Science.gov

Sample records for absorption lag time

  1. Oral vaccination of African catfish with Vibrio anguillarum O2: effect on antigen uptake and immune response by absorption enhancers in lag time coated pellets.

    PubMed

    Vervarcke, Stefaan; Ollevier, Frans; Kinget, Renaat; Michoel, Armand

    2004-03-01

    The impact on antigen uptake and antibody response by the addition of absorption enhancers to Vibrio anguillarum O2 antigen was studied in oral vaccination trials of African catfish (Clarias gariepinus). Oral vaccination was achieved by feeding lag time coated pellets. The lag time coat prevents premature release of the encapsulated vaccine in the tank, before ingestion of the pellets by the fish. To monitor the antigen uptake, a competitive ELISA was used. The antibody response was measured using an indirect ELISA. Feeding of bacterin-layered pellets without absorption enhancers resulted in a rather low antigen uptake and antibody levels. The addition of absorption enhancers such as sodium salicylate, sodium caprate and vitamin E TPGS increased the serum antigen levels and specific antibody levels in the systemic circulation. Skin mucus antibody levels were higher after oral vaccination compared to the IP and control group. The addition of absorption enhancers in the oral groups further increased the antibody levels obtained in the skin mucus. PMID:15123307

  2. A multi-epoch spectroscopic study of the BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. II. Emission- and absorption-line variability time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saturni, F. G.; Trevese, D.; Vagnetti, F.; Perna, M.; Dadina, M.

    2016-03-01

    Context. The study of high-redshift bright quasars is crucial to gather information about the history of galaxy assembly and evolution. Variability analyses can provide useful data on the physics of quasar processes and their relation with the host galaxy. Aims: In this study, we aim to measure the black hole mass of the bright lensed BAL QSO APM 08279+5255 at z = 3.911 through reverberation mapping, and to update and extend the monitoring of its C IV absorption line variability. Methods: We perform the first reverberation mapping of the Si IV and C IV emission lines for a high-luminosity quasar at high redshift with the use of 138 R-band photometric data and 30 spectra available over 16 years of observations. We also cross-correlate the C IV absorption equivalent width variations with the continuum light curve to estimate the recombination time lags of the various absorbers and infer the physical conditions of the ionised gas. Results: We find a reverberation-mapping time lag of ~900 rest-frame days for both Si IV and C IV emission lines. This is consistent with an extension of the BLR size-to-luminosity relation for active galactic nuclei up to a luminosity of ~1048 erg s-1, and implies a black hole mass of 1010 M⊙. Additionally, we measure a recombination time lag of ~160 days in the rest frame for the C IV narrow absorption system, which implies an electron density of the absorbing gas of ~2.5 × 104 cm-3. Conclusions: The measured black hole mass of APM 08279+5255 indicates that the quasar resides in an under-massive host-galaxy bulge with Mbulge ~ 7.5MBH, and that the lens magnification is lower than ~8. Finally, the inferred electron density of the narrow-line absorber implies a distance of the order of 10 kpc of the absorbing gas from the quasar, placing it within the host galaxy.

  3. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lag times. 52.103 Section 52.103... Free Numbers § 52.103 Lag times. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between...

  4. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lag times. 52.103 Section 52.103... Free Numbers § 52.103 Lag times. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between...

  5. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lag times. 52.103 Section 52.103 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Toll Free Numbers § 52.103 Lag times. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions apply: (1) Assigned Status. A toll free...

  6. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... entered by the Responsible Organization in the Service Management System database and is pending... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between a toll free number's reservation in the Service Management System database and its conversion to...

  7. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... entered by the Responsible Organization in the Service Management System database and is pending... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between a toll free number's reservation in the Service Management System database and its conversion to...

  8. No Time Lag in the Photoelectric Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gluck, Paul; Saering, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    The photoelectric effect was discovered in the 19th century by Heinrich Hertz. It is interesting to note that the same scientist showed experimentally the wave nature of light, and thereby vindicated Maxwell's wave theory, and discovered the effect in which light shows corpuscular behavior. This paper describes a simple demonstration, enabling one to show the absence of a time lag in the photoelectric effect to an accuracy of a microsecond.

  9. Effect of lag time distribution on the lag phase of bacterial growth - a Monte Carlo analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study is to use Monte Carlo simulation to evaluate the effect of lag time distribution of individual bacterial cells incubated under isothermal conditions on the development of lag phase. The growth of bacterial cells of the same initial concentration and mean lag phase durati...

  10. Statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The study of X-ray time-lag spectra in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is currently an active research area, since it has the potential to illuminate the physics and geometry of the innermost region (i.e. close to the putative super-massive black hole) in these objects. To obtain reliable information from these studies, the statistical properties of time-lags estimated from data must be known as accurately as possible. Aims: We investigated the statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates (i.e. based on the cross-periodogram), using evenly sampled time series with no missing points. Our aim is to provide practical "guidelines" on estimating time-lags that are minimally biased (i.e. whose mean is close to their intrinsic value) and have known errors. Methods: Our investigation is based on both analytical work and extensive numerical simulations. The latter consisted of generating artificial time series with various signal-to-noise ratios and sampling patterns/durations similar to those offered by AGN observations with present and past X-ray satellites. We also considered a range of different model time-lag spectra commonly assumed in X-ray analyses of compact accreting systems. Results: Discrete sampling, binning and finite light curve duration cause the mean of the time-lag estimates to have a smaller magnitude than their intrinsic values. Smoothing (i.e. binning over consecutive frequencies) of the cross-periodogram can add extra bias at low frequencies. The use of light curves with low signal-to-noise ratio reduces the intrinsic coherence, and can introduce a bias to the sample coherence, time-lag estimates, and their predicted error. Conclusions: Our results have direct implications for X-ray time-lag studies in AGN, but can also be applied to similar studies in other research fields. We find that: a) time-lags should be estimated at frequencies lower than ≈ 1/2 the Nyquist frequency to minimise the effects of discrete binning of the

  11. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  12. CALCULATING TIME LAGS FROM UNEVENLY SAMPLED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    Timing techniques are powerful tools to study dynamical astrophysical phenomena. In the X-ray band, they offer the potential of probing accretion physics down to the event horizon. Recent work has used frequency- and energy-dependent time lags as tools for studying relativistic reverberation around the black holes in several Seyfert galaxies. This was achieved due to the evenly sampled light curves obtained using XMM-Newton. Continuously sampled data are, however, not always available and standard Fourier techniques are not applicable. Here, building on the work of Miller et al., we discuss and use a maximum likelihood method to obtain frequency-dependent lags that takes into account light curve gaps. Instead of calculating the lag directly, the method estimates the most likely lag values at a particular frequency given two observed light curves. We use Monte Carlo simulations to assess the method's applicability and use it to obtain lag-energy spectra from Suzaku data for two objects, NGC 4151 and MCG-5-23-16, that had previously shown signatures of iron K reverberation. The lags obtained are consistent with those calculated using standard methods using XMM-Newton data.

  13. Sensitivity analysis for dynamic systems with time-lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rihan, Fathalla A.

    2003-02-01

    Many problems in bioscience for which observations are reported in the literature can be modelled by suitable functional differential equations incorporating time-lags (other terminology: delays) or memory effects, parameterized by scientifically meaningful constant parameters p or/and variable parameters (for example, control functions) u(t). It is often desirable to have information about the effect on the solution of the dynamic system of perturbing the initial data, control functions, time-lags and other parameters appearing in the model. The main purpose of this paper is to derive a general theory for sensitivity analysis of mathematical models that contain time-lags. In this paper, we use adjoint equations and direct methods to estimate the sensitivity functions when the parameters appearing in the model are not only constants but also variables of time. To illustrate the results, the methodology is applied numerically to an example of a delay differential model.

  14. The QPO phenomena and their time lags in five ULXs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinlu

    2016-07-01

    We investigated the power density spectrum (PDS) and time lag of 5 Ultraluminous X-ray Sources (ULXs) observed by XMM-Newton, which show quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs). The motivation underneath is that, the correlations between the frequency of QPO and the BH mass, and between the time lag and BH mass provide us a chance of probing in time domain the mas of the compact object harbored in ULXs. As a result we found from these five ULXs for both correlations, which suggests that the compact objects are black holes with intermediate sizes if puts these relations into a context established by stellar black holes and supermassive black holes.

  15. Lag and anticipating synchronization without time-delay coupling.

    PubMed

    Corron, Ned J; Blakely, Jonathan N; Pethel, Shawn D

    2005-06-01

    We describe a new method for achieving approximate lag and anticipating synchronization in unidirectionally coupled chaotic oscillators. The method uses a specific parameter mismatch between the drive and response that is a first-order approximation to true time-delay coupling. As a result, an adjustable lag or anticipation effect can be achieved without the need for a variable delay line, making the method simpler and more economical to implement in many physical systems. We present a stability analysis, demonstrate the method numerically, and report experimental observation of the effect in radio-frequency electronic oscillators. In the circuit experiments, both lag and anticipation are controlled by tuning a single capacitor in the response oscillator. PMID:16035886

  16. Heat conduction errors and time lag in cryogenic thermometer installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I.

    1973-01-01

    Installation practices are recommended that will increase rate of heat exchange between the thermometric sensing element and the cryogenic fluid and that will reduce the rate of undesired heat transfer to higher-temperature objects. Formulas and numerical data are given that help to estimate the magnitude of heat-conduction errors and of time lag in response.

  17. Time fractional dual-phase-lag heat conduction equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Huan-Ying; Jiang, Xiao-Yun

    2015-03-01

    We build a fractional dual-phase-lag model and the corresponding bioheat transfer equation, which we use to interpret the experiment results for processed meat that have been explained by applying the hyperbolic conduction. Analytical solutions expressed by H-functions are obtained by using the Laplace and Fourier transforms method. The inverse fractional dual-phase-lag heat conduction problem for the simultaneous estimation of two relaxation times and orders of fractionality is solved by applying the nonlinear least-square method. The estimated model parameters are given. Finally, the measured and the calculated temperatures versus time are compared and discussed. Some numerical examples are also given and discussed. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11102102, 11472161, and 91130017), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2014AQ015), and the Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University, China (Grant No. 2013ZRYQ002).

  18. Double time lag combustion instability model for bipropellant rocket engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, C. K.

    1973-01-01

    A bipropellant stability model is presented in which feed system inertance and capacitance are treated along with injection pressure drop and distinctly different propellant time lags. The model is essentially an extension of Crocco's and Cheng's monopropellant model to the bipropellant case assuming that the feed system inertance and capacitance along with the resistance are located at the injector. The neutral stability boundaries are computed in terms of these parameters to demonstrate the interaction among them.

  19. Time Lag and Communication in Changing Unpopular Norms

    PubMed Central

    Gërxhani, Klarita; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Humans often coordinate their social lives through norms. When a large majority of people are dissatisfied with an existing norm, it seems obvious that they will change it. Often, however, this does not occur. We investigate how a time lag between individual support of a norm change and the change itself hinders such change, related to the critical mass of supporters needed to effectuate the change, and the (im)possibility of communicating about it. To isolate these factors, we utilize a laboratory experiment. As predicted, we find unambiguous effects of time lag on precluding norm change; a higher threshold for a critical mass does so as well. Communication facilitates choosing superior norms but it does not necessarily lead to norm change when the uncertainty on whether there will be a norm change in the future is high. Communication seems to help coordination on actions at the present but not the future. Hence, the uncertainty driven by time lag makes individuals choose the status quo, here the unpopular norm. PMID:25880200

  20. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Nitin S; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-21

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway. PMID:27334194

  1. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nitin S.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway.

  2. Dynamic regimes of local homogeneous population model with time lag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neverova, Galina; Frisman, Efim

    2016-06-01

    We investigated Moran - Ricker model with time lag 1. It is made analytical and numerical study of the model. It is shown there is co-existence of various dynamic regimes under the same values of parameters. The model simultaneously possesses several different limit regimes: stable state, periodic fluctuations, and chaotic attractor. The research results show if present population size substantially depends on population number of previous year then it is observed quasi-periodic oscillations. Fluctuations with period 2 occur when the growth of population size is regulated by density dependence in the current year.

  3. Flood Forecasting via Time Lag Forward Network; Kelantan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajarmizadeh, Milad; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Bte Basri, Hidayah; Shakira Jaffar, Aminah

    2016-03-01

    Forecasting water level is one of the critical issues in Malaysia for Kelantan region. Based on the flood events in 2014, this study investigates the hourly-forecasting of water level in one station namely Kg Jenob in Kelantan. For this issue, Time Lag Forward Network (TLFN) is evaluated for forecasting the water level as dynamic model. Heuristic method in stepwise forward methodology is performed. Rainfall and water level are the input and output of the modelling respectively. For selected flood period 15/12/2014 to 30/12/2014, 8 scenarios are developed to obtain a minimum error in water level forecasting. By monitoring the error, it will show that the optimum configuration of network has 2 processors in hidden layer and 7 lags have enough contribution on the result of hourly forecasting. Transfer functions in hidden and output layers are is Tangent hyperbolic and bias. Observed and simulated data are compared with usual error criteria called Mean Square Error (MSE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) which obtained 0.005 and 0.07 respectively. In conclusion, this study will be as a baseline for Kelantan to show that TLFN has promising result to forecast the flood events.

  4. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  5. Time lag between photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Y.; Gavrichkova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Important part of CO2 efflux from planted soils is root-derived CO2, meaning that it originates directly and indirectly from roots: directly from root respiration, and indirectly from respiration of rhizosphere microorganisms decomposing organic substances released by roots into the soil (rhizodeposits). Recent studies have shown that apart of well studied effect of soil temperature and soil water content, the C supply of assimilates from photosynthetically active plant organs have a significant effect on the root-derived CO2. In fact, the effect of photosynthesis on root-derived CO2 is often masked by temperature because root biomass typically peaks in summer. However, roots can only respire the C that was allocated belowground, and so the effect of temperature on root respiration is likely to be constrained by photosynthesis. If models of soil respiration are to incorporate photosynthetic C inputs it is necessary to understand how these two fluxes are coupled and what are the factors affecting the time lag between C uptake and its following respiration by roots and associated microorganisms. We reviewed literature and own studies relevant for estimation of the delay of C assimilation by photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil. The most of the studies were based on pulse labeling of annual plants in the atmosphere with 14CO2 or 13CO2 and subsequent chase of 14C or 13C in the CO2 efflux from soil. We analyzed the dynamics of the CO2 efflux curves and evaluated 3 parameters: 1) the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil, 2) maximum of labeled CO2, and 3) disappearance of the labeled CO2 from the total CO2 efflux from soil. Numerous studies showed that newly assimilated C cycles quickly within the ecosystem, being found in root respiration already some minutes after its assimilation. Reported time lags in situ and laboratory experiments varied from minutes to days. For annual and perennial grasses the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil was measured within

  6. Time-lag cross-correlations in collective phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podobnik, B.; Wang, D.; Horvatic, D.; Grosse, I.; Stanley, H. E.

    2010-06-01

    We study long-range magnitude cross-correlations in collective modes of real-world data from finance, physiology, and genomics using time-lag random matrix theory. We find long-range magnitude cross-correlations i) in time series of price fluctuations, ii) in physiological time series, both healthy and pathological, indicating scale-invariant interactions between different physiological time series, and iii) in ChIP-seq data of the mouse genome, where we uncover a complex interplay of different DNA-binding proteins, resulting in power-law cross-correlations in xij, the probability that protein i binds to gene j, ranging up to 10 million base pairs. In finance, we find that the changes in singular vectors and singular values are largest in times of crisis. We find that the largest 500 singular values of the NYSE Composite members follow a Zipf distribution with exponent ≈2. In physiology, we find statistically significant differences between alcoholic and control subjects.

  7. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    PubMed

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:25111249

  8. To lag or not to lag? How to compare indices of stock markets that operate on different times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandoval, Leonidas

    2014-06-01

    Financial markets worldwide do not have the same working hours. As a consequence, the study of correlation or causality between financial market indices becomes dependent on whether we should use all indices on the same day or lagged indices in computations of correlation matrices. The answer this article proposes is that we should consider both, by representing original and lagged indices in the same network. We then obtain a better understanding of how indices that operate on different hours relate to each other. We use a diverse range of 79 stock market indices from around the world and study their correlation structure, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of their correlations under different time periods and volatility, as well as the differences between the working hours of the stock exchanges in order to analyze the possible time zone effects and suggest ways to remove them. We also analyze the enlarged correlation matrix obtained from original and lagged indices and examine a network structure derived from it, thus showing connections between lagged and original indices that could not be well represented before.

  9. Time-evolving distribution of time lags between commercial airline disasters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausloos, M.; Lambiotte, R.

    2006-04-01

    We have studied the time lags between commercial line airplane disasters and their occurrence frequency till 2002, as obtained from a freely available website. We show that the time lags seem to be well described by Poisson random events, where the average events rate is itself a function of time, i.e., time-dependent Poisson events. This is likely due to the unsteady growth of the industry. The time lag distribution is compared with a truncated Tsallis distribution, thereby showing that the “phenomenon” has similarities with a Brownian particle with time-dependent mass. We distinguish between “other causes” (or natural causes) and “terrorism acts”, the latter amounts to about 5%, but we find no drastic difference nor impact due to the latter on the overall distribution.

  10. Short Lag Times for Invasive Tropical Plants: Evidence from Experimental Plantings in Hawai'i

    PubMed Central

    Daehler, Curtis C.

    2009-01-01

    Background The lag time of an invasion is the delay between arrival of an introduced species and its successful spread in a new area. To date, most estimates of lag times for plants have been indirect or anecdotal, and these estimates suggest that plant invasions are often characterized by lag times of 50 years or more. No general estimates are available of lag times for tropical plant invasions. Historical plantings and documentation were used to directly estimate lag times for tropical plant invasions in Hawai'i. Methodology/Principal Findings Historical planting records for the Lyon Arboretum dating back to 1920 were examined to identify plants that have since become invasive pests in the Hawaiian Islands. Annual reports describing escape from plantings were then used to determine the lag times between initial plantings and earliest recorded spread of the successful invaders. Among 23 species that eventually became invasive pests, the average lag time between introduction and first evidence of spread was 14 years for woody plants and 5 years for herbaceous plants. Conclusions/Significance These direct estimates of lag times are as much as an order of magnitude shorter than previous, indirect estimates, which were mainly based on temperate plants. Tropical invaders may have much shorter lag times than temperate species. A lack of direct and deliberate observations may have also inflated many previous lag time estimates. Although there have been documented cases of long lag times due to delayed arrival of a mutualist or environmental changes over time, this study suggests that most successful invasions are likely to begin shortly after arrival of the plant in a suitable habitat, at least in tropical environments. Short lag times suggest that controlled field trials may be a practical element of risk assessment for plant introductions. PMID:19223966

  11. Time-dependent Electron Acceleration in Blazar Transients: X-Ray Time Lags and Spectral Formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Tiffany R.; Becker, Peter A.; Finke, Justin D.

    2016-06-01

    Electromagnetic radiation from blazar jets often displays strong variability, extending from radio to γ-ray frequencies. In a few cases, this variability has been characterized using Fourier time lags, such as those detected in the X-rays from Mrk 421 using BeppoSAX. The lack of a theoretical framework to interpret the data has motivated us to develop a new model for the formation of the X-ray spectrum and the time lags in blazar jets based on a transport equation including terms describing stochastic Fermi acceleration, synchrotron losses, shock acceleration, adiabatic expansion, and spatial diffusion. We derive the exact solution for the Fourier transform of the electron distribution and use it to compute the Fourier transform of the synchrotron radiation spectrum and the associated X-ray time lags. The same theoretical framework is also used to compute the peak flare X-ray spectrum, assuming that a steady-state electron distribution is achieved during the peak of the flare. The model parameters are constrained by comparing the theoretical predictions with the observational data for Mrk 421. The resulting integrated model yields, for the first time, a complete first-principles physical explanation for both the formation of the observed time lags and the shape of the peak flare X-ray spectrum. It also yields direct estimates of the strength of the shock and the stochastic magnetohydrodynamical wave acceleration components in the Mrk 421 jet.

  12. Study on lag time model of fire plume under a sloped ceiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jinhui; Li, Guoqiang

    2014-10-01

    It is known that there is a lag time for smoke plume induced by fires transporting from a fire origin to the location of interest underneath an unconfined and flat ceiling. This lag behavior of smoke plume also exists for a fire under a sloped ceiling, and is fundamental to estimate the activation time of a fire detector or other fire extinguishing system. This study focuses on the lag time of smoke plume under a sloped ceiling. Based on the weak-plume theory at early-fire phase and previous studies concerning the fire plume characteristics under a sloped ceiling, a calculation method on lag time of fire plume transporting is presented in theory. Meanwhile, two dimensionless equations predicting the lag time of fire plume for steady fire and unsteady fire are proposed respectively. Furthermore, the critical time calculation equation is also proposed to determine the applicability of quasi-steady assumption for a time-dependent fire.

  13. Effects of lag-time on dichotic word perception in children

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, Sheryl S.; Goshorn, Edward L.; Jette, Shannon

    2003-10-01

    Dichotic word perception is an essential component in audiological test batteries that are designed to identify auditory processing disorders (APD). Lag-time is the time difference between onsets of dichotic stimuli. The contribution of lag-time to perception of dichotic speech is not fully known and there is a lack of data available on children. Studies by Black (1955) and Berlin et al. (1973) found intermittent effects of lag-time on perception of dichotic speech in adults. This project examined the effects of 3 lag-times (0, 150, and 300 ms) on perception of NU-CHCIPS [Elliot and Katz (1980)] words presented dichotically at 50 dB HL through ER-3A insert phones. The sequence of lag-times and ear order was balanced. Subjects were six children age 7 to 10 years who had normal hearing and normal findings on standardized APD tests. Lag-times of 0, 150, and 300 ms yielded mean error rates of 1.3, 1.5, and 1.7 ms, respectively. Mean right ear and left ear error rates were 1.4 and 1.6, respectively. A two-way ANOVA showed no significant (p>0.05) effect for lag-time, ear preference, or their interaction. Implications for findings and development of APD treatment materials based on lag-time data will be presented.

  14. Estimation of the lag time in a subsequent monomer addition model for fibril elongation.

    PubMed

    Shoffner, Suzanne K; Schnell, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Fibrillogenesis, the production or development of protein fibers, has been linked to protein folding diseases. The progress curve of fibrils or aggregates typically takes on a sigmoidal shape with a lag phase, a rapid growth phase, and a final plateau regime. The study of the lag phase and the estimation of its critical timescale provide insight into the factors regulating the fibrillation process. However, methods to estimate a quantitative expression for the lag time rely on empirical expressions, which cannot connect the lag time to kinetic parameters associated with the reaction mechanisms of protein fibrillation. Here we introduce an approach for the estimation of the lag time using the governing rate equations of the elementary reactions of a subsequent monomer addition model for protein fibrillation as a case study. We show that the lag time is given by the sum of the critical timescales for each fibril intermediate in the subsequent monomer addition mechanism and therefore reveals causal connectivity between intermediate species. Furthermore, we find that single-molecule assays of protein fibrillation can exhibit a lag phase without a nucleation process, while dyes and extrinsic fluorescent probe bulk assays of protein fibrillation do not exhibit an observable lag phase during template-dependent elongation. Our approach could be valuable for investigating the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors to the protein fibrillation reaction mechanism and provides physicochemical insights into parameters regulating the lag phase. PMID:27250246

  15. A Time Lag Analysis of Temporal Relations between Motivation, Academic Achievement, and Two Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Monica R.; Pasnak, Robert; Romero, Sandy L.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study employed a time lag design to assess temporal relationships between motivation, academic achievement, and cognitive development. Eighty-one children from 2 preschool programs were measured twice, with an 11-week time lag, on 2 measures of motivation (marble drop task, bean bag toss task), 2 measures of…

  16. Signatures of Steady Heating in Time Lag Analysis of Coronal Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viall, Nicholeen M.; Klimchuk, James A.

    2016-09-01

    Among the multitude of methods used to investigate coronal heating, the time lag method of Viall & Klimchuk is becoming increasingly prevalent as an analysis technique that is complementary to those that are traditionally used. The time lag method cross correlates light curves at a given spatial location obtained in spectral bands that sample different temperature plasmas. It has been used most extensively with data from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory. We have previously applied the time lag method to entire active regions and surrounding the quiet Sun and created maps of the results. We find that the majority of time lags are consistent with the cooling of coronal plasma that has been impulsively heated. Additionally, a significant fraction of the map area has a time lag of zero. This does not indicate a lack of variability. Rather, strong variability must be present, and it must occur in phase between the different channels. We have previously shown that these zero time lags are consistent with the transition region response to coronal nanoflares, although other explanations are possible. A common misconception is that the zero time lag indicates steady emission resulting from steady heating. Using simulated and observed light curves, we demonstrate here that highly correlated light curves at zero time lag are not compatible with equilibrium solutions. Such light curves can only be created by evolution.

  17. Liquid-to-crystal nucleation: Automated lag-time apparatus to study supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneghan, A. F.; Wilson, P. W.; Wang, Genmiao; Haymet, A. D. J.

    2001-10-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are studied using an automated lag-time apparatus. A single 500 μL sample of distilled water is repeatedly supercooled to a fixed temperature below its equilibrium freezing temperature, held until freezing occurred, and then thawed. Our raw data is then a set of approximately 300 lag-times for each of three set supercooling temperatures. In each case, a small insoluble AgI crystal was added to ensure heterogeneous nucleation and average nucleation temperatures around ΔT=8 K. The distribution of lag-times is analyzed, and shown to be well approximated by a single exponential decay, with average lag-times in the range of 1000-3000 seconds. This average lag-time decreases markedly at deeper levels of supercooling, and for the present data, this decrease is fit equally well by exponential, power law decay, and classical nucleation functional forms.

  18. Evaluation of Early Jet Lag Symptoms by Passengers Crossing 7 Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobiński, Rafał; Michalik, Anna

    Numerous studies have shown that travelling across three or more time zones may lead to jet lag, which is a consequence of circadian misalignment that occurs after crossing time zones too rapidly for the circadian system to keep pace. The main aim of this paper was to define the early symptoms of jet lag in travelers crossing seven time zones in the western and eastern direction. In order to verify the hypothesis there were 175 subjects, who could evaluate subjective severity of jet lag using a visual analogue scale. The current study showed that the significant predictors of early jet lag are tiredness, moodiness and gastrointestinal disturbance. There is a correlation between subjective effects of jet lag and physical well-being, tiredness, bowel movements, concentration and irritability.

  19. A generalized expression for lag-time in the gas-phase permeation of hollow tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. K.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hamaker, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized expression for the nonsteady-state parameter, lag-time, has been obtained from Fick's second law for gas-phase transport through hollow, cylindrical membranes. This generalized expression is simplified for three limiting cases of practical interest: (1) diffusion controlled transport, (2) phase boundary reaction control at the inlet surface, and (3) phase boundary reaction control at the outlet surface. In all three cases the lag-time expressions were found to be inversely proportional only to the diffusion coefficient and functionally dependent on the membrane radii. Finally, the lag-time expressions were applied to experimentally obtained lag-time data for alpha-phase titanium and alpha-phase iron.

  20. Time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donghai; Zhao, Xiang; Liang, Shunlin; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Kaicheng; Tang, Bijian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2015-09-01

    Climate conditions significantly affect vegetation growth in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of ecosystems, the vegetation responses to climate vary considerably with the diverse spatial patterns and the time-lag effects, which are the most important mechanism of climate-vegetation interactive effects. Extensive studies focused on large-scale vegetation-climate interactions use the simultaneous meteorological and vegetation indicators to develop models; however, the time-lag effects are less considered, which tends to increase uncertainty. In this study, we aim to quantitatively determine the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors using the GIMMS3g NDVI time series and the CRU temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation datasets. First, this study analyzed the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors. Then, a multiple linear regression model and partial correlation model were established to statistically analyze the roles of different climatic factors on vegetation responses, from which the primary climate-driving factors for different vegetation types were determined. The results showed that (i) both the time-lag effects of the vegetation responses and the major climate-driving factors that significantly affect vegetation growth varied significantly at the global scale, which was related to the diverse vegetation and climate characteristics; (ii) regarding the time-lag effects, the climatic factors explained 64% variation of the global vegetation growth, which was 11% relatively higher than the model ignoring the time-lag effects; (iii) for the area with a significant change trend (for the period 1982-2008) in the global GIMMS3g NDVI (P < 0.05), the primary driving factor was temperature; and (iv) at the regional scale, the variation in vegetation growth was also related to human activities and natural disturbances. Considering the time-lag effects is quite

  1. Patterns of Activity Revealed by a Time Lag Analysis of a Model Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Stephen; Viall, Nicholeen

    2016-05-01

    We investigate the global activity patterns predicted from a model active region heated by distributions of nanoflares that have a range of average frequencies. The activity patterns are manifested in time lag maps of narrow-band instrument channel pairs. We combine an extrapolated magnetic skeleton with hydrodynamic and forward modeling codes to create a model active region, and apply the time lag method to synthetic observations. Our aim is to recover some typical properties and patterns of activity observed in active regions. Our key findings are: 1. Cooling dominates the time lag signature and the time lags between the channel pairs are generally consistent with observed values. 2. Shorter coronal loops in the core cool more quickly than longer loops at the periphery. 3. All channel pairs show zero time lag when the line-of-sight passes through coronal loop foot-points. 4. There is strong evidence that plasma must be re-energized on a time scale comparable to the cooling timescale to reproduce the observed coronal activity, but it is likely that a relatively broad spectrum of heating frequencies operates across active regions. 5. Due to their highly dynamic nature, we find nanoflare trains produce zero time lags along entire flux tubes in our model active region that are seen between the same channel pairs in observed active regions.

  2. Consequences of varied soil hydraulic and meteorological complexity on unsaturated zone time lag estimates.

    PubMed

    Vero, S E; Ibrahim, T G; Creamer, R E; Grant, J; Healy, M G; Henry, T; Kramers, G; Richards, K G; Fenton, O

    2014-12-01

    The true efficacy of a programme of agricultural mitigation measures within a catchment to improve water quality can be determined only after a certain hydrologic time lag period (subsequent to implementation) has elapsed. As the biophysical response to policy is not synchronous, accurate estimates of total time lag (unsaturated and saturated) become critical to manage the expectations of policy makers. The estimation of the vertical unsaturated zone component of time lag is vital as it indicates early trends (initial breakthrough), bulk (centre of mass) and total (Exit) travel times. Typically, estimation of time lag through the unsaturated zone is poor, due to the lack of site specific soil physical data, or by assuming saturated conditions. Numerical models (e.g. Hydrus 1D) enable estimates of time lag with varied levels of input data. The current study examines the consequences of varied soil hydraulic and meteorological complexity on unsaturated zone time lag estimates using simulated and actual soil profiles. Results indicated that: greater temporal resolution (from daily to hourly) of meteorological data was more critical as the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil decreased; high clay content soils failed to converge reflecting prevalence of lateral component as a contaminant pathway; elucidation of soil hydraulic properties was influenced by the complexity of soil physical data employed (textural menu, ROSETTA, full and partial soil water characteristic curves), which consequently affected time lag ranges; as the importance of the unsaturated zone increases with respect to total travel times the requirements for high complexity/resolution input data become greater. The methodology presented herein demonstrates that decisions made regarding input data and landscape position will have consequences for the estimated range of vertical travel times. Insufficiencies or inaccuracies regarding such input data can therefore mislead policy makers regarding

  3. ALTA: An automated lag-time apparatus for studying the nucleation of supercooled liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Thomas W.; Haymet, A. D. J.

    1995-04-01

    An automated apparatus for studying repeatedly the nucleation of a sample of supercooled liquid is designed and constructed. Many of the ideas are developed from an apparatus of M. Baldwin and B. Vonnegut [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 53, 1911 (1982)]. After preparation of a nonequilibrium state, ALTA measures repeatedly the ``lag time'' or ``induction'' time before nucleation and growth of the equilibrium state. A single sample is used in all experiments. The operation of the apparatus is demonstrated by generating a time series of lag times for the nucleation of supercooled water on (insoluble) AgI crystals at the temperature 269.2 K. The same sample is repeatedly frozen and thawed over 350 times. An average lag time τ can be measured precisely and reproducibly. However, nucleation of this sample is shown to be a stochastic process obeying ``first-order'' kinetics. Improved methods for analyzing time series of nucleation data are presented and tested.

  4. Laboratory tests for measuring the time-lag of fully grouted piezometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simeoni, L.

    2012-05-01

    SummaryTime-lag is the most important parameter describing the conformance of a piezometer because it represents the time that it takes for the instrument to reach equilibrium when there is a pore water pressure change in the soil. The use of fully grouted piezometers would make the installation easier and faster than the conventional one, since it prevents the failure risks during the placement of the sand pack and the overlying bentonite seal. This paper describes a number of laboratory tests performed to evaluate the time-lag of fully grouted piezometers. A pore water pressure change was applied at the bottom of cylindrical samples of grout and the pressure equalization was measured at the top. The samples were made of a cement-bentonite mixture and were 2 cm, 4 cm or 8 cm in height. Time-lags resulted in no longer than 6 min, that is a time generally acceptable in geotechnical projects. It was also found that the time-lag relies on the pore water pressure value. For a given draining path length, the higher the pore water pressure the shorter the response time. This behavior has been explained by assuming that the time-lag depends on both the hydraulic and compressible characteristics of the grout mixture and that these characteristics vary with the pore water pressure because the grout is in a quasi saturated state.

  5. Time lags between crown and basal sap flows in tropical lianas and co-occurring trees.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ya-Jun; Bongers, Frans; Tomlinson, Kyle; Fan, Ze-Xin; Lin, Hua; Zhang, Shu-Bin; Zheng, Yu-Long; Li, Yang-Ping; Cao, Kun-Fang; Zhang, Jiao-Lin

    2016-06-01

    Water storage in the stems of woody plants contributes to their responses to short-term water shortages. To estimate the contribution of water storage to the daily water budget of trees, time lags of sap flow between different positions of trunk are used as a proxy of stem water storage. In lianas, another large group of woody species, it has rarely been studied whether stored water functions in their daily water use, despite their increasing roles in the carbon and water dynamics of tropical forests caused by their increasing abundance. We hypothesized that lianas would exhibit large time lags due to their extremely long stems, wide vessels and large volume of parenchyma in the stem. We examined time lags in sap flow, diel changes of stem volumetric water content (VWC) and biophysical properties of sapwood of 19 lianas and 26 co-occurring trees from 27 species in 4 forests (karst, tropical seasonal, flood plain and savanna) during a wet season. The plants varied in height/length from <5 to >60 m. The results showed that lianas had significantly higher saturated water content (SWC) and much lower wood density than trees. Seven of 19 liana individuals had no time lags; in contrast, only 3 of 26 tree individuals had no time lags. In general, lianas had shorter time lags than trees in our data set, but this difference was not significant for our most conservative analyses. Across trees and lianas, time lag duration increased with diurnal maximum changeable VWC but was independent of the body size, path length, wood density and SWC. The results suggest that in most lianas, internal stem water storage contributes little to daily water budget, while trees may rely more on stored water in the stem. PMID:26446267

  6. Throwing Pattern: Changes in Timing of Joint Lag According to Age between and within Skill Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Accomplished throwers conserve angular momentum when distal joints of the throwing arm reach peak velocity at a later time than their proximal neighbors. The result is an increase in velocity of the most distal segment--the hand. Past research indicates that skill level varies by the number of joints experiencing distal timing lag (time to peak…

  7. ENERGY-DEPENDENT TIME LAGS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY NGC 4593

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Agrawal, V. K.; Rao, A. R.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the energy-time lag dependence of the source NGC 4593 using XMM-Newton/EPIC pn data. We found that the time lag dependency is linear in nature with respect to the logarithm of different energy bands. We also investigate the frequency-dependent time lags and identify that at some frequency range (5 x 10{sup -5} Hz to 2 x 10{sup -4} Hz) the X-ray emission is highly coherent, mildly frequency dependent, and very strongly energy dependent. These observations can be explained in the framework of the thermal Comptonization process, and they indicate a truncated accretion disk very close to the black hole. We discuss the plausible spectral state to explain the phenomenon and conclude that the observed properties bear a close resemblance to the intermediate state or the steep power-law state, found in galactic black hole sources.

  8. Calibration of Watershed Lag Time Equation for Philippine Hydrology using RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriano, F. R.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; Horritt, M.; Mendoza, J.; Sabio, G.; Punay, K. N.; Taniza, H. J.; Uichanco, C.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread flooding is a major problem in the Philippines. The country experiences heavy amount of rainfall throughout the year and several areas are prone to flood hazards because of its unique topography. Human casualties and destruction of infrastructure are just some of the damages caused by flooding and the Philippine government has undertaken various efforts to mitigate these hazards. One of the solutions was to create flood hazard maps of different floodplains and use them to predict the possible catastrophic results of different rain scenarios. To produce these maps with accurate output, different input parameters were needed and one of those is calculating hydrological components from topographical data. This paper presents how a calibrated lag time (TL) equation was obtained using measurable catchment parameters. Lag time is an essential input in flood mapping and is defined as the duration between the peak rainfall and peak discharge of the watershed. The lag time equation involves three measurable parameters, namely, watershed length (L), maximum potential retention (S) derived from the curve number, and watershed slope (Y), all of which were available from RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models (DEM). This approach was based on a similar method developed by CH2M Hill and Horritt for Taiwan, which has a similar set of meteorological and hydrological parameters with the Philippines. Rainfall data from fourteen water level sensors covering 67 storms from all the regions in the country were used to estimate the actual lag time. These sensors were chosen by using a screening process that considers the distance of the sensors from the sea, the availability of recorded data, and the catchment size. The actual lag time values were plotted against the values obtained from the Natural Resource Conservation Management handbook lag time equation. Regression analysis was used to obtain the final calibrated equation that would be used to calculate the lag time

  9. A global look at X-ray time lags in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, E.; Alston, W.; Fabian, A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray reverberation, where light-travel time delays map out the compact geometry around the inner accretion flow in supermassive black holes, has been discovered in several of the brightest, most variable and well-known bare Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we expand the study of X-ray time lags to all Seyfert galaxies in the XMM-Newton archive above a nominal rms and exposure level. We find that reverberation is found in > 50% of sources (with > 99% confidence). We also find that the low-frequency hard lag (which is likely associated with the coronal emission) is found in > 80% of sources, suggesting that most sources with X-ray variability show intrinsic variability from the nuclear region. We update the known iron K lag amplitude vs. black hole mass relation.

  10. Teleconnection between the central tropical Pacific and the Antarctic stratosphere: spatial patterns and time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evtushevsky, O. M.; Kravchenko, V. O.; Hood, L. L.; Milinevsky, G. P.

    2015-04-01

    Coupling between the central tropical Pacific (CTP) sea surface temperature (SST) variability and the Antarctic stratosphere known from previous studies is analysed using a lagged correlation method. Monthly mean SST, stratospheric temperatures and zonal winds from the NCEP-NCAR reanalysis and total ozone from the Merged Ozone Data Set over the 1979-2011 period are used. Indices for interannual variability were created and sequential lagged correlations were used to determine the spatial patterns and time lags of the strongest teleconnection. It has been revealed that interannual SST variations in a westward-oriented V -shaped pattern in the CTP region (160-220°E, 30°N-20°S) are associated with statistically significant positive signals in zonally asymmetric region of the Antarctic stratosphere temperature field. Stratospheric pathway dominates in the poleward and downward propagation of the CTP related anomaly in the Southern Hemisphere zonal wind variability. Abrupt modification of the teleconnection patterns in October is accompanied by occurrence of the intense meridional wave train in the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The strongest lagged correlations between the CTP SST index in June and the Southern Hemisphere atmosphere variables in October ( r = ±0.7) could be related to the corresponding seasonal peaks in the stationary planetary wave activity. Possible causes of the V-pattern formation and the lagged teleconnection mechanisms are briefly discussed.

  11. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  12. Constraints and time lags for recovery of a keystone species (Dipodomys spectabilis) after landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Habitat restoration is typically focused on reestablishing suitable conditions at a local scale, but landscape constraints may be important for keystone species with limited dispersal. We tested for time lags and examined the relative importance of local and landscape constraints on the response of ...

  13. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency.

    PubMed

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species' flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge. PMID:26820548

  14. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species’ flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge. PMID:26820548

  15. Alteration of the growth rate and lag time of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B F; Fogler, H S

    2001-03-20

    Bacterial profile modification is an important enhanced oil recovery technique used to direct injected water into a reservoir's low permeability zone containing trapped crude oil. During water flooding, the use of bacteria to plug the high permeability water zone and divert flow into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone will have a significant economic impact. However, during the field implementation of bacterial profile modification, the rapid growth of bacteria near the injection well bore may hinder the subsequent injection of growth media so that profile modification of the reservoir occurs only in the immediate vicinity of the well bore. By slowing the growth rate and prolonging the lag phase, the onset of pore-space plugging may be delayed and the biologically active zone extended deep into the reservoir. High substrate loading, high pH values, and the addition of the growth inhibitors sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium benzoate have been used in combination to alter the growth characteristics of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 grown in batch conditions. The highest sucrose concentration used in these studies, 500 g/L, produced lag times 12-fold greater than the slowest lag times achieved at low sucrose concentrations. When L. mesenteroides was grown in media containing 500 g/L sucrose, an alkaline pH value threshold was found above which bacteria did not grow. At this threshold pH value of 8.1, an average lag time of 200 h was observed. Increasing the concentration of sodium benzoate had no effect on lag time, but reduced the growth rate until the threshold concentration of 0.6%, above which bacteria did not grow. Last, it was found that a solution of 0.075 mM sodium dodecylsulfate in media containing 15 g/L sucrose completely inhibited bacterial growth. PMID:11460251

  16. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama-Sechura).

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Pablo C; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T K; Wiens, John J

    2013-07-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama-Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth's driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama-Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4-14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ∼8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ∼2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  17. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth’s driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama–Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4–14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ∼8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ∼2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  18. SOFT TIME LAGS IN THE X-RAY EMISSION OF Mrk 1040

    SciTech Connect

    Tripathi, Shruti; Rastogi, Shantanu; Misra, Ranjeev; Dewangan, Gulab E-mail: rmisra@iucaa.ernet.in

    2011-08-01

    Temporal analysis of X-ray binaries and active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have shown that hard X-rays react to variation of soft ones after a time delay. The opposite trend, or soft lag, has only been seen in a few rare quasi-periodic oscillations in X-ray binaries and recently for the AGN 1H 0707-495, on short timescales of {approx}10{sup 3} s. Here, we report analysis of an XMM-Newton observation of Mrk 1040, which reveals that on the dominant variability timescale of {approx}10{sup 4} s, the source seems to exhibit soft lags. If the lags are frequency independent, they could be due to reverberation effects of a relativistically blurred reflection component responding to a varying continuum. Alternatively, they could be due to Comptonization delays in the case when high-energy photons impinge back on the soft photon source. Both models can be verified and their parameters tightly constrained, because they will need to predict the photon spectrum, rms variability, and time lag as a function of energy. A successful application of either model will provide unprecedented information on the radiative process, geometry, and more importantly the size of the system, which in turn may provide a stringent test of strong general relativistic effects.

  19. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andrés; Bloch, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine if there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized, placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years old with major depressive disorder. Our main outcomes were (1) time to publication of positive versus negative trials, and (2) proportion of treatment responders in trials with standard (< 3 years after study completion) versus delayed publication. Results We identified 15 randomized, placebo-controlled trials of SRIs for pediatric depression. Trials with negative findings had a significantly longer time to publication (median years ± standard deviation = 4.2 ±1.9) than trials with positive findings (2.2 ±0.9; log-rank χ2 = 4.35, p = 0.037). The estimated efficacy in trials with standard publication time (number needed to treat = 7, 95% CI: 5 – 11) was significantly greater than those with delayed publication (17, 95% CI: 9 – ∞; χ2 = 4.98, p = 0.025). The inflation-adjusted impact factor of journals for published trials with positive (15.33 ±11.01) and negative results (7.54 ±7.90) did not statistically differ (t = 1.4, df = 10, p = 0.17). Conclusions Despite a small number of trials of SRIs for pediatric antidepressants we found a significant evidence of time-lag bias in the publication of findings. This time-lag bias altered the perceived efficacy of pediatric antidepressants in the medical literature. Time-lag bias is not unique to child psychiatry and reflects a larger problem in scientific publishing. PMID:21156271

  20. Effect of spectral time-lag correlation coefficient and signal averaging on airborne CO2 DIAL measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-David, Avishai; Vanderbeek, Richard G.; Gotoff, Steven W.; D'Amico, Francis M.

    1997-10-01

    The effects of flight geometry, signal averaging and time- lag correlation coefficient on airborne CO2 dial lidar measurements are shown in simulations and field measurements. These factors have implications for multi- vapor measurements and also for measuring a shingle vapor with a wide absorption spectra for which one would like to make DIAL measurements at many wavelengths across the absorption spectra of the gas. Thus it is of interest to know how many wavelengths and how many groups of wavelengths can be used effectively in DIAL measurements. Our data indicate that for our lidar about 80 wavelengths can be used for DIAL measurements of a stationary vapor. The lidar signal is composed of fluctuations with three time scales: a very short time scale due to system noise which is faster than the data acquisition sampling rate of the receiver, a medium time scale due to atmospheric turbulence, and a long time scale due to slow atmospheric transmission drift from aerosol in homogeneities. The decorrelation time scale of fluctuations for airborne lidar measurements depends on the flight geometry.

  1. Estimating Appropriate Lag Length for Synchronized Physiological Time Series: The Electrodermal Response.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Reiter, Katherine; Malon, Matthew

    2015-07-01

    Physiological synchronization of autonomic arousal between people is thought to be an important component of work team dynamics, therapist-client relationships, and other interpersonal dynamics. This article examines concepts and mathematical models of synchronization that could be relevant to work teams. Before it is possible to deploy nonlinear modeling, however, it is necessary to develop a strategy for determining appropriate lag lengths. If a measurement at time 2 is a function of itself at time 1 and a coupling effect from another source, what is the appropriate amount of real time that should be allowed to elapse between the two measurements in order to observe the coupling effect? This study examined four strategies for doing so. In the experiment, 78 undergraduates worked in pairs to perform a vigilance dual task for 90 min while galvanic skin responses (GSR) were recorded. Lags based on mutual entropy and the natural rate criteria produced corroborating results, whereas strategies based on a critical decline in the linear autocorrelation (max r/e) and Theiler's W did not produce usable results for this situation. Some connections were uncovered between linear autocorrelation strength and lag based on mutual entropy with performance on the tasks and subjective ratings of workload. PMID:26058337

  2. The impact of age at death on the lag time of radiocarbon values in human bone.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Thomas, Christian; Olson, Jacqueline E

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of modern bomb-pulse radiocarbon in human bone offers data needed to interpret the post-mortem interval in skeletonized human remains recovered from forensic contexts. Radiocarbon analysis of different tissues with distinct rates of remodeling allows proper placement of the values on the modern bomb-curve. However, the lag time between the date of intercept on the curve and the actual death date is largely affected by the age at death. Published data on radiocarbon analysis of individuals of known age at death and death dates indicate that this lag time increases with age until about 60 years. The lag time documented for each decade of life can be used to compensate for this age-related factor and increase the accuracy of interpretation of the death date. While this method could be greatly improved by original research with a larger sample size, this study provides an adequate point from which to launch further investigations into the subject. PMID:25863698

  3. Optimization of lag time underlies antibiotic tolerance in evolved bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Ofer; Goldberg, Amir; Ronin, Irine; Shoresh, Noam; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2014-09-18

    The great therapeutic achievements of antibiotics have been dramatically undercut by the evolution of bacterial strategies that overcome antibiotic stress. These strategies fall into two classes. 'Resistance' makes it possible for a microorganism to grow in the constant presence of the antibiotic, provided that the concentration of the antibiotic is not too high. 'Tolerance' allows a microorganism to survive antibiotic treatment, even at high antibiotic concentrations, as long as the duration of the treatment is limited. Although both resistance and tolerance are important reasons for the failure of antibiotic treatments, the evolution of resistance is much better understood than that of tolerance. Here we followed the evolution of bacterial populations under intermittent exposure to the high concentrations of antibiotics used in the clinic and characterized the evolved strains in terms of both resistance and tolerance. We found that all strains adapted by specific genetic mutations, which became fixed in the evolved populations. By monitoring the phenotypic changes at the population and single-cell levels, we found that the first adaptive change to antibiotic stress was the development of tolerance through a major adjustment in the single-cell lag-time distribution, without a change in resistance. Strikingly, we found that the lag time of bacteria before regrowth was optimized to match the duration of the antibiotic-exposure interval. Whole genome sequencing of the evolved strains and restoration of the wild-type alleles allowed us to identify target genes involved in this antibiotic-driven phenotype: 'tolerance by lag' (tbl). Better understanding of lag-time evolution as a key determinant of the survival of bacterial populations under high antibiotic concentrations could lead to new approaches to impeding the evolution of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25043002

  4. Comparison of time/phase lags in the hard state and plateau state of GRS 1915+105

    SciTech Connect

    Pahari, Mayukh; Yadav, J. S.; Neilsen, Joseph; Misra, Ranjeev; Uttley, Phil

    2013-12-01

    We investigate the complex behavior of energy- and frequency-dependent time/phase lags in the plateau state and the radio-quiet hard (χ) state of GRS 1915+105. In our timing analysis, we find that when the source is faint in the radio, quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) are observed above 2 Hz and typically exhibit soft lags (soft photons lag hard photons), whereas QPOs in the radio-bright plateau state are found below 2.2 Hz and consistently show hard lags. The phase lag at the QPO frequency is strongly anti-correlated with that frequency, changing sign at 2.2 Hz. However, the phase lag at the frequency of the first harmonic is positive and nearly independent of that frequency at ∼0.172 rad, regardless of the radio emission. The lag energy dependence at the first harmonic is also independent of radio flux. However, the lags at the QPO frequency are negative at all energies during the radio-quiet state, but lags at the QPO frequency during the plateau state are positive at all energies and show a 'reflection-type' evolution of the lag energy spectra with respect to the radio-quiet state. The lag energy dependence is roughly logarithmic, but there is some evidence for a break around 4-6 keV. Finally, the Fourier-frequency-dependent phase lag spectra are fairly flat during the plateau state, but increase from negative to positive during the radio-quiet state. We discuss the implications of our results in light of some generic models.

  5. [Time zone shifts and jet lag after long-distance flights].

    PubMed

    Rose, D M; Jung, D; Parera, D; Konietzko, J

    1999-10-01

    Long distance flights with rapid time zone shifts of more than 3 hours lead to a dissociation of the inner circadian clock to the outer pacer. Additionally, the different endogenous circadian rhythms will not longer be synchronized by the endogenous pacer melatonin. This leads to complaints like sleepiness, sleep-disturbances and others. These symptoms are called jet-lag. The subject's performance is disturbed, as well. Different studies showed smaller problems with jet lag when travelling to the west. Since the inner circadian rhythm tends to be 24 up to 26 hours, travelling to the west with a prolongation of the daylight will be tolerated better than flights to the east with a shortening of the day length. Rapid time zone shifts with more than 8 hours to the east lead to individual different ways of resynchronization. Subject either try to adapt to the new time zone by shortening the day (backward adaptation) or they resynchronize forward with a longer duration of adaptation time. Elder subjects with already diminished circadian hormonal rhythm often get more problems concerning symptoms of the jet-lag and in time to recover from the disturbance of the inner clock. No differences can be found between business travelers, tourists and high-performance sportsmen. After flights to the west within 3 to 7 days, most of our inner circadian rhythm will be re-synchronized. After flights to the east, resynchronization can take 5 to 14 days. A symptomatic therapy of jet lag symptoms with a short-acting benzodiazepine like triazolam in a dosage of 12.5 mg or less is well tolerated. A therapy with oral melatonin in a dosage of 0.5 to 5 mg/day given in the evening 1 to 2 hours prior to the desired sleeping-time may be helpful for a group of subjects. Another group of subjects will not have any benefit of a therapy with melatonin, but cannot be defined in advance. A recommendation for a therapy with melatonin to treat jet lag symptoms cannot be given at the moment, since

  6. Global Lagged Finite-Time Synchronization of Two Chaotic Lur’e Systems Subject to Time Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yun; Wu, Xiaofeng; Lin, Qian

    This paper investigates the global lagged finite-time synchronization of the master-slave Lur’e systems subject to time delay of signal transmission. By designing a variable-substitution and feedback controller, a master-slave finite-time synchronization scheme for the Lur’e systems with time delay is built up. Two delay-independent global lagged finite-time synchronization criteria are proved in the forms of linear matrix inequalities (LMIs), and the corresponding settling time of synchronization is analytically estimated. The obtained LMI criteria are applied to Chua’s oscillators, obtaining some easily implemented algebraic criteria under various single-variable-substitution and feedback controller, which are then optimized to improve their conservative property. Finally, several numerical examples are illustrated to verify the effectiveness of the optimized criteria.

  7. Soft Fourier time lags observed in the dwarf nova SS Cyg

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranzana, E.; Scaringi, S.; K"ording, E.

    2014-07-01

    Accretion is a common phenomenon in active galactic nuclei (AGNs), X-ray binary systems (XRBs) and cataclysmic variables (CVs), providing different scenarios to study the physics involved in accretion discs. It has been shown that XRBs and CVs show similar observational properties such as recurrent outbursts, spectral state transitions and aperiodic variability. The latter has been extensively studied for XRBs, but only recently has the rms-flux relation and optical Fourier time-lags been observed in CVs. We present a broad-band Fourier analysis of the well-known cataclysmic variable SS Cyg in quiescence based on data collected by William Herschel Telescope using ULTRACAM. Lightcurves in SDSS filters u', g' and r' were taken simultaneously with sub-second cadence. The high sensitive camera allows us to study the broad-band noise of the source in a frequency range of ≈ 10^{-4}-2 Hz. We explored the coherence, cross spectra and the power spectral densities that are well described by a power law. Soft lags at lowest frequencies were observed indicating that the emission in the softer bands lags the emission in the harder bands. This can be possibly described by hard photons reprocessing created in the boundary layer close to the white dwarf.

  8. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Wenwu; Cao, Jinde

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, a new type of generalized Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization is defined. Adaptive Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization and parameters identification of uncertain delayed neural networks have been considered, where the delays are multiple time-varying delays. A novel control method is given by using the Lyapunov functional method. With this new and effective method, parameters identification and Q-S (lag, anticipated, and complete) time-varying synchronization can be achieved simultaneously. Simulation results are given to justify the theoretical analysis in this paper.

  9. A nonlinear time-lag differential equation model for predicting monthly precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yongqing; Yan, Shaojin; Wang, Tongmei

    1995-08-01

    This paper investigates the nonlinear prediction of monthly rainfall time series which consists of phase space continuation of one-dimensional sequence, followed by least-square determination of the coefficients for the terms of the time-lag differential equation model and then fitting of the prognostic expression is made to 1951 1980 monthly rainfall datasets from Changsha station. Results show that the model is likely to describe the nonlinearity of the annual cycle of precipitation on a monthly basis and to provide a basis for flood prevention and drought combating for the wet season.

  10. The time lag and interval of discharge with a spring actuated fuel injection pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Robertson; Gardiner, A W

    1923-01-01

    Discussed here is research on a spring activated fuel pump for solid or airless injection with small, high speed internal combustion engines. The pump characteristics under investigation were the interval of fuel injection in terms of degrees of crank travel and in absolute time, the lag between the time the injection pump plunger begins its stroke and the appearance of the jet at the orifice, and the manner in which the fuel spray builds up to a maximum when the fuel valve is opened, and then diminishes.

  11. The time lag spectrum of Cir X-1 on its normal branch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Jinlu; Lu, Yu; Ding, Guoqiang; Zhang, Fan; Lei, Yajuan; Li, Zhibing

    2010-01-01

    In the radiation-hydrodynamics model, the time lag and fractional root-mean-squared (rms) amplitude as a function of emitted photon energy should show a minimum on the normal branch oscillations. This has been seen in the Z-sources Cyg X-2 and GX 5-1. Here, using the observations from the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), we study the energy dependence of normal branch QPOs in the peculiar Z-source Cir X-1. We discuss the results in the context of radiation-hydrodynamics and the Comptonization model.

  12. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations. PMID:25566928

  13. Sudden cold temperature regulates the time-lag between plant CO2 uptake and release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, M.; Cieraad, E.; Zakharova, A.; Hunt, J. E.

    2013-11-01

    Since substrates for respiration are supplied mainly by recent photo-assimilates, there is a strong but time-lagged link between short-term above- and belowground carbon (C) cycling. However, regulation of this coupling by environmental variables is poorly understood. Whereas recent studies focussed on the effect of drought and shading on the link between above and belowground short-term C cycling, the effect of temperature remains unclear. We used a 13CO2 pulse-chase labelling experiment to investigate the effect of a sudden temperature change from 25 °C to 10 °C on the short-term coupling between assimilatory C uptake and respiratory loss. The study was done in the laboratory using two month old perennial rye-grass plants (time intervals using laser spectroscopy. In addition, δ13C was also analysed in bulk root and shoot samples using IRMS. Cold temperature (10 °C) reduced the short-term coupling between shoot and roots by delaying belowground transfer of recent assimilates and its subsequent respiratory use, as indicated by the δ13C signal of root respiration (δ13CRR). That is, the time-lag from the actual shoot labelling to the first appearance of the label in 13CRR was about 1.5 times longer under cold temperature (time-lags of 1 h and 1.5 h in the warm and cold treatments, respectively). Moreover, analysis of bulk shoot and root material revealed that plants at cold temperature invest relatively more carbon into respiration compared to growth or storage. These results increase our understanding of environmental controls on the link between short-term above- and belowground C cycling.

  14. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects. PMID:25795441

  15. Groundwater recharge and time lag measurement through Vertosols using impulse response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Mark; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the world there are many stressed aquifers used to support irrigated agriculture. The Condamine River catchment (southern Queensland, Australia) is one example of a globally significant agricultural region where groundwater use has exceeded recharge over the last 50 years. There is a high dependence on groundwater in this catchment, because yearly rainfall is highly variable, and actual evapotranspiration often exceeds rainfall. To better manage the aquifer there is a need to correctly conceptualise the primary inputs and outputs of the system, and characterise the lags in system response to all forcings. In catchment models it is particularly important to correctly proportion diffuse (areal) rainfall recharge and to account for the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table. Throughout large portions of the Condamine Catchment, groundwater levels are now 20 or more metres below the ground surface. This study aimed to better quantify the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table using the predefined impulse response function in continuous time method (PIRFICT; von Asmuth et al., 2002; von Asmuth, 2012). The PIRFICT method was applied to 255 multi-decadal groundwater level data sets throughout the catchment. Inputs into the modelling include rainfall, irrigation deep drainage, stream water level, evapotranspiration, and groundwater extractions. As an independent check the PIRFICT model derived diffuse recharge estimates are compared to point lysimeter and geochemical recharge estimates in the Vertosol soils within this catchment. It is estimated using the PIRFICT method that in the Condamine Catchment between 1990 and 2012, the mean rain-derived groundwater recharge is 4.4 mm/year. Mean groundwater response from rainfall was determined to be 5.3 years: range 188 days to 48 years. The recharge estimates are consistent with both geochemical and lysimeter point measurements of recharge. It is concluded that where extensive groundwater

  16. LateBiclustering: Efficient Heuristic Algorithm for Time-Lagged Bicluster Identification.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Madeira, Sara C

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns in temporal data is key to uncover meaningful relationships in diverse domains, from stock trading to social interactions. Also of great interest are clinical and biological applications, namely monitoring patient response to treatment or characterizing activity at the molecular level. In biology, researchers seek to gain insight into gene functions and dynamics of biological processes, as well as potential perturbations of these leading to disease, through the study of patterns emerging from gene expression time series. Clustering can group genes exhibiting similar expression profiles, but focuses on global patterns denoting rather broad, unspecific responses. Biclustering reveals local patterns, which more naturally capture the intricate collaboration between biological players, particularly under a temporal setting. Despite the general biclustering formulation being NP-hard, considering specific properties of time series has led to efficient solutions for the discovery of temporally aligned patterns. Notably, the identification of biclusters with time-lagged patterns, suggestive of transcriptional cascades, remains a challenge due to the combinatorial explosion of delayed occurrences. Herein, we propose LateBiclustering, a sensible heuristic algorithm enabling a polynomial rather than exponential time solution for the problem. We show that it identifies meaningful time-lagged biclusters relevant to the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat stress. PMID:26356854

  17. Influence of time lag and noncolocation on integrated structural/control system designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, R. A.; Schmit, L. A.

    1989-01-01

    Recent research efforts have led to the development of simultaneous structural/control system design procedures. Absent in any of the work is the time delay present in the control system sensors and actuators and the computational time delay for synthesizing actuator commands from sensor measurements. Madden has shown that the time delay present in the control system can have profound effects on the resulting system performance and stability regardless of its source. In addition, many of the simultaneous structural/control system design procedures have used colocated sensors and actuators for implementation of the control system. In actual practice, colocation in not always possible. The issue of stability degradation when using noncolocated sensor and actuators was raised. The integrated structural/control system design procedure is extended to include the effects of time lag and noncolocation of sensors and actuators on the resulting optimum designs.

  18. Sco X-1 revisited with Kepler, MAXI and HERMES: outflows, time-lags and echoes unveiled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scaringi, S.; Maccarone, T. J.; Hynes, R. I.; Körding, E.; Ponti, G.; Knigge, C.; Britt, C. T.; van Winckel, H.

    2015-08-01

    Sco X-1 has been the subject of many multiwavelength studies in the past, being the brightest persistent extrasolar X-ray source ever observed. Here, we revisit Sco X-1 with simultaneous short cadence Kepler optical photometry and Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image X-ray photometry over a 78 d period, as well as optical spectroscopy obtained with High Efficiency and Resolution Mercator Echelle Spectrograph (HERMES). We find Sco X-1 to be highly variable in all our data sets. The optical fluxes are clearly bimodal, implying the system can be found in two distinct optical states. These states are generally associated with the known flaring/normal branch X-ray states, although the flux distributions associated with these states overlap. Furthermore, we find that the optical power spectrum of Sco X-1 differs substantially between optical luminosity states. Additionally we find rms-flux relations in both optical states, but only find a linear relation during periods of low optical luminosity. The full optical/X-ray discrete correlation function displays a broad ≈12.5 h optical lag. However, during the normal branch phase, the X-ray and optical fluxes are anticorrelated, whilst being correlated during the flaring branch. We also performed a Cepstrum analysis on the full Kepler light curve to determine the presence of any echoes within the optical light curve alone. We find significant echo signals, consistent with the optical lags found using the discrete cross-correlation. We speculate that whilst some of the driving X-ray emission is reflected by the disc, some is absorbed and re-processed on the thermal time-scale, giving rise to both the observed optical lags and optical echoes.

  19. Extensions to the time lag models for practical application to rocket engine stability design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.

    The combustion instability problem in liquid-propellant rocket engines (LREs) has remained a tremendous challenge since their discovery in the 1930s. Improvements are usually made in solving the combustion instability problem primarily using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and also by testing demonstrator engines. Another approach is to use analytical models. Analytical models can be used such that design, redesign, or improvement of an engine system is feasible in a relatively short period of time. Improvements to the analytical models can greatly aid in design efforts. A thorough literature review is first conducted on liquid-propellant rocket engine (LRE) throttling. Throttling is usually studied in terms of vehicle descent or ballistic missile control however there are many other cases where throttling is important. It was found that combustion instabilities are one of a few major issues that occur during deep throttling (other major issues are heat transfer concerns, performance loss, and pump dynamics). In the past and again recently, gas injected into liquid propellants has shown to be a viable solution to throttle engines and to eliminate some forms of combustion instability. This review uncovered a clever solution that was used to eliminate a chug instability in the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE), a modified RL10 engine. A separate review was also conducted on classic time lag combustion instability models. Several new stability models are developed by incorporating important features to the classic and contemporary models, which are commonly used in the aerospace rocket industry. The first two models are extensions of the original Crocco and Cheng concentrated combustion model with feed system contributions. A third new model is an extension to the Wenzel and Szuch double-time lag model also with feed system contributions. The first new model incorporates the appropriate injector acoustic boundary condition which is neglected in contemporary

  20. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag.

  1. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag. PMID:23464233

  2. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system.

    PubMed

    Beckon, William N

    2016-07-01

    For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment). PMID:27149556

  3. Exploratory time varying lagged regression: modeling association of cognitive and functional trajectories with expected clinic visits in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Ghosh, Samiran; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a longitudinal study on factors affecting the frequency of clinic visits of older adults, an exploratory time varying lagged regression analysis is proposed to relate a longitudinal response to multiple cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors from time varying lags. Regression relations are allowed to vary with time through smooth varying coefficient functions. The main goal of the proposal is to detect deviations from a concurrent varying coefficient model potentially in a subset of the longitudinal predictors with nonzero estimated lags. The proposed methodology is geared towards irregular and infrequent data where different longitudinal variables may be observed at different frequencies, possibly at unsynchronized time points and contaminated with additive measurement error. Furthermore, to cope with the curse of dimensionality which limits related current modeling approaches, a sequential model building procedure is proposed to explore and select the time varying lags of the longitudinal predictors. The estimation procedure is based on estimation of the moments of the predictor and response trajectories by pooling information from all subjects. The finite sample properties of the proposed estimation algorithm are studied under various lag structures and correlation levels among the predictor processes in simulation studies. Application to the clinic visits data show the effect of cognitive and functional impairment scores from varying lags on the frequency of the clinic visits throughout the study. PMID:24436504

  4. Time lags of the flickering in cataclysmic variables as a function of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Albert

    2015-07-01

    Context. Flickering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in cataclysmic variables (CVs). Although the underlying light source is one of the main contributors to the optical radiation, the mechanism leading to flickering is not understood as yet. Aims: The present study aims to contribute to the set of boundary conditions, defined by observations, which must be met by physical models that describe the flickering. In particular, time lags in the occurrence of flickering events at different wavelengths over the optical range are examined. Methods: To this end, the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of numerous light curves of a sample of CVs are analysed that were observed simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously in different bands of various photometric systems. Results: Deviations of the maxima of the CCFs from zero time-shift indicate a dependence of the flickering activity on the wavelength in the sense that flickering flares reach their maxima slightly earlier in the blue range than in the red. While the available observational material does not permit detecting this individually in all observed systems, the ensemble of all data clearly shows this effect. Particularly instructive are the cases of V603 Aql and TT Ari, where time lags of 15ṣ1 and 4ṣ3, respectively, are observed between the U and R bands. In principle this can be understood if during the development of a flickering flare the radiation characteristics of the light source responsible for flickering change such that in the early phases of a flare more short-wavelength radiation is emitted, and later on, the peak of the emission shifts to the red. Respective scenarios are discussed and shown to be in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations.

  5. Infrared Time Lags for the Periodic Quasar PG 1302-102

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Hyunsung D.; Stern, Daniel; Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Mainzer, Amy; Cutri, Roc M.; Drake, Andrew J.; Mahabal, Ashish A.

    2015-11-01

    The optical light curve of the quasar PG 1302-102 at z=0.278 shows a strong, smooth 5.2 year periodic signal, detectable over a period of ∼20 years. Although the interpretation of this phenomenon is still uncertain, the most plausible mechanisms involve a binary system of two supermassive black holes with a subparsec separation. At this close separation, the nuclear black holes in PG 1302-102 will likely merge within ∼ {10}5 years due to gravitational wave emission alone. Here, we report the rest-frame near-infrared time lags for PG 1302-102. Compiling data from WISE and Akari, we confirm that the periodic behavior reported in the optical light curve from Graham et al. is reproduced at infrared wavelengths, with best-fit observed-frame 3.4 and 4.6 μ {{m}} time lags of (2219 ± 153, 2408 ± 148) days for a near face-on orientation of the torus, or (4103 ± 153, 4292 ± 148) days for an inclined system with relativistic Doppler boosting in effect. The periodicity in the infrared light curves and the light-travel time of the accretion disk photons to reach the dust glowing regions support that a source within the accretion disk is responsible for the optical variability of PG 1302-102, echoed at the farther out dusty regions. The implied distance of this dusty, assumed toroidal region is ∼1.5 pc for a near face-on geometry or ∼1.1 pc for the relativistic Doppler-boosted case.

  6. Time lagged ordinal partition networks for capturing dynamics of continuous dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Michael; Iu, Herbert Ho-Ching; Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas

    2015-05-15

    We investigate a generalised version of the recently proposed ordinal partition time series to network transformation algorithm. First, we introduce a fixed time lag for the elements of each partition that is selected using techniques from traditional time delay embedding. The resulting partitions define regions in the embedding phase space that are mapped to nodes in the network space. Edges are allocated between nodes based on temporal succession thus creating a Markov chain representation of the time series. We then apply this new transformation algorithm to time series generated by the Rössler system and find that periodic dynamics translate to ring structures whereas chaotic time series translate to band or tube-like structures—thereby indicating that our algorithm generates networks whose structure is sensitive to system dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simple network measures including the mean out degree and variance of out degrees can track changes in the dynamical behaviour in a manner comparable to the largest Lyapunov exponent. We also apply the same analysis to experimental time series generated by a diode resonator circuit and show that the network size, mean shortest path length, and network diameter are highly sensitive to the interior crisis captured in this particular data set.

  7. [Time lag effect between stem sap flow and photosynthetically active radiation, vapor pressure deficit of Acacia mangium].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Zhao, Ping; Cai, Xi-An; Ma, Ling; Rao, Xing-Quan; Zeng, Xiao-Ping

    2008-02-01

    Based on the measurement of the stem sap flow of Acacia mangium with Granier' s thermal dissipation probe, and the cross-correlation and time serial analysis of the sap flow and corresponding photosynthetically active radiation and vapor pressure deficit, this paper studied the time lag effect between the stem sap flow of A. mangium and the driving factors of the tree canopy transpiration. The results indicated that the main driving factors of the transpiration were photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD). Sap flux density (Js) was more dependent on PAR than on VPD, and the dependence was more significant in dry season than in wet season. Sap flow lagged behind PAR but advanced than VPD in both dry and wet seasons. The time lag did not show any significant variation across different size tree individuals, but showed significant variation in different seasons. Time lag effect was not correlated with tree height, diameter at the breast, and canopy size. The time lag between Js and VPD was significantly related to nighttime water recharge in dry season, but reversed in wet season. PMID:18464623

  8. [Radial variation and time lag of sap flow of Populus gansuensis in Minqin Oasis, Northwest].

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Zhang, You-Yan; Li, Chang-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sap flow of tree trunk is very important to reflect the dynamics of physiological activities, as well as to estimate the water consumption of individual plant. In the present study, we used the thermal dissipation technique to monitor the sap flow velocity (J) at four depth loci (i. e. 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm) of three Populus gansuensis trees (30 year-old) in Minqin Oasis for two consecutive growing seasons. The results showed that there were significant differences among J values at four depth loci under tree trunk cambium. J value at the 3 cm depth locus (J3) of the tree trunk was the highest, and then in sequences, were 2 cm, 5 cm and 8 cm depth loci (J2, J5 and J8). J value (J3) on typical sunny days in June with the highest atmospheric potential evapotranspiration (ET0) was up to 28.53 g · cm(-2) · h(-1), which was 1.42, 2.74 and 4.4 times of J2, J5 and J8, respectively. In the process of diurnal variation of sap flow velocity, the peak value time of J at the four depth loci of the tree trunk was different, but the differences among them were within 20 min. Furthermore, the peak value time of sap flow velocity was very different to that of solar radiation (Rs) and air vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The time lag between J and Rs was from 55 to 88 min on typical sunny days during the main growing seasons (from June to August), and, positively related to the depth of the locus under tree trunk cambium, while the time lag between J and VPD reached 60-96 min, and was negatively related to the depth of the locus. The seasonal variation patterns of J were consistent with ET0. With the increase of tree physiological activities, there was a trend that the major water transportation layer extended to the interior sapwood. The most important meteorological factor was the solar radiation, which primarily drove sap flow at different depths of tree trunk. However, the secondary factor changed along with the depth, and VPD became increasingly important with increasing the

  9. Time Lags between Exanthematous Illness Attributed to Zika Virus, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and Microcephaly, Salvador, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Paploski, Igor A.D.; Prates, Ana Paula P.B.; Cardoso, Cristiane W.; Kikuti, Mariana; Silva, Monaise M. O.; Waller, Lance A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Kitron, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus infection emerged as a public health emergency after increasing evidence for its association with neurologic disorders and congenital malformations. In Salvador, Brazil, outbreaks of acute exanthematous illness (AEI) attributed to Zika virus, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), and microcephaly occurred in 2015. We investigated temporal correlations and time lags between these outbreaks to identify a common link between them by using epidemic curves and time series cross-correlations. Number of GBS cases peaked after a lag of 5–9 weeks from the AEI peak. Number of suspected cases of microcephaly peaked after a lag of 30–33 weeks from the AEI peak, which corresponded to time of potential infections of pregnant mothers during the first trimester. These findings support the association of GBS and microcephaly with Zika virus infection and provide evidence for a temporal relationship between timing of arboviral infection of pregnant women during the first trimester and birth outcome. PMID:27144515

  10. Time Lags between Exanthematous Illness Attributed to Zika Virus, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and Microcephaly, Salvador, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Paploski, Igor A D; Prates, Ana Paula P B; Cardoso, Cristiane W; Kikuti, Mariana; Silva, Monaise M O; Waller, Lance A; Reis, Mitermayer G; Kitron, Uriel; Ribeiro, Guilherme S

    2016-08-01

    Zika virus infection emerged as a public health emergency after increasing evidence for its association with neurologic disorders and congenital malformations. In Salvador, Brazil, outbreaks of acute exanthematous illness (AEI) attributed to Zika virus, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), and microcephaly occurred in 2015. We investigated temporal correlations and time lags between these outbreaks to identify a common link between them by using epidemic curves and time series cross-correlations. Number of GBS cases peaked after a lag of 5-9 weeks from the AEI peak. Number of suspected cases of microcephaly peaked after a lag of 30-33 weeks from the AEI peak, which corresponded to time of potential infections of pregnant mothers during the first trimester. These findings support the association of GBS and microcephaly with Zika virus infection and provide evidence for a temporal relationship between timing of arboviral infection of pregnant women during the first trimester and birth outcome. PMID:27144515

  11. State space modeling of time-varying contemporaneous and lagged relations in connectivity maps.

    PubMed

    Molenaar, Peter C M; Beltz, Adriene M; Gates, Kathleen M; Wilson, Stephen J

    2016-01-15

    Most connectivity mapping techniques for neuroimaging data assume stationarity (i.e., network parameters are constant across time), but this assumption does not always hold true. The authors provide a description of a new approach for simultaneously detecting time-varying (or dynamic) contemporaneous and lagged relations in brain connectivity maps. Specifically, they use a novel raw data likelihood estimation technique (involving a second-order extended Kalman filter/smoother embedded in a nonlinear optimizer) to determine the variances of the random walks associated with state space model parameters and their autoregressive components. The authors illustrate their approach with simulated and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 daily cigarette smokers performing a verbal working memory task, focusing on seven regions of interest (ROIs). Twelve participants had dynamic directed functional connectivity maps: Eleven had one or more time-varying contemporaneous ROI state loadings, and one had a time-varying autoregressive parameter. Compared to smokers without dynamic maps, smokers with dynamic maps performed the task with greater accuracy. Thus, accurate detection of dynamic brain processes is meaningfully related to behavior in a clinical sample. PMID:26546863

  12. Investigating the Time Lag Effect between Economic Recession and Suicide Rates in Agriculture, Fisheries, and Forestry Workers in Korea.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jin-Ha; Junger, Washington; Kim, Boo-Wook; Kim, Young-Joo; Koh, Sang-Baek

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies on the vast increase in suicide mortality in Southeast Asia have indicated that suicide rates increase in parallel with a rise in unemployment or during periods of economic recession. This paper examines the effects of economic recession on suicidal rates amongst agriculture, fisheries, and forestry workers in Korea. Monthly time-series gross domestic product (GDP) data were linked with suicidal rates gathered from the cause of death records between1993-2008. Data were analyzed using generalized additive models to analyze trends, while a polynomial lag model was used to assess the unconstrained time lag effects of changes in GDP on suicidal rate. We found that there were significant inverse correlations between changes in GDP and suicide for a time lag of one to four months after the occurrence of economic event. Furthermore, it was evident that the overall relative risks of suicide were high enough to bring about social concern. PMID:23251845

  13. On cell resistance and immune response time lag in a model for the HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovey, Guillermo; Peruani, Fernando; Ponce Dawson, Silvina; Maria Zorzenon dos Santos, Rita

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a cellular automata model has been introduced (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 168102) to describe the spread of the HIV infection among target cells in lymphoid tissues. The model reproduces qualitatively the entire course of the infection displaying, in particular, the two time scales that characterize its dynamics. In this work, we investigate the robustness of the model against changes in three of its parameters. Two of them are related to the resistance of the cells to get infected. The other one describes the time interval necessary to mount specific immune responses. We have observed that an increase of the cell resistance, at any stage of the infection, leads to a reduction of the latency period, i.e., of the time interval between the primary infection and the onset of AIDS. However, during the early stages of the infection, when the cell resistance increase is combined with an increase in the initial concentration of infected cells, the original behavior is recovered. Therefore we find a long and a short latency regime (eight and one year long, respectively) depending on the value of the cell resistance. We have obtained, on the other hand, that changes on the parameter that describes the immune system time lag affects the time interval during which the primary infection occurs. Using different extended versions of the model, we also discuss how the two-time scale dynamics is affected when we include inhomogeneities on the cells properties, as for instance, on the cell resistance or on the time interval to mount specific immune responses.

  14. Effects of Preculturing Conditions on Lag Time and Specific Growth Rate of Enterobacter sakazakii in Reconstituted Powdered Infant Formula

    PubMed Central

    Kandhai, M. C.; Reij, M. W.; Grognou, C.; van Schothorst, M.; Gorris, L. G. M.; Zwietering, M. H.

    2006-01-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii can be present, although in low levels, in dry powdered infant formulae, and it has been linked to cases of meningitis in neonates, especially those born prematurely. In order to prevent illness, product contamination at manufacture and during preparation, as well as growth after reconstitution, must be minimized by appropriate control measures. In this publication, several determinants of the growth of E. sakazakii in reconstituted infant formula are reported. The following key growth parameters were determined: lag time, specific growth rate, and maximum population density. Cells were harvested at different phases of growth and spiked into powdered infant formula. After reconstitution in sterile water, E. sakazakii was able to grow at temperatures between 8 and 47°C. The estimated optimal growth temperature was 39.4°C, whereas the optimal specific growth rate was 2.31 h−1. The effect of temperature on the specific growth rate was described with two secondary growth models. The resulting minimum and maximum temperatures estimated with the secondary Rosso equation were 3.6°C and 47.6°C, respectively. The estimated lag time varied from 83.3 ± 18.7 h at 10°C to 1.73 ± 0.43 h at 37°C and could be described with the hyperbolic model and reciprocal square root relation. Cells harvested at different phases of growth did not exhibit significant differences in either specific growth rate or lag time. Strains did not have different lag times, and lag times were short given that the cells had spent several (3 to 10) days in dry powdered infant formula. The growth rates and lag times at various temperatures obtained in this study may help in calculations of the period for which reconstituted infant formula can be stored at a specific temperature without detrimental impact on health. PMID:16597976

  15. Dynamic Stability Analysis of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles Using Time-Lagged Aftbody Pitching Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazemba, Cole D.; Braun, Robert D.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Clark, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This analysis defines an analytic model for the pitching motion of blunt bodies during atmospheric entry. The proposed model is independent of the pitch damping sum coefficient present in the standard formulation of the equations of motion describing pitch oscillations of a decelerating blunt body, instead using the principle of a time-lagged aftbody moment as the forcing function for oscillation divergence. Four parameters, all with intuitive physical relevance, are introduced to fully define the aftbody moment and the associated time delay. It is shown that the dynamic oscillation responses typical to blunt bodies can be produced using hysteresis of the aftbody moment in place of the pitch damping coefficient. The approach used in this investigation is shown to be useful in understanding the governing physical mechanisms for blunt body dynamic stability and in guiding vehicle and mission design requirements. A validation case study using simulated ballistic range test data is conducted. From this, parameter identification is carried out through the use of a least squares optimizing routine. Results show good agreement with the limited existing literature for the parameters identified, suggesting that the model proposed could be validated by an experimental ballistic range test series. The trajectories produced by the identified parameters were found to match closely those from the MER ballistic range tests for a wide array of initial conditions and can be identified with a reasonable number of ballistic range shots and computational effort.

  16. Catchment Legacies and Time Lags: A Parsimonious Watershed Model to Predict the Effects of Legacy Storage on Nitrogen Export

    PubMed Central

    Van Meter, Kimberly J.; Basu, Nandita B.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient legacies in anthropogenic landscapes, accumulated over decades of fertilizer application, lead to time lags between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. Quantification of such time lags has remained difficult, however, due to an incomplete understanding of controls on nutrient depletion trajectories after changes in land-use or management practices. In this study, we have developed a parsimonious watershed model for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). The model accurately predicted the time lags observed in an Iowa watershed that had undergone a 41% conversion of area from row crop to native prairie. We explored the time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change. Our results demonstrate that the existence of biogeochemical nutrient legacies increases time lags beyond those due to hydrologic legacy alone. In addition, we show that the maximum concentration reduction benefits vary according to the spatial pattern of intervention, with preferential conversion of land parcels having the shortest catchment-scale travel times providing proportionally greater concentration reductions as well as faster response times. In contrast, a random pattern of conversion results in a 1:1 relationship between percent land conversion and percent concentration reduction, irrespective of denitrification rates within the landscape. Our modeling framework allows for the quantification of tradeoffs between costs associated with implementation of conservation measures and the time needed to see the desired concentration reductions, making it of great value to decision makers regarding optimal implementation of watershed conservation measures. PMID:25985290

  17. Catchment legacies and time lags: a parsimonious watershed model to predict the effects of legacy storage on nitrogen export.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Kimberly J; Basu, Nandita B

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient legacies in anthropogenic landscapes, accumulated over decades of fertilizer application, lead to time lags between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. Quantification of such time lags has remained difficult, however, due to an incomplete understanding of controls on nutrient depletion trajectories after changes in land-use or management practices. In this study, we have developed a parsimonious watershed model for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). The model accurately predicted the time lags observed in an Iowa watershed that had undergone a 41% conversion of area from row crop to native prairie. We explored the time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change. Our results demonstrate that the existence of biogeochemical nutrient legacies increases time lags beyond those due to hydrologic legacy alone. In addition, we show that the maximum concentration reduction benefits vary according to the spatial pattern of intervention, with preferential conversion of land parcels having the shortest catchment-scale travel times providing proportionally greater concentration reductions as well as faster response times. In contrast, a random pattern of conversion results in a 1:1 relationship between percent land conversion and percent concentration reduction, irrespective of denitrification rates within the landscape. Our modeling framework allows for the quantification of tradeoffs between costs associated with implementation of conservation measures and the time needed to see the desired concentration reductions, making it of great value to decision makers regarding optimal implementation of watershed conservation measures. PMID:25985290

  18. Nutrient Legacies and Time Lags: Understanding Catchment Biogeochemical Responses in Anthropogenic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2014-12-01

    Human modification of the nitrogen (N) cycle has resulted in increased flows of reactive N, with some suggesting that planetary boundaries for maintaining human and ecosystem health have been exceeded. Persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters created by elevated concentrations of nitrate is one of the most significant impacts of such increased flows. While the need to manage these flows is recognized, best management practices to reduce stream N concentrations have had only limited success. Some have attributed this lack of success to accumulation of legacy N stores from decades of fertilizer application. Here we introduce an unprecedented analysis of long-term soil data from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) revealing significant increases in total N (TN) content. We show that TN accumulation for the MRB accounts for 43% of net anthropogenic N inputs, complementing previous work indicating an approximately 25% loss of net inputs as riverine output. These findings significantly reduce uncertainty associated with basin-level N retention and demonstrate the presence of N accumulation in the deeper subsurface of agricultural soils. The presence of such legacy N stores is utilized in the development of a conceptual framework for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). Time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations are explored as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change, and an optimization approach has been developed to determine maximum possible concentration reduction benefits within time frames of interest.

  19. Estimating and Analyzing Savannah Phenology with a Lagged Time Series Model.

    PubMed

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Beringer, Jason; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-01-01

    Savannah regions are predicted to undergo changes in precipitation patterns according to current climate change projections. This change will affect leaf phenology, which controls net primary productivity. It is of importance to study this since savannahs play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their areal coverage and can have an effect on the food security in regions that depend on subsistence farming. In this study we investigate how soil moisture, mean annual precipitation, and day length control savannah phenology by developing a lagged time series model. The model uses climate data for 15 flux tower sites across four continents, and normalized difference vegetation index from satellite to optimize a statistical phenological model. We show that all three variables can be used to estimate savannah phenology on a global scale. However, it was not possible to create a simplified savannah model that works equally well for all sites on the global scale without inclusion of more site specific parameters. The simplified model showed no bias towards tree cover or between continents and resulted in a cross-validated r2 of 0.6 and root mean squared error of 0.1. We therefore expect similar average results when applying the model to other savannah areas and further expect that it could be used to estimate the productivity of savannah regions. PMID:27128678

  20. Cued Speech Transliteration: Effects of Speaking Rate and Lag Time on Production Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Krause, Jean C; Tessler, Morgan P

    2016-10-01

    Many deaf and hard-of-hearing children rely on interpreters to access classroom communication. Although the exact level of access provided by interpreters in these settings is unknown, it is likely to depend heavily on interpreter accuracy (portion of message correctly produced by the interpreter) and the factors that govern interpreter accuracy. In this study, the accuracy of 12 Cued Speech (CS) transliterators with varying degrees of experience was examined at three different speaking rates (slow, normal, fast). Accuracy was measured with a high-resolution, objective metric in order to facilitate quantitative analyses of the effect of each factor on accuracy. Results showed that speaking rate had a large negative effect on accuracy, caused primarily by an increase in omitted cues, whereas the effect of lag time on accuracy, also negative, was quite small and explained just 3% of the variance. Increased experience level was generally associated with increased accuracy; however, high levels of experience did not guarantee high levels of accuracy. Finally, the overall accuracy of the 12 transliterators, 54% on average across all three factors, was low enough to raise serious concerns about the quality of CS transliteration services that (at least some) children receive in educational settings. PMID:27221370

  1. Accretion disc time lag distributions: applying CREAM to simulated AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, D. A.; Horne, Keith; Villforth, C.

    2016-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary in their brightness across all wavelengths. Moreover, longer wavelength ultraviolet-optical continuum light curves appear to be delayed with respect to shorter wavelength light curves. A simple way to model these delays is by assuming thermal reprocessing of a variable point source (a lamp post) by a blackbody accretion disc. We introduce a new method, CREAM (Continuum REprocessed AGN Markov Chain Monte Carlo), that models continuum variations using this lamp post model. The disc light curves lag the lamp post emission with a time delay distribution sensitive to the disc temperature-radius profile and inclination. We test CREAM's ability to recover both inclination and product of black hole mass and accretion rate {Mdot{M}}, and show that the code is also able to infer the shape of the driving light curve. CREAM is applied to synthetic light curves expected from 1000 s exposures of a 17th magnitude AGN with a 2-m telescope in Sloan g and i bands with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of 500-900 depending on the filter and lunar phase. We also test CREAM on poorer quality g and i light curves with SNR = 100. We find in the high-SNR case that CREAM can recover the accretion disc inclination to within an uncertainty of 5° and an {Mdot{M}} to within 0.04 dex.

  2. Estimating and Analyzing Savannah Phenology with a Lagged Time Series Model

    PubMed Central

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Beringer, Jason; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-01-01

    Savannah regions are predicted to undergo changes in precipitation patterns according to current climate change projections. This change will affect leaf phenology, which controls net primary productivity. It is of importance to study this since savannahs play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their areal coverage and can have an effect on the food security in regions that depend on subsistence farming. In this study we investigate how soil moisture, mean annual precipitation, and day length control savannah phenology by developing a lagged time series model. The model uses climate data for 15 flux tower sites across four continents, and normalized difference vegetation index from satellite to optimize a statistical phenological model. We show that all three variables can be used to estimate savannah phenology on a global scale. However, it was not possible to create a simplified savannah model that works equally well for all sites on the global scale without inclusion of more site specific parameters. The simplified model showed no bias towards tree cover or between continents and resulted in a cross-validated r2 of 0.6 and root mean squared error of 0.1. We therefore expect similar average results when applying the model to other savannah areas and further expect that it could be used to estimate the productivity of savannah regions. PMID:27128678

  3. Catchment Legacies and Trajectories: Understanding Time Lags in Catchment Response as a Function of Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Increased nutrient loads delivered from watersheds due to agricultural intensification, industrialization, and urbanization have contributed globally to the persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters. Watershed management practices targeting these non-point source pollutants often lead to little or no improvement in water quality, even after extensive implementation of conservation measures or Best Management Practices (BMPs). The lag time between implementation of a conservation measure and resultant water quality benefits has recently been recognized as an important factor in the "apparent" failure of these BMPs. When conservation measures are implemented without explicit consideration of the lag time and with expectations that they will lead to immediate benefits, the resulting failure to meet such expectations can discourage vital restoration efforts. It is therefore important to quantify the lag times associated with watershed management efforts a priori and to implement restoration strategies targeted specifically at minimizing lag times and maximizing restoration benefits. The focus of this research is to develop a framework for understanding the time lags between land-use changes and stream water quality benefits. We hypothesize that such time lags arise from nutrient legacies building over decades of fertilizer application. For nitrogen (N), one can conceptualize this as either hydrologic legacy, in the form of dissolved nitrate that is delayed due to slow groundwater transport, or as biogeochemical legacy, in the form of organic N, possibly in dissolved or readily mineralizable forms. Indeed, mass-balance studies across the Mississippi and Thames river basins indicate the possibility of missing N mass in these landscapes, with inputs being consistently greater than the outputs even when accounting for all possible pathways of nitrogen transformation. Historical soil data within the upper Mississippi River Basin (MRB) indicate that

  4. Projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Cun-Fang; Xu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2008-06-01

    We study projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random networks. We relax some limitations of previous work, where projective-anticipating and projective-lag synchronization can be achieved only on two coupled chaotic systems. In this paper, we realize projective-anticipating and projective-lag synchronization on complex dynamical networks composed of a large number of interconnected components. At the same time, although previous work studied projective synchronization on complex dynamical networks, the dynamics of the nodes are coupled partially linear chaotic systems. In this paper, the dynamics of the nodes of the complex networks are time-delayed chaotic systems without the limitation of the partial linearity. Based on the Lyapunov stability theory, we suggest a generic method to achieve the projective-anticipating, projective, and projective-lag synchronization of time-delayed chaotic systems on random dynamical networks, and we find both its existence and sufficient stability conditions. The validity of the proposed method is demonstrated and verified by examining specific examples using Ikeda and Mackey-Glass systems on Erdös-Rényi networks.

  5. An integrated error estimation and lag-aware data assimilation scheme for real-time flood forecasting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of conventional filtering methods can be degraded by ignoring the time lag between soil moisture and discharge response when discharge observations are assimilated into streamflow modelling. This has led to the ongoing development of more optimal ways to implement sequential data ass...

  6. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  7. Relativistic X-ray reverberation modelling of the combined time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainakun, P.; Young, A. J.; Kara, E.

    2016-08-01

    General relativistic ray tracing simulations of the time-averaged spectrum and energy-dependent time delays in active galactic nuclei (AGN) are presented. We model the lamp-post geometry in which the accreting gas is illuminated by an X-ray source located on the rotation axis of the black hole. The spectroscopic features imprinted in the reflection component are modelled using REFLIONX. The associated time delays after the direct continuum, known as reverberation lags, are computed including the full effects of dilution and ionization gradients on the disc. We perform, for the first time, simultaneous fitting of the time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in three AGN: Mrk 335, IRAS 13224-3809 and Ark 564 observed with XMM-Newton. The best-fitting source height and central mass of each AGN partly agree with those previously reported. We find that including the ionization gradient in the model naturally explains lag-energy observations in which the 3 keV and 7-10 keV bands precede other bands. To obtain the clear 3 keV and 7-10 keV dips in the lag-energy profile, the model requires either a source height >5 rg, or a disc that is highly ionized at small radii and is colder further out. We also show that fitting the lag or the mean spectra alone can lead to different results and interpretations. This is therefore important to combine the spectral and timing data in order to find the plausible but self-consistent fits which are achievable with our model.

  8. Relativistic X-ray reverberation modelling of the combined time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainakun, P.; Young, A. J.; Kara, E.

    2016-08-01

    General relativistic ray tracing simulations of the time-averaged spectrum and energy-dependent time delays in AGN are presented. We model the lamp-post geometry in which the accreting gas is illuminated by an X-ray source located on the rotation axis of the black hole. The spectroscopic features imprinted in the reflection component are modelled using REFLIONX. The associated time delays after the direct continuum, known as reverberation lags, are computed including the full effects of dilution and ionization gradients on the disc. We perform, for the first time, simultaneous fitting of the time-averaged and lag-energy spectra in three AGN: Mrk 335, IRAS 13224-3809 and Ark 564 observed with XMM-Newton. The best fitting source height and central mass of each AGN partly agree with those previously reported. We find that including the ionization gradient in the model naturally explains lag-energy observations in which the 3 keV and 7-10 keV bands precede other bands. To obtain the clear 3 keV and 7-10 keV dips in the lag-energy profile, the model requires either a source height > 5$r_g$, or a disc that is highly ionized at small radii and is colder further out. We also show that fitting the lag or the mean spectra alone can lead to different results and interpretations. This is therefore important to combine the spectral and timing data in order to find the plausible but self-consistent fits which is achievable with our model.

  9. [Time lag characteristics of stem sap flow of common tree species during their growth season in Beijing downtown].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Ouyang, Zhi-yun; Zheng, Hua; Wang, Xiao-ke; Ni, Yong-ming; Ren, Yu-fen

    2009-09-01

    From April to September in 2008, the stem sap flow velocity (Js) of several common tree species (Ginkgo biloba, Aesculus chinensis, Magnolia denudata, Robinia pseudoacacia, Pinus tabulaeformis and Cedrus deodara) in Beijing was measured by thermal dissipation method. Crosscorrelation analysis was used to estimate the time lag between the stem sap flow and the driving factors of canopy transpiration among the tree species. The Js of the six tree species was significantly correlated with the total radiation (Rs) and vapor pressure deficit (D), and the Js was lagged behind Rs but ahead of D. The maximum correlation coefficient of Js with Rs (0.74-0.93) was often higher than that of Js with D (0.57-0.79), indicating that the diurnal Js was more dependent on Rs than on D. The sampled tree species except P. tabulaeformis had a shorter time lag of Js with Rs (10-70 min) than with D (47-130 min), and there existed significant differences among R. pseudoacacia, P. tabulaeformis, and C. deodara. The time lag between the Js and the driving factors of canopy transpiration was mainly correlated with the tree features (DBH, tree height, canopy area, and sapwood area) and the nocturnal water recharge, regardless of tree species. PMID:20030130

  10. The relevance of mineralization lag time in the evaluation of histologic changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Libbey, N P; Chazan, J A; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1993-04-01

    We examined bone biopsies from 47 patients on chronic hemodialysis, and analyzed the histomorphometric and biochemical findings and histologic quantitation of bone aluminium, looking primarily at mineralization lag time (Mlt) to evaluate its usefulness in categorization of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). The patients were categorized as having either relatively normal Mlt (< 35 days, n = 21 patients), moderately prolonged Mlt (35-100 days, n = 13 patients) or markedly prolonged Mlt (> 100 days, n = 13 patients). The group with relatively normal Mlt showed significantly higher C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTHc) levels (26,141 +/- 19,270 vs 7,226 +/- 6,073 and 4,434 +/- 4,000 pg/ml) than the moderately or markedly prolonged Mlt groups (p < .01) and was associated with histologic characteristics of osteitis fibrosa or mild hyperparathyroidism (BFR/BS range 0.146-0.947 mcm3/mcm2/d). The group with markedly prolonged Mlt included one patient with classic and 11 with adynamic osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.009-0.099) and had greater bone aluminum (Al.S/OS 35.3 +/- 26.7% vs 7.2 +/- 9.0%) than the normal Mlt group (p < .01). The group with moderately prolonged Mlt included two patients with aplastic bone disease (Mlt 80.0 and 84.6 days, and Al.S/OS 100.0 and 72.3%) and 11 patients with features of hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.068-0.243) with variable but generally intermediate bone aluminum deposition (Al.S/OS 22.5 +/- 19.9%). Like BFR/BS and other dynamic parameters Mlt correlates with morphologic types of ROD which primarily reflect bone turnover, but it may also suggest varying degrees of mineralization impairment in a spectrum ranging from high to low turnover types of ROD. Its usefulness in this respect should not be overlooked. PMID:8491052

  11. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire.

    PubMed

    Hossack, Blake R; Lowe, Winsor H; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region. PMID:22978248

  12. INITIAL ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT POWER TIME LAG DUE TO HETEROGENEITY WITHIN THE TREAT FUEL MATRIX.

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Wachs; A.X. Zabriskie, W.R. Marcum

    2014-06-01

    The topic Nuclear Safety encompasses a broad spectrum of focal areas within the nuclear industry; one specific aspect centers on the performance and integrity of nuclear fuel during a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). This specific accident has proven to be fundamentally difficult to theoretically characterize due to the numerous empirically driven characteristics that quantify the fuel and reactor performance. The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility was designed and operated to better understand fuel behavior under extreme (i.e. accident) conditions; it was shutdown in 1994. Recently, efforts have been underway to commission the TREAT facility to continue testing of advanced accident tolerant fuels (i.e. recently developed fuel concepts). To aid in the restart effort, new simulation tools are being used to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuels during facility’s transient events. This study focuses specifically on the characterizing modeled effects of fuel particles within the fuel matrix of the TREAT. The objective of this study was to (1) identify the impact of modeled heterogeneity within the fuel matrix during a transient event, and (2) demonstrate acceptable modeling processes for the purpose of TREAT safety analyses, specific to fuel matrix and particle size. Hypothetically, a fuel that is dominantly heterogeneous will demonstrate a clearly different temporal heating response to that of a modeled homogeneous fuel. This time difference is a result of the uniqueness of the thermal diffusivity within the fuel particle and fuel matrix. Using MOOSE/BISON to simulate the temperature time-lag effect of fuel particle diameter during a transient event, a comparison of the average graphite moderator temperature surrounding a spherical particle of fuel was made for both types of fuel simulations. This comparison showed that at a given time and with a specific fuel particle diameter, the fuel particle (heterogeneous) simulation and the homogeneous simulation

  13. Lagged PM2.5 effects in mortality time series: Critical impact of covariate model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common approaches to modeling the effects of air pollution on mortality are the Harvard and the Johns Hopkins (NMMAPS) approaches. These two approaches, which use different sets of covariates, result in dissimilar estimates of the effect of lagged fine particulate ma...

  14. The importance of lag time extension in determining bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Li, Bing; Qiu, Yong; Shi, Hanchang; Yin, Huabing

    2016-05-10

    It is widely appreciated that widespread antibiotic resistance has significantly reduced the utility of today's antibiotics. Many antibiotics now fail to cure infectious diseases, although they are classified as effective bactericidal agents based on antibiotic susceptibility tests. Here, via kinetic growth assays, we evaluated the effects of 12 commonly used antibiotics on the lag phase of a range of pure environmental isolates and of sludge bacterial communities with a high diversity. We show that an extended lag phase offers bacteria survival advantages and promotes regrowth upon the removal of antibiotics. By utilizing both lag phase extension and IC50, the killing efficiency of an antibiotic on a strain or a community can be easily revealed. Interestingly, for several strains of relevance to endemic nosocomial infections (e.g. Acinetobacter sp. and Pseudomonas aeruginosa) and the diverse sludge communities, tetracycline and quinolone antibiotics are most likely to be resisted via extended lag phase. This discovery is significant from a clinical point view since underestimation of bacteria resistance can lead to the recurrence of diseases. PMID:27077143

  15. Using a Continuous Time Lag to Determine the Associations Between Ambient PM2.5 Hourly Levels and Daily Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Staniswalis, Joan G.; Yang, Hongling; Li, Wen-Whai; Kelly, Kerry E.

    2009-01-01

    We are interested in understanding the possible association between exposure to short-term PM2.5 peaks that have changing physical characteristics throughout the day and observable health outcomes (daily mortality). To this end, modern statistical methods are used here that allow for a continuous time lag between hourly PM2.5 mass concentration and daily mortality. The functional linear regression model was used to study how hourly PM2.5 mass of past days continuously influence the daily mortality count of the current day. Using a Poisson likelihood with the canonical link, we found that a 10 μg/m3 increase in the hourly PM2.5 above the hourly average is associated with 1.7% (.1, 3.4), 2.4% (1.2, 3.7), 1.6% (.6, 2.7), .8% (−.2, 1.8) higher risk of mortality on the same day, next day, 2-days and 3-days later, respectively. The increase in relative risk is statistically significant for lags of 0−2 days, but not at lag 3. The highest association between PM2.5 mass concentration and daily mortality was found to occur in the morning when both mass and PM number concentrations peak at roughly 8 a.m. (lag of 15, 39, and 63 hours). This morning time interval corresponds to automobile traffic rush-hour that coincides with a morning atmospheric inversion that traps high concentrations of nanoparticles. PMID:19842325

  16. Groundwater dating for understanding nitrogen in groundwater systems - Time lag, fate, and detailed flow path ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Hadfield, John; Stenger, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is a problem world-wide. Nitrate from land use activities can leach out of the root zone of the crop into the deeper part of the unsaturated zone and ultimately contaminate the underlying groundwater resources. Nitrate travels with the groundwater and then discharges into surface water causing eutrophication of surface water bodies. To understand the source, fate, and future nitrogen loads to ground and surface water bodies, detailed knowledge of the groundwater flow dynamics is essential. Groundwater sampled at monitoring wells or discharges may not yet be in equilibrium with current land use intensity due to the time lag between leaching out of the root zone and arrival at the sampling location. Anoxic groundwater zones can act as nitrate sinks through microbial denitrification. However, the effect of denitrification on overall nitrate fluxes depends on the fraction of the groundwater flowing through such zones. We will show results from volcanic aquifers in the central North Island of New Zealand where age tracers clearly indicate that the groundwater discharges into large sensitive lakes like Lake Taupo and Lake Rotorua are not yet fully realising current land use intensity. The majority of the water discharging into these lakes is decades and up to over hundred years old. Therefore, increases in dairy farming over the last decades are not yet reflected in these old water discharges, but over time these increased nitrate inputs will eventually work their way through the large groundwater systems and increasing N loads to the lakes are to be expected. Anoxic zones are present in some of these aquifers, indicating some denitrification potential, however, age tracer results from nested piezo wells show young groundwater in oxic zones indicating active flow in these zones, while anoxic zones tend to have older water indicating poorer hydraulic conductivity in these zones. Consequently, to evaluate the effect of denitrification

  17. 24-hour pattern in lag time of response by firemen to calls for urgent medical aid.

    PubMed

    Brousse, Eric; Forget, Coralie; Riedel, Marc; Marlot, Michel; Mechkouri, Mohamed; Smolensky, Michael H; Touitou, Yvan; Reinberg, Alain

    2011-04-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the group 24-h pattern of lag time (LT) in response by regular and volunteer firemen (RFM and VFM) to calls for medical help (CFMH), specifically calls for out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). LT, duration in min between a CFMH and departure of service vehicle equipped with a semiautomated defibrillator and generally staffed with four well-trained and ready-to-go FM, represents the integrated duration of several processes, each with separate reaction and decision-making times. The exact time of each CFHM (in min, h, day, month, yr) was recorded electronically, and the exact departure time from the station of the responding FM vehicle was recorded by an on-duty FM. Overall, CFMH made up 53 ± 9% (SEM) of all emergencies calls for aid. To standardize the study methods, the reported findings are based on 568 CFMH specifically regarding OHCA that occurred during the 4-yr study span (January 2005 to December 2008). CFMH exhibited a 24-h pattern with a major peak at 10:00 h (mean ± SEM: n = 9.5 ± 1.6) and major trough at 01:00 h (n = 1.3 ± 0.3; t test, p < .001). From year to year and season to season, a 24-h pattern was detected in the total of CFMH/h with two peaks (∼10:00 and ∼17:00 h) and two troughs (∼01:00 and ∼15:00 h) (analysis of variance [ANOVA], p < .01; Cosinor, p < .05 to < .003), with neither season- nor year-related differences (χ(2), p > .05). In CFMH/h pooled time series, ANOVA-detected differences between the hourly means (p < .01), and Cosinor analysis validated a 24-h rhythm (p < .002). In raw data, the longest LT, indicative of poorest performance, occurred at 05:00 h (8.8 ± 0.7 min) and the trough of LT, indicative of best performance, at 16:00 h (4.3 ± 0.8 min (t test, p < .02). 24-h patterning in LT was validated both by ANOVA of hourly means (p < .0006) and Cosinor analysis (p < .05), with longest LT ∼05:00 h and shortest LT ∼16.00 h for data of the

  18. Lag Times in Reporting Injuries, Receiving Medical Care, and Missing Work: Associations With the Length of Work Disability in Occupational Back Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Elyssa; Harrell, Mason; Pransky, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the associations between lag times following occupational low back injury and the length of work disability. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study using workers’ compensation claims, random effects Tobit models were used to explore how disability length relates to three lag times: the number of days from the date of injury to reporting the injury, the number of days from the date of injury to medical care, and the number of days from the date of injury to initiating work disability. Results: In general, shorter lag times for each of the different lags were related to shorter lengths of disability. Conclusions: Decreasing the length of the lag times in reporting injuries, receiving medical care, and missing work may help to decrease the length of work disability for workers after low back injury. PMID:26445030

  19. Plant ecophysiological status and soil micro-organisms control the time-lagged response of ecosystem respiration to environmental changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmon, Y.; Barnard, R. L.; Buchmann, N. C.

    2009-12-01

    Carbon stable isotopes are widely used tools to study the carbon exchange between atmosphere and biosphere. In particular, stable carbon isotopes have been used as a natural tracer in many ecosystem studies to investigate environmental controls on carbon turnover time. This tracer-function results from the changes of carbon isotopic signature (δ13C) of newly assimilated sugars due to plant physiological response to environmental changes through photosynthetic discrimination. Previous studies have shown response of δ13C in ecosystem respiration (δ13CR) to environmental changes with a time lag of 1 to 10 days. The observed time lag was attributed to the transfer of newly assimilated carbon from leaves to heterotrophic ecosystem components where it is respired. However, these time-lagged responses were not consistently observed. Therefore, a clear understanding of the mechanisms underlying time-lagged responses to environmental changes of δ13CR is still lacking. This study aims to improve our understanding of plant physiology and soil micro-organisms controls over these time-lagged responses. The first part of this study focus on the impact of plant physiology on the time-lagged response of δ13CR to environmental changes. Wheat plants with different physiological status were obtained by growing them under different nutrient and water availabilities. The response of δ13C of leaf and soil-respired CO2 to a 13C labeling was measured. We found that the measured carbon turnover time was related to plant physiology, in particular leaf conductance (gs). The second part aims to determine if time-lagged responses of δ13CR to environmental changes are only triggered by the transfer of newly assimilated sugars with different δ13C or if these responses are also due to activity of soil micro-organisms. We exposed a set of beech saplings suffering from drought at different temperature to a water pulse mimicking a rain event. To test the importance of carbon transfer from

  20. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Lionello, R.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism (location, duration) in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present results from a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200 and 500 light-seconds), maximum temperature reached (3 million degrees Kelvin and 10 million degrees Kelvin), and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by X-ray telescope/Be-thin filter and various Extreme Ultra Violet Atmospheric Imaging Assembly channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length. Additional results were computed using the zero-dimensional Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) code in order to test the compatibility of the two codes and to investigate additional loop lengths. Initial results indicate that the long (greater than 5000 seconds) lags observed in the approximately 100 light-seconds loops of active regions can only be reproduced using photospheric abundances and much longer loop lengths. This result suggests that the observed time lags cannot be completely explained by impulsive heating.

  1. EVOLUTION OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION AND TIME LAG OF 4U 1735-44 ALONG THE BRANCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yajuan; Zhang Haotong; Zhang Chengmin; Yuan Hailong; Dong Yiqiao; Zhao Yongheng; Zhang Yanxia; Qu Jinlu; Song Liming; Wang Dehua; Yin Hongxing

    2013-09-15

    We analyze the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with RXTE data, and find anti-correlated soft and hard time lags of about a hecto-second. In the island state, the observations do not show any obvious correlations, and most observations of the banana branch show a positive correlation. However, anti-correlations are detected in the upper banana branch. These results are different from those of Z-sources (Cyg X-2, GX 5-1), where anti-correlations are detected in the horizontal branch and upper normal branch. In this case, the lag timescales of both this atoll and Z-sources are found to be similar, at a magnitude of several tens to hundreds of seconds. As a comparison, it is noted that anti-correlated lags lasting thousands of seconds have been reported from several black hole candidates in their intermediate states. In addition, for an observation containing four segments that show positive or anti-correlation, we analyze the spectral evolution with the hybrid model. In the observation, the anti-correlation is detected at the highest flux. The fitting results show that the Comptonized component is not the lowest at the highest flux, which suggests that the anti-correlation corresponds to the transition between the soft and hard states. Finally, we compare the corresponding results of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with those observed in Z-sources and black hole candidates, and the possible origins of the anti-correlated time lags are discussed.

  2. Using a continuous time lag to determine the associations between ambient PM2.5 hourly levels and daily mortality.

    PubMed

    Staniswalis, Joan G; Yang, Hongling; Li, Wen-Whai; Kelly, Kerry E

    2009-10-01

    The authors are interested in understanding the possible association between exposure to short-term fine particulate matter (PM2.5) peaks that have changing physical characteristics throughout the day and observable health outcomes (daily mortality). To this end, modern statistical methods are used here that allow for a continuous time lag between hourly PM2.5 mass concentration and daily mortality. The functional linear regression model was used to study how hourly PM2.5 mass of past days continuously influences the daily mortality count of the current day. Using a Poisson likelihood with the canonical link, the authors found that a 10-microg/m3 increase in the hourly PM2.5 above the hourly average is associated with 1.7% (0.1, 3.4), 2.4% (1.2, 3.7), 1.6% (0.6, 2.7), and 0.8% (-0.2, 1.8) higher risk of mortality on the same day, next day, 2 days, and 3 days later, respectively. The increase in relative risk is statistically significant for lags of 0-2 days, but not at lag 3. The highest association between PM2.5 mass concentration and daily mortality was found to occur in the morning when both mass and PM number concentrations peak at approximately 8:00 a.m. (lag of 15, 39, and 63 hr). This morning time interval corresponds to automobile traffic rush hour that coincides with a morning atmospheric inversion that traps high concentrations of nanoparticles. PMID:19842325

  3. Low-Frequency Combustion Instability Induced by the Combustion Time Lag of Liquid Oxidizer in Hybrid Rocket Motors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morita, Takakazu; Kitagawa, Koki; Yuasa, Saburo; Yamaguchi, Shigeru; Shimada, Toru

    This paper deals with a theoretical analysis of the low-frequency combustion instability induced by the combustion time lag of liquid oxidizer in small-scale hybrid rocket motors. We obtained the determined linear stability limit using the following parameters: the combustion time delay of liquid oxidizer, the residence time of a combustion chamber, injector pressure, chamber pressure, mass flux exponent, O/F, and the polytropic exponent of mixture gas in a combustion chamber. Kitagawa and Yuasa sometimes observed low-frequency oscillations, such as chugging, in their swirling-oxidizer-flow-type hybrid rocket engine. The obtained theoretical stability limit was compared with these experimental data.

  4. An Integrated Model for the Production of X-Ray Time Lags and Quiescent Spectra from Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Black Hole Accretion Coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.

    2016-04-01

    Many accreting black holes manifest time lags during outbursts, in which the hard Fourier component typically lags behind the soft component. Despite decades of observations of this phenomenon, the underlying physical explanation for the time lags has remained elusive, although there are suggestions that Compton reverberation plays an important role. However, the lack of analytical solutions has hindered the interpretation of the available data. In this paper, we investigate the generation of X-ray time lags in Compton scattering coronae using a new mathematical approach based on analysis of the Fourier-transformed transport equation. By solving this equation, we obtain the Fourier transform of the radiation Green’s function, which allows us to calculate the exact dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous coronal clouds. We use the new formalism to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. We show that our model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the time-averaged (quiescent) X-ray spectra for Cyg X-1 and GX 339-04, using a single set of coronal parameters for each source. The time lags are the result of impulsive bremsstrahlung injection occurring near the outer edge of the corona, while the time-averaged spectra are the result of continual distributed injection of soft photons throughout the cloud.

  5. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  6. Lagged response of tropical tropospheric temperature to solar ultraviolet variations on intraseasonal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hood, L. L.

    2016-04-01

    Correlative and regression analyses of daily ERA-Interim reanalysis data for three separate solar maximum periods confirm the existence of a temperature response to short-term (mainly ˜27 day) solar ultraviolet variations at tropical latitudes in both the lower stratosphere and troposphere. The response, which occurs at a phase lag of 6-10 days after the solar forcing peak, consists of a warming in the lower stratosphere, consistent with relative downwelling and a slowing of the mean meridional (Brewer-Dobson) circulation, and a cooling in the troposphere. The midtropospheric cooling response is most significant in the tropical Pacific, especially under positive El Niño-Southern Oscillation conditions and may be related to a reduction in the number of Madden-Julian oscillation events that propagate eastward into the central Pacific following peaks in short-term solar forcing.

  7. Anti-correlated Time Lags in the Z Source GX 5-1: Possible Evidence for a Truncated Accretion Disk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the nature of the inner accretion disk in the neutron star source GX 5-1 by making a detailed study of time lags between X-rays of different energies. Using the cross-correlation analysis, we found anti-correlated hard and soft time lags of the order of a few tens to a few hundred seconds and the corresponding intensity states were mostly the horizontal branch (HB) and upper normal branch. The model independent and dependent spectral analysis showed that during these time lags the structure of the accretion disk significantly varied. Both eastern and western approaches were used to unfold the X-ray continuum and systematic changes were observed in soft and hard spectral components. These changes along with a systematic shift in the frequency of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) made it substantially evident that the geometry of the accretion disk is truncated. Simultaneous energy spectral and power density spectral study shows that the production of the horizontal branch oscillations (HBOs) is closely related to the Comptonizing region rather than the disk component in the accretion disk. We found that as the HBO frequency decreases from the hard apex to upper HB, the disk temperature increases along with an increase in the coronal temperature, which is in sharp contrast with the changes found in black hole binaries where the decrease in the QPO frequency is accompanied by a decrease in the disk temperature and a simultaneous increase in the coronal temperature. We discuss the results in the context of re-condensation of coronal material in the inner region of the disk.

  8. ANTI-CORRELATED TIME LAGS IN THE Z SOURCE GX 5-1: POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR A TRUNCATED ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the nature of the inner accretion disk in the neutron star source GX 5-1 by making a detailed study of time lags between X-rays of different energies. Using the cross-correlation analysis, we found anti-correlated hard and soft time lags of the order of a few tens to a few hundred seconds and the corresponding intensity states were mostly the horizontal branch (HB) and upper normal branch. The model independent and dependent spectral analysis showed that during these time lags the structure of the accretion disk significantly varied. Both eastern and western approaches were used to unfold the X-ray continuum and systematic changes were observed in soft and hard spectral components. These changes along with a systematic shift in the frequency of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) made it substantially evident that the geometry of the accretion disk is truncated. Simultaneous energy spectral and power density spectral study shows that the production of the horizontal branch oscillations (HBOs) is closely related to the Comptonizing region rather than the disk component in the accretion disk. We found that as the HBO frequency decreases from the hard apex to upper HB, the disk temperature increases along with an increase in the coronal temperature, which is in sharp contrast with the changes found in black hole binaries where the decrease in the QPO frequency is accompanied by a decrease in the disk temperature and a simultaneous increase in the coronal temperature. We discuss the results in the context of re-condensation of coronal material in the inner region of the disk.

  9. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Lionello, R.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present the results from a 1D hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200 and 500 Mm), maximum temperature reached (3MK and 10 MK0, and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by XRT/Be-thin and various EUV AIA channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed and tested using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length.

  10. New results on anti-synchronization of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuting; Wen, Shiping; Chen, Michael Z Q; Huang, Tingwen; Zeng, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    This paper investigates the problem of global exponential anti-synchronization of a class of switched neural networks with time-varying delays and lag signals. Considering the packed circuits, the controller is dependent on the output of the system as the inner states are very hard to measure. Therefore, it is necessary to investigate the controller based on the output of the neuron cell. Through theoretical analysis, it is obvious that the obtained ones improve and generalize the results derived in the previous literature. To illustrate the effectiveness, a simulation example with applications in image encryptions is also presented in the paper. PMID:27295505

  11. A FOURIER-TRANSFORMED BREMSSTRAHLUNG FLASH MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS IN ACCRETING BLACK HOLE SOURCES

    SciTech Connect

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A. E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu

    2014-04-20

    Accreting black hole sources show a wide variety of rapid time variability, including the manifestation of time lags during X-ray transients, in which a delay (phase shift) is observed between the Fourier components of the hard and soft spectra. Despite a large body of observational evidence for time lags, no fundamental physical explanation for the origin of this phenomenon has been presented. We develop a new theoretical model for the production of X-ray time lags based on an exact analytical solution for the Fourier transform describing the diffusion and Comptonization of seed photons propagating through a spherical corona. The resulting Green's function can be convolved with any source distribution to compute the associated Fourier transform and time lags, hence allowing us to explore a wide variety of injection scenarios. We show that thermal Comptonization is able to self-consistently explain both the X-ray time lags and the steady-state (quiescent) X-ray spectrum observed in the low-hard state of Cyg X-1. The reprocessing of bremsstrahlung seed photons produces X-ray time lags that diminish with increasing Fourier frequency, in agreement with the observations for a wide range of sources.

  12. Self-Organized Near-Zero-Lag Synchronization Induced by Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity in Cortical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Several cognitive tasks related to learning and memory exhibit synchronization of macroscopic cortical areas together with synaptic plasticity at neuronal level. Therefore, there is a growing effort among computational neuroscientists to understand the underlying mechanisms relating synchrony and plasticity in the brain. Here we numerically study the interplay between spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and anticipated synchronization (AS). AS emerges when a dominant flux of information from one area to another is accompanied by a negative time lag (or phase). This means that the receiver region pulses before the sender does. In this paper we study the interplay between different synchronization regimes and STDP at the level of three-neuron microcircuits as well as cortical populations. We show that STDP can promote auto-organized zero-lag synchronization in unidirectionally coupled neuronal populations. We also find synchronization regimes with negative phase difference (AS) that are stable against plasticity. Finally, we show that the interplay between negative phase difference and STDP provides limited synaptic weight distribution without the need of imposing artificial boundaries. PMID:26474165

  13. Development of time controlled chronomodulated tablet with swelling and rupturable layers: Optimization of factors influencing lag-time and drug release

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Mayur; Jivani, Rishad R; Patel, Laxman D; Jivani, Noordin P; Sonagara, Bhavin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: A tablet system consisting of cores coated with two layers of swelling and rupturable coatings was prepared and evaluated as time controlled chronomodulated tablet. Materials and Methods: Cores containing Montelukast sodium as model drug were prepared by direct compression and then coated sequentially with an inner swelling layer containing a HPMC E 5 and an outer rupturable layer of Eudragit RL/RS (1:1). A three-factor, two-level, full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of amount of HPMC E 5 and Eudragit RL/RS (1:1) on the responses, i.e., lag time to release and time required for 80% of drug to releases. The dissolution tests were studied using the USP paddle method at 50 rpm in 0.1 N HCL for 2 hr and than in phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Methods: Cores containing Montelukast sodium as model drug were prepared by direct compression and then coated sequentially with an inner swelling layer containing a HPMC E 5 and an outer rupturable layer of Eudragit RL/RS (1:1). A three-factor, two-level, full factorial design was used to investigate the influence of amount of HPMC E 5 and Eudragit RL/RS (1:1) on the responses, i.e., lag time to release and time required for 80% of drug to releases. The dissolution tests were studied using the USP paddle method at 50 rpm in 0.1 N HCL for 2 hr and than in phosphate buffer pH 6.8. Result: The lag time of the drug release decreased by increasing the inner swelling layer and increased by increasing the rupturing layer level. Conclusion: The results obtain from present study suggest that swelling come reputable coating approach gives desire drug release after lag time. PMID:23580937

  14. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals.

  15. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals. PMID:27406342

  16. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis.

    PubMed

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals. PMID:27406342

  17. Lag in adaptation to lactose as a probe to the timing of permease incorporation into the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A L

    1975-01-01

    If bacteria are incapable of forming and incorporating proteins into the cytoplasmic membranes in all phases of the cell cycle, then not all cells from an asynchronous culture should be capable of growth when switched to a new carbon and energy source whose metabolism requires new membrane function. The transfer of an inducible culture to low lactose provides such a situation since the cells cannot grow unless galactoside permease can function to concentrate the lactose internally. From such experiments, it was concluded that the Y gene product of the lac operon is synthesized, incorporated, and can start functioning in active transport, at any time throughout the bulk of the cell cycle. Not only were the lags before growth re-ensued much shorter than would be expected if the membrane transport capability could only be developed in a small portion of the cycle, but brief pulses of a gratuitous inducer shortened the lags much further. Three types of Escherichia coli ML 30 culture were studied: cells that had exhausted the limiting glucose; cells taken directly from glucose-limited chemostats; and a washed suspension of highly catabolite repressed cells from cultures grown in high levels of glucose and gluconate. The growth studies reported here were performed on-line with a minicomputer. They represent at least an order of magnitude increase in accuracy in estimating growth parameters over previous instrumentation. PMID:1100610

  18. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Lionello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism (location, duration) in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present results from a 1D hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200, and 500 Mm), maximum temperature reached (3MK and 10MK), and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by XRT/Be-thin and various EUV AIA channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length. Additional results were computed using the 0D EBTEL code in order to test the compatibility of the two codes and to investigate additional loop lengths. Initial results indicate that the long (greater than 5000s) lags observed in the approx. 100Mm loops of active regions can only be reproduced using photospheric abundances and much longer loop lengths.

  19. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  20. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients. PMID:26127033

  1. Quantifying causal coupling strength: A lag-specific measure for multivariate time series related to transfer entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Heitzig, Jobst; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    While it is an important problem to identify the existence of causal associations between two components of a multivariate time series, a topic addressed in Runge, Heitzig, Petoukhov, and Kurths [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.258701 108, 258701 (2012)], it is even more important to assess the strength of their association in a meaningful way. In the present article we focus on the problem of defining a meaningful coupling strength using information-theoretic measures and demonstrate the shortcomings of the well-known mutual information and transfer entropy. Instead, we propose a certain time-delayed conditional mutual information, the momentary information transfer (MIT), as a lag-specific measure of association that is general, causal, reflects a well interpretable notion of coupling strength, and is practically computable. Rooted in information theory, MIT is general in that it does not assume a certain model class underlying the process that generates the time series. As discussed in a previous paper [Runge, Heitzig, Petoukhov, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.258701 108, 258701 (2012)], the general framework of graphical models makes MIT causal in that it gives a nonzero value only to lagged components that are not independent conditional on the remaining process. Further, graphical models admit a low-dimensional formulation of conditions, which is important for a reliable estimation of conditional mutual information and, thus, makes MIT practically computable. MIT is based on the fundamental concept of source entropy, which we utilize to yield a notion of coupling strength that is, compared to mutual information and transfer entropy, well interpretable in that, for many cases, it solely depends on the interaction of the two components at a certain lag. In particular, MIT is, thus, in many cases able to exclude the misleading influence of autodependency within a process in an information-theoretic way

  2. X-ray time lags and non-linear variability in the ultraluminous X-ray sources NGC 5408 X-1 and NGC 6946 X-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-García, L.; Vaughan, S.; Roberts, T. P.; Middleton, M.

    2015-11-01

    We present our analysis of the X-ray variability of two ultraluminous X-ray sources (ULXs) based on multiple XMM-Newton observations. We show that the linear rms-flux relation is present in eight observations of NGC 5408 X-1 and also in three observations of NGC 6946 X-1, but data from other ULXs are generally not sufficient to constrain any rms-flux relation. The presence of this relation was previously reported in only two observations of NGC 5408 X-1; our results show that this is a persistent property of the variability of NGC 5408 X-1 and extends to at least one other variable ULX. We speculate this is a ubiquitous property of ULX variability, as it is for X-ray variability in other luminous accreting sources. We also recover the time delay between hard and soft bands in NGC 5408 X-1, with the soft band (<1 keV) delayed with respect to the hard band (>1 keV) by up to ˜10 s (˜0.2 rad) at frequencies above ˜few mHz. For the first time, we extend the lag analysis to lower frequencies and find some evidence for a reversal of the lag, a hard lag of ˜1 ks at frequencies of ˜0.1 mHz. Our energy-resolved analysis shows that the time delays are energy dependent. We argue that the lag is unlikely to be a result of reflection from an accretion disc (`reverberation') based on the lack of reflection features in the spectra, and the large size of the reflector inferred from the magnitude of the lag. We also argue that associating the soft lag with a quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in these ULXs - and drawing an analogy between soft lags in ULXs and soft lags seen in some low-frequency QPOs of Galactic X-ray binaries - is premature.

  3. Methionine oxidation reduces lag-times for amyloid-β(1-40) fiber formation but generates highly fragmented fibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Miao; Viles, John H

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress and the formation of amyloid plaques containing amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides are two key hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease. A proportion of methionine (Met) at position 35 within Aβ is oxidized to methionine sulphoxide (Met(OX)) within the Alzheimer's plaques. These oxidative processes may be the key to understanding the early stages of Alzheimer's disease. In vitro oxidation of Aβ, by the physiological oxidant H2O2, was monitored using (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. Here we investigate the effect of Aβ methionine oxidation on fiber formation kinetics and morphology using the amyloid specific fluorescence dye Thioflavin T (ThT) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Methionine oxidation reduces the total amount of fibers generated for both dominant forms of Aβ, however there are marked differences in the effect of Met(OX) between Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). Surprisingly the presence of Met(OX) reduces lag-times for Aβ(1-40) fiber formation but extends lag-times for Aβ(1-42). TEM indicates a change in fiber morphology with a pronounced reduction in fiber length for both methionine oxidized Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42). In contrast, the morphology of preformed amyloid fibers is largely unaffected by the presence of H2O2. Our studies suggest that methionine oxidation promotes highly fragmented fiber assemblies of Aβ. Oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer's disease can cause oxidation of methionine within Aβ and this in turn will influence the complex assembly of Aβ monomer into amyloid fibers, which is likely to impact Aβ toxicity. PMID:27108954

  4. Time lag estimates for nitrate travel through the vadose zone in Southland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Scott; Chanut, Pierre; Ledgard, George; Rissmann, Clint

    2014-05-01

    A regional-scale study was carried out to calculate the travel time of a nitrate particle from the ground surface into shallow groundwater. The aim of the study was to obtain preliminary answers to two questions. Firstly, if leaching limits are set, how long would it take to see an improvement in shallow groundwater quality? Secondly, have groundwater nitrate concentrations reached equilibrium from recent dairy expansion in the region, or could we expect future increases? We applied a methodology that provides a balance between the detail and generalisation that is required for a regional-scale study. Steady-state advective transport through the vadose zone was modelled with water retention curves. These curves enable an estimate of the average volumetric water content of the vadose zone. The percentage saturation can then be used to calculate the vadose zone transit time if effective porosity, depth to the water table and annual average soil drainage are known. A time for mixing in the uppermost part of the aquifer has also been calculated. Two different vadose zone water retention curve models were used for comparison, the Brooks-Corey (1964), and the Van Genuchten (1980) methods. The water retention curves were parameterised by sediment texture via the Rawls and Brakensiek (1985) pedotransfer functions. Hydraulic properties were derived by positioning sediment textural descriptions on the Folk textural triangle, estimates of effective porosity from literature, and hydraulic conductivity values from aquifer tests. Uncertainty of parameter estimates was included by assigning standard deviations and appropriate probability distributions. Vadose zone saturation was modelled at 6,450 sites across the region with a Monte Carlo simulation involving 10,000 realisations. This generated a probability distribution of saturation for each site. Average volumetric water content of the vadose zone ranged from 8.5 to 40.7 % for the Brooks-Corey model and 12.9 to 36.3% for the

  5. Study on Reduction of Time Lag for Laser-Induced Electrical Discharge in Atmospheric Air with Non-Uniform Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    1998-11-01

    Study on Reduction of Time Lag for Laser-Induced Electrical Discharge in Atmospheric Air with Non-Uniform Electric Field* , Daisuke Okano, Kyushu Tokai University, 9-1-1 Toroku, Kumamoto, Japan. -----As an electrical discharge can be inductively occurred [1] by a pulsed laser-produced plasma (PLPP) in a rod-to-plate air gap stressed by a DC high voltage(Va), the starting point of laser-induced electrical discharge (LIED) is almost delayed more than few microseconds from focusing the laser beam. It is expected that the LIED by a PLPP is effectively occurred by reducing the time lag. The aim of our research focuses on the reduction for the time lag of LIED using CO2- and YAG pulsed lasers. The typical results are summarized as follows.The time lag of LIED in an atmospheric air gap (30mm) stressed at Va=30 kV is strongly reduced to 33 using CO2- and YAG pulsed lasers. The mechanism for the time lag of LIED is due to the electron attachment and detachment. [1] M.Inoue, T.Takashima, D.Okano et.al., Bull. of Inst. of Industrial Sci. & technical res.in Kyushu Tokai University, No.11 (1995)165 in Japanese. . *This work was supported by Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (C)-no.10650295 of The Ministry of education, Science Sports and Culture in japan.

  6. The discovery and modeling of energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mubashir; Iqbal, Naseer; Pahari, Mayukh; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery and modeling of enigmatic Energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of the heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105. The time-lags reveal the crucial information related to geometry of accretion flow, the emission regions and the relation between various spectral parameters. The lag and frms at the fundamental frequency show non-monotonic behavior with energy. The lag increases up to typically ˜10 keV and later shows a reversal and in some observations becomes hard(negative). However, the lags at the harmonic increase with energy and don't show any turn around at least till ˜20 keV. The frms at harmonic has similar non-monotonic behavior as at fundamental, however the variability amplitude is lesser as expected. The lag seen here can have magnitude of the order of seconds, and thus can't be accounted by light travel time effects or comptonization delays. The continuum X-ray spectra can roughly be described by a disk blackbody and a hard X-ray power-law component and from phase resolved spectroscopy it has been shown that the inner disk radius varies during the oscillation We propose the model based on the delayed response of inner disc (DRIOD) radius to the outer accretion rate i;e r_{in}(t)∝ dot{m}^β (t-τ_d). The fluctuating accretion rate varies the inner disk after a certain time delay t_d which could be of the order of the viscous propagation delays. The model very well explains the observed shape and nature of lags and frms at fundamental and harmonic frequencies. We present here the series of observations that constrain the four free parameters of our model. These parameters contain the vital information related to the nature of accretion flow in a highly periodic state like a heartbeat state.

  7. An integrated error parameter estimation and lag-aware data assimilation scheme for real-time flood forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yuan; Ryu, Dongryeol; Western, Andrew W.; Wang, Q. J.; Robertson, David E.; Crow, Wade T.

    2014-11-01

    For operational flood forecasting, discharge observations may be assimilated into a hydrologic model to improve forecasts. However, the performance of conventional filtering schemes can be degraded by ignoring the time lag between soil moisture and discharge responses. This has led to ongoing development of more appropriate ways to implement sequential data assimilation. In this paper, an ensemble Kalman smoother (EnKS) with fixed time window is implemented for the GR4H hydrologic model (modèle du Génie Rural à 4 paramètres Horaire) to update current and antecedent model states. Model and observation error parameters are estimated through the maximum a posteriori method constrained by prior information drawn from flow gauging data. When evaluated in a hypothetical forecasting mode using observed rainfall, the EnKS is found to be more stable and produce more accurate discharge forecasts than a standard ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) by reducing the mean of the ensemble root mean squared error (MRMSE) by 13-17%. The latter tends to over-correct current model states and leads to spurious peaks and oscillations in discharge forecasts. When evaluated in a real-time forecasting mode using rainfall forecasts from a numerical weather prediction model, the benefit of the EnKS is reduced as uncertainty in rainfall forecasts becomes dominant, especially at large forecast lead time.

  8. Analysis on the Time-Lag Correlation for the Changes of the Length of the Day and Geomagnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Guo-Ming; Kang, Guo-Fa; Bai, Chun-Hua; Li, Wei

    2007-06-01

    Two data sets including the historical geomagnetic field model and the length of the day are used to analyze the correlation characteristics of the geomagnetic field variation and the changes in the length of the day from 1840-2000. The results show that a lag correlation is available in the changes of geomagnetic field and the length od the day. The geomagnetic intensity parameter is approximately exceeding LOD by 7.5-10 year. However the geomagnetic western drift parameters lag behind LOD variation, the western drift components lag behind LOD by 7.5 years, the average drifting speed and the latitudinal drifting components of the geomagnetic filed lag behind LOD by 20-22.5 years.

  9. A model for the energy-dependent time-lag and rms of the heartbeat oscillations in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mubashir Hamid; Misra, Ranjeev; Pahari, Mayukh; Iqbal, Naseer; Ahmad, Naveel

    2016-04-01

    Energy-dependent phase lags reveal crucial information about the causal relation between various spectral components and about the nature of the accretion geometry around the compact objects. The time-lag and the fractional root mean square (rms) spectra of GRS 1915+105 in its heartbeat oscillation class/ρ state show peculiar behaviour at the fundamental and harmonic frequencies where the lags at the fundamental show a turn around at ˜10 keV, while the lags at the harmonic do not show any turn around at least till ˜20 keV. The magnitude of lags is of the order of few seconds and hence cannot be attributed to the light travel time effects or Comptonization delays. The continuum X-ray spectra can roughly be described by a disc blackbody and a hard X-ray power-law component and from phase-resolved spectroscopy, it has been shown that the inner disc radius varies during the oscillation. Here, we propose that there is a delayed response of the inner disc radius to the accretion rate such that r_{in}(t)∝ dot{m}^β (t-τ_d). The fluctuating accretion rate drives the oscillations of the inner radius after a time delay τd while the power-law component responds immediately. We show that in such a scenario a pure sinusoidal oscillation of the accretion rate can explain not only the shape and magnitude of energy-dependent rms and time-lag spectra at the fundamental, but also the next harmonic with just four free parameters.

  10. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, Benjamin; Hocking, Daniel; O'Neill, K.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59 °C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C · decade-1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d · decade-1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (~ 0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (~ 0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  11. Coming out of the starting blocks: extended lag time rearranges genetic diversity in introduced marine fishes of Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Toonen, Robert J.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions with known histories are rare, especially in the sea, and empirical studies of the genetic consequences are even rarer. Fifty-five years ago, the state of Hawai‘i began a remarkable, if unintentional, ‘experiment’ with the introduction of three reef fishes, Lutjanus fulvus, Cephalopholis argus and Lutjanus kasmira. All have since expanded from the initial introduction of 2204 to 3163 individuals; however, historical records show that initially L. fulvus remained scarce, C. argus had modest population expansion and L. kasmira experienced rapid population growth. The consequences of differential population growth rates are apparent in F-statistics: Hawaiian L. fulvus demonstrate strong and significant haplotype frequency shifts from the founder location (FST = 0.449), C. argus shows low but significant differentiation (FST = 0.066) and L. kasmira is nearly identical to the founder location (FST = 0.008). All three species had higher mtDNA diversity in the introduced range, which can be explained by multiple sources for L. fulvus and L. kasmira, but not for C. argus. We conclude that lag time before population expansion, in conjunction with genetic drift, has defined the genetic architecture of these three species in the introduced range. PMID:22874747

  12. Rat Blastocysts from Nuclear Injection and Time-Lagged Enucleation and Their Commitment to Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiromasa; Goto, Teppei; Takizawa, Akiko; Sanbo, Makoto; Jacob, Howard J; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Hochi, Shinichi; Hirabayashi, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Pronucleus-like vesicle formation following premature chromosome condensation (PCC) of the donor cell nucleus is the key event for successful generation of cloned rodents by nuclear transplantation (NT). However in rat cloning, this change is difficult to induce in enucleated recipient oocytes because of their inability to maintain maturation-promoting factor levels. In this study, intact oocytes retrieved from nuclear-visualized H2B-tdTomato knock-in rats were injected with Venus-labeled cell nuclei. Because the incidence of PCC under MG-132 treatment significantly increased with the culture period (0%, 10.8%, 36.8%, and 87.5% at 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 h postinjection, respectively), the metaphase plate of the oocyte was removed 1-2 h after the nuclear injection. The NT-derived rat zygotes (n = 748) were activated with ionomycin/cycloheximide and transferred into temporal host mothers, resulting in the harvest of three blastocysts (0.4%) with Venus fluorescence. Two blastocysts were examined for their potential to commit to NT-derived embryonic stem cells (ntESCs). One ntESC line was established successfully and found to be competent in terms of karyotype, stem cell marker expression, and pluripotency. In conclusion, time-lagged enucleation of visualized oocyte nuclei allows the PCC incidence of donor nuclei and generation of NT blastocysts, and the blastocysts can commit to germline-competent ntESCs. PMID:26990947

  13. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Benjamin H; Hocking, Daniel J; O'Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R; Nislow, Keith H; O'Donnell, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade(-1)) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade(-1)). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network. PMID:26966662

  14. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Daniel J.; O’Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O’Donnell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network. PMID:26966662

  15. Factors Influencing Time Lag between First Parental Concern and First Visit to Child Psychiatric Services in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Funahashi, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    The early assessment of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is important to improving patient outcomes, allowing family members to prepare for and cope with symptoms, and assisting in plans for appropriate educational opportunities. However, little is known about factors that influence the time lag between the parents' first concerns and the first…

  16. Effect of imprecise lag time and high-frequency attenuation on surface-atmosphere exchange fluxes determined with the relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moravek, A.; Trebs, I.; Foken, T.

    2013-09-01

    eddy accumulation (REA) systems that employ one single long inlet tube are prone to measurement uncertainties caused by (a) an imprecisely determined lag time between the change of sign in the vertical wind velocity and the switching of the splitter valves and (b) attenuation of high-frequency concentration fluctuations in the tube flow. However, there is currently no commonly applied procedure to address these uncertainties. In this study, we first evaluated the lag time error of the volume flow, mass flow, and cross-correlation method (online and offline) and experimentally determined the magnitude of high-frequency attenuation for a 21.5 m long inlet tube of an operating REA system. In a second step, we simulated the impact for different artificial lag time errors and low-pass filter strengths on the REA concentration differences and, thus, on the REA flux, using high-frequency time series of temperature, O3, CO2, and H2O. The reduction of scalar fluxes was mainly correlated with increasing switching frequencies and ranged for typical lag time errors of the investigated REA system between <5% and 50%, whereas the flux loss due to high-frequency attenuation was between <5% and 30%. The results were very similar for all scalar quantities. Based on our results, we derived empirical correction functions for both imprecise lag times and high-frequency attenuation, discuss their potential application to correct fluxes measured with other REA systems, and give a general procedure to address the uncertainties in future REA setups.

  17. Mapping agroecological zones and time lag in vegetation growth by means of Fourier analysis of time series of NDVI images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Verhoef, W.; Van Swol, R.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are presented of applications of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to analyze time series of images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index values. The results obtained for a case study on Zambia indicated that differences in vegetation development among map units of an existing agroclimatic map were not significant, while reliable differences were observed among the map units obtained using the Fourier analysis.

  18. Exploring Nitrogen Legacies and Time Lags in Anthropogenic Landscapes: A 200-Year Longitudinal Study of the Mississippi and Susquehanna Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Kimberly; Basu, Nandita; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Global flows of reactive nitrogen (N) have increased significantly over the last century in response to land-use change, agricultural intensification and elevated levels of atmospheric N. Despite widespread implementation of a range of conservation measures to mitigate the impacts of N-intensive agriculture, N concentrations in surface waters are in many cases remaining steady or continuing to increase. Such time lags to the recovery of surface water quality are increasingly being attributed to the presence of legacy N stores in subsurface reservoirs. It has remained unclear, however, what the magnitudes of such stores might be, and how they are partitioned between soil and groundwater reservoirs. In the present work, we have synthesized data from numerous sources to develop a comprehensive, 200-year dataset of N inputs to the land surface of the continental United States. We have concurrently developed a parsimonious, process-based model that utilizes this N input trajectory together with a travel time-based approach to simulate biogeochemical transformations of N along subsurface pathways. Model results allow us predict the magnitudes of legacy N in soil and groundwater pools and to predict long-term N-loading trajectories over the last century and into the future. We have applied this modeling approach to two major U.S. watersheds, the Mississippi River and Susquehanna River Basins, which are the sources of significant nutrient contamination to the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay, respectively. Our results show significant N loading above baseline levels in both watersheds before the widespread use of commercial N fertilizers, largely due to 19th-century conversion of natural forest and grassland areas to row-crop agriculture, although the temporal patterns of this loading differed between the two watersheds due to differences in the trajectories of land-use change. Using the model, we estimate spatiotemporal patterns of N accumulation in both groundwater and

  19. Probing the origin of quasi-periodic oscillations: the short-time-scale evolution of phase lags in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Eijnden, Jakob; Ingram, Adam; Uttley, Phil

    2016-06-01

    We present a model-independent analysis of the short-time-scale energy dependence of low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in the X-ray flux of GRS 1915+105. The QPO frequency in this source has previously been observed to depend on photon energy, with the frequency increasing with energy for observations with a high (≳2 Hz) QPO frequency, and decreasing with energy for observations with a low (≲2 Hz) QPO frequency. As this observed energy dependence is currently unexplained, we investigate if it is intrinsic to the QPO mechanism by tracking phase lags on (sub)second time-scales. We find that the phase lag between two broad energy bands systematically increases for 5-10 QPO cycles, after which the QPO becomes decoherent, the phase lag resets and the pattern repeats. This shows that the band with the higher QPO frequency is running away from the other band on short time-scales, providing strong evidence that the energy dependence of the QPO frequency is intrinsic. We also find that the faster the QPO decoheres, the faster the phase lag increases, suggesting that the intrinsic frequency difference contributes to the decoherence of the QPO. We interpret our results within a simple geometric QPO model, where different radii in the inner accretion flow experience Lense-Thirring precession at different frequencies, causing the decoherence of the oscillation. By varying the spectral shape of the inner accretion flow as a function of radius, we are able to qualitatively explain the energy-dependent behaviour of both QPO frequency and phase lag.

  20. Time-lagged variation in pond density and primary productivity affects duck nest survival in the Prairie Pothole Region.

    PubMed

    Walker, Johann; Rotella, Jay J; Stephens, Scott E; Lindberg, Mark S; Ringelman, James K; Hunter, Christine; Smith, Aaron J

    2013-07-01

    The Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) is the primary breeding region for most species of North American dabbling ducks (Anas spp.). Conservation of these species is guided in part by knowledge of relationships between nest survival probability and habitat features. Positive relationships between duck nest survival and amount and configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation have been observed in previous studies, but these 2- to 4-year studies might not have adequately characterized the temporal effect of wet-dry episodes on nest survival. Over an eight-year period, we studied nest survival of five species of ducks in the PPR relative to spatial and temporal variation in pond density, primary productivity, and hydrologic status of wetlands, soil, and vegetation on 52 study sites selected to span a gradient of spatial variation in proportion of herbaceous perennial vegetation and in number of wetland basins. We observed the fate of 12 754 nests. Consistent with past studies, 90% of nests that failed to hatch were destroyed by predators. Nest survival probability was positively related to current-year pond density and primary productivity, negatively related to pond density and primary productivity during the previous two years, and positively related to the number of wetland basins on the study site. Predicted relationships between nest survival and proportion or configuration of herbaceous perennial vegetation in the surrounding landscape were not supported. For mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), median estimated nest survival probability ranged from 0.02 (SE = 0.01) to 0.22 (SE = 0.02). Estimated nest survival was greatest on sites with numerous wetland basins that had transitioned from dry, unproductive conditions to wet, productive conditions in the previous 1-2 years. Our results were consistent with time-lagged responses of food webs to resource pulses in a broad array of ecosystems. Our study highlighted the importance of wetland basins and wet-dry episodes to duck

  1. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, O.; Vero, S.; Ibrahim, T. G.; Murphy, P. N. C.; Sherriff, S. C.; Ó hUallacháin, D.

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (tT) is divided into unsaturated (tu) and saturated (ts) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of tT. In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of tu were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When tu estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from the use of

  2. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates.

    PubMed

    Fenton, O; Vero, S; Ibrahim, T G; Murphy, P N C; Sherriff, S C; Ó hUallacháin, D

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (t(T)) is divided into unsaturated (t(u)) and saturated (t(s)) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of t(T). In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of t(u) were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When t(u) estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from

  3. A novel approach to genetic and environmental analysis of cross-lagged associations over time: the cross-lagged relationship between self-perceived abilities and school achievement is mediated by genes as well as the environment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu L L; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Using longitudinal cross-lagged analysis to infer causal directions of reciprocal effects is one of the most important tools in the developmental armamentarium. The strength of these analyses can be enhanced by analyzing the genetic and environmental aetiology underlying cross-lagged relationships, for which we present a novel approach here. Our approach is based on standard Cholesky decomposition. Standardized path coefficients are employed to assess genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations. We indicate how our model differs importantly from another approach that does not in fact analyze genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the analysis of the cross-lagged relationships between self-perceived abilities and school achievement from age 9 to age 12. Self-perceived abilities of 3852 pairs of twins from the UK Twins Early Development Study were assessed using a self-report scale. School achievement was assessed by teachers based on UK National Curriculum criteria. The key cross-lagged association between self-perceived abilities at age 9 and school achievement at age 12 was mediated by genetic influences (28%) as well as shared (55%) and non-shared (16%) environment. The reverse cross-lagged association from school achievement at 9 to self-perceived abilities at 12 was primarily genetically mediated (73%). Unlike the approach to cross-lagged genetic analysis used in recent research, our approach assesses genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations per se. We discuss implications of finding that genetic factors contribute to the cross-lag between self-perceived abilities at age 9 and school achievement at age 12. PMID:20874463

  4. Nanowire antenna absorption probed with time-reversed fourier microscopy.

    PubMed

    Grzela, Grzegorz; Paniagua-Domínguez, Ramón; Barten, Tommy; van Dam, Dick; Sánchez-Gil, José A; Rivas, Jaime Gómez

    2014-06-11

    Understanding light absorption in individual nanostructures is crucial for optimizing the light-matter interaction at the nanoscale. Here, we introduce a technique named time-reversed Fourier microscopy that enables the measurement of the angle-dependent light absorption in dilute arrays of uncoupled semiconductor nanowires. Because of their large separation, the nanowires have a response that can be described in terms of individual nanostructures. The geometry of individual nanowires makes them behave as nanoantennas that show a strong interaction with the incident light. The angle-dependent absorption measurements, which are compared to numerical simulations and Mie scattering calculations, show the transition from guided-mode to Mie-resonance absorption in individual nanowires and the relative efficiency of these two absorption mechanisms in the same nanostructures. Mie theory fails to describe the absorption in finite-length vertical nanowires illuminated at small angles with respect to their axis. At these angles, the incident light is efficiently absorbed after being coupled to guided modes. Our findings are relevant for the design of nanowire-based photodetectors and solar cells with an optimum efficiency. PMID:24810791

  5. Vadose zone lag time and potential 21st century climate change effects on spatially distributed groundwater recharge in the semi-arid Nebraska Sand Hills

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossman, N. R.; Zlotnik, V. A.; Rowe, C. M.; Szilagyi, J.

    2014-11-01

    Deep drainage of water below plant root zones (potential groundwater recharge) will become groundwater recharge (GR) after a delay (or lag time) in which soil moisture traverses the vadose zone before reaching the water table. Depending on the thickness of the vadose zone, the magnitude of deep drainage, and soil hydraulic properties, lag times will vary broadly, exceeding decades to centuries in semi-arid and arid environments. Yet, studies of future climate change impacts to GR have typically avoided focusing on impacts beyond 100 years and often neglect to consider lag effects caused by the vadose zone. We investigate the effects of vadose zone lag time and potential 21st century climate change on the spatial distribution and timing of GR throughout the semi-arid Nebraska Sand Hills (NSH) region (∼50,000 km2). We propose a simple and rapid quantitative approach for assessment of the groundwater system response time to changes in climate. Understanding of such effects is needed for groundwater modeling, analysis of climate change impacts on groundwater, and the effective management and sustainability of future water resources. Lag time estimates are made using the pressure-based vertical velocity of soil moisture changes, equivalent to a kinematic wave approximation of Richards' equation. The underlying assumptions (unit hydraulic gradient and relatively slow changes in climate) are supported by observations in the High Plains aquifer region, encompassing the NSH. The analysis relies on four sources of input data, including: Spatially distributed high resolution (1.1-km) GR rates (as the difference in 2000-2009 mean precipitation and evapotranspiration-estimated using a novel MODIS-based approach); thickness of the vadose zone-based on 30-m digital elevation models of the land surface and water table elevations; statistically downscaled estimates of future (2010-2099) potential GR rates from two hydroclimate model projections (WRCP CMIP3) with opposing GR

  6. Alternative Approach To Modeling Bacterial Lag Time, Using Logistic Regression as a Function of Time, Temperature, pH, and Sodium Chloride Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Nonaka, Junko

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  7. Alternative approach to modeling bacterial lag time, using logistic regression as a function of time, temperature, pH, and sodium chloride concentration.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shige; Nonaka, Junko

    2012-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a probabilistic model to predict the end of lag time (λ) during the growth of Bacillus cereus vegetative cells as a function of temperature, pH, and salt concentration using logistic regression. The developed λ model was subsequently combined with a logistic differential equation to simulate bacterial numbers over time. To develop a novel model for λ, we determined whether bacterial growth had begun, i.e., whether λ had ended, at each time point during the growth kinetics. The growth of B. cereus was evaluated by optical density (OD) measurements in culture media for various pHs (5.5 ∼ 7.0) and salt concentrations (0.5 ∼ 2.0%) at static temperatures (10 ∼ 20°C). The probability of the end of λ was modeled using dichotomous judgments obtained at each OD measurement point concerning whether a significant increase had been observed. The probability of the end of λ was described as a function of time, temperature, pH, and salt concentration and showed a high goodness of fit. The λ model was validated with independent data sets of B. cereus growth in culture media and foods, indicating acceptable performance. Furthermore, the λ model, in combination with a logistic differential equation, enabled a simulation of the population of B. cereus in various foods over time at static and/or fluctuating temperatures with high accuracy. Thus, this newly developed modeling procedure enables the description of λ using observable environmental parameters without any conceptual assumptions and the simulation of bacterial numbers over time with the use of a logistic differential equation. PMID:22729541

  8. Constraining the size of the Comptonizing medium by modelling the energy-dependent time lags of kHz QPOs of neutron star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-09-01

    We study the dependence of the estimated size and geometry of the medium on the time-averaged spectral model assumed and on the frequency of the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the framework of a thermal Comptonization model. We use the high-quality time lag and rms obtained during 1996 March 3 observation of 4U 1608-52 by RXTE as well as other observations of the source at different QPO frequencies where a single time lag between two broad energy bands has been reported. We compare the results obtained when assuming that the time-averaged spectra are represented by the spectrally degenerate `hot (kTb ≥ 1 keV)' and `cold (kTb ≤ 0.5 keV)' seed spectral models where Tb is seed source temperature. We find that for the `hot-seed' model the medium size is in the range of 0.3-2.0 km and the size decreases with increasing QPO frequency. On the other hand, for the `cold-seed' model, the range for the sizes is much larger 0.5-20 km and hence perhaps show no variation with QPO frequency. Our results emphasize the need for broad-band spectral information combined with high-frequency timing to lift this degeneracy. We further compare the rms as a function of energy for the upper kHz QPO, and indeed we find that the driver for this QPO should be temperature variations of the corona identical to the lower kHz QPO. However, the time lag reported for the upper kHz QPO is hard, which if confirmed would challenge the simple Comptonization model presented here.

  9. Strength and time lag of relationships between human pressures and fish-based metrics used to assess ecological quality of estuarine systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasquaud, Stéphanie; Courrat, Anne; Fonseca, Vanessa F.; Gamito, Rita; Gonçalves, Catarina I.; Lobry, Jérémy; Lepage, Mario; Costa, Maria José; Cabral, Henrique

    2013-12-01

    Fish-based multi-metric indices have been widely developed in ecological quality assessments of estuaries in the past few years, but the ability of these indices and their respective metrics to respond to human pressures may be quite different. Based on a group consensus approach eliciting information from multiple experts integrating published literature, this work evaluated the strength and time-lag of the response of eight fish-based indices (AFI, EFAI, ELFI, Z-EBI, TFCI, EBI, EFCI, IBI), and their respective metrics, in relation to several human pressures (chemical pollution, eutrophication, loss of habitat, water turbidity, habitat fragmentation, fishing mortalities, invasive species, water temperature changes and flow changes). Results pointed out that most of the metrics detect several human pressures, being difficult to identify a particular pressure effect and its source. The majority of the metrics analysed presented a weak relationship with pressures and/or respond in a long time period. The metrics responding to chemical pollution and loss of habitat were generally the ones with stronger relationships, but their responses were often in a long time period. Consequently, the fish-based indices analysed did not detect all the pressures with the same sensitivity in terms of strength and time lag. This clearly collides with the needs for water ecological quality assessments, management and rehabilitation of estuarine ecosystems, and highlighted the value of metrics, especially the ones that are specific of certain pressures.

  10. An Investigation of the Effects of the Time Lag due to Long Transmission Distances Upon Remote Control. Phase 1; Tracking Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James L.

    1961-01-01

    A series of pursuit tracking tasks were performed incorporating a transport lag in the control loop. The target was a mixture of four sine waves, the fastest having a frequency of 16 cycles per minute at full speed. An attempt was made to design the experiments so that they would provide data applicable to remote control of a ground vehicle over long transmission distances. Three programs were run. In each the time lag was placed between the control and the display. In the first program a velocity control was used and the operator was told that his knob controlled a vehicle, the problem represented a road 9 and he was to drive his vehicle along the road 9 using the delayed vehicle position as feedback for whatever means he desired. The objective was not to match the display traces. In the second program a velocity control was used, and the operator was told that the problem trace represented a road and the delayed trace represented a vehicle and he was to keep them together. The objective was to match display traces. The third program was identical with the first, except that an acceleration control was used rather than a velocity control. Target speeds used were full speed, 1/2 speed, 1/4 speed, 1/8 speed, and 1/16 speed. Time lags were 1/4 second, l/2 second, 1 second, 1-1/2 second, 2 second, 3 second, and 6 seconds. The experimental results are presented in the last section of this report.

  11. Memory of the Lake Rotorua catchment - time lag of the water in the catchment and delayed arrival of contaminants from past land use activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Daughney, Christopher J.; Stewart, Michael K.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2013-04-01

    The transit time distribution of streamflow is a fundamental descriptor of the flowpaths of water through a catchment and the storage of water within it, controlling its response to landuse change, pollution, ecological degradation, and climate change. Significant time lags (catchment memory) in the responses of streams to these stressors and their amelioration or restoration have been observed. Lag time can be quantified via water transit time of the catchment discharge. Mean transit times can be in the order of years and decades (Stewart et al 2012, Morgenstern et al., 2010). If the water passes through large groundwater reservoirs, it is difficult to quantify and predict the lag time. A pulse shaped tracer that moves with the water can allow quantification of the mean transit time. Environmental tritium is the ideal tracer of the water cycle. Tritium is part of the water molecule, is not affected by chemical reactions in the aquifer, and the bomb tritium from the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing represents a pulse shaped tracer input that allows for very accurate measurement of the age distribution parameters of the water in the catchment discharge. Tritium time series data from all catchment discharges (streams and springs) into Lake Rotorua, New Zealand, allow for accurate determination of the age distribution parameters. The Lake Rotorua catchment tritium data from streams and springs are unique, with high-quality tritium data available over more than four decades, encompassing the time when the bomb-tritium moved through the groundwater system, and from a very high number of streams and springs. Together with the well-defined tritium input into the Rotorua catchment, this data set allows for the best understanding of the water dynamics through a large scale catchment, including validation of complicated water mixing models. Mean transit times of the main streams into the lake range between 27 and 170 years. With such old water discharging into the lake

  12. Reverberation Mapping with Intermediate-band Photometry: Detection of Broad-line Hα Time Lags for Quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhua; Shen, Yue; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Morganson, Eric; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2016-02-01

    We present a reverberation mapping (RM) experiment that combines broad- and intermediate-band photometry; it is the first such attempt targeting 13 quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.9. The quasars were selected to have strong Hα or Hβ emission lines that are located in one of three intermediate bands (with FWHM around 200 Å) centered at 8045, 8505, and 9171 Å. The imaging observations were carried out in the intermediate bands and the broad i and z bands using the prime-focus imager 90Prime on the 2.3 m Bok telescope. Because of the large (˜1 deg2) field of view (FOV) of 90Prime, we included the 13 quasars within only five telescope pointings or fields. The five fields were repeatedly observed over 20-30 epochs that were unevenly distributed over a duration of 5-6 months. The combination of the broad- and intermediate-band photometry allows us to derive accurate light curves for both optical continuum emission (from the accretion disk) and line emission (from the broad-line region, or BLR). We detect Hα time lags between the continuum and line emission in six quasars. These quasars are at relatively low redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.4. The measured lags are consistent with the current BLR size-luminosity relation for Hβ at z < 0.3. While this experiment appears successful in detecting lags of the bright Hα line, further investigation is required to see if it can also be applied to the fainter Hβ line for quasars at higher redshifts. Finally we demonstrate that, by using a small telescope with a large FOV, intermediate-band photometric RM can be efficiently executed for a large sample of quasars at z > 0.2.

  13. Evidence of Two Component Accretion Flows as revealed by time lag properties: Results of Long-Term RXTE/ASM Data Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arindam; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Long-term RXTE/ASM X-ray data of several Galactic black hole candidates (BHCs) are analyzed. The results of this analysis show the existence of two component accretion flow (TCAF) in both low-mass and high-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs & HMXBs). Large disks with long viscous timescales in the accreting matter with high angular momentum are prevalent in LMXBs due to processes like Roche lobe overflow, while small disks with little viscous delays are observed in HMXBs, primarily because of wind accretion. Two parameters are defined as photon indices, independent of the choice of a BHC, in order to find correlation between the two components, namely, the Keplerian disk component and the sub-Keplerian component, thereby estimating the time lag between two aforesaid timescales. Fluxes of hard and soft photons are observed to be anti-correlated with respect to these photon indices. The time lags give us an idea of the viscosity in the Keplerian component.

  14. Estimated lag time in global carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations produced by commercial nuclear power through 2009 with projections through 2030.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Neil M; Abramson, Lee R; Coleman, Fiona A B

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the past and future impact of nuclear reactors on anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. If nuclear power had never been commercially developed, what additional global carbon emissions would have occurred? More than 44 y of global nuclear power have caused a lag time of at least 1.2 y in carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations through the end of 2009. This lag time incorporates the contribution of life cycle carbon emissions due to the construction and operation of nuclear plants. Cumulative global carbon emissions would have been about 13 Gt greater through 2009, and the mean annual CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa would have been ~2.7 ppm greater than without nuclear power. This study finds that an additional 14–17 Gt of atmospheric carbon emissions could be averted by the global use of nuclear power through 2030, for a cumulative total of 27–30 Gt averted during the period 1965–2030. This result is based on International Atomic Energy Agency projections of future growth in nuclear power from 2009–2030, modified by the recent loss or permanent shutdown of 14 reactors in Japan and Germany PMID:22420021

  15. Time-dependent phase lag of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biotargets studied with alternating current magnetic susceptometor for liquid phase immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, S. H.; Yang, H. C.; Horng, H. E.; Chieh, J. J.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Liu, C. I.; Liu, C. W.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the time-dependent phase lag θ of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) conjugated with biotargets is studied with a home-made alternating current (ac) susceptometor for liquid phase immunoassays. The sensing unit of the ac susceptometor composed of excitation, pick-up, and compensation coils are balanced to 0.03 ppm. The BMNs are anti-goat C-reactive protein coated onto dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles composed of Fe3O4, labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. The bio-targets are human CRP. As the human CRP is conjugated with reagents Fe3O4-antiCRP, the magnetic clusters of Fe3O4-antiCRP-CRP are formulated. Due to the clustering effect, the Brownian relaxation of BMNs will be depressed, which in turn enhances the effective relaxation time. By monitoring the dynamic phase lag, we demonstrate a sensitive platform of assaying human CRP. The detection platform is robust, easy to use and can be applied for assaying a wide variety of biotargets including viruses, proteins, tumor markers, chemicals, etc.

  16. Modelling the effect of essential oil of betel leaf (Piper betle L.) on germination, growth, and apparent lag time of Penicillium expansum on semi-synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Basak, Suradeep; Guha, Proshanta

    2015-12-23

    The current study aimed at characterizing the chemical components of betel leaf (Piper betle L. var. Tamluk Mitha) essential oil (BLEO) and modelling its effect on growth of Penicillium expansum on semi-synthetic medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS) analysis of BLEO revealed the presence of different bioactive phenolic compounds in significant amounts. Among 46 different components identified, chavibetol (22.0%), estragole (15.8%), β-cubebene (13.6%), chavicol (11.8%), and caryophyllene (11.3%) were found to be the major compounds of BLEO. A disc diffusion and disc volatilization method were used to evaluate antifungal activity of the oil against a selected food spoilage mould. The logistic model was used to study the kinetics of spore germination. Prediction and validation of antifungal effect of BLEO was performed on semi-synthetic medium (apple juice agar) using predictive microbiological tools. The Baranyi and Roberts model was used to estimate maximum growth rate (μmax in mm/day) and apparent lag time (λ in days) of the mould. Secondary modelling was performed using a re-parameterized Monod-type equation based on cardinal values to study the effect of different BLEO concentration on estimated growth parameters. Emax (minimum concentration of oil at which mould growth was inhibited) and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration of BLEO at which lag time is infinite) value of BLEO against P. expansum was estimated to be 0.56 and 0.74 μl/ml, respectively, which was found to be similar on potato dextrose agar (PDA) as well as apple juice agar (AJA) medium. The correlation between estimated growth parameters of the mould on both the media was obtained with satisfactory statistical indices (R(2) and RMSE). This study revealed inhibitory efficacy of BLEO on spore germination, mycelial growth and apparent lag time of P. expansum in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, BLEO has potential to be used as a natural food preservative. PMID:26439423

  17. Understanding selection bias, time-lags and measurement bias in secondary data sources: Putting the Encyclopedia of Associations database in broader context.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Shaun; Baumgartner, Frank R; Johnson, Erik W; McCarthy, John D

    2013-11-01

    Secondary data gathered for purposes other than research play an important role in the social sciences. A recent data release has made an important source of publicly available data on associational interests, the Encyclopedia of Associations (EA), readily accessible to scholars (www.policyagendas.org). In this paper we introduce these new data and systematically investigate issues of lag between events and subsequent reporting in the EA, as these have important but under-appreciated effects on time-series statistical models. We further analyze the accuracy and coverage of the database in numerous ways. Our study serves as a guide to potential users of this database, but we also reflect upon a number of issues that should concern all researchers who use secondary data such as newspaper records, IRS reports and FBI Uniform Crime Reports. PMID:24090865

  18. Lagged correlation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community

  19. Power and Sample Size Calculation for Log-rank Test with a Time Lag in Treatment Effect

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Daowen; Quan, Hui

    2009-01-01

    Summary The log-rank test is the most powerful nonparametric test for detecting a proportional hazards alternative and thus is the most commonly used testing procedure for comparing time-to-event distributions between different treatments in clinical trials. When the log-rank test is used for the primary data analysis, the sample size calculation should also be based on the test to ensure the desired power for the study. In some clinical trials, the treatment effect may not manifest itself right after patients receive the treatment. Therefore, the proportional hazards assumption may not hold. Furthermore, patients may discontinue the study treatment prematurely and thus may have diluted treatment effect after treatment discontinuation. If a patient’s treatment termination time is independent of his/her time-to-event of interest, the termination time can be treated as a censoring time in the final data analysis. Alternatively, we may keep collecting time-to-event data until study termination from those patients who discontinued the treatment and conduct an intent-to-treat (ITT) analysis by including them in the original treatment groups. We derive formulas necessary to calculate the asymptotic power of the log-rank test under this non-proportional hazards alternative for the two data analysis strategies. Simulation studies indicate that the formulas provide accurate power for a variety of trial settings. A clinical trial example is used to illustrate the application of the proposed methods. PMID:19152230

  20. GRB/GW Association: Long–Short GRB Candidates, Time Lag, Measuring Gravitational Wave Velocity, and Testing Einstein’s Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Yi-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are widely believed to be powered by the mergers of compact binaries, such as binary neutron stars or possibly neutron star–black hole binaries. Though the prospect of detecting SGRBs with gravitational wave (GW) signals by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/VIRGO network is promising, no known SGRB has been found within the expected advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for binary neutron star systems. We find, however, that the two long–short GRBs (GRB 060505 and GRB 060614) may be within the horizon of advanced GW detectors. In the upcoming era of GW astronomy, the merger origin of some long–short GRBs, as favored by the macronova signature displayed in GRB 060614, can be unambiguously tested. The model-dependent time lags between the merger and the onset of the prompt emission of the GRB are estimated. The comparison of such time lags between model predictions and the real data expected in the era of the GW astronomy would be helpful in revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine (including the launch of the relativistic outflow, the emergence of the outflow from the dense material ejected during the merger, and the radiation of gamma rays). We also show that the speed of GWs, with or without a simultaneous test of Einstein’s equivalence principle, can be directly measured to an accuracy of ∼ 3× {10}-8 {cm} {{{s}}}-1 or even better in the advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  1. GRB/GW Association: Long–Short GRB Candidates, Time Lag, Measuring Gravitational Wave Velocity, and Testing Einstein’s Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Yi-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are widely believed to be powered by the mergers of compact binaries, such as binary neutron stars or possibly neutron star–black hole binaries. Though the prospect of detecting SGRBs with gravitational wave (GW) signals by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/VIRGO network is promising, no known SGRB has been found within the expected advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for binary neutron star systems. We find, however, that the two long–short GRBs (GRB 060505 and GRB 060614) may be within the horizon of advanced GW detectors. In the upcoming era of GW astronomy, the merger origin of some long–short GRBs, as favored by the macronova signature displayed in GRB 060614, can be unambiguously tested. The model-dependent time lags between the merger and the onset of the prompt emission of the GRB are estimated. The comparison of such time lags between model predictions and the real data expected in the era of the GW astronomy would be helpful in revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine (including the launch of the relativistic outflow, the emergence of the outflow from the dense material ejected during the merger, and the radiation of gamma rays). We also show that the speed of GWs, with or without a simultaneous test of Einstein’s equivalence principle, can be directly measured to an accuracy of ˜ 3× {10}-8 {cm} {{{s}}}-1 or even better in the advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  2. A new technique for lag screw placement in the dynamic hip screw fixation of intertrochanteric fractures: decreasing radiation time dramatically

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Wei-Chao; Li, Jia-Zhen; Chen, Sheng-Hua

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this study was to confirm the decrease in radiation time required for a new technique to place dynamic hip screws (DHS) in intertrochanteric fractures. Seventy-six patients were treated with DHS by either the new technique (NT) or the conventional technique (CT). The width of femoral shaft, the length of the hip screw to be implanted into the injured side, and the distance between the tip of the greater trochanter and the entry point of the guide wire were measured at the uninjured side on the anteroposterior pelvic radiograph preoperatively, and the actual width of the injured femoral shaft was measured intra-operatively. Finally, the entry point and the length of hip screw were obtained through an equation. Mean radiation time of the NT patients (24.57 ± 7.80 s) was significantly shorter than the CT patients (54.2 ± 18.26 s) (P  < 0.001). The new technique decreased radiation time dramatically in DHS fixation. PMID:18265981

  3. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... your internal clock before you travel. While in flight: DO NOT sleep unless it matches the bedtime ... decrease jet lag. If you will be in flight during the bedtime of your destination, take some ...

  4. Global Characteristics of the Correlation and Time Lag Between Solar and Ionospheric Parameters in the 27-day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Dieter,Bilitza; Ki-Weon,Seo

    2012-01-01

    The 27-day variations of topside ionosphere are investigated using the in-situ electron density measurements from the CHAMP planar Langmuir probe and GRACE K-band ranging system. As the two satellite systems orbit at the altitudes of approx. 370 km and approx. 480 km, respectively, the satellite data sets are greatly valuable for examining the electron density variations in the vicinity of F2-peak. In a 27-day period, the electron density measurements from the satellites are in good agreements with the solar flux, except during the solar minimum period. The time delays are mostly 1-2 day and represent the hemispherical asymmetry. The globally-estimated spatial patterns of the correlation between solar flux and in-situ satellite measurements show poor correlations in the (magnetic) equatorial region, which are not found from the ground measurements of vertically-integrated electron content. We suggest that the most plausible cause for the poor correlation is the vertical movement of ionization due to atmospheric dynamic processes that is not controlled by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  5. How are parent-child conflict and childhood externalizing symptoms related over time? Results from a genetically informative cross-lagged study.

    PubMed

    Burt, S Alexandra; McGue, Matt; Krueger, Robert F; Iacono, William G

    2005-01-01

    The present study attempted to determine the direction and etiology of the robust relationship between childhood externalizing (EXT) symptoms and parent-child conflict using a genetically informative longitudinal model and data from the ongoing Minnesota Twin Family Study. Participants consisted of 1,506 same-sex twins assessed at ages 11 and 14, and their parents. The relationship between EXT and parent-child conflict from ages 11 to 14 was examined within a biometrical cross-lagged design. The results revealed three primary findings: first, the stability of conflict and externalizing over time is largely, although not solely, a result of genetic factors. Second, there appears to be a bidirectional relationship between conflict and EXT over time, such that both conflict and EXT at 11 independently predict the other 3 years later. Finally, the results are consistent with the notion that parent-child conflict partially results from parental responses to their child's heritable externalizing behavior, while simultaneously contributing to child externalizing via environmental mechanisms. These results suggest a "downward spiral" of interplay between parent-child conflict and EXT, and offer confirmation of a (partially) environmentally mediated effect of parenting on child behavior. PMID:15971764

  6. Modeling the growth rate and lag time of different strains of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in ready-to-eat lettuce.

    PubMed

    Sant'Ana, Anderson S; Franco, Bernadette D G M; Schaffner, Donald W

    2012-05-01

    The growth parameters (growth rate, μ and lag time, λ) of three different strains each of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in minimally processed lettuce (MPL) and their changes as a function of temperature were modeled. MPL were packed under modified atmosphere (5% O₂, 15% CO₂ and 80% N₂), stored at 7-30 °C and samples collected at different time intervals were enumerated for S. enterica and L. monocytogenes. Growth curves and equations describing the relationship between μ and λ as a function of temperature were constructed using the DMFit Excel add-in and through linear regression, respectively. The predicted growth parameters for the pathogens observed in this study were compared to ComBase, Pathogen modeling program (PMP) and data from the literature. High R² values (0.97 and 0.93) were observed for average growth curves of different strains of pathogens grown on MPL. Secondary models of μ and λ for both pathogens followed a linear trend with high R² values (>0.90). Root mean square error (RMSE) showed that the models obtained are accurate and suitable for modeling the growth of S. enterica and L. monocytogenes in MP lettuce. The current study provides growth models for these foodborne pathogens that can be used in microbial risk assessment. PMID:22265311

  7. The pathophysiology of jet lag.

    PubMed

    Sack, Robert L

    2009-03-01

    Jet Lag Disorder (JLD) is a recognized circadian rhythm sleep disorder characterized by insomnia or excessive daytime sleepiness (and sometimes general malaise and somatic symptoms) associated with transmeridian jet travel. It is a consequence of circadian misalignment that occurs after crossing time zones too rapidly for the circadian system to keep pace. The thesis of this review is that a rational treatment approach for jet lag can be grounded in an understanding of the biology of the human circadian timekeeping system. An overview of circadian rhythm physiology is presented with special emphasis on the role of light exposure and melatonin secretion in the regulation of circadian timing. Both timed light exposure (or avoidance) and exogenous melatonin administration have been recruited as treatment modalities to accelerate circadian realignment, based on an understanding of their role in circadian physiology. In addition to circadian misalignment, other contributing causes to jet lag are considered including travel-related sleep deprivation and fatigue. Clinical field trials that have tested the application of circadian rhythm based interventions are then reviewed. PMID:19237143

  8. Multiple Model Adaptive Two-Step Filter and Motion Tracking Sliding-Mode Guidance for Missiles with Time Lag in Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Di; Zhang, Yong-An; Duan, Guang-Ren

    The two-step filter has been combined with a modified Sage-Husa time-varying measurement noise statistical estimator, which is able to estimate the covariance of measurement noise on line, to generate an adaptive two-step filter. In many practical applications such as the bearings-only guidance, some model parameters and the process noise covariance are also unknown a priori. Based on the adaptive two-step filter, we utilize multiple models in the first-step filtering as well as in the time update of the second-step filtering to handle the uncertainties of model parameters and process noise covariance. In each timestep of the multiple model filtering, probabilistic weights punishing the estimates of first-step state from different models, and their associated covariance matrices are acquired according to Bayes’ rule. The weighted sum of the estimates of first-step state and that of the associated covariance matrices are extracted as the ultimate estimate and covariance of the first-step state, and are used as measurement information for the measurement update of the second-step state. Thus there is still only one iteration process and no apparent enhancement of computation burden. A motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law is presented for missiles with non-negligible delays in actual acceleration. This guidance law guarantees guidance accuracy and is able to enhance observability in bearings-only tracking. In bearings-only cases, the multiple model adaptive two-step filter is applied to the motion tracking sliding-mode guidance law, supplying relative range, relative velocity, and target acceleration information. In simulation experiments satisfactory filtering and guidance results are obtained, even if the filter runs into unknown target maneuvers and unknown time-varying measurement noise covariance, and the guidance law has to deal with a large time lag in acceleration.

  9. The Time-lagged Impacts of Spring Sensible Heat over the Tibetan Plateau on the Summer Rainfall Anomaly in East China: Cases Study by Using WRF Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, A.

    2014-12-01

    This study explores the time-lagged impacts of the spring sensible heat (SH) source over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) on summer rainfall anomaly in east China by using the WRF model. Numerical experiments for the 2003 case indicates that spring SH anomaly over the TP can maintains its impact until summer and leads to the overall strong atmospheric heat source, which is characterized by the enhanced both SH over the western TP and condensation latent heat to the east. The wave activity diagnosis revealed that the enhanced TP heating forces a Rossby wave train to the downstream regions. The cyclonic response to the northeast TP brings about the low level northerly anomaly over the northern China, while the anticyclonic response over the western Pacific enhances the subtropical high and the low level southerly in its western flank. As a result, cold and dry airflows from mid-high latitudes and warm and wet airflows from tropical oceans converge around the Huaihe River basin. In addition, warm advection originated from the TP induces vigorous ascending motion over the convergence belt. With such a favourable circulation condition, the eastward propagating vortexes initiated over the TP intensify the torrential rainfall processes over the Huaihe River basin. Another case study of 2001 with weak spring SH over the TP and the overall southward retreat of summer rainfall belt in east China further demonstrates the role of spring SH over the TP in regulating the interannual variability of EASM in terms of wave activity and synoptic disturbance.

  10. A paired comparison between human skin and hairless guinea pig skin in vitro permeability and lag time measurements for 6 industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure and compare permeability coefficients (k(p)) and lag times (tau) in human skin and hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. Paired experiments employed heat-separated epidermal membranes from human and HGP sources mounted on static in vitro diffusion cells. Infinite-dose, saturated aqueous solutions of 6 industrial chemicals were used as donors: aniline, benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, diethyl phthalate, naphthalene, and tetrachloroethylene. No significant differences were found between human and HGP skin for either k(p) or tau for any of these chemicals (p >or= .24). HGP vs. human k(p) measurements, and HGP vs. human tau measurements, were highly correlated. For k(p), the slope of the linear correlation was close to unity (1.080 +/- 0.182) and the intercept close to 0 (0.015 +/- 0. 029 cm/h), with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) = 0.898. For tau, the slope was also close to unity (0.818 +/- 0.030) and the intercept close to 0 (-0.014 +/- 0.023 h), with r(2) = 0.994. These results suggest that HGP skin may serve as an excellent surrogate for human skin in in vitro dermal penetration studies. PMID:19552540

  11. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Horvath, Jorge E.

    2013-08-01

    We studied the energy and frequency dependence of the Fourier time lags and intrinsic coherence of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53, using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We confirmed that, in both sources, the time lags of the lower kHz QPO are soft and their magnitude increases with energy. We also found that: (i) In 4U 1636-53, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at ˜ 30 μs in the QPO frequency range 500-850 Hz, and decrease to ˜ 10 μs when the QPO frequency increases further. In 4U 1608-52, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at 40 μs up to 800 Hz, the highest frequency reached by this QPO in our data. (ii) In both sources, the time lags of the upper kHz QPO are hard, independent of energy or frequency and inconsistent with the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO. (iii) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO remains constant at ˜0.6 between 5 and 12 keV, and drops to zero above that energy. The intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with being zero across the full energy range. (iv) In 4U 1636-53, the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO increases from ˜0 at ˜600 Hz to ˜1, and it decreases to ˜0.5 at 920 Hz; in 4U 1608-52, the intrinsic coherence is consistent with the same trend. (v) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with zero over the full frequency range of the QPO, except in 4U 1636-53 between 700 and 900 Hz where the intrinsic coherence marginally increases. We discuss our results in the context of scenarios in which the soft lags are either due to reflection off the accretion disc or up-/down-scattering in a hot medium close to the neutron star. We finally explore the connection between, on one hand the time lags and the intrinsic coherence of the kHz QPOs, and on the other the QPOs' amplitude and quality factor in

  12. Distributed lags time series analysis versus linear correlation analysis (Pearson's r) in identifying the relationship between antipseudomonal antibiotic consumption and the susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates in a single Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Erdeljić, Viktorija; Francetić, Igor; Bošnjak, Zrinka; Budimir, Ana; Kalenić, Smilja; Bielen, Luka; Makar-Aušperger, Ksenija; Likić, Robert

    2011-05-01

    The relationship between antibiotic consumption and selection of resistant strains has been studied mainly by employing conventional statistical methods. A time delay in effect must be anticipated and this has rarely been taken into account in previous studies. Therefore, distributed lags time series analysis and simple linear correlation were compared in their ability to evaluate this relationship. Data on monthly antibiotic consumption for ciprofloxacin, piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems and cefepime as well as Pseudomonas aeruginosa susceptibility were retrospectively collected for the period April 2006 to July 2007. Using distributed lags analysis, a significant temporal relationship was identified between ciprofloxacin, meropenem and cefepime consumption and the resistance rates of P. aeruginosa isolates to these antibiotics. This effect was lagged for ciprofloxacin and cefepime [1 month (R=0.827, P=0.039) and 2 months (R=0.962, P=0.001), respectively] and was simultaneous for meropenem (lag 0, R=0.876, P=0.002). Furthermore, a significant concomitant effect of meropenem consumption on the appearance of multidrug-resistant P. aeruginosa strains (resistant to three or more representatives of classes of antibiotics) was identified (lag 0, R=0.992, P<0.001). This effect was not delayed and it was therefore identified both by distributed lags analysis and the Pearson's correlation coefficient. Correlation coefficient analysis was not able to identify relationships between antibiotic consumption and bacterial resistance when the effect was delayed. These results indicate that the use of diverse statistical methods can yield significantly different results, thus leading to the introduction of possibly inappropriate infection control measures. PMID:21277747

  13. Assessment of the effect of a Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium culture supernatant on the single-cell lag time of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Blana, Vasiliki A; Lianou, Alexandra; Nychas, George-John E

    2015-12-23

    The objective of this study was the in vitro evaluation of the effect of a cell-free microbial supernatant, produced by a luxS-positive Salmonella enterica ser. Typhimurium strain, on the single-cell growth kinetic behavior of two strains of S. enterica (serotypes Enteritidis and Typhimurium) and a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain. The single-cell lag time (λ) of the pathogens was estimated in the absence and presence (20% v/v) of microbial supernatant based on optical density measurements. As demonstrated by the obtained results, the tested microbial supernatant had a strain-specific effect on the single-cell λ and its variability. Although the mean λ values were similar in the absence and presence of microbial supernatant in the case of Salmonella Enteritidis, a significant (P ≤ 0.05) reduction and increase in the mean value of this parameter in the presence of microbial supernatant were observed for Salmonella Typhimurium and St. aureus, respectively. With regard to the effect of the tested microbial supernatant on the single-cell variability of λ, similar λ distributions were obtained in its absence and presence for S. Enteritidis, while considerable differences were noted for the other two tested organisms; the coefficient of variation of λ in the absence and presence of microbial supernatant was 41.6 and 69.8% for S. Typhimurium, respectively, with the corresponding values for St. aureus being 74.0 and 56.9%. As demonstrated by the results of bioassays, the tested microbial supernatant exhibited autoinducer-2 activity, indicating a potential association of such quorum sensing compounds with the observed effects. Although preliminary in nature, the collected data provide a good basis for future research on the role of quorum sensing in the single-cell growth behavior of foodborne pathogens. PMID:26433459

  14. Real-time atomic absorption mercury continuous emission monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamzow, Daniel S.; Bajic, Stanley J.; Eckels, David E.; Baldwin, David P.; Winterrowd, Chris; Keeney, Robert

    2003-08-01

    A continuous emission monitor (CEM) for mercury (Hg) in combustor flue gas streams has been designed and tested for the detection of Hg by optical absorption. A sampling system that allows continuous introduction of stack gas is incorporated into the CEM, for the sequential analysis of elemental and total Hg. A heated pyrolysis tube is used in the system to convert oxidized Hg compounds to elemental Hg for analysis of total Hg; the pyrolysis tube is bypassed to determine the elemental Hg concentration in the gas stream. A key component of the CEM is a laboratory-designed and -assembled echelle spectrometer that provides simultaneous detection of all of the emission lines from a Hg pen lamp, which is used as the light source for the optical absorption measurement. This feature allows for on-line spectroscopic correction for interferent gases such as sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, typically present in combustion stack gas streams, that also absorb at the Hg detection wavelength (253.65 nm). This article provides a detailed description of the CEM system, the characteristics and performance of the CEM, and the results of field tests performed at the Environmental Protection Agency-Rotary Kiln at Research Triangle Park, NC.

  15. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, M. G. B.; Méndez, M.; Sanna, A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the time lags and the coherence of the X-ray light curves of the neutron star low mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53. These quantities are frequency-dependent measures of the time or phase delay and of the degree of linear correlation between two X-ray light curves in two different energies bands; they encode information about the size and geometry of the medium that produces them.

  16. Caries experience in the primary dentition and presence of plaque in 7-year-old Chinese children: A 4-year time-lag study

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xuan; Fan, Mingwen; Mulder, Jan; Frencken, J. E.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that dental caries prevalence and caries experience in primary dentitions has increased over 4 years and to compare the presence of plaque on permanent teeth in child cohorts over 4 years. Materials and Methods: A time-lag study design was used comprising two cohorts of children aged 7 years from the same five primary schools in Wuhan examined in 2007 and 2011. Two calibrated examiners visually assessed plaque accumulation according to the Greene and Vermillion Index and the dentitions according to the Atraumatic Restorative Treatment (ART) caries criteria. Analysis of variance (ANOVA), logistic regression, and Chi-square test were used to test for differences between dependent and independent variables. Results: The 2007 sample consisted of 817 children and the 2011 sample consisted of 1010 children. The prevalence of dental caries (d3mft) was 68.2% in 2007 and 67.7% in 2011, while that of d2mft was 78.5% in 2007 and 71.4% in 2011 (P < 0.0006). The mean d3mft score was 2.8 in 2007 and 3.1 in 2011 (P = 0.046), while the mean d3mfs score was 4.9 in 2007 and 7.3 in 2011 (P < 0.0001). The d3-component of the d3mft index was 73% in 2007 and 69% in 2011, while the f-component was 22% in 2007 and 26% in 2011. The hypothesis was not accepted. The proportion of children with plaque code 3 (extensive coverage) was higher in 2011 (21.8%) than in age mates in 2007 (5.7%). Conclusions: There were no obvious signs that dental caries prevalence had been increased in primary dentitions of this child population between 2007 and 2011. But as the mean caries experience scores at the surface level were higher in 2011 than in 2007, monitoring caries prevalence remains essential, but should start at an earlier age than that covered by this study. Health and educational authorities should collaborate in setting up programs aimed at ensuring good oral health for school children. PMID:26236680

  17. Time-resolved air monitoring using Fourier absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Biermann, H.W.

    1995-12-31

    Two categories where spectroscopic techniques excel are the capabilities to perform air analyses in situ and to obtain data at very high time resolutions. Because of these features, the Department of Pesticide Regulation augmented its extensive air monitoring capabilities with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer using open-path optical systems for time resolved ambient air monitoring. A description of the instrumentation and the data analysis procedures will be presented based on two data sets obtained with this FTIR system. In one case, a 100 m folded optical path was used to measure methyl bromide concentrations after fumigation in a warehouse with a time resolution of 15 min and a detection limit of 0.2 ppm. And trying to assess the capability of this FTIR spectrometer to determine flux, water vapor concentrations were measured with a four-meter path length at a time resolution of 0.6 seconds.

  18. Residue-specific, real-time characterization of lag-phase species and fibril growth during amyloid formation: a combined fluorescence and IR study of p-cyanophenylalanine analogs of islet amyloid polypeptide.

    PubMed

    Marek, Peter; Mukherjee, Sudipta; Zanni, Martin T; Raleigh, Daniel P

    2010-07-23

    Amyloid formation normally exhibits a lag phase followed by a growth phase, which leads to amyloid fibrils. Characterization of the species populated during the lag phase is experimentally challenging, but is critical since the most toxic entities may be pre-fibrillar species. p-Cyanophenylalanine (F(C[triple bond]N)) fluorescence is used to probe the nature of lag-phase species populated during the formation of amyloid by human islet amyloid polypeptide. The polypeptide contains two phenylalanines at positions 15 and 23 and a single tyrosine located at the C-terminus. Each aromatic residue was separately replaced by F(C[triple bond]N). The substitutions do not perturb amyloid formation relative to wild-type islet amyloid polypeptide as detected using thioflavin T fluorescence and electron microscopy. F(C[triple bond]N) fluorescence is high when the cyano group is hydrogen bonded and low when it is not. It can also be quenched via Förster resonance energy transfer to tyrosine. Fluorescence intensity was monitored in real time and revealed that all three positions remained exposed to solvent during the lag phase but less exposed than unstructured model peptides. The time course of amyloid formation as monitored by thioflavin T fluorescence and F(C[triple bond]N) fluorescence is virtually identical. Fluorescence quenching experiments confirmed that each residue remains exposed during the lag phase. These results place significant constraints on the nature of intermediates that are populated during the lag phase and indicate that significant sequestering of the aromatic side chains does not occur until beta-structure sufficient to bind thioflavin T has developed. Seeding studies and analysis of maximum rates confirm that sequestering of the cyano groups occurs concomitantly with the development of thioflavin T binding capability. Overall, the process of amyloid formation and growth appears to be remarkably homogenous in terms of side-chain ordering. F(C[triple bond

  19. Cross-correlation and time-lag analysis of high frequency monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain) to reveal cause-effect relationships between variables governing slope instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Marco; Moya, Jose; Corsini, Alessandro; Corominas, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    The Vallcebre landslide is a slow moving large landslide located 140 km north of Barcelona in the Eastern Pyrenees. Monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide represent a singular case of multi parameter high-frequency monitoring system set up in 1996 and still ongoing. Data of movements and groundwater levels are measured and recorded with a frequency of 20 minutes in 6 boreholes distributed in the landslide, each one equipped with a wire extensometer and a piezometer, while rainfall is recorded by a specific gauge at the site. Data from 3 boreholes recorded during three full years of measurements (from 1999 to 2001) have been analyzed by means of a cross-correlation function in order to determine the reciprocal interdependency and the relative time lag between rainfall, groundwater and movement rate maxima and, ultimately, to evidence cause-effect processes occurring along the slope. It should be pinpointed that, in this specific case, rainfall is also a proxy for the discharge level of the stream eroding the toe of the landslide, that is believed to be one of the main instability factors. The cross-correlation function is a quite simple signal processing tool for measuring similarities of waveforms as function of an applied time-lag. Specifically, it was applied to study: i) the relations between rainfall and movement rate, so to highlight the relative time lag for rainfall to produce an effect in different points of the landslide; ii) the inter-dependencies between different movement rates in the three boreholes in order to determine the pattern of mobilization of the landslide (from up to down slope and vice-versa); iii) the response of groundwater with respect to rainfall, which reflects the local permeability; iv) the evolution of groundwater levels in the three monitoring points. Altogether, results confirm and constrain in time the retrogressive trend of movements in the landslide (in agreement with a 2D numerical model previously developed by Ferrari et

  20. Wavelength-modulated tunable diode-laser absorption spectrometry for real-time monitoring of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Xiang, Jindong; Axner, Ove; Ying, Chaofu

    2016-03-20

    It is important to monitor and assess the growth of micro-organisms under various conditions. Yet, thus far there has been no technique to do this with the required speed and accuracy. This work demonstrates swift and accurate assessment of the concentration of carbon dioxide that is produced by use of a wavelength-modulated tunable diode-laser based absorption spectroscopy (WM-TDLAS). It is shown by experiments on two types of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, that the technique can produce high signal-to-noise-ratio data from bacteria grown in confined spaces and exposed to limited amounts of nutrients that can be used for extraction of growth parameters by fitting of the Gompertz model. By applying the technique to S. aureus bacteria at various temperatures (in the 25°C to 42°C range), it is specifically shown that both the maximum growth rate and the so-called lag time have a strong temperature dependence (under the specific conditions with a maximum of the former at 37°C) that matches conventional models well for bacterial growth. Hence, it is demonstrated that WM-TDLAS monitoring CO2 is a user-friendly, non-intrusive, and label-free technique that swiftly, and with high signal-to-noise-ratio, can be used for rapid (on the Hz scale) and accurate assessment of bacterial growth. PMID:27140571

  1. Time to Absorption for a Heterogeneous Neutral Competition Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borile, Claudio; Pra, Paolo Dai; Fischer, Markus; Formentin, Marco; Maritan, Amos

    2014-07-01

    Neutral models aspire to explain biodiversity patterns in ecosystems where species difference can be neglected and perfect symmetry is assumed between species. Voter-like models capture the essential ingredients of the neutral hypothesis and represent a paradigm for other disciplines like social studies and chemical reactions. In a system where each individual can interact with all the other members of the community, the typical time to reach an absorbing state with a single species scales linearly with the community size. Here we show, by using a rigorous approach based on a large deviation principle and confirming previous approximate and numerical results, that in a mean-field heterogeneous voter model the typical time to reach an absorbing state scales exponentially with the system size.

  2. The Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature on Mortality in Wuhan, China: A Time-Series Study Using a Distributed Lag Non-Linear Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yunquan; Li, Cunlu; Feng, Renjie; Zhu, Yaohui; Wu, Kai; Tan, Xiaodong; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Less evidence concerning the association between ambient temperature and mortality is available in developing countries/regions, especially inland areas of China, and few previous studies have compared the predictive ability of different temperature indictors (minimum, mean, and maximum temperature) on mortality. We assessed the effects of temperature on daily mortality from 2003 to 2010 in Jiang’an District of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Quasi-Poisson generalized linear models combined with both non-threshold and double-threshold distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM) were used to examine the associations between different temperature indictors and cause-specific mortality. We found a U-shaped relationship between temperature and mortality in Wuhan. Double-threshold DLNM with mean temperature performed best in predicting temperature-mortality relationship. Cold effect was delayed, whereas hot effect was acute, both of which lasted for several days. For cold effects over lag 0–21 days, a 1 °C decrease in mean temperature below the cold thresholds was associated with a 2.39% (95% CI: 1.71, 3.08) increase in non-accidental mortality, 3.65% (95% CI: 2.62, 4.69) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 3.87% (95% CI: 1.57, 6.22) increase in respiratory mortality, 3.13% (95% CI: 1.88, 4.38) increase in stroke mortality, and 21.57% (95% CI: 12.59, 31.26) increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality. For hot effects over lag 0–7 days, a 1 °C increase in mean temperature above the hot thresholds was associated with a 25.18% (95% CI: 18.74, 31.96) increase in non-accidental mortality, 34.10% (95% CI: 25.63, 43.16) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 24.27% (95% CI: 7.55, 43.59) increase in respiratory mortality, 59.1% (95% CI: 41.81, 78.5) increase in stroke mortality, and 17.00% (95% CI: 7.91, 26.87) increase in IHD mortality. This study suggested that both low and high temperature were associated with increased mortality in Wuhan, and that

  3. The Short-Term Effect of Ambient Temperature on Mortality in Wuhan, China: A Time-Series Study Using a Distributed Lag Non-Linear Model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunquan; Li, Cunlu; Feng, Renjie; Zhu, Yaohui; Wu, Kai; Tan, Xiaodong; Ma, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Less evidence concerning the association between ambient temperature and mortality is available in developing countries/regions, especially inland areas of China, and few previous studies have compared the predictive ability of different temperature indictors (minimum, mean, and maximum temperature) on mortality. We assessed the effects of temperature on daily mortality from 2003 to 2010 in Jiang'an District of Wuhan, the largest city in central China. Quasi-Poisson generalized linear models combined with both non-threshold and double-threshold distributed lag non-linear models (DLNM) were used to examine the associations between different temperature indictors and cause-specific mortality. We found a U-shaped relationship between temperature and mortality in Wuhan. Double-threshold DLNM with mean temperature performed best in predicting temperature-mortality relationship. Cold effect was delayed, whereas hot effect was acute, both of which lasted for several days. For cold effects over lag 0-21 days, a 1 °C decrease in mean temperature below the cold thresholds was associated with a 2.39% (95% CI: 1.71, 3.08) increase in non-accidental mortality, 3.65% (95% CI: 2.62, 4.69) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 3.87% (95% CI: 1.57, 6.22) increase in respiratory mortality, 3.13% (95% CI: 1.88, 4.38) increase in stroke mortality, and 21.57% (95% CI: 12.59, 31.26) increase in ischemic heart disease (IHD) mortality. For hot effects over lag 0-7 days, a 1 °C increase in mean temperature above the hot thresholds was associated with a 25.18% (95% CI: 18.74, 31.96) increase in non-accidental mortality, 34.10% (95% CI: 25.63, 43.16) increase in cardiovascular mortality, 24.27% (95% CI: 7.55, 43.59) increase in respiratory mortality, 59.1% (95% CI: 41.81, 78.5) increase in stroke mortality, and 17.00% (95% CI: 7.91, 26.87) increase in IHD mortality. This study suggested that both low and high temperature were associated with increased mortality in Wuhan, and that mean

  4. Absorption spectroscopy of powdered materials using time-resolved diffuse optical methods.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Cosimo; Obraztsova, Ekaterina A; Farina, Andrea; Taroni, Paola; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Pifferi, Antonio

    2012-11-10

    In this paper a novel method, based on time-resolved diffuse optical spectroscopy, is proposed to measure the absorption of small amounts of nanostructured powder materials independent of scattering. Experimental validation, in the visible and near-infrared spectral range, has been carried out on India Inkparticles. The effectiveness of the technique to measure scattering-free absorption is demonstrated on carbon nanotubes. The comparison between the absorption spectra acquired by the proposed method and conventional measurements performed with a commercial spectrophotometer is discussed. PMID:23142900

  5. Time-resolved refractive index and absorption mapping of light-plasma filaments in water.

    PubMed

    Minardi, Stefano; Gopal, Amrutha; Tatarakis, Michael; Couairon, Arnaud; Tamosauskas, Gintaras; Piskarskas, Rimtautas; Dubietis, Audrius; Di Trapani, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    By means of a quantitative shadowgraphic method, we performed a space-time characterization of the refractive index variation and transient absorption induced by a light-plasma filament generated by a 120 fs laser pulse in water. The formation and evolution of the plasma channel in the proximity of the nonlinear focus were observed with a 23 fs time resolution. PMID:18157267

  6. Excited-State Absorption from Real-Time Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory: Optical Limiting in Zinc Phthalocyanine.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Sean A; Cramer, Christopher J; Govind, Niranjan

    2016-04-01

    Optical-limiting materials are capable of attenuating light to protect delicate equipment from high-intensity light sources. Phthalocyanines have attracted a lot of attention for optical-limiting applications due to their versatility and large nonlinear absorption. With excited-state absorption (ESA) being the primary mechanism for optical limiting behavior in phthalocyanines, the ability to tune the optical absorption of ground and excited states in phthalocyanines would allow for the development of advanced optical limiters. We recently developed a method for the calculation of ESA based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory propagation of an excited-state density. In this work, we apply the approach to zinc phthalocyanine, demonstrating the ability of our method to efficiently identify the optical limiting potential of a molecular complex. PMID:27007445

  7. The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera house seating areas.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Kim, Jae Ho; Ryu, Jong Kwan

    2015-03-01

    The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera houses were investigated using computer simulations and scale model measurements. The reverberation time (RT) was measured in stalls seating with and without variable stage elements (e.g., fly curtains, side curtains, cycloramas, and stage sets). The absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling of the stage houses were varied accordingly. It was found that variable stage elements have a significant influence on reverberation times in seating areas, particularly for a reverberant stage house, due to the low absorption of the walls and ceiling in the stage house. It was also found that the absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling should be over 0.5 to avoid RT decreases of over 10% due to the absorption of the variable stage elements. In addition, coupled room effects were investigated both with and without variable stage elements and the results show that double slope was not found in the opera houses investigated in this study. PMID:25786925

  8. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  9. Photodissociation of thioglycolic acid studied by femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Attar, Andrew R.; Blumling, Daniel E.; Knappenberger, Kenneth L. Jr.

    2011-01-14

    Steady-state and time-resolved spectroscopies were employed to study the photodissociation of both the neutral (HS-CH{sub 2}-COOH) and doubly deprotonated ({sup -}S-CH{sub 2}-COO{sup -}) forms of thioglycolic acid (TGA), a common surface-passivating ligand used in the aqueous synthesis and organization of semiconducting nanostructures. Room temperature UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy indicated strong absorption by the S{sub 1} and S{sub 2} excited states at 250 nm and 185 nm, respectively. The spectrum also contained a weaker absorption band that extended to approximately 550 nm, which was assigned to the {pi}{sub CO}{sup *}(leftarrow)n{sub O} transition. Femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy was performed on TGA using 400 nm excitation and a white-light continuum probe to provide the temporally and spectrally resolved data. Both forms of TGA underwent a photoinduced dissociation from the excited state to form an {alpha}-thiol-substituted acyl radical ({alpha}-TAR, S-CH{sub 2}-CO). For the acidic form of TGA, radical formation occurred with an apparent time constant of 60 {+-} 5 fs; subsequent unimolecular decay took 400 {+-} 60 fs. Similar kinetics were observed for the deprotonated form of TGA (70 {+-} 10 fs radical formation; 420 {+-} 40 fs decay). The production of the {alpha}-TAR was corroborated by the observation of its characteristic optical absorption. Time-resolved data indicated that the photoinduced dissociation of TGA via cleavage of the C-OH bond occurred rapidly ({<=}100 fs). The prevalence of TGA in aqueous semiconducting nanoparticles makes its absorption in the visible spectral region and subsequent dissociation key to understanding the behavior of nanoscale systems.

  10. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... a day to adjust to one to two time zones. So if you travel over three time zones, it will take about two days for ... decisions the first day. Once you arrive, spend time in the sun. This can help reset your internal clock.

  11. Real-time detection of hydrogen absorption and desorption in metallic palladium using vibrating wire method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inagaki, Yuji; Nishimura, Atsuki; Yokooji, Honoka; Takata, Hiroki; Kawae, Tatsuya

    2015-09-01

    A vibrating wire (VW) method was applied to investigate the hydrogen absorption and desorption properties of palladium. At room temperature, a considerable shift in resonance frequency was successfully observed in VW spectra under H2 gas exposure. The shift is reversible in the initial stage of the exposure and is attributed to changes in the density and Young’s modulus of the VW sensor. Irreversibility of the shift because of embrittlement is detected after a sufficient exposure time. H absorption is slowed down enormously at T = 200 K owing to suppression of the thermal activation process.

  12. Forecasting of Chaotic Cloud Absorption Time Series for Meteorological and Plume Dispersion Modeling.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Muñuzuri, V.

    1998-11-01

    A nonlinear forecasting method based on the reconstruction of a chaotic strange attractor from about 1.5 years of cloud absorption data obtained from half-hourly Meteosat infrared images was used to predict the behavior of the time series 24 h in advance. The forecast values are then used by a meteorological model for daily prediction of plume transport from the As Pontes 1400-MW power plant in northwestern Spain. Results from the meteorological model, using the cloud absorption predictions, are compared with measurements obtained from meteorological towers and a Remtech PA-3 sodar. The effects of cloud absorption on SO2 ground-level concentration forecasts are analyzed for two different days.

  13. Real-time atmospheric absorption spectra for in-flight tuning of an airborne dial system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dombrowski, M.; Walden, H.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Milrod, J.; Korb, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of atmospheric absorption spectra are displayed and used to precisely calibrate and fix the frequency of an Alexandrite laser to specific oxygen absorption features for airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature. The DIAL system used contains two narrowband tunable Alexandrite lasers: one is electronically scanned to tune to oxygen absorption features for on-line signals while the second is used to obtain off-line (nonabsorbed) atmospheric return signals. The lidar operator may select the number of shots to be averaged, the altitude, and altitude interval over which the signals are averaged using single key stroke commands. The operator also determines exactly which oxygen absorption lines are scanned by comparing the line spacings and relative strengths with known line parameters, thus calibrating the laser wavelength readout. The system was used successfully to measure the atmospheric pressure profile on the first flights of this lidar, November 20, and December 9, 1985, aboard the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft.

  14. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption.

    PubMed

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than approximately 1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity. PMID:19405646

  15. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than ˜1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)3]2+ and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  16. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-15

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than {approx}1 ns are recorded by the ''classical'' technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent ''pump-probe'' technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {l_brace}[Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and a less symmetric derivative{r_brace} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  17. Picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ultrafast aluminum plasmas.

    PubMed

    Audebert, P; Renaudin, P; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S; Geindre, J-P; Chenais-Popovics, C; Tzortzakis, S; Nagels-Silvert, V; Shepherd, R; Matsushima, I; Gary, S; Girard, F; Peyrusse, O; Gauthier, J-C

    2005-01-21

    We have used point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy to infer the ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas. Two femtosecond beams of the 100 TW laser at the LULI facility were used to produce an aluminum plasma on a thin aluminum foil (83 or 50 nm), and a picosecond x-ray backlighter source. The short-pulse backlighter probed the aluminum plasma at different times by adjusting the delay between the two femtosecond driving beams. Absorption x-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma. Collisional-radiative atomic physics coupled with hydrodynamic simulations reproduce fairly well the measured average ionization as a function of time. PMID:15698184

  18. Effects of lag and maximum growth in contaminant transport and biodegradation modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, B.D.; Dawson, C.N.

    1992-06-01

    The effects of time lag and maximum microbial growth on biodegradation in contaminant transport are discussed. A mathematical model is formulated that accounts for these effects, and a numerical case study is presented that demonstrates how lag influences biodegradation.

  19. Time-varying sodium absorption in the Type Ia supernova 2013gh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, R.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Butler, R. P.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Doran, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Freeland, E.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Mattila, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Petrushevska, T.; Valenti, S.; Vogt, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. Aims: To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova (SN) evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernovae peak in the ultraviolet. We attempt, therefore, to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. Methods: We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption-line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results: Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R ≈ 1019 cm from the explosion. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe. The nondetection of variations during early phases makes it possible to put limits on the abundance of the species at those distances. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only

  20. Broadband time-domain absorption spectroscopy with a ns-pulse supercontinuum source.

    PubMed

    Sych, Yaroslav; Engelbrecht, Rainer; Schmauss, Bernhard; Kozlov, Dimitrii; Seeger, Thomas; Leipertz, Alfred

    2010-10-25

    A Q-switched laser based system for broadband absorption spectroscopy in the range of 1390-1740 nm (7200-5750 cm(-1)) has been developed and tested. In the spectrometer the 1064 nm light of a 25 kHz repetition-rate micro-chip Nd:YAG laser is directed into a photonic crystal fiber to produce a short (about 2 ns) pulse of radiation in a wide spectral range. This radiation is passed through a 25 km long dispersive single-mode fiber in order to spread the respective wavelengths over a time interval of about 140 ns at the fiber output. This fast swept-wavelength light source allows to record gas absorption spectra by temporally-resolved detection of the transmitted light power. The realized spectral resolution is about 2 cm(-1). Examples of spectra recorded in a cell with CO(2):CH(4):N(2) gas mixtures are presented. An algorithm employed for the evaluation of molar concentrations of different species from the spectra with non-overlapping absorption bands of mixture components is described. The uncertainties of the concentration values retrieved at different acquisition times due to the required averaging are evaluated. As an example, spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio large enough to provide species concentrations with a relative error of 5% can be obtained in real time at a millisecond time scale. Potentials and limitations of this technique are discussed. PMID:21164614

  1. Time-Resolved Absorption in Cryogenic and Room-Temperature, Direct-Drive Imploding Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seka, W.

    2007-11-01

    Time-resolved absorption has been measured in direct-drive-implosion experiments for various targets and pulse shapes using OMEGA's UV Laser System. These experiments reveal a number of interaction processes beyond inverse bremsstrahlung absorption. During the first 100 to 200 ps, evidence of enhanced absorption points toward resonance absorption. Depending on target material and pulse shapes, the absorption at times t > 0.7 ns is reduced compared to predictions by hydrodynamic simulations with flux-limited electron heat transport. This discrepancy may be partly due to uncertainties in the heat transport model. Scattered light spectra further indicate that beam-to-beam energy transfer with gain provided by stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) may also contribute. Evidence for two-plasmon-decay (TPD) instability is seen in almost all direct-drive-implosion experiments as evidenced by hard-x-ray and 3φ/2 emission. The TPD instability is driven particularly hard when the laser burns through the CD shell during the laser pulse in a cryogenic target implosion with the concomitant possibility of fast-electron preheat. This wealth of interaction processes will be discussed along with implications for future larger-scale experiments. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC52-92SF19460. Contributors: D.H. Edgell, V.N. Goncharov, I.V. Igumenshchev, J.A. Delettrez, J. Myatt, A.V. Maximov, R.W. Short, C. Stoeckl, and T.C. Sangster.

  2. Comparison between two models of absorption of matter waves by a thin time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    2015-11-01

    We report a quantitative, analytical, and numerical comparison between two models of the interaction of a nonrelativistic quantum particle with a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by a set of time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions, which are closely related to Kottler boundary conditions used in stationary-wave optics as a mathematical basis for Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The second model mimics the absorbing barrier with an off-diagonal δ potential with a time-dependent amplitude. We show that the two models of absorption agree in their predictions in a semiclassical regime, the regime readily accessible in modern experiments with ultracold atoms.

  3. Ultrashort coherence times in partially polarized stationary optical beams measured by two-photon absorption.

    PubMed

    Shevchenko, Andriy; Roussey, Matthieu; Friberg, Ari T; Setälä, Tero

    2015-11-30

    We measure the recently introduced electromagnetic temporal degree of coherence of a stationary, partially polarized, classical optical beam. Instead of recording the visibility of intensity fringes, the spectrum, or the polarization characteristics, we introduce a novel technique based on two-photon absorption. Using a Michelson interferometer equipped with polarizers and a specific GaAs photocount tube, we obtain the two fundamental quantities pertaining to the fluctuations of light: the degree of coherence and the degree of polarization. We also show that the electromagnetic intensity-correlation measurements with two-photon absorption require that the polarization dynamics, i.e., the time evolution of the instantaneous polarization state, is properly taken into account. We apply the technique to unpolarized and polarized sources of amplified spontaneous emission (Gaussian statistics) and to a superposition of two independent, narrow-band laser beams of different mid frequencies (non-Gaussian statistics). For these two sources femtosecond-range coherence times are found that are in good agreement with the traditional spectral measurements. Although previously employed for laser pulses, two-photon absorption provides a new physical principle to study electromagnetic coherence phenomena in classical and quantum continuous-wave light at extremely short time scales. PMID:26698754

  4. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  5. [Real-time forecasting model for monitoring pollutant with differential optical absorption spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Li, Su-Wen; Liu, Wen-Qing; Xie, Pin-Hua; Wang, Feng-Sui; Yang, Yi-Jun

    2009-11-01

    For real-time and on-line monitoring DOAS (differential optical absorption spectroscopy) system, a model based on an improved Elman network for monitoring pollutant concentrations was proposed. In order to reduce the systematical complexity, the forecasting factors have been obtained based on the step-wise regression method. The forecasting factors were current concentrations, temperature and relative humidity, and wind speed and wind direction. The dynamic back propagation (BP) algorithm was used for creating training set. The experiment results show that the predicted value follows the real well. So the modified Elman network can meet the demand of DOAS system's real time forecasting. PMID:20101985

  6. Calculation of Personalized Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet Plan

    1998-07-30

    The software lets a traveler or the traveler''s agent enter key information about a specific travel itinerary and then computes and displays an Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet plan tailored to the individual itinerary. The Argonne Ant-Jet-Lag Diet helps people who travel across three or more time zones avoid or minimize jet lag by greatly speeding their adjustment to a new time zone. The software displays precise date and time information about when to start and endmore » the Argonne Anti-Jet-Lag Diet plan, when to eat meals, and what to eat. It also displays tips and answers common questions about the diet plan and how best to implement it.« less

  7. A delay in membrane fusion: lag times observed by fluorescence microscopy of individual fusion events induced by an electric field pulse.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D S; Sowers, A E

    1990-09-11

    Low light level video microscopy of the fusion of DiI- (1,1'-dihexadecyl-3,3,3',3'-tetramethylindocarbocyanine perchlorate) labeled rabbit erythrocyte ghosts with unlabeled rabbit erythrocyte ghosts, held in stable apposition by dielectrophoresis in sodium phosphate buffers, showed reproducible time intervals (delays) between the application of a single fusogenic electric pulse and the earliest detection of fluorescence in the unlabeled adjacent membranes. The delay increased over the range 0.3-4 s with a decrease in (i) the electric field strength of the fusion-inducing pulse from 1000 to 250 V/mm, (ii) the decay half-time of the fusogenic pulse in the range 1.8-0.073 ms, and (iii) the dielectrophoretic force which brings the membranes into close apposition. A change in the buffer viscosity from 1.8 to 10 mP.s caused the delay to increase from 0.36 to 3.7 s (in glycerol solutions) or to 5.2 s (in sucrose solutions). The delay decreased 2-3 times with an increase in temperature from 21 to 37 degrees C. It did not differ significantly for "white" ghosts [0.013 mM hemoglobin (Hb)] or "red" ghosts (0.15 mM Hb) or buffer strength over the range 5-60 mM (sodium phosphate, pH 8.5). The calculated activation energy, 17 kcal/mol, does not depend on the field strength. The yield of fused cells was high when the delay was short. The delay in electrofusion resembles the delays in pH-dependent fusion of vesicular stomatitis viruses with erythrocyte ghosts [Clague, M. J., Schoch, C., Zech, L., & Blumenthal, R. (1990) Biochemistry 29, 1303-1308] and of fibroblasts expressing influenza hemagglutinin and red blood cells [Morris, S. J., Sarkar, D.P., White, J. M., & Blumenthal, R. (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 3972-3978].(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2174698

  8. Real-time HF Radio Absorption Maps Incorporating Riometer and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil; Honary, Farideh; Warrington, Mike; Stocker, Alan; Danskin, Donald

    2016-04-01

    A real-time model of HF radio propagation conditions is being developed as a service for aircraft communications at high latitudes. An essential component of this is a real-time map of the absorption of HF (3-30 MHz) radio signals in the D-region ionosphere. Empirical, climatological Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) models in common usage cannot account for day-to-day variations in ionospheric composition and are inaccurate during the large changes in recombination rate at twilight. However, parameters of such models may be optimised using an age-weighted regression to absorption measurements from riometers in Canada and Scandinavia. Such parameters include the day- and night-time sensitivity to proton flux as measured on a geostationary satellite (GOES). Modelling the twilight transition as a linear or Gauss error function over a range of solar-zenith angles (χl < χ < χu) is found to provide greater accuracy than 'Earth shadow' methods (as applied in the Sodankylä Ionospheric Chemistry (SIC) model, for example) due to a more gradual ionospheric response for χ < 90° . The fitted χl parameter is found to be most variable, with smaller values (as low as 60°) post-sunrise compared with pre-sunset. Correlation coefficients of model parameters between riometers are presented and these provide a means of appropriately weighting individual riometer contributions in an assimilative PCA model. At times outside of PCA events, the probability of absorption in the auroral zones is related to the energetic electron flux inside the precipitation loss cone, as measured on the polar-orbiting POES satellites. This varies with magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity, and its relation to the real-time solar wind - magnetospheric coupling function [Newell et al., 2007] will be presented. Reference: Newell, P. T., T. Sotirelis, K. Liou, C.-I. Meng, and F. J. Rich (2007), A nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function inferred from 10

  9. Ultrafast recovery time and broadband saturable absorption properties of black phosphorus suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingwei; Huang, Guanghui; Chen, Jiazhang; Xiao, Si He, Jun; Mu, Haoran; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2015-08-31

    As a new type of two-dimensional crystal material, black phosphorus (BP) exhibits excellent electronics and optical performance. Herein, we focus on carrier relaxation dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of BP suspension. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission spectrum are employed to characterize the structure and linear optical properties of the BP. Additionally, pump-probe experiments at wavelength of 1550 nm were carried out to study the carrier dynamics in BP suspension, and ultrafast recovery time was observed (τ{sub s} = 24 ± 2 fs). Furthermore, we demonstrate the saturable absorption signals by open aperture Z-scan experiments at wavelengths of 1550 nm, 532 nm, and 680 nm. The results indicate that BP has broadband saturable absorption properties and the nonlinear absorption coefficients were determined to be β{sub 2} = −0.20 ± 0.08 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (532 nm), β{sub 2} = −0.12 ± 0.05 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (680 nm), and β{sub 2} = −0.15 ± 0.09 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (1550 nm)

  10. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T.

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide ( 1-), N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide ( 2-) and N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide ( 3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45000 cm -1). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0→ D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  11. Implementation of real-time multiple reflection and Fresnel absorption of laser beam in keyhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Ho; Na, Suck-Joo

    2006-12-01

    A computational analysis of laser keyhole welding is achieved. The main driving force to make the molten pool as a narrow and deep keyhole is the recoil pressure induced by evaporation of the material. Also, the multiple reflection effect on the keyhole wall plays an important role in making the keyhole deeper and raising its total energy absorption rate. Multiple reflection and Fresnel absorption are implemented simultaneously with the proposed ray tracing technique in a discrete grid cell system during the simulation for every single time step. In particular, the Fresnel absorption model is chosen as an energy transfer mechanism from laser beam to workpiece. With all the governing equations including continuity, momentum and energy equation, the VOF method is adopted to trace the free surface of the molten pool. Simulation results are compared with the experimental ones to verify its validity. A pulsed Nd : YAG laser was used for keyhole welding experiments on mild steel plates of 7 mm thickness. It was observed that the generated keyhole maintains its solidified shape without any closing phenomenon both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  12. The influence of thermolysis time on the absorption spectra of polyvinyl chloride in acetophenone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmagin, S. I.; Krasovskii, V. I.; Vlasov, D. V.; Apresyan, L. A.; Vlasova, T. V.; Kryshtoba, V. I.; Feofanov, I. N.; Kazaryan, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    The influence of thermolysis time on the absorption spectra of partially thermally dehydrochlorinated polyvinyl chloride in acetophenone solution is studied. Strong increase in the optical density Dλ of the dehydrochlorinated PVC samples is caused by the increasing amount N-C=C- and the length of chains of conjugated double bonds of carbon -C = C-. It is noted that the optical density Dλ first increases linearly with dehydrochlorination time and then reaches saturation. The estimation of amount of double conjugated carbon bonds in 1ml versus thermolysis time t is given, which varies between N-C=C- = 4.1017 - 7.4.1018 for t from 40 to 420 minutes. The effective capture cross section of a photon on conjugated double bonds of carbon for dehydrochlorinated PVC solution in acetophenone is estimated, which was about 10-17 cm2 . The analysis is done of the absorption curves «red» shift to longer wavelengths with growth of N-C=C- upon increase of thermolysis time. It is noted that the dependence of the optical density on the wavelength in this range is well described by a simple exponential function.

  13. LAG3 Expression in Active Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Bonnie L.; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H.; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus–induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4+ T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response. PMID:25549835

  14. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  15. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  16. Two-color-absorption sensor for time-resolved measurements of gasoline concentration and temperature.

    PubMed

    Pyun, Sung Hyun; Porter, Jason M; Jeffries, Jay B; Hanson, Ronald K; Montoya, Juan C; Allen, Mark G; Sholes, Kevin R

    2009-11-20

    A midinfrared absorption sensor for crank-angle-resolved in-cylinder measurements of gasoline concentration and gas temperature for spark-ignition internal-combustion engines is reported, and design considerations and validation testing in the controlled environments of a heated cell and shock-heated gases are discussed. Mid-IR laser light was tuned to transitions in the strong absorption bands associated with C-H stretching vibration near 3.4 microm, and time-resolved fuel vapor concentration and gas temperature were determined simultaneously from the absorption at two different wavelengths. These two infrared laser wavelengths were simultaneously produced by difference-frequency generation, which combines a near-IR signal laser with two near-IR pump lasers in a periodically poled lithium niobate crystal. Injection current modulation of the pump lasers produced intensity modulation of the mid-IR, which allowed the transmitted signals from the two laser wavelengths to be detected on a single detector and separated by frequency demultiplexing. Injection current modulation produced a wavelength modulation synchronous with the intensity modulation for each of the laser wavelengths, and accurate measurement of the gasoline absorption signal required the effects of wavelength modulation to be considered. Validation experiments were conducted for a single-component hydrocarbon fuel (2,2,4-trimethyl-pentane, commonly known as iso-octane) and a gasoline blend in a heated static cell (300 < or = T < or = 600 K) and behind planar shock waves (600 < T < 1100 K) in a shock tube. With a bandwidth of 10 kHz, the measured fuel concentrations agreed within 5% RMS and the measured temperature agreed within 3% RMS to the known values. The 10 kHz bandwidth is sufficient to resolve 1 crank-angle degree at 1600 RPM. PMID:19935971

  17. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  18. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  19. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  20. Time-resolved nonlinear polarization spectroscopy for measuring transient absorption and refraction in isotropic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranenko, Victor B.; Bazhenov, Vladimir Y.; Kulikovskaya, Olga A.

    1995-11-01

    A novel time-resolved nonlinear spectroscopic technique is described, which is based on stroboscopic registration of optical polarization transformation taking place at a vector incoherent two-wave mixing interaction in a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. It allows an accurate measuring of the dynamics of excitation and relaxation for real and imaginary parts of complex nonlinearity tensor components. The technique is demonstrated for measuring the light-induced change of transient absorption (delta) (alpha) e(t), (delta) (alpha) o(t) and refraction (delta) ne(t), (delta) no(t) for bacteriorhodopsin- based film pumped by linearly polarized laser pulses.

  1. Fiber-optic thermometer using temperature dependent absorption, broadband detection, and time domain referencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Piltch, Nancy D.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic thermometer based on temperature dependent absorption in Nd(3+) doped glass is demonstrated over the 298-573 K range. A broadband detection technique allows the use of the complete spectrum of a pulse modulated light emitting diode. A fiber-optic recirculating loop is employed to construct a reference channel in the time domain by generating a train of pulses from one initial pulse. A theoretical model is developed, and experimental data are shown to compare well with the theory. Possible sources of error and instability are identified, and ways to enhance the performance of the system are proposed.

  2. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  3. Comparison between two models of time-dependent absorption of matter waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    The interaction between an atom and a laser might give rise to transitions between two, or more, internal states of the atom. Such processes can be efficiently described within the framework of matter wave absorption, in which the laser beam is mimicked by an absorbing barrier. In this talk we present a quantitative comparison between two models describing the interaction between a non-relativistic quantum particle and a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions imposed on both the wave function of the particle and its spatial derivative. The second model treats the particle as a spinor submitted to a time-dependent off-diagonal δ-potential. We show the two models to be in excellent agreement in a semiclassical regime. Reference: M. Barbier, M. Beau, A. Goussev, arXiv:1510.06996, Phys. Rev. A (in press). EPSRC Grant No. EP/K024116/1.

  4. Capturing molecular structural dynamics by 100 ps time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kohei; Tomita, Ayana; Chollet, Matthieu; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin Ichi; Koshihara, Shin Ya

    2009-01-01

    An experimental set-up for time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 100 ps time resolution at beamline NW14A at the Photon Factory Advanced Ring is presented. The X-ray positional active feedback to crystals in a monochromator combined with a figure-of-merit scan of the laser beam position has been utilized as an essential tool to stabilize the spatial overlap of the X-ray and laser beams at the sample position. As a typical example, a time-resolved XAFS measurement of a photo-induced spin crossover reaction of the tris(1,10-phenanthrorine)iron(II) complex in water is presented. PMID:19096182

  5. Time variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boissé, P.; Bergeron, J.; Prochaska, J. X.; Péroux, C.; York, D. G.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: We have searched for temporal variations of narrow absorption lines in high resolution quasar spectra. A sample of five distant sources were assembled, for which two spectra are available, either VLT/UVES or Keck/HIRES, which were taken several years apart. Methods: We first investigate under which conditions variations in absorption line profiles can be detected reliably from high resolution spectra and discuss the implications of changes in terms of small-scale structure within the intervening gas or intrinsic origin. The targets selected allow us to investigate the time behaviour of a broad variety of absorption line systems by sampling diverse environments: the vicinity of active nuclei, galaxy halos, molecular-rich galaxy disks associated with damped Lyα systems, as well as neutral gas within our own Galaxy. Results: Intervening absorption lines from Mg ii, Fe ii, or proxy species with lines of lower opacity tracing the same kind of (moderately ionised) gas appear in general to be remarkably stable (1σ upper limits as low as 10% for some components on scales in the range 10-100 au), even for systems at zabs ≈ ze. Marginal variations are observed for Mg ii lines towards PKS 1229-021 at zabs = 0.83032; however, we detect no systems that display any change as large as those reported in low resolution SDSS spectra. The lack of clear variations for low β Mg ii systems does not support the existence of a specific population of absorbers made of swept-up gas towards blazars. In neutral or diffuse molecular media, clear changes are seen for Galactic Na i lines towards PKS 1229-02 (decrease in N by a factor of four for one of the five components over 9.7 yr), corresponding to structure on a scale of about 35 au, in good agreement with known properties of the Galactic interstellar medium. Tentative variations are detected for H2J = 3 lines towards FBQS J2340-0053 at zabs = 2.05454 (≃35% change in column density, N, over 0.7 yr in the rest frame), suggesting

  6. No Time Lag in the Photoelectric Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul; Saering, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    The photoelectric effect was discovered in the 19th century by Heinrich Hertz. It is interesting to note that the same scientist showed experimentally the wave nature of light, and thereby vindicated Maxwell's wave theory, and discovered the effect in which light shows corpuscular behavior. This paper describes a simple demonstration, enabling one…

  7. Time resolved laser absorption spectroscopy in a self-pulsed microplasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, X.; Rousseau, A.; Lagrange, J. F.; Sadeghi, N.

    2006-10-01

    It was recently shown that microplasmas of the microhollow cathode type geometry may operate in a self-pulsing regime for intermediate current (0.1-1 mA) [1]. At lower current (< 0.1 mA) the plasma is stable and located inside the hole; at higher current (> 1 mA) , the plasma is also stable but expands outside the hole on the cathode backside region. The self pulsing was attributed to the breakdown of the gas, outside the micro-hole, on the cathode backside. However, the mechanisms of the plasma ignition on the cathode backside are not understood and metastable atoms may play a major role. In the present work, time resolved diode laser absorption measurements have been performed through the micro-hole in the self-pulsing regime; the plasma hole ranges is in the range of 100 μm and the gas pressure ranges from 50 to 300 Torr; the feed gas is argon and the transition studied is 772.376 nm (Paschen notation 1s5-2p7). The objective is i) to measure the time evolution of the 1s5 metastable density, ii) deduce the gas temperature and plasma density from the absorption line profile. Similar results are performed in 3 electrodes configuration [1] A. Rousseau and X. Aubert J. Phys.D : Appl. Phys. 39 (2006) 1619--1622.

  8. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  9. Jet-lag and human performance.

    PubMed

    Loat, C E; Rhodes, E C

    1989-10-01

    The desynchronisation of an athlete's physiological and psychological cycles has adverse effects on his/her performance. The primary cause of dysrhythmia in an athlete is jet-lag, which is a rapid displacement across the earth's time zones and is often experienced while competing in international events and in continental leagues. General symptoms which arise from dysynchronization include malaise, appetite loss, tiredness during the day and disturbed sleep. The specific symptoms resulting from jet-lag are characterised as phase shifts in physiological and psychological cycles. These phase shifts occur in body temperature, ability to mobilise energy substrates, excretion of water and metabolites, arousal levels, sleep/wake cycles and reaction time. The severity of these adverse effects and therefore the time required for resynchronization depends on the ability to preset the bodily rhythms prior to flying, the number of time zones crossed, the direction of flight, the type of individual (introvert/extrovert), age, social interaction and activity, diet plan and prescribed use of chronobiotic drugs. PMID:2692117

  10. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines. PMID:26764626

  11. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  12. Mapping absorption processes onto a Markov chain, conserving the mean first passage time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Katja

    2013-04-01

    The dynamics of a multidimensional system is projected onto a discrete state master equation using the transition rates W(k → k‧ t, t + dt) between a set of states {k} represented by the regions {ζk} in phase or discrete state space. Depending on the dynamics Γi(t) of the original process and the choice of ζk, the discretized process can be Markovian or non-Markovian. For absorption processes, it is shown that irrespective of these properties of the projection, a master equation with time-independent transition rates \\bar{W}(k\\rightarrow k^{\\prime }) can be obtained, which conserves the total occupation time of the partitions of the phase or discrete state space of the original process. An expression for the transition probabilities \\bar{p}(k^{\\prime }|k) is derived based on either time-discrete measurements {ti} with variable time stepping Δ(i + 1)i = ti + 1 - ti or the theoretical knowledge at continuous times t. This allows computational methods of absorbing Markov chains to be used to obtain the mean first passage time (MFPT) of the system. To illustrate this approach, the procedure is applied to obtain the MFPT for the overdamped Brownian motion of particles subject to a system with dichotomous noise and the escape from an entropic barrier. The high accuracy of the simulation results confirms with the theory.

  13. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Ledoux, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Smette, A.; De Cia, A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Fox, A. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Fe II, Fe III, Si II, C II and Cr II detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column density decrease of all observed Fe II levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the Fe III 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all Fe III) can only be explained through ionization of Fe II, as a large fraction of the ionized Fe II ions (we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic and Cowan codes) initially populate the 7S3 level of Fe III rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant Fe III 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level, the UV34 triplet, are observed, such as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and η Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200-400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H] = +0.2) and the low H I column density (log N(H i) = 18.7) in the host of GRB 080310. Finally

  14. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the dynamics of radical reactions.

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, R. G.

    2008-01-01

    There is very little information available about the dynamics of radical+radical interactions. These processes are important in combustion being chain termination steps as well as generating new molecular species. To study these processes, a new experimental apparatus has been constructed to investigate radical-radical dynamics. The first radical or atomic species is produced with a known concentration in a microwave discharge flow system. The second is produced by pulsed laser photolysis of a suitable photolyte. The time dependence of individual rovibrational states of the product is followed by absorption of a continuous infrared laser. This approach will allow the reaction of interest to be differentiated from other radical reactions occurring simultaneously. The experimental approach is highly versatile, being able to detect a number of molecular species of particular interest to combustion processes such as water, methane, acetylene etc. at the state specific level. State specific infrared absorption coefficients of radicals can be measured in situ allowing for the determination of the absolute concentrations and hence branching ratios for reactions having multiple reaction pathways.

  15. SPECTRAL LAGS AND THE LAG-LUMINOSITY RELATION: AN INVESTIGATION WITH SWIFT BAT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Eskandarian, A.; Maximon, L. C.; Parke, W. C.; Stamatikos, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.

    2010-03-10

    Spectral lag, the time difference between the arrival of high-energy and low-energy photons, is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Norris et al. reported a correlation between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity of GRBs based on a limited sample. More recently, a number of authors have provided further support for this correlation using arbitrary energy bands of various instruments. In this paper, we report on a systematic extraction of spectral lags based on the largest Swift sample to date of 31 GRBs with measured redshifts. We extracted the spectral lags for all combinations of the standard Swift hard X-ray energy bands: 15-25 keV, 25-50 keV, 50-100 keV, and 100-200 keV and plotted the time dilation corrected lag as a function of isotropic peak luminosity. The mean value of the correlation coefficient for various channel combinations is -0.68 with a chance probability of {approx}0.7 x 10{sup -3}. In addition, the mean value of the power-law index is 1.4 +- 0.3. Hence, our study lends support to the existence of a lag-luminosity correlation, albeit with large scatter.

  16. Long-Lag, Wide-pulse Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Kazanas, D.; Scargle, . D.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the best available probe of the early phase of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet attributes is the prompt gamma-ray emission, in which several intrinsic and extrinsic variables determine GRB pulse evolution. Bright, usually complex bursts have many narrow pulses that are difficult to model due to overlap. However, the relatively simple, long spectral lag, wide-pulse bursts may have simpler physics and are easier to model. In this work we analyze the temporal and spectral behavior of wide pulses in 24 long-lag bursts, using a pulse model with two shape parameters - width and asymmetry - and the Band spectral model with three shape parameters. We find that pulses in long-lag bursts are distinguished both temporally and spectrally from those in bright bursts: the pulses in long spectral lag bursts are few in number, and approximately 100 times wider (10s of seconds), have systematically lower peaks in vF(v), harder low-energy spectra and softer high-energy spectra. We find that these five pulse descriptors are essentially uncorrelated for our long-lag sample, suggesting that at least approximately 5 parameters are needed to model burst temporal and spectral behavior. However, pulse width is strongly correlated with spectral lag; hence these two parameters may be viewed as mutual surrogates. We infer that accurate formulations for estimating GRB luminosity and total energy will depend on several gamma-ray attributes, at least for long-lag bursts. The prevalence of long-lag bursts near the BATSE trigger threshold, their predominantly low vF(v) spectral peaks, and relatively steep upper power-law spectral indices indicate that Swift will detect many such bursts.

  17. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  18. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  19. Effect of line, soaking and cooking time on water absorption, texture and splitting of red kidney beans.

    PubMed

    Zamindar, Nafiseh; Baghekhandan, Mohamad Shahedi; Nasirpour, Ali; Sheikhzeinoddin, Mahmoud

    2013-02-01

    Dry beans are rich sources of dietary fiber and phytochemicals such as flavonoids and phenolics that exhibit good functional properties. In current study line, cooking and soaking time effects were investigated on water absorption, splitting and texture of different Iranian red kidney beans to determine the best lines and the best soaking time related to them for industrial use. D81083 line had the highest level of water absorption after 24 h soaking followed by Akhtar and KS31164 lines while Azna, Goli and Naz lines had the lowest level of water absorption (p < 0.05). Akhtar and Sayyad had the highest level of splitting while KS31164 had the lowest level of splitting (p < 0.05). Soaking of Akhtar line for 24 h caused the highest level of water absorption accompanied with low splitting level. 24 h soaking and longer cooking time is recommended for Sayyad, while 12 h soaking and longer cooking time is recommended for KS31164 line. 24 h soaking causes higher level of water absorption and lower level of splitting in Derakhshan line. The effects of line, cooking and soaking time on red bean texture were significant (p < 0.01). PMID:24425894

  20. Direct extraction of intense-field-induced polarization in the continuum on the attosecond time scale from transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Haxton, D. J.; Gaarde, M. B.; Schafer, K. J.; McCurdy, C. W.

    2016-02-01

    A procedure is suggested for using transient absorption spectroscopy above the ionization threshold to measure the polarization of the continuum induced by an intense optical pulse. In this way transient absorption measurement can be used to probe subfemtosecond intense field dynamics in atoms and molecules. The method is based on an approximation to the dependence of these spectra on time delay between an attosecond XUV probe pulse and an intense pump pulse that is tested over a wide range of intensities and time delays by all-electrons-active calculations using the multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree-Fock method in the case of neon.

  1. Implications of Lag-Luminosity Relationship for Unified GRB Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Spectral lags (tau(sub lag)) are deduced for 1437 long (T(sub 90) greater than 2 s) BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with peak flux F(sub p) greater than 0.25 photons cm(sup -2)/s, near to the BATSE trigger threshold. The lags are modeled to approximate the observed distribution in the F(sub p)-T(sub lag) plane, realizing a noise-free representation. Assuming a two-branch lag-luminosity relationship, the lags are self-consistently corrected for cosmological effects to yield distributions in luminosity, distance, and redshift. The results have several consequences for GRB populations and for unified gamma-ray/afterglow scenarios which would account for afterglow break times and gamma-ray spectral evolution in terms of jet opening angle, viewing angle, or a profiled jet with variable Lorentz factor: A component of the burst sample is identified - those with few, wide pulses, lags of a few tenths to several seconds, and soft spectra - whose Log[N]-Log[F(sub p)] distribution approximates a -3/2 power-law, suggesting homogeneity and thus relatively nearby sources. The proportion of these long-lag bursts increases from negligible among bright BATSE bursts to approx. 50% at trigger threshold. Bursts with very long lags, approx. 1-2 less than tau(sub lag) (S) less than 10, show a tendency to concentrate near the Supergalactic Plane with a quadrupole moment of approx. -0.10 +/- 0.04. GRB 980425 (SN 1998bw) is a member of this subsample of approx. 90 bursts with estimated distances less than 100 Mpc. The frequency of the observed ultra-low luminosity bursts is approx. 1/4 that of SNe Ib/c within the same volume. If truly nearby, the core-collapse events associated with these GRBs might produce gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II. Such nearby bursts might also help explain flattening of the cosmic ray spectrum at ultra-high energies, as observed by AGASA.

  2. Effect of a Disintegration Mechanism on Wetting, Water Absorption, and Disintegration Time of Orodispersible Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Pabari, RM; Ramtoola, Z

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of disintegration mechanism of various types of disintegrants on the absorption ratio (AR), wetting time (WT), and disintegration time (DT) of orodispersible tablets (ODTs). ODTs were prepared by direct compression using mannitol as filler and disintegrants selected from a range of swellable, osmotic, and porous disintegrants. Tablets formed were characterized for their water AR, WT, and DT. The porosity and mechanical strength of the tablets were also measured. Results show that the DT of formulated ODTs was directly related to the WT and was a function of the disintegration mechanism of the disintegrant used. The lowest WT and DT were observed for tablets formulated using the osmotic disintegrant sodium citrate and these tablets also showed the lowest AR and porosity. The wetting and disintegration of tablets containing the highly swellable disintegrant, sodium starch glycollate, was slowest despite their high water AR and high tablet porosity. Rapid wetting and disintegration of ODTs were therefore not necessarily related to the porosity of the tablets. PMID:23112534

  3. Variable lag variography using k-means clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapageridis, I. K.

    2015-12-01

    Experimental variography in three dimensions based on drillhole data and current modelling software requires the selection of particular directions (azimuth and plunge) and a basic lag distance. Variogram points are then calculated on distances which are multiples of that basic lag. As samples rarely follow a regular grid, directional and distance tolerances are applied in order to have sufficient pairs to calculate reliable variogram points. This process is adequate when drillholes follow a drilling pattern (even if not an exactly regular grid) but can be time consuming and hard when the drilling pattern is irregular or when drillhole orientations vary considerably. Having all variogram points being calculated on multiples of a fixed lag, and the same tolerance being applied throughout the range of distances used, can be very restrictive and a reason for considerable time wasting or even failure to calculate an interpretable experimental variogram. The method discussed in this paper is using k-means clustering of sample pairs based on pair separation distance leading to a number of clusters each representing a different variogram point. This way, lag parameters are adjusted automatically to match the spatial distribution of sample locations and the resulting variogram is improved. Case studies are provided showing the benefits of this method over current fixed-lag experimental variogram calculation techniques.

  4. Time-Variable Complex Metal Absorption Lines in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Tajitsu, Akito

    2005-08-01

    We present a new spectrum of the quasar HS 1603+3820 taken 1.28 yr (0.36 yr in the quasar rest frame) after a previous observation with Subaru+HDS. The new spectrum enables us to search for time variability as an identifier of intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs). This quasar shows a rich complex of C IV NALs within 60,000 km s-1 of the emission redshift. On the basis of covering factor analysis, Misawa et al. found that the C IV NAL system at zabs=2.42-2.45 (system A, at a shift velocity of vsh=8300-10,600 km s-1 relative to the quasar) was intrinsic to the quasar. With our new spectrum, we perform time variability analysis, as well as covering factor analysis, to separate intrinsic NALs from intervening NALs for eight C IV systems. Only system A, which was identified as an intrinsic system in the earlier paper by Misawa et al., shows a strong variation in line strength (Wobs~10.4-->19.1 Å). We speculate that a broad absorption line (BAL) could be forming in this quasar (i.e., many narrower lines will blend together to make a BAL profile). We illustrate the plausibility of this suggestion with the help of a simulation in which we vary the column densities and covering factors of the NAL complex. Under the assumption that a change of ionization state causes the variability, a lower limit can be placed on the electron density (ne>~3×104cm-3) and an upper limit on the distance from the continuum source (r<=6 kpc). On the other hand, if the motion of clumpy gas causes the variability (a more likely scenario), the crossing velocity and the distance from the continuum source are estimated to be vcross>8000 km s-1 and r<3 pc. In this case, the absorber does not intercept any flux from the broad emission line region, but only flux from the UV continuum source. If we adopt the dynamical model of Murray et al., we can obtain a much more strict constraint on the distance of the gas parcel from the continuum source, r<0.2 pc. Based on data collected at the Subaru

  5. Mathematics of Radiation Propagation in Planetary Atmospheres: Absorption, Refraction, Time Delay, Occultation, and Abel Inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huestis, D. L.

    Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths curved by refraction. The inverse problem, determining the altitude profile of mass density (index of refraction) or the concentration of an individual chemical species (absorption), from occultation data, also has its mathematically interesting (i.e., difficult) aspects. Now we automatically have noise and thus statistical analysis is just as important as calculus and numerical analysis. Here we will describe a new approach of least-squares fitting occultation data to an expansion over compact basis functions. This approach, which avoids numerical differentiation and singular integrals, was originally developed to analyze laboratory imaging data.Forward integration calculation of air mass, refraction, and time delay requires care even for very smooth model atmospheres. The literature abounds in examples of injudicious approximations, assumptions, transformations, variable substitutions, and failures to verify that the formulas work with unlimited accuracy for simple cases and also survive challenges from mathematically pathological but physically realizable cases. A few years ago we addressed the problem of evaluation of the Chapman function for attenuation along a straight line path in an exponential atmosphere. In this presentation we will describe issues and approaches for integration over light paths

  6. Time- and space-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of aluminum irradiated by a subpicosecond high-power laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzortzakis, S.; Audebert, P.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J. P.; Chenais-Popovics, C.; Nagels, V.; Gary, S.; Shepherd, R.; Girard, F.; Matsushima, I.; Peyrusse, O.; Gauthier, J.-C.

    2006-05-01

    The ionization and recombination dynamics of transient aluminum plasmas was measured using point projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy. An aluminum plasma was produced with a subpicosecond beam of the 100-TW laser at the LULI facility and probed at different times with a picosecond X-ray backlighter created with a synchronized subpicosecond laser beam. Fourier-Domain-Interferometry (FDI) was used to measure the electron temperature at the peak of the heating laser pulse. Absorption X-ray spectra at early times are characteristic of a dense and rather homogeneous plasma, with limited longitudinal gradients as shown by hydrodynamic simulations. The shift of the Al K-edge was measured in the cold dense plasma located at the edge of the heated plasma. From the 1s 2p absorption spectra, the average ionization was measured as a function of time and was also modeled with a collisional-radiative atomic physics code coupled with hydrodynamic simulations.

  7. On the lag phase in amyloid fibril formation

    PubMed Central

    Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-01-01

    The formation of nanoscale amyloid fibrils from normally soluble peptides and proteins is a common form of self-assembly phenomenon that has fundamental connections with biological functions and human diseases. The kinetics of this process has been widely studied and exhibits on a macroscopic level three characteristic stages: a lag phase, a growth phase and a final plateau regime. The question of which molecular events take place during each one of these phases has been a central element in the quest for a mechanism of amyloid formation. In this review, we discuss the nature and molecular origin of the lag-phase in amyloid formation by making use of tools and concepts from physical chemistry, in particular from chemical reaction kinetics. We discuss how, in macroscopic samples, it has become apparent that the lag-phase is not a waiting time for nuclei to form. Rather, multiple parallel processes exist and typically millions of primary nuclei form during the lag phase from monomers in solution. Thus, the lag-time represents a time that is required for the nuclei that are formed early on in the reaction to grow and proliferate in order to reach an aggregate concentration that is readily detected in bulk assays. In many cases, this proliferation takes place through secondary nucleation, where fibrils may present a catalytic surface for the formation of new aggregates. Fibrils may also break (fragmentation) and thereby provide new ends for elongation. Thus, at least two – primary nucleation and elongation – and in many systems at least four – primary nucleation, elongation, secondary nucleation and fragmentation – microscopic processes occur during the lag phase. Moreover, these same processes occur during all three phases of the macroscopic aggregation process, albeit at different rates as governed by rate constants and by the concentration of reacting species at each point in time. PMID:25719972

  8. Prediction of Iron K-Edge Absorption Spectra Using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    George, S.DeBeer; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2009-05-14

    Iron K-edge X-ray absorption pre-edge features have been calculated using a time-dependent density functional approach. The influence of functional, solvation, and relativistic effects on the calculated energies and intensities has been examined by correlation of the calculated parameters to experimental data on a series of 10 iron model complexes, which span a range of high-spin and low-spin ferrous and ferric complexes in O{sub h} to T{sub d} geometries. Both quadrupole and dipole contributions to the spectra have been calculated. We find that good agreement between theory and experiment is obtained by using the BP86 functional with the CP(PPP) basis set on the Fe and TZVP one of the remaining atoms. Inclusion of solvation yields a small improvement in the calculated energies. However, the inclusion of scalar relativistic effects did not yield any improved correlation with experiment. The use of these methods to uniquely assign individual spectral transitions and to examine experimental contributions to backbonding is discussed.

  9. Time resolved infrared absorption studies of geminate recombination and vibrational relaxation in OClO photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Hayes, Sophia C.; Reid, Philip J.

    2004-09-01

    Ultrafast time-resolved infrared absorption studies of aqueous chlorine dioxide (OClO) photochemistry are reported. Following photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density at frequencies between 1000 to 1100 cm-1 is monitored to investigate vibrational energy deposition and relaxation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate following the reformation of ground-state OClO via geminate recombination of the primary photofragments. The measured kinetics are compared to two proposed models for the vibrational-relaxation dynamics along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. This comparison demonstrates that the perturbation model derived from molecular dynamics studies is capable of qualitatively reproducing the observed kinetics, where the collisional model employed in previous UV-pump, visible probe experiments demonstrates poor agreement with experiment. The ability of the perturbation model to reproduce the optical-density evolution observed in these studies demonstrates that for aqueous OClO, frequency dependence of the solvent-solute coupling is important in defining the level-dependent vibrational relaxation rates along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. The absence of optical-density evolution corresponding to the population of higher vibrational levels (n>8) along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate suggests that following geminate recombination, energy is initially deposited into a local Cl-O stretch, with the relaxation of vibrational energy from this coordinate providing for delayed vibrational excitation of the asymmetric- and symmetric-stretch coordinates relative to geminate recombination, as previously observed.

  10. In-Line Capacitance Sensor for Real-Time Water Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Perusich, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A capacitance/dielectric sensor was designed, constructed, and used to measure in real time the in-situ water concentration in a desiccant water bed. Measurements were carried out with two experimental setups: (1) passing nitrogen through a humidity generator and allowing the gas stream to become saturated at a measured temperature and pressure, and (2) injecting water via a syringe pump into a nitrogen stream. Both water vapor generating devices were attached to a downstream vertically-mounted water capture bed filled with 19.5 g of Moisture Gone desiccant. The sensor consisted of two electrodes: (1) a 1/8" dia stainless steel rod placed in the middle of the bed and (2) the outer shell of the stainless steel bed concentric with the rod. All phases of the water capture process (background, heating, absorption, desorption, and cooling) were monitored with capacitance. The measured capacitance was found to vary linearly with the water content in the bed at frequencies above 100 kHz indicating dipolar motion dominated the signal; below this frequency, ionic motion caused nonlinearities in the water concentration/capacitance relationship. The desiccant exhibited a dielectric relaxation whose activation energy was lowered upon addition of water indicating either a less hindered rotational motion or crystal reorientation.

  11. Species richness changes lag behind climate change.

    PubMed

    Menéndez, Rosa; Megías, Adela González; Hill, Jane K; Braschler, Brigitte; Willis, Stephen G; Collingham, Yvonne; Fox, Richard; Roy, David B; Thomas, Chris D

    2006-06-22

    Species-energy theory indicates that recent climate warming should have driven increases in species richness in cool and species-poor parts of the Northern Hemisphere. We confirm that the average species richness of British butterflies has increased since 1970-82, but much more slowly than predicted from changes of climate: on average, only one-third of the predicted increase has taken place. The resultant species assemblages are increasingly dominated by generalist species that were able to respond quickly. The time lag is confirmed by the successful introduction of many species to climatically suitable areas beyond their ranges. Our results imply that it may be decades or centuries before the species richness and composition of biological communities adjusts to the current climate. PMID:16777739

  12. MRI is unable to illustrate the absorption time of the absorbable TIGR mesh in humans: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Öberg, Stina; Andresen, Kristoffer; Møller, Jakob M.; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A male patient had a bilateral laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in 2012. The right-sided hernia was treated with a permanent mesh, and the left-sided hernia received an absorbable mesh. The absorbable TIGR mesh has been proved to be completely absorbed and replaced by new connective tissue after 3 years in sheep. The patient was therefore followed for 3 years by annual magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) to illustrate the absorption time in humans. During follow-up, the thickness of the absorbable mesh slightly decreased, and at the last clinical examination, the patient was without a recurrence. However, MRI failed to illustrate absorption of the TIGR mesh, perhaps since new connective tissue and the mesh material had the same appearance on the images. In conclusion, MRI was unable to confirm an absorption time of 3 years for the TIGR mesh, and further studies are needed to investigate if the mesh also completely absorbs in humans. PMID:26581219

  13. Pressure Lag in Tubing Used in Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Howard L; Rathert, George A , Jr

    1945-01-01

    Tests described in this report were undertaken to obtain a quantitative measure of the pressure lag in typical pressure-tubing systems used by the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory in flight research investigations. Lag measurements were made with both single-direction and oscillating pressure changes. Single-direction pressure changes were investigated to determine if the lag in orifice-pressure lines and in the research airspeed and altitude measuring systems of pursuit-type airplane undergoing flight tests was sufficient to cause an appreciable error in the record of a sudden pressure change. Oscillating pressure changes were investigated with particular reference to the accuracy of pressure peaks in pressure-distribution measurements during the time of buffeting conditions as found in stalls. (author)

  14. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  15. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-03-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  16. Spectral lag features of GRB 060814 from swift bat and Suzaku observations

    SciTech Connect

    Roychoudhury, Arundhati; Sarkar, Samir K.; Bhadra, Arunava E-mail: samirksarkar@rediffmail.com

    2014-02-20

    This work reports a study on the spectral lag of the prompt emission spectrum of a multi-pulse gamma-ray burst (GRB) GRB 060814 (z = 0.84) using the observations of the Swift Burst Alert Telescope and the Suzaku Wide Area Monitor. We found that the spectral lag for GRB 060814 is positive for the first two and the fourth pulses, while the third pulse exhibits negative lag. However, the time variation of the E {sub peak} of all the stated pulses shows a similar trend. The leading models for spectral lags in GRBs are thus found inadequate to explain the observed spectral lag features of GRB 060814. Probable causes of the spectral lag characteristics of GRB 060814 are discussed.

  17. Time-Resolved Transient Absorption Spectroscopy and Luminescence in Undoped YVO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochum, H. M.; Grigorjeva, L.; Yochum, M. C. S.; Stevens, K. T.

    2005-03-01

    Yttrium orthovanadate (YVO4) is currently used as a solid-state laser host material and as a polarization component for fiber optic applications but suffers from crystal uniformity and discoloration problems. In an effort to increase our understanding of electron-hole traps and their role on the optical properties of YVO4, we have measured transient absorption spectra (1.1 eV - 3.5 eV) and relaxation kinetics following electron-hole pair generation induced by 270 keV, 10 ns electron pulses for probe delays 10 ns--10 microseconds. These experiments were completed on four Czochralski grown YVO4 samples with different levels of as-grown absorption in the 380 nm -- 430 nm region. For all samples, we find three transient absorption bands with similar energies. We have also measured the luminescence kinetics induced by ns electron pulses and by light pulses at 355 nm and 420 nm -- 600 nm.

  18. Acoustical pipe lagging systems design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.D.; Chapnik, B.V.; Howe, B.

    1998-10-30

    HGC Engineering was retained by the PRC International at the American Gas Association, to undertake a study of acoustical pipe lagging systems. The study included gathering input from PRCI member companies regarding their concerns and their established material specifications for lagging systems; conducting a comprehensive acoustical measurement program; using the measured results in conjunction with computer modeling to identify optimal lagging configurations; and developing material specifications for several standardized lagging systems for use by PRCI member companies. For all the lagging configurations, the measurement and modeling results showed amplification of sound at frequencies less than about 315 Hz. This result is a well known phenomenon, widely discussed the published acoustical literature, which means that pipe lagging is only effective for controlling higher frequencies noise (above about 500 Hz). Fortunately, in many gas piping applications, it is this higher frequency range that is of concern. The measurement and modeling results further showed that the high frequency performance of a lagging system is dependent primarily on having sufficient jacket mass and insulation thickness. The performance can be improved using an intermediate mass loaded barrier layer.

  19. The lag RST turbulence model applied to vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, Matthew John

    The subject of this work is the application of Olsen and Coakley's Reynolds stress relaxation turbulence model, which they call the lag Reynold stress transport (RST) model, to wingtip vortex flows. The lag RST model is meant for general non-equilibrium turbulent flows, and has not been applied to vortical flows before this work. Such a model relaxes the Reynolds stresses toward their equilibrium value, determined by the Boussinesq approximation, at a rate depending on a model constant, alpha0, multiplied by the specific dissipation rate of the turbulence, o. The alpha 0 constant can be adjusted to vary the rate at which the Reynolds stress tensor relaxes toward its equilibrium value. It performs this relaxation by solving for the equilibrium Reynolds stresses using Wilcox's k-o model, but then uses a relaxation equation to solve for the actual Reynolds stress tensor. The lag RST turbulence model allows the principal axes of the Reynolds stress tensor to be misaligned with those of the mean strain rate tensor, something linear eddy viscosity models cannot do, but something that occurs in actual vortical flows. The lag RST model is used with the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations to compute a one-dimensional, time-varying, line vortex with axial flow, called the q-vortex. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) data is available for comparison. Also, a modified version of the OVERFLOW code is used to solve the RANS and lag RST model equations in a three-dimensional wingtip vortex flow, for which there is experimental data. This work shows that computations performed with the lag RST model have a mean flow in much better agreement with the DNS or experimental data than those performed with the k-o model, the lag RST model's base. In fact, the lag RST model performs equally or better in this these flows than the well performing Spalart-Allmaras model with a correction for streamline curvature and rotation. As the lag parameter alpha0 is decreased, the amount

  20. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-01

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  1. AIR POLLUTION EPIDEMIOLOGY: CAN INFORMATION BE OBTAINED FROM THE VARIATIONS IN SIGNIFICANCE AND RISK AS A FUNCTION OF DAYS AFTER EXPOSURE (LAG STRUCTURE)?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determine if analysis of lag structure from time series epidemiology, using gases, particles, and source factor time series, can contribute to understanding the relationships among various air pollution indicators. Methods: Analyze lag structure from an epidemiologic study of ca...

  2. Attosecond XUV absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states in helium atoms dressed by a time-delayed femtosecond infrared laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Z. Q.; Ye, D. F.; Ding, Thomas; Pfeifer, Thomas; Fu, L. B.

    2015-01-01

    In the present paper, we investigate the time-resolved transient absorption spectroscopy of doubly excited states of helium atoms by solving the time-dependent two-electron Schrödinger equation numerically based on a one-dimensional model. The helium atoms are subjected to an extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse and a time-delayed infrared (IR) few-cycle laser pulse. A superposition of doubly excited states populated by the XUV pulse is identified, which interferes with the direct ionization pathway leading to Fano resonance profiles in the photoabsorption spectrum. In the presence of an IR laser, however, the Fano line profiles are strongly modified: A shifting, splitting, and broadening of the original absorption lines is observed when the XUV attosecond pulse and infrared few-cycle laser pulse overlap in time, which is in good agreement with recent experimental results. At certain time delays, we observe symmetric Lorentz, inverted Fano profiles, and even negative absorption cross sections indicating that the XUV light can be amplified during the interaction with atoms. We further prove that the above pictures are general for different doubly excited states by suitably varying the frequency of the IR field to coherently couple the corresponding states.

  3. A simple theory of lags in gamma-ray bursts: Comparison to observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochkovitch, R.; Heussaff, V.; Atteia, J. L.; Boçi, S.; Hafizi, M.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Lags observed between the light curves of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) seen in different energy bands are related to its spectral evolution. Moreover the lags have been found to correlate with burst luminosity, therefore providing a potential distance indicator. Aims: We want to quantify the nature of the link between lags and spectral evolution to better understand the origin of the lag-luminosity relation and evaluate its interest as a distance indicator. Methods: We directly relate the lag of a pulse to the spectral parameters (peak energy Ep, low and high energy indices, α and β, and their time derivatives) evaluated at pulse maximum. Then, using a Yonetoku-like relation we obtain a theoretical lag-luminosity relation that is confronted with data. Results: We first apply our model to the initial pulse of GRB 130427A, for which high quality data are available, to check quantitatively whether the measured lags are consistent with the observed spectral evolution. We then use a Monte Carlo approach to generate a sample of synthetic lags, which we compare to an observed sample of Swift bursts. The dispersion of both the observed and modelled lag-luminosity relations appears large, which questions the value of this relation as a reliable distance indicator.

  4. Dissipation, correlation and lags in heat engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campisi, Michele; Fazio, Rosario

    2016-08-01

    By modelling heat engines as driven multi-partite system we show that their dissipation can be expressed in terms of the lag (relative entropy) between the perturbed state of each partition and their equilibrium state, and the correlations that build up among the partitions. We show that the non-negativity of the overall dissipation implies Carnot formulation of the second law. We illustrate the rich interplay between correlations and lags with a two-qubit device driven by a quantum gate.

  5. Implication of Lag cross over QPO frequency in black hole binaries during outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal Dutta, Broja; Sarathi Pal, Partha; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Studies of energy dependent temporal properties in different variability time scales can diagnose dynamics and geometry of accretion flows around black holes. The dependence of time lag on photon energy is more intriguing in black hole binaries. We study lag properties for high inclination sources using RXTE/PCA data. We find that the lag at QPO frequency generally rises as the frequency itself goes down in both high and low inclination sources. An exactly opposite result is found also in the declining phase. In TCAF solution, this implies that the lag would increase as the size of the Comptonizing region increases. We discussed all possible effects which could be controlling the property of the lag. We also find that for the high inclination objects, at a particular QPO frequency, time lag changes its sign from positive to negative, i.e., soft photons appearing before hard photons due to reflection and focusing effects. This frequency gives rise to a characteristic length-scale where the lag changes its sign. This characteristic length-scale is again would depend on inclination angles and the mass of the black holes. We discuss possibility of finding black hole mass with this lag property.

  6. Embedded absorbers for helicopter rotor lag damping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers, Lynn; Gandhi, Farhan

    2009-09-01

    Radial and chordwise damped vibration absorbers embedded in the rotor blade are compared for rotor lag damping augmentation. Results show that the radial absorber is more effective in transferring damping to the rotor blade lag mode. The chordwise absorber needs to be at a more outboard location and have a larger mass to introduce levels of lag damping comparable to that introduced by the radial absorber. The 1/rev amplitude of a chordwise absorber at the blade tip, per degree of blade lead-lag motion in forward flight, is of the order of 35% of the blade chord, and such a stroke might be difficult to accommodate. The 1/rev amplitude of a radial absorber at 70% span (having significantly lower mass than the chordwise absorber and producing comparable lag damping) is of the order of 4% of the rotor blade span. The static displacement of the radial absorber under centrifugal load needs to be limited using a frequency-dependent (high static stiffness, low dynamic stiffness) or nonlinear spring. The chordwise absorber can also undergo a large static displacement under the chordwise component of the centrifugal load if there is an offset from the feather axis, and this would again have to be limited using a strategy such as a frequency-dependent spring. Significant advantages of the radial absorber are—higher lag damping, lower absorber mass, space for absorber mass travel, and no chordwise travel of blade center of gravity reducing susceptibility to aeroelastic instability and dynamic pitch-link loads.

  7. Picosecond time-resolved absorption and fluorescence dynamics in the artificial bacteriorhodopsin pigment BR6.11.

    PubMed Central

    Brack, T. L.; Delaney, J. K.; Atkinson, G. H.; Albeck, A.; Sheves, M.; Ottolenghi, M.

    1993-01-01

    The picosecond molecular dynamics in an artificial bacteriorhodopsin (BR) pigment containing a structurally modified all-trans retinal chromphore with a six-membered ring bridging the C11=C12-C13 positions (BR6.11) are measured by picosecond transient absorption and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Time-dependent intensity and spectral changes in absorption in the 570-650-nm region are monitored for delays as long as 5 ns after the 7-ps, 573-nm excitation of BR6.11. Two intermediates, J6.11 and K6.11/1, both with enhanced absorption to the red (> 600 nm) of the BR6.11 spectrum are observed within approximately 50 ps. The J6.11 intermediate decays with a time constant of 12 +/- 3 ps to form K6.11/1. The K6.11/1 intermediate decays with an approximately 100-ps time constant to form a third intermediate, K6.11/2, which is observed through diminished 650-nm absorption (relative to that of K6.11/1). No other transient absorption changes are found during the remainder of the initial 5-ns period of the BR6.11 photoreaction. Fluorescence in the 650-900-nm region is observed from BR6.11, K6.11/1, and K6.11/2, but no emission assignable to J6.11 is found. The BR6.11 fluroescence spectrum has a approximately 725-nm maximum which is blue-shifted by approximately 15 nm relative to that of native BR-570 and is 4.2 +/- 1.5 times larger in intensity (same sample optical density). No differences in the profile of the fluorescence spectra of BR6.11 and the intermediates K6.11/1 and K6.11/2 are observed. Following ground-state depletion of the BR6.11 population, the time-resolved fluroescence intensity monitored at 725 nm increases with two time constants, 12 +/- 3 and approximately 100 ps, both of which correlate well with changes in the picosecond transient absorption data. The resonance Raman spectrum of ground-state BR6.11, measured with low-energy, 560-nm excitation, is significantly different from the spectrum of native BR-570, thus confirming that the

  8. A SOFT X-RAY REVERBERATION LAG IN THE AGN ESO 113-G010

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Zogbhi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Uttley, P.

    2013-02-10

    Reverberation lags have recently been discovered in a handful of nearby, variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here, we analyze a {approx}100 ks archival XMM-Newton observation of the highly variable AGN, ESO 113-G010, in order to search for lags between hard, 1.5-4.5 keV, and soft, 0.3-0.9 keV, energy X-ray bands. At the lowest frequencies available in the light curve ({approx}< 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz), we find hard lags where the power-law-dominated hard band lags the soft band (where the reflection fraction is high). However, at higher frequencies in the range (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz we find a soft lag of -325 {+-} 89 s. The general evolution from hard to soft lags as the frequency increases is similar to other AGNs where soft lags have been detected. We interpret this soft lag as due to reverberation from the accretion disk, with the reflection component responding to variability from the X-ray corona. For a black hole mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} this corresponds to a light-crossing time of {approx}9 R{sub g} /c; however, dilution effects mean that the intrinsic lag is likely longer than this. Based on recent black hole mass scaling for lag properties, the lag amplitude and frequency are more consistent with a black hole a few times more massive than the best estimates, though flux-dependent effects could easily add scatter this large.

  9. Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering and Absorption by Particles in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique has been extended to simulate light scattering and absorption by nonspherical particles embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition is used to truncate the computational domain. When computing the single-scattering properties of a particle in an absorbing dielectric medium, we derive the single-scattering properties including scattering phase functions, extinction, and absorption efficiencies using a volume integration of the internal field. A Mie solution for light scattering and absorption by spherical particles in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD code. It is found that the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies from the 3-D UPML FDTD are less than similar to 2%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically less than similar to 5%. The errors in the asymmetry factors are less than similar to 0.l%. For light scattering by particles in free space, the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD scheme is similar to a previous model.

  10. Real-time trace gas sensor using a multimode diode laser and multiple-line integrated cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2015-07-01

    We describe and demonstrate a highly sensitive trace gas sensor based on a simplified design that is capable of measuring sub-ppb concentrations of NO2 in tens of milliseconds. The sensor makes use of a relatively inexpensive Fabry-Perot diode laser to conduct off-axis cavity enhanced spectroscopy. The broad frequency range of a multimode Fabry-Perot diode laser spans a large number of absorption lines, thereby removing the need for a single-frequency tunable laser source. The use of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy enhances the sensitivity of the sensor by providing a pathlength on the order of 1 km in a small volume. Off-axis alignment excites a large number of cavity modes simultaneously, thereby reducing the sensor's susceptibility to vibration. Multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy (where one integrates the absorption spectra over a large number of rovibronic transitions of the molecular species) further improves the sensitivity of detection. Relatively high laser power (∼400  mW) is used to compensate for the low coupling efficiency of a broad linewidth laser to the optical cavity. The approach was demonstrated using a 407 nm diode laser to detect trace quantities of NO2 in zero air. Sensitivities of 750 ppt, 110 ppt, and 65 ppt were achieved using integration times of 50 ms, 5 s, and 20 s respectively. PMID:26193156

  11. Tailored pump-probe transient spectroscopy with time-dependent density-functional theory: controlling absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkenhorst, Jessica; De Giovannini, Umberto; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology allow us to follow electronic motion at its natural time-scale with ultra-fast time resolution, leading the way towards attosecond physics experiments of extreme precision. In this work, we assess the use of tailored pumps in order to enhance (or reduce) some given features of the probe absorption (for example, absorption in the visible range of otherwise transparent samples). This type of manipulation of the system response could be helpful for its full characterization, since it would allow us to visualize transitions that are dark when using unshaped pulses. In order to investigate these possibilities, we perform first a theoretical analysis of the non-equilibrium response function in this context, aided by one simple numerical model of the hydrogen atom. Then, we proceed to investigate the feasibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory as a means to implement, theoretically, this absorption-optimization idea, for more complex atoms or molecules. We conclude that the proposed idea could in principle be brought to the laboratory: tailored pump pulses can excite systems into light-absorbing states. However, we also highlight the severe numerical and theoretical difficulties posed by the problem: large-scale non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are cumbersome, even with TDDFT, and the shortcomings of state-of-the-art TDDFT functionals may still be serious for these out-of-equilibrium situations.

  12. PROCEDURES FOR CALCULATING CESSATION LAG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental regulations aimed at reducing cancer risks usually have the effect of reducing exposure to a carcinogen at the time the regulation is implemented. The reduction of cancer risk may occur shortly after the reduced exposure or after a considerable period of time. The t...

  13. Encoding, maintenance, and retrieval processes in the lag effect: a multinomial processing tree analysis.

    PubMed

    Küpper-Tetzel, Carolina E; Erdfelder, Edgar

    2012-01-01

    Short-term studies on repeated learning of verbatim material have typically revealed an overall benefit of long lags compared to short lags between repetitions. This has been referred to as the lag effect. On educationally relevant time scales, however, an inverted-U-shaped relation between lag and memory performance is often observed. Recently, Cepeda et al. (2009) showed that the optimal lag for relearning depends heavily on the time interval between the last learning session and the final memory test (i.e., the retention interval; RI). In order to explore the cognitive mechanisms underlying this result in more detail we independently manipulated both the lag and the RI in a 3×2 experimental design and analysed our data using a multinomial processing tree model for free-then-cued-recall data. Our results reveal that the lag effect trends are mainly driven by encoding and maintenance processes rather than by retrieval mechanisms. Our findings have important implications for theories of the lag effect. PMID:22171809

  14. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  15. A method for segregating the optical absorption properties and the mass concentration of winter time urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajtai, T.; Utry, N.; Pintér, M.; Major, B.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2015-12-01

    A novel in-situ, real time method for the determination of inherent absorption properties of light absorbing carbonaceous particulate matter and its possible application for source apportionment are introduced here. The method is deduced from a two-week campaign under wintry urban conditions during which strong correlation was found between aerosol number size distribution and wavelength dependent optical absorption coefficient (AOC(λ)), measured by a Single Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a multi-wavelength photoacoustic absorption spectrometer, respectively, while wood burning and traffic (i.e. fossil fuel burning) activity were identified to be the dominant sources of carbonaceous particulate. Indeed, during the whole campaign, regardless of the actual emission strength of the aerosol sources, the measured number size distributions were always dominated by two unimodal modes with Count Mean Diameter (CMD) of 20 and 100 nm, which could be correlated to traffic and wood burning activities, respectively. AAEff, AAEwb (i.e. the Aerosol Angström Exponent of traffic and wood burning aerosol, respectively), σff(266 nm), σff(1064 nm), σwb(266 nm) and σff(1064 nm) (i.e. the segregated mass specific optical absorption coefficients at two of the measurement wavelengths) were found to be 1.17 ± 0.18, 2.6 ± 0.14, 7.3 ± 0.3 m2g-1, 1.7 ± 0.1 m2g-1 3.4 ± 0.3 m2g-1 and 0.31 ± 0.08 m2g-1, respectively. Furthermore the introduced methodology can also disentangle and quantify the temporal variation of both the segregated optical absorptions and the segregated mass concentrations of traffic and wood burning aerosol. Accordingly, the contribution of wood burning to optical absorption of PM was found to be negligible at 1064 nm but increased gradually towards the shorter wavelengths and became commensurable with the optical absorption of traffic at 266 nm during the whole measurement period. Furthermore, the contribution of wood burning mass to CM (mass of carbonaceous

  16. Stabilized NADH as a Countermeasure for Jet Lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Gary G.; Viirre, Erik; Clark, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Current remedies for jet lag (phototherapy, melatonin, stimulant, and sedative medications) are limited in efficacy and practicality. The efficacy of a stabilized, sublingual form of reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, ENADAlert, Menuco Corp.) as a countermeasure for jet lag was examined. Because NADH increases cellular production of ATP and facilitates dopamine synthesis, it may counteract the effects of jet lag on cognitive functioning and sleepiness. Thirty-five healthy, employed subjects participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Training and baseline testing were conducted on the West Coast before subjects flew overnight to the East Coast, where they would experience a 3-hour time difference. Upon arrival, individuals were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg of sublingual stabilized ADH (n=18) or identical placebo tablets (n=17). All participants completed computer-administered tests (including CogScreen7) to assess changes in cognitive functioning, mood, and sleepiness in the morning and afternoon. Jet lag resulted in increased sleepiness for over half the participants and deterioration of cognitive functioning for approximately one third. The morning following the flight, subjects experienced lapses of attention in addition to disruptions in working memory, divided attention, and visual perceptual speed. Individuals who received NADH performed significantly better on 5 of 8 cognitive and psychomotor test measures (P less than or equal to 0.5) and showed a trend for better performance on the other three measures (P less than or equal to .l0). Subjects also reported less sleepiness compared with those who received placebo. No adverse effects were observed with NADH treatment. Stabilized NADH significantly reduced jet lag-induced disruptions of cognitive functioning, was easily administered, and was found to have no adverse side effects.

  17. Collective Dynamics of Oscillator Networks: Why do we suffer from heavy jet lag?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kori, Hiroshi

    The circadian rhythm of the entire body in mammals is orchestrated by a small tissue in the brain called the suprachiamatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN consists of a population of neurons, each of which exhibit circadian (i.e., approximately 24 h) gene expression. Neurons form a complex network and interact with each other using various types of neurotransmitters. The rhythmic gene expressions of individual cells in the SCN synchronize through such interaction. Jet-lag symptoms arise from temporal mismatch between the internal circadian clock orchestrated by the SCN and external solar time. It may take about one week or even longer to recover from jet lag after a long-distance trip. We recently found that recovery from jet lag is considerably accelerated in the knocked-out (KO) mice lacking the receptors of a certain neurotransmitter in the SCN. Importantly, all other properties of mice including sleep-awake rhythms and breeding seem to be intact. Only the response to the jet lag changes. It was also found that after a few days of jet lag, cells in the SCN desynchronize in the wild type (WT) mice, whereas they do not in KO mice. This desynchrony might be a main reason for heavy jet lag symptoms. To understand the mechanism underlying jet lag, we propose a simple model of the SCN, which is a network of phase oscillators. Despite its simplicity, this model can reproduce important dynamical properties of the SCN. For example, this model reproduces the desynchrony of oscillators after jet lag. Moreover, when intercellular interaction is weaker, this desynchrony is suppressed and the recover from jet lag is considerably accelerated. Our mathematical study provides a deeper understanding of jet lag and an idea how to circumvent heavy jet lag symptoms

  18. Infrared absorption of gaseous ClCS detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Li-Kang; Han, Hui-Ling; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2007-05-07

    A transient infrared absorption spectrum of gaseous ClCS was detected with a step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell. ClCS was produced upon irradiating a flowing mixture of Cl{sub 2}CS and N{sub 2} or CO{sub 2} with a KrF excimer laser at 248 nm. A transient band in the region of 1160-1220 cm{sup -1}, which diminished on prolonged reaction, is assigned to the C-S stretching ({nu}{sub 1}) mode of ClCS. Calculations with density-functional theory (B3P86 and B3LYP/aug-cc-pVTZ) predict the geometry, vibrational wave numbers, and rotational parameters of ClCS. The rotational contour of the spectrum of ClCS simulated based on predicted rotational parameters agrees satisfactorily with experimental observation; from spectral simulation, the band origin is determined to be at 1194.4 cm{sup -1}. Reaction kinetics involving ClCS, CS, and CS{sub 2} are discussed.

  19. 100-picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure of FeII(1,10-phenanthroline)3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Tokushi; Nozawa, Shunsuke; Ichiyanagi, Kouhei; Tomita, Ayana; Ichikawa, Hirohiko; Chollet, Matthieu; Fujii, Hiroshi; Adachi, Shin-ichi; Koshihara, Shin-ya

    2009-02-01

    Studying photo-induced molecular dynamics in liquid with sub-nanosecond time-resolution and sub-Angstrom spatial resolution gives information for understanding fundamental chemical process in the photo-induced cooperative phenomena of molecular systems and also for developing new materials and devices. Here, we present time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure on the spin-crossover complex FeII tris-(1,10-phenanthroline) dissolved in aqueous solution. We utilized femtosecond laser at 400nm pulse for excitation and 100ps X-ray pulse for probe.

  20. Selection of Temporal Lags When Modeling Economic and Financial Processes.

    PubMed

    Matilla-Garcia, Mariano; Ojeda, Rina B; Marin, Manuel Ruiz

    2016-10-01

    This paper suggests new nonparametric statistical tools and procedures for modeling linear and nonlinear univariate economic and financial processes. In particular, the tools presented help in selecting relevant lags in the model description of a general linear or nonlinear time series; that is, nonlinear models are not a restriction. The tests seem to be robust to the selection of free parameters. We also show that the test can be used as a diagnostic tool for well-defined models. PMID:27550703

  1. Infrared absorption of CH3OSO detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jin-Dah; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-03-01

    A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to detect temporally resolved infrared absorption spectra of CH(3)OSO produced upon irradiation of a flowing gaseous mixture of CH(3)OS(O)Cl in N(2) or CO(2) at 248 nm. Two intense transient features with origins near 1152 and 994 cm(-1) are assigned to syn-CH(3)OSO; the former is attributed to overlapping bands at 1154 ± 3 and 1151 ± 3 cm(-1), assigned to the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) rocking (ν(8)) and the S=O stretching mixed with CH(3) wagging (ν(9)) modes, respectively, and the latter to the C-O stretching (ν(10)) mode at 994 ± 6 cm(-1). Two weak bands at 2991 ± 6 and 2956 ± 3 cm(-1) are assigned as the CH(3) antisymmetric stretching (ν(2)) and symmetric stretching (ν(3)) modes, respectively. Observed vibrational transition wavenumbers agree satisfactorily with those predicted with quantum-chemical calculations at level B3P86∕aug-cc-pVTZ. Based on rotational parameters predicted at that level, the simulated rotational contours of these bands agree satisfactorily with experimental results. The simulation indicates that the S=O stretching mode of anti-CH(3)OSO near 1164 cm(-1) likely makes a small contribution to the observed band near 1152 cm(-1). A simple kinetic model of self-reaction is employed to account for the decay of CH(3)OSO and yields a second-order rate coefficient k=(4 ± 2)×10(-10) cm(3)molecule(-1)s(-1). PMID:21384966

  2. Infrared absorption of CH3OSO detected with time-resolved Fourier-transform spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jin-Dah; Lee, Yuan-Pern

    2011-03-01

    A step-scan Fourier-transform spectrometer coupled with a multipass absorption cell was employed to detect temporally resolved infrared absorption spectra of CH3OSO produced upon irradiation of a flowing gaseous mixture of CH3OS(O)Cl in N2 or CO2 at 248 nm. Two intense transient features with origins near 1152 and 994 cm-1 are assigned to syn-CH3OSO; the former is attributed to overlapping bands at 1154 ± 3 and 1151 ± 3 cm-1, assigned to the S=O stretching mixed with CH3 rocking (ν8) and the S=O stretching mixed with CH3 wagging (ν9) modes, respectively, and the latter to the C-O stretching (ν10) mode at 994 ± 6 cm-1. Two weak bands at 2991 ± 6 and 2956 ± 3 cm-1 are assigned as the CH3 antisymmetric stretching (ν2) and symmetric stretching (ν3) modes, respectively. Observed vibrational transition wavenumbers agree satisfactorily with those predicted with quantum-chemical calculations at level B3P86/aug-cc-pVTZ. Based on rotational parameters predicted at that level, the simulated rotational contours of these bands agree satisfactorily with experimental results. The simulation indicates that the S=O stretching mode of anti-CH3OSO near 1164 cm-1 likely makes a small contribution to the observed band near 1152 cm-1. A simple kinetic model of self-reaction is employed to account for the decay of CH3OSO and yields a second-order rate coefficient k = (4 ± 2)×10-10 cm3 molecule-1 s-1.

  3. Mitigating shear lag in tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Himanshu; Goliya, Ravindra K.

    2015-09-01

    As the height of building increases, effect of shear lag also becomes considerable in the design of high-rise buildings. In this paper, shear lag effect in tall buildings of heights, i.e., 120, 96, 72, 48 and 36 stories of which aspect ratio ranges from 3 to 10 is studied. Tube-in-tube structural system with façade bracing is used for designing the building of height 120 story. It is found that bracing system considerably reduces the shear lag effect and hence increases the building stiffness to withstand lateral loads. Different geometric patterns of bracing system are considered. The best effective geometric configuration of bracing system is concluded in this study. Lateral force, as wind load is applied on the buildings as it is the most dominating lateral force for such heights. Wind load is set as per Indian standard code of practice IS 875 Part-3. For analysis purpose SAP 2000 software program is used.

  4. Individual-based modelling of bacterial cultures to study the microscopic causes of the lag phase.

    PubMed

    Prats, Clara; López, Daniel; Giró, Antoni; Ferrer, Jordi; Valls, Joaquim

    2006-08-21

    The lag phase has been widely studied for years in an effort to contribute to the improvement of food safety. Many analytical models have been built and tested by several authors. The use of Individual-based Modelling (IbM) allows us to probe deeper into the behaviour of individual cells; it is a bridge between theories and experiments when needed. INDividual DIScrete SIMulation (INDISIM) has been developed and coded by our group as an IbM simulator and used to study bacterial growth, including the microscopic causes of the lag phase. First of all, the evolution of cellular masses, specifically the mean mass and biomass distribution, is shown to be a determining factor in the beginning of the exponential phase. Secondly, whenever there is a need for an enzyme synthesis, its rate has a direct effect on the lag duration. The variability of the lag phase with different factors is also studied. The known decrease of the lag phase with an increase in the temperature is also observed in the simulations. An initial study of the relationship between individual and collective lag phases is presented, as a complement to the studies already published. One important result is the variability of the individual lag times and generation times. It has also been found that the mean of the individual lags is greater than the population lag. This is the first in a series of studies of the lag phase that we are carrying out. Therefore, the present work addresses a generic system by making a simple set of assumptions. PMID:16524598

  5. Jet Lag and Shift Work Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Abbott, Sabra M

    2015-12-01

    Jet lag and shift work disorder are circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders resulting from behaviorally altering the sleep-wake schedule in relation to the external environment. Not everyone who experiences trans-meridian travel or performs shift work has a disorder. The prevalence of jet lag disorder is unclear, approximately 5%-10% of shift workers have shift work disorder. Treatment aims to realign the internal circadian clock with the external environment. Behavioral therapies include sleep hygiene and management of the light-dark and sleep schedule. Pharmacologic agents are used to treat insomnia and excessive sleepiness, and melatonin is used to facilitate sleep and circadian realignment. PMID:26568127

  6. Scintillator avalanche photoconductor with high resolution emitter readout for low dose x-ray imaging: Lag

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan; Zhao, Wei; Nanba, Masakazu; Egami, Norifomi

    2009-01-01

    lag clearance procedure can be implemented by turning on all the FEA pixels simultaneously between subsequent frames without negative impact of readout speed. For large-area SAPHIRE, the bias electrode for the HARP needs to be divided into strips to allow parallel readout. With typical cardiac detector parameters, SAPHIRE with 128 parallel strips can provide real-time readout (30 frames∕s) with first frame lag of ∼4%. Conclusions: The investigation of lag in SAPHIRE shows that the angular distribution of emitted electrons from FEA can result in substantial lag if the readout was performed pixel by pixel. Effective strategies for reducing lag include dividing the bias electrode into multiple strips to allow parallel readout and the incorporation of rapid charge clearance procedure between subsequent frames or rows. PMID:19810477

  7. Flap-Lag-Torsion Stability in Forward Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, B.; Chopra, I.

    1985-01-01

    An aeroelastic stability of three-degree flap-lag-torsion blade in forward flight is examined. Quasisteady aerodynamics with a dynamic inflow model is used. The nonlinear time dependent periodic blade response is calculated using an iterative procedure based on Floquet theory. The periodic perturbation equations are solved for stability using Floquet transition matrix theory as well as constant coefficient approximation in the fixed reference frame. Results are presented for both stiff-inplane and soft-inplane blade configurations. The effects of several parameters on blade stability are examined, including structural coupling, pitch-flap and pitch-lag coupling, torsion stiffness, steady inflow distribution, dynamic inflow, blade response solution and constant coefficient approximation.

  8. Real-time process control using diode-laser absorption sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D.S.; Furlong, E.R.; Hanson, R.K.

    1996-12-31

    A multiplexed diode-laser sensor system, based on absorption spectroscopy techniques and comprised of two InGaAsP diode lasers and fiber-optic components, has been developed to measure temperature and species concentration non-intrusively over a single path for closed-loop process control. The system was applied to measure and control the gas temperature in the post-flame gases 6 mm above the surface of a Hencken burner (multiple CH{sub 4}-air diffusion flames). The wavelengths of the lasers were independently current-tuned across H{sub 2}O transitions near 1343 nm (v{sub 1} + v{sub 3} band) and 1392 nm (2v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} + v{sub 3} bands). Temperature was determined from the ratio of measured peak absorbances, and H{sub 2}O concentration was determined from the measured peak absorbance of one transition set at the measured temperature. A closed-loop feedback system was demonstrated to control the mean temperature and the amplitude of temperature fluctuations at particular frequencies by appropriately modulating the fuel flow rate. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of multiplexed diode lasers for rapid, continuous, in situ measurements and control of gasdynamic parameters in high-temperature combustion flowfields and other environments with difficult optical access.

  9. Time-Dependent Density Functional Calculations of Ligand K-Edge X-Ray Absorption Spectra

    SciTech Connect

    DeBeer George, S.; Petrenko, T.; Neese, F.

    2007-07-10

    X-ray absorption spectra (XAS) at the Cl and S K edge and Mo L edge have been calculated at the TDDFT level for a series of dioxomolybdenum complexes LMoO{sub 2}X (L = hydrotris(3,5-dimethyl-1-pyrazolyl)borate, X = Cl, SCH{sub 2}Ph, OPh), which play an important role in modeling the catalytic cycle of the sulfite oxidase enzyme. Also, the XAS spectra of model molecules of the Mo complexes have been simulated and interpreted in terms of the Mo 4d orbital splitting, in order to find possible correlations with the spectral pattern of the complexes. Comparison with the available experimental data allows us to assess the performances of the present computational scheme to describe the core excitations in large bioinorganic systems. The theoretical interpretation of the spectral features of both the metal and ligand core excitations in terms of the oscillator strength distribution provides important insight into the covalency of the metal-ligand bond.

  10. Traumatic brain injury: the lag between diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Retsinas, J

    1993-01-01

    Ogburn described the "culture lag" between technology and attitudes, as people take time to assimilate new technologies, and new facts, into their worldviews. Traumatic brain injury is now a common diagnosis, thanks to neurosurgical expertise. Where thirty years ago mortality from head injuries was high, today mortality rates have improved dramatically; yet even while neurosurgeons spare thousands of people each year, our society struggles to develop appropriate rehabilitation protocols. To date, we are in the lag phase, between diagnosis and treatment. This paper discusses that lag, including reasons for the lack of an effective rehabilitation protocol (the paucity of funds for research, the nature of brain injuries per se), the reluctance of insurers to cover brain injury rehabilitation (the lengthy time involved in rehabilitation, the blurring between rehabilitation and long term care, the nature of experience-rated contracting to businesses for health care insurance, the burgeoning of proprietary brain injury rehabilitation centers), and the prospects for closing the gap in the near future. The paper concludes that preventive measures (seat belt laws, motorcycle helmet laws, laws for helmets in contact sports) allow policy-makers to confront the growing societal problem of the mounting census of head-injured, by avoiding that census and focusing instead on the prevention, or diminution, of future head injuries. PMID:10125462

  11. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  12. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Dorchies, F. Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-15

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%–20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ∼1 mn and ∼100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  13. Time-averaging approximation in the interaction picture: Absorption line shapes for coupled chromophores with application to liquid water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Mino; Skinner, J. L.

    2011-10-01

    The time-averaging approximation (TAA), originally developed to calculate vibrational line shapes for coupled chromophores using mixed quantum/classical methods, is reformulated. In the original version of the theory, time averaging was performed for the full one-exciton Hamiltonian, while herein the time averaging is performed on the coupling (off-diagonal) Hamiltonian in the interaction picture. As a result, the influence of the dynamic fluctuations of the transition energies is more accurately described. We compare numerical results of the two versions of the TAA with numerically exact results for the vibrational absorption line shape of the OH stretching modes in neat water. It is shown that the TAA in the interaction picture yields theoretical line shapes that are in better agreement with exact results.

  14. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  15. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  16. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  17. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  18. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  19. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  20. Water vapor absorption in porous media polluted by calcium nitrate studied by time domain nuclear magnetic resonance.

    PubMed

    Gombia, Mirko; Bortolotti, Villiam; Brown, Robert J S; Camaiti, Mara; Cavallero, Luisa; Fantazzini, Paola

    2009-08-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance relaxation analysis of liquid water (1)H nuclei in real porous media, selected for their similar composition (carbonate rocks) and different pore space architecture, polluted with calcium nitrate, is presented to study the kinetics of water condensation and salt deliquescence inside the pore space. These phenomena are responsible for deterioration of porous materials when exposed to environmental injury by pollution in a humid atmosphere. The theory is well described for simple pore geometries, but it is not yet well understood in real porous media with wide distributions of pore sizes and connections. The experiment is performed by following in time the formation of liquid water inside the pore space by T(1) and T(2) relaxation time distributions. The distributions allow one to see the effects of both the salt concentration and the pore space structure on the amount of water vapor condensed and its kinetics. It is shown that, for a given lithotype, even with different amounts of pollutant, the rate-average relaxation time T(1ra) tends to increase monotonically with NMR signal, proportional to the amount of liquid water. T(1ra) is often inversely associated with surface-to-volume ratio. This suggests a trend toward the filling of larger pores as amounts of liquid water increase, but it does not indicate a strict sequential filling of pores in order of size and starting with the smallest; in fact, relaxation time distributions show clearly that this is not the case. Increased amounts of salt lead to both markedly increased rates and markedly increased amounts of water absorption. NMR measurements of amounts of water, together with relaxation time distributions, give the possibility of information on the effect of pollution in porous materials exposed to humid atmospheres but sheltered from liquid water, even before the absorption of large amounts of moisture and subsequent damage. These phenomena are of importance also in other fields

  1. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  2. Optimal Consumption in a Brownian Model with Absorption and Finite Time Horizon

    SciTech Connect

    Grandits, Peter

    2013-04-15

    We construct {epsilon}-optimal strategies for the following control problem: Maximize E[{integral}{sub [0,{tau})}e{sup -{beta}s} dC{sub s}+e{sup -{beta}{tau}}X{sub {tau}}] , where X{sub t}=x+{mu}t+{sigma}W{sub t}-C{sub t}, {tau}{identical_to}inf{l_brace}t>0|X{sub t}=0{r_brace} Logical-And T, T>0 is a fixed finite time horizon, W{sub t} is standard Brownian motion, {mu}, {sigma} are constants, and C{sub t} describes accumulated consumption until time t. It is shown that {epsilon}-optimal strategies are given by barrier strategies with time-dependent barriers.

  3. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  4. Triplet excited electronic state switching induced by hydrogen bonding: A transient absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT study.

    PubMed

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2016-03-21

    The solvent plays a decisive role in the photochemistry and photophysics of aromatic ketones. Xanthone (XT) is one such aromatic ketone and its triplet-triplet (T-T) absorption spectra show intriguing solvatochromic behavior. Also, the reactivity of XT towards H-atom abstraction shows an unprecedented decrease in protic solvents relative to aprotic solvents. Therefore, a comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of the triplet-triplet absorption spectra of XT was carried out in conjunction with time dependent density functional theory using the ad hoc explicit solvent model approach. A detailed solvatochromic analysis of the T-T absorption bands of XT suggests that the hydrogen bonding interactions are different in the corresponding triplet excited states. Furthermore, the contributions of non-specific and hydrogen bonding interactions towards differential solvation of the triplet states in protic solvents were found to be of equal magnitude. The frontier molecular orbital and electron density difference analysis of the T1 and T2 states of XT indicates that the charge redistribution in these states leads to intermolecular hydrogen bond strengthening and weakening, respectively, relative to the S0 state. This is further supported by the vertical excitation energy calculations of the XT-methanol supra-molecular complex. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding potential energy curves obtained for this complex in the S0, T1, and T2 states support the model. In summary, we propose that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest triplet excited states of XT result in a decreasing role of the nπ(∗) triplet state, and are thus responsible for its reduced reactivity towards H-atom abstraction in protic solvents. PMID:27004870

  5. Triplet excited electronic state switching induced by hydrogen bonding: A transient absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent DFT study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravi Kumar, Venkatraman; Ariese, Freek; Umapathy, Siva

    2016-03-01

    The solvent plays a decisive role in the photochemistry and photophysics of aromatic ketones. Xanthone (XT) is one such aromatic ketone and its triplet-triplet (T-T) absorption spectra show intriguing solvatochromic behavior. Also, the reactivity of XT towards H-atom abstraction shows an unprecedented decrease in protic solvents relative to aprotic solvents. Therefore, a comprehensive solvatochromic analysis of the triplet-triplet absorption spectra of XT was carried out in conjunction with time dependent density functional theory using the ad hoc explicit solvent model approach. A detailed solvatochromic analysis of the T-T absorption bands of XT suggests that the hydrogen bonding interactions are different in the corresponding triplet excited states. Furthermore, the contributions of non-specific and hydrogen bonding interactions towards differential solvation of the triplet states in protic solvents were found to be of equal magnitude. The frontier molecular orbital and electron density difference analysis of the T1 and T2 states of XT indicates that the charge redistribution in these states leads to intermolecular hydrogen bond strengthening and weakening, respectively, relative to the S0 state. This is further supported by the vertical excitation energy calculations of the XT-methanol supra-molecular complex. The intermolecular hydrogen bonding potential energy curves obtained for this complex in the S0, T1, and T2 states support the model. In summary, we propose that the different hydrogen bonding mechanisms exhibited by the two lowest triplet excited states of XT result in a decreasing role of the nπ∗ triplet state, and are thus responsible for its reduced reactivity towards H-atom abstraction in protic solvents.

  6. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - V. Time-variable interstellar absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEvoy, Catherine M.; Smoker, Jonathan V.; Dufton, Philip L.; Smith, Keith T.; Kennedy, Michael B.; Keenan, Francis P.; Lambert, David L.; Welty, Daniel E.; Lauroesch, James T.

    2015-08-01

    The structure and properties of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales, sub-au to 1 pc, are poorly understood. We compare interstellar absorption lines, observed towards a selection of O- and B-type stars at two or more epochs, to search for variations over time caused by the transverse motion of each star combined with changes in the structure in the foreground ISM. Two sets of data were used: 83 VLT/UVES spectra with approximately 6 yr between epochs and 21 McDonald observatory 2.7-m telescope echelle spectra with 6-20 yr between epochs, over a range of scales from ˜0-360 au. The interstellar absorption lines observed at the two epochs were subtracted and searched for any residuals due to changes in the foreground ISM. Of the 104 sightlines investigated with typically five or more components in Na I D, possible temporal variation was identified in five UVES spectra (six components), in Ca II, Ca I and/or Na I absorption lines. The variations detected range from 7 per cent to a factor of 3.6 in column density. No variation was found in any other interstellar species. Most sightlines show no variation, with 3σ upper limits to changes of the order 0.1-0.3 dex in Ca II and Na I. These variations observed imply that fine-scale structure is present in the ISM, but at the resolution available in this study, is not very common at visible wavelengths. A determination of the electron densities and lower limits to the total number density of a sample of the sightlines implies that there is no striking difference between these parameters in sightlines with, and sightlines without, varying components.

  7. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  8. Why does lag affect the durability of memory-based automaticity: loss of memory strength or interference?

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Nicolas J; Rawson, Katherine A

    2013-10-01

    In Rickard, Lau, and Pashler's (2008) investigation of the lag effect on memory-based automaticity, response times were faster and proportion of trials retrieved was higher at the end of practice for short lag items than for long lag items. However, during testing after a delay, response times were slower and proportion of trials retrieved was lower for short lag items than for long lag items. The current study investigated the extent to which the lag effect on the durability of memory-based automaticity is due to interference or to the loss of memory strength with time. Participants repeatedly practiced alphabet subtraction items in short lag and long lag conditions. After practice, half of the participants were immediately tested and the other half were tested after a 7-day delay. Results indicate that the lag effect on the durability of memory-based automaticity is primarily due to interference. We discuss potential modification of current memory-based processing theories to account for these effects. PMID:24012722

  9. Nanosecond time-resolved absorption studies of human oxyhemoglobin photolysis intermediates.

    PubMed Central

    Ghelichkhani, E; Goldbeck, R A; Lewis, J W; Kliger, D S

    1996-01-01

    The time-resolved spectra of photoproducts from ligand photodissociation of oxyhemoglobin are measured in the Soret spectral region for times from 10 ns to 320 microseconds after laser photolysis. Four processes are detected at a heme concentration of 80 microM: a 38-ns geminate recombination, a 137-ns tertiary relaxation, and two bimolecular processes for rebinding of molecular oxygen. The pseudo-first-order rate constants for rebinding to the alpha and beta subunits of hemoglobin are 3.2 x 10(4) s-1 (31 microseconds lifetime) and 9.4 x 10(4) s-1 (11 microseconds lifetime), respectively. The significance of kinetic measurements made at different heme concentrations is discussed in terms of the equilibrium compositions of hemoglobin tetramer and dimer mixtures. The rebinding rate constants for alpha and beta chains are observed to be about two times slower in the dimer than in the tetramer, a finding that appears to support the observation of quaternary enhancement in equilibrium ligand binding by hemoglobin tetramers. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 5 PMID:8874033

  10. How quickly do brains catch up with bodies? A comparative method for detecting evolutionary lag.

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, R O; Nunn, C L

    1999-01-01

    A trait may be at odds with theoretical expectation because it is still in the process of responding to a recent selective force. Such a situation can be termed evolutionary lag. Although many cases of evolutionary lag have been suggested, almost all of the arguments have focused on trait fitness. An alternative approach is to examine the prediction that trait expression is a function of the time over which the trait could evolve. Here we present a phylogenetic comparative method for using this 'time' approach and we apply the method to a long-standing lag hypothesis: evolutionary changes in brain size lag behind evolutionary changes in body size. We tested the prediction in primates that brain mass contrast residuals, calculated from a regression of pairwise brain mass contrasts on positive pairwise body mass contrasts, are correlated with the time since the paired species diverged. Contrary to the brain size lag hypothesis, time since divergence was not significantly correlated with brain mass contrast residuals. We found the same result when we accounted for socioecology, used alternative body mass estimates and used male rather than female values. These tests do not support the brain size lag hypothesis. Therefore, body mass need not be viewed as a suspect variable in comparative neuroanatomical studies and relative brain size should not be used to infer recent evolutionary changes in body size. PMID:10331289

  11. Dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation studied with time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum in an energy range well above the ablation threshold with the ultrafast time-resolved x-ray-absorption fine structure imaging technique. Analyzing the spectral structures near the L absorption edge that appeared in one-dimensional images of soft-x-ray absorbance, we successfully identified doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid nanoparticles, and possible atomic clusters in the expanding ablation plume. We also clarified that the ejected particles depend strongly on the laser irradiation intensity. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ablation particles allows us to estimate the spatial distribution of atomic density and the ejection velocity of each type of particle. In particular, we discuss the temporal sequence of the particle ejection in the early stages of plume expansion. Our experimental results strongly support the idea that photomechanical fragmentation and vaporization are dominant mechanisms for the production of liquid nanoparticles and neutral atoms, respectively, in femtosecond laser ablation induced in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  13. Magnetized galactic haloes and velocity lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henriksen, R. N.; Irwin, J. A.

    2016-06-01

    We present an analytic model of a magnetized galactic halo surrounding a Mestel gravitating disc. The magnetic field is taken to be in energy equipartition with the pressure dominant rotating halo gas (not with the cosmic rays), and the whole system is in a steady state. A more flexible `anisotropic equipartition' model is also explored. A definite pressure law is required to maintain the equilibrium, but the halo density is constant. The velocity/magnetic system is scale-free. The objective is to find the rotational velocity lag in such a halo. The magnetic field is not force-free so that angular momentum may be transported from the halo to the intergalactic medium. We find that the `X'-shaped structure observed for halo magnetic fields can be obtained together with a simple analytic formula for the rate of decline of the velocity with height z. The formula also predicts the change in lag with radius, r.

  14. Atomic Resolution Mapping of the Excited-State Electronic Structure of Cu2O with Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, Patrick B.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2009-09-29

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that that the conduction band and valence band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  15. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, Nils; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2010-05-02

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  16. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    , meant to achieve lag motion amplitudes up to 45 degrees. In order to reduce the required actuation force, the blade hinges were moved to 40% of the blade radius to increase the rotating lag frequency to approximately 1/rev. The blade hinges were redesigned to produce a flap-lag coupling so the large flapwise aerodynamic loads could be exploited to actuate the blades in the lag direction. A wind tunnel test of this rotor concept revealed actuation and blade motion scheduling problems. The project was eventually discontinued due to these problems and high blade stresses. Around the same time, at Boelkow in Germany, a similar lead-lag rotor program was conducted under the leadership of Hans Derschmidt. Here, too, the blade hinges were moved outboard to 34% radius to reduce the actuation loads. The main difference between this and the United Aircraft program was the use of a mechanical actuation scheme with maximum lead-lag motions of 400. This program was also discontinued for unclear reasons. The present study is directed toward conducting a comprehensive analytical examination to evaluate the effectiveness of controlled lead-lag motions in reducing vibratory hub loads and increasing maximum flight speed. Since both previous studies on this subject were purely experimental, only a limited data set and physical understanding of the problem was obtained. With the currently available analytical models and computational resources, the present effort is geared toward developing an in-depth physical understanding of the precise underlying mechanisms by which vibration reduction may be achieved. Additionally, in recognition of the fact that large amplitude lead-lag motions would - (i) be difficult to implement, and (ii) produce very large blade stresses; the present study examines the potential of only moderate-to-small lead-lag motions for reduction of vibratory hub loads. Using such an approach, the emphasis is not on eliminating the periodic variations in tangential velocity

  17. The effect of soaking time on water absorption and solid losses of whole and dehulled soybeans.

    PubMed

    Cabral, L C; Serna-Saldivar, S O; Tinsley, A M

    1995-03-01

    Dehulled entire soybean cotyledons are required for the preparation of many interesting products. Removing hulls had a dramatic effect on the rate of water uptake during soaking. Maximum uptake was reached in only 3 hr compared to the 12 hr needed by whole beans. This saves time and reduces microbial growth during soaking. The amount of water absorbed by beans, with and without hulls, was similar once corrected for solid losses and surface water. Removal of fibrous shells during dehulling increased both the protein and oil contents by 2 %. Dehulled beans steadily lost solids during soaking. Losses were 8.6 % compared to 0.7 % for whole beans when maximum uptakes were first reached. Ways of avoiding or reducing these losses are discussed. PMID:8729252

  18. A signal filter with zero phase lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forsyth, T. J.; Burnett, T. S.

    1988-01-01

    Rotorcraft and rotorcraft models are tested at the NASA Ames National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC). The models tested in the NFAC wind tunnels are controlled by a remote control console located in a control room. Certain critical information must be displayed on the control console to monitor the rotor to insure that the rotor is within operational limits. The signal for these parameters is complex (with ac and dc components) and is derived from pitch and flapping transducers on the rotor head. The pitch and flapping cyclics are derived from resolver circuits that indicate the magnitude and phase of the cyclics. Conventional filter circuits used to separate the ac and dc components have a phase lag on the ac component, which will introduce an error in the cyclic vector. To overcome this error, a filter with zero phase lag needed to be developed. This paper discusses a rotorcraft circuit that was designed to have an ac/dc filter with zero phase lag over the frequency range.

  19. Taking the Lag out of Jet Lag through Model-Based Schedule Design

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Dennis A.; Forger, Daniel B.; Klerman, Elizabeth B.

    2009-01-01

    Travel across multiple time zones results in desynchronization of environmental time cues and the sleep–wake schedule from their normal phase relationships with the endogenous circadian system. Circadian misalignment can result in poor neurobehavioral performance, decreased sleep efficiency, and inappropriately timed physiological signals including gastrointestinal activity and hormone release. Frequent and repeated transmeridian travel is associated with long-term cognitive deficits, and rodents experimentally exposed to repeated schedule shifts have increased death rates. One approach to reduce the short-term circadian, sleep–wake, and performance problems is to use mathematical models of the circadian pacemaker to design countermeasures that rapidly shift the circadian pacemaker to align with the new schedule. In this paper, the use of mathematical models to design sleep–wake and countermeasure schedules for improved performance is demonstrated. We present an approach to designing interventions that combines an algorithm for optimal placement of countermeasures with a novel mode of schedule representation. With these methods, rapid circadian resynchrony and the resulting improvement in neurobehavioral performance can be quickly achieved even after moderate to large shifts in the sleep–wake schedule. The key schedule design inputs are endogenous circadian period length, desired sleep–wake schedule, length of intervention, background light level, and countermeasure strength. The new schedule representation facilitates schedule design, simulation studies, and experiment design and significantly decreases the amount of time to design an appropriate intervention. The method presented in this paper has direct implications for designing jet lag, shift-work, and non-24-hour schedules, including scheduling for extreme environments, such as in space, undersea, or in polar regions. PMID:19543382

  20. Time-resolved pump and probe x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 at PETRA III.

    PubMed

    Göries, D; Dicke, B; Roedig, P; Stübe, N; Meyer, J; Galler, A; Gawelda, W; Britz, A; Geßler, P; Sotoudi Namin, H; Beckmann, A; Schlie, M; Warmer, M; Naumova, M; Bressler, C; Rübhausen, M; Weckert, E; Meents, A

    2016-05-01

    We report about the development and implementation of a new setup for time-resolved X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy at beamline P11 utilizing the outstanding source properties of the low-emittance PETRA III synchrotron storage ring in Hamburg. Using a high intensity micrometer-sized X-ray beam in combination with two positional feedback systems, measurements were performed on the transition metal complex fac-Tris[2-phenylpyridinato-C2,N]iridium(III) also referred to as fac-Ir(ppy)3. This compound is a representative of the phosphorescent iridium(III) complexes, which play an important role in organic light emitting diode (OLED) technology. The experiment could directly prove the anticipated photoinduced charge transfer reaction. Our results further reveal that the temporal resolution of the experiment is limited by the PETRA III X-ray bunch length of ∼103 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM). PMID:27250401

  1. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  2. Head Lag in Infancy: What Is It Telling Us?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lauren C.; Seefeldt, Kristin; Hilton, Claudia L.; Rogers, Cynthia L.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate changes in head lag across postmenstrual age and define associations between head lag and (1) perinatal exposures and (2) neurodevelopment. METHOD. Sixty-four infants born ≤30 wk gestation had head lag assessed before and at term-equivalent age. Neurobehavior was assessed at term age. At 2 yr, neurodevelopmental testing was conducted. RESULTS. Head lag decreased with advancing postmenstrual age, but 58% (n = 37) of infants continued to demonstrate head lag at term. Head lag was associated with longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (p = .009), inotrope use (p = .04), sepsis (p = .02), longer endotracheal intubation (p = .01), and cerebral injury (p = .006). Head lag was related to alterations in early neurobehavior (p < .03), but no associations with neurodevelopment were found at 2 yr. CONCLUSION. Head lag was related to medical factors and early neurobehavior, but it may not be a good predictor of outcome when used in isolation. PMID:26709421

  3. Four-Year Cross-Lagged Associations between Physical and Mental Health in the Medical Outcomes Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Ron D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Applied structural equation modeling to evaluation of cross-lagged panel models. Self-reports of physical and mental health at three time points spanning four-year interval were analyzed to illustrate cross-lagged analysis methodology. Data were analyzed from 856 patients with hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, or depression. Cross-lagged…

  4. Photocycles of bacteriorhodopsin in light- and dark-adapted purple membrane studied by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hofrichter, J; Henry, E R; Lozier, R H

    1989-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectra have been measured throughout the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin in both light-adapted and dark-adapted purple membrane (PM). The data from dark-adapted samples are interpretable as the superposition of two photocycles arising independently from the all-trans and 13-cis retinal isomers that coexist in the dark-adapted state. The presence of a photocycle in dark-adapted PM which is indistinguishable from that observed for light-adapted PM under the same experimental conditions is demonstrated by the observation of the same five relaxation rates associated with essentially identical changes in the photoproduct spectra. This cycle is attributed to the all-trans component. The cycle of the 13-cis component is revealed by scaling the data measured for the light-adapted sample and subtracting it from the data on the dark-adapted mixture. At times less than 1 ms, the resulting difference spectra are nearly time-independent. The peak of the difference spectrum is near 600 nm, although there appears to be a slight (approximately 2 nm) blue-shift in the first few microseconds. Subsequently the amplitude of this spectrum decays and the peak of the difference spectrum shifts in two relaxations. Most of the amplitude of the photoproduct difference spectrum (approximately 80%) decays in a single relaxation having a time constant of approximately 35 ms. The difference spectrum remaining after this relaxation peaks at approximately 590 nm and is indistinguishable from the classical light-dark difference spectrum, which we find, in experiments performed on a much longer time scale, to peak at 588 nm. The decay of this remaining photo-product is not resolvable in the nanosecond kinetic experiments, but dark adaptation of a completely light-adapted sample is found to occur exponentially with a relaxation time of approximately 2,000 s under the conditions of our experiments. PMID:2819234

  5. Modeling Eye Gaze Patterns in Clinician-Patient Interaction with Lag Sequential Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Montague, E; Xu, J; Asan, O; Chen, P; Chewning, B; Barrett, B

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to examine whether lag-sequential analysis could be used to describe eye gaze orientation between clinicians and patients in the medical encounter. This topic is particularly important as new technologies are implemented into multi-user health care settings where trust is critical and nonverbal cues are integral to achieving trust. This analysis method could lead to design guidelines for technologies and more effective assessments of interventions. Background Nonverbal communication patterns are important aspects of clinician-patient interactions and may impact patient outcomes. Method Eye gaze behaviors of clinicians and patients in 110-videotaped medical encounters were analyzed using the lag-sequential method to identify significant behavior sequences. Lag-sequential analysis included both event-based lag and time-based lag. Results Results from event-based lag analysis showed that the patients’ gaze followed that of clinicians, while clinicians did not follow patients. Time-based sequential analysis showed that responses from the patient usually occurred within two seconds after the initial behavior of the clinician. Conclusion Our data suggest that the clinician’s gaze significantly affects the medical encounter but not the converse. Application Findings from this research have implications for the design of clinical work systems and modeling interactions. Similar research methods could be used to identify different behavior patterns in clinical settings (physical layout, technology, etc.) to facilitate and evaluate clinical work system designs. PMID:22046723

  6. Time-resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of a Cobalt-Based Hydrogen Evolution System for Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert, Carolina; Lehmann, Carl; Southworth, Stephen; Llobet, Antoni; Argonne National Laboratory Team; Institut Català d'Investigació Química Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Production of cost-effective hydrogen gas through solar power is an important challenge of the Department of Energy among other global industry initiatives. In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen evolving complex(OEC) can carry out four-electron water splitting to hydrogen with an efficiency of around 60%. Although, much progress has been carried out in determining mechanistic pathways of the OEC, biomimetic approaches have not duplicated Nature's efficiency in function. Over the past years, we have witnessed progress in developments of light harvesting modules, so called chromophore/catalytic assemblies. In spite of reportedly high catalytic activity of these systems, quantum yields of hydrogen production are below 40 % when using monochromatic light. Proper understanding of kinetics and bond making/breaking steps has to be achieved to improve efficiency of hydrogen evolution systems. This project shows the timing implementation of ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy to visualize in ``real time'' the photo-induced kinetics accompanying a sequence of redox reactions in a cobalt-based molecular photocatalytic system. Formation of a Co(I) species followed by a Co(III) hydride species all the way towards hydrogen evolution is shown through time-resolved XANES.

  7. REAL TIME CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF [CO2] AND δ13C AT MULTIPLE LOCATIONS USING CAVITY ENHANCED LASER ABSORPTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlexander, W. I.; Rau, G. H.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-12-01

    A commercial instrument (Los Gatos Research, model 908-0003) utilizing Cavity Enhanced Laser Absorption Spectroscopy was deployed in 2009 at the ZERT carbon release site (Bozeman, MT) for real time measurement of above-ground CO2 concentration and isotope ratio (δ13C). An automated switching system sampled 13 different locations in the field, as well as two known references, over an 8 day period. Real-time Keeling plots were constructed showing distinct signatures of soil (-27.0 ‰) and fossil (-56.0 ‰) sources compared to background air (-8.2 ‰). Instrument performance gave 0.2 ‰ precision with only 100 seconds of averaging per inlet. Sequential sampling of the various inlets gave a temporal and physical mapping of the CO2 release plume that is difficult to obtain using more conventional techniques. The figures show the nature and quality of the data from one of the locations. Details concerning instrument performance, systematics, calibration, and data processing will be discussed. Fig1: Time chart of CO2 concentration and isotope ratio δ13C from one of 13 sample inlet locations at ZERT release field, July, 2009. Fig2: Keeling plot of data from Fig1 illustrating the two source mixing of soil (-27 ‰) and fossil (-56 ‰) CO2 with background air.

  8. Why Do Rereading Lag Effects Depend on Test Delay?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rawson, Katherine A.

    2012-01-01

    In previous research, rereading after a long lag versus a short lag led to greater performance on delayed tests but not on immediate tests. The current study tested two accounts of why the effects of rereading lag depend on test delay. The "levels of representation" ("LOR") "hypothesis" states that the effects reflect differential emphasis on…

  9. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Leaks under lagging. 230.64 Section 230.64... Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out of service at once any boiler that has developed a leak under the lagging due to a crack in the shell, or...

  10. THE VERY YOUNG TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2013dy: DISCOVERY, AND STRONG CARBON ABSORPTION IN EARLY-TIME SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Nugent, Peter E.; Graham, Melissa; Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Shivvers, Isaac; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Li, Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Howie Marion, G.; Kasen, Daniel; Wang, Xiaofeng; Valenti, Stefano; Howell, D. Andrew; Ciabattari, Fabrizio; Cenko, S. Bradley; Balam, Dave; Hsiao, Eric; Sand, David; and others

    2013-11-20

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ≈ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 ± 0.05 days (2.4 ± 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R {sub 0} ≲ 0.25 R {sub ☉}, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 days after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of M{sub B} = –18.72 ± 0.03 mag ∼17.7 days after first light.

  11. Resonance Raman and vibronic absorption spectra with Duschinsky rotation from a time-dependent perspective: Application to β-carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Kröner, Dominik; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The time-dependent approach to electronic spectroscopy, as popularized by Heller and co-workers in the 1980s, is applied here in conjunction with linear-response, time-dependent density functional theory to study vibronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene, with and without a solvent. Two-state models, the harmonic and the Condon approximations are used in order to do so. A new code has been developed which includes excited state displacements, vibrational frequency shifts, and Duschinsky rotation, i.e., mode mixing, for both non-adiabatic spectroscopies. It is shown that Duschinsky rotation has a pronounced effect on the resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene. In particular, it can explain a recently found anomalous behaviour of the so-called ν1 peak in resonance Raman spectra [N. Tschirner, M. Schenderlein, K. Brose, E. Schlodder, M. A. Mroginski, C. Thomsen, and P. Hildebrandt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 11471 (2009)], 10.1039/b917341b, which shifts with the change in excitation wavelength.

  12. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  13. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  14. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  15. The Lag-Luminosity Relation in the GRB Source Frame: An Investigation with Swift BAT Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Stamatikos, M.; Dermer, C. D.; Sakamoto, T.; Sonbas, E.; Parke, W. C.; Maximon, L. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Bhat, P. N.; Eskandarian, A.; Gehrels, N.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Tollefson, K.; Norris, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral lag. which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high- and low-energy photons. is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However. most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts). we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82 +/- 0.05 (chance probability of approx. 5.5 x 10(exp -5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, L(sub iso). with a best-fitting power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2. In addition, there is an anticorrelation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum.

  16. Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions

    PubMed Central

    Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a numerical exploration of contact transitions with the fingertip. When picking up objects our fingertips must make contact at specific locations, and—upon contact—maintain posture while producing well-directed force vectors. However, the joint torques for moving the fingertip towards a surface (τm) are different from those for producing static force vectors (τf). We previously described the neural control of such abrupt transitions in humans, and found that unavoidable errors arise because sensorimotor time delays and lags prevent an instantaneous switch between different torques. Here, we use numerical optimization on a finger model to reveal physical bounds for controlling such rapid contact transitions. Resembling human data, it is necessary to anticipatorily switch joint torques to τf at about 30 ms before contact to minimize the initial misdirection of the fingertip force vector. This anticipatory strategy arises in our deterministic model from neuromuscular lags, and not from optimizing for robustness to noise/uncertainties. Importantly, the optimal solution also leads to a trade-off between the speed of force magnitude increase versus the accuracy of initial force direction. This is an alternative to prevailing theories that propose multiplicative noise in muscles as the driver of speed–accuracy trade-offs. We instead find that the speed–accuracy trade-off arises solely from neuromuscular lags. Finally, because our model intentionally uses idealized assumptions, its agreement with human data suggests that the biological system is controlled in a way that approaches the physical boundaries of performance. PMID:19218157

  17. Proposed human stratum corneum water domain in chemical absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Compounds with varying physical and chemical properties may have different affinities to the stratum corneum (SC) and/or its intercellular lipids, keratin protein, and possible water domains. To better understand the mechanism of percutaneous absorption, we utilized 21 carbon-14 labeled chemicals, with wide hydrophilicity (log P = -0.05 to 6.17), and quantified their absorption/adsorption properties for a short incubation time (15 min) with regards to intact SC membrane, delipidized SC membrane and SC lipid. A facile method was developed for SC/lipid absorption, providing a more equivalent procedure and comparable data. SC lipid absorption of chemical solutes positively correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P). Differences between the percent dose of chemical absorption to intact SC and the total percent dose contributed by the protein and lipid domains suggest the possibility and significance of a water domain. Absorption rate experiments showed a longer lag time for intact SC than for delipidized SC or SC lipid, suggesting that the water domain may delay chemical binding to protein and lipid domains, and may be a factor in the resistance of many chemicals to current decontamination methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26206725

  18. Experimental investigation of the enhancement factor for microwave irregular networks with preserved and broken time reversal symmetry in the presence of absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ławniczak, Michał; Bauch, Szymon; Hul, Oleh; Sirko, Leszek

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of the experimental study of the two-port scattering matrix Ŝ elastic enhancement factor WS,β for microwave irregular networks simulating quantum graphs with preserved and broken time reversal symmetry in the presence of moderate and strong absorption. In the experiment, quantum graphs with preserved time reversal symmetry were simulated by microwave networks which were built of coaxial cables and attenuators connected by joints. Absorption in the networks was controlled by the length of microwave cables and the use of microwave attenuators. In order to simulate quantum graphs with broken time reversal symmetry we used the microwave networks with microwave circulators. We show that the experimental results obtained for networks with moderate and strong absorption are in good agreement with the ones obtained within the framework of random matrix theory.

  19. Experimental investigation of the enhancement factor for microwave irregular networks with preserved and broken time reversal symmetry in the presence of absorption.

    PubMed

    Ławniczak, Michał; Bauch, Szymon; Hul, Oleh; Sirko, Leszek

    2010-04-01

    We present the results of the experimental study of the two-port scattering matrix S[over ] elastic enhancement factor W{S,beta} for microwave irregular networks simulating quantum graphs with preserved and broken time reversal symmetry in the presence of moderate and strong absorption. In the experiment, quantum graphs with preserved time reversal symmetry were simulated by microwave networks which were built of coaxial cables and attenuators connected by joints. Absorption in the networks was controlled by the length of microwave cables and the use of microwave attenuators. In order to simulate quantum graphs with broken time reversal symmetry we used the microwave networks with microwave circulators. We show that the experimental results obtained for networks with moderate and strong absorption are in good agreement with the ones obtained within the framework of random matrix theory. PMID:20481804

  20. Disentangling the ambiguity of the lagged correlation function - analysis of the Walker circulation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    A first step towards the investigation of tropical climate variability and teleconnections is the analysis of observations. Lagged correlation analysis is commonly used to gain insights into interaction mechanisms between climatological processes, in particular to determine the time delay and strength of a mechanism. In this talk, such an analysis is discussed on the mechanism of the Walker circulation. The influence of serial correlation on lagged correlation functions and regressions is investigated and it is demonstrated how this influence can lead to ambiguous and misleading conclusions about the time delay and strength of an interaction mechanism. To overcome the issues arising in interpreting the lag and strength of a correlation, we propose to use graphical models that encode the lag-specific causality between multiple processes. In this framework a certain partial correlation measure is derived that allows to very specifically measure the time delay and strength of a coupling mechanism. This approach is then shown to yield a more precise picture of the interaction mechanism of the Walker circulation. The talk is intended to serve as a guideline to interpret lagged correlations and regressions and introduces a more powerful approach to analyze time delays and strengths of interaction mechanisms.

  1. Lag measurement in an a-Se active matrix flat-panel imager.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, C; Stanescu, T; Rathee, S; Fallone, B G

    2004-05-01

    Lag and residual contrast have been quantified in an amorphous selenium (a-Se) active-matrix flat-panel imager (AMFPI) as a function of frame time, kilovoltage (kV) and megavoltage (MV) x-ray photon energies and amount of radiation incident on the detector. The AMFPI contains a 200 microm thick a-Se layer deposited on a thin film transistor (TFT) array of size 8.7 cm x 8.7 cm with an 85-microm pixel pitch. For all energies, the lag (signal normalized to the signal due to exposure) for the first (n = 1) and second (n = 2) frame after exposure ranges from 0.45% to 0.91% and from 0.29% to 0.51%, respectively. The amount of lag was determined to be a function of the time after the x-ray exposure irrespective of frame time or the magnitude of exposure. The lag for MV photon energies was slightly less than that for kV photon energies. The residual contrast for all energies studied ranges from 0.41% to 0.75% and from 0.219% to 0.41% for the n = 1 and n = 2 frames, respectively. These results show that lag and residual contrast in kV and MV radiographic applications are always less than 1% for the detection system used and only depend on the time after x-ray exposure. PMID:15191310

  2. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  3. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  4. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems. PMID:24197060

  5. Clustered LAG-1 binding sites in lag-1/CSL are involved in regulating lag-1 expression during lin-12/Notch-dependent cell-fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Vit Na; Park, Seong Kyun; Hwang, Byung Joon

    2013-01-01

    The cell-fate specification of the anchor cell (AC) and a ventral uterine precursor cell (VU) in Caenorhabditis elegans is initiated by a stochastic interaction between LIN-12/Notch receptor and LAG-2/Delta ligand in two neighboring Z1.ppp and Z4.aaa cells. Both cells express lin-12 and lag-2 before specification, and a small difference in LIN-12 activity leads to the exclusive expressions of lin-12 in VU and lag-2 in the AC, through a feedback mechanism of unknown nature. Here we show that the expression pattern of lag-1/CSL, a transcriptional repressor itself that turns into an activator upon binding of the intracellular domain of Notch, overlaps with that of lin-12. Site-directed mutagenesis of LAG-1 binding sites in lag-1 maintains its expression in the AC, and eliminates it in the VU. Thus, AC/VU cell-fate specification appears to involve direct regulation of lag-1 expression by the LAG-1 protein, activating its transcription in VU cells, but repressing it in the AC. [BMB Reports 2013; 46(4): 219-224] PMID:23615264

  6. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-01

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H2O, D2O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120±50fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D2O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H2O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D2O relative to H2O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H2O and D2O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  7. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-22

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120{+-}50 fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D{sub 2}O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H{sub 2}O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D{sub 2}O relative to H{sub 2}O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  8. A Comparison of Several Methods of Measuring Ignition Lag in a Compression-ignition Engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spanogle, J A

    1934-01-01

    The ignition lag of a fuel oil in the combustion chamber of a high speed compression-ignition engine was measured by three different methods. The start of injection of the fuel as observed with a Stoborama was taken as the start of the period of ignition lag in all cases. The end of the period of ignition lag was determined by observation of the appearance of incandescence in the combustion chamber, by inspection of a pressure-time card for evidence of pressure rise, and by analysis of the indicator card for evidence of the combustion of a small but definite quantity of fuel. A comparison of the values for ignition lags obtained by these three methods indicates that the appearance of incandescence is later than other evidences of the start of combustion, that visual inspection of a pressure-time diagram gives consistent and usable values with a minimum requirement of time and/or apparatus, and that analysis of the indicator card is not worth while for ignition lag alone.

  9. Tracing the Reverberation Lag in the Hard State of Black Hole X-Ray Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Marco, B.; Ponti, G.; Muñoz-Darias, T.; Nandra, K.

    2015-11-01

    We report results obtained from a systematic analysis of X-ray lags in a sample of black hole X-ray binaries, with the aim of assessing the presence of reverberation lags and studying their evolution during outburst. We used XMM-Newton and simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations to obtain broadband energy coverage of both the disk and the hard X-ray Comptonization components. In most cases the detection of reverberation lags is hampered by low levels of variability-power signal-to-noise ratio (typically when the source is in a soft state) and/or short exposure times. The most detailed study was possible for GX 339-4 in the hard state, which allowed us to characterize the evolution of X-ray lags as a function of luminosity in a single source. Over all the sampled frequencies (˜0.05-9 Hz), we observe the hard lags intrinsic to the power-law component, already well known from previous RXTE studies. The XMM-Newton soft X-ray response allows us to detail the disk variability. At low frequencies (long timescales) the disk component always leads the power-law component. On the other hand, a soft reverberation lag (ascribable to thermal reprocessing) is always detected at high frequencies (short timescales). The intrinsic amplitude of the reverberation lag decreases as the source luminosity and the disk fraction increase. This suggests that the distance between the X-ray source and the region of the optically thick disk where reprocessing occurs gradually decreases as GX 339-4 rises in luminosity through the hard state, possibly as a consequence of reduced disk truncation.

  10. Lag structure in resting-state fMRI

    PubMed Central

    Snyder, A. Z.; Hacker, C. D.; Raichle, M. E.

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that spontaneous fluctuations in blood oxygen level-dependent (BOLD) signals contain information about the functional organization of the brain has caused a paradigm shift in neuroimaging. It is now well established that intrinsic brain activity is organized into spatially segregated resting-state networks (RSNs). Less is known regarding how spatially segregated networks are integrated by the propagation of intrinsic activity over time. To explore this question, we examined the latency structure of spontaneous fluctuations in the fMRI BOLD signal. Our data reveal that intrinsic activity propagates through and across networks on a timescale of ∼1 s. Variations in the latency structure of this activity resulting from sensory state manipulation (eyes open vs. closed), antecedent motor task (button press) performance, and time of day (morning vs. evening) suggest that BOLD signal lags reflect neuronal processes rather than hemodynamic delay. Our results emphasize the importance of the temporal structure of the brain's spontaneous activity. PMID:24598530

  11. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution.

    PubMed

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  12. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  13. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    PubMed Central

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%–88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%–81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  14. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  15. The effects of structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling on soft inplane hingeless rotor stability in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    A 1.62-m-diameter rotor model was tested in hover to examine the effects of structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling on isolated rotor blade lead-lag stability. Flap-lag coupling was introduced by inclining the principal axes of the blade structure up to 60 degrees. Pitch-lag coupling was obtained either alone or in combination with flap-lag coupling through the use of skewed flexural hinges. The principal results confirm the predictions of theory, and show that both structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling when used separately are beneficial to blade stability. Moreover, when the couplings are combined, the lead-lag damping is significantly greater than it would be if the individual contributions were superimposed. Pitch-flap coupling is shown to have only a minor effect on blade lead-lag damping. Differences between theory and experiment observed at zero blade pitch and flexure angles during the initial testing were determined in a second test to be caused by stand flexibility. Other differences between theory and experiment warrant further investigation.

  16. Study of the laser-induced decomposition of energetic materials at static high-pressure by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Philippe; Saint-Amans, Charles

    2013-06-01

    A detailed description of the reaction rates and mechanisms occurring in shock-induced decomposition of condensed explosives is very important to improve the predictive capabilities of shock-to-detonation transition models. However, direct measurements of such experimental data are difficult to perform during detonation experiments. By coupling pulsed laser ignition of an explosive in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) with time-resolved streak camera recording of transmitted light, it is possible to make direct observations of deflagration phenomena at detonation pressure. We have developed an experimental set-up that allows combustion front propagation rates and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements. The decomposition reactions are initiated using a nanosecond YAG laser and their kinetics is followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The results obtained for two explosives, nitromethane (NM) and HMX are presented in this paper. For NM, a change in reactivity is clearly seen around 25 GPa. Below this pressure, the reaction products are essentially carbon residues whereas at higher pressure, a transient absorption feature is first observed and is followed by the formation of a white amorphous product. For HMX, the evolution of the absorption as a function of time indicates a multi-step reaction mechanism which is found to depend on both the initial pressure and the laser fluence.

  17. Investigation of the Lag Phase of Collagen Fibrillogenesis Using Fluorescence Anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kun; Li, Guoying

    2015-10-01

    The lag phase of collagen fibrillogenesis (1.0 mg/mL collagen solution) with an L-glutamine-L-arginine mixture (Glu-Arg) was monitored by the fluorescence anisotropy of tyrosine residues in real time. A suitable concentration of Glu-Arg (40 mmol/L) could control the aggregate ingredients in a collagen solution effectively before fibrillogenesis, and the mechanism was found to be similar to that with the monovalent ions. Fluorescence anisotropy analysis in the lag phase for a 1.0 mg/mL collagen solution confirmed the formation of collagen nuclei in multiple steps during the lag phase when the initial state of the collagen molecules was monomeric. A comparison of the fibrillogenesis lag phase for collagen solutions of 0.25, 0.50, and 1.0 mg/mL with 40 mmol/L Glu-Arg suggested that the length of the lag phase is inversely proportional to the increase in collagen concentration. Atomic force microscopy was used to investigate the effect of collagen aggregates on the fiber size. Based on the fluorescence anisotropy and atomic force microscopy results, it was proposed that an equilibrium exists between collagen aggregates and monomers accompanied by a nucleation of collagen monomers. A kinetic analysis for 0.25 and 1.0 mg/mL collagen with 40 mmol/L Glu-Arg at 18-38 °C indicated that collagen nucleation in the lag phase was favored by increasing temperature, and a corresponding activation energy of 76 and 97 kJ/mol was obtained for a collagen fibrillogenesis lag phase of 0.25 and 1.0 mg/mL, respectively. PMID:26449804

  18. A microsecond time resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure synchrotron study of phase transitions in Fe undergoing ramp heating at high pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Marini, C.; Mathon, O.; Pascarelli, S.; Occelli, F.; Torchio, R.; Recoules, V.; Loubeyre, P.

    2014-03-07

    We report a microsecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near edge structure study using synchrotron radiation to dynamically detect structural phase transitions in Fe undergoing rapid heating along a quasi-isochoric path. Within a few ms, we observed two structural phase transitions, which transform the ambient bcc phase of Fe into the fcc phase, and then into the liquid phase. This example illustrates the opportunities offered by energy dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the study of matter under extreme dynamic conditions. Advanced simulations are compared to these data.

  19. X-ray absorption resonances near L2,3-edges from real-time propagation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix.

    PubMed

    Kadek, Marius; Konecny, Lukas; Gao, Bin; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-09-21

    The solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the relativistic Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix formalism is presented and used to calculate X-ray absorption cross sections. Both dynamical relaxation effects and spin-orbit corrections are included, as demonstrated by calculations of the X-ray absorption of SF6 near the sulfur L2,3-edges. We also propose an analysis facilitating the interpretation of spectral transitions from real-time simulations, and a selective perturbation that eliminates nonphysical excitations that are artifacts of the finite basis representation. PMID:26268195

  20. Thermal lag, fusion, and the compensation effect during biomass pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Antal, M.J. Jr.; Narayan, R.

    1995-12-01

    Results from a numerical model for endothermic biomass pyrolysis, which includes both high activation energy kinetics and heat transfer to the reacting solid particle, are presented. The model accounts for conventional thermocouple thermal lag, and unconventional thermal lag due to heat demand by the chemical reaction (which is governed by Arrhenius kinetics). We show that biomass fusion, first identified quantitatively by Lede and Villermaux at the University of Nancy in France, is a manifestation of severe thermal lag that results from the chemical reaction heat demand. We also show that unidentified thermal lag in TGA experiments manifests itself as the compensation effect.

  1. Modeling the Listeria innocua micropopulation lag phase and its variability.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; González, Andrea; Ozçelik, Nicem; Rodríguez, María R; García de Fernando, Gonzalo D

    2013-06-01

    Listeria innocua micropopulation lag phase and its variability have been modeled as a function of growth temperature, intensity of heat stress, and the number of surviving cells initiating growth. Micropopulation lag phases were found to correlate negatively with inoculum size and growth temperature and positively with heat shock intensity. Validation of the models using experimental milk samples indicated that the average lag phase duration predicted is shorter and more variable than the observed, meaning that they should be considered safe for risk assessment. Our results suggest that the effect of inoculum size on the population lag phase has both stochastic and physiological components. PMID:23591376

  2. Ultrasensitive, real-time analysis of biomarkers in breath using tunable external cavity laser and off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Akman, Hatice

    2015-03-01

    A robust biomedical sensor for ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers in breath based on a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) and an off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OA-CEAS) using an amplitude stabilizer is developed. A single-mode, narrow-linewidth, tunable ECL is demonstrated. A broadly coarse wavelength tuning range of 720 cm-1 for the spectral range between 6890 and 6170 cm-1 is achieved by rotating the diffraction grating forming a Littrow-type external-cavity configuration. A mode-hop-free tuning range of 1.85 cm-1 is obtained. The linewidths below 140 kHz are recorded. The ECL is combined with an OA-CEAS to perform laser chemical sensing. Our system is able to detect any molecule in breath at concentrations to the ppbv range that have absorption lines in the spectral range between 1450 and 1620 nm. Ammonia is selected as target molecule to evaluate the performance of the sensor. Using the absorption line of ammonia at 6528.76 cm-1, a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of approximately 1×10-8 cm-1 is demonstrated for 256 averages. This is achieved for a 1.4-km absorption path length and a 2-s data-acquisition time. These results yield a detection sensitivity of approximately 8.6×10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2. Ammonia in exhaled breath is analyzed and found in a concentration of 870 ppb for our example.

  3. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs. PMID:27439620

  4. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE {gamma}-RAY/OPTICAL LAGS IN LUMINOUS BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Janiak, Mateusz; Sikora, Marek; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl

    2012-12-01

    Blazars are strongly variable sources that occasionally show spectacular flares visible in various energy bands. These flares are often, but not always, correlated. In a number of cases, the peaks of optical flares are found to be somewhat delayed with respect to the {gamma}-ray peaks. One notable example of such a delay was found in 3C 279 by Hayashida et al. and interpreted as a result of steeper drop with a distance of the energy density of an external radiation field than of the magnetic energy density. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in general, depending on the respective energy density profile along the jet, such lags can have both signs and that they can take place for any ratio of these energy densities. We study the dependence of such lags on the ratio of these energy densities at a distance of a maximal energy dissipation in a jet, on their gradients, as well as on the time profile of the relativistic electron injection within the moving source. We show how prominent such lags can be, and their expected timescales. We suggest that studies of such lags can provide a powerful tool to resolve the structure of relativistic jets and their radiative environment. As an example we model the lag observed in 3C 279, showing that in this object the flare is produced at a distance of a few parsecs from the central black hole, consistent with our previous inferences based on the spectra and optical polarization properties.

  5. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Suresh, K; Sabarathinam, S; Thamilmaran, K; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling. PMID:27586600

  6. Toward an Understanding of GRB Prompt Emission Mechanism. I. The Origin of Spectral Lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Despite decades of investigations, the physical mechanism that powers the bright prompt γ-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still not identified. One important observational clue that still has not been properly interpreted is the existence of time lags of broad light curve pulses in different energy bands, referred to as “spectral lags.” Here, we show that the traditional view invoking the high-latitude emission “curvature effect” of a relativistic jet cannot account for spectral lags. Rather, the observed spectral lags demand the sweep of a spectral peak across the observing energy band in a specific manner. The duration of the broad pulses and inferred typical Lorentz factor of GRBs require that the emission region be in an optically thin emission region far from the GRB central engine. We construct a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation from a rapidly expanding outflow. We show that the observed spectral lags appear naturally in our model light curves given that (1) the gamma-ray photon spectrum is curved (as observed), (2) the magnetic field strength in the emitting region decreases with radius as the region expands in space, and (3) the emission region itself undergoes rapid bulk acceleration as the prompt γ-rays are produced. These requirements are consistent with a Poynting-flux-dominated jet abruptly dissipating magnetic energy at a large distance from the engine.

  7. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Sabarathinam, S.; Thamilmaran, K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K.

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling.

  8. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds have been performed. The results show a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The qualitative features of the model agree well with the reqirements of displaced narrow absorption components in UV lines.

  9. Sulfur K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy and time-dependent density functional theory of arsenic dithiocarbamates.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Courtney M; Pacheco, Juan S Lezama; Keith, Jason M; Daly, Scott R

    2014-06-28

    S K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations were performed on a series of As[S2CNR2]3 complexes, where R2 = Et2, (CH2)5 and Ph2, to determine how dithiocarbamate substituents attached to N affect As[S2CNR2]3 electronic structure. Complimentary [PPh4][S2CNR2] salts were also studied to compare dithiocarbamate bonding in the absence of As. The XAS results indicate that changing the orientation of the alkyl substituents from trans to cis (R2 = Et2vs. (CH2)5) yields subtle variations whereas differences associated with a change from alkyl to aryl are much more pronounced. For example, despite the differences in As 4p mixing, the first features in the S K-edge XAS spectra of [PPh4][S2CNPh2] and As[S2CNPh2]3 were both shifted by 0.3 eV compared to their alkyl-substituted derivatives. DFT calculations revealed that the unique shift observed for [PPh4][S2CNPh2] is due to phenyl-induced splitting of the π* orbitals delocalized over N, C and S. A similar phenomenon accounts for the shift observed for As[S2CNPh2]3, but the presence of two unique S environments (As-S and As···S) prevented reliable analysis of As-S covalency from the XAS data. In the absence of experimental values, DFT calculations revealed a decrease in As-S orbital mixing in As[S2CNPh2]3 that stems from a redistribution of electron density to S atoms participating in weaker As···S interactions. Simulated spectra obtained from TDDFT calculations reproduce the experimental differences in the S K-edge XAS data, which suggests that the theory is accurately modeling the experimental differences in As-S orbital mixing. The results highlight how S K-edge XAS and DFT can be used cooperatively to understand the electronic structure of low symmetry coordination complexes containing S atoms in different chemical environments. PMID:24811926

  10. Microsecond Time-Resolved Absorption Spectroscopy Used to Study CO Compounds of Cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Siletsky, Sergey A.; Zaspa, Andrey A.; Poole, Robert K.; Borisov, Vitaliy B.

    2014-01-01

    Cytochrome bd is a tri-heme (b558, b595, d) respiratory oxygen reductase that is found in many bacteria including pathogenic species. It couples the electron transfer from quinol to O2 with generation of an electrochemical proton gradient. We examined photolysis and subsequent recombination of CO with isolated cytochrome bd from Escherichia coli in one-electron reduced (MV) and fully reduced (R) states by microsecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy at 532-nm excitation. Both Soret and visible band regions were examined. CO photodissociation from MV enzyme possibly causes fast (τ<1.5 µs) electron transfer from heme d to heme b595 in a small fraction of the protein, not reported earlier. Then the electron migrates to heme b558 (τ∼16 µs). It returns from the b-hemes to heme d with τ∼180 µs. Unlike cytochrome bd in the R state, in MV enzyme the apparent contribution of absorbance changes associated with CO dissociation from heme d is small, if any. Photodissociation of CO from heme d in MV enzyme is suggested to be accompanied by the binding of an internal ligand (L) at the opposite side of the heme. CO recombines with heme d (τ∼16 µs) yielding a transient hexacoordinate state (CO-Fe2+-L). Then the ligand slowly (τ∼30 ms) dissociates from heme d. Recombination of CO with a reduced heme b in a fraction of the MV sample may also contribute to the 30-ms phase. In R enzyme, CO recombines to heme d (τ∼20 µs), some heme b558 (τ∼0.2–3 ms), and finally migrates from heme d to heme b595 (τ∼24 ms) in ∼5% of the enzyme population. Data are consistent with the recent nanosecond study of Rappaport et al. conducted on the membranes at 640-nm excitation but limited to the Soret band. The additional phases were revealed due to differences in excitation and other experimental conditions. PMID:24755641

  11. Decomposing the transfer entropy to quantify lag-specific Granger causality in cardiovascular variability.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2013-01-01

    We present a modification of the well known transfer entropy (TE) which makes it able to detect, besides the direction and strength of the information transfer between coupled processes, its exact timing. The approach follows a decomposition strategy which identifies--according to a lag-specific formulation of the concept of Granger causality--the set of time delays carrying significant information, and then assigns to each of these delays an amount of information transfer such that the total contribution yields the overall TE. We propose also a procedure for the practical estimation from time series data of the relevant delays and lag-specific TE in both bivariate and multivariate settings. The proposed approach is tested in simulations and in real cardiovascular time series, showing the feasibility of lag-specific TE estimation, the ability to reflect expected mechanisms of cardiovascular regulation, and the necessity of using the multivariate TE to properly assess time-lagged information transfer in the presence of multiple interacting systems. PMID:24110870

  12. Assessment of rainfall and NDVI anomalies in semi-arid regions using distributed lag models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zewdie, Worku; Csaplovics, E.

    2015-05-01

    The semiarid regions of Ethiopia are exposed to anthropogenic and natural calamities. In this study, we assessed the relationship between Tropical Applications of Meteorology using Satellite data (TAMSAT) and MODIS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data for the period 2000 to 2014 on decadal and annual basis using multivariate distributed lag (DL) models. Decadal growing season (June to September) values for kaftahumera were calculated from MODIS NDVI data. The growing season NDVI values are highly correlated with the precipitations during the whole study period. A lag of up to 30 days observed in most parts of our study region in which the rainfall has effects on vegetation growth after 40 days. The lag-time effects vary with the distribution of land use types and seasons. A lower correlation was observed in the woodland regions where significant deforestation occurred due to expansion of croplands. The loss in vegetation contributed to the low biomass production attributable to extended loss in vegetation cover.

  13. Aeromechanical stability augmentation using semi-active friction-based lead-lag damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sandeep

    2005-11-01

    Lead-lag dampers are present in most rotors to provide the required level of damping in all flight conditions. These dampers are a critical component of the rotor system, but they also represent a major source of maintenance cost. In present rotor systems, both hydraulic and elastomeric lead-lag dampers have been used. Hydraulic dampers are complex mechanical components that require hydraulic fluids and have high associated maintenance costs. Elastomeric dampers are conceptually simpler and provide a "dry" rotor, but are rather costly. Furthermore, their damping characteristics can degrade with time without showing external signs of failure. Hence, the dampers must be replaced on a regular basis. A semi-active friction based lead-lag damper is proposed as a replacement for hydraulic and elastomeric dampers. Damping is provided by optimized energy dissipation due to frictional forces in semi-active joints. An actuator in the joint modulates the normal force that controls energy dissipation at the frictional interfaces, resulting in large hysteretic loops. Various selective damping strategies are developed and tested for a simple system containing two different frequency modes in its response, one of which needs to be damped out. The system reflects the situation encountered in rotor response where 1P excitation is present along with the potentially unstable regressive lag motion. Simulation of the system response is obtained to compare their effectiveness. Next, a control law governing the actuation in the lag damper is designed to generate the desired level of damping for performing adaptive selective damping of individual blade lag motion. Further, conceptual design of a piezoelectric friction based lag damper for a full-scale rotor is presented and various factors affecting size, design and maintenance cost, damping capacity, and power requirements of the damper are discussed. The selective semi-active damping strategy is then studied in the context of classical

  14. Lag Sequential Analysis: Taking Consultation Communication Research to the Movies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benes, Kathryn M.; Gutkin, Terry B.; Kramer, Jack J.

    1995-01-01

    Describes lag-sequential analysis and its unique contributions to research literature, addressing communication processes in school-based consultation. For purposes of demonstrating the application and potential utility of lag-sequential analysis, article analyzes the communication behaviors of two consultants. Considers directions for future…

  15. Determination of Watershed Lag Equation for Philippine Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriano, F. R.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.; Uichanco, C.; Mendoza, J.; Sabio, G.; Punay, K. N.; Oquindo, M. R.; Horritt, M.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread flooding is a major problem in the Philippines. The country experiences heavy amount of rainfall throughout the year and several areas are prone to flood hazards because of its unique topography. Human casualties and destruction of infrastructure are some of the damages caused by flooding and the country's government has undertaken various efforts to mitigate these hazards. One of the solutions was to create flood hazard maps of different floodplains and use them to predict the possible catastrophic results of different rain scenarios. To produce these maps, different types of data were needed and part of that is calculating hydrological components to come up with an accurate output. This paper presents how an important parameter, the time-to-peak of the watershed (Tp) was calculated. Time-to-peak is defined as the time at which the largest discharge of the watershed occurs. This is computed by using a lag time equation that was developed specifically for the Philippine setting. The equation involves three measurable parameters, namely, watershed length (L), maximum potential retention (S), and watershed slope (Y). This approach is based on a similar method developed by CH2M Hill and Horritt for Taiwan, which has a similar set of meteorological and hydrological parameters with the Philippines. Data from fourteen water level sensors covering 67 storms from all the regions in the country were used to estimate the time-to-peak. These sensors were chosen by using a screening process that considers the distance of the sensors from the sea, the availability of recorded data, and the catchment size. Values of Tp from the different sensors were generated from the general lag time equation based on the Natural Resource Conservation Management handbook by the US Department of Agriculture. The calculated Tp values were plotted against the values obtained from the equation L0.8(S+1)0.7/Y0.5. Regression analysis was used to obtain the final equation that would be

  16. Lags in Training Response to Changes in Economic Activity: An Exploratory Inquiry for Five Industries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Azevedo, Ross E.; Park, Jin S.; Akdere, Mesut

    2007-01-01

    This study investigates the length of time it takes training budgets in five industries to respond to changes in the demand for their services/activity and for their speed of response to changes in productive activity. The results indicate that for the industries studied, the length of lag between change in demand and median adjustment to that…

  17. Adolescents' Pregnancy Intentions, Wantedness, and Regret: Cross-Lagged Relations with Mental Health and Harsh Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Chien, Nina C.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors used cross-lagged analyses to examine the across-time influences on and consequences of adolescents' pregnancy intentions, wantedness, and regret. One hundred pregnant Latina adolescents were studied during pregnancy and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. The results revealed 4 main findings: (a) similar to what has been found in adult…

  18. Analytical determination of the lag phase in grapes by remote measurement of trellis tension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lag phase (L) of grape berry growth is used to determine the timing of hand sampling for yield estimation. In commercial practice, growers apply scalars to measurements of berry of cluster masses under the assumption that fruit was assessed during L, which is the short period of slowest increase...

  19. The Lag-Luminosity Relation in the GRB Source-Frame: An Investigation with Swift BAT Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Stamatikos, M.; Dermer, C. D.; Sakamoto, T.; Sonbas, E.; Parke, W. C.; Maximon, L. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Bhat, P. N.; Eskandarian, A.; Gehrels, N.; Abeysekara, U.; Tollefson, K.; Norris, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral lag, which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high and low energy photons, is a common feature in Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However, most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer-frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts), we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source-frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82+/-0.05 (chance probability of approx 5.5 X 10(exp -5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, L(sub iso), with a best-fit power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2, such that L(sub iso) varies as lag(exp -1.2). In addition, there is an anti-correlation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum, E(sub pk)(1 + z).

  20. Lagged effects of family-supportive organization perceptions and supervision in relation to generalized work-related resources.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Russell A; Toumbeva, Tatiana H

    2015-07-01

    In the present study, grounded in organizational support and social exchange theory, the dynamic lagged interplay between family supportive supervision (FSS), family supportive organization perceptions (FSOP), perceived organizational support (POS), and leader-member exchange (LMX) was examined. Data were collected from 435 respondents over 3 time points with 6-week lags between assessments. Consistent with theory, FSS had a significant lagged effect on FSOP, whereas the reverse relationship was not supported. Interestingly, contrary to conservation of resources theory, we did not find significant lagged effects between POS and FSOP. Results further indicated that LMX and FSS were reciprocally related over time, suggesting the potential for a dynamic, mutually beneficial exchange relationship between subordinates and supervisors. Theoretical implications and considerations for research and practice are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25402223

  1. Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Data for the Study of Chemical Reaction Intermediate States

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz Moreno, Sofia; Bowron, Daniel T.; Evans, John

    2007-02-02

    Energy-dispersive X-ray absorption Spectroscopy is an increasingly powerful tool for the investigation of kinetic processes in chemical systems as an element-specific local structure and electronic-state probe. In this paper we present a study of the structural evolution of the inner-sphere electron transfer reaction between [IrCl6]2- and [Co(CN)5]3-. The experimental requirements necessary for the extraction of maximal structural and electronic information are discussed.

  2. The GEOS Retrospective Data Assimilation System: The 6-hour lag case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Yan-Qiu; Todling, Ricardo; Guo, Jing; Cohn, Stephen E.; Navon, I. Michael; Yang, Yan; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The fixed-lag Kalman smoother (FLKS) has been proposed as a framework to construct data assimilation procedures capable of producing high-quality climate research datasets. Fixed-lag Kalman smoother-based systems, referred to as retrospective data assimilation systems, are an extension to three-dimensional filtering procedures with the added capability of incorporating observations not only in the past and present time of the estimate, but also at future times. A variety of simplifications are necessary to render retrospective assimilation procedures practical. In this article, we present an FLKS-based retrospective data assimilation system implementation for the Goddard Earth Observing System (GOES) Data Assimilation System (DAS). The practicality of this implementation comes from the practicality of its underlying (filter) analysis system, i.e., the physical-space statistical analysis system (PSAS). The behavior of two schemes is studied here. The first retrospective analysis (RA) scheme is designed simply to update the regular PSAS analyses with observations available at times ahead of the regular analysis times. Although our GEOS DAS implementation is general, results are only presented for when observations 6-hours ahead of the analysis time are used to update the PSAS analyses and thereby to calculate the so-called lag-1 retrospective analyses. Consistency tests for this RA scheme show that the lag-1 retrospective analyses indeed have better 6-hour predictive skills than the predictions from the regular analyses. This motivates the introduction of the second retrospective analysis scheme which, at each analysis time, uses the 6-hour retrospective analysis to replace the first-guess normally used in the PSAS analysis, and therefore allows the calculation of a revised (filter) PSAS analysis. Since in this scheme the lag-1 retrospective analyses influence the filter results, this procedure is referred to as the retrospective-based iterative analysis (RIA) scheme

  3. Application of independent component analysis method in real-time spectral analysis of gaseous mixtures for acousto-optical spectrometers based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadeyev, A. V.; Pozhar, V. E.

    2012-10-01

    It is discussed the reliability problem of time-optimized method for remote optical spectral analysis of gas-polluted ambient air. The method based on differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) enables fragmentary spectrum registration (FSR) and is suitable for random-spectral-access (RSA) optical spectrometers like acousto-optical (AO) ones. Here, it is proposed the algorithm based on statistical method of independent component analysis (ICA) for estimation of a correctness of absorption spectral lines selection for FSR-method. Implementations of ICA method for RSA-based real-time adaptive systems are considered. Numerical simulations are presented with use of real spectra detected by the trace gas monitoring system GAOS based on AO spectrometer.

  4. Detection of High Velocity Absorption Components in the He I Lines of Eta Carinae near the Time of Periastron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; St-Jean, Lucas; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Hillier, D. John; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Corcoran, Michael; Damineli, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a total of 58 high spectral resolution (R90,000) spectra of the massive binary star eta Carinae since 2012 in an effort to continue our orbital and long-term echelle monitoring of this extreme binary (Richardson et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1534) with the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO 1.5 m telescope (Tokovinin et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 1336) in the 45507500A region. We have increased our monitoring efforts and observation frequency as the periastron event of 2014 has approached. We note that there were multiple epochs this year where we observe unusual absorption components in the P Cygni troughs of the He I triplet lines. In particular, we note high velocity absorption components related to the following epochs for the following lines: He I 4713: HJD 2456754- 2456795 (velocity -450 to -560 kms) He I 5876: HJD 2456791- 2456819 (velocity -690 to -800 kms) He I 7065: HJD 2456791- 2456810 (velocity -665 to -730 kms) Figures: Note that red indicates a high-velocity component noted above. He I 4713: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson4713.png He I 5876: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson5876.png He I 7065: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson7065.png These absorptions are likely related to the wind-wind collision region and bow shock, as suggested by the high-velocity absorption observed by Groh et al. (2010, AA, 519, 9) in the He I 10830 Atransition. In these cases, we suspect that we look along an arm of the shock cone and that we will see a fast absorption change from the other collision region shortly after periastron. We suspect that this is related to the multiple-components of the He II 4686 line that was noted by Walter (ATel6334), and is confirmed in our data. Further, high spectral resolution data are highly encouraged,especially for resolving powers greater than 50,000.These observations were obtained with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium, and were obtained through both SMARTS and NOAO programs 2012A-0216,2012B-0194

  5. Picosecond transient absorption rise time for ultrafast tagging of the interaction of ionizing radiation with scintillating crystals in high energy physics experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Buganov, O.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Mechinsky, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Vasil'ev, A.; Lecoq, P.

    2014-07-01

    Here we report the first results of a search of a signature for picosecond time stamps of the interaction between ionizing particles and transparent crystalline media. The induced absorption with sub-picosecond rise time observed in a cerium fluoride scintillation single crystal under UV excitation is directly associated with the ionization of Ce3+ atoms in CeF3 crystals, and the very fast occurrence thereof can be used to generate picosecond-precise time stamps corresponding to the interaction of ionizing particles with the crystal in high energy physics experiments.

  6. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  7. The effect of lag on image quality for a digital breast tomosynthesis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainprize, James G.; Wang, Xinying; Yaffe, Martin J.

    2009-02-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a limited-view, limited-angle computed tomography (CT) technique that has the potential to yield improved lesion conspicuity over that of standard digital mammography. To maintain short acquisition time, the detector must have a rapid temporal response. Transient effects like lag and ghosting have been noted previously in digital mammography systems, but for the times between successive views (approx. 1 minute), their impact on image quality is generally negligible. However, tomosynthesis imaging requires much shorter times between projection images (< 1 s). Under these conditions, detectors that may have been acceptable for digital mammography may not be suitable for tomosynthesis. Transient effects will generally cause both a loss of signal and an increase in image noise. A cascaded systems analysis is used to determine the effect of lag on image quality in a DBT system. It is shown that in the projection images, lag results in artifacts appearing as a "trail" of prior exposures. The effect of lag on image quality is also evaluated with a simple Monte Carlo simulation of a cone-beam tomosynthesis image formation incorporating a filtered back-projection algorithm.

  8. Proposal for direct measurement of intense-field induced polarization in the continuum on the attosecond time scale using transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCurdy, C. William; Haxton, Daniel; Li, Xuan

    2015-05-01

    A procedure is proposed for using transient absorption spectroscopy above the ionization threshold to measure the polarization of the continuum induced by an intense optical pulse. In this way transient absorption measurement can be used to probe sub-femtosecond intense field dynamics in atoms and molecules and extract the high frequency polarization that plays a central role in high harmonic generation. The method is based on a robust approximation to the dependence of these spectra on time-delay between an attosecond XUV probe pulse and an intense pump pulse that is verified over a wide range of intensities and time delays by all-electrons-active calculations using the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree Fock method. To demonstrate the extraction of the field-induced polarization, we study the transient absorption spectrum of atomic Neon. Work at LBNL supported by USDOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division, and work at UC Davis supported by USDOE grant No. DESC0007182.

  9. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  10. Development and operation of a real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1985-01-01

    Computer hardware and software of the NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) sysatem were improved. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment for remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentration from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed with the capability of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights were successfully performed on board the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1984. Improvements on the DIAL data acquisition system (DAS) are described.

  11. Internet and Free Press Are Associated with Reduced Lags in Global Outbreak Reporting

    PubMed Central

    McAlarnen, Lindsey; Smith, Katherine; Brownstein, John S.; Jerde, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background: Global outbreak detection and reporting have generally improved for a variety of infectious diseases and geographic regions in recent decades. Nevertheless, lags in outbreak reporting remain a threat to the global human health and economy. In the time between first occurrence of a novel disease incident and public notification of an outbreak, infected individuals have a greater possibility of traveling and spreading the pathogen to other nations. Shortening outbreak reporting lags has the potential to improve global health by preventing local outbreaks from escalating into global epidemics. Methods: Reporting lags between the first record and the first public report of an event were calculated for 318 outbreaks occurring 1996-2009. The influence of freedom of the press, Internet usage, per capita health expenditure, and cell phone subscriptions, on the timeliness of outbreak reporting was evaluated. Results: Freer presses and increasing Internet usage correlate with reduced time between the first record of an outbreak and the public report. Increasing Internet usage reduced the expected reporting lag from more than one month in nations without Internet users to one day in those where 75 of 100 people use the Internet. Conclusion: Advances in technology and the emergence of more open and free governments are associated with to improved global infectious disease surveillance. PMID:25642380

  12. Lag and seasonality considerations in evaluating AVHRR NDVI response to precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Peters, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of the relationship between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and precipitation is important in understanding vegetation and climate interaction at a large scale. NDVI response to precipitation, however, is difficult to quantify due to the lag and seasonality effects, which will vary due to vegetation cover type, soils and climate. A time series analysis was performed on biweekly NDVI and precipitation around weather stations in the northern and central U.S. Great Plains. Regression models that incorporate lag and seasonality effects were used to quantify the relationship between NDVI and lagged precipitation in grasslands and croplands. It was found that the time lag was shorter in the early growing season, but longer in the mid- to late-growing season for most locations. The regression models with seasonal adjustment indicate that the relationship between NDVI and precipitation over the entire growing season was strong, with R2 values of 0.69 and 0.72 for grasslands and croplands, respectively. We conclude that vegetation greenness can be predicted using current and antecedent precipitation, if seasonal effects are taken into account.

  13. Jet lag: therapeutic use of melatonin and possible application of melatonin analogs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Spence, D Warren; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trakht, Ilya; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    Each year millions of travelers undertake long distance flights over one or more continents. These multiple time zone flights produce a constellation of symptoms known as jet lag. Familiar to almost every intercontinental traveler is the experience of fatigue upon arrival in a new time zone, but almost as problematic are a number of other jet lag symptoms. These include reduced alertness, nighttime insomnia, loss of appetite, depressed mood, poor psychomotor coordination and reduced cognitive skills, all symptoms which are closely affected by both the length and direction of travel. The most important jet lag symptoms are due to disruptions to the body's sleep/wake cycle. Clinical and pathophysiological studies also indicate that jet lag can exacerbate existing affective disorders. It has been suggested that dysregulation of melatonin secretion and occurrence of circadian rhythm disturbances may be the common links which underlie jet lag and affective disorders. Largely because of its regulatory effects on the circadian system, melatonin has proven to be highly effective for treating the range of symptoms that accompany transmeridian air travel. Additionally, it has been found to be of value in treating mood disorders like seasonal affective disorder. Melatonin acts on MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of the body's master circadian clock. Melatonin resets disturbed circadian rhythms and promotes sleep in jet lag and other circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including delayed sleep phase syndrome and shift-work disorder. Although post-flight melatonin administration works efficiently in transmeridian flights across less than 7-8 times zones, in the case longer distances, melatonin should be given by 2-3 days in advance to the flight. To deal with the unwanted side effects which usually accompany this pre-departure treatment (acute soporific and sedative effects in times that may not be wanted), the

  14. Saturable absorption behavior of free-standing graphene polymer composite films over broad wavelength and time ranges.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yanyan; Dong, Ningning; Wang, Gaozhong; Li, Yuanxin; Zhang, Saifeng; Wang, Kangpeng; Zhang, Long; Blau, Werner J; Wang, Jun

    2015-01-12

    A comparative research on saturable absorption (SA) behavior dependence on wavelength and pulse duration was performed for graphene polymer composites. Free-standing graphene-polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) composite films were fabricated by using solution cast method in combination of liquid phase exfoliation. SA responses were observed by using an open-aperture Z-scan technique for 340 fs pulses at 1030 nm and 515 nm from a mode-locked fiber laser, and 6 ns pulses at 1064 nm and 532 nm from a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser. The graphene films possess better SA property, i.e., larger SA coefficient and figure of merit (FOM), and lower saturation intensity I(s), for ns pulses than that for fs pulses at the similar near infrared (NIR) wavelength. For fs pulses, the films show better SA response at 1030 nm than that at 515 nm. By employing slow and fast SA modelling, the excited state and ground state absorption cross sections were estimated to be ~10(-17) cm(2), and the ratio was ~0.6 at NIR for both fs and ns pulses. PMID:25835702

  15. Variability of broad absorption lines in QSO SDSS J022844.09+000217.0 on multiyear time-scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhi-Cheng; Bian, Wei-Hao; Jiang, Xiao-Lei; Wang, Yue-Feng

    2014-09-01

    The variability of broad absorption lines is investigated for a broad-absorption-line (BAL) quasar (QSO), SDSS J022844.09+000217.0 (z = 2.719), with 18 Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS)/Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) spectra covering 4128 d in the observed frame. Using the ratio of the root-mean-square (rms) spectrum to the mean spectrum, the relative flux change of the BAL trough is larger than that of the emission lines and the continuum. Fitting a power-law continuum and the emission-line profiles of C IV λ1549 and Si IVλ1399, we calculate the equivalent width (EW) for different epochs, as well as the continuum luminosity and the spectral index. It is found that there is a strong correlation between the BAL-trough EW and the spectral index and a weak negative correlation between the BAL-trough EW and the continuum luminosity. The strong correlation between the BAL-trough EW and the spectral index for this particular QSO suggests that dust is intrinsic to outflows. The weak correlation between the BAL variability and the continuum luminosity for this particular QSO implies that the BAL-trough variation is not dominated by photoionization.

  16. Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Well-Being: Stability and Cross-Lagged Relations within One- and Six-Year Follow-Ups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantanen, Johanna; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2008-01-01

    The rank-order stability and cross-lagged relations between work-to-family conflict (WFC), family-to-work conflict (FWC), and psychological well-being were examined in two longitudinal studies with full two-wave panel designs. In Study 1 (n = 365), the time lag was one year, and in Study 2 (n = 153), six years. The Structural Equation Modeling…

  17. Decadal time-series of SeaWiFS retrieved CDOM absorption and estimated CO2 photoproduction on the continental shelf of the eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vecchio, Rossana; Subramaniam, Ajit; Schollaert Uz, Stephanie; Ballabrera-Poy, Joaquim; Brown, Christopher W.; Blough, Neil V.

    2009-01-01

    Published algorithms were employed to convert SeaWiFS images of normalized water-leaving-radiance to absorption images of CDOM (chromophoric dissolved organic matter). The best performing algorithm was employed to produce decadal time-series of CDOM monthly composites from 1998 through 2007. Deficits in CDOM absorption coefficient for surface waters across the shelf over the summer were then acquired relative to the uniformly mixed waters prior to and following stratification (spring and fall, respectively). Estimates were attained of the photochemical oxidation of carbon to CO2 on and beyond the shelf of the Middle Atlantic Bight. Approximately 3-7 × 1010 g C as CO2 were estimated to be produced via photooxidation of CDOM over the summertime, highlighting the significance of CDOM photochemistry and pointing out the importance of CO2 photoproduction at a global scale. In principle, this approach could be applied to global ocean color data.

  18. TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2013-02-10

    Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

  19. Influence of Circulation System on Estimation of Absorption and Elimination Constant after per oral Drug Administration: A Reanalysis.

    PubMed

    Rausova, Z; Chrenova, J; Dedik, L

    2013-03-01

    This study aimed to identify the cause of atypical shape of measured concentration-time profile in the peak area by one compartment open model with a lag time (Bateman function with a lag) after single dose oral administration of drug published in "Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Data Analysis: Concepts and Application" by Gabrielsson and Weiner (1997) and two concentration profiles after frequent sampling oral glucose tolerance test. Following the oral administration of 100 μg of substance A to human volunteer, frequent sampling was carried out and concentration-time profiles were obtained. Our hemodynamic circulatory structural model capable of parameters estimation of circulation and gastrointestinal subsystem to explain the plateau within the interval 40-100 min (substance A) and 15-30 min (glucose) of the measured concentration-time profile was developed. The mean residence time, the rate constants of absorption and elimination parameters of our model were calculated. Comparing to the Bateman function, our results demonstrate better approximation of the substance A and glucose concentration-time profile and estimation of absorption rate constant by our structural model. Obtained model results indicate that the atypical shape of measured concentration-time profile of single dose oral administration of drug was probably caused by the gastrointestinal and circulation system with deep compartment. This applies to the substances with high coefficient of absorption. PMID:24019565

  20. Temperature lags of luminescence measurements in a commercial luminescence reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitis, George; Kiyak, Nafiye G.; Polymeris, George S.

    2015-09-01

    The temperature recorded in thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence equipments is not the temperature of the sample but that of the heating element on which the thermocouple is attached. Depending upon the rate of heating, a temperature difference appears between the samples and the heating element, termed as temperature lag, which could have serious effects on the curve shapes and trapping parameters. In the present work the temperature lag effect is studied in a newly developed luminescence equipment measuring both thermoluminescence and optically stimulated luminescence. It is found that the temperature lag could be large for heating rates above 2 K/s and it is strongly dependent upon the sample holder. A simple approximation method is proposed in order to both predict as well as correct for temperature lag effects in luminescence measurements.

  1. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  2. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  3. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  4. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  5. Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... 159529.html Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says Only 6 in 10 Americans covered ... federal government report says. This type of law bans smoking in all indoor areas of workplaces, restaurants ...

  6. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  7. Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159529.html Southern States Lagging in Tough Smoking Bans, CDC Says Only 6 in 10 Americans covered by state or local laws banning smoking in public places To use the sharing features ...

  8. On-The-Job Training Funds for Pediatricians Lagging

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158004.html On-the-Job Training Funds for Pediatricians Lagging: Experts American Academy of ... 28, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Funding for graduate medical education (GME) for doctors-in-training needs to be ...

  9. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  10. Visual recognition memory in Alzheimer's disease: repetition-lag effects.

    PubMed

    Viggiano, Maria Pia; Galli, Giulia; Righi, Stefania; Brancati, Claudia; Gori, Guido; Cincotta, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that visual recognition memory is largely affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD). Deficits might concern the forming, maintaining, and matching of the memory representation of the visual stimulus, especially when long interitem lags occur. The aim of the present study was to assess the effect of repetition lag on picture identification in mild- and moderate-AD patients, as well as in elderly controls. Participants underwent an old/new paradigm. To manipulate the temporal gradient, short and long lags were introduced between the first and second presentations. Pictures were presented at different levels of spatial filtering, following a coarse-to-fine order. This allowed for the measurement of the amount of physical information required for the identification of stimuli as a function of prior exposure and repetition lag. In the elderly, the magnitude of repetition priming did not differ as a function of interitem lag. Instead, repetition-lag effects interacted with dementia severity, and the capacity to retain memory traces for longer intervals worsened as the disease progresses. Current findings suggest that severe cortical degeneration may render AD patients unable to maintain their perceptual memories, and that dementia severity is a critical variable in the visual recognition memory assessment. PMID:18568983

  11. Thermal lag, fusion, and the compensation effect during biomass pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Narayan, R.; Antal, M.J. Jr.

    1996-05-01

    Results from a numerical model for endothermic biomass pyrolysis, which includes both high activation energy kinetics and heat transfer across a boundary layer to the reacting solid particle, are presented. The model accounts for conventional thermocouple thermal lag and unconventional thermal lag due to heat demand by the chemical reaction (which is governed by Arrhenius kinetics). Biomass fusion, first identified quantitatively by Lede and Villermaux, is shown to be a manifestation of severe thermal lag that results from the chemical reaction heat demand. Over the wide range or conditions studied, the true substrate temperature remains almost constant during pyrolysis, as is the case with compounds undergoing fusion or sublimation at constant pressure. A simple algebraic model, whose derivation presupposes the idea that biomass pyrolysis mimics the melting of a block of ice, accurately predicts the maximum value of thermal lag during pyrolysis. Unidentified thermal lag in TGA experiments lowers the values of the apparent activation energy and frequency factor associated with the experimental data but approximately retains the true value of their ratio. Thus, the widely varying values of kinetic parameters for cellulose pyrolysis reported in the literature may be a result of differing thermal lag characteristics of the experiments.

  12. Lagged cells in the inferior colliculus of the awake ferret

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Barak; Marvit, Peter; Depireux, Didier A

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in primary auditory cortex (AI) encode complex features of the spectral content of sound, such as direction selectivity. Recent findings of temporal symmetry in AI predict a specific organization of the subcortical input into cortex that contributes to the emergence of direction selectivity. We demonstrate two sub-populations of neurons in the central nucleus of the inferior colliculus, which differ in their steady-state temporal response profile: lagged and non-lagged. The lagged cells (23%) are shifted in temporal phase with respect to non-lagged cells and are characterized by an “inhibition first” and delayed excitation in their spectro-temporal receptive fields. Non-lagged cells (77%) have a canonical “excitation first” response. However, we find no difference in the response onset latency to pure tone stimuli between the two sub-populations. Given the homogeneity of tonal response latency, we predict that these lagged cells receive inhibitory input mediated by cortical feedback projections. PMID:20092554

  13. Information-theoretic approach to lead-lag effect on financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-08-01

    Recently the interest of researchers has shifted from the analysis of synchronous relationships of financial instruments to the analysis of more meaningful asynchronous relationships. Both types of analysis are concentrated mostly on Pearson's correlation coefficient and consequently intraday lead-lag relationships (where one of the variables in a pair is time-lagged) are also associated with them. Under the Efficient-Market Hypothesis such relationships are not possible as all information is embedded in the prices, but in real markets we find such dependencies. In this paper we analyse lead-lag relationships of financial instruments and extend known methodology by using mutual information instead of Pearson's correlation coefficient. Mutual information is not only a more general measure, sensitive to non-linear dependencies, but also can lead to a simpler procedure of statistical validation of links between financial instruments. We analyse lagged relationships using New York Stock Exchange 100 data not only on an intraday level, but also for daily stock returns, which have usually been ignored.

  14. How to compare cross-lagged associations in a multilevel autoregressive model.

    PubMed

    Schuurman, Noémi K; Ferrer, Emilio; de Boer-Sonnenschein, Mieke; Hamaker, Ellen L

    2016-06-01

    By modeling variables over time it is possible to investigate the Granger-causal cross-lagged associations between variables. By comparing the standardized cross-lagged coefficients, the relative strength of these associations can be evaluated in order to determine important driving forces in the dynamic system. The aim of this study was twofold: first, to illustrate the added value of a multilevel multivariate autoregressive modeling approach for investigating these associations over more traditional techniques; and second, to discuss how the coefficients of the multilevel autoregressive model should be standardized for comparing the strength of the cross-lagged associations. The hierarchical structure of multilevel multivariate autoregressive models complicates standardization, because subject-based statistics or group-based statistics can be used to standardize the coefficients, and each method may result in different conclusions. We argue that in order to make a meaningful comparison of the strength of the cross-lagged associations, the coefficients should be standardized within persons. We further illustrate the bivariate multilevel autoregressive model and the standardization of the coefficients, and we show that disregarding individual differences in dynamics can prove misleading, by means of an empirical example on experienced competence and exhaustion in persons diagnosed with burnout. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27045851

  15. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site

    PubMed Central

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB− mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950–1100 cm−1 in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, “Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I” Makita and Hastings (2016) [1]. PMID:27182540

  16. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB (-) mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950-1100 cm(-1) in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, "Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I" Makita and Hastings (2016) [1]. PMID:27182540

  17. A lagged variable model for characterizing temporally dynamic export of legacy anthropogenic nitrogen from watersheds to rivers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dingjiang; Guo, Yi; Hu, Minpeng; Dahlgren, Randy A

    2015-08-01

    Legacy nitrogen (N) sources originating from anthropogenic N inputs (NANI) may be a major cause of increasing riverine N exports in many regions, despite a significant decline in NANI. However, little quantitative knowledge exists concerning the lag effect of NANI on riverine N export. As a result, the N leaching lag effect is not well represented in most current watershed models. This study developed a lagged variable model (LVM) to address temporally dynamic export of watershed NANI to rivers. Employing a Koyck transformation approach used in economic analyses, the LVM expresses the indefinite number of lag terms from previous years' NANI with a lag term that incorporates the previous year's riverine N flux, enabling us to inversely calibrate model parameters from measurable variables using Bayesian statistics. Applying the LVM to the upper Jiaojiang watershed in eastern China for 1980-2010 indicated that ~97% of riverine export of annual NANI occurred in the current year and succeeding 10 years (~11 years lag time) and ~72% of annual riverine N flux was derived from previous years' NANI. Existing NANI over the 1993-2010 period would have required a 22% reduction to attain the target TN level (1.0 mg N L(-1)), guiding watershed N source controls considering the lag effect. The LVM was developed with parsimony of model structure and parameters (only four parameters in this study); thus, it is easy to develop and apply in other watersheds. The LVM provides a simple and effective tool for quantifying the lag effect of anthropogenic N input on riverine export in support of efficient development and evaluation of watershed N control strategies. PMID:25804663

  18. Corotation lag limit on mass-loss rate from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Considering rapid escape of H2O from Io during an early hot evolutionary epoch, an H2O plasma torus is constructed by balancing dissociation and ionization products against centrifugally driven diffusion, including for the first time the effects of corotation lag resulting from mass loading. Two fundamental limits are found as the mass injection rate increases: (1) an 'ignition' limit of 1.1 x 10 to the 6th kg/s, beyond which the torus cannot ionize itself and photoionization dominates; and (2) the ultimate mass loading limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th kg/s, which occurs when neutrals newly created by charge exchange and recombination cannot leave the torus, thereby bringing magnetospherically driven transport to a halt. Connecting this limit with the variations of Io's temperature in its early evolution epoch gives an estimate of the upper limit on the total mass loss from Io, about 3.0 x 10 to the 20th kg (for high-opacity nebula) and about 8.9 x 10 to the 20th kg (for low-opacity nebula). These limits correspond to eroding 8 km and 22 km of H2O from the surface. It is concluded that compared to the other Galilean satellites, Io was created basically dry.

  19. Synthetic Aperture Focusing for Short-Lag Spatial Coherence Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bottenus, Nick; Byram, Brett C.; Dahl, Jeremy J.; Trahey, Gregg E.

    2013-01-01

    It has been demonstrated that short-lag spatial coherence (SLSC) ultrasound imaging can provide improved speckle SNR and lesion CNR compared to conventional B-mode images, especially in the presence of noise and clutter. Application of the van Cittert-Zernike theorem predicts that coherence among the ultrasound echoes received across an array is reduced significantly away from the transmit focal depth, leading to a limited axial depth of field in SLSC images. Transmit focus throughout the field of view can be achieved using synthetic aperture methods to combine multiple transmit events into a single final image. A synthetic aperture can be formed with either focused or diverging transmit beams. We explore the application of these methods to form synthetically focused channel data to create SLSC images with an extended axial depth of field. An analytical expression of SLSC image brightness through depth is derived for the dynamic receive focus case. Experimental results in a phantom and in vivo are presented and compared to dynamic receive focused SLSC images, demonstrating improved SNR and CNR away from the transmit focus and an axial depth of field four to five times longer. PMID:24658715

  20. sLORETA intracortical lagged coherence during breath counting in meditation-naïve participants

    PubMed Central

    Milz, Patricia; Faber, Pascal L.; Lehmann, Dietrich; Kochi, Kieko; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated brain functional connectivity comparing no-task resting to breath counting (a meditation exercise but given as task without referring to meditation). Functional connectivity computed as EEG coherence between head-surface data suffers from localization ambiguity, reference dependence, and overestimation due to volume conduction. Lagged coherence between intracortical model sources addresses these criticisms. With this analysis approach, experienced meditators reportedly showed reduced coherence during meditation, meditation-naïve participants have not yet been investigated. 58-channel EEG from 23 healthy, right-handed, meditation-naïve males during resting [3 runs] and breath counting [2 runs] was computed into sLORETA time series of intracortical electrical activity in 19 regions of interest (ROI) corresponding to the cortex underlying 19 scalp electrode sites, for each of the eight independent EEG frequency bands covering 1.5–44 Hz. Intracortical lagged coherences and head-surface conventional coherences were computed between the 19 regions/sites. During breath counting compared to resting, paired t-tests corrected for multiple testing revealed four significantly lower intracortical lagged coherences, but four significantly higher head-surface conventional coherences. Lowered intracortical lagged coherences involved left BA 10 and right BAs 3, 10, 17, 40. In conclusion, intracortical lagged coherence can yield results that are inverted to those of head-surface conventional coherence. The lowered functional connectivity between cognitive control areas and sensory perception areas during meditation-type breath counting compared to resting conceivably reflects the attention to a bodily percept without cognitive reasoning. The reductions in functional connectivity were similar but not as widespread as the reductions reported during meditation in experienced meditators. PMID:24860483

  1. Mosquito Surveillance Revealed Lagged Effects of Mosquito Abundance on Mosquito-Borne Disease Transmission: A Retrospective Study in Zhejiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Ling, Feng; Hou, Juan; Wang, Jinna; Fu, Guiming; Gong, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases (MBDs) are still threats to public health in Zhejiang. In this study, the associations between the time-lagged mosquito capture data and MBDs incidence over five years were used to examine the potential effects of mosquito abundance on patterns of MBDs epidemiology in Zhejiang during 2008–2012. Light traps were used to collect adult mosquitoes at 11 cities. Correlation tests with and without time lag were performed to investigate the correlations between MBDs incidence rates and mosquito abundance by month. Selected MBDs consisted of Japanese encephalitis (JE), dengue fever (DF) and malaria. A Poisson regression analysis was performed by using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach, and the most parsimonious model was selected based on the quasi-likelihood based information criterion (QICu). We identified five mosquito species and the constituent ratio of Culex pipiens pallens, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles sinensis and Armigeres subalbatus was 66.73%, 21.47%, 6.72%, 2.83% and 2.25%, respectively. The correlation analysis without and with time lag showed that Culex mosquito abundance at a lag of 0 or 1 month was positively correlated with JE incidence during 2008–2012, Ae. albopictus abundance at a lag of 1 month was positively correlated with DF incidence in 2009, and An. sinensis abundance at a lag of 0–2 months was positively correlated with malaria incidence during 2008–2010. The Poisson regression analysis showed each 0.1 rise of monthly mosquito abundance corresponded to a positive increase of MBD cases for the period of 2008–2012. The rise of mosquito abundance with a lag of 0–2 months increased the risk of human MBDs infection in Zhejiang. Our study provides evidence that mosquito monitoring could be a useful early warning tool for the occurrence and transmission of MBDs. PMID:25393834

  2. Mosquito surveillance revealed lagged effects of mosquito abundance on mosquito-borne disease transmission: a retrospective study in Zhejiang, China.

    PubMed

    Guo, Song; Ling, Feng; Hou, Juan; Wang, Jinna; Fu, Guiming; Gong, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases (MBDs) are still threats to public health in Zhejiang. In this study, the associations between the time-lagged mosquito capture data and MBDs incidence over five years were used to examine the potential effects of mosquito abundance on patterns of MBDs epidemiology in Zhejiang during 2008-2012. Light traps were used to collect adult mosquitoes at 11 cities. Correlation tests with and without time lag were performed to investigate the correlations between MBDs incidence rates and mosquito abundance by month. Selected MBDs consisted of Japanese encephalitis (JE), dengue fever (DF) and malaria. A Poisson regression analysis was performed by using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach, and the most parsimonious model was selected based on the quasi-likelihood based information criterion (QICu). We identified five mosquito species and the constituent ratio of Culex pipiens pallens, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles sinensis and Armigeres subalbatus was 66.73%, 21.47%, 6.72%, 2.83% and 2.25%, respectively. The correlation analysis without and with time lag showed that Culex mosquito abundance at a lag of 0 or 1 month was positively correlated with JE incidence during 2008-2012, Ae. albopictus abundance at a lag of 1 month was positively correlated with DF incidence in 2009, and An. sinensis abundance at a lag of 0-2 months was positively correlated with malaria incidence during 2008-2010. The Poisson regression analysis showed each 0.1 rise of monthly mosquito abundance corresponded to a positive increase of MBD cases for the period of 2008-2012. The rise of mosquito abundance with a lag of 0-2 months increased the risk of human MBDs infection in Zhejiang. Our study provides evidence that mosquito monitoring could be a useful early warning tool for the occurrence and transmission of MBDs. PMID:25393834

  3. Multispecies absorption spectroscopy of detonation events at 100  kHz using a fiber-coupled, time-division-multiplexed quantum-cascade-laser system.

    PubMed

    Rein, Keith D; Roy, Sukesh; Sanders, Scott T; Caswell, Andrew W; Schauer, Frederick R; Gord, James R

    2016-08-10

    A mid-infrared fiber-coupled laser system constructed around three time-division-multiplexed quantum-cascade lasers capable of measuring the absorption spectra of CO, CO2, and N2O at 100 kHz over a wide range of operating pressures and temperatures is demonstrated. This system is first demonstrated in a laboratory burner and then used to measure temperature, pressure, and concentrations of CO, CO2, and N2O as a function of time in a detonated mixture of N2O and C3H8. Both fuel-rich and fuel-lean detonation cases are outlined. High-temperature fluctuations during the blowdown are observed. Concentrations of CO are shown to decrease with time for fuel-lean conditions and increase for fuel-rich conditions. PMID:27534467

  4. Transient Absorption and Time-Resolved Fluorescence Studies of Solvated Ruthenium Di-Bipyridine Pseudo-Halide Complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compton, R.; Weidinger, D.; Owrutsky, J. C.

    2012-06-01

    Time-resolved IR and fluorescence measurements were performed to probe the vibrational and electronic properties, respectively, of ruthenium di-bipyridine pseudo-halide (Ru(Bpy){_2}(X){_2} (where X = CN, N{_3} or NCS)) complexes. Vibrational energy relaxation (VER) times were determined for the complexes dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) with a trend in VER time of NCS > CN > N{_3}. A similar trend and comparable absolute rates for NCS- and N3- were previously observed by our group and others for simple inorganic anions in solution, suggesting a minimal contribution due to complexation. Measurements of the VER time of the CN complex in various solvents provide VER times in ethanol (42.3 ps) and DMSO (53.3 ps), which shows that protic solvents promote the relaxation. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements indicate a strong ligand dependence, with a factor of five decrease in the excited electronic state decay time from the CN (215 ns) to the NCS (39 ns) complex. A solvent dependence of the CN complex reveals a nearly 3-fold increase in the fluorescence decay time from acetonitrile (70 ns) to DMSO (215 ns).

  5. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-01

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells. PMID

  6. SkyProbe: Real-Time Precision Monitoring in the Optical of the Absolute Atmospheric Absorption on the Telescope Science and Calibration Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuillandre, J.-C.; Magnier, E.; Sabin, D.; Mahoney, B.

    2016-05-01

    Mauna Kea is known for its pristine seeing conditions but sky transparency can be an issue for science operations since at least 25% of the observable (i.e. open dome) nights are not photometric, an effect mostly due to high-altitude cirrus. Since 2001, the original single channel SkyProbe mounted in parallel on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) has gathered one V-band exposure every minute during each observing night using a small CCD camera offering a very wide field of view (35 sq. deg.) encompassing the region pointed by the telescope for science operations, and exposures long enough (40 seconds) to capture at least 100 stars of Hipparcos' Tycho catalog at high galactic latitudes (and up to 600 stars at low galactic latitudes). The measurement of the true atmospheric absorption is achieved within 2%, a key advantage over all-sky direct thermal infrared imaging detection of clouds. The absolute measurement of the true atmospheric absorption by clouds and particulates affecting the data being gathered by the telescope's main science instrument has proven crucial for decision making in the CFHT queued service observing (QSO) representing today all of the telescope time. Also, science exposures taken in non-photometric conditions are automatically registered for a new observation at a later date at 1/10th of the original exposure time in photometric conditions to ensure a proper final absolute photometric calibration. Photometric standards are observed only when conditions are reported as being perfectly stable by SkyProbe. The more recent dual color system (simultaneous B & V bands) will offer a better characterization of the sky properties above Mauna Kea and should enable a better detection of the thinnest cirrus (absorption down to 0.01 mag., or 1%).

  7. Woody biomass production lags stem-girth increase by over one month in coniferous forests.

    PubMed

    Cuny, Henri E; Rathgeber, Cyrille B K; Frank, David; Fonti, Patrick; Mäkinen, Harri; Prislan, Peter; Rossi, Sergio; Del Castillo, Edurne Martinez; Campelo, Filipe; Vavrčík, Hanuš; Camarero, Jesus Julio; Bryukhanova, Marina V; Jyske, Tuula; Gričar, Jožica; Gryc, Vladimír; De Luis, Martin; Vieira, Joana; Čufar, Katarina; Kirdyanov, Alexander V; Oberhuber, Walter; Treml, Vaclav; Huang, Jian-Guo; Li, Xiaoxia; Swidrak, Irene; Deslauriers, Annie; Liang, Eryuan; Nöjd, Pekka; Gruber, Andreas; Nabais, Cristina; Morin, Hubert; Krause, Cornelia; King, Gregory; Fournier, Meriem

    2015-01-01

    Wood is the main terrestrial biotic reservoir for long-term carbon sequestration(1), and its formation in trees consumes around 15% of anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions each year(2). However, the seasonal dynamics of woody biomass production cannot be quantified from eddy covariance or satellite observations. As such, our understanding of this key carbon cycle component, and its sensitivity to climate, remains limited. Here, we present high-resolution cellular based measurements of wood formation dynamics in three coniferous forest sites in northeastern France, performed over a period of 3 years. We show that stem woody biomass production lags behind stem-girth increase by over 1 month. We also analyse more general phenological observations of xylem tissue formation in Northern Hemisphere forests and find similar time lags in boreal, temperate, subalpine and Mediterranean forests. These time lags question the extension of the equivalence between stem size increase and woody biomass production to intra-annual time scales(3, 4, 5, 6). They also suggest that these two growth processes exhibit differential sensitivities to local environmental conditions. Indeed, in the well-watered French sites the seasonal dynamics of stem-girth increase matched the photoperiod cycle, whereas those of woody biomass production closely followed the seasonal course of temperature. We suggest that forecasted changes in the annual cycle of climatic factors(7) may shift the phase timing of stem size increase and woody biomass production in the future. PMID:27251531

  8. Spectral Lags and Variability of Gamma-ray Bursts in the Swift Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukwatta, Tilan N.

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to be the most concentrated and brightest explosions in the universe, making them observable to very great distances. Hence GRBs can be used to probe the early universe, including the re-ionization period as well as the intergalactic medium. GRBs may also be used to study the biggest mystery of our time: 'Dark Energy'. However, unlike Supernove 1a, GRBs as yet are not good standard candles. Hence, in order to use GRBs to connect luminosity and distance, we need GRB Luminosity Relations. Over the years people have proposed a number of GRB luminosity relations. Unfortunately, none of them are tight enough to be used individually to construct the GRB Hubble Diagram. However, by combining multiple GRB luminosity relations we can construct a GRB Hubble diagram that may be able to constrain cosmological parameters. Thus, it is important to study and improve existing GRB luminosity relations and perhaps discover new GRB luminosity relations. In addition to helping to improve our understanding of Dark Energy, these GRB luminosity relations are very useful to understand the underlying physics of GRBs. One major limiting factor in GRB luminosity relation studies is the low statistics. Before the Swift mission there were very few GRBs with measured redshifts. But now in the Swift era we have more than 150 GRBs with measured redshifts. In this work we have utilized this high-quality data set to study two GRB luminosity relations. In Part-I we extracted spectral lags and studied the lag-luminosity relation. The spectral lag is the time difference between the arrival of high-energy and low-energy photons. To quantify this lag we have developed an improved method based upon the cross correlation function. With this method we investigated the lag-luminosity relation over the entire Swift Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) energy range. Typically, a spectral lag is extracted in two arbitrary energy bands in the observer-frame. However, because of the

  9. Cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Ostlund, Richard E

    2002-03-01

    Cholesterol absorption is a key regulatory point in human lipid metabolism because it determines the amount of endogenous biliary as well as dietary cholesterol that is retained, thereby influencing whole body cholesterol balance. Plant sterols (phytosterols) and the drug ezetimibe reduce cholesterol absorption and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in clinical trials, complementing the statin drugs, which inhibit cholesterol biosynthesis. The mechanism of cholesterol absorption is not completely known but involves the genes ABC1, ABCG5, and ABCG8, which are members of the ATP-binding cassette protein family and appear to remove unwanted cholesterol and phytosterols from the enterocyte. ABC1 is upregulated by the liver X (LXR) and retinoid X (RXR) nuclear receptors. Acylcholesterol acytransferase-2 is an intestinal enzyme that esterifies absorbed cholesterol and increases cholesterol absorption when dietary intake is high. New clinical treatments based on better understanding of absorption physiology are likely to substantially improve clinical cholesterol management in the future. PMID:17033296

  10. Time-dependent aggregation-induced enhanced emission, absorption spectral broadening, and aggregation morphology of a novel perylene derivative with a large D-π-A structure.

    PubMed

    Yang, Long; Yu, Yuyan; Zhang, Jin; Ge, Feijie; Zhang, Jianling; Jiang, Long; Gao, Fang; Dan, Yi

    2015-05-01

    Strong aggregation-caused quenching of perylene diimides (PDI) is changed successfully by simple chemical modification with two quinoline moieties through C=C at the bay positions to obtain aggregation-induced enhanced emission (AIEE) of a perylene derivative (Cya-PDI) with a large π-conjugation system. Cya-PDI is weakly luminescent in the well-dispersed CH(3)CN or THF solutions and exhibits an evident time-dependent AIEE and absorption spectra broadening in the aggregated state. In addition, morphological inspection demonstrates that the morphology of the aggregated form of Cya-PDI molecules changed from plate-shaped to rod-like aggregates under the co-effects of time and water. An edge-to-face arrangement of aggregation was proposed and discussed. The fact that the Cya-PDI aggregates show a broad absorption covering the whole visible-light range and strong intermolecular interaction through π-π stacking in the solid state makes them promising materials for optoelectric applications. PMID:25643930

  11. Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory Study of Low-Lying Absorption and Fluorescence Band Shapes for Phenylene-Containing Oligoacenes.

    PubMed

    Jun, Ye

    2015-12-24

    Low-lying band shapes of absorption and fluorescence spectra for a member of a newly synthesized family of phenylene-containing oligoacenes (POA 6) reported in J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2012 , 134 , 15351 are studied theoretically with two different approaches with TIPS-anthracene as a comparison. Underlying photophysics and exciton-phonon interactions in both molecules are investigated in details with the aid of the time-dependent density functional theory and multimode Brownian oscillator model. The first two low-lying excited-states of POA 6 were found to exhibit excitation characteristics spanning entire conjugated backbone despite the presence of antiaromatic phenylene section. Absorption and fluorescence spectra calculated from both time-dependent density functional theory and multimode Brownian oscillator model are shown to reach good agreement with experimental ones. The coupling between phonon modes and optical transitions is generally weak as suggested by the multimode Brownian oscillator model. Broader peaks of POA 6 spectra are found to relate to stronger coupling between low frequency phonon modes such as backbone twisting (with frequency <300 cm(-1)) and optical transitions. Furthermore, POA 6 exhibits weaker exciton-phonon coupling for the phonon modes above 1000 cm(-1) compared to TIPS-anthracene owing to extended conjugated backbone. A significant coupling between an in-plane breathing mode localized around the antiaromatic phenylene segment with frequency at 1687 cm(-1) and optical transitions for the first two excited-states of POA 6 is also observed. PMID:26611665

  12. Circadian disruption and remedial interventions: effects and interventions for jet lag for athletic peak performance.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Robertson, Sarah; Dudley, Edward; Vadgama, Pankaj; Cook, Christian; Drawer, Scott; Kilduff, Liam

    2012-03-01

    Jet lag has potentially serious deleterious effects on performance in athletes following transmeridian travel, where time zones are crossed eastwards or westwards; as such, travel causes specific effects related to desynchronization of the athlete's internal body clock or circadian clock. Athletes are particularly sensitive to the effects of jet lag, as many intrinsic aspects of sporting performance show a circadian rhythm, and optimum competitive results require all aspects of the athlete's mind and body to be working in tandem at their peak efficiency. International competition often requires transmeridian travel, and competition timings cannot be adjusted to suit individual athletes. It is therefore in the interest of the individual athlete and team to understand the effects of jet lag and the potential adaptation strategies that can be adopted. In this review, we describe the underlying genetic and physiological mechanisms controlling the circadian clock and its inherent ability to adapt to external conditions on a daily basis. We then examine the fundamentals of the various adaptation stimuli, such as light, chronobiotics (e.g. melatonin), exercise, and diet and meal timing, with particular emphasis on their suitability as strategies for competing athletes on the international circuit. These stimuli can be artificially manipulated to produce phase shifts in the circadian rhythm to promote adaptation in the optimum direction, but care must be taken to apply them at the correct time and dose, as the effects produced on the circadian rhythm follow a phase-response curve, with pronounced shifts in direction at different times. Light is the strongest realigning stimulus and careful timing of light exposure and avoidance can promote adjustment. Chronobiotics such as melatonin can also be used to realign the circadian clock but, as well as timing and dosage issues, there are also concerns as to its legal status in different countries and with the World Anti

  13. Phase-lag Distances of OH Masing AGB Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, D.; Etoka, S.; Gérard, E.; Richards, A.

    2015-08-01

    Distances to AGB stars with optically thick circumstellar shells cannot be determined using optical parallaxes. However, for stars with OH 1612 MHz maser emission emanating from their circumstellar shells, distances can be determined by the phase-lag method. This method combines a linear diameter obtained from a phase-lag measurement with an angular diameter obtained from interferometry. The phase-lag of the variable emission from the back and front sides of the shells has been determined for 20 OH/IR stars in the galactic disk. These measurements are based on a monitoring program with the Nançay radio telescope ongoing for more than 6 years. The interferometric observations are continuing. We estimate that the uncertainties of the distance determination will be ˜20%.

  14. Temporal Profiles and Spectral Lags of XRF 060218

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Stamatikos, Mike; Zhang, Bing; Norris, Jay; Gehrels, Neil; Zhang, Jin; Dai, Z. G.

    2006-01-01

    The spectral and temporal properties of the nonthermal emission of the nearby XRF 060218 in the 0.3-150 keV band are studied. We show that both the spectral energy distribution and the light-curve properties suggest the same origin of the nonthermal emission detected by Swift BAT and XRT. This event has the longest pulse duration and spectral lag observed to date among the known GRBs. The pulse structure and its energy dependence are analogous to typical GRBs,. By extrapolating the observed spectral lag to the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) BATSE bands we find that the hypothesis that this event complies with the same luminosity-lag relation with bright GRBs cannot be ruled out at 2 sigma significance level. These intriguing facts, along with its compliance with the Amati relation, indicate that XRF 060218 shares the similar radiation physics as typical GRBs.

  15. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: First Broad-line Hβ and Mg II Lags at z ≳ 0.3 from Six-month Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Horne, Keith; Grier, C. J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Denney, Kelly D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Sun, Mouyuan; Brandt, W. N.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ho, Luis C.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; McGreer, Ian D.; Petitjean, Patrick; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tao, Charling; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zu, Ying; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Ge, Jian; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-02-01

    Reverberation mapping (RM) measurements of broad-line region (BLR) lags in z\\gt 0.3 quasars are important for directly measuring black hole masses in these distant objects, but so far there have been limited attempts and success given the practical difficulties of RM in this regime. Here we report preliminary results of 15 BLR lag measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project, a dedicated RM program with multi-object spectroscopy designed for RM over a wide redshift range. The lags are based on the 2014 spectroscopic light curves alone (32 epochs over six months) and focus on the Hβ and Mg ii broad lines in the 100 lowest-redshift (z\\lt 0.8) quasars included in SDSS-RM; they represent a small subset of the lags that SDSS-RM (including 849 quasars to z˜ 4.5) is expected to deliver. The reported preliminary lag measurements are for intermediate-luminosity quasars at 0.3≲ z\\lt 0.8, including nine Hβ lags and six Mg ii lags, for the first time extending RM results to this redshift-luminosity regime and providing direct quasar black hole mass estimates over approximately half of cosmic time. The Mg ii lags also increase the number of known Mg ii lags by several fold and start to explore the utility of Mg ii for RM at high redshift. The location of these new lags at higher redshifts on the observed BLR size-luminosity relationship is statistically consistent with previous Hβ results at z\\lt 0.3. However, an independent constraint on the relationship slope at z\\gt 0.3 is not yet possible owing to the limitations in our current sample. Our results demonstrate the general feasibility and potential of multi-object RM for z\\gt 0.3 quasars.

  16. ON THE NATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION PHASE LAGS IN BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov

    2012-06-20

    Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes (BHs). In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provide feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and time-delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its nonlinear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy-dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signals in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes on the nature of the power-law spectral component and its variability.

  17. Investigation into pulse laser heating of nanoscale Au film using dual-phase-lag model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Ching-Yen; Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Chen, Bor-Chyuan

    2013-10-01

    In this study the thermal field is presented for pulse laser processing of nanoscale Au films. Fourier law is inadequate for describing the heat conduction in nanoscale process due to the boundary scattering and the finite relaxation time of heat carriers. In the regime where the particle description of electrons and phonons is valid, the Boltzmann equation is the most accurate option to model heat transfer in such problems. However, solving the Boltzmann equation is generally difficult due to involving three spatial, three momentums and one time. Dual-phase-lag (DPL) model is averaged over the momentum space and thus involves only spatial coordinates plus time, as in the Fourier equation. Therefore this paper utilizes the dual-phase-lag (DPL) model with scattering boundary condition to study the temperature field for laser processing of nanometer-sized thin films instead of Boltzmann equation. The results obtained from the dual-phase-lag heat conduction model, hyperbolic and parabolic heat conduction equations were compared with the available experimental data to validate the compatibility of the thermal models for analyzing the heat transfer in nanoscale thin film irradiated by laser. The temperature history at different locations of the thin film and the effects of boundary phonon scattering on the normalized temperature were also discussed. PMID:24245230

  18. Estimation of LDA signal frequency using the autocovariance (ACV) lag ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matovic, D.; Tropea, C.

    1989-08-01

    An algorithm to realize the ACV lag ratio method is introduced and applied to real Doppler signals as acquired using a transient recorder, and processed on a digital computer. Measurements using other time domain and frequency domain estimation techniques are also performed on the same data sets and compared using basic statistical parameters. Results are presented for comparisons with an estimate based on the power spectral density, since the time domain estimates investigated are unable to achieve meaningful results for signals with high noise content. The prospects of implementing the ACV lag ratio method in a dedicated processor are discussed and the potential advantages of such a processor are summarized. For applications in phase/Doppler anemometry, the cross-correlation of the two Doppler signals rather than the autocorrelation can be computed without having to modify the algorithm for frequency determination. Once the frequency is known, the phase difference can be immediately computed by examining the shift of the cross-correlation function maximum away from lag time zero. Thus both particle velocity and size can be recovered with no additional computation.

  19. Lag variability associated with quasi periodic oscillations in GX 339-4 during outbursts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Broja Gopal; Belloni, Tomaso; Motta, Sara

    The black hole transient GX 339-4 has exhibited four outbursts at a 2-3 years intervals. We have analyzed RXTE/PCA data of this source for the 2002/2003, 2004, 2007 and 2010 outbursts. The power density spectrum exhibits quasi-periodic oscillations (QPO) whose frequency varies from 0.2 Hz to 8 Hz in addition to band-limited noise. We measured the time/phase lags between soft (2-5 keV) and hard (5-13 keV) photons at the QPO centroid frequency and at the continuum noise. We find hard phase/time lags for both centroid frequency and continuum monotonically increasing from .01 at 0.2 Hz to 0.68 at 8 Hz. This correlation appears to be same for all outbursts. The single correlation picture of phase/time lag for all four outbursts suggests a general evolution scenario of the QPOs during the outbursts. We discuss the implications of these results on the basis of possible accretion models

  20. On the Nature of QPO Phase Lags in Black Hole Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes. In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provides a feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and a time delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its non-linear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signal in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes to the nature of the power law spectral component and its variability.

  1. Non-negative matrix factorization for the near real-time interpretation of absorption effects in elemental distribution images acquired by X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Barriobero-Vila, Pere; Requena, Guillermo; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Elemental distribution images acquired by imaging X-ray fluorescence analysis can contain high degrees of redundancy and weakly discernible correlations. In this article near real-time non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is described for the analysis of a number of data sets acquired from samples of a bi-modal α+β Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy. NMF was used for the first time to reveal absorption artefacts in the elemental distribution images of the samples, where two phases of the alloy, namely α and β, were in superposition. The findings and interpretation of the NMF results were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation of the layered alloy system. Furthermore, it is shown how the simultaneous factorization of several stacks of elemental distribution images provides uniform basis vectors and consequently simplifies the interpretation of the representation. PMID:26917147

  2. Effect of gas residence time on near-edge X-ray absorption fine structures of hydrogenated amorphous carbon films grown by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Lingyun; Sugiura, Hirotsugu; Kondo, Hiroki; Takeda, Keigo; Ishikawa, Kenji; Oda, Osamu; Sekine, Makoto; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Hori, Masaru

    2016-04-01

    In hydrogenated amorphous carbon films, deposited using a radical-injection plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition system, the chemical bonding structure was analyzed by near-edge X-ray absorption fine-structure spectroscopy. With a change in the residence times of source gases in a reactor, whereby total gas flow rates of H2/CH4 increased from 50 to 400 sccm, sp2-C fractions showed the minimum value at 150 sccm, while H concentration negligibly changed according to the results of secondary ion mass spectroscopy. On the other hand, widths of σ* C-C peaks increased with decreasing gas residence time, which indicates an increase in the fluctuation of bonding structures.

  3. Sub-picosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of all- trans-neurosporene in solution and bound to the LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Inaba, Toru; Watanabe, Yasutaka; Koyama, Yasushi

    2000-12-01

    Sub-picosecond, time-resolved absorption spectra of all- trans-neurosporene, both free in n-hexane solution and bound to the LH2 complex from Rhodobacter sphaeroides G1C, were recorded and analyzed by singular-value decomposition followed by global fitting using a sequential model. The former experiment identified the 1B u+→1B u-→2A g- internal conversion, whereas the latter experiment identified a transformation of 1B u+→2A g-→T 1(1 3B u+). Excitation to the 1B u+(0) or 1B u+(1) vibronic level resulted in enhancement of stimulated emission from the particular level, showing that vibrational relaxation in the 1B u+ state has a time constant comparable to, or larger than, that of electronic relaxation.

  4. A 100 kHz Time-Resolved Multiple-Probe Femtosecond to Second Infrared Absorption Spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Greetham, Gregory M; Donaldson, Paul M; Nation, Charlie; Sazanovich, Igor V; Clark, Ian P; Shaw, Daniel J; Parker, Anthony W; Towrie, Michael

    2016-04-01

    We present a dual-amplifier laser system for time-resolved multiple-probe infrared (IR) spectroscopy based on the ytterbium potassium gadolinium tungstate (Yb:KGW) laser medium. Comparisons are made between the ytterbium-based technology and titanium sapphire laser systems for time-resolved IR spectroscopy measurements. The 100 kHz probing system provides new capability in time-resolved multiple-probe experiments, as more information is obtained from samples in a single experiment through multiple-probing. This method uses the high repetition-rate probe pulses to repeatedly measure spectra at 10 µs intervals following excitation allowing extended timescales to be measured routinely along with ultrafast data. Results are presented showing the measurement of molecular dynamics over >10 orders of magnitude in timescale, out to 20 ms, with an experimental time response of <200 fs. The power of multiple-probing is explored through principal component analysis of repeating probe measurements as a novel method for removing noise and measurement artifacts. PMID:26887988

  5. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  7. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Ignition Lag and Engine Knock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Frtiz A F

    1939-01-01

    The author believes, on the basis of experimental ignition-lag data, that the character of a fuel cannot be stated in terms of a single constant (such as octane or cetane number) but that at least two and generally three constants are required. Thus no correlation between knock ratings can be expected if in one set of tests the charge temperature was varied while in the other the charge pressure was varied. For this reason, he favors knock rating being based on an equation characterizing the ignition lag of the fuel as a function of pressure and temperature of the charge.

  8. Hot photocarrier dynamics in organic solar cells measured by transient absorption and time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, Paul A.; Cunningham, Paul D.; Melinger, Joseph S.; Heilweil, Edwin J.

    2014-10-01

    We present a study of charge transfer and carrier dynamics in films of zinc phthalocyanine (ZnPc) and buckmisnsterfullerene (C60) by investigated by time-resolved terahertz spectroscopy (TRTS). We compare terahertz photoconductivity dynamics in composite and multi-layered films of C60 and ZnPc. The few picosecond terahertz photoconductivity dynamics arise from autoionization and recombination between C60 molecules and cooling of hot photocarriers following from charge transfer between C60 and ZnPc.

  9. 46 CFR 36.30-1 - Lagged tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lagged tanks-TB/ALL. 36.30-1 Section 36.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Periodic Inspections § 36.30-1 Lagged tanks—TB/ALL. (a) Lagged tanks shall have part of the lagging removed on...

  10. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor–Visual Temporal Recalibration

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor–visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor–visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor–visual temporal recalibration. PMID:26778983

  11. 46 CFR 36.30-1 - Lagged tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lagged tanks-TB/ALL. 36.30-1 Section 36.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Periodic Inspections § 36.30-1 Lagged tanks—TB/ALL. (a) Lagged tanks shall have part of the lagging removed on...

  12. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  13. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of 1(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden 1(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed.

  14. A time-dependent density-functional theory and complete active space self-consistent field method study of vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin.

    PubMed

    Li, Junfeng; Rinkevicius, Zilvinas; Cao, Zexing

    2014-07-01

    Time-dependent density-functional theory (TD-DFT) and complete active space multiconfiguration self-consistent field (CASSCF) calculations have been used to determine equilibrium structures and vibrational frequencies of the ground state and several singlet low-lying excited states of coumarin. Vertical and adiabatic transition energies of S1, S2, and S3 have been estimated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF/PT2. Calculations predict that the dipole-allowed S1 and S3 states have a character of (1)(ππ*), while the dipole-forbidden (1)(nπ*) state is responsible for S2. The vibronic absorption and emission spectra of coumarin have been simulated by TD-B3LYP and CASSCF calculations within the Franck-Condon approximation, respectively. The simulated vibronic spectra show good agreement with the experimental observations available, which allow us to reasonably interpret vibronic features in the S0→S1 and S0→S3 absorption and the S0←S1 emission spectra. Based on the calculated results, activity, intensity, and density of the vibronic transitions and their contribution to the experimental spectrum profile have been discussed. PMID:25005288

  15. Direct time integration of Maxwell's equations in linear dispersive media with absorption for scattering and propagation of femtosecond electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.; Taflove, Allen

    1991-01-01

    The initial results for femtosecond pulse propagation and scattering interactions for a Lorentz medium obtained by a direct time integration of Maxwell's equations are reported. The computational approach provides reflection coefficients accurate to better than 6 parts in 10,000 over the frequency range of dc to 3 x 10 to the 16th Hz for a single 0.2-fs Gaussian pulse incident upon a Lorentz-medium half-space. New results for Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors are shown and compared with previous analyses. The present approach is robust and permits 2D and 3D electromagnetic pulse propagation directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  16. State-Dependent Resource Harvesting with Lagged Information about System States

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Byron K.; Nichols, James D.; Dorazio, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Markov decision processes (MDPs), which involve a temporal sequence of actions conditioned on the state of the managed system, are increasingly being applied in natural resource management. This study focuses on the modification of a traditional MDP to account for those cases in which an action must be chosen after a significant time lag in observing system state, but just prior to a new observation. In order to calculate an optimal decision policy under these conditions, possible actions must be conditioned on the previous observed system state and action taken. We show how to solve these problems when the state transition structure is known and when it is uncertain. Our focus is on the latter case, and we show how actions must be conditioned not only on the previous system state and action, but on the probabilities associated with alternative models of system dynamics. To demonstrate this framework, we calculated and simulated optimal, adaptive policies for MDPs with lagged states for the problem of deciding annual harvest regulations for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in the United States. In this particular example, changes in harvest policy induced by the use of lagged information about system state were sufficient to maintain expected management performance (e.g. population size, harvest) even in the face of an uncertain system state at the time of a decision. PMID:27314852

  17. Spectral lags of flaring events in LS I+61°303 from RXTE Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Tamal; Sarkar, Samir; Bhadra, Arunava

    2016-07-01

    This work reports the first discovery of (negative) spectral lags in X-ray emission below 10keV from the gamma ray binary LS I+61° 303 during large flaring episodes using Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations. It is found from the RXTE data that during the flares, low energy (3–5 keV) variations lead the higher energy (8–10 keV) variations by a few tens of seconds whereas no significant time lag is observed during the non-flaring states. The observed spectral lag features for flaring events suggest that inverse Compton scattering may be operating, at least in some part of the system. Another possibility is that the sites of particle acceleration may be different for flaring and non-flaring events such as in the microquasar model, in which the flaring radiation may come from hot spots sitting above the black hole while steady state emissions are due to the jets.

  18. State-Dependent Resource Harvesting with Lagged Information about System States.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Fred A; Fackler, Paul L; Boomer, G Scott; Zimmerman, Guthrie S; Williams, Byron K; Nichols, James D; Dorazio, Robert M

    2016-01-01

    Markov decision processes (MDPs), which involve a temporal sequence of actions conditioned on the state of the managed system, are increasingly being applied in natural resource management. This study focuses on the modification of a traditional MDP to account for those cases in which an action must be chosen after a significant time lag in observing system state, but just prior to a new observation. In order to calculate an optimal decision policy under these conditions, possible actions must be conditioned on the previous observed system state and action taken. We show how to solve these problems when the state transition structure is known and when it is uncertain. Our focus is on the latter case, and we show how actions must be conditioned not only on the previous system state and action, but on the probabilities associated with alternative models of system dynamics. To demonstrate this framework, we calculated and simulated optimal, adaptive policies for MDPs with lagged states for the problem of deciding annual harvest regulations for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in the United States. In this particular example, changes in harvest policy induced by the use of lagged information about system state were sufficient to maintain expected management performance (e.g. population size, harvest) even in the face of an uncertain system state at the time of a decision. PMID:27314852

  19. State-dependent resource harvesting with lagged information about system states

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Fred A.; Fackler, Paul L.; Boomer, G Scott; Zimmerman, Guthrie; Williams, Byron K.; Nichols, James; Dorazio, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Markov decision processes (MDPs), which involve a temporal sequence of actions conditioned on the state of the managed system, are increasingly being applied in natural resource management. This study focuses on the modification of a traditional MDP to account for those cases in which an action must be chosen after a significant time lag in observing system state, but just prior to a new observation. In order to calculate an optimal decision policy under these conditions, possible actions must be conditioned on the previous observed system state and action taken. We show how to solve these problems when the state transition structure is known and when it is uncertain. Our focus is on the latter case, and we show how actions must be conditioned not only on the previous system state and action, but on the probabilities associated with alternative models of system dynamics. To demonstrate this framework, we calculated and simulated optimal, adaptive policies for MDPs with lagged states for the problem of deciding annual harvest regulations for mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) in the United States. In this particular example, changes in harvest policy induced by the use of lagged information about system state were sufficient to maintain expected management performance (e.g. population size, harvest) even in the face of an uncertain system state at the time of a decision.

  20. A method for assessing real time rates of dissolution and absorption of carbohydrate and other food matrices in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Lentle, R G; Sequeira, I R; Hardacre, A K; Reynolds, G

    2016-06-15

    We prepared pasta of differing physical dimensions but identical chemical composition that contained two monosaccharide probes (lactulose and mannitol) that are absorbed passively and promptly excreted in urine. We showed that the rates of their liberation from the pasta under simulated gastric and small intestinal conditions largely depended upon the rate of digestion of the starchy matrix. We showed, in 20 female subjects, that excretion of mannitol was slower from the pasta with the larger particle size. Hence, after consumption of either the powdered pasta or the simple solution of probe sugars, the mass of mannitol excreted between 1 and 2½ hours was greater than that excreted between 2½ and 4 hours. However these masses did not differ significantly after consumption of the pasta pellets. These differences were not reflected in the concurrent patterns of variation in either serum glucose or insulin taken over 120 minutes, their levels being similar for pasta pellets and powder with their peak values occurring synchronously during the first hour. Hence feeding test foods impregnated with lactulose and mannitol probes provided a reproducible and practical means of assessing the timing of digestion of the carbohydrate matrix and showed that this was more protracted than suggested by post prandial glucose levels. Further, the transit times calculated on a basis of the ratios of the two marker sugars could identify that the prolongation of digestion of larger particles was not accompanied by retention of digesta in particular segments of the gut. PMID:27228950

  1. The evolution of the X-ray phase lags during the outbursts of the black hole candidate GX 339-4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altamirano, Diego; Méndez, Mariano

    2015-06-01

    Owing to the frequency and reproducibility of its outbursts, the black hole candidate GX 339-4 has become the standard against which the outbursts of other black hole candidate are matched up. Here we present the first systematic study of the evolution of the X-ray lags of the broad-band variability component (0.008-5 Hz) in GX 339-4 as a function of the position of the source in the hardness-intensity diagram. The hard photons always lag the soft ones, consistent with previous results. In the low-hard state the lags correlate with X-ray intensity, and as the source starts the transition to the intermediate/soft states, the lags first increase faster, and then appear to reach a maximum, although the exact evolution depends on the outburst and the energy band used to calculate the lags. The time of the maximum of the lags appears to coincide with a sudden drop of the optical/near-infrared flux, the fractional rms amplitude of the broad-band component in the power spectrum, and the appearance of a thermal component in the X-ray spectra, strongly suggesting that the lags can be very useful to understand the physical changes that GX 339-4 undergoes during an outburst. We find strong evidence for a connection between the evolution of the cut-off energy of the hard component in the energy spectrum and the phase lags, suggesting that the average magnitude of the lags is correlated with the properties of the corona/jet rather than those of the disc. Finally, we show that the lags in GX 339-4 evolve in a similar manner to those of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1, suggesting similar phenomena could be observable in other black hole systems.

  2. Jet-lag: prevention with Pycnogenol. Preliminary report: evaluation in healthy individuals and in hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Belcaro, G; Cesarone, M R; Steigerwalt, R J; Di Renzo, A; Grossi, M G; Ricci, A; Stuard, S; Ledda, A; Dugall, M; Cornelli, U; Cacchio, M

    2008-10-01

    This study was conducted with the aim of showing the effects of Pycnogenol on controlling jet-lag symptoms. Oral Pycnogenol, 50 mg tablets 3 times/die, for 7 days starting 2 days prior to the flight was used. The study was divided into two separate parts. In study 1 the most common complaints of patients with jet-lag were evaluated with a rating scale consisting in of a scoring system. In study 2 a brain CT scan was performed after the flight in order to assess minimal brain edema (MBE) in association with typical signs and symptoms, observed in previous published flight studies. Study one included 38 subjects treated with Pycnogenol and 30 controls. The symptomatic jet-lag related total score was significantly lower (indicating a lower level of jet-lag) in the Pycnogenol group. The average duration of any jet lag symptom following the flight was significantly reduced from 39.3 (SD=0.8) hours in controls to an average of 18.2 (SD=3.3) hours in the Pycnogenol group (P<0.05). Study 2 included 34 subjects treated with Pycnogenol and 31 controls. The main observation was the brain CT scan performed within 28 hours after the end of the flight. The difference between the Pycnogenol and the control groups was statistically significant (P<0.05) for all items assessed including the cerebral edema score obtained by CT scan. The short-term memory was significantly altered in the control group and associated to edema and swelling of the lower limbs. The score (and the level of edema) was comparatively higher in a subgroup of hypertensive subjects in the control group. Minor alterations of cardiac function were observed in association with de-stabilisation of blood pressure. Fatigue was also significantly higher in the control group in comparison with the Pycnogenol group. A number of spontaneously reported symptoms was also scored and there was a statistically significant difference (P<0.05) between the Pycnogenol and control groups. In conlusion, Pycnogenol was useful to

  3. Ex-Vivo percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin: Comparison of LMOG organogel vs. pentravan cream.

    PubMed

    Kirilov, Plamen; Tran, Van Hung; Ducrotté-Tassel, Alban; Salvi, Jean-Paul; Perrot, Sébastien; Haftek, Marek; Boulieu, Roselyne; Pirot, Fabrice

    2016-02-10

    The objective of this study was to investigate the percutaneous absorption of enrofloxacin from two base formulations, Pentravan cream and LMOG organogel. Ex-vivo experiments were carried out on pig ear skin. The percutaneous permeation through pig skin of two formulations containing 5 wt% of enrofloxacin was measured and compared using Franz diffusion cells. At appropriate intervals up to 120 h, diffusion samples were taken and analyzed using HPLC assays. Permeation profiles were established and the parameters Tlag and flux values were calculated. In this ex-vivo study, the flux values were 0.35 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for Pentravan and 1.22 μgcm(-2)h(-1) for LMOG organogel, corresponding respectively to 7.9 % and 29.3 % of enrofloxacin absorbed after 120 h by these formulations. The lag time (T lag) of Pentravan and organogel were 6.32 and 0.015 h respectively. The absorption time to reach the antibiotic concentration of enrofloxacin (2 μgmL(-1)) in the receptor was 60 h with Pentravan and 30 h with the organogel, suggesting more effective treatment by the latter. Enrofloxacin contained in organogel could be absorbed through pig ear skin 3.7 times greater than that in Pentravan (commercial formulation). This study demonstrates the perspective of organogel formulations as potential drug delivery systems. PMID:26688043

  4. Bimodal Bilingualism and the Frequency-Lag Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emmorey, Karen; Petrich, Jennifer A. F.; Gollan, Tamar H.

    2013-01-01

    The frequency-lag hypothesis proposes that bilinguals have slowed lexical retrieval relative to monolinguals and in their nondominant language relative to their dominant language, particularly for low-frequency words. These effects arise because bilinguals divide their language use between 2 languages and use their nondominant language less…

  5. The Lag Model Applied to High Speed Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Michael E.; Coakley, Thomas J.; Lillard, Randolph P.

    2005-01-01

    The Lag model has shown great promise in prediction of low speed and transonic separations. The predictions of the model, along with other models (Spalart-Allmaras and Menter SST) are assessed for various high speed flowfields. In addition to skin friction and separation predictions, the prediction of heat transfer are compared among these models, and some fundamental building block flowfields, are investigated.

  6. Investigating the Twenty Year Lag in the Vocational Rehabilitation Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowitt, Julian

    In the rehabilitation workshop there is insufficient attention to job development oriented to the current and future needs of industry. Many types of work which were done in vocational workshops in contract from industrial firms are now done by automation. Semiskilled labor is thus in diminished demand. There is a twenty year lag in the industrial…

  7. Theory and operation of the real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar (DIAL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1986-01-01

    The improvement of computer hardware and software of the NASA Multipurpose Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is documented. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment at NASA Langley Research Center for the remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentrations from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed capable of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights of the DIAL system were successfully performed onboard the NASA Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1985. The DIAL Data Acquisition System has undergone a number of improvements over the past few years. These improvements have now been field tested. The theory behind a real time computer system as it applies to the needs of the DIAL system is discussed. This report is designed to be used as an operational manual for the DIAL DAS.

  8. Simulating Cl K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy in MCl62- (M= U, Np, Pu) complexes and UOCl5- using time-dependent density functional theory

    SciTech Connect

    Govind, Niranjan; De Jong, Wibe A.

    2014-02-21

    We report simulations of the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at the Cl K-edge of actinide hexahalides MCl62- (M = U, Np, Pu) and the UOCl5- complex using linear-response time-dependent density functional theory (LR-TDDFT) extended for core excitations. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first calculations of the Cl K-edge spectra of NpCl62- and PuCl62-. In addition, the spectra are simulated with and without the environmental effects of the host crystal as well as ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) to capture the dynamical effects due to atomic motion. The calculated spectra are compared with experimental results, where available and the observed trends are discussed.

  9. Observation of femtosecond-laser-induced ablation plumes of aluminum using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Yasuaki; Oguri, Katsuya; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2006-11-27

    The dynamics of the laser ablation plume expansion of aluminum was investigated by using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Blueshifts of the Al L-shell photoabsorption edge indicating the state of aluminum were observed in the plumes, which were generated by irradiating an aluminum target with 120 fs near-infrared pulses at an intensity of 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatiotemporal evolution of the plumes exhibited a multilayer structure consisting of vaporized aluminum and condensed aluminum particles, following the expansion of plasma, with expansion velocities of 10{sup 4} m/s for the atomic state and 10{sup 3} m/s for the condensed state.

  10. Percutaneous absorption of drugs.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Maibach, H I

    1992-10-01

    The skin is an evolutionary masterpiece of living tissue which is the final control unit for determining the local and systemic availability of any drug which must pass into and through it. In vivo in humans, many factors will affect the absorption of drugs. These include individual biological variation and may be influenced by race. The skin site of the body will also influence percutaneous absorption. Generally, those body parts exposed to the open environment (and to cosmetics, drugs and hazardous toxic substances) are most affected. Treating patients may involve single daily drug treatment or multiple daily administration. Finally, the body will be washed (normal daily process or when there is concern about skin decontamination) and this will influence percutaneous absorption. The vehicle of a drug will affect release of drug to skin. On skin, the interrelationships of this form of administration involve drug concentration, surface area exposed, frequency and time of exposure. These interrelationships determine percutaneous absorption. Accounting for all the drug administered is desirable in controlled studies. The bioavailability of the drug then is assessed in relationship to its efficacy and toxicity in drug development. There are methods, both quantitative and qualitative, in vitro and in vivo, for studying percutaneous absorption of drugs. Animal models are substituted for humans to determine percutaneous absorption. Each of these methods thus becomes a factor in determining percutaneous absorption because they predict absorption in humans. The relevance of these predictions to humans in vivo is of intense research interest. The most relevant determination of percutaneous absorption of a drug in humans is when the drug in its approved formulation is applied in vivo to humans in the intended clinical situation. Deviation from this scenario involves the introduction of variables which may alter percutaneous absorption. PMID:1296607

  11. X-ray absorption spectroscopy with time-tagged photon counting: Application to study the structure of Co(I) intermediate of H2 evolving photo-catalyst

    PubMed Central

    Smolentsev, Grigory; Guda, Alexander; Janousch, Markus; Frieh, Cristophe; Jud, Gaudenz; Zamponi, Flavio; Chavarot-Kerlidou, Murielle; Artero, Vincent; van Bokhoven, Jeroen A.; Nachtegaal, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    In order to probe the structure of reaction intermediates of photochemical reactions a new setup for laser-initiated time-resolved X-ray absorption (XAS) measurements has been developed. With this approach the arrival time of each photon in respect to the laser pulse is measured and therefore full kinetic information is obtained. All X-rays that reach the detector are used to measure this kinetic information and therefore the detection efficiency of this method is high. The newly developed setup is optimized for time-resolved experiments in the microsecond range for samples with relatively low metal concentration (~1mM). This setup has been applied to study a multicomponent photocatalytic system with a Co(dmgBF2)2 catalyst (dmg2− = dimethylglyoximato dianion), [Ru(bpy)3]2+ chromophore (bpy=2,2′-bipyridine) and methyl viologen as the electron relay. On the basis of analysis of hundreds of Co K-edge XAS spectra corresponding to different delay times after the laser excitation of the chromophore, the presence of a Co(I) intermediate is confirmed. The calculated X-ray transient signal for a model of Co(I) state with a 0.14 Å displacement of Co out of the dmg ligand plane and with the closest solvent molecule at a distance of 2.06 Å gives reasonable agreement with the experimental data. PMID:25415460

  12. 2D lag and signal nonlinearity correction in an amorphous silicon EPID and their impact on pretreatment dosimetric verification

    SciTech Connect

    Warkentin, B.; Rathee, S.; Steciw, S.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: This investigation provides measurements of signal lag and nonlinearity separately for the Varian aS500 electronic portal imaging device (EPID), and an algorithm to correct for these effects in 2D; their potential impact on intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) verification is also investigated. The authors quantify lag, as a function of both delivered monitor units (MU) and time, by using a range of MUs delivered at a clinically used rate of 400 MU/min. Explicit cumulative lag curves are thus determined for a range of MUs and times between the end of irradiation and the end of image acquisition. Signal nonlinearity is also investigated as a function of total MUs delivered. The family of cumulative lag curves and signal nonlinearity are then used to determine their effects on dynamic multileaf collimator (MLC) (IMRT) deliveries, and to correct for theses effects in 2D. Methods: Images acquired with an aS500 EPID and Varis Portal-Vision software were used to quantify detector lag and signal-nonlinearity. For the signal lag investigation, Portal-Vision's service monitor was used to acquire EPID images at a rate of 8 frames/s. The images were acquired during irradiation and 66 s thereafter, by inhibiting the M-holdoff-In signal of the Linac for a range of 4.5-198.5 MUs. Relative cumulative lag was calculated by integrating the EPID signal for a time after beam-off, and normalizing this to the integrated EPID signal accumulated during radiation. Signal nonlinearity was studied by acquiring 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 cm{sup 2} open-field EPID images in 'integrated image' mode for a range of 2-500 MUs, and normalized to the 100 MU case. All data were incorporated into in-house written software to create a 2D correction map for these effects, using the field's MLC file and a field-specific calculated 2D 'time-map,' which keeps track of the time elapsed from the last fluence delivered at each given point in the image to the end of the beam delivery. Results

  13. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, HuiLi; Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 ; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-03-07

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI{sup −})), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI{sup −} although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm{sup −1} agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  14. Assessment of mode-mixing and Herzberg-Teller effects on two-photon absorption and resonance hyper-Raman spectra from a time-dependent approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, HuiLi; Zhao, Yi; Liang, WanZhen

    2014-03-01

    A time-dependent approach is presented to simulate the two-photon absorption (TPA) and resonance hyper-Raman scattering (RHRS) spectra including Duschinsky rotation (mode-mixing) and Herzberg-Teller (HT) vibronic coupling effects. The computational obstacles for the excited-state geometries, vibrational frequencies, and nuclear derivatives of transition dipole moments, which enter the expressions of TPA and RHRS cross sections, are further overcome by the recently developed analytical excited-state energy derivative approaches in the framework of time-dependent density functional theory. The excited-state potential curvatures are evaluated at different levels of approximation to inspect the effects of frequency differences, mode-mixing and HT on TPA and RHRS spectra. Two types of molecules, one with high symmetry (formaldehyde, p-difluorobenzene, and benzotrifluoride) and the other with non-centrosymmetry (cis-hydroxybenzylidene-2,3-dimethylimidazolinone in the deprotonated anion state (HDBI-)), are used as test systems. The calculated results reveal that it is crucial to adopt the exact excited-state potential curvatures in the calculations of TPA and RHRS spectra even for the high-symmetric molecules, and that the vertical gradient approximation leads to a large deviation. Furthermore, it is found that the HT contribution is evident in the TPA and RHRS spectra of HDBI- although its one- and two-photon transitions are strongly allowed, and its effect results in an obvious blueshift of the TPA maximum with respect to the one-photon absorption maximum. With the HT and solvent effects getting involved, the simulated blueshift of 1291 cm-1 agrees well with the experimental measurement.

  15. Accommodative Lag by Autorefraction and Two Dynamic Retinoscopy Methods

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate two clinical procedures, MEM and Nott retinoscopy, for detecting accommodative lags 1.00 diopter (D) or greater in children as identified by an open-field autorefractor. Methods 168 children 8 to <12 years old with low myopia, normal visual acuity, and no strabismus participated as part of an ancillary study within the screening process for a randomized trial. Accommodative response to a 3.00 D demand was first assessed by MEM and Nott retinoscopy, viewing binocularly with spherocylindrical refractive error corrected, with testing order randomized and each performed by a different masked examiner. The response was then determined viewing monocularly with spherical equivalent refractive error corrected, using an open-field autorefractor, which was the gold standard used for eligibility for the clinical trial. Sensitivity and specificity for accommodative lags of 1.00 D or more were calculated for each retinoscopy method compared to the autorefractor. Results 116 (69%) of the 168 children had accommodative lag of 1.00 D or more by autorefraction. MEM identified 66 children identified by autorefraction for a sensitivity of 57% (95% CI = 47% to 66%) and a specificity of 63% (95% CI = 49% to 76%). Nott retinoscopy identified 35 children for a sensitivity of 30% (95% CI = 22% to 39%) and a specificity of 81% (95% CI = 67% to 90%). Analysis of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves constructed for MEM and for Nott retinoscopy failed to reveal alternate cut points that would improve the combination of sensitivity and specificity for identifying accommodative lag ≥ 1.00 D as defined by autorefraction. Conclusions Neither MEM nor Nott retinoscopy provided adequate sensitivity and specificity to identify myopic children with accommodative lag ≥ 1.00 D as determined by autorefraction. A variety of methodological differences between the techniques may contribute to the modest to poor agreement. PMID:19214130

  16. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide.

    PubMed

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-09-28

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamical calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged. To compare the computational efficiency, standard MCTDH simulations using the same Hamiltonian are also performed. A comparison of the MCTDH and ML-MCTDH calculations shows that even for the present not-too-large system (9D here) the ML-MCTDH calculations can save a considerable amount of computational resources while producing identical spectra as the MCTDH calculations. Furthermore, the present theoretical B̃(1)A'←X̃(1)A' UV spectral band and the corresponding experimental measurements [J. M. Beames, F. Liu, L. Lu, and M. I. Lester, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 134, 20045-20048 (2012); L. Sheps, J. Phys. Chem. Lett. 4, 4201-4205 (2013); W.-L. Ting, Y.-H. Chen, W. Chao, M. C. Smith, and J. J.-M. Lin, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 16, 10438-10443 (2014)] are discussed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first theoretical UV spectrum simulated for this molecule including nuclear motion beyond an adiabatic harmonic approximation. PMID:25273439

  17. A full-dimensional multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree study on the ultraviolet absorption spectrum of formaldehyde oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Qingyong; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-09-01

    Employing the multilayer multiconfiguration time-dependent Hartree (ML-MCTDH) method in conjunction with the multistate multimode vibronic coupling Hamiltonian (MMVCH) model, we perform a full dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical study on the simplest Criegee intermediate, formaldehyde oxide, in five lower-lying singlet electronic states. The ultraviolet (UV) spectrum is then simulated by a Fourier transform of the auto-correlation function. The MMVCH model is built based on extensive MRCI(8e,8o)/aug-cc-pVTZ calculations. To ensure a fast convergence of the final calculations, a large number of ML-MCTDH test calculations is performed to find an appropriate multilayer separations (ML-trees) of the ML-MCTDH nuclear wave functions, and the dynamical calculations are carefully checked to ensure that the calculations are well converged.