Yi; Fan, Shanhui</p> <p>2014-05-01</p> <p>High-performance photovoltaic cells use semiconductors to convert sunlight into clean electrical power, and transparent dielectrics or conductive oxides as antireflection coatings. A common feature of these materials is their high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>. Whereas high-<span class="hlt">index</span> materials in a planar form tend to produce a strong, undesired reflection of sunlight, high-<span class="hlt">index</span> nanostructures afford new ways to manipulate light at a subwavelength scale. For example, nanoscale wires, particles and voids support strong optical resonances that can enhance and effectively control light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and scattering processes. As such, they provide ideal building blocks for novel, broadband antireflection coatings, light-trapping layers and super-absorbing films. This Review discusses some of the recent developments in the design and implementation of such photonic elements in thin-film photovoltaic cells.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24977814','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24977814"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span>-free Bragg reflector using Zeeman sublevels in atomic vapor.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chen, Zhongjie; Luo, Bin; Guo, Hong</p> <p>2014-06-30</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span>-free Bragg reflector has been studied in ions doped in crystals. We propose a new scheme using Zeeman sublevels of atoms to construct an <span class="hlt">absorption</span>-free Bragg reflector with practical laser power. Its spatial period of refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> equals half of the wavelength of the incident standing-wave coupling light. The proposal is simulated in a helium atom scheme, and can be extended to alkali earth atoms. PMID:24977814</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9714277','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9714277"><span id="translatedtitle">The HLD (CalMod) <span class="hlt">index</span> and the <span class="hlt">index</span> question.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Parker, W S</p> <p>1998-08-01</p> <p>The malocclusion <span class="hlt">index</span> problem arises because of the need to identify which patient's treatments will be paid for with tax dollars. Both the civilian (Medicaid) and military (Champus) programs in the United States require that "need" be demonstrated. Need is defined as "medically necessary handicapping malocclusion" in Medicaid parlance. It is defined by Champus as "seriously handicapping malocclusion." The responsible specialty organization (the AAO) first approved the Salzmann <span class="hlt">Index</span> in 1969 for this purpose and then reversed course in 1985 and took a formal position against the use of any <span class="hlt">index</span>. Dentistry has historically chosen a state of occlusal perfection as ideal and normal and declared that variation was not normal hence abnormal and thus malocclusion. This "ideal" composes from 1% to 2% of the population and fails all statistical standards. Many <span class="hlt">indexes</span> have been proposed based on variations from this "ideal" and fail for that reason. They are not logical. The HLD (CalMod) <span class="hlt">Index</span> is a lawsuit-driven modification of some 1960 suggestions by Dr. Harry L. Draker. It proposes to identify the worst looking malocclusions as handicapping and offers a cut-off point to identify them. In addition, the modification includes two situations known to be destructive to tissue and structures. As of Jan. 1, 1998, the California program has had 135,655 patients screened by qualified orthodontists using this <span class="hlt">index</span>. Of that number, 49,537 patients have had study models made and screened by qualified orthodontists using the <span class="hlt">index</span>. Two separate studies have been performed to examine results and to identify problems. Necessary changes have been made and guidelines produced. The <span class="hlt">index</span> problem has proven to be very dynamic in application. The HLD (CalMod) <span class="hlt">Index</span> has been successfully applied and tested in very large numbers. This article is published as a factual review of the situation regarding the <span class="hlt">index</span> question and one solution in the United States. PMID:9714277</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=293981','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=293981"><span id="translatedtitle">Determining leaf dry matter content using the normalized dry matter <span class="hlt">index</span> and its possible application for estimating fuel moisture content</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>The Normalized Dry Matter <span class="hlt">Index</span> (NDMI) was developed for the remote sensing of dry matter content using high-spectral resolution data. This narrow-band <span class="hlt">index</span> is based on <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at a C-H bond stretch overtone (1722 nm wavelength) and is correlated with dry matter content in fresh green leaves. ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991REDS..119..355S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1991REDS..119..355S"><span id="translatedtitle">Determination of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> difference caused by the birefringence of FA (II) centers in KCl:Li</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Silfsten, Pertti; Ketolainen, Pertti</p> <p>1991-11-01</p> <p>A method is described for determining the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> difference caused by the birefringence of oriented FA (II) centers in KCl:Li crystals. It is shown that the portion induced by the birefringence can be separated from an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrum measured through a polarizer-analyzer system. From this portion the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> difference can then be calculated with ease.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21175740','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21175740"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> and related optical dispersion effects on the spectral response of a surface plasmon resonance sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Nakkach, Mohamed; Lecaruyer, Pierre; Bardin, Fabrice; Sakly, Jaouhar; Lakhdar, Zohra Ben; Canva, Michael</p> <p>2008-11-20</p> <p>Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensing is an optical technique that allows real time detection of small changes in the physical properties, in particular in the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>, of a dielectric medium near a metal film surface. One way to increase the SPR signal shift is then to incorporate a substance possessing a strong dispersive refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> in the range of the plasmon resonance band. In this paper, we investigate the impact of materials possessing a strong dispersive <span class="hlt">index</span> integrated to the dielectric medium on the SPR reflectivity profile. We present theoretical results based on chromophore <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra and on their associated refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> obtained from the Lorentz approach and Kramers-Kroenig equations. As predicted by the theory, the experimental results show an enhancement of the SPR response, maximized when the chromophore <span class="hlt">absorption</span> band coincides with the plasmon resonant wavelength. This shows that chromophores labeling can provide a potential way for SPR response enhancement.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=4&id=EJ541529','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=HASS&pg=4&id=EJ541529"><span id="translatedtitle">The Earliest Hebrew Citation <span class="hlt">Indexes</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Weinberg, Bella Hass</p> <p>1997-01-01</p> <p>Describes early Hebrew citation <span class="hlt">indexes</span>, both embedded and book-length, and discusses terminological variation, format, precision of locators, the order of <span class="hlt">index</span> entries and assumption of user knowledge, knowledge of the compilers, and recommendations for further research. (59 references) (LRW)</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_19");'>19</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li class="active"><span>21</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_21 --> <div id="page_22" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="421"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lighting&pg=4&id=EJ723775','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=lighting&pg=4&id=EJ723775"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> of Refraction without Geometry</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Farkas, N.; Henriksen, P. N.; Ramsier, R. D.</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>This article presents several activities that permit students to determine the <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction of transparent solids and liquids using simple equipment without the need for geometrical relationships, special lighting or optical instruments. Graphical analysis of the measured data is shown to be a useful method for determining the <span class="hlt">index</span> of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22General+Interest+--+Periodicals%22&id=EJ187159','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=%22General+Interest+--+Periodicals%22&id=EJ187159"><span id="translatedtitle">Magazine <span class="hlt">Index</span>: Popular Literature Online</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Slade, Rod</p> <p>1978-01-01</p> <p>A description is given of Magazine <span class="hlt">Index</span> (MI) which is now available on-line through the Dialog system. Features of MI include wide coverage of 372 general interest periodicals, cover to cover <span class="hlt">indexing</span>, several access methods, and two name authority files. (JPF)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Structure+AND+Motion&pg=2&id=EJ878326','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=Structure+AND+Motion&pg=2&id=EJ878326"><span id="translatedtitle">Linguistic <span class="hlt">Indexicality</span> in Algebra Discussions</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Staats, Susan; Batteen, Chris</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In discussion-oriented classrooms, students create mathematical ideas through conversations that reflect growing collective knowledge. Linguistic forms known as <span class="hlt">indexicals</span> assist in the analysis of this collective, negotiated understanding. <span class="hlt">Indexical</span> words and phrases create meaning through reference to the physical, verbal and ideational context.…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=index&pg=2&id=EJ881947','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=index&pg=2&id=EJ881947"><span id="translatedtitle">Simplifying the Water Poverty <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cho, Danny I.; Ogwang, Tomson; Opio, Christopher</p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>In this paper, principal components methodology is used to derive simplified and cost effective <span class="hlt">indexes</span> of water poverty. Using a well known data set for 147 countries from which an earlier five-component water poverty <span class="hlt">index</span> comprising of "Resources," "Access," "Capacity," "Use" and "Environment" was constructed, we find that a simplified…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144w4106N','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2016JChPh.144w4106N"><span id="translatedtitle">Generalized flexibility-rigidity <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nguyen, Duc Duy; Xia, Kelin; Wei, Guo-Wei</p> <p>2016-06-01</p> <p>Flexibility-rigidity <span class="hlt">index</span> (FRI) has been developed as a robust, accurate, and efficient method for macromolecular thermal fluctuation analysis and B-factor prediction. The performance of FRI depends on its formulations of rigidity <span class="hlt">index</span> and flexibility <span class="hlt">index</span>. In this work, we introduce alternative rigidity and flexibility formulations. The structure of the classic Gaussian surface is utilized to construct a new type of rigidity <span class="hlt">index</span>, which leads to a new class of rigidity densities with the classic Gaussian surface as a special case. Additionally, we introduce a new type of flexibility <span class="hlt">index</span> based on the domain indicator property of normalized rigidity density. These generalized FRI (gFRI) methods have been extensively validated by the B-factor predictions of 364 proteins. Significantly outperforming the classic Gaussian network model, gFRI is a new generation of methodologies for accurate, robust, and efficient analysis of protein flexibility and fluctuation. Finally, gFRI based molecular surface generation and flexibility visualization are demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED363258.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED363258.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Price <span class="hlt">Indexes</span> for Institutions of Higher Education.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Cohen, Michael P.</p> <p></p> <p>The need for a system of price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> for colleges and universities is discussed. First, past efforts to develop price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> are reviewed, dating back to 1952 and highlighting two specific <span class="hlt">indexes</span>, the Higher Education Price <span class="hlt">Index</span> (HEPI) and the Uniform Price <span class="hlt">Index</span> Calculation System (UPICS). For the latter, the price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> of direct costs…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960047136','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/19960047136"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> to NASA News Releases 1995</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-01-01</p> <p>This issue of the <span class="hlt">index</span> to NASA News Releases contains a listing of news releases distributed by the Office of Public Affairs, NASA Headquarters, during 1995. The <span class="hlt">index</span> is arranged in six sections: Subject <span class="hlt">index</span>, Personal name <span class="hlt">index</span>, News release number <span class="hlt">index</span>, Accession number <span class="hlt">index</span>, Speeches, and News releases.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2496111','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=2496111"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> of different lead compounds</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Barltrop, D.; Meek, F.</p> <p>1975-01-01</p> <p>A rapid method for the determination of relative <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of dietary lead by rats is described. The influence of age, weight and dose rate has been determined and using standard conditions the tissue lead content of blood, kidney and femur are significantly correlated with each other and are a function of ingested lead. Eight lead compounds were evaluated using this technique and the findings related to lead acetate as a reference compound. Of the inorganic preparations studied, lead carbonate (basic) and metallic lead showed a twelve-fold difference in <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, with the remaining compounds giving intermediate values. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of lead from four organic compounds was determined from diets containing 7·5% corn oil added to the standard diet. Lead tallate was absorbed to the same degree as lead acetate, but lesser <span class="hlt">absorptions</span> resulted from lead octoate, naphthenate and alsynate. The addition of corn oil to a final concentration of 7·5% of the diet enhanced the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of lead acetate. PMID:1208290</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JNOPM..12..385Z','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2003JNOPM..12..385Z"><span id="translatedtitle">Effect of Solvent on Nonlinear Refractive <span class="hlt">Index</span> of 2-(2‧-HYDROXYPHENYL) Benzoxazole</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>ZHANG, GUILAN; XIONG, FEIBING; ZHANG, BAO; TANG, GUOQING; CHEN, WENJU; WANG, LIANYING; BAI, YUBAI</p> <p></p> <p>Nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">indexes</span> n2 of 2-(2‧-hydroxyphenyl) benzoxazole (HBO) in three species of solvent (cyclohexane, ethanol and dimethyl sulfoxide) have been determined by using the Z-scan technique. The experimental results show that the n2 of HBO is strongly dependent on the polarity of the solvent. Through the study on the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and fluorescence spectra of HBO in different solvents, we regard that the principal origin of the nonlinear refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of HBO is not the thermal effect because of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of incident light but the excited state intramolecular proton transfer of HBO under the incident light.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23572000','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23572000"><span id="translatedtitle">Strong <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and selective emission from engineered metals with dielectric coatings.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Streyer, W; Law, S; Rooney, G; Jacobs, T; Wasserman, D</p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>We demonstrate strong-to-perfect <span class="hlt">absorption</span> across a wide range of mid-infrared wavelengths (5-12µm) using a two-layer system consisting of heavily-doped silicon and a thin high-<span class="hlt">index</span> germanium dielectric layer. We demonstrate spectral control of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resonance by varying the thickness of the dielectric layer. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resonance is shown to be largely polarization-independent and angle-invariant. Upon heating, we observe selective thermal emission from our materials. Experimental data is compared to an analytical model of our structures with strong agreement. PMID:23572000</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3510467','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3510467"><span id="translatedtitle">Sensitive Real-Time Monitoring of Refractive <span class="hlt">Indexes</span> Using a Novel Graphene-Based Optical Sensor</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Xing, Fei; Liu, Zhi-Bo; Deng, Zhi-Chao; Kong, Xiang-Tian; Yan, Xiao-Qing; Chen, Xu-Dong; Ye, Qing; Zhang, Chun-Ping; Chen, Yong-Sheng; Tian, Jian-Guo</p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>Based on the polarization-sensitive <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of graphene under conditions of total internal reflection, a novel optical sensor combining graphene and a microfluidic structure was constructed to achieve the sensitive real-time monitoring of refractive <span class="hlt">indexes</span>. The atomic thickness and strong broadband <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of graphene cause it to exhibit very different reflectivity for transverse electric and transverse magnetic modes in the context of a total internal reflection structure, which is sensitive to the media in contact with the graphene. A graphene refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> sensor can quickly and sensitively monitor changes in the local refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> with a fast response time and broad dynamic range. These results indicate that graphene, used in a simple and efficient total internal reflection structure and combined with microfluidic techniques, is an ideal material for fabricating refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> sensors and biosensor devices, which are in high demand. PMID:23205270</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22037129','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22037129"><span id="translatedtitle">THE VIEWING ANGLES OF BROAD <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> LINE VERSUS UNABSORBED QUASARS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>DiPompeo, M. A.; Brotherton, M. S.; De Breuck, C.</p> <p>2012-06-10</p> <p>It was recently shown that there is a significant difference in the radio spectral <span class="hlt">index</span> distributions of broad <span class="hlt">absorption</span> line (BAL) quasars and unabsorbed quasars, with an overabundance of BAL quasars with steeper radio spectra. This result suggests that source orientation does play into the presence or absence of BAL features. In this paper, we provide more quantitative analysis of this result based on Monte Carlo simulations. While the relationship between viewing angle and spectral <span class="hlt">index</span> does indeed contain a lot of scatter, the spectral <span class="hlt">index</span> distributions are different enough to overcome that intrinsic variation. Utilizing two different models of the relationship between spectral <span class="hlt">index</span> and viewing angle, the simulations indicate that the difference in spectral <span class="hlt">index</span> distributions can be explained by allowing BAL quasar viewing angles to extend about 10 Degree-Sign farther from the radio jet axis than non-BAL sources, though both can be seen at small angles. These results show that orientation cannot be the only factor determining whether BAL features are present, but it does play a role.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740056895&hterms=1111&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D1111','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19740056895&hterms=1111&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D50%26Ntt%3D1111"><span id="translatedtitle">Thermodynamic derivatives of infrared <span class="hlt">absorptance</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Broersma, S.; Walls, W. L.</p> <p>1974-01-01</p> <p>Calculation of the concentration, pressure, and temperature dependence of the spectral <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> of a vibrational <span class="hlt">absorption</span> band. A smooth thermodynamic dependence was found for wavelength intervals where the average <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> is less than 0.65. Individual rotational lines, whose parameters are often well known, were used as bases in the calculation of medium resolution spectra. Two modes of calculation were combined: well-separated rotational lines plus interaction terms, or strongly overlapping lines that were represented by a compound line of similar shape plus corrections. The 1.9- and 6.3-micron bands of H2O and the 4.3-micron band of CO2 were examined in detail and compared with experiment.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22220788','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22220788"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> properties of identical atoms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Sancho, Pedro</p> <p>2013-09-15</p> <p>Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas. -- Highlights: •The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> rates of a pair of identical atoms in product and (anti)symmetrized states are different. •The modifications of the optical properties are essentially determined by the overlapping between the atoms. •The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> properties differ, in some cases, for bosons and fermions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993STIN...9423793G','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1993STIN...9423793G"><span id="translatedtitle">Enhanced <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cycle computer model</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Grossman, G.; Wilk, M.</p> <p>1993-09-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> heat pumps have received renewed and increasing attention in the past two decades. The rising cost of electricity has made the particular features of this heat-powered cycle attractive for both residential and industrial applications. Solar-powered <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chillers, gas-fired domestic heat pumps, and waste-heat-powered industrial temperature boosters are a few of the applications recently subjected to intensive research and development. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump research community has begun to search for both advanced cycles in various multistage configurations and new working fluid combinations with potential for enhanced performance and reliability. The development of working <span class="hlt">absorption</span> systems has created a need for reliable and effective system simulations. A computer code has been developed for simulation of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> systems at steady state in a flexible and modular form, making it possible to investigate various cycle configurations with different working fluids. The code is based on unit subroutines containing the governing equations for the system's components and property subroutines containing thermodynamic properties of the working fluids. The user conveys to the computer an image of his cycle by specifying the different subunits and their interconnections. Based on this information, the program calculates the temperature, flow rate, concentration, pressure, and vapor fraction at each state point in the system, and the heat duty at each unit, from which the coefficient of performance (COP) may be determined. This report describes the code and its operation, including improvements introduced into the present version. Simulation results are described for LiBr-H2O triple-effect cycles, LiCl-H2O solar-powered open <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cycles, and NH3-H2O single-effect and generator-absorber heat exchange cycles. An appendix contains the user's manual.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009TellB..61...79M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009TellB..61...79M"><span id="translatedtitle">Spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of Saharan dust during SAMUM-1</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Müller, T.; Schladitz, A.; Massling, A.; Kaaden, N.; Kandler, K.; Wiedensohler, A.</p> <p>2009-02-01</p> <p>ABSTRACT During the SAMUM-1 experiment, <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients and imaginary parts of refractive indices of mineral dust particles were investigated in southern Morocco. Main absorbing constituents of airborne samples were identified to be iron oxide and soot. Spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficients were measured using a spectral optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> photometer (SOAP) in the wavelength range from 300 to 800 nm with a resolution of 50 nm. A new method that accounts for a loading-dependent correction of fibre filter based <span class="hlt">absorption</span> photometers, was developed. The imaginary part of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> was determined using Mie calculations from 350 to 800 nm. The spectral <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient allowed a separation between dust and soot <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. A correlation analysis showed that the dust <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient is correlated (R2 up to 0.55) with the particle number concentration for particle diameters larger than 0.5 μm, whereas the coefficient of determination R2 for smaller particles is below 0.1. Refractive indices were derived for both the total aerosol and a dust aerosol that was corrected for soot <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Average imaginary parts of refractive indices of the entire aerosol are 7.4 × 10-3, 3.4 × 10-3 and 2.0 × 10-3 at wavelengths of 450, 550 and 650 nm. After a correction for the soot <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, imaginary parts of refractive indices are 5.1 × 10-3, 1.6 × 10-3 and 4.5 × 10-4.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AMH&pg=4&id=EJ212537','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AMH&pg=4&id=EJ212537"><span id="translatedtitle">L'<span class="hlt">index</span> significant (The Pointed <span class="hlt">Index</span> Finger).</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Calbris, G.</p> <p>1979-01-01</p> <p>In the framework of a study of nonverbal communication, the various meanings attached to the pointed <span class="hlt">index</span> finger are analyzed. The question is raised as to what extent the findings hold for cultures other than French. (AMH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980IJAmE...1..117V','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1980IJAmE...1..117V"><span id="translatedtitle">Solar powered <span class="hlt">absorption</span> air conditioning</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Vardon, J. M.</p> <p>1980-04-01</p> <p>Artificial means of providing or removing heat from the building are discussed along with the problem of the appropriate building design and construction for a suitable heat climate inside the building. The use of a lithium bromide-water <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chiller, powered by a hot water store heated by an array of stationary flat collectors, is analyzed. An iterative method of predicting the cooling output from a LiBr-water <span class="hlt">absorption</span> refrigeration plant having variable heat input is described and a model allowing investigation of the performance of a solar collector and thermal storage system is developed.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7261238','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/7261238"><span id="translatedtitle">Periodic microwave <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in superconductors</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Martinek, J.; Stankowski, J. )</p> <p>1994-08-01</p> <p>A model explaining the presence of a periodic train of microwave <span class="hlt">absorption</span> lines in the magnetic modulated microwave <span class="hlt">absorption</span> (MMMA) spectra of high- and low-temperature superconductors is proposed. The model assumes the occurrence of regular superconducting current loops, closed by Josephson junctions, in these materials. The system of such loops is considered within the basic model of the rf superconducting quantum interference device taking into account the effect of thermal fluctuations. The magnetic-field and temperature dependencies of the MMMA obtained on the basis of the proposed model are in qualitative agreement with experimental data.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6456056','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/6456056"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span>-heat-pump system</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Grossman, G.; Perez-Blanco, H.</p> <p>1983-06-16</p> <p>An improvement in an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump cycle is obtained by adding adiabatic <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and desorption steps to the absorber and desorber of the system. The adiabatic processes make it possible to obtain the highest temperature in the absorber before any heat is removed from it and the lowest temperature in the desorber before heat is added to it, allowing for efficient utilization of the thermodynamic availability of the heat supply stream. The improved system can operate with a larger difference between high and low working fluid concentrations, less circulation losses, and more efficient heat exchange than a conventional system.</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_20");'>20</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li class="active"><span>22</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_22 --> <div id="page_23" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="441"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4191228','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=4191228"><span id="translatedtitle">Regional Hospital Input Price <span class="hlt">Indexes</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Freeland, Mark S.; Schendler, Carol Ellen; Anderson, Gerard</p> <p>1981-01-01</p> <p>This paper describes the development of regional hospital input price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> that is consistent with the general methodology used for the National Hospital Input Price <span class="hlt">Index</span>. The feasibility of developing regional <span class="hlt">indexes</span> was investigated because individuals inquired whether different regions experienced different rates of increase in hospital input prices. The regional <span class="hlt">indexes</span> incorporate variations in cost-share weights (the amount an expense category contributes to total spending) associated with hospital type and location, and variations in the rate of input price increases for various regions. We found that between 1972 and 1979 none of the regional price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> increased at average annual rates significantly different from the national rate. For the more recent period 1977 through 1979, the increase in one Census Region was significantly below the national rate. Further analyses indicated that variations in cost-share weights for various types of hospitals produced no substantial variations in the regional price <span class="hlt">indexes</span> relative to the national <span class="hlt">index</span>. We consider these findings preliminary because of limitations in the availability of current, relevant, and reliable data, especially for local area wage rate increases. PMID:10309557</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5724...34M','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2005SPIE.5724...34M"><span id="translatedtitle">High refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> photocurable resins</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Morford, Robert V.; Mercado, Ramil L.; Planje, Curtis E.; Flaim, Tony D.</p> <p>2005-04-01</p> <p>The performance of optoelectronic devices can be increased by incorporating a high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> layer into the system. This paper describes several potential high refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> resin candidates. Our materials include the added advantages over other systems because the new materials are cationically photocurable and free flowing, have low shrinkage upon cure, have no (or little) volatile organic components, are applicable by a variety of methods (dip coating, roller coating, injection molding, or film casting), can be applied in a variety of thicknesses (10-100 m), are fast-curing, and possess robust physical properties. Particular attention focuses on the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> in the visible spectrum, light transmission, and formulation viscosity.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2007AGUFM.A32A..01G&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2007AGUFM.A32A..01G&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Measurements in MILAGRO.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Gaffney, J. S.; Marley, N. A.; Arnott, W. P.; Paredes-Miranda, L.; Barnard, J. C.</p> <p>2007-12-01</p> <p>During the month of March 2006, a number of instruments were used to determine the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> characteristics of aerosols found in the Mexico City Megacity and nearby Valley of Mexico. These measurements were taken as part of the Department of Energy's Megacity Aerosol Experiment - Mexico City (MAX-Mex) that was carried out in collaboration with the Megacity Interactions: Local and Global Research Observations (MILAGRO) campaign. MILAGRO was a joint effort between the DOE, NSF, NASA, and Mexican agencies aimed at understanding the impacts of a megacity on the urban and regional scale. A super-site was operated at the Instituto Mexicano de Petroleo in Mexico City (designated T-0) and at the Universidad Technologica de Tecamac (designated T-1) that was located about 35 km to the north east of the T-0 site in the State of Mexico. A third site was located at a private rancho in the State of Hidalgo approximately another 35 km to the northeast (designated T-2). Aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> measurements were taken in real time using a number of instruments at the T-0 and T-1 sites. These included a seven wavelength aethalometer, a multi-angle <span class="hlt">absorption</span> photometer (MAAP), and a photo-acoustic spectrometer. Aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> was also derived from spectral radiometers including a multi-filter rotating band spectral radiometer (MFRSR). The results clearly indicate that there is significant aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by the aerosols in the Mexico City megacity region. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> can lead to single scattering albedo reduction leading to values below 0.5 under some circumstances. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is also found to deviate from that expected for a "well-behaved" soot anticipated from diesel engine emissions, i.e. from a simple 1/lambda wavelength dependence for <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Indeed, enhanced <span class="hlt">absorption</span> is seen in the region of 300-450 nm in many cases, particularly in the afternoon periods indicating that secondary organic aerosols are contributing to the aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. This is likely due</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040082169&hterms=chlorine+ultraviolet+radiation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dchlorine%2Bultraviolet%2Bradiation','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=20040082169&hterms=chlorine+ultraviolet+radiation&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D70%26Ntt%3Dchlorine%2Bultraviolet%2Bradiation"><span id="translatedtitle">Aerosol <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Effects in the TOMS UV Algorithm</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Torres, O.; Krotkov, N.; Bhartia, P. K.</p> <p>2004-01-01</p> <p>The availability of global long-term estimates of surface UV radiation is very important, not only for preventive medicine considerations, but also as an important tool to monitor the effects of the stratospheric ozone recovery expected to occur in the next few decades as a result of the decline of the stratospheric chlorine levels. In addition to the modulating effects of ozone and clouds, aerosols also affect the levels of UV-A and W-B radiation reaching the surface. Oscillations in surface W associated with the effects of aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> may be comparable in magnitude to variations associated with the stratospheric ozone recovery. Thus, the accurate calculation of surface W radiation requires that both the scattering and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> effects of tropospheric aerosols be taken into account. Although <span class="hlt">absorption</span> effects of dust and elevated carbonaceous aerosols are already accounted for using Aerosol <span class="hlt">Index</span> technique, this approach does not work for urban/industrial aerosols in the planetary boundary layer. The use of the new TOMS long-term global data record on UV aerosol <span class="hlt">absorption</span> optical depth, can improve the accuracy of TOMS spectral UV products, by properly including the spectral attenuation effects of carbonaceous, urban/industrial and mineral aerosols. The TOMS data set on aerosol properties will be discussed, and results of its use in the TOMS surface W algorithm will be presented.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ultraviolet&pg=7&id=EJ300481','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=ultraviolet&pg=7&id=EJ300481"><span id="translatedtitle">Ultraviolet and Light <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Spectrometry.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Hargis, L. G.; Howell, J. A.</p> <p>1984-01-01</p> <p>Reviews developments in ultraviolet and light <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectrometry from December 1981 through November 1983, focusing on the chemistry involved in developing suitable reagents, absorbing systems, and methods of determination, and on physical aspects of the procedures. Includes lists of spectrophotometric methods for metals, non-metals, and…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009OptSp.106..881S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009OptSp.106..881S"><span id="translatedtitle">Slow light and saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Selden, A. C.</p> <p>2009-06-01</p> <p>Quantitative analysis of slow light experiments utilising coherent population oscillation (CPO) in a range of saturably absorbing media, including ruby and alexandrite, Er3+:Y2SiO5, bacteriorhodopsin, semiconductor quantum devices and erbium-doped optical fibres, shows that the observations may be more simply interpreted as saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> phenomena. A basic two-level model of a saturable absorber displays all the effects normally associated with slow light, namely phase shift and modulation gain of the transmitted signal, hole burning in the modulation frequency spectrum and power broadening of the spectral hole, each arising from the finite response time of the non-linear <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. Only where hole-burning in the optical spectrum is observed (using independent pump and probe beams), or pulse delays exceeding the limits set by saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> are obtained, can reasonable confidence be placed in the observation of slow light in such experiments. Superluminal (“fast light”) phenomena in media with reverse saturable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> (RSA) may be similarly explained.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12285766','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12285766"><span id="translatedtitle">Migrant labor <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in Malaysia.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Nayagam, J</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>The use of migrant workers to ease labor shortages caused by rapid industrialization in Malaysia during the twentieth century is examined. "This paper will focus on: (1) the extent, composition and distribution of migrant workers; (2) the labor shortage and <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of migrant workers; and (3) the role of migrant workers in the government's economic restructuring process." PMID:12285766</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=316570&keyword=time&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77970748&CFTOKEN=36150706','EPA-EIMS'); return false;" href="http://cfpub.epa.gov/si/si_public_record_report.cfm?dirEntryId=316570&keyword=time&actType=&TIMSType=+&TIMSSubTypeID=&DEID=&epaNumber=&ntisID=&archiveStatus=Both&ombCat=Any&dateBeginCreated=&dateEndCreated=&dateBeginPublishedPresented=&dateEndPublishedPresented=&dateBeginUpdated=&dateEndUpdated=&dateBeginCompleted=&dateEndCompleted=&personID=&role=Any&journalID=&publisherID=&sortBy=revisionDate&count=50&CFID=77970748&CFTOKEN=36150706"><span id="translatedtitle">Environmental Quality <span class="hlt">Index</span> - Overview Report</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://oaspub.epa.gov/eims/query.page">EPA Science Inventory</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>A better estimate of overall environmental quality is needed to improve our understanding of the relationship between environmental conditions and humanhealth. Described in this report is the effort to construct an environmental quality <span class="hlt">index</span> representing multiple domains of the ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AMH&pg=2&id=ED192536','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=AMH&pg=2&id=ED192536"><span id="translatedtitle">French Basic Course. Grammatical <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Defense Language Inst., Monterey, CA.</p> <p></p> <p>This <span class="hlt">index</span> is intended for use with Volumes 1 through 8 of the French Basic Course. It facilitates the finding of grammatical references in those volumes. The items are cross-referenced and arranged in alphabetical order. (Author/AMH)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060049129','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://hdl.handle.net/2060/20060049129"><span id="translatedtitle">Energy <span class="hlt">Index</span> For Aircraft Maneuvers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Chidester, Thomas R. (Inventor); Lynch, Robert E. (Inventor); Lawrence, Robert E. (Inventor); Amidan, Brett G. (Inventor); Ferryman, Thomas A. (Inventor); Drew, Douglas A. (Inventor); Ainsworth, Robert J. (Inventor); Prothero, Gary L. (Inventor); Romanowski, Tomothy P. (Inventor); Bloch, Laurent (Inventor)</p> <p>2006-01-01</p> <p>Method and system for analyzing, separately or in combination, kinetic energy and potential energy and/or their time derivatives, measured or estimated or computed, for an aircraft in approach phase or in takeoff phase, to determine if the aircraft is or will be put in an anomalous configuration in order to join a stable approach path or takeoff path. A 3 reference value of kinetic energy andor potential energy (or time derivatives thereof) is provided, and a comparison <span class="hlt">index</span> .for the estimated energy and reference energy is computed and compared with a normal range of <span class="hlt">index</span> values for a corresponding aircraft maneuver. If the computed energy <span class="hlt">index</span> lies outside the normal <span class="hlt">index</span> range, this phase of the aircraft is identified as anomalous, non-normal or potentially unstable.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.showmap&pollutant=OZONE','NIH-MEDLINEPLUS'); return false;" href="https://www.airnow.gov/index.cfm?action=airnow.showmap&pollutant=OZONE"><span id="translatedtitle">Ozone - Current Air Quality <span class="hlt">Index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://medlineplus.gov/">MedlinePlus</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>... reducing exposure to extremely high levels of particle pollution is available here . Fires: Current Conditions Click to ... Air Quality Basics Air Quality <span class="hlt">Index</span> | Ozone | Particle Pollution | Smoke from fires | What You Can Do Health ...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-148.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-148.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> Models: Muskellunge</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Cook, Mark F.; Solomon, R. Charles</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> (HSI) model for the muskellunge (Esox masquinongy Mitchell). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an <span class="hlt">index</span> between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-147.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-147.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> Models: Bobcat</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Boyle, Katherine A.; Fendley, Timothy T.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>A review and synthesis of existing information were used to develop a Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> (HSI) model for the bobcat (Felis rufus). The model consolidates habitat use information into a framework appropriate for field application, and is scaled to produce an <span class="hlt">index</span> between 0.0 (unsuitable habitat) to 1.0 (optimum habitat). HSI models are designed to be used with Habitat Evaluation Procedures previously developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E3390T','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2014cosp...40E3390T"><span id="translatedtitle">PC <span class="hlt">index</span> and magnetic substorms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly</p> <p></p> <p>PC <span class="hlt">index</span> is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-<span class="hlt">index</span>) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-<span class="hlt">index</span>) and magnetic storms (Dst-<span class="hlt">index</span>), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС <span class="hlt">index</span> growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC <span class="hlt">index</span> exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920071651&hterms=Total+Quality+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DTotal%2BQuality%2BManagement','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19920071651&hterms=Total+Quality+Management&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D80%26Ntt%3DTotal%2BQuality%2BManagement"><span id="translatedtitle">Quality <span class="hlt">indexing</span> with computer-aided lexicography</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Buchan, Ronald L.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Indexing</span> with computers is a far cry from <span class="hlt">indexing</span> with the first <span class="hlt">indexing</span> tool, the manual card sorter. With the aid of computer-aided lexicography, both <span class="hlt">indexing</span> and <span class="hlt">indexing</span> tools can provide standardization, consistency, and accuracy, resulting in greater quality control than ever before. A brief survey of computer activity in <span class="hlt">indexing</span> is presented with detailed illustrations from NASA activity. Applications from techniques mentioned, such as Retrospective <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> (RI), can be made to many <span class="hlt">indexing</span> systems. In addition to improving the quality of <span class="hlt">indexing</span> with computers, the improved efficiency with which certain tasks can be done is demonstrated.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25402159','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25402159"><span id="translatedtitle">Tunable <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resonances in the ultraviolet for InP nanowire arrays.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Aghaeipour, Mahtab; Anttu, Nicklas; Nylund, Gustav; Samuelson, Lars; Lehmann, Sebastian; Pistol, Mats-Erik</p> <p>2014-11-17</p> <p>The ability to tune the photon <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> spectrum is an attracting way of tailoring the response of devices like photodetectors and solar cells. Here, we measure the reflectance spectra of InP substrates patterned with arrays of vertically standing InP nanowires. Using the reflectance spectra, we calculate and analyze the corresponding <span class="hlt">absorptance</span> spectra of the nanowires. We show that we can tune <span class="hlt">absorption</span> resonances for the nanowire arrays into the ultraviolet by decreasing the diameter of the nanowires. When we compare our measurements with electromagnetic modeling, we generally find good agreement. Interestingly, the remaining differences between modeled and measured spectra are attributed to a crystal-phase dependence in the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of InP. Specifically, we find indication of significant differences in the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> between the modeled zinc-blende InP nanowires and the measured wurtzite InP nanowires in the ultraviolet. We believe that such crystal-phase dependent differences in the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> affect the possibility to excite optical resonances in the large wavelength range of 345 < λ < 390 nm. To support this claim, we investigated how resonances in nanostructures can be shifted in wavelength by geometrical tuning. We find that dispersion in the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> can dominate over geometrical tuning and stop the possibility for such shifting. Our results open the door for using crystal-phase engineering to optimize the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in InP nanowire-based solar cells and photodetectors. PMID:25402159</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20216896','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20216896"><span id="translatedtitle">Photoacoustic determination of optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> to extinction ratio in aerosols.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Roessler, D M; Faxvog, F R</p> <p>1980-02-15</p> <p>The photoacoustic technique has been used in conjunction with an optical transmission measurement to determine the fraction of light absorbed in cigarette and acetylene smoke aerosols. At 0.5145-microm wavelength,the <span class="hlt">absorption</span>-to-extinction fraction is 0.01 +/- 0.003 for cigarette smoke and is in excellent agreement with predictions from Mie theory for smoke particles having a refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of 1.45-0.00133i and a median diameter in the 0.15-0.65-microm range. For acetylene smoke the absorbed fraction was 0.85 +/- 0.05. PMID:20216896</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5243609','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5243609"><span id="translatedtitle">Nonlinearity of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> due to an excitonic molecule resonance state in CdS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Baumert, R.; Broser, I.; Buschick, K.</p> <p>1986-08-01</p> <p>The authors report the observation of an intensity-dependent refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> nonlinearity in CdS due to a resonance state where an excitonic molecule is created by induced <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light. The refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> n as a function of the incident laser photon energy E is measured directly by light refraction in thin crystal prisms. A renormalized dielectric function describes the measured n(E) spectra well. This strong refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> nonlinearity is well suited to produce an optical bistability and to further strengthen the evidence of CdS to be an important material for laser-induced dynamic gratings.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992OptCo..87..109F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1992OptCo..87..109F"><span id="translatedtitle">Lasing without inversion and enhancement of the <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction via interference of incoherent pump processes</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fleischhauer, M.; Keitel, C. H.; Scully, M. O.; Su, C.</p> <p>1992-01-01</p> <p>For the Λ quantum beat laser we investigate the generation of coherence between the two lower levels via incoherent pumping of these two levels to a fourth auxiliary level. It will be shown that this way of establishing coherence also leads to lasing without inversion and to an enhancement of the <span class="hlt">index</span> of refraction at a point of vanishing <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3982215','PMC'); return false;" href="http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?tool=pmcentrez&artid=3982215"><span id="translatedtitle">The Intestinal <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> of Folates</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pmc">PubMed Central</a></p> <p>Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I. David</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The properties of intestinal folate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li class="active"><span>23</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_23 --> <div id="page_24" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="461"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24512081','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24512081"><span id="translatedtitle">The intestinal <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of folates.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Visentin, Michele; Diop-Bove, Ndeye; Zhao, Rongbao; Goldman, I David</p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>The properties of intestinal folate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> were documented decades ago. However, it was only recently that the proton-coupled folate transporter (PCFT) was identified and its critical role in folate transport across the apical brush-border membrane of the proximal small intestine established by the loss-of-function mutations identified in the PCFT gene in subjects with hereditary folate malabsorption and, more recently, by the Pcft-null mouse. This article reviews the current understanding of the properties of PCFT-mediated transport and how they differ from those of the reduced folate carrier. Other processes that contribute to the transport of folates across the enterocyte, along with the contribution of the enterohepatic circulation, are considered. Important unresolved issues are addressed, including the mechanism of intestinal folate <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the absence of PCFT and regulation of PCFT gene expression. The impact of a variety of ions, organic molecules, and drugs on PCFT-mediated folate transport is described. PMID:24512081</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1783989','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1783989"><span id="translatedtitle">Maximum entropy and drug <span class="hlt">absorption</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Charter, M K; Gull, S F</p> <p>1991-10-01</p> <p>The application of maximum entropy to the calculation of drug <span class="hlt">absorption</span> rates was introduced in an earlier paper. Here it is developed further, and the whole procedure is presented as a problem in scientific inference to be solved using Bayes' theorem. Blood samples do not need to be taken at equally spaced intervals, and no smoothing, interpolation, extrapolation, or other preprocessing of the data is necessary. The resulting input rate estimates are smooth and physiologically realistic, even with noisy data, and their accuracy is quantified. Derived quantities such as the proportion of the dose absorbed, and the mean and median <span class="hlt">absorption</span> times, are also obtained, together with their error estimates. There are no arbitrarily valued parameters in the analysis, and no specific functional form, such as an exponential or polynomial, is assumed for the input rate functions. PMID:1783989</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MAR.V1069L','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013APS..MAR.V1069L"><span id="translatedtitle">Optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in trilayer graphene</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Li, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Niu, Qian</p> <p>2013-03-01</p> <p>We use a low energy effective model to analyze the optical responses of trilayer graphene samples. We first show that optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of the ABA-stacked trilayer has strong dependence on both the Fermi energy and optical frequency, which is in sharp contrast to that of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. Secondly, we are able to determine the possible existence of trigonal warping effects in the bandstructure of ABC-stacked trilayer graphene by a divergence in the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra at around 10 meV. In addition, we can partially distinguish the vairious broken symmetry states driven by electron-electron interactions in ABC-stacked trilayer graphene. In particular, the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) state is sensitive to the polarization of the incident light, giving a way to detect its possible existence.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21017258','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21017258"><span id="translatedtitle">New analytical technique for carbon dioxide <span class="hlt">absorption</span> solvents</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Pouryousefi, F.; Idem, R.O.</p> <p>2008-02-15</p> <p>The densities and refractive indices of two binary systems (water + MEA and water + MDEA) and three ternary systems (water + MEA + CO{sub 2}, water + MDEA + CO{sub 2}, and water + MEA + MDEA) used for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture were measured over the range of compositions of the aqueous alkanolamine(s) used for CO{sub 2} <span class="hlt">absorption</span> at temperatures from 295 to 338 K. Experimental densities were modeled empirically, while the experimental refractive indices were modeled using well-established models from the known values of their pure-component densities and refractive indices. The density and Gladstone-Dale refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> models were then used to obtain the compositions of unknown samples of the binary and ternary systems by simultaneous solution of the density and refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> equations. The results from this technique have been compared with HPLC (high-performance liquid chromatography) results, while a third independent technique (acid-base titration) was used to verify the results. The results show that the systems' compositions obtained from the simple and easy-to-use refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>/density technique were very comparable to the expensive and laborious HPLC/titration techniques, suggesting that the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>/density technique can be used to replace existing methods for analysis of fresh or nondegraded, CO{sub 2}-loaded, single and mixed alkanolamine solutions.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865537','DOE-PATENT-XML'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/865537"><span id="translatedtitle">Photodetector with enhanced light <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/doepatents">DOEpatents</a></p> <p>Kane, James</p> <p>1985-01-01</p> <p>A photodetector including a light transmissive electrically conducting layer having a textured surface with a semiconductor body thereon. This layer traps incident light thereby enhancing the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of light by the semiconductor body. A photodetector comprising a textured light transmissive electrically conducting layer of SnO.sub.2 and a body of hydrogenated amorphous silicon has a conversion efficiency about fifty percent greater than that of comparative cells. The invention also includes a method of fabricating the photodetector of the invention.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AnPhy.336..482S','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013AnPhy.336..482S"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> properties of identical atoms</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Sancho, Pedro</p> <p>2013-09-01</p> <p>Emission rates and other optical properties of multi-particle systems in collective and entangled states differ from those in product ones. We show the existence of similar effects in the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> probabilities for (anti)symmetrized states of two identical atoms. The effects strongly depend on the overlapping between the atoms and differ for bosons and fermions. We propose a viable experimental verification of these ideas.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22068572','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/22068572"><span id="translatedtitle">Geometrical interpretation of optical <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Monzon, J. J.; Barriuso, A. G.; Sanchez-Soto, L. L.; Montesinos-Amilibia, J. M.</p> <p>2011-08-15</p> <p>We reinterpret the transfer matrix for an absorbing system in very simple geometrical terms. In appropriate variables, the system appears as performing a Lorentz transformation in a (1 + 3)-dimensional space. Using homogeneous coordinates, we map that action on the unit sphere, which is at the realm of the Klein model of hyperbolic geometry. The effects of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> appear then as a loxodromic transformation, that is, a rhumb line crossing all the meridians at the same angle.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987InfPh..27...25P','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/1987InfPh..27...25P"><span id="translatedtitle">Multiphonon infrared <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in silicon</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Pradhan, M. M.; Garg, R. K.; Arora, M.</p> <p>1987-01-01</p> <p>Investigations have been carried out on silicon crystals, grown by float zone (FZ) and Czochralski (CZ) methods, of infrared <span class="hlt">absorption</span> bands using a Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer. Multiphonon bands are identified in the light of recent theoretical calculations based on the total energy of silicon crystal lattice. Theoretical results of Ihm et al. (1) and Yin and Cohen (2,3) are found to be in good agreement with the experimental observations of multiphonon infrared bands.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20002351','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/20002351"><span id="translatedtitle">GAX <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cycle design process</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Priedeman, D.K.; Christensen, R.N.</p> <p>1999-07-01</p> <p>This paper presents an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> system design process that relies on computer simulations that are validated by experimental findings. An ammonia-water <span class="hlt">absorption</span> heat pump cycle at 3 refrigeration tons (RT) and chillers at 3.3 RT and 5 RT (10.5 kW, 11.6 kW, and 17.6 kW) were initially modeled and then built and tested. The experimental results were used to calibrate both the cycle simulation and the component simulations, yielding computer design routines that could accurately predict component and cycle performance. Each system was a generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) cycle, and all were sized for residential and light commercial use, where very little <span class="hlt">absorption</span> equipment is currently used. The specific findings of the 5 RT (17.6 kW) chiller are presented. Modeling incorporated a heat loss from the gas-fired generator and pressure drops in both the evaporator and absorber. Simulation results and experimental findings agreed closely and validated the modeling method and simulation software.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5526152','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/5526152"><span id="translatedtitle">Purge needs in <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chillers</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Murray, J.G. )</p> <p>1993-10-01</p> <p><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> chillers are regaining a significant share of large tonnage chiller sales, such as they had 20 years ago. Gas-fired chillers are now available that have a base energy (ultimate fuel usage) consumption rate per ton comparable to that in electric units. Effective purging in an <span class="hlt">absorption</span> chiller is an absolute necessity to achieve the low chilled water temperature needed for dehumidification and to fully benefit from the energy savings offered by double-effect cycles. Although the purge system is usually not shown on the typical cycle schematic, its proper functioning is a key requirement for satisfactory machine operation. This article discusses the effect of noncondensible (N/C) gases on the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> cooling process and the basics of purge systems. In addition, the article discusses the rationale for the important design step of selecting the location of the N/C probe, and discusses purge systems applicable to the direct-fired, double-effect machines now entering the marketplace.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900029167&hterms=formaldehyde&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dformaldehyde','NASA-TRS'); return false;" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp?R=19900029167&hterms=formaldehyde&qs=Ntx%3Dmode%2Bmatchall%26Ntk%3DAll%26N%3D0%26No%3D40%26Ntt%3Dformaldehyde"><span id="translatedtitle">Formaldehyde <span class="hlt">absorption</span> toward W51</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://ntrs.nasa.gov/search.jsp">NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)</a></p> <p>Kogut, A.; Smoot, G. F.; Bennett, C. L.; Petuchowski, S. J.</p> <p>1989-01-01</p> <p>Formaldehyde (H2CO) <span class="hlt">absorption</span> toward the H II region complex W51A (G49.5 - 0.4) in the 6 cm and 2 cm wavelength rotational transitions has been measured with angular resolution of about 0.15 pc. The continuum H II region shows a large, previously undetected shell structure 5.5 pc along the major axis. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span>, converted to optical depth, shows a higher degree of clumping throughout the map than previous maps at lower resolution; in particular, two narrow regions of enhanced opacity are observed. The <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in the velocity range 64-67 km/s LSR extends over most of the region, with an observed velocity gradient of 5.2 km/s pc. The opacity structure largely parallels the velocity structure, with a ridge of enhanced opacity to the north of the highest velocity feature. The S/N of the maps allows accurate modeling of the spectral profiles. Nine distinct clumps in the foreground clouds have been identified and parametrized, and column densities for the 1(11) and 2(12) rotational levels of orthoformaldehyde have been derived.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/459824','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/servlets/purl/459824"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Indexes</span> to Nuclear Regulatory Commission Issuances</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p></p> <p>1996-12-31</p> <p>Digests and <span class="hlt">indexes</span> for issuances of the Commission (CLI), the Atomic Safety and licensing Board Panel (LBP), the Administrative Law Judges (ALJ) the Directors` Decisions (DD), and the Decisions on Petitions for Rulemaking (DPRM) are presented in this document. These digests and <span class="hlt">indexes</span> are intended to serve as a guide to the issuances. Information elements are displayed in one or more of five separate formats arranged as follows: Case Name <span class="hlt">Index</span>; Headers and Digests; Legal Citations <span class="hlt">Index</span>; Subject <span class="hlt">Index</span>; and Facility <span class="hlt">Index</span>.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1414958','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1414958"><span id="translatedtitle">Creatinine arm <span class="hlt">index</span> as alternative for creatinine height <span class="hlt">index</span>.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Van Hoeyweghen, R J; De Leeuw, I H; Vandewoude, M F</p> <p>1992-10-01</p> <p>Nutritional assessment of elderly people is limited due to a lack of age-corrected standards. The objective of this study was to develop a new, more age-independent <span class="hlt">index</span> for nutritional assessment by correcting the creatinine height <span class="hlt">index</span> (CHI) for the age-induced changes in its variables. This might improve the differentiation between physiological reduction in muscle mass in elderly people and the changes induced by malnutrition. Seventy-four elderly and 100 young healthy volunteers were compared by anthropometric and biochemical-assessment variables. From the high correlation between total arm length and body length (r = 0.86; P less than 0.001) and the use of an alternative formula to calculate ideal body weight (IBW) from height and wrist circumference, a relatively age-independent estimate of IBW was determined. Creatinine arm <span class="hlt">index</span>, as an adapted <span class="hlt">index</span> of CHI, is proposed based on this age-independent IBW estimation and a specific creatinine coefficient for different age groups. PMID:1414958</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=background+AND+information+AND+chemistry&pg=2&id=EJ284582','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=background+AND+information+AND+chemistry&pg=2&id=EJ284582"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Spectroscopy in Homogeneous and Micellar Solutions.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Shah, S. Sadiq; Henscheid, Leonard G.</p> <p>1983-01-01</p> <p>Describes an experiment which has helped physical chemistry students learn principles of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectroscopy, the effect of solvent polarity on <span class="hlt">absorption</span> spectra, and some micellar chemistry. Background information and experimental procedures are provided. (JN)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-011.pdf','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://www.nwrc.usgs.gov/wdb/pub/hsi/hsi-011.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> Models: Marten</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Allen, Arthur W.</p> <p>1982-01-01</p> <p>Habitat preferences and species characteristics of the pine marten (Martes americana) are described in this publication. It is one of a series of Habitat Suitability <span class="hlt">Index</span> (HSI) models and was developed through an analysis of available scientific data on the species-habitat requirements of the pine marten. Habitat use information is presented in a review of the literature, followed by the development of a HSI model. The model is presented in three formats: graphic, word and mathematical. Suitability <span class="hlt">index</span> graphs quantify the species-habitat relationship. These data are then synthesized into a model which is designed to provide information for use in impact assessment and habitat management activities.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7577E..0XN','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2010SPIE.7577E..0XN"><span id="translatedtitle">Extraction of complex refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> dispersion from SPR data</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Nakkach, Mohamed; Moreau, Julien; Canva, Michael</p> <p>2010-02-01</p> <p>Surface Plasmon Resonnance (SPR) techniques have been mostly set-up as angular reflectivity interrogation mode using quasi-monochromatic light or as spectral reflectivity interrogation mode at one given wavelength, providing information about variation of effective optical thickness ▵n.e above the metal surface. In this communication we present a dual mode sensor working both in angular and spectral interrogation modes. A white light illuminates the sensor surface and the reflectivity spectra in TE and TM polarization are measured with a spectrometer. By changing the angular coupling conditions, a complete reflectivity surface R(θ, λ) can be measured. The 2D reflectivity decrease valley is affected by both the real and imaginary part of the optical <span class="hlt">index</span> of the dielectric medium as well as their spectral dispersion. With such experimental data set, it is possible to back calculate the dispersion of the complex refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of the dielectric layer. This is demonstrated using a turquoise dye doped solution. According to the Kramers-Kronig relations, the imaginary part of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> for an absorbing medium is proportional to the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> while the real part presents a large dispersion around the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> wavelength. The reflectivity surface R(θ, λ) was measured from 500 nm to 750 nm over about 8° angular range. The whole complex refractive optical <span class="hlt">index</span> of the doped solution, absorbing around 630 nm, was reconstructed from the SPR reflectivity experimental data, using a homemade program based on an extended Rouard method to fit the experimental angular plasmon data for each wavelength. These results show that the classical SPR technique can be extended to acquire precise spectral information about biomolecular interactions occurring on the metallic layer.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7454E..0VJ','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2009SPIE.7454E..0VJ"><span id="translatedtitle">Estimation of canopy water content with MODIS spectral <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Jiang, Zuoning; Li, Lin; Ustin, Susan L.</p> <p>2009-08-01</p> <p>Canopy water content is an important variable for forestry and agriculture management. This study was aimed at building calibration models to estimate vegetation canopy (VC) equivalent water thickness (EWT) from high temporal resolution and large areal coverage MODIS images. The models were developed for a semi-arid area in Arizona (SMEX04) and the best one was applied to MODIS images covering a forest area in Southern Indiana. EWT derived from hyperspectral data in the process of atmospheric correction was used for calibrating MODIS spectral indices. Tested in this study were four vegetation indices: Normalized Difference Water <span class="hlt">Index</span> (NDWI), Shortwave Infrared Water Stress <span class="hlt">Index</span> (SIWSI), Normalized Difference Vegetation <span class="hlt">Index</span> (NDVI), and Enhanced Vegetation <span class="hlt">Index</span> (EVI), which were designed based on either water (NDWI and SIWSI) or chlorophyll <span class="hlt">absorptions</span> (NDVI and EVI). Validating these indices on field measured EWT for the SMEX04 site resulted in R2 correlations of 0.7547, 0.7509, 0.7299 and 0.7547, respectively. According to regression equations, however, EWT estimated using NDWI and SIWSI shows a slope more close to 1 than those using NDVI and EVI when validated with ground measured EWT, thus showing a better prediction ability than the two chlorophyll indices. The SIWSI-EWT model was chosen to apply to a time series of MODIS images covering the Southern Indiana areas and the relationship of EWT derived from these images to precipitation was examined.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2012-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 516.157 - Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span>... MINOR SPECIES <span class="hlt">Index</span> of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species § 516.157 Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing. (a) FDA will make the list of <span class="hlt">indexed</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2014-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 5.1 - Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-01-01</p> <p>... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices paid...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf','CFR2012'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2012-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2012-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 5.1 - Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2012&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2012-01-01</p> <p>... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices paid...</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li class="active"><span>24</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>25</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_24 --> <div id="page_25" class="hiddenDiv"> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div> </div> <div class="row"> <div class="col-sm-12"> <ol class="result-class" start="481"> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2010-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 516.157 - Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span>... MINOR SPECIES <span class="hlt">Index</span> of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species § 516.157 Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing. (a) FDA will make the list of <span class="hlt">indexed</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf','CFR2014'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2014-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2014-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 516.157 - Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2014&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2014-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span>... MINOR SPECIES <span class="hlt">Index</span> of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species § 516.157 Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing. (a) FDA will make the list of <span class="hlt">indexed</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2013-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 5.1 - Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices paid...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2011-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 516.157 - Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span>... MINOR SPECIES <span class="hlt">Index</span> of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species § 516.157 Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing. (a) FDA will make the list of <span class="hlt">indexed</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf','CFR2013'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2013-title21-vol6/pdf/CFR-2013-title21-vol6-sec516-157.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">21 CFR 516.157 - Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2013&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2013-04-01</p> <p>... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span>... MINOR SPECIES <span class="hlt">Index</span> of Legally Marketed Unapproved New Animal Drugs for Minor Species § 516.157 Publication of the <span class="hlt">index</span> and content of an <span class="hlt">index</span> listing. (a) FDA will make the list of <span class="hlt">indexed</span>...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf','CFR2011'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2011-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 5.1 - Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2011&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices paid...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf','CFR'); return false;" href="https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2010-title7-vol1/pdf/CFR-2010-title7-vol1-sec5-1.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle">7 CFR 5.1 - Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/browse/collectionCfr.action?selectedYearFrom=2010&page.go=Go">Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR</a></p> <p></p> <p>2010-01-01</p> <p>... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers... § 5.1 Parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices received by farmers. (a) The parity <span class="hlt">index</span> and related indices..., 1949, 1954, and 1956 (hereinafter referred to as section 301(a)) shall be the <span class="hlt">index</span> of prices paid...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25822141','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25822141"><span id="translatedtitle">A naked eye refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> sensor with a visible multiple peak metamaterial absorber.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Ma, Heli; Song, Kun; Zhou, Liang; Zhao, Xiaopeng</p> <p>2015-01-01</p> <p>We report a naked eye refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> sensor with a visible metamaterial absorber. The visible metamaterial absorber consisting of a silver dendritic/dielectric/metal structure shows multiple <span class="hlt">absorption</span> peaks. By incorporating a gain material (rhodamine B) into the dielectric layer, the maximal magnitude of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> peak can be improved by about 30%. As the metamaterial absorber is sensitive to the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of glucose solutions, it can function as a sensor that quickly responds to variations of the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> of the liquid. Meanwhile, since the response is presented via color changes, it can be clearly observed by the naked eyes. Further experiments have confirmed that the sensor can be used repeatedly. PMID:25822141</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27573337','PUBMED'); return false;" href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27573337"><span id="translatedtitle">Broadband giant-refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> material based on mesoscopic space-filling curves.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?DB=pubmed">PubMed</a></p> <p>Chang, Taeyong; Kim, Jong Uk; Kang, Seung Kyu; Kim, Hyowook; Kim, Do Kyung; Lee, Yong-Hee; Shin, Jonghwa</p> <p>2016-01-01</p> <p>The refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> is the fundamental property of all optical materials and dictates Snell's law, propagation speed, wavelength, diffraction, energy density, <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and emission of light in materials. Experimentally realized broadband refractive indices remain <40, even with intricately designed artificial media. Herein, we demonstrate a measured <span class="hlt">index</span> >1,800 resulting from a mesoscopic crystal with a dielectric constant greater than three million. This gigantic enhancement effect originates from the space-filling curve concept from mathematics. The principle is inherently very broad band, the enhancement being nearly constant from zero up to the frequency of interest. This broadband giant-refractive-<span class="hlt">index</span> medium promises not only enhanced resolution in imaging and raised fundamental <span class="hlt">absorption</span> limits in solar energy devices, but also compact, power-efficient components for optical communication and increased performance in many other applications. PMID:27573337</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=paranoia&pg=5&id=ED198471','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=paranoia&pg=5&id=ED198471"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Absorption</span>, Creativity, Peak Experiences, Empathy, and Psychoticism.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Mathes, Eugene W.; And Others</p> <p></p> <p>Tellegen and Atkinson suggested that the trait of <span class="hlt">absorption</span> may play a part in meditative skill, creativity, capacity for peak experiences, and empathy. Although the <span class="hlt">absorption</span>-meditative skill relationship has been confirmed, other predictions have not been tested. Tellegen and Atkinson's <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Scale was completed by undergraduates in four…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=144725','TEKTRAN'); return false;" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/research/publications/Publications.htm?seq_no_115=144725"><span id="translatedtitle">ADAPTATION IN ZINC <span class="hlt">ABSORPTION</span> FROM WHOLE DIETS</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.ars.usda.gov/services/TekTran.htm">Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p>Limited evidence suggests that humans increase zinc (Zn) <span class="hlt">absorption</span> in response to low Zn intake. Aim: To assess human Zn <span class="hlt">absorption</span> from whole diets varying in Zn content, and short-term adaptation to meet apparent Zn requirements. Method: Using 65Zn and whole body counting, Zn <span class="hlt">absorption</span> by 83 hea...</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...117u5309K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2015JAP...117u5309K"><span id="translatedtitle">Integrated three-dimensional photonic nanostructures for achieving near-unity solar <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and superhydrophobicity</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Kuang, Ping; Hsieh, Mei-Li; Lin, Shawn-Yu</p> <p>2015-06-01</p> <p>In this paper, we proposed and realized 3D photonic nanostructures consisting of ultra-thin graded <span class="hlt">index</span> antireflective coatings (ARCs) and woodpile photonic crystals. The use of the integrated ARC and photonic crystal structure can achieve broadband, broad-angle near unity solar <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. The amorphous silicon based photonic nanostructure experimentally shows an average <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of ˜95% for λ = 400-620 nm over a wide angular acceptance of θ = 0°-60°. Theoretical studies show that a Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) based structure can achieve an average <span class="hlt">absorption</span> of >95% for λ = 400-870 nm. Furthermore, the use of the slanted SiO2 nanorod ARC surface layer by glancing angle deposition exhibits Cassie-Baxter state wetting, and superhydrophobic surface is obtained with highest water contact angle θCB ˜ 153°. These properties are fundamentally important for achieving maximum solar <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and surface self-cleaning in thin film solar cell applications.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015SPIE.9503E..0RT&link_type=ABSTRACT','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/cgi-bin/nph-data_query?bibcode=2015SPIE.9503E..0RT&link_type=ABSTRACT"><span id="translatedtitle">Propagation of femtosecond pulse with self-similar shape in medium with nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Zakharova, Irina G.</p> <p>2015-05-01</p> <p>We investigate the propagation of laser pulse with self-similar shape in homogeneous medium with various mechanisms of nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span>: multi-photon <span class="hlt">absorption</span> or resonant nonlinearity under detuning the frequency, corresponding to energy transition, from the current frequency of wave packet, or nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span> with its saturation. Both types of sign for frequency detuning are considered. This results in appearance of a refractive <span class="hlt">index</span> grating which induced a laser pulse self-action. We analyze also the influence of the laser pulse self-modulation due to cubic nonlinearity on existence of the laser pulse propagation mode with self-similar shape. We develop an analytical solution of the corresponding nonlinear eigenfunction problem for laser pulse propagation in medium with nonlinear <span class="hlt">absorption</span>. This solution is confirmed by computer simulation of the eigenfunction problem for Schrödinger equation with considered nonlinearity. This mode of laser pulse propagation is very important for powerful TW laser pulse propagating in glass.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MNRAS.386.1426K','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2008MNRAS.386.1426K"><span id="translatedtitle">The intrinsic fraction of broad-<span class="hlt">absorption</span> line quasars</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Knigge, Christian; Scaringi, Simone; Goad, Michael R.; Cottis, Christopher E.</p> <p>2008-05-01</p> <p>We carefully reconsider the problem of classifying broad-<span class="hlt">absorption</span> line quasars (BALQSOs) and derive a new, unbiased estimate of the intrinsic BALQSO fraction from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) DR3 quasi-stellar object (QSO) catalogue. We first show that the distribution of objects selected by the so-called `<span class="hlt">absorption</span> <span class="hlt">index</span>' (AI) is clearly bimodal in logAI, with only one mode corresponding to definite BALQSOs. The surprisingly high BALQSO fractions that have recently been inferred from AI-based samples are therefore likely to be overestimated. We then present two new approaches to the classification problem that are designed to be more robust than the AI, but also more complete than the traditional `balnicity <span class="hlt">index</span>' (BI). Both approaches yield observed BALQSO fractions around 13.5 per cent, while a conservative third approach suggests an upper limit of 18.3 per cent. Finally, we discuss the selection biases that affect our observed BALQSO fraction. After correcting for these biases, we arrive at our final estimate of the intrinsic BALQSO fraction. This is fBALQSO = 0.17 +/- 0.01(stat) +/- 0.03(sys) with an upper limit of fBALQSO ~= 0.23. We conclude by pointing out that the bimodality of the logAI distribution may be evidence that the BAL-forming region has clearly delineated physical boundaries.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JEOS....8E3055F','NASAADS'); return false;" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abs/2013JEOS....8E3055F"><span id="translatedtitle">Scattering and <span class="hlt">Absorption</span> Properties of Biomaterials for Dental Restorative Applications</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://adsabs.harvard.edu/abstract_service.html">NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)</a></p> <p>Fernandez-Oliveras, A.; Rubiño, M.; Pérez, M. M.</p> <p>2013-08-01</p> <p>The physical understanding of the optical properties of dental biomaterials is mandatory for their final success in restorative applications.Light propagation in biological media is characterized by the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> coefficient, the scattering coefficient, the scattering phase function,the refractive <span class="hlt">index</span>, and the surface conditions (roughness). We have employed the inverse adding-doubling (IAD) method to combine transmittance and reflectance measurements performed using an integrating-sphere setup with the results of the previous scattering-anisotropygoniometric measurements. This has led to the determination of the <span class="hlt">absorption</span> and the scattering coefficients. The aim was to optically characterize two different dental-resin composites (nanocomposite and hybrid) and one type of zirconia ceramic, and comparatively study them. The experimental procedure was conducted under repeatability conditions of measurement in order to determine the uncertainty associated to the optical properties of the biomaterials. Spectral variations of the refraction <span class="hlt">index</span> and the scattering anisotropy factor were also considered. The whole experimental procedure fulfilled all the necessary requirements to provide optical-property values with lower associated uncertainties. The effective transport coefficient presented a similar spectral behavior for the two composites but completely different for the zirconia ceramic. The results demonstrated that the scattering anisotropy exerted a clearly distinct impact on the optical properties of the zirconia ceramic compared with those of the dental-resin composites.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230685-lawrence-berkeley-lab-indexing-toolbox','SCIGOV-ESTSC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/1230685-lawrence-berkeley-lab-indexing-toolbox"><span id="translatedtitle">Lawrence Berkeley Lab <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Toolbox</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href=""></a></p> <p></p> <p>2003-09-08</p> <p>The Lawrence Berkeley Lab <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Toolbox is intended to be used in the context of X-ray crystallography experiments involving biological macromolecules. Macromolecules such as proteins form 3-dimensional periodic arrays (crystal) which in turn lead to lattice-like diffraction patterns when the crystal sample is irradiated with collimated X-rays from a synchrotron or other X-ray source. Once the diffraction pattern is captured on an imaging device the next step is to deduce the periodic nature of themore » crystal sample, along with its internal symmetry. this analysis, known as "<span class="hlt">indexing</span>" is a well-studied problem. However, there are no other implementations designed to operate in an automated setting, in which the human experimentalist is not prosent to manually verify the results of <span class="hlt">indexing</span>. In particular LABELIT uses three novel algorithms to facilitate automation: a more robust way to verify the position of the incident X-ray beam on the image, a better way to verify that the deduced lattice is consistent with the observed crystal lattice, and new method to deduce the internal symmetry from measurements of the lattice. Moreover, the algorithms are implemented in a Python framework that permits <span class="hlt">indexing</span> to fail (in rare cases) without crashing the program, thus allowing the software to be incorporated in robotic systems where unattended operation is expected. It will be especially useful for high throughput operations at snychrotron beamlines.« less</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED025304.pdf','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED025304.pdf"><span id="translatedtitle"><span class="hlt">Index</span> and Description of Tests.</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>New York Univ., NY. Inst. for Developmental Studies.</p> <p></p> <p>The tests described in this <span class="hlt">index</span> are used by the Institute for Developmental Studies in its principal areas of research and do not include recently developed tests. The research at the Institute is concerned with (1) the relationship of differing environments to language development, (2) classroom communication between teachers and children of…</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21396209','SCIGOV-STC'); return false;" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech/biblio/21396209"><span id="translatedtitle">Optimal deployment of solar <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.osti.gov/scitech">SciTech Connect</a></p> <p>Croucher, Matt</p> <p>2010-11-15</p> <p>There is a growing trend, generally caused by state-specific renewable portfolio standards, to increase the importance of renewable electricity generation within generation portfolios. While RPS assist with determining the composition of generation they do not, for the most part, dictate the location of generation. Using data from various public sources, the authors create an optimal <span class="hlt">index</span> for solar deployment. (author)</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036726','USGSPUBS'); return false;" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/publication/70036726"><span id="translatedtitle">USGS 1-min Dst <span class="hlt">index</span></span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://pubs.er.usgs.gov/pubs/index.jsp?view=adv">USGS Publications Warehouse</a></p> <p>Gannon, J.L.; Love, J.J.</p> <p>2011-01-01</p> <p>We produce a 1-min time resolution storm-time disturbance <span class="hlt">index</span>, the USGS Dst, called Dst8507-4SM. This <span class="hlt">index</span> is based on minute resolution horizontal magnetic field intensity from low-latitude observatories in Honolulu, Kakioka, San Juan and Hermanus, for the years 1985-2007. The method used to produce the <span class="hlt">index</span> uses a combination of time- and frequency-domain techniques, which more clearly identifies and excises solar-quiet variation from the horizontal intensity time series of an individual station than the strictly time-domain method used in the Kyoto Dst <span class="hlt">index</span>. The USGS 1-min Dst is compared against the Kyoto Dst, Kyoto Sym-H, and the USGS 1-h Dst (Dst5807-4SH). In a time series comparison, Sym-H is found to produce more extreme values during both sudden impulses and main phase maximum deviation, possibly due to the latitude of its contributing observatories. Both Kyoto indices are shown to have a peak in their distributions below zero, while the USGS indices have a peak near zero. The USGS 1-min Dst is shown to have the higher time resolution benefits of Sym-H, while using the more typical low-latitude observatories of Kyoto Dst. ?? 2010.</p> </li> <li> <p><a target="_blank" onclick="trackOutboundLink('http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mining+AND+environment&pg=2&id=ED557816','ERIC'); return false;" href="http://eric.ed.gov/?q=mining+AND+environment&pg=2&id=ED557816"><span id="translatedtitle">Mining and <span class="hlt">Indexing</span> Graph Databases</span></a></p> <p><a target="_blank" href="http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/extended.jsp?_pageLabel=advanced">ERIC Educational Resources Information Center</a></p> <p>Yuan, Dayu</p> <p>2013-01-01</p> <p>Graphs are widely used to model structures and relationships of objects in various scientific and commercial fields. Chemical molecules, proteins, malware system-call dependencies and three-dimensional mechanical parts are all modeled as graphs. In this dissertation, we propose to mine and <span class="hlt">index</span> those graph data to enable fast and scalable search.…</p> </li> </ol> <div class="pull-right"> <ul class="pagination"> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_1");'>«</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_21");'>21</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_22");'>22</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_23");'>23</a></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_24");'>24</a></li> <li class="active"><span>25</span></li> <li><a href="#" onclick='return showDiv("page_25");'>»</a></li> </ul> </div> </div><!-- col-sm-12 --> </div><!-- row --> </div><!-- page_25 --> <center> <div class="footer-extlink text-muted"><small>Some links on this page may take you to non-federal websites. Their policies may differ from this site.</small> </div> </center> <div id="footer-wrapper"> <div class="footer-content"> <div id="footerOSTI" class=""> <div class="row"> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-push-4 footer-content-center"><small><a href="http://www.science.gov/disclaimer.html">Privacy and Security</a></small> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center col-md-pull-4 footer-content-left"> <img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/DOE_SC31.png" alt="U.S. Department of Energy" usemap="#doe" height="31" width="177"><map style="display:none;" name="doe" id="doe"><area shape="rect" coords="1,3,107,30" href="http://www.energy.gov" alt="U.S. Deparment of Energy"><area shape="rect" coords="114,3,165,30" href="http://www.science.energy.gov" alt="Office of Science"></map> <a ref="http://www.osti.gov" style="margin-left: 15px;"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/ostigov53.png" alt="Office of Scientific and Technical Information" height="31" width="53"></a> <div class="visible-sm visible-xs push_footer"></div> </div> <div class="col-md-4 text-center footer-content-right"> <a href="http://www.osti.gov/nle"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/NLElogo31.png" alt="National Library of Energy" height="31" width="79"></a> <a href="http://www.science.gov"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/scigov77.png" alt="science.gov" height="31" width="98"></a> <a href="http://worldwidescience.org"><img src="https://www.osti.gov/images/footerimages/wws82.png" alt="WorldWideScience.org" height="31" width="90"></a> </div> </div> </div> </div> </div> <p><br></p> </div><!-- container --> </body> </html>