Science.gov

Sample records for absorption lag time

  1. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lag times. 52.103 Section 52.103... Free Numbers § 52.103 Lag times. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between...

  2. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lag times. 52.103 Section 52.103... Free Numbers § 52.103 Lag times. (a) Definitions. As used in this section, the following definitions... and an exchange carrier intercept recording is being provided. (3) Lag Time. The interval between...

  3. Time lag in transient cosmic accreting sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Giovannelli, F.

    2017-02-01

    Context. We develop models for time lag between the maxima of the source brightness in different wavelengths during a transient flash of luminosity that is connected with a short-period increase of the mass flux onto the central compact object. Aims: We derive a simple formula for finding the time delay among events in different wavelengths which is valid in general for all disk-accreting cosmic sources. We quantitatively also discuss a model for time-lag formation in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Methods: In close binaries with accretion disks, the time lag is connected with effects of viscosity that define a radial motion of matter in the accretion disk. In AGN flashes, the infalling matter has a low angular momentum, and the time lag is defined by the free-fall time to the gravitating center. Results: We show the validity of these models by means of several examples of galactic and extragalactic accreting sources.

  4. Protein Fibrillation Lag Times During Kinetic Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Pagano, Rodrigo S.; López Medus, Máximo; Gómez, Gabriela E.; Couto, Paula M.; Labanda, María S.; Landolfo, Lucas; D’Alessio, Cecilia; Caramelo, Julio J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein aggregation is linked to more than 30 human pathologies, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. Since small oligomers that form at the beginning of the fibrillation process probably are the most toxic elements, therapeutic strategies involving fibril fragmentation could be detrimental. An alternative approach, named kinetic inhibition, aims to prevent fibril formation by using small ligands that stabilize the parent protein. The factors that govern fibrillation lag times during kinetic inhibition are largely unknown, notwithstanding their importance for designing effective long-term therapies. Inhibitor-bound species are not likely to be incorporated into the core of mature fibrils, although their presence could alter the kinetics of the fibrillation process. For instance, inhibitor-bound species may act as capping elements that impair the nucleation process and/or fibril growth. Here, we address this issue by studying the effect of two natural inhibitors on the fibrillation behavior of lysozyme at neutral pH. We analyzed a set of 79 fibrillation curves obtained in lysozyme alone and a set of 37 obtained in the presence of inhibitors. We calculated the concentrations of the relevant species at the beginning of the curves using the inhibitor-binding constants measured under the same experimental conditions. We found that inhibitor-bound protein species do not affect fibrillation onset times, which are mainly determined by the concentration of unbound protein species present in equilibrium. In this system, knowledge of the fibrillation kinetics and inhibitor affinities suffices to predict the effect of kinetic inhibitors on fibrillation lag times. In addition, we developed a new methodology to better estimate fibrillation lag times from experimental curves. PMID:25099810

  5. Erratum: Discovery of Microsecond Time Lags in Kilohertz QPOs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, B. A.; van der Klis, M.; Méndez, M.; van Paradijs, J.; Wijnands, R. A. D.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Lamb, F. K.; Psaltis, D.; Kuulkers, E.; Oosterbroek, T.

    1998-12-01

    In the Letter ``Discovery of Microsecond Time Lags in Kilohertz QPOs'' by B. A. Vaughan, M. van der Klis, M. Méndez, J. van Paradijs, R. A. D. Wijnands, W. H. G. Lewin, F. K. Lamb, D. Psaltis, E. Kuulkers, and T. Oosterbroek (ApJ, 483, L115 [1997]), the reported time lags, while correct in magnitude, have a sign that is incorrect. We reanalyzed the data and checked the sign of our results using the hard lags in Cyg X-1 and GX 339-4 and the soft lags in the accreting millisecond pulsar SAX J1808.4-3658, as well as by using test signals. The true time delays for 4U 1608-52 are in the sense of the soft photons lagging the hard ones. Any lags in the reported energy and frequency ranges for 4U 0614+091 are between -80 and +15 μs and for 4U 1636-53 are between -50 and +25 μs (95% confidence), respectively, where a positive sign indicates a hard lag. This strengthens the conclusion of the Letter that in simple scattering models any time lags due to inverse Compton scattering are small and imply very small (<~1-10 km) scattering geometries. The time-lag data provide no independent evidence for inverse Compton scattering affecting the X-rays in these sources; another mechanism, perhaps related to the generation of the QPOs, must be operating to produce the soft lags in 4U 1608-52.

  6. Statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.

    2016-06-01

    Context. The study of X-ray time-lag spectra in active galactic nuclei (AGN) is currently an active research area, since it has the potential to illuminate the physics and geometry of the innermost region (i.e. close to the putative super-massive black hole) in these objects. To obtain reliable information from these studies, the statistical properties of time-lags estimated from data must be known as accurately as possible. Aims: We investigated the statistical properties of Fourier-based time-lag estimates (i.e. based on the cross-periodogram), using evenly sampled time series with no missing points. Our aim is to provide practical "guidelines" on estimating time-lags that are minimally biased (i.e. whose mean is close to their intrinsic value) and have known errors. Methods: Our investigation is based on both analytical work and extensive numerical simulations. The latter consisted of generating artificial time series with various signal-to-noise ratios and sampling patterns/durations similar to those offered by AGN observations with present and past X-ray satellites. We also considered a range of different model time-lag spectra commonly assumed in X-ray analyses of compact accreting systems. Results: Discrete sampling, binning and finite light curve duration cause the mean of the time-lag estimates to have a smaller magnitude than their intrinsic values. Smoothing (i.e. binning over consecutive frequencies) of the cross-periodogram can add extra bias at low frequencies. The use of light curves with low signal-to-noise ratio reduces the intrinsic coherence, and can introduce a bias to the sample coherence, time-lag estimates, and their predicted error. Conclusions: Our results have direct implications for X-ray time-lag studies in AGN, but can also be applied to similar studies in other research fields. We find that: a) time-lags should be estimated at frequencies lower than ≈ 1/2 the Nyquist frequency to minimise the effects of discrete binning of the

  7. Time-dependent oral absorption models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Higaki, K.; Yamashita, S.; Amidon, G. L.

    2001-01-01

    The plasma concentration-time profiles following oral administration of drugs are often irregular and cannot be interpreted easily with conventional models based on first- or zero-order absorption kinetics and lag time. Six new models were developed using a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), wherein the time dependency was varied to account for the dynamic processes such as changes in fluid absorption or secretion, in absorption surface area, and in motility with time, in the gastrointestinal tract. In the present study, the plasma concentration profiles of propranolol obtained in human subjects following oral dosing were analyzed using the newly derived models based on mass balance and compared with the conventional models. Nonlinear regression analysis indicated that the conventional compartment model including lag time (CLAG model) could not predict the rapid initial increase in plasma concentration after dosing and the predicted Cmax values were much lower than that observed. On the other hand, all models with the time-dependent absorption rate coefficient, ka(t), were superior to the CLAG model in predicting plasma concentration profiles. Based on Akaike's Information Criterion (AIC), the fluid absorption model without lag time (FA model) exhibited the best overall fit to the data. The two-phase model including lag time, TPLAG model was also found to be a good model judging from the values of sum of squares. This model also described the irregular profiles of plasma concentration with time and frequently predicted Cmax values satisfactorily. A comparison of the absorption rate profiles also suggested that the TPLAG model is better at prediction of irregular absorption kinetics than the FA model. In conclusion, the incorporation of a time-dependent absorption rate coefficient ka(t) allows the prediction of nonlinear absorption characteristics in a more reliable manner.

  8. CALCULATING TIME LAGS FROM UNEVENLY SAMPLED LIGHT CURVES

    SciTech Connect

    Zoghbi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Cackett, E. M.

    2013-11-01

    Timing techniques are powerful tools to study dynamical astrophysical phenomena. In the X-ray band, they offer the potential of probing accretion physics down to the event horizon. Recent work has used frequency- and energy-dependent time lags as tools for studying relativistic reverberation around the black holes in several Seyfert galaxies. This was achieved due to the evenly sampled light curves obtained using XMM-Newton. Continuously sampled data are, however, not always available and standard Fourier techniques are not applicable. Here, building on the work of Miller et al., we discuss and use a maximum likelihood method to obtain frequency-dependent lags that takes into account light curve gaps. Instead of calculating the lag directly, the method estimates the most likely lag values at a particular frequency given two observed light curves. We use Monte Carlo simulations to assess the method's applicability and use it to obtain lag-energy spectra from Suzaku data for two objects, NGC 4151 and MCG-5-23-16, that had previously shown signatures of iron K reverberation. The lags obtained are consistent with those calculated using standard methods using XMM-Newton data.

  9. Infrared Variability and Time Lags for Periodic Quasars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Hyunsung David; Stern, Daniel; Graham, Matthew J.; Djorgovski, Stanislav G.; Mainzer, Amy; Cutri, Roc M.; Drake, Andrew J.; Mahabal, Ashish A.

    2017-01-01

    The optical light curve of the quasar PG 1302-102 at z=0.278 shows a 5.2 year periodic signal, detectable over a period of 20 years. The most plausible mechanisms involve a binary supermassive black hole system with a sub-pc separation, where they will likely merge within ~10^5 years due to gravitational wave emission alone. Here, we report the infrared time lags for PG 1302-102 from WISE and Akari missions. We confirm that the periodic behavior reported in the optical light curve is reproduced at infrared, with best-fit 3.4 and 4.6 micron time lags of (2219 ± 153, 2408 ± 148) days for a near face-on orientation of the torus, or (4103 ± 153, 4292 ± 148) days for an inclined system with relativistic Doppler boosting in effect. The periodicity in the infrared light curves and the time lag to the optical support that a source within the accretion disk is responsible for the optical variability of PG 1302-102, echoed at the farther out dusty regions ~1.1-1.3 pc away. We briefly mention ongoing works to constrain the infrared variability and time lags for all the identified periodic quasars, and to relate the quantities to physical origins.

  10. Heat conduction errors and time lag in cryogenic thermometer installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshawsky, I.

    1973-01-01

    Installation practices are recommended that will increase rate of heat exchange between the thermometric sensing element and the cryogenic fluid and that will reduce the rate of undesired heat transfer to higher-temperature objects. Formulas and numerical data are given that help to estimate the magnitude of heat-conduction errors and of time lag in response.

  11. Discrimination, Time-Lag and Assessment Inequity in Black Neighborhoods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lim, Gill C.

    This paper examines the effect of racial discrimination on assessments of urban properties. A method is developed to isolate the effect of racial variables on assessment sales ratios from that of time-lag between assessments and market transactions. An empirical analysis is conducted usinq data from Chicago. The results of this analysis indicate…

  12. An optimum settling problem for time lag systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobs, M. Q.; Kao, T.-J.

    1972-01-01

    A solution is presented to an optimization problem for time lag systems by the classical method of Lagrange multipliers in a Banach space. Following terminology and assumption definitions, the regularity and controllability of the Lagrange multipliers problem is discussed, and a set of necessary conditions for an optimal control is derived. In conclusion, the solution existence, uniqueness, and sufficiency are established.

  13. Time Lag and Communication in Changing Unpopular Norms

    PubMed Central

    Gërxhani, Klarita; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Humans often coordinate their social lives through norms. When a large majority of people are dissatisfied with an existing norm, it seems obvious that they will change it. Often, however, this does not occur. We investigate how a time lag between individual support of a norm change and the change itself hinders such change, related to the critical mass of supporters needed to effectuate the change, and the (im)possibility of communicating about it. To isolate these factors, we utilize a laboratory experiment. As predicted, we find unambiguous effects of time lag on precluding norm change; a higher threshold for a critical mass does so as well. Communication facilitates choosing superior norms but it does not necessarily lead to norm change when the uncertainty on whether there will be a norm change in the future is high. Communication seems to help coordination on actions at the present but not the future. Hence, the uncertainty driven by time lag makes individuals choose the status quo, here the unpopular norm. PMID:25880200

  14. Time lag and communication in changing unpopular norms.

    PubMed

    Gërxhani, Klarita; Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    Humans often coordinate their social lives through norms. When a large majority of people are dissatisfied with an existing norm, it seems obvious that they will change it. Often, however, this does not occur. We investigate how a time lag between individual support of a norm change and the change itself hinders such change, related to the critical mass of supporters needed to effectuate the change, and the (im)possibility of communicating about it. To isolate these factors, we utilize a laboratory experiment. As predicted, we find unambiguous effects of time lag on precluding norm change; a higher threshold for a critical mass does so as well. Communication facilitates choosing superior norms but it does not necessarily lead to norm change when the uncertainty on whether there will be a norm change in the future is high. Communication seems to help coordination on actions at the present but not the future. Hence, the uncertainty driven by time lag makes individuals choose the status quo, here the unpopular norm.

  15. Transient behavior and time lags in binary nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Wyslouzil, B.E.; Wilemski, G.

    1996-04-02

    To investigate transient binary nucleation, both qualitatively and quantitatively, we numerically solved the birth-death equations for vapor-to-liquid phase transitions. We found that in its early transient stages, binary nucleation rarely, if ever, occurs via the saddle point. Instead most binary systems pass through a temporary stage in which the region of maximum flux extends over a ridge on the free energy surface before reaching the state of saddle point nucleation. Both the number of particles formed and their composition may be affected, and this could be very important for nucleation in glasses and other condensed mixtures for which timescales are very long. In order to plan experiments, accurate estimates of the time lag are important. We therefore directly calculated the time lag for the saddle point flux using our numerical results and compared it with the available analytical predictions. Although the analytical results over-estimate the time lag by factors of 2-6, the numerical results followed the predicted analytical trends quite closely under most conditions.

  16. Stochastic lag time in nucleated linear self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Nitin S.; van der Schoot, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Protein aggregation is of great importance in biology, e.g., in amyloid fibrillation. The aggregation processes that occur at the cellular scale must be highly stochastic in nature because of the statistical number fluctuations that arise on account of the small system size at the cellular scale. We study the nucleated reversible self-assembly of monomeric building blocks into polymer-like aggregates using the method of kinetic Monte Carlo. Kinetic Monte Carlo, being inherently stochastic, allows us to study the impact of fluctuations on the polymerization reactions. One of the most important characteristic features in this kind of problem is the existence of a lag phase before self-assembly takes off, which is what we focus attention on. We study the associated lag time as a function of system size and kinetic pathway. We find that the leading order stochastic contribution to the lag time before polymerization commences is inversely proportional to the system volume for large-enough system size for all nine reaction pathways tested. Finite-size corrections to this do depend on the kinetic pathway.

  17. Estimating time and time-lag in time-of-flight velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lading, L.

    1983-01-01

    Estimating time and time-lag in time-of-flight velocimeters is investigated. Statistics of a filtered Poisson point process is given. A Maximum Likelihood Estimator is compared with suboptimum estimators in terms of robustness. For a dominating background combined spatial and temporal processing can improve the robustness compared with purely temporal processing. Schemes for the spatial filters are given.

  18. Flood Forecasting via Time Lag Forward Network; Kelantan, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajarmizadeh, Milad; Mohd Sidek, Lariyah; Bte Basri, Hidayah; Shakira Jaffar, Aminah

    2016-03-01

    Forecasting water level is one of the critical issues in Malaysia for Kelantan region. Based on the flood events in 2014, this study investigates the hourly-forecasting of water level in one station namely Kg Jenob in Kelantan. For this issue, Time Lag Forward Network (TLFN) is evaluated for forecasting the water level as dynamic model. Heuristic method in stepwise forward methodology is performed. Rainfall and water level are the input and output of the modelling respectively. For selected flood period 15/12/2014 to 30/12/2014, 8 scenarios are developed to obtain a minimum error in water level forecasting. By monitoring the error, it will show that the optimum configuration of network has 2 processors in hidden layer and 7 lags have enough contribution on the result of hourly forecasting. Transfer functions in hidden and output layers are is Tangent hyperbolic and bias. Observed and simulated data are compared with usual error criteria called Mean Square Error (MSE) and Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) which obtained 0.005 and 0.07 respectively. In conclusion, this study will be as a baseline for Kelantan to show that TLFN has promising result to forecast the flood events.

  19. Time lag between photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzyakov, Y.; Gavrichkova, O.

    2009-04-01

    Important part of CO2 efflux from planted soils is root-derived CO2, meaning that it originates directly and indirectly from roots: directly from root respiration, and indirectly from respiration of rhizosphere microorganisms decomposing organic substances released by roots into the soil (rhizodeposits). Recent studies have shown that apart of well studied effect of soil temperature and soil water content, the C supply of assimilates from photosynthetically active plant organs have a significant effect on the root-derived CO2. In fact, the effect of photosynthesis on root-derived CO2 is often masked by temperature because root biomass typically peaks in summer. However, roots can only respire the C that was allocated belowground, and so the effect of temperature on root respiration is likely to be constrained by photosynthesis. If models of soil respiration are to incorporate photosynthetic C inputs it is necessary to understand how these two fluxes are coupled and what are the factors affecting the time lag between C uptake and its following respiration by roots and associated microorganisms. We reviewed literature and own studies relevant for estimation of the delay of C assimilation by photosynthesis and CO2 efflux from soil. The most of the studies were based on pulse labeling of annual plants in the atmosphere with 14CO2 or 13CO2 and subsequent chase of 14C or 13C in the CO2 efflux from soil. We analyzed the dynamics of the CO2 efflux curves and evaluated 3 parameters: 1) the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil, 2) maximum of labeled CO2, and 3) disappearance of the labeled CO2 from the total CO2 efflux from soil. Numerous studies showed that newly assimilated C cycles quickly within the ecosystem, being found in root respiration already some minutes after its assimilation. Reported time lags in situ and laboratory experiments varied from minutes to days. For annual and perennial grasses the first appearance of labeled CO2 from soil was measured within

  20. Oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    T'Ien, J. S.

    1972-01-01

    An analysis has been performed for oscillatory burning of solid propellants including gas phase time lag. The gaseous flame is assumed to be premixed and laminar with a one-step overall chemical reaction. The propellant is assumed to decompose according to the Arrenhius Law, with no condensed phase reaction. With this model, strong gas phase resonance has been found in certain cases at the characteristic gas-phase frequencies, but the peaking of the acoustic admittance is in the direction favoring the damping of pressure waves. At still higher frequencies, moderate wave-amplifying ability was found. The limit of low frequency response obtained previously by Denison and Baum was recovered, and the limitations of the quasi-steady theory were investigated.

  1. Modeling time-lagged reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships.

    PubMed

    Maynard, M Travis; Luciano, Margaret M; D'Innocenzo, Lauren; Mathieu, John E; Dean, Matthew D

    2014-11-01

    Employee psychological empowerment is widely accepted as a means for organizations to compete in increasingly dynamic environments. Previous empirical research and meta-analyses have demonstrated that employee psychological empowerment is positively related to several attitudinal and behavioral outcomes including job performance. While this research positions psychological empowerment as an antecedent influencing such outcomes, a close examination of the literature reveals that this relationship is primarily based on cross-sectional research. Notably, evidence supporting the presumed benefits of empowerment has failed to account for potential reciprocal relationships and endogeneity effects. Accordingly, using a multiwave, time-lagged design, we model reciprocal relationships between psychological empowerment and job performance using a sample of 441 nurses from 5 hospitals. Incorporating temporal effects in a staggered research design and using structural equation modeling techniques, our findings provide support for the conventional positive correlation between empowerment and subsequent performance. Moreover, accounting for the temporal stability of variables over time, we found support for empowerment levels as positive influences on subsequent changes in performance. Finally, we also found support for the reciprocal relationship, as performance levels were shown to relate positively to changes in empowerment over time. Theoretical and practical implications of the reciprocal psychological empowerment-performance relationships are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Cell assemblies at multiple time scales with arbitrary lag constellations

    PubMed Central

    Russo, Eleonora; Durstewitz, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Hebb's idea of a cell assembly as the fundamental unit of neural information processing has dominated neuroscience like no other theoretical concept within the past 60 years. A range of different physiological phenomena, from precisely synchronized spiking to broadly simultaneous rate increases, has been subsumed under this term. Yet progress in this area is hampered by the lack of statistical tools that would enable to extract assemblies with arbitrary constellations of time lags, and at multiple temporal scales, partly due to the severe computational burden. Here we present such a unifying methodological and conceptual framework which detects assembly structure at many different time scales, levels of precision, and with arbitrary internal organization. Applying this methodology to multiple single unit recordings from various cortical areas, we find that there is no universal cortical coding scheme, but that assembly structure and precision significantly depends on the brain area recorded and ongoing task demands. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19428.001 PMID:28074777

  3. Hydrophilic excipients modulate the time lag of time-controlled disintegrating press-coated tablets.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Li, Mei-Jane; Lin, Kung-Hsu

    2004-08-16

    An oral press-coated tablet was developed by means of direct compression to achieve the time-controlled disintegrating or rupturing function with a distinct predetermined lag time. This press-coated tablet containing sodium diclofenac in the inner core was formulated with an outer shell by different weight ratios of hydrophobic polymer of micronized ethylcellulose (EC) powder and hydrophilic excipients such as spray-dried lactose (SDL) or hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC). The effect of the formulation of an outer shell comprising both hydrophobic polymer and hydrophilic excipients on the time lag of drug release was investigated. The release profile of the press-coated tablet exhibited a time period without drug release (time lag) followed by a rapid and complete release phase, in which the outer shell ruptured or broke into 2 halves. The lag phase was markedly dependent on the weight ratios of EC/SDL or EC/HPMC in the outer shell. Different time lags of the press-coated tablets from 1.0 to 16.3 hours could be modulated by changing the type and amount of the excipients. A semilogarithmic plot of the time lag of the tablet against the weight ratios of EC/SDL or EC/HPMC in the outer shell demonstrated a good linear relationship, with r = 0.976 and r = 0.982, respectively. The predetermined time lag prior to the drug release from a press-coated tablet prepared by using a micronized EC as a retarding coating shell can be adequately scheduled with the addition of hydrophilic excipients according to the time or site requirements.

  4. THE CROSS SPECTRAL TIME LAG EVOLUTION ALONG BRANCHES IN XTE J1701-462

    SciTech Connect

    Li Zhaosheng; Chen Li; Bu Qingcui; Wang Dehua; Qu Jinlu E-mail: chenli@bnu.edu.cn

    2013-04-20

    We investigate the cross spectrum of XTE J1701-462 in various types of neutron star low-mass X-ray binary subclasses during its 2006-2007 outburst. We analyze the relation between the time lags and temporal variabilities. We find that the hard time lags accompany horizontal branch oscillations (HBOs) and the soft time lags dominate the noise in the low frequency range 0.1-10 Hz on HB. In the Cyg-like phase, the time lags decrease on the middle normal branch (NB) from HB/NB vertex to NB/FB vertex, whereas the time lags are roughly invariant in the Sco-like source. We discuss the fact that the Compton upscattering by the corona introduces the soft lag in low-frequency noise. We suggest that the variation of the Comptonization component from the disk emission leads to the HBOs' time lag evolutions along the Z tracks. We also report the rms amplitude spectrum and phase lag spectrum for the normal branch oscillation (NBO). A {approx}160 Degree-Sign phase lag is found. We find that the rms amplitudes of both the Cyg-like and the Sco-like NBOs linearly increase with the photon energy in low energy bands, and drop in the highest energy band.

  5. A Time Lag Analysis of Temporal Relations between Motivation, Academic Achievement, and Two Cognitive Abilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Monica R.; Pasnak, Robert; Romero, Sandy L.

    2009-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study employed a time lag design to assess temporal relationships between motivation, academic achievement, and cognitive development. Eighty-one children from 2 preschool programs were measured twice, with an 11-week time lag, on 2 measures of motivation (marble drop task, bean bag toss task), 2 measures of…

  6. The usual suspects-influence of physicochemical properties on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration of nine model compounds.

    PubMed

    Bo Nielsen, Jesper; Ahm Sørensen, Jens; Nielsen, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    The influence of physicochemical properties of nine model compounds on lag time, skin deposition, and percutaneous penetration was evaluated. Static diffusion cells mounted with human skin were used as the experimental model, and experiments were carried out in accordance with Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) guidelines. The model compounds were chosen to cover a wide spectrum of solubilities and molecular weights. The pesticides included were glyphosate, dimethoate, pirimicarb, malathion, paclobutrazol, methiocarb, prochloraz, and benzoic acid, with the ninth model compound being caffeine. The fastest dermal penetration was observed for compounds with log Pow values between 1.5 and 4. Malathion did not fit into this generalization. No clear relationship was observed between molecular weight and Kp values. The shortest lag time was observed for the most hydrophilic model compounds. With increasing molecular weight, the lag time rose. Thus, the lag time for the smallest model compound was close to 1.5 h, while the lag time exceeded 20 h for a model compound with a molecular weight of 377 g. A difference in lag time of this magnitude inevitably produces differences in the amounts of a chemical able to penetrate the skin within a limited period of time. The relative deposition in the skin was highest for the lipophilic model compounds. For log Pow values between -1 and 2, a linear relationship was observed between log Pow and log Kp. Comparisons between theoretical Kp values based on the Potts-Guy equation and experimental Kp values demonstrated good agreement. Experimental Kp values based on experiments using full-thickness human skin generally underestimated the calculated Kp values by 25%. The observations are relevant to industrial hygienists and regulatory agencies using experimental data for assessing systemic toxicity following dermal exposures as for development of structure activity relationships for dermal absorption of chemicals.

  7. The answer is 17 years, what is the question: understanding time lags in translational research

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Zoë Slote; Wooding, Steven; Grant, Jonathan

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to review the literature describing and quantifying time lags in the health research translation process. Papers were included in the review if they quantified time lags in the development of health interventions. The study identified 23 papers. Few were comparable as different studies use different measures, of different things, at different time points. We concluded that the current state of knowledge of time lags is of limited use to those responsible for R&D and knowledge transfer who face difficulties in knowing what they should or can do to reduce time lags. This effectively ‘blindfolds’ investment decisions and risks wasting effort. The study concludes that understanding lags first requires agreeing models, definitions and measures, which can be applied in practice. A second task would be to develop a process by which to gather these data. PMID:22179294

  8. Evaluation of Early Jet Lag Symptoms by Passengers Crossing 7 Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobiński, Rafał; Michalik, Anna

    Numerous studies have shown that travelling across three or more time zones may lead to jet lag, which is a consequence of circadian misalignment that occurs after crossing time zones too rapidly for the circadian system to keep pace. The main aim of this paper was to define the early symptoms of jet lag in travelers crossing seven time zones in the western and eastern direction. In order to verify the hypothesis there were 175 subjects, who could evaluate subjective severity of jet lag using a visual analogue scale. The current study showed that the significant predictors of early jet lag are tiredness, moodiness and gastrointestinal disturbance. There is a correlation between subjective effects of jet lag and physical well-being, tiredness, bowel movements, concentration and irritability.

  9. An Investigation of Time Lag Maps Using Three-dimensional Simulations of Highly Stratified Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winebarger, Amy R.; Lionello, Roberto; Downs, Cooper; Mikić, Zoran; Linker, Jon; Mok, Yung

    2016-11-01

    The location and frequency of coronal energy release provide a significant constraint on the coronal heating mechanism. The evolution of the intensity observed in coronal structures found from time lag analysis of Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) data has been used to argue that heating must occur sporadically. Recently, we have demonstrated that quasi-steady, highly stratified (footpoint) heating can produce results qualitatively consistent with the evolution of observed coronal structures. The goals of this paper are to demonstrate that time lag analysis of 3D simulations of footpoint heating are qualitatively consistent with time lag analysis of observations and to use the 3D simulations to further understand whether time lag analysis is a useful tool in defining the evolution of coronal structures. We find the time lag maps generated from simulated data are consistent with the observed time lag maps. We next investigate several example points. In some cases, the calculated time lag reflects the evolution of a unique loop along the line of sight, though there may be additional evolving structures along the line of sight. We confirm that using the multi-peak AIA channels can produce time lags that are difficult to interpret. We suggest using a different high temperature channel, such as an X-ray channel. Finally, we find that multiple evolving structures along the line of sight can produce time lags that do not represent the physical properties of any structure along the line of sight, although the cross-correlation coefficient of the lightcurves is high. Considering the projected geometry of the loops may reduce some of the line-of-sight confusion.

  10. The changing X-ray time lag in MCG-6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, E.; Fabian, A. C.; Marinucci, A.; Matt, G.; Parker, M. L.; Alston, W.; Brenneman, L. W.; Cackett, E. M.; Miniutti, G.

    2014-11-01

    MCG-6-30-15 is one of the most observed narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies in the X-ray band. In this paper, we examine the X-ray time lags in this source using a total of 600 ks in observations (440 ks exposure) taken with the XMM-Newton telescope (300 ks in 2001 and 300 ks in 2013). Both the old and new observations show the usual hard lag that increases with energy; however, the hard lag turns over to a soft lag at frequencies below ˜10-4 Hz. The highest frequencies (˜10-3 Hz) in this source show a clear soft lag, as previously presented for the first 300 ks observation, but no clear iron K lag is detected in either the old or new observation. The soft lag is more significant in the old observation than the new. The observations are consistent with a reverberation interpretation, where the soft, reflected emission is delayed with respect to the hard power-law component. These spectral timing results suggest that two distinct variability mechanisms are important in this source: intrinsic coronal variations (which lead to correlated variability in the reprocessed emission) and geometrical changes in the corona. Variability due to geometrical changes does not result in correlated variability in the reflection, and therefore inhibits the clear detection of an iron K lag.

  11. The prediction of AE, ap, and Dst at time lags between 0 and 30 hours

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. F.; Garrett, H. B.; Shea, M. A.

    1979-01-01

    The magnetic activity indexes AE, ap, and Dst are correlated with approximately 35,000 hours of interplanetary plasma and magnetic field measurements acquired near the Earth (assembled by NASA/NSSDC into a composite data sat). Lag times between the indexes and solar wind parameters ranged from 0 to 30 hours. Correlations at lags less than 6 hours yield results in agreement with previous studies. At greater lags, the correlation coefficients between the solar wind parameters and AE and ap approach these parameters' autocorrelation (persistence) values. For Dst the correlation with solar wind parameters is lower than that with AE and ap in the 3 to 4 hour lag range whereas the autocorrelation of Dst is significantly higher over the entire 0 to 30 hour lag range. The implications of these differences between AE, ap, and Dst are discussed in terms of persistence of solar wind structure.

  12. Effective Iterated Greedy Algorithm for Flow-Shop Scheduling Problems with Time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ZHAO, Ning; YE, Song; LI, Kaidian; CHEN, Siyu

    2017-03-01

    Flow shop scheduling problem with time lags is a practical scheduling problem and attracts many studies. Permutation problem(PFSP with time lags) is concentrated but non-permutation problem(non-PFSP with time lags) seems to be neglected. With the aim to minimize the makespan and satisfy time lag constraints, efficient algorithms corresponding to PFSP and non-PFSP problems are proposed, which consist of iterated greedy algorithm for permutation(IGTLP) and iterated greedy algorithm for non-permutation (IGTLNP). The proposed algorithms are verified using well-known simple and complex instances of permutation and non-permutation problems with various time lag ranges. The permutation results indicate that the proposed IGTLP can reach near optimal solution within nearly 11% computational time of traditional GA approach. The non-permutation results indicate that the proposed IG can reach nearly same solution within less than 1% computational time compared with traditional GA approach. The proposed research combines PFSP and non-PFSP together with minimal and maximal time lag consideration, which provides an interesting viewpoint for industrial implementation.

  13. A generalized expression for lag-time in the gas-phase permeation of hollow tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, K. K.; Nelson, H. G.; Johnson, D. L.; Hamaker, F. M.

    1975-01-01

    A generalized expression for the nonsteady-state parameter, lag-time, has been obtained from Fick's second law for gas-phase transport through hollow, cylindrical membranes. This generalized expression is simplified for three limiting cases of practical interest: (1) diffusion controlled transport, (2) phase boundary reaction control at the inlet surface, and (3) phase boundary reaction control at the outlet surface. In all three cases the lag-time expressions were found to be inversely proportional only to the diffusion coefficient and functionally dependent on the membrane radii. Finally, the lag-time expressions were applied to experimentally obtained lag-time data for alpha-phase titanium and alpha-phase iron.

  14. Detection of Time Lags between Quasar Continuum Emission Bands Based On Pan-STARRS Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Morganson, Eric; Shen, Yue; Pancoast, Anna; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Anderson, Scott F.; Brandt, W. N.; Grier, C. J.; Rix, H.-W.; Ruan, John J.; Protopapas, Pavlos; Scott, Caroline; Burgett, W. S.; Hodapp, K. W.; Huber, M. E.; Kaiser, N.; Kudritzki, R. P.; Magnier, E. A.; Metcalfe, N.; Tonry, J. T.; Wainscoat, R. J.; Waters, C.

    2017-02-01

    We study the time lags between the continuum emission of quasars at different wavelengths, based on more than four years of multi-band (g, r, i, z) light curves in the Pan-STARRS Medium Deep Fields. As photons from different bands emerge from different radial ranges in the accretion disk, the lags constrain the sizes of the accretion disks. We select 240 quasars with redshifts of z ≈ 1 or z ≈ 0.3 that are relatively emission-line free. The light curves are sampled from day to month timescales, which makes it possible to detect lags on the scale of the light crossing time of the accretion disks. With the code JAVELIN, we detect typical lags of several days in the rest frame between the g band and the riz bands. The detected lags are ∼2–3 times larger than the light crossing time estimated from the standard thin disk model, consistent with the recently measured lag in NGC 5548 and microlensing measurements of quasars. The lags in our sample are found to increase with increasing luminosity. Furthermore, the increase in lags going from g ‑ r to g ‑ i and then to g ‑ z is slower than predicted in the thin disk model, particularly for high-luminosity quasars. The radial temperature profile in the disk must be different from what is assumed. We also find evidence that the lags decrease with increasing line ratios between ultraviolet Fe ii lines and Mg ii, which may point to changes in the accretion disk structure at higher metallicity.

  15. Time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to climate change.

    PubMed

    Wu, Donghai; Zhao, Xiang; Liang, Shunlin; Zhou, Tao; Huang, Kaicheng; Tang, Bijian; Zhao, Wenqian

    2015-09-01

    Climate conditions significantly affect vegetation growth in terrestrial ecosystems. Due to the spatial heterogeneity of ecosystems, the vegetation responses to climate vary considerably with the diverse spatial patterns and the time-lag effects, which are the most important mechanism of climate-vegetation interactive effects. Extensive studies focused on large-scale vegetation-climate interactions use the simultaneous meteorological and vegetation indicators to develop models; however, the time-lag effects are less considered, which tends to increase uncertainty. In this study, we aim to quantitatively determine the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors using the GIMMS3g NDVI time series and the CRU temperature, precipitation, and solar radiation datasets. First, this study analyzed the time-lag effects of global vegetation responses to different climatic factors. Then, a multiple linear regression model and partial correlation model were established to statistically analyze the roles of different climatic factors on vegetation responses, from which the primary climate-driving factors for different vegetation types were determined. The results showed that (i) both the time-lag effects of the vegetation responses and the major climate-driving factors that significantly affect vegetation growth varied significantly at the global scale, which was related to the diverse vegetation and climate characteristics; (ii) regarding the time-lag effects, the climatic factors explained 64% variation of the global vegetation growth, which was 11% relatively higher than the model ignoring the time-lag effects; (iii) for the area with a significant change trend (for the period 1982-2008) in the global GIMMS3g NDVI (P < 0.05), the primary driving factor was temperature; and (iv) at the regional scale, the variation in vegetation growth was also related to human activities and natural disturbances. Considering the time-lag effects is quite

  16. Consequences of varied soil hydraulic and meteorological complexity on unsaturated zone time lag estimates.

    PubMed

    Vero, S E; Ibrahim, T G; Creamer, R E; Grant, J; Healy, M G; Henry, T; Kramers, G; Richards, K G; Fenton, O

    2014-12-01

    The true efficacy of a programme of agricultural mitigation measures within a catchment to improve water quality can be determined only after a certain hydrologic time lag period (subsequent to implementation) has elapsed. As the biophysical response to policy is not synchronous, accurate estimates of total time lag (unsaturated and saturated) become critical to manage the expectations of policy makers. The estimation of the vertical unsaturated zone component of time lag is vital as it indicates early trends (initial breakthrough), bulk (centre of mass) and total (Exit) travel times. Typically, estimation of time lag through the unsaturated zone is poor, due to the lack of site specific soil physical data, or by assuming saturated conditions. Numerical models (e.g. Hydrus 1D) enable estimates of time lag with varied levels of input data. The current study examines the consequences of varied soil hydraulic and meteorological complexity on unsaturated zone time lag estimates using simulated and actual soil profiles. Results indicated that: greater temporal resolution (from daily to hourly) of meteorological data was more critical as the saturated hydraulic conductivity of the soil decreased; high clay content soils failed to converge reflecting prevalence of lateral component as a contaminant pathway; elucidation of soil hydraulic properties was influenced by the complexity of soil physical data employed (textural menu, ROSETTA, full and partial soil water characteristic curves), which consequently affected time lag ranges; as the importance of the unsaturated zone increases with respect to total travel times the requirements for high complexity/resolution input data become greater. The methodology presented herein demonstrates that decisions made regarding input data and landscape position will have consequences for the estimated range of vertical travel times. Insufficiencies or inaccuracies regarding such input data can therefore mislead policy makers regarding

  17. Frequency-Dependent Time Lags in Three Blazars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marscher, Alan P.; Jorstad, Svetlana G.; Aller, Margo F.

    2004-01-01

    The work completed includes the analysis of observations obtained during Cycle 6 of the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE). The project is part of a longer-term, continuing program to study the X-ray emission process in blazars in collaboration with Dr. Ian McHardy (U. of Southampton, UK). The goals of the program are to study the X-ray emission mechanism in blazars and the relation of the X-ray emission to changes in the relativistic jet. The program includes contemporaneous brightness and linear polarization monitoring at radio and optical wavelengths, total and polarized intensity imaging at 43 GHz with a resolution of 0.1 milliarcseconds with the VLBA, and well-sampled X-ray light curves obtained from a series of approved RXTE programs. During RXTE cycle 6, the project was awarded RXTE time to monitor three quasars: PKS 1510-089 two times per week, and 3C 273 and 3C 279 three times per week each. The X-ray data, including those from earlier cycles, were compared with radio measurements obtained 2-3 times per week in the centimeter-wave band with the Michigan radio telescope, monthly imaging observations with the VLBA at 43 GHz, and optical observations obtained at several telescopes around the world. Since it is the long-term X-ray light curve that is of greatest value, this report includes discussion of all the data collected through August 2003 rather than just the Cycle 6 data.

  18. Throwing Pattern: Changes in Timing of Joint Lag According to Age between and within Skill Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Southard, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Accomplished throwers conserve angular momentum when distal joints of the throwing arm reach peak velocity at a later time than their proximal neighbors. The result is an increase in velocity of the most distal segment--the hand. Past research indicates that skill level varies by the number of joints experiencing distal timing lag (time to peak…

  19. Cosmology with AGN dust time lags-simulating the new VEILS survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hönig, S. F.; Watson, D.; Kishimoto, M.; Gandhi, P.; Goad, M.; Horne, K.; Shankar, F.; Banerji, M.; Boulderstone, B.; Jarvis, M.; Smith, M.; Sullivan, M.

    2017-01-01

    The time lag between optical and near-infrared continuum emission in active galactic nuclei (AGN) shows a tight correlation with luminosity and has been proposed as a standardizable candle for cosmology. In this paper, we explore the use of these AGN hot-dust time lags for cosmological model fitting under the constraints of the new VISTA Extragalactic Infrared Legacy Survey (VEILS). This new survey will target a 9 deg2 field observed in J and Ks band with a 14-d cadence and will run for 3 yr. The same area will be covered simultaneously in the optical griz bands by the Dark Energy Survey, providing complementary time-domain optical data. We perform realistic simulations of the survey setup, showing that we expect to recover dust time lags for about 450 objects out of a total of 1350 optical type 1 AGN, spanning a redshift range of 0.1 < z < 1.2. We use the lags recovered from our simulations to calculate precise distance moduli, establish a Hubble diagram, and fit cosmological models. Assuming realistic scatter in the distribution of the dust around the AGN as well as in the normalization of the lag-luminosity relation, we are able to constrain Ω _Λ in ΛCDM with similar accuracy as current supernova samples. We discuss the benefits of combining AGN and supernovae for cosmology and connect the present work to future attempts to reach out to redshifts of z > 4.

  20. The impact of age at death on the lag time of radiocarbon values in human bone.

    PubMed

    Ubelaker, Douglas H; Thomas, Christian; Olson, Jacqueline E

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of modern bomb-pulse radiocarbon in human bone offers data needed to interpret the post-mortem interval in skeletonized human remains recovered from forensic contexts. Radiocarbon analysis of different tissues with distinct rates of remodeling allows proper placement of the values on the modern bomb-curve. However, the lag time between the date of intercept on the curve and the actual death date is largely affected by the age at death. Published data on radiocarbon analysis of individuals of known age at death and death dates indicate that this lag time increases with age until about 60 years. The lag time documented for each decade of life can be used to compensate for this age-related factor and increase the accuracy of interpretation of the death date. While this method could be greatly improved by original research with a larger sample size, this study provides an adequate point from which to launch further investigations into the subject.

  1. ENERGY-DEPENDENT TIME LAGS IN THE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY NGC 4593

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Agrawal, V. K.; Rao, A. R.

    2009-08-01

    We investigate the energy-time lag dependence of the source NGC 4593 using XMM-Newton/EPIC pn data. We found that the time lag dependency is linear in nature with respect to the logarithm of different energy bands. We also investigate the frequency-dependent time lags and identify that at some frequency range (5 x 10{sup -5} Hz to 2 x 10{sup -4} Hz) the X-ray emission is highly coherent, mildly frequency dependent, and very strongly energy dependent. These observations can be explained in the framework of the thermal Comptonization process, and they indicate a truncated accretion disk very close to the black hole. We discuss the plausible spectral state to explain the phenomenon and conclude that the observed properties bear a close resemblance to the intermediate state or the steep power-law state, found in galactic black hole sources.

  2. Modeling Time-Dependent Association in Longitudinal Data: A Lag as Moderator Approach.

    PubMed

    Selig, James P; Preacher, Kristopher J; Little, Todd D

    2012-01-01

    We describe a straightforward, yet novel, approach to examine time-dependent association between variables. The approach relies on a measurement-lag research design in conjunction with statistical interaction models. We base arguments in favor of this approach on the potential for better understanding the associations between variables by describing how the association changes with time. We introduce a number of different functional forms for describing these lag-moderated associations, each with a different substantive meaning. Finally, we use empirical data to demonstrate methods for exploring functional forms and model fitting based on this approach.

  3. Calibration of Watershed Lag Time Equation for Philippine Hydrology using RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriano, F. R.; Lagmay, A. M. A.; Horritt, M.; Mendoza, J.; Sabio, G.; Punay, K. N.; Taniza, H. J.; Uichanco, C.

    2015-12-01

    Widespread flooding is a major problem in the Philippines. The country experiences heavy amount of rainfall throughout the year and several areas are prone to flood hazards because of its unique topography. Human casualties and destruction of infrastructure are just some of the damages caused by flooding and the Philippine government has undertaken various efforts to mitigate these hazards. One of the solutions was to create flood hazard maps of different floodplains and use them to predict the possible catastrophic results of different rain scenarios. To produce these maps with accurate output, different input parameters were needed and one of those is calculating hydrological components from topographical data. This paper presents how a calibrated lag time (TL) equation was obtained using measurable catchment parameters. Lag time is an essential input in flood mapping and is defined as the duration between the peak rainfall and peak discharge of the watershed. The lag time equation involves three measurable parameters, namely, watershed length (L), maximum potential retention (S) derived from the curve number, and watershed slope (Y), all of which were available from RADARSAT Digital Elevation Models (DEM). This approach was based on a similar method developed by CH2M Hill and Horritt for Taiwan, which has a similar set of meteorological and hydrological parameters with the Philippines. Rainfall data from fourteen water level sensors covering 67 storms from all the regions in the country were used to estimate the actual lag time. These sensors were chosen by using a screening process that considers the distance of the sensors from the sea, the availability of recorded data, and the catchment size. The actual lag time values were plotted against the values obtained from the Natural Resource Conservation Management handbook lag time equation. Regression analysis was used to obtain the final calibrated equation that would be used to calculate the lag time

  4. A comparison of alternative variants of the lead and lag time TTO.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Nancy; Buckingham, Ken; Shah, Koonal; Tsuchiya, Aki; Tilling, Carl; Wilkinson, Grahame; van Hout, Ben

    2013-05-01

    'Lead Time' TTO improves upon conventional TTO by providing a uniform method for eliciting positive and negative values. This research investigates (i) the values generated from different combinations of time in poor health and in full health; and the order in which these appear (lead vs. lag); (ii) whether values concur with participants' views about states; (iii) methods for handling extreme preferences. n = 208 participants valued five EQ-5D states, using two of four variants. Combinations of lead time and health state duration were: 10 years and 20 years; 5 years and 1 year; 5 years and 10 years; and a health state duration of 5 years with a lag time of 10 years. Longer lead times capture more preferences, but may involve a framing effect. Lag time results in less non-trading for mild states, and less time being traded for severe states. Negative values broadly agree with participants' stated opinion that the state is worse than dead. The values are sensitive to the ratio of lead time to duration of poor health, and the order in which these appear (lead vs. lag). It is feasible to handle extreme preferences though challenges remain.

  5. Time-Dependent SSI Multispectral Properties for Rock, Soil, Ice, and Sublimation Lags at the Phoenix Landing Site on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, R. V.; Lemmon, M. T.; Arvidson, R. E.; Blaney, D. L.; Ellehoj, M. D.; Mellon, M. T.; Phoenix, S. T.

    2008-12-01

    The Surface Stereo Imager (SSI) on the Phoenix Lander is a 15 band multispectral imager covering the spectral range from 0.45 to 1.00 micrometers. More than 250 15-filter spectral image cubes have been obtained for surface targets at the Phoenix landing site in the north polar region of Mars. The spectra of surface soils and rocks are dominated by a ferric absorption edge from nanophase ferric oxide, and they are broadly similar to most multispectral data obtained during the Pathfinder and MER missions. Negative spectral slopes between about 0.70 and 1.00 micrometers, indicative of high concentrations of olivine in the El Dorado sand sheet at Gusev crater, were not detected. The albedo (cos(i) corrected) of Phoenix surface spectra is highly dependent on the time of sol (albedo at 0.80 micrometers varies by a factor of 2), consistent with opposition and phase function effects. Subsurface layers bearing water ice were exposed at a depth of about 4 cm by digging with the robotic arm scoop. The SSI spectra of icy materials are highly variable, ranging from typical ice (spectrally neutral and high albedo near 0.7) at the Dodo-Goldilocks trench to low albedo spectra (about 0.3 at 0.80 micrometers) with a ferric absorption edge at the Snow White trench. The differences are attributed, respectively, to low and high concentrations of fine-grained and ferric-rich material dispersed throughout the ice. The spectra of the icy surfaces are dependent on time as the ice sublimes. At Snow White, an optically thick (about 300 micrometers) sublimate lag develops within two sols. At Dodo- Goldilocks, the time scale for development of an optically thick sublimate lag is 5 to greater than 60 sols, depending on location within the trench. The spectra of sublimate lag are equivalent to those for fine-grained soil.

  6. Constraints and time lags for recovery of a keystone species (Dipodomys spectabilis) after landscape restoration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Habitat restoration is typically focused on reestablishing suitable conditions at a local scale, but landscape constraints may be important for keystone species with limited dispersal. We tested for time lags and examined the relative importance of local and landscape constraints on the response of ...

  7. Modeling Time-Dependent Association in Longitudinal Data: A Lag as Moderator Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selig, James P.; Preacher, Kristopher J.; Little, Todd D.

    2012-01-01

    We describe a straightforward, yet novel, approach to examine time-dependent association between variables. The approach relies on a measurement-lag research design in conjunction with statistical interaction models. We base arguments in favor of this approach on the potential for better understanding the associations between variables by…

  8. Time-Lag Bias in Trials of Pediatric Antidepressants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reyes, Magdalena M.; Panza, Kaitlyn E.; Martin, Andres; Bloch, Michael H.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether there is evidence of a time-lag bias in the publication of pediatric antidepressant trials. Method: We conducted a meta-analysis of published and unpublished randomized placebo-controlled trials of serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in subjects less than 18 years of age with major depressive disorder. Our main…

  9. Transport and time lag of chlorofluorocarbon gases in the unsaturated zone, Rabis Creek, Denmark

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engesgaard, Peter; Højberg, Anker L.; Hinsby, Klaus; Jensen, Karsten H.; Laier, Troels; Larsen, Flemming; Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    2004-01-01

    Transport of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases through the unsaturated zone to the water table is affected by gas diffusion, air–water exchange (solubility), sorption to the soil matrix, advective–dispersive transport in the water phase, and, in some cases, anaerobic degradation. In deep unsaturated zones, this may lead to a time lag between entry of gases at the land surface and recharge to groundwater. Data from a Danish field site were used to investigate how time lag is affected by variations in water content and to explore the use of simple analytical solutions to calculate time lag. Numerical simulations demonstrate that either degradation or sorption of CFC-11 takes place, whereas CFC-12 and CFC-113 are nonreactive. Water flow did not appreciably affect transport. An analytical solution for the period with a linear increase in atmospheric CFC concentrations (approximately early 1970s to early 1990s) was used to calculate CFC profiles and time lags. We compared the analytical results with numerical simulations. The time lags in the 15-m-deep unsaturated zone increase from 4.2 to between 5.2 and 6.1 yr and from 3.4 to 3.9 yr for CFC-11 and CFC-12, respectively, when simulations change from use of an exponential to a linear increase in atmospheric concentrations. The CFC concentrations at the water table before the early 1990s can be estimated by displacing the atmospheric input function by these fixed time lags. A sensitivity study demonstrates conditions under which a time lag in the unsaturated zone becomes important. The most critical parameter is the tortuosity coefficient. The analytical approach is valid for the low range of tortuosity coefficients (τ = 0.1–0.4) and unsaturated zones greater than approximately 20 m in thickness. In these cases the CFC distribution may still be from either the exponential or linear phase. In other cases, the use of numerical models, as described in our work and elsewhere, is an option.

  10. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency

    PubMed Central

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species’ flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge. PMID:26820548

  11. Time-Lag in Responses of Birds to Atlantic Forest Fragmentation: Restoration Opportunity and Urgency.

    PubMed

    Uezu, Alexandre; Metzger, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    There are few opportunities to evaluate the relative importance of landscape structure and dynamics upon biodiversity, especially in highly fragmented tropical landscapes. Conservation strategies and species risk evaluations often rely exclusively on current aspects of landscape structure, although such limited assumptions are known to be misleading when time-lag responses occur. By relating bird functional-group richness to forest patch size and isolation in ten-year intervals (1956, 1965, 1978, 1984, 1993 and 2003), we revealed that birds with different sensitivity to fragmentation display contrasting responses to landscape dynamics in the Brazilian Atlantic Forest. For non-sensitive groups, there was no time-lag in response: the recent degree of isolation best explains their variation in richness, which likely relates to these species' flexibility to adapt to changes in landscape structure. However, for sensitive bird groups, the 1978 patch area was the best explanatory variable, providing evidence for a 25-year time-lag in response to habitat reduction. Time-lag was more likely in landscapes that encompass large patches, which can support temporarily the presence of some sensitive species, even when habitat cover is relatively low. These landscapes potentially support the most threatened populations and should be priorities for restoration efforts to avoid further species loss. Although time-lags provide an opportunity to counteract the negative consequences of fragmentation, it also reinforces the urgency of restoration actions. Fragmented landscapes will be depleted of biodiversity if landscape structure is only maintained, and not improved. The urgency of restoration action may be even higher in landscapes where habitat loss and fragmentation history is older and where no large fragment remained to act temporarily as a refuge.

  12. Effects of time lag and frequency matching on phase-based connectivity.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael X

    2015-07-30

    The time- and frequency-varying dynamics of how brain regions interact is one of the fundamental mysteries of neuroscience. In electrophysiological data, functional connectivity is often measured through the consistency of oscillatory phase angles between two electrodes placed in or over different brain regions. However, due to volume conduction, the results of such analyses can be difficult to interpret, because mathematical estimates of connectivity can be driven both by true inter-regional connectivity, and by volume conduction from the same neural source. Generally, there are two approaches to attenuate artifacts due to volume conduction: spatial filtering in combination with standard connectivity methods, or connectivity methods such as the weighted phase lag index that are blind to instantaneous connectivity that may reflect volume conduction artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to compare these two approaches directly in the presence of different connectivity time lags (5 or 25 ms) and physiologically realistic frequency non-stationarities. The results show that standard connectivity methods in combination with Laplacian spatial filtering correctly identified simulated connectivity regardless of time lag or changes in frequency, although residual volume conduction artifacts were seen in the vicinity of the "seed" electrode. Weighted phase lag index under-estimated connectivity strength at small time lags and failed to identify connectivity in the presence of frequency mismatches or non-stationarities, but did not misidentify volume conduction as "connectivity." Both approaches have strengths and limitations, and this paper concludes with practical advice for when to use which approach in context of hypothesis testing and exploratory data analyses.

  13. Alteration of the growth rate and lag time of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523.

    PubMed

    Wolf, B F; Fogler, H S

    2001-03-20

    Bacterial profile modification is an important enhanced oil recovery technique used to direct injected water into a reservoir's low permeability zone containing trapped crude oil. During water flooding, the use of bacteria to plug the high permeability water zone and divert flow into the oil-bearing low-permeability zone will have a significant economic impact. However, during the field implementation of bacterial profile modification, the rapid growth of bacteria near the injection well bore may hinder the subsequent injection of growth media so that profile modification of the reservoir occurs only in the immediate vicinity of the well bore. By slowing the growth rate and prolonging the lag phase, the onset of pore-space plugging may be delayed and the biologically active zone extended deep into the reservoir. High substrate loading, high pH values, and the addition of the growth inhibitors sodium dodecylsulfate and sodium benzoate have been used in combination to alter the growth characteristics of Leuconostoc mesenteroides NRRL-B523 grown in batch conditions. The highest sucrose concentration used in these studies, 500 g/L, produced lag times 12-fold greater than the slowest lag times achieved at low sucrose concentrations. When L. mesenteroides was grown in media containing 500 g/L sucrose, an alkaline pH value threshold was found above which bacteria did not grow. At this threshold pH value of 8.1, an average lag time of 200 h was observed. Increasing the concentration of sodium benzoate had no effect on lag time, but reduced the growth rate until the threshold concentration of 0.6%, above which bacteria did not grow. Last, it was found that a solution of 0.075 mM sodium dodecylsulfate in media containing 15 g/L sucrose completely inhibited bacterial growth.

  14. Evolutionary lag times and recent origin of the biota of an ancient desert (Atacama–Sechura)

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Pablo C.; Rosas, Marcelo; Arroyo, Mary T. K.; Wiens, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The assembly of regional biotas and organismal responses to anthropogenic climate change both depend on the capacity of organisms to adapt to novel ecological conditions. Here we demonstrate the concept of evolutionary lag time, the time between when a climatic regime or habitat develops in a region and when it is colonized by a given clade. We analyzed the time of colonization of four clades (three plant genera and one lizard genus) into the Atacama–Sechura Desert of South America, one of Earth’s driest and oldest deserts. We reconstructed time-calibrated phylogenies for each clade and analyzed the timing of shifts in climatic distributions and biogeography and compared these estimates to independent geological estimates of the time of origin of these deserts. Chaetanthera and Malesherbia (plants) and Liolaemus (animal) invaded arid regions of the Atacama–Sechura Desert in the last 10 million years, some 20 million years after the initial onset of aridity in the region. There are also major lag times between when these clades colonized the region and when they invaded arid habitats within the region (typically 4–14 million years). Similarly, hyperarid climates developed ∼8 million years ago, but the most diverse plant clade in these habitats (Nolana) only colonized them ∼2 million years ago. Similar evolutionary lag times may occur in other organisms and habitats, but these results are important in suggesting that many lineages may require very long time scales to adapt to modern desertification and climatic change. PMID:23798420

  15. Influence of heavy metals on microbial growth kinetics including lag time: mathematical modeling and experimental verification.

    PubMed

    Sengör, S Sevinç; Barua, Sutapa; Gikas, Petros; Ginn, Timothy R; Peyton, Brent; Sani, Rajesh K; Spycher, Nicolas F

    2009-10-01

    Heavy metals can significantly affect the kinetics of substrate biodegradation and microbial growth, including lag times and specific growth rates. A model to describe microbial metabolic lag as a function of the history of substrate concentration has been previously described by Wood et al. (Water Resour Res 31:553-563) and Ginn (Water Resour Res 35:1395-1408). In the present study, this model is extended by including the effect of heavy metals on metabolic lag by developing an inhibitor-dependent functional to account for the metabolic state of the microorganisms. The concentration of the inhibiting metal is explicitly incorporated into the functional. The validity of the model is tested against experimental data on the effects of zinc on Pseudomonas species isolated from Lake Coeur d'Alene sediments, Idaho, U.S.A., as well as the effects of nickel or cobalt on a mixed microbial culture collected from the aeration tank of a wastewater treatment plant in Athens, Greece. The simulations demonstrate the ability to incorporate the effect of metals on metabolism through lag, yield coefficient, and specific growth rates. The model includes growth limitation due to insufficient transfer of oxygen into the growth medium.

  16. Liquid-to-crystal nucleation: A New Generation lag-time apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heneghan, Af; Haymet, Adj

    2002-03-01

    The statistics of liquid-to-crystal nucleation are examined using a new generation lag-time apparatus. A single 200 micro L sample of distilled water, both unseeded and seeded with an insoluble AgI crystal, is cooled at a constant rate, α, until the sample freezes. This cycle is repeated as many times as possible to generate the unambiguous statistics of nucleation. Our data are the times and the temperatures to nucleation for approximately 300 runs at each of five different cooling rates. The cooling rates in this experiment range from 0.01 K sec_-1 = 0.6 K min_-1 to more than an order of magnitude faster. Of interest is the functional form describing the average lag-time, <τ>, as a function of supercooling, Δ T. These data and analysis yield, from a single experiment, this average lag time, <τ>, as a function of the supercooling, Δ T. The one approximation in this analysis is easily verified by this apparatus and experiments performed thus far[1]. Comparison is made with related experiments of supercooled alloys. [1] Heneghan AF, Wilson PW, Wang GW, Haymet ADJ, Journal of Chemical Physics, 115, 7599-7608 (2001)

  17. [Jet lag].

    PubMed

    Lagarde, D; Doireau, P

    1997-01-01

    Desynchronization of circadian rhythmicity resulting from rapid travel through at least four time zones leads to symptoms known in everyday English as jet-lag. The most detrimental effect of jet-lag is fatigue with poor alertness and psychomotor performance. Severity is subject to individual variation in susceptibility (morning/evening typology, age,...) and environmental factors (direction of travel, number of time zones crossed, psychosocial environment...). Many measures used to prevent or reduce jet lag are inappropriate or ineffective and some may even be dangerous, such as use of melatonin. One of the most reliable preventive techniques consists of reinforcing social synchronizers by maintaining exposure to sunlight and social activity. Only two drugs currently available on the market can be recommended, i.e. non-benzodiazepinic hypnotics which induce high quality sleep to allow quick recovery and a new time-release caffeine agent which has been shown to prolong psychomotor performance.

  18. Flow investigation in sidewall aneurysm model using a novel PIV multi-time-lag method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillot, Pierre; Brina, Olivier; Ouared, Rafik; Lovblad, Karl-Olof; Mendes Pereira, Vitor; Farhat, Mohamed

    2013-11-01

    The intracranial aneurysm (IA) lesion is one of the main causes of intracranial hemorrhage in productive population. It is well known that the hemodynamic factors have large impact on both the IAs rupture and treatment efficacy based on flow diverter stents. Precise experimental investigations of blood flow in IAs using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV) are therefore strongly required in order to validate clinical treatments based on computational and clinical flow assessment tools. Due to the large variations of flow velocities in IAs, a single PIV measurement with a unique time lag between two consecutive images cannot provide a good level of precision in all the measured volume. In this work, we implement an error analysis based on several PIV measurements with different time lags to ensure an optimal precision in the entire measurement volume. This PIV multi-time-lag method is applied on a sidewall IA model to investigate the effect of the inflow pulsatility. By comparing the flow patterns resulting from steady and unsteady inflows we point out important differences which could be involved in the IAs evolution. In particular, the blood transfer in the IA and the vortical structure are significantly modified when increasing the pulsatility compared to quasi-steady conditions.

  19. A global look at X-ray time lags in Seyfert galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kara, E.; Alston, W. N.; Fabian, A. C.; Cackett, E. M.; Uttley, P.; Reynolds, C. S.; Zoghbi, A.

    2016-10-01

    X-ray reverberation, where light-travel time delays map out the compact geometry around the inner accretion flow in supermassive black holes, has been discovered in several of the brightest, most variable and well-known Seyfert galaxies. In this work, we expand the study of X-ray reverberation to all Seyfert galaxies in the XMM-Newton archive above a nominal rms variability and exposure level (a total of 43 sources). Approximately 50 per cent of sources exhibit iron K reverberation, in that the broad iron K emission line responds to rapid variability in the continuum. We also find that on long time-scales, the hard band emission lags behind the soft band emission in 85 per cent of sources. This `low-frequency hard lag' is likely associated with the coronal emission, and so this result suggests that most sources with X-ray variability show intrinsic variability from the nuclear region. We update the known iron K lag amplitude versus black hole mass relation, and find evidence that the height or extent of the coronal source (as inferred by the reverberation time delay) increases with mass accretion rate.

  20. Time-lag estimate between dietary intake and breast cancer mortality in Japan.

    PubMed

    Harashima, Emiko; Nakagawa, Yasue; Urata, Gunpei; Tsuji, Keisuke; Shirataka, Masuo; Matsumura, Yasuhiro

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the relationship between the nutrient intake, including total dietary fiber (TDF) and fat, and the age-adjusted mortality from breast cancer (MBC) in Japanese females during the period from 1948 to 2000. The information for MBC in females was based on the data in Vital Statistics of Japan. Nutritional data were collected from the National Nutrition Survey reports. The data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation and a partial correlation, adjusting for the effect of reproductive factors. The time lag was estimated by measuring the strength of the linear relationship set up for a 0-35-year delay in mortality and statistically evaluated by comparing the correlation coefficients. The partial correlation analysis indicated that the individual intakes of total fat (r=0.688), animal protein (r=0.657), carbohydrate (r=-0.886), and plant protein (r=-0.770) were significantly (p<0.01) correlated with MBC. Each of these coefficients of correlation changed and reached a maximum value with increasing time lag. The estimated time lag values for the influence of fat, animal protein and TDF were 20-32 years, 19-31 years and 9-35 years, respectively. It is deduced from the results that the increased MBC in Japanese women is related to the long-term effect from the intake of a high-fat, high-animal protein and low-fiber diet typical in the western world.

  1. Visuomotor integration is associated with zero time-lag synchronization among cortical areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelfsema, Pieter R.; Engel, Andreas K.; König, Peter; Singer, Wolf

    1997-01-01

    INFORMATION processing in the cerebral cortex invariably involves the activation of millions of neurons that are widely distributed over its various areas. These distributed activity patterns need to be integrated into coherent representational states. A candidate mechanism for the integration and coordination of neuronal activity between different brain regions is synchronization on a fine temporal scale1-3. In the visual cortex, synchronization occurs selectively between the responses of neurons that represent related features2-5 and that need to be integrated for the generation of coherent percepts; neurons in other areas of the cerebral cortex also synchronize their discharges6-10. However, little is known about the patterns and the behavioural correlates of synchrony among widely separated cortical regions. Here we report that synchronization occurs between areas of the visual and parietal cortex, and between areas of the parietal and motor cortex, in the awake cat. When cats responded to a sudden change of a visual pattern, neuronal activity in cortical areas exhibited synchrony without time lags; this synchrony was particularly strong between areas subserving related functions. During reward and inter-trial episodes, zero-time-lag synchrony was lost and replaced by interactions exhibiting large and unsystematic time lags.

  2. Optimization of lag time underlies antibiotic tolerance in evolved bacterial populations.

    PubMed

    Fridman, Ofer; Goldberg, Amir; Ronin, Irine; Shoresh, Noam; Balaban, Nathalie Q

    2014-09-18

    The great therapeutic achievements of antibiotics have been dramatically undercut by the evolution of bacterial strategies that overcome antibiotic stress. These strategies fall into two classes. 'Resistance' makes it possible for a microorganism to grow in the constant presence of the antibiotic, provided that the concentration of the antibiotic is not too high. 'Tolerance' allows a microorganism to survive antibiotic treatment, even at high antibiotic concentrations, as long as the duration of the treatment is limited. Although both resistance and tolerance are important reasons for the failure of antibiotic treatments, the evolution of resistance is much better understood than that of tolerance. Here we followed the evolution of bacterial populations under intermittent exposure to the high concentrations of antibiotics used in the clinic and characterized the evolved strains in terms of both resistance and tolerance. We found that all strains adapted by specific genetic mutations, which became fixed in the evolved populations. By monitoring the phenotypic changes at the population and single-cell levels, we found that the first adaptive change to antibiotic stress was the development of tolerance through a major adjustment in the single-cell lag-time distribution, without a change in resistance. Strikingly, we found that the lag time of bacteria before regrowth was optimized to match the duration of the antibiotic-exposure interval. Whole genome sequencing of the evolved strains and restoration of the wild-type alleles allowed us to identify target genes involved in this antibiotic-driven phenotype: 'tolerance by lag' (tbl). Better understanding of lag-time evolution as a key determinant of the survival of bacterial populations under high antibiotic concentrations could lead to new approaches to impeding the evolution of antibiotic resistance.

  3. Lag time for germination of Penicillium chrysogenum conidia is induced by temperature shifts.

    PubMed

    Kalai, Safaa; Bensoussan, Maurice; Dantigny, Philippe

    2014-09-01

    In the environment, fungal conidia are subject to transient conditions. In particular, temperature is varying according to day/night periods. All predictive models for germination assume that fungal spores can adapt instantaneously to changes of temperature. The only study that supports this assumption (Gougouli and Koutsoumanis, 2012, Modelling germination of fungal spores at constant and fluctuating temperature conditions. International Journal of Food Microbiology, 152: 153-161) was carried out on Penicillium expansum and Aspergillus niger conidia that, in most cases, already produced germ tubes. In contrast, the present study focuses on temperature shifts applied during the first stages of germination (i.e., before the apparition of the germ tubes). Firstly, germination times were determined in steady state conditions at 10, 15, 20 and 25 °C. Secondly, temperature shifts (e.g., up-shifts and down-shifts) were applied at 1/4, 1/2, and 3/4 of germination times, with 5, 10 and 15 °C magnitudes. Experiments were carried out in triplicate on Penicillium chrysogenum conidia on Potato Dextrose Agar medium according to a full factorial design. Statistical analysis of the results clearly demonstrated that the assumption of instantaneous adaptation of the conidia should be rejected. Temperature shifts during germination led to an induced lag time or an extended germination time as compared to the experiments conducted ay steady state. The induced lag time was maximized when the amplitude of the shift was equal to 10 °C. Interaction between the instant and the direction of the shift was highlighted. A negative lag time was observed for a 15 °C down-shift applied at 1/4 of the germination time. This result suggested that at optimal temperature the rate of germination decreased with time, and that the variation of this rate with time depended on temperature.

  4. High temporal frequency adaptation compresses time in the Flash-Lag illusion.

    PubMed

    Rowland, Edward; Durant, Szonya

    2014-12-01

    Previous research finds that 20 Hz temporal frequency (TF) adaptation causes a compression of perceived visual event duration. We investigate if this temporal compression affects further time-dependent percepts, implying a further functional role for duration perception mechanisms. We measure the effect of 20 Hz flicker adaptation on Flash-Lag, an illusion whereby an observer perceives a moving object displaced further along its trajectory compared to a spatially localized briefly flashed object. The illusion scales with object speed; therefore, it has a fixed temporal component. By comparing adaptation at 5 Hz and 20 Hz we show that 20 Hz TF adaptation reduces perceived Flash-Lag magnitude significantly, with no effect at 5 Hz, whereas the opposite pattern of adaptation was seen on perceived speed. There is a significant effect of 20 Hz adaptation on the perceived duration of a moving bar. This suggests that 20 Hz TF adaptation has compressed the fixed temporal component of the Flash-Lag illusion, implying the mechanism underlying duration perception also has effects on judging spatial relationships in dynamic stimuli.

  5. The time lag and interval of discharge with a spring actuated fuel injection pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matthews, Robertson; Gardiner, A W

    1923-01-01

    Discussed here is research on a spring activated fuel pump for solid or airless injection with small, high speed internal combustion engines. The pump characteristics under investigation were the interval of fuel injection in terms of degrees of crank travel and in absolute time, the lag between the time the injection pump plunger begins its stroke and the appearance of the jet at the orifice, and the manner in which the fuel spray builds up to a maximum when the fuel valve is opened, and then diminishes.

  6. A simple method to assess unsaturated zone time lag in the travel time from ground surface to receptor.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Marcelo R; Jones, Jon P; Frind, Emil O; Rudolph, David L

    2013-01-01

    In contaminant travel from ground surface to groundwater receptors, the time taken in travelling through the unsaturated zone is known as the unsaturated zone time lag. Depending on the situation, this time lag may or may not be significant within the context of the overall problem. A method is presented for assessing the importance of the unsaturated zone in the travel time from source to receptor in terms of estimates of both the absolute and the relative advective times. A choice of different techniques for both unsaturated and saturated travel time estimation is provided. This method may be useful for practitioners to decide whether to incorporate unsaturated processes in conceptual and numerical models and can also be used to roughly estimate the total travel time between points near ground surface and a groundwater receptor. This method was applied to a field site located in a glacial aquifer system in Ontario, Canada. Advective travel times were estimated using techniques with different levels of sophistication. The application of the proposed method indicates that the time lag in the unsaturated zone is significant at this field site and should be taken into account. For this case, sophisticated and simplified techniques lead to similar assessments when the same knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity field is assumed. When there is significant uncertainty regarding the hydraulic conductivity, simplified calculations did not lead to a conclusive decision.

  7. Repeated ketamine administration redeems the time lag for citalopram's antidepressant-like effects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, G-F; Liu, W-X; Qiu, L-L; Guo, J; Wang, X-M; Sun, H-L; Yang, J-J; Zhou, Z-Q

    2015-06-01

    Current available antidepressants exhibit low remission rate with a long response lag time. Growing evidence has demonstrated acute sub-anesthetic dose of ketamine exerts rapid, robust, and lasting antidepressant effects. However, a long term use of ketamine tends to elicit its adverse reactions. The present study aimed to investigate the antidepressant-like effects of intermittent and consecutive administrations of ketamine on chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) rats, and to determine whether ketamine can redeem the time lag for treatment response of classic antidepressants. The behavioral responses were assessed by the sucrose preference test, forced swimming test, and open field test. In the first stage of experiments, all the four treatment regimens of ketamine (10mg/kg ip, once daily for 3 or 7 consecutive days, or once every 7 or 3 days, in a total 21 days) showed robust antidepressant-like effects, with no significant influence on locomotor activity and stereotype behavior in the CUMS rats. The intermittent administration regimens produced longer antidepressant-like effects than the consecutive administration regimens and the administration every 7 days presented similar antidepressant-like effects with less administration times compared with the administration every 3 days. In the second stage of experiments, the combination of ketamine (10 mg/kg ip, once every 7 days) and citalopram (20 mg/kg po, once daily) for 21 days caused more rapid and sustained antidepressant-like effects than citalopram administered alone. In summary, repeated sub-anesthestic doses of ketamine can redeem the time lag for the antidepressant-like effects of citalopram, suggesting the combination of ketamine and classic antidepressants is a promising regimen for depression with quick onset time and stable and lasting effects.

  8. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations.

  9. Groundwater recharge and time lag measurement through Vertosols using impulse response functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hocking, Mark; Kelly, Bryce F. J.

    2016-04-01

    Throughout the world there are many stressed aquifers used to support irrigated agriculture. The Condamine River catchment (southern Queensland, Australia) is one example of a globally significant agricultural region where groundwater use has exceeded recharge over the last 50 years. There is a high dependence on groundwater in this catchment, because yearly rainfall is highly variable, and actual evapotranspiration often exceeds rainfall. To better manage the aquifer there is a need to correctly conceptualise the primary inputs and outputs of the system, and characterise the lags in system response to all forcings. In catchment models it is particularly important to correctly proportion diffuse (areal) rainfall recharge and to account for the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table. Throughout large portions of the Condamine Catchment, groundwater levels are now 20 or more metres below the ground surface. This study aimed to better quantify the lag between rainfall and recharge at the water table using the predefined impulse response function in continuous time method (PIRFICT; von Asmuth et al., 2002; von Asmuth, 2012). The PIRFICT method was applied to 255 multi-decadal groundwater level data sets throughout the catchment. Inputs into the modelling include rainfall, irrigation deep drainage, stream water level, evapotranspiration, and groundwater extractions. As an independent check the PIRFICT model derived diffuse recharge estimates are compared to point lysimeter and geochemical recharge estimates in the Vertosol soils within this catchment. It is estimated using the PIRFICT method that in the Condamine Catchment between 1990 and 2012, the mean rain-derived groundwater recharge is 4.4 mm/year. Mean groundwater response from rainfall was determined to be 5.3 years: range 188 days to 48 years. The recharge estimates are consistent with both geochemical and lysimeter point measurements of recharge. It is concluded that where extensive groundwater

  10. LateBiclustering: Efficient Heuristic Algorithm for Time-Lagged Bicluster Identification.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Joana P; Madeira, Sara C

    2014-01-01

    Identifying patterns in temporal data is key to uncover meaningful relationships in diverse domains, from stock trading to social interactions. Also of great interest are clinical and biological applications, namely monitoring patient response to treatment or characterizing activity at the molecular level. In biology, researchers seek to gain insight into gene functions and dynamics of biological processes, as well as potential perturbations of these leading to disease, through the study of patterns emerging from gene expression time series. Clustering can group genes exhibiting similar expression profiles, but focuses on global patterns denoting rather broad, unspecific responses. Biclustering reveals local patterns, which more naturally capture the intricate collaboration between biological players, particularly under a temporal setting. Despite the general biclustering formulation being NP-hard, considering specific properties of time series has led to efficient solutions for the discovery of temporally aligned patterns. Notably, the identification of biclusters with time-lagged patterns, suggestive of transcriptional cascades, remains a challenge due to the combinatorial explosion of delayed occurrences. Herein, we propose LateBiclustering, a sensible heuristic algorithm enabling a polynomial rather than exponential time solution for the problem. We show that it identifies meaningful time-lagged biclusters relevant to the response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to heat stress.

  11. [Time lag effects of throughfall in natural Larix gmelinii forest in the north of Great Xing'an Mountains, China].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu-jie; Man, Xiu-ling; Sheng, Hong-cai

    2015-11-01

    Based on a natural Larix gmelinii forest from Mohe Ecological Station, located in north of Great Xing' an Mountains, time lag effects of throughfall inside the Larix gmelinii forest were analyzed by measuring rainfall, throughfall and stemflow with the method of location observation. The result showed that forest throughfall, stemflow and canopy interception accounted for 76.5%, 2.6% and 20.9% of total rainfall, respectively. Time lag of rainfall inside L. gmelinii forest was found both in beginning and termination of rainfall compared to outside, and the higher the rainfall level, the shorter the time lag of throughfall. For throughfall and stemflow, variations of time lag were (67.8 ± 7.8)--(17.2 ± 3.9) min and (112.0 ± 38.8)--(48.3 ± 10.6) min, respectively. The time lag of throughfall decreased with the increasing rainfall intensity under the same rainfall level. When the rainfall intensity was greater than 2 mm · h(-1), the time lag of throughfall was shortened significantly, but it increased with prolonging the antecedent dry period before rainfall. Rainfall would be the critical factor to affect the time lag of throughfall when the antecedent dry period was longer than 48 h. Termination of throughfall also lagged when rainfall termination happened with a rainfall greater than 5.0 mm. The time lag of throughfall termination increased with increasing the rainfall intensity, but it had no significant relationship with the antecedent dry period before rainfall. However, the termination of stemflow occurred prior to rainfall, which was relevant to the rainfall level, and the smaller the rainfall level, the sooner the stemflow terminated.

  12. Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian forests using cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeWalle, David R.; Boyer, Elizabeth W.; Buda, Anthony R.

    2016-12-01

    Forecasts of ecosystem changes due to variations in atmospheric emissions policies require a fundamental understanding of lag times between changes in chemical inputs and watershed response. Impacts of changes in atmospheric deposition in the United States have been documented using national and regional long-term environmental monitoring programs beginning several decades ago. Consequently, time series of weekly NADP atmospheric wet deposition and monthly EPA-Long Term Monitoring stream chemistry now exist for much of the Northeast which may provide insights into lag times. In this study of Appalachian forest basins, we estimated lag times for S, N and Cl by cross-correlating monthly data from four pairs of stream and deposition monitoring sites during the period from 1978 to 2012. A systems or impulse response function approach to cross-correlation was used to estimate lag times where the input deposition time series was pre-whitened using regression modeling and the stream response time series was filtered using the deposition regression model prior to cross-correlation. Cross-correlations for S were greatest at annual intervals over a relatively well-defined range of lags with the maximum correlations occurring at mean lags of 48 months. Chloride results were similar but more erratic with a mean lag of 57 months. Few high-correlation lags for N were indicated. Given the growing availability of atmospheric deposition and surface water chemistry monitoring data and our results for four Appalachian basins, further testing of cross-correlation as a method of estimating lag times on other basins appears justified.

  13. Ensemble X-ray variability of active galactic nuclei at intermediate and long time lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vagnetti, Fausto; Middei, Riccardo

    2016-08-01

    We present a variability analysis for a sample of 2700 active galactic nuclei extracted from the latest release of the XMM-Newton serendipitous source catalogue. The structure function of this sample increases up to rest-frame time lags of about 5 years. Moreover, comparing observations performed by the XMM-Newton and ROSAT satellites, we are able to extend the X-ray structure function to 20 years rest-frame, showing a further increase of variability without any evidence of a plateau. Our results are compared with similar analyses in the optical band, and discussed in relation to the physical sizes of the emitting regions.

  14. Topics in High-Energy Astrophysics: X-ray Time Lags and Gamma-ray Flares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.

    The Universe is host to a wide variety of high-energy processes that convert gravitational potential energy or rest-mass energy into non-thermal radiation such as bremsstrahlung and synchrotron. Prevailing models of X-ray emission from accreting Black Hole Binaries (BHBs) struggle to simultaneously fit the quiescent X-ray spectrum and the transients which result in the phenomenon known as X-ray time lags. And similarly, classical models of diffusive shock acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae fail to explain the extreme particle acceleration in very short timescales as is inferred from recent gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula. In this dissertation, I develop new exact analytic models to shed light on these intriguing processes. I take a fresh look at the formation of X-ray time lags in compact sources using a new mathematical approach in which I obtain the exact Green's function solution. The resulting Green's function allows one to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. I obtain the exact solution for the dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous clouds. The model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the quiescent X-ray spectrum using a single set of coronal parameters. I show that the implied coronal radii in the new model are significantly smaller than those obtained in the Monte Carlo simulations, hence greatly reducing the coronal heating problem. Recent bright gamma-ray flares from the Crab nebula observed by AGILE and Fermi reaching GeV energies and lasting several days challenge the contemporary model for particle acceleration in pulsar wind nebulae, specifically the diffusive shock acceleration model. Simulations indicate electron/positron pairs in the Crab nebula pulsar wind must be accelerated up to PeV energies in the presence of ambient magnetic fields with strength B ~100 microG. No

  15. Extensions to the time lag models for practical application to rocket engine stability design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casiano, Matthew J.

    The combustion instability problem in liquid-propellant rocket engines (LREs) has remained a tremendous challenge since their discovery in the 1930s. Improvements are usually made in solving the combustion instability problem primarily using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and also by testing demonstrator engines. Another approach is to use analytical models. Analytical models can be used such that design, redesign, or improvement of an engine system is feasible in a relatively short period of time. Improvements to the analytical models can greatly aid in design efforts. A thorough literature review is first conducted on liquid-propellant rocket engine (LRE) throttling. Throttling is usually studied in terms of vehicle descent or ballistic missile control however there are many other cases where throttling is important. It was found that combustion instabilities are one of a few major issues that occur during deep throttling (other major issues are heat transfer concerns, performance loss, and pump dynamics). In the past and again recently, gas injected into liquid propellants has shown to be a viable solution to throttle engines and to eliminate some forms of combustion instability. This review uncovered a clever solution that was used to eliminate a chug instability in the Common Extensible Cryogenic Engine (CECE), a modified RL10 engine. A separate review was also conducted on classic time lag combustion instability models. Several new stability models are developed by incorporating important features to the classic and contemporary models, which are commonly used in the aerospace rocket industry. The first two models are extensions of the original Crocco and Cheng concentrated combustion model with feed system contributions. A third new model is an extension to the Wenzel and Szuch double-time lag model also with feed system contributions. The first new model incorporates the appropriate injector acoustic boundary condition which is neglected in contemporary

  16. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions.

    PubMed

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag.

  17. Time-lag properties of corona streamer discharges between impulse sphere and dc needle electrodes under atmospheric air conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okano, Daisuke

    2013-02-01

    In this study of corona streamer discharges from an impulse generator using a dc power supply, the relationship of the discharge time-lag with the dc bias voltage between the sphere-to-needle electrodes under atmospheric conditions is investigated. Devices utilizing corona discharges have been used to purify air or water, destroy bacteria, and to remove undesirable substances, and in order to achieve fast response times and high power efficiencies in such devices, it is important to minimize the time-lag of the corona discharge. Our experimental results show that (a) the discharge path of a negatively biased needle electrode will be straighter than that of a positively biased needle and (b) the discharge threshold voltage in both the positive and the negative needle electrodes is nearly equal to 33 kV. By expressing the discharge voltage as a power function of time-lag, the extent of corona generation can be quantitatively specified using the exponent of this power function. The observed behavior of a corona streamer discharge between the negative spherical and the positive needle electrodes indicates that the largest power exponent is associated with the shortest time-lag, owing to the reduction in the statistical time-lag in the absence of a formative time-lag.

  18. Investigating effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) molecular weight grades on lag time of press-coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-11-01

    The research undertaken exemplifies the effects of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC) molecular weight (MW) grades of on lag time of press-coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets. The formulation comprised an immediate release core (containing prednisone as a model drug) surrounded by compression coating with variegated EC-HPMC blends. Five selected HPMC grades (E5, E15, E50, K100LV and K4M) were explored at three different concentrations (10% w/w, 20% w/w and 30% w/w in outer coat) to understand their effects on lag time and drug release. In vitro drug release testing demonstrated that, with increase in concentration of E5 and E15, up to 30% w/w, the mean lag time decreased progressively; whereas with remaining grades, the mean lag time initially decreased up to 20% w/w level and thereafter increased for 30% w/w level. Importantly, with increase in HPMC concentration in the outer coat, the variability in lag time (%RSD; n = 6) was decreased for each of E5, E15 and E50, whereas increased for K100LV and K4M. In general, the variability in lag time was increased with increase in HPMC MW at studied concentration levels. Markedly, tablets with 30% w/w K4M in outer coat exhibited slight premature release (before the rupture of outer coat) along with high variability in lag time. Overall, the study concluded that low MW HPMCs (E5, E15 and E50) were found rather efficient than higher MW HPMCs for developing robust EC-based press-coated pulsatile release formulations where precise lag time followed by sharp burst release is desired.

  19. Exploratory time varying lagged regression: modeling association of cognitive and functional trajectories with expected clinic visits in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Şentürk, Damla; Ghosh, Samiran; Nguyen, Danh V.

    2014-01-01

    Motivated by a longitudinal study on factors affecting the frequency of clinic visits of older adults, an exploratory time varying lagged regression analysis is proposed to relate a longitudinal response to multiple cross-sectional and longitudinal predictors from time varying lags. Regression relations are allowed to vary with time through smooth varying coefficient functions. The main goal of the proposal is to detect deviations from a concurrent varying coefficient model potentially in a subset of the longitudinal predictors with nonzero estimated lags. The proposed methodology is geared towards irregular and infrequent data where different longitudinal variables may be observed at different frequencies, possibly at unsynchronized time points and contaminated with additive measurement error. Furthermore, to cope with the curse of dimensionality which limits related current modeling approaches, a sequential model building procedure is proposed to explore and select the time varying lags of the longitudinal predictors. The estimation procedure is based on estimation of the moments of the predictor and response trajectories by pooling information from all subjects. The finite sample properties of the proposed estimation algorithm are studied under various lag structures and correlation levels among the predictor processes in simulation studies. Application to the clinic visits data show the effect of cognitive and functional impairment scores from varying lags on the frequency of the clinic visits throughout the study. PMID:24436504

  20. [Time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors in agroforestry system in West Liaoning Province].

    PubMed

    Di, Sun; Guan, De-xin; Yuan, Feng-hui; Wang, An-zhi; Wu, Jia-bing

    2010-11-01

    By using Granier's thermal dissipation probe, the sap flow velocity of the poplars in agroforestry system in west Liaoning was continuously measured, and the microclimate factors were measured synchronously. Dislocation contrast method was applied to analyze the sap flow velocity and corresponding air temperature, air humidity, net radiation, and vapor pressure deficit to discuss the time lag effect between poplar' s sap flow velocity and microclimate factors on sunny days. It was found that the poplar's sap flow velocity advanced of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure deficit, and lagged behind net radiation. The sap flow velocity in June, July, August, and September was advanced of 70, 30, 50, and 90 min to air temperature, of 80, 30, 40, and 90 min to air humidity, and of 90, 50, 70, and 120 min to vapor pressure deficit, but lagged behind 10, 10, 40, and 40 min to net radiation, respectively. The time lag time of net radiation was shorter than that of air temperature, air humidity, and vapor pressure. The regression analysis showed that in the cases the time lag effect was contained and not, the determination coefficients between comprehensive microclimate factor and poplar's sap flow velocity were 0.903 and 0.855, respectively, indicating that when the time lag effect was contained, the determination coefficient was ascended by 2.04%, and thus, the simulation accuracy of poplar's sap flow velocity was improved.

  1. A method for improving predictive modeling by taking into account lag time: Example of selenium bioaccumulation in a flowing system.

    PubMed

    Beckon, William N

    2016-07-01

    For bioaccumulative substances, efforts to predict concentrations in organisms at upper trophic levels, based on measurements of environmental exposure, have been confounded by the appreciable but hitherto unknown amount of time it may take for bioaccumulation to occur through various pathways and across several trophic transfers. The study summarized here demonstrates an objective method of estimating this lag time by testing a large array of potential lag times for selenium bioaccumulation, selecting the lag that provides the best regression between environmental exposure (concentration in ambient water) and concentration in the tissue of the target organism. Bioaccumulation lag is generally greater for organisms at higher trophic levels, reaching times of more than a year in piscivorous fish. Predictive modeling of bioaccumulation is improved appreciably by taking into account this lag. More generally, the method demonstrated here may improve the accuracy of predictive modeling in a wide variety of other cause-effect relationships in which lag time is substantial but inadequately known, in disciplines as diverse as climatology (e.g., the effect of greenhouse gases on sea levels) and economics (e.g., the effects of fiscal stimulus on employment).

  2. Time lags of the flickering in cataclysmic variables as a function of wavelength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruch, Albert

    2015-07-01

    Context. Flickering is a ubiquitous phenomenon in cataclysmic variables (CVs). Although the underlying light source is one of the main contributors to the optical radiation, the mechanism leading to flickering is not understood as yet. Aims: The present study aims to contribute to the set of boundary conditions, defined by observations, which must be met by physical models that describe the flickering. In particular, time lags in the occurrence of flickering events at different wavelengths over the optical range are examined. Methods: To this end, the cross-correlation functions (CCFs) of numerous light curves of a sample of CVs are analysed that were observed simultaneously or quasi-simultaneously in different bands of various photometric systems. Results: Deviations of the maxima of the CCFs from zero time-shift indicate a dependence of the flickering activity on the wavelength in the sense that flickering flares reach their maxima slightly earlier in the blue range than in the red. While the available observational material does not permit detecting this individually in all observed systems, the ensemble of all data clearly shows this effect. Particularly instructive are the cases of V603 Aql and TT Ari, where time lags of 15ṣ1 and 4ṣ3, respectively, are observed between the U and R bands. In principle this can be understood if during the development of a flickering flare the radiation characteristics of the light source responsible for flickering change such that in the early phases of a flare more short-wavelength radiation is emitted, and later on, the peak of the emission shifts to the red. Respective scenarios are discussed and shown to be in qualitative and quantitative agreement with observations.

  3. Multi-time-lag PIV analysis of steady and pulsatile flows in a sidewall aneurysm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouillot, P.; Brina, O.; Ouared, R.; Lovblad, K. O.; Pereira, V. Mendes; Farhat, M.

    2014-06-01

    The effect of inflow waveform on the hemodynamics of a real-size idealized sidewall intracranial aneurysm (IA) model was investigated using particle imaging velocimetry (PIV). For this purpose, we implemented an error analysis based on several PIV measurements with different time lags to ensure high precision of velocity fields measured in both the IA and the parent artery. The relative error measured in the main part of the circulating volume was <1 % despite the three orders of magnitude difference of parent artery and IA dome velocities. Moreover, important features involved in IA evolution were potentially emphasized from the qualitative and quantitative flow pattern comparison resulting from steady and unsteady inflows. In particular, the flow transfer in IA and the vortical structure were significantly modified when increasing the number of harmonics for a typical physiological flow, in comparison with quasi-steady conditions.

  4. Time lagged ordinal partition networks for capturing dynamics of continuous dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect

    McCullough, Michael; Iu, Herbert Ho-Ching; Small, Michael; Stemler, Thomas

    2015-05-15

    We investigate a generalised version of the recently proposed ordinal partition time series to network transformation algorithm. First, we introduce a fixed time lag for the elements of each partition that is selected using techniques from traditional time delay embedding. The resulting partitions define regions in the embedding phase space that are mapped to nodes in the network space. Edges are allocated between nodes based on temporal succession thus creating a Markov chain representation of the time series. We then apply this new transformation algorithm to time series generated by the Rössler system and find that periodic dynamics translate to ring structures whereas chaotic time series translate to band or tube-like structures—thereby indicating that our algorithm generates networks whose structure is sensitive to system dynamics. Furthermore, we demonstrate that simple network measures including the mean out degree and variance of out degrees can track changes in the dynamical behaviour in a manner comparable to the largest Lyapunov exponent. We also apply the same analysis to experimental time series generated by a diode resonator circuit and show that the network size, mean shortest path length, and network diameter are highly sensitive to the interior crisis captured in this particular data set.

  5. Influence of lag time on event-based rainfall-runoff modeling using the data driven approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talei, Amin; Chua, Lloyd H. C.

    2012-05-01

    SummaryThis study investigated the effect of lag time on the performance of data-driven models, specifically the adaptive network-based fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), in event-based rainfall-runoff modeling. Rainfall and runoff data for a catchment in Singapore were chosen for this study. For the purpose of this study, lag time was determined from cross-correlation analysis of the rainfall and runoff time series. Rainfall antecedents were the only inputs of the models and direct runoff was the desired output. An ANFIS model with three sub-models defined based on three different ranges of lag times was developed. The performance of the sub-models was compared with previously developed ANFIS models and the physically-based Storm Water Management Model (SWMM). The ANFIS sub-models gave significantly superior results in terms of the RMSE, r2, CE and the prediction of the peak discharge, compared to other ANFIS models where the lag time was not considered. In addition, the ANFIS sub-models provided results that were comparable with results from SWMM. It is thus concluded that the lag time plays an important role in the selection of events for training and testing of data-driven models in event-based rainfall-runoff modeling.

  6. Combining Fourier and lagged k-nearest neighbor imputation for biomedical time series data.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shah Atiqur; Huang, Yuxiao; Claassen, Jan; Heintzman, Nathaniel; Kleinberg, Samantha

    2015-12-01

    Most clinical and biomedical data contain missing values. A patient's record may be split across multiple institutions, devices may fail, and sensors may not be worn at all times. While these missing values are often ignored, this can lead to bias and error when the data are mined. Further, the data are not simply missing at random. Instead the measurement of a variable such as blood glucose may depend on its prior values as well as that of other variables. These dependencies exist across time as well, but current methods have yet to incorporate these temporal relationships as well as multiple types of missingness. To address this, we propose an imputation method (FLk-NN) that incorporates time lagged correlations both within and across variables by combining two imputation methods, based on an extension to k-NN and the Fourier transform. This enables imputation of missing values even when all data at a time point is missing and when there are different types of missingness both within and across variables. In comparison to other approaches on three biological datasets (simulated and actual Type 1 diabetes datasets, and multi-modality neurological ICU monitoring) the proposed method has the highest imputation accuracy. This was true for up to half the data being missing and when consecutive missing values are a significant fraction of the overall time series length.

  7. Investigating the X-ray time lags in PG 1244+026 using an extended corona model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chainakun, P.; Young, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    We present an extended corona model based on ray-tracing simulations to investigate X-ray time lags in active galactic nuclei (AGNs). This model consists of two axial point sources illuminating an accretion disc that produce the reverberation lags. These lags are due to the time delays between the directly observed and reflection photons and are associated with the light-travel time between the source and the disc, so they allow us to probe the disc-corona geometry. We assume the variations of two X-ray sources are triggered by the same primary variations, but allow the two sources to respond in different ways (i.e. having different source responses). The variations of each source induce a delayed accretion disc response and the total lags consist of a combination of both source and disc responses. We show that the extended corona model can reproduce both the low-frequency hard and high-frequency soft (reverberation) lags. Fitting the model to the timing data of PG 1244+026 reveals the hard and soft X-ray sources at ∼6rg and ∼11rg, respectively. The upper source produces small amounts of reflection and can be interpreted as a relativistic jet, or outflowing blob, whose emission is beamed away from the disc. This explains the observed lag energy in which there is no soft lag at energies <1 keV as they are diluted by the soft continuum of the upper source. Finally, our models suggest that the fluctuations propagating between the two sources of PG 1244+026 are possible but only at near the speed of light.

  8. [Radial variation and time lag of sap flow of Populus gansuensis in Minqin Oasis, Northwest].

    PubMed

    Dang, Hong-Zhong; Yang, Wen-Bin; Li, Wei; Zhang, You-Yan; Li, Chang-Long

    2014-09-01

    Sap flow of tree trunk is very important to reflect the dynamics of physiological activities, as well as to estimate the water consumption of individual plant. In the present study, we used the thermal dissipation technique to monitor the sap flow velocity (J) at four depth loci (i. e. 2 cm, 3 cm, 5 cm, 8 cm) of three Populus gansuensis trees (30 year-old) in Minqin Oasis for two consecutive growing seasons. The results showed that there were significant differences among J values at four depth loci under tree trunk cambium. J value at the 3 cm depth locus (J3) of the tree trunk was the highest, and then in sequences, were 2 cm, 5 cm and 8 cm depth loci (J2, J5 and J8). J value (J3) on typical sunny days in June with the highest atmospheric potential evapotranspiration (ET0) was up to 28.53 g · cm(-2) · h(-1), which was 1.42, 2.74 and 4.4 times of J2, J5 and J8, respectively. In the process of diurnal variation of sap flow velocity, the peak value time of J at the four depth loci of the tree trunk was different, but the differences among them were within 20 min. Furthermore, the peak value time of sap flow velocity was very different to that of solar radiation (Rs) and air vapour pressure deficit (VPD). The time lag between J and Rs was from 55 to 88 min on typical sunny days during the main growing seasons (from June to August), and, positively related to the depth of the locus under tree trunk cambium, while the time lag between J and VPD reached 60-96 min, and was negatively related to the depth of the locus. The seasonal variation patterns of J were consistent with ET0. With the increase of tree physiological activities, there was a trend that the major water transportation layer extended to the interior sapwood. The most important meteorological factor was the solar radiation, which primarily drove sap flow at different depths of tree trunk. However, the secondary factor changed along with the depth, and VPD became increasingly important with increasing the

  9. State Space Modeling of Time-Varying Contemporaneous and Lagged Relations in Connectivity Maps

    PubMed Central

    Molenaar, Peter C. M.; Beltz, Adriene M.; Gates, Kathleen M.; Wilson, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Most connectivity mapping techniques for neuroimaging data assume stationarity (i.e., network parameters are constant across time), but this assumption does not always hold true. The authors provide a description of a new approach for simultaneously detecting time-varying (or dynamic) contemporaneous and lagged relations in brain connectivity maps. Specifically, they use a novel raw data likelihood estimation technique (involving a second-order extended Kalman filter/smoother embedded in a nonlinear optimizer) to determine the variances of the random walks associated with state space model parameters and their autoregressive components. The authors illustrate their approach with simulated and blood oxygen level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging data from 30 daily cigarette smokers performing a verbal working memory task, focusing on seven regions of interest (ROIs). Twelve participants had dynamic directed functional connectivity maps: Eleven had one or more time-varying contemporaneous ROI state loadings, and one had a time-varying autoregressive parameter. Compared to smokers without dynamic maps, smokers with dynamic maps performed the task with greater accuracy. Thus, accurate detection of dynamic brain processes is meaningfully related to behavior in a clinical sample. PMID:26546863

  10. Time Lags between Exanthematous Illness Attributed to Zika Virus, Guillain-Barré Syndrome, and Microcephaly, Salvador, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Paploski, Igor A.D.; Prates, Ana Paula P.B.; Cardoso, Cristiane W.; Kikuti, Mariana; Silva, Monaise M. O.; Waller, Lance A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Kitron, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus infection emerged as a public health emergency after increasing evidence for its association with neurologic disorders and congenital malformations. In Salvador, Brazil, outbreaks of acute exanthematous illness (AEI) attributed to Zika virus, Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), and microcephaly occurred in 2015. We investigated temporal correlations and time lags between these outbreaks to identify a common link between them by using epidemic curves and time series cross-correlations. Number of GBS cases peaked after a lag of 5–9 weeks from the AEI peak. Number of suspected cases of microcephaly peaked after a lag of 30–33 weeks from the AEI peak, which corresponded to time of potential infections of pregnant mothers during the first trimester. These findings support the association of GBS and microcephaly with Zika virus infection and provide evidence for a temporal relationship between timing of arboviral infection of pregnant women during the first trimester and birth outcome. PMID:27144515

  11. Improving precipitation forecast with hybrid 3DVar and time-lagged ensembles in a heavy rainfall event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuanbing; Min, Jinzhong; Chen, Yaodeng; Huang, Xiang-Yu; Zeng, Mingjian; Li, Xin

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluates the performance of three-dimensional variational (3DVar) and a hybrid data assimilation system using time-lagged ensembles in a heavy rainfall event. The time-lagged ensembles are constructed by sampling from a moving time window of 3 h along a model trajectory, which is economical and easy to implement. The proposed hybrid data assimilation system introduces flow-dependent error covariance derived from time-lagged ensemble into variational cost function without significantly increasing computational cost. Single observation tests are performed to document characteristic of the hybrid system. The sensitivity of precipitation forecasts to ensemble covariance weight and localization scale is investigated. Additionally, the TLEn-Var is evaluated and compared to the ETKF(ensemble transformed Kalman filter)-based hybrid assimilation within a continuously cycling framework, through which new hybrid analyses are produced every 3 h over 10 days. The 24 h accumulated precipitation, moisture, wind are analyzed between 3DVar and the hybrid assimilation using time-lagged ensembles. Results show that model states and precipitation forecast skill are improved by the hybrid assimilation using time-lagged ensembles compared with 3DVar. Simulation of the precipitable water and structure of the wind are also improved. Cyclonic wind increments are generated near the rainfall center, leading to an improved precipitation forecast. This study indicates that the hybrid data assimilation using time-lagged ensembles seems like a viable alternative or supplement in the complex models for some weather service agencies that have limited computing resources to conduct large size of ensembles.

  12. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-03-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. We are here applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantifying the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time-lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time-lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining datasets from several analysers and using simulations we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time-lag eliminates these effects (provided the time-lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time-lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  13. Eddy-covariance data with low signal-to-noise ratio: time-lag determination, uncertainties and limit of detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, B.; Acton, W.; Ammann, C.; Valach, A.; Nemitz, E.

    2015-10-01

    All eddy-covariance flux measurements are associated with random uncertainties which are a combination of sampling error due to natural variability in turbulence and sensor noise. The former is the principal error for systems where the signal-to-noise ratio of the analyser is high, as is usually the case when measuring fluxes of heat, CO2 or H2O. Where signal is limited, which is often the case for measurements of other trace gases and aerosols, instrument uncertainties dominate. Here, we are applying a consistent approach based on auto- and cross-covariance functions to quantify the total random flux error and the random error due to instrument noise separately. As with previous approaches, the random error quantification assumes that the time lag between wind and concentration measurement is known. However, if combined with commonly used automated methods that identify the individual time lag by looking for the maximum in the cross-covariance function of the two entities, analyser noise additionally leads to a systematic bias in the fluxes. Combining data sets from several analysers and using simulations, we show that the method of time-lag determination becomes increasingly important as the magnitude of the instrument error approaches that of the sampling error. The flux bias can be particularly significant for disjunct data, whereas using a prescribed time lag eliminates these effects (provided the time lag does not fluctuate unduly over time). We also demonstrate that when sampling at higher elevations, where low frequency turbulence dominates and covariance peaks are broader, both the probability and magnitude of bias are magnified. We show that the statistical significance of noisy flux data can be increased (limit of detection can be decreased) by appropriate averaging of individual fluxes, but only if systematic biases are avoided by using a prescribed time lag. Finally, we make recommendations for the analysis and reporting of data with low signal

  14. On cell resistance and immune response time lag in a model for the HIV infection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solovey, Guillermo; Peruani, Fernando; Ponce Dawson, Silvina; Maria Zorzenon dos Santos, Rita

    2004-11-01

    Recently, a cellular automata model has been introduced (Phys. Rev. Lett. 87 (2001) 168102) to describe the spread of the HIV infection among target cells in lymphoid tissues. The model reproduces qualitatively the entire course of the infection displaying, in particular, the two time scales that characterize its dynamics. In this work, we investigate the robustness of the model against changes in three of its parameters. Two of them are related to the resistance of the cells to get infected. The other one describes the time interval necessary to mount specific immune responses. We have observed that an increase of the cell resistance, at any stage of the infection, leads to a reduction of the latency period, i.e., of the time interval between the primary infection and the onset of AIDS. However, during the early stages of the infection, when the cell resistance increase is combined with an increase in the initial concentration of infected cells, the original behavior is recovered. Therefore we find a long and a short latency regime (eight and one year long, respectively) depending on the value of the cell resistance. We have obtained, on the other hand, that changes on the parameter that describes the immune system time lag affects the time interval during which the primary infection occurs. Using different extended versions of the model, we also discuss how the two-time scale dynamics is affected when we include inhomogeneities on the cells properties, as for instance, on the cell resistance or on the time interval to mount specific immune responses.

  15. Effects of preculturing conditions on lag time and specific growth rate of Enterobacter sakazakii in reconstituted powdered infant formula.

    PubMed

    Kandhai, M C; Reij, M W; Grognou, C; van Schothorst, M; Gorris, L G M; Zwietering, M H

    2006-04-01

    Enterobacter sakazakii can be present, although in low levels, in dry powdered infant formulae, and it has been linked to cases of meningitis in neonates, especially those born prematurely. In order to prevent illness, product contamination at manufacture and during preparation, as well as growth after reconstitution, must be minimized by appropriate control measures. In this publication, several determinants of the growth of E. sakazakii in reconstituted infant formula are reported. The following key growth parameters were determined: lag time, specific growth rate, and maximum population density. Cells were harvested at different phases of growth and spiked into powdered infant formula. After reconstitution in sterile water, E. sakazakii was able to grow at temperatures between 8 and 47 degrees C. The estimated optimal growth temperature was 39.4 degrees C, whereas the optimal specific growth rate was 2.31 h(-1). The effect of temperature on the specific growth rate was described with two secondary growth models. The resulting minimum and maximum temperatures estimated with the secondary Rosso equation were 3.6 degrees C and 47.6 degrees C, respectively. The estimated lag time varied from 83.3 +/- 18.7 h at 10 degrees C to 1.73 +/- 0.43 h at 37 degrees C and could be described with the hyperbolic model and reciprocal square root relation. Cells harvested at different phases of growth did not exhibit significant differences in either specific growth rate or lag time. Strains did not have different lag times, and lag times were short given that the cells had spent several (3 to 10) days in dry powdered infant formula. The growth rates and lag times at various temperatures obtained in this study may help in calculations of the period for which reconstituted infant formula can be stored at a specific temperature without detrimental impact on health.

  16. [What determines the time-lag for publications in Revista Médica de Chile?].

    PubMed

    Reyes B, Humberto; Andresen H, Max; Palma H, Joaquín

    2006-07-01

    The number of manuscripts submitted for publication in Revista Médica de Chile has increased steadily. Consequently, the number of external experts that generously contribute in the peer review process has also been enlarged. When the manuscripts return to the authors with specific requests to be improved, according to the criticisms raised by their reviewers or the editors, more time is added until a corrected version is received and accepted. After acceptance, the manuscripts are programmed by the editors to be included in future monthly issues of the Revista. The number of manuscripts that can be included in an issue is limited by the number of pages accorded between the publishers and the owner institution. Therefore, an additional time-lag occurs: research articles and case reports may be published 6-8 months after they were finally accepted, while reviews and special articles have to wait even more. As experienced in prestigious journals worldwide, a computational program to handle the editorial process through the Internet is needed, but it is not yet available in Spanish language. Although it should fasten communications and facilitate the authors a rapid insight in the stages of the editorial process where their manuscripts are, the increasing number of submissions, the current acceptance rate and the limitation in space will still retard the publications once they are accepted.

  17. Dynamic Stability Analysis of Blunt Body Entry Vehicles Using Time-Lagged Aftbody Pitching Moments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazemba, Cole D.; Braun, Robert D.; Schoenenberger, Mark; Clark, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    This analysis defines an analytic model for the pitching motion of blunt bodies during atmospheric entry. The proposed model is independent of the pitch damping sum coefficient present in the standard formulation of the equations of motion describing pitch oscillations of a decelerating blunt body, instead using the principle of a time-lagged aftbody moment as the forcing function for oscillation divergence. Four parameters, all with intuitive physical relevance, are introduced to fully define the aftbody moment and the associated time delay. It is shown that the dynamic oscillation responses typical to blunt bodies can be produced using hysteresis of the aftbody moment in place of the pitch damping coefficient. The approach used in this investigation is shown to be useful in understanding the governing physical mechanisms for blunt body dynamic stability and in guiding vehicle and mission design requirements. A validation case study using simulated ballistic range test data is conducted. From this, parameter identification is carried out through the use of a least squares optimizing routine. Results show good agreement with the limited existing literature for the parameters identified, suggesting that the model proposed could be validated by an experimental ballistic range test series. The trajectories produced by the identified parameters were found to match closely those from the MER ballistic range tests for a wide array of initial conditions and can be identified with a reasonable number of ballistic range shots and computational effort.

  18. A physical model for the X-ray time lags of narrow-line Seyfert type 1 active galactic nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Emma; Done, Chris

    2014-08-01

    We study the origin of the soft X-ray excess seen in the `simple' narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy PG1244+026 using all available spectral-timing information. This object shows the now ubiquitous switch between soft leading the hard band on long time-scales, to the opposite behaviour on short time-scales. This is interpreted as a combination of intrinsic fluctuations propagating down through the accretion flow giving the soft lead, together with reflection of the hard X-rays giving the soft lag. We build a full model of the spectral and time variability including both propagation and reflection, and compare our model with the observed power spectra, coherence, covariance, lag-frequency and lag-energy spectra. We compare models based on a separate soft excess component with those based on reflection-dominated soft emission. Reflection-dominated spectra have difficulty reproducing the soft lead at low frequency since reflection will always lag. They also suffer from high coherence and nearly identical hard- and soft-band power spectra in disagreement with the observations. This is a direct result of the power-law and reflection components both contributing to the hard and soft energy bands, and the small radii over which the relativistically smeared reflection is produced allowing too much high-frequency power to be transmitted into the soft band. Conversely, we find the separate soft excess models (where the inner disc radius is >6Rg) have difficulty reproducing the soft lag at high frequency, as reflected flux does not contribute enough signal to overwhelm the soft lead. However, reflection should also be accompanied by reprocessing and this should add to the soft excess at low energies. This model can quantitatively reproduce the switch from soft lead to soft lag seen in the data and reproduces well the observed power spectra and other timing features which reflection-dominated models cannot.

  19. Nutrient Legacies and Time Lags: Understanding Catchment Biogeochemical Responses in Anthropogenic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2014-12-01

    Human modification of the nitrogen (N) cycle has resulted in increased flows of reactive N, with some suggesting that planetary boundaries for maintaining human and ecosystem health have been exceeded. Persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters created by elevated concentrations of nitrate is one of the most significant impacts of such increased flows. While the need to manage these flows is recognized, best management practices to reduce stream N concentrations have had only limited success. Some have attributed this lack of success to accumulation of legacy N stores from decades of fertilizer application. Here we introduce an unprecedented analysis of long-term soil data from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) revealing significant increases in total N (TN) content. We show that TN accumulation for the MRB accounts for 43% of net anthropogenic N inputs, complementing previous work indicating an approximately 25% loss of net inputs as riverine output. These findings significantly reduce uncertainty associated with basin-level N retention and demonstrate the presence of N accumulation in the deeper subsurface of agricultural soils. The presence of such legacy N stores is utilized in the development of a conceptual framework for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). Time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations are explored as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change, and an optimization approach has been developed to determine maximum possible concentration reduction benefits within time frames of interest.

  20. Catchment Legacies and Time Lags: A Parsimonious Watershed Model to Predict the Effects of Legacy Storage on Nitrogen Export

    PubMed Central

    Van Meter, Kimberly J.; Basu, Nandita B.

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient legacies in anthropogenic landscapes, accumulated over decades of fertilizer application, lead to time lags between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. Quantification of such time lags has remained difficult, however, due to an incomplete understanding of controls on nutrient depletion trajectories after changes in land-use or management practices. In this study, we have developed a parsimonious watershed model for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). The model accurately predicted the time lags observed in an Iowa watershed that had undergone a 41% conversion of area from row crop to native prairie. We explored the time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change. Our results demonstrate that the existence of biogeochemical nutrient legacies increases time lags beyond those due to hydrologic legacy alone. In addition, we show that the maximum concentration reduction benefits vary according to the spatial pattern of intervention, with preferential conversion of land parcels having the shortest catchment-scale travel times providing proportionally greater concentration reductions as well as faster response times. In contrast, a random pattern of conversion results in a 1:1 relationship between percent land conversion and percent concentration reduction, irrespective of denitrification rates within the landscape. Our modeling framework allows for the quantification of tradeoffs between costs associated with implementation of conservation measures and the time needed to see the desired concentration reductions, making it of great value to decision makers regarding optimal implementation of watershed conservation measures. PMID:25985290

  1. Catchment legacies and time lags: a parsimonious watershed model to predict the effects of legacy storage on nitrogen export.

    PubMed

    Van Meter, Kimberly J; Basu, Nandita B

    2015-01-01

    Nutrient legacies in anthropogenic landscapes, accumulated over decades of fertilizer application, lead to time lags between implementation of conservation measures and improvements in water quality. Quantification of such time lags has remained difficult, however, due to an incomplete understanding of controls on nutrient depletion trajectories after changes in land-use or management practices. In this study, we have developed a parsimonious watershed model for quantifying catchment-scale time lags based on both soil nutrient accumulations (biogeochemical legacy) and groundwater travel time distributions (hydrologic legacy). The model accurately predicted the time lags observed in an Iowa watershed that had undergone a 41% conversion of area from row crop to native prairie. We explored the time scales of change for stream nutrient concentrations as a function of both natural and anthropogenic controls, from topography to spatial patterns of land-use change. Our results demonstrate that the existence of biogeochemical nutrient legacies increases time lags beyond those due to hydrologic legacy alone. In addition, we show that the maximum concentration reduction benefits vary according to the spatial pattern of intervention, with preferential conversion of land parcels having the shortest catchment-scale travel times providing proportionally greater concentration reductions as well as faster response times. In contrast, a random pattern of conversion results in a 1:1 relationship between percent land conversion and percent concentration reduction, irrespective of denitrification rates within the landscape. Our modeling framework allows for the quantification of tradeoffs between costs associated with implementation of conservation measures and the time needed to see the desired concentration reductions, making it of great value to decision makers regarding optimal implementation of watershed conservation measures.

  2. Estimating and Analyzing Savannah Phenology with a Lagged Time Series Model.

    PubMed

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Beringer, Jason; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-01-01

    Savannah regions are predicted to undergo changes in precipitation patterns according to current climate change projections. This change will affect leaf phenology, which controls net primary productivity. It is of importance to study this since savannahs play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their areal coverage and can have an effect on the food security in regions that depend on subsistence farming. In this study we investigate how soil moisture, mean annual precipitation, and day length control savannah phenology by developing a lagged time series model. The model uses climate data for 15 flux tower sites across four continents, and normalized difference vegetation index from satellite to optimize a statistical phenological model. We show that all three variables can be used to estimate savannah phenology on a global scale. However, it was not possible to create a simplified savannah model that works equally well for all sites on the global scale without inclusion of more site specific parameters. The simplified model showed no bias towards tree cover or between continents and resulted in a cross-validated r2 of 0.6 and root mean squared error of 0.1. We therefore expect similar average results when applying the model to other savannah areas and further expect that it could be used to estimate the productivity of savannah regions.

  3. Accretion disc time lag distributions: applying CREAM to simulated AGN light curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starkey, D. A.; Horne, Keith; Villforth, C.

    2016-02-01

    Active galactic nuclei (AGN) vary in their brightness across all wavelengths. Moreover, longer wavelength ultraviolet-optical continuum light curves appear to be delayed with respect to shorter wavelength light curves. A simple way to model these delays is by assuming thermal reprocessing of a variable point source (a lamp post) by a blackbody accretion disc. We introduce a new method, CREAM (Continuum REprocessed AGN Markov Chain Monte Carlo), that models continuum variations using this lamp post model. The disc light curves lag the lamp post emission with a time delay distribution sensitive to the disc temperature-radius profile and inclination. We test CREAM's ability to recover both inclination and product of black hole mass and accretion rate {Mdot{M}}, and show that the code is also able to infer the shape of the driving light curve. CREAM is applied to synthetic light curves expected from 1000 s exposures of a 17th magnitude AGN with a 2-m telescope in Sloan g and i bands with Signal-to-Noise Ratio (SNR) of 500-900 depending on the filter and lunar phase. We also test CREAM on poorer quality g and i light curves with SNR = 100. We find in the high-SNR case that CREAM can recover the accretion disc inclination to within an uncertainty of 5° and an {Mdot{M}} to within 0.04 dex.

  4. Estimating and Analyzing Savannah Phenology with a Lagged Time Series Model

    PubMed Central

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Beringer, Jason; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-01-01

    Savannah regions are predicted to undergo changes in precipitation patterns according to current climate change projections. This change will affect leaf phenology, which controls net primary productivity. It is of importance to study this since savannahs play an important role in the global carbon cycle due to their areal coverage and can have an effect on the food security in regions that depend on subsistence farming. In this study we investigate how soil moisture, mean annual precipitation, and day length control savannah phenology by developing a lagged time series model. The model uses climate data for 15 flux tower sites across four continents, and normalized difference vegetation index from satellite to optimize a statistical phenological model. We show that all three variables can be used to estimate savannah phenology on a global scale. However, it was not possible to create a simplified savannah model that works equally well for all sites on the global scale without inclusion of more site specific parameters. The simplified model showed no bias towards tree cover or between continents and resulted in a cross-validated r2 of 0.6 and root mean squared error of 0.1. We therefore expect similar average results when applying the model to other savannah areas and further expect that it could be used to estimate the productivity of savannah regions. PMID:27128678

  5. Theoretical modelling of the AGN iron line vs. continuum time-lags in the lamp-post geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epitropakis, A.; Papadakis, I. E.; Dovčiak, M.; Pecháček, T.; Emmanoulopoulos, D.; Karas, V.; McHardy, I. M.

    2016-10-01

    Context. Theoretical modelling of time-lags between variations in the Fe Kα emission and the X-ray continuum might shed light on the physics and geometry of the X-ray emitting region in active galaxies (AGN) and X-ray binaries. We here present the results from a systematic analysis of time-lags between variations in two energy bands (5-7 vs. 2-4 keV) for seven X-ray bright and variable AGN. Aims: We estimate time-lags as accurately as possible and fit them with theoretical models in the context of the lamp-post geometry. We also constrain the geometry of the X-ray emitting region in AGN. Methods: We used all available archival XMM-Newton data for the sources in our sample and extracted light curves in the 5-7 and 2-4 keV energy bands. We used these light curves and applied a thoroughly tested (through extensive numerical simulations) recipe to estimate time-lags that have minimal bias, approximately follow a Gaussian distribution, and have known errors. Using traditional χ2 minimisation techniques, we then fitted the observed time-lags with two different models: a phenomenological model where the time-lags have a power-law dependence on frequency, and a physical model, using the reverberation time-lags expected in the lamp-post geometry. The latter were computed assuming a point-like primary X-ray source above a black hole surrounded by a neutral and prograde accretion disc with solar iron abundance. We took all relativistic effects into account for various X-ray source heights, inclination angles, and black hole spin values. Results: Given the available data, time-lags between the two energy bands can only be reliably measured at frequencies between ~5 × 10-5 Hz and ~10-3 Hz. The power-law and reverberation time-lag models can both fit the data well in terms of formal statistical characteristics. When fitting the observed time-lags to the lamp-post reverberation scenario, we can only constrain the height of the X-ray source. The data require, or are consistent

  6. Catchment Legacies and Trajectories: Understanding Time Lags in Catchment Response as a Function of Hydrologic and Biogeochemical Controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, N. B.; Van Meter, K. J.

    2012-12-01

    Increased nutrient loads delivered from watersheds due to agricultural intensification, industrialization, and urbanization have contributed globally to the persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters. Watershed management practices targeting these non-point source pollutants often lead to little or no improvement in water quality, even after extensive implementation of conservation measures or Best Management Practices (BMPs). The lag time between implementation of a conservation measure and resultant water quality benefits has recently been recognized as an important factor in the "apparent" failure of these BMPs. When conservation measures are implemented without explicit consideration of the lag time and with expectations that they will lead to immediate benefits, the resulting failure to meet such expectations can discourage vital restoration efforts. It is therefore important to quantify the lag times associated with watershed management efforts a priori and to implement restoration strategies targeted specifically at minimizing lag times and maximizing restoration benefits. The focus of this research is to develop a framework for understanding the time lags between land-use changes and stream water quality benefits. We hypothesize that such time lags arise from nutrient legacies building over decades of fertilizer application. For nitrogen (N), one can conceptualize this as either hydrologic legacy, in the form of dissolved nitrate that is delayed due to slow groundwater transport, or as biogeochemical legacy, in the form of organic N, possibly in dissolved or readily mineralizable forms. Indeed, mass-balance studies across the Mississippi and Thames river basins indicate the possibility of missing N mass in these landscapes, with inputs being consistently greater than the outputs even when accounting for all possible pathways of nitrogen transformation. Historical soil data within the upper Mississippi River Basin (MRB) indicate that

  7. Cooperative Weblog Learning in Higher Education: Its Facilitating Effects on Social Interaction, Time Lag, and Cognitive Load

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Tien-Chi; Huang, Yueh-Min; Yu, Fu-Yun

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines the effects of using weblog technologies to support cooperative learning in higher education. The study focused on the effects of features embedded in weblogs on social interactions, time lags, and cognitive loads. A quasi-experimental control-group research design was adopted. The participants were 115 undergraduates who were…

  8. An integrated error estimation and lag-aware data assimilation scheme for real-time flood forecasting

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performance of conventional filtering methods can be degraded by ignoring the time lag between soil moisture and discharge response when discharge observations are assimilated into streamflow modelling. This has led to the ongoing development of more optimal ways to implement sequential data ass...

  9. Modeling the relative impact of capsular tissue effects on implanted glucose sensor time lag and signal attenuation.

    PubMed

    Novak, Matthew T; Yuan, Fan; Reichert, William M

    2010-10-01

    Little is known mechanistically about why implanted glucose sensors lag behind blood glucose levels in both the time to peak sensor response and the magnitude of peak sensor response. A mathematical model of glucose transport from capillaries through surrounding tissue to the sensor surface was constructed to address how different aspects of the tissue affect glucose transport to an implanted sensor. Physiologically relevant values of capsule diffusion coefficient, capsule porosity, cellular glucose consumption, capsule thickness, and subcutaneous vessel density were used as inputs to create simulated sensor traces that mimic experimental instances of time lag and concentration attenuation relative to a given blood glucose profile. Using logarithmic sensitivity analysis, each parameter was analyzed to study the effect of these variables on both lag and attenuation. Results identify capsule thickness as the strongest determinant of sensor time lag, while subcutaneous vessel density and capsule porosity had the largest effects on attenuation of glucose that reaches the sensor surface. These findings provide mechanistic insight for the rational design of sensor modifications that may alleviate the deleterious consequences of tissue effects on implanted sensor performance.

  10. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hossack, Blake R.; Lowe, Winsor H.; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  11. Rapid increases and time-lagged declines in amphibian occupancy after wildfire.

    PubMed

    Hossack, Blake R; Lowe, Winsor H; Corn, Paul Stephen

    2013-02-01

    Climate change is expected to increase the frequency and severity of drought and wildfire. Aquatic and moisture-sensitive species, such as amphibians, may be particularly vulnerable to these modified disturbance regimes because large wildfires often occur during extended droughts and thus may compound environmental threats. However, understanding of the effects of wildfires on amphibians in forests with long fire-return intervals is limited. Numerous stand-replacing wildfires have occurred since 1988 in Glacier National Park (Montana, U.S.A.), where we have conducted long-term monitoring of amphibians. We measured responses of 3 amphibian species to fires of different sizes, severity, and age in a small geographic area with uniform management. We used data from wetlands associated with 6 wildfires that burned between 1988 and 2003 to evaluate whether burn extent and severity and interactions between wildfire and wetland isolation affected the distribution of breeding populations. We measured responses with models that accounted for imperfect detection to estimate occupancy during prefire (0-4 years) and different postfire recovery periods. For the long-toed salamander (Ambystoma macrodactylum) and Columbia spotted frog (Rana luteiventris), occupancy was not affected for 6 years after wildfire. But 7-21 years after wildfire, occupancy for both species decreased ≥ 25% in areas where >50% of the forest within 500 m of wetlands burned. In contrast, occupancy of the boreal toad (Anaxyrus boreas) tripled in the 3 years after low-elevation forests burned. This increase in occupancy was followed by a gradual decline. Our results show that accounting for magnitude of change and time lags is critical to understanding population dynamics of amphibians after large disturbances. Our results also inform understanding of the potential threat of increases in wildfire frequency or severity to amphibians in the region.

  12. The relevance of mineralization lag time in the evaluation of histologic changes in renal osteodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Libbey, N P; Chazan, J A; London, M R; Pono, L; Abuelo, J G

    1993-04-01

    We examined bone biopsies from 47 patients on chronic hemodialysis, and analyzed the histomorphometric and biochemical findings and histologic quantitation of bone aluminium, looking primarily at mineralization lag time (Mlt) to evaluate its usefulness in categorization of renal osteodystrophy (ROD). The patients were categorized as having either relatively normal Mlt (< 35 days, n = 21 patients), moderately prolonged Mlt (35-100 days, n = 13 patients) or markedly prolonged Mlt (> 100 days, n = 13 patients). The group with relatively normal Mlt showed significantly higher C-terminal parathyroid hormone (PTHc) levels (26,141 +/- 19,270 vs 7,226 +/- 6,073 and 4,434 +/- 4,000 pg/ml) than the moderately or markedly prolonged Mlt groups (p < .01) and was associated with histologic characteristics of osteitis fibrosa or mild hyperparathyroidism (BFR/BS range 0.146-0.947 mcm3/mcm2/d). The group with markedly prolonged Mlt included one patient with classic and 11 with adynamic osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.009-0.099) and had greater bone aluminum (Al.S/OS 35.3 +/- 26.7% vs 7.2 +/- 9.0%) than the normal Mlt group (p < .01). The group with moderately prolonged Mlt included two patients with aplastic bone disease (Mlt 80.0 and 84.6 days, and Al.S/OS 100.0 and 72.3%) and 11 patients with features of hyperparathyroidism and osteomalacia (BFR/BS range 0.068-0.243) with variable but generally intermediate bone aluminum deposition (Al.S/OS 22.5 +/- 19.9%). Like BFR/BS and other dynamic parameters Mlt correlates with morphologic types of ROD which primarily reflect bone turnover, but it may also suggest varying degrees of mineralization impairment in a spectrum ranging from high to low turnover types of ROD. Its usefulness in this respect should not be overlooked.

  13. INITIAL ANALYSIS OF TRANSIENT POWER TIME LAG DUE TO HETEROGENEITY WITHIN THE TREAT FUEL MATRIX.

    SciTech Connect

    D.M. Wachs; A.X. Zabriskie, W.R. Marcum

    2014-06-01

    The topic Nuclear Safety encompasses a broad spectrum of focal areas within the nuclear industry; one specific aspect centers on the performance and integrity of nuclear fuel during a reactivity insertion accident (RIA). This specific accident has proven to be fundamentally difficult to theoretically characterize due to the numerous empirically driven characteristics that quantify the fuel and reactor performance. The Transient Reactor Test (TREAT) facility was designed and operated to better understand fuel behavior under extreme (i.e. accident) conditions; it was shutdown in 1994. Recently, efforts have been underway to commission the TREAT facility to continue testing of advanced accident tolerant fuels (i.e. recently developed fuel concepts). To aid in the restart effort, new simulation tools are being used to investigate the behavior of nuclear fuels during facility’s transient events. This study focuses specifically on the characterizing modeled effects of fuel particles within the fuel matrix of the TREAT. The objective of this study was to (1) identify the impact of modeled heterogeneity within the fuel matrix during a transient event, and (2) demonstrate acceptable modeling processes for the purpose of TREAT safety analyses, specific to fuel matrix and particle size. Hypothetically, a fuel that is dominantly heterogeneous will demonstrate a clearly different temporal heating response to that of a modeled homogeneous fuel. This time difference is a result of the uniqueness of the thermal diffusivity within the fuel particle and fuel matrix. Using MOOSE/BISON to simulate the temperature time-lag effect of fuel particle diameter during a transient event, a comparison of the average graphite moderator temperature surrounding a spherical particle of fuel was made for both types of fuel simulations. This comparison showed that at a given time and with a specific fuel particle diameter, the fuel particle (heterogeneous) simulation and the homogeneous simulation

  14. Lagged PM2.5 effects in mortality time series: Critical impact of covariate model

    EPA Science Inventory

    The two most common approaches to modeling the effects of air pollution on mortality are the Harvard and the Johns Hopkins (NMMAPS) approaches. These two approaches, which use different sets of covariates, result in dissimilar estimates of the effect of lagged fine particulate ma...

  15. Time-Lagging Interplay Effect and Excess Risk of Meteorological/Mosquito Parameters and Petrochemical Gas Explosion on Dengue Incidence

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ko; Chen, Chaur-Dong; Shih, Chien-Ming; Lee, Tzu-Chi; Wu, Ming-Tsang; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Hung, Chih-Hsing; Wu, Meng-Chieh; Huang, Chun-Chi; Lee, Chien-Hung; Ho, Chi-Kung

    2016-01-01

    In Kaohsiung, a metropolitan city in Taiwan at high risk of dengue epidemic, weather factors combined with an accidental petrochemical gas explosion (PGE) may affect mosquito‒human dynamics in 2014. Generalized estimating equations with lagged-time Poisson regression analyses were used to evaluate the effect of meteorological/mosquito parameters and PGE on dengue incidences (2000–2014) in Kaohsiung. Increased minimum temperatures rendered a 2- and 3-month lagging interactive effect on higher dengue risks, and higher rainfall exhibited a 1- and 2-month lagging interplay effect on lower risks (interaction, P ≤ 0.001). The dengue risk was significantly higher than that in a large-scale outbreak year (2002) from week 5 after PGE accident in 2014 (2.9‒8.3-fold for weeks 5‒22). The greatest cross-correlation of dengue incidences in the PGE-affected and PGE-neighboring districts was identified at weeks 1 after the PGE (rs = 0.956, P < 0.001). Compared with the reference years, the combined effect of minimum temperature, rainfall, and PGE accounted for 75.1% of excess dengue risk in 2014. In conclusion, time-lagging interplay effects from minimum temperature and rainfall may be respectively associated with early and near environments facilitating dengue transmission. Events that interact with weather and influence mosquito‒human dynamics, such as PGEs, should not be ignored in dengue prevention and control. PMID:27733774

  16. Using the Time-Lagged Function of Dual-Aperture Scintillometer Measurements to Obtain the Crosswind

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Dinther, D.; Hartogensis, O.

    2013-12-01

    In this study the so-called crosswind (U⊥), the wind component perpendicular on a path, is determined from scintillometer measurements. A scintillometer is a device consisting of a transmitter and receiver, typically spaced a few hundred meters to a few kilometers apart. The dual-aperture scintillometer used in this study consists of two transmitters and two receivers installed next to each other. The transmitters emit light with a certain intensity which is refracted by the eddies in the atmosphere. The eddy field in between the transmitters and receivers constantly changes leading to intensity fluctuations of the light at the receivers side, which gives the scintillometer signal. The driving phenomenon of the changing eddy field is wind. The scintillometer path is ~ 100 m and the spacing in between the apertures is ~ 10 cm therefore the eddy field is mainly changed due to U⊥. A scintillometer obtains a path averaged U⊥, which for some applications (e.g. at airports) is an advantage compared to other wind measurement devices. Applying Taylor's frozen turbulence assumption the signals of the two scintillometers should be the same except for a small time shift between the two signals, from which U⊥ can be determined. This time shift can be obtained from the time-lagged-correlation function of the two signals (r12 (τ)). Four methods were used to obtain U⊥; the peak method, the Briggs method, the zero-slope method, and the correlation method. The last one is a new method introduced in this study, which obtains U⊥ by comparing r12 (τ) of a measurement to r12 (τ) of Lawrence et al. (1972) theoretical model. U⊥ values obtained from the scintillometer were validated against sonic anemometer measurements. The best results were obtained by the zero-slope method and the correlation method. The zero-slope method gave the best results for low U⊥ values (< 2 m s-1), while the correlation method gave the best results for high U⊥ values (> 2 m s-1). The

  17. Analyzing savannah vegetation phenology with remotely sensed data, lagged time-series models and phenopictures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boke-Olén, Niklas; Lehsten, Veiko; Ardö, Jonas; Eklundh, Lars; Holst, Thomas; Beringer, Jason; Veenendaal, Elmar; Tagesson, Torbern

    2016-04-01

    It is predicted that savannah regions will see changes in precipitation patterns due to current climate change projections. The change will most likely affect leaf phenology which controls net primary production. It is therefore important to; 1) study those changes and its drivers, 2) to be able to correctly model the changes to vegetation phenology due to climate change. To our knowledge there is no existing global savannah phenology model that can capture both the phenological events and the vegetation state between the events. We therefore, investigate how day length, mean annual precipitation and soil moisture affects and controls the vegetation phenology of savannahs (using MODIS NDVI as a proxy for phenological state) with a lagged time series model for global application. We furthermore use phenological pictures (phenopictures) to investigate savannah tree and grass phenology. Phenopictures are pictures taken with a digital time-lapse camera with the purpose of recording and studying phenological events. We used climate data from 15 flux towers sites located in 4 continents together with normalized difference vegetation index from MODIS for the model development. Two of the sites located in Africa were further analyzed using phenopictures. The developed model identified all three considered variables as usable for modelling of savannah leaf phenology but showed some inconsistent result for some of the sites indicating the difficulties in creating a simple common model that works equally well across sites. We attribute some of these difficulties to site specific differences (e.g. grazing or tree and grass ratio) that the simplified model did not consider. But we expect it to on average give the cross-validated result (r2= 0.6, RMSE = 0.1) when applied to other savannah areas. The preliminary analysis of the phenological pictures with respect to tree and grass to some extent support this by showing differences in the start of the leaves development in the

  18. Groundwater dating for understanding nitrogen in groundwater systems - Time lag, fate, and detailed flow path ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Hadfield, John; Stenger, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Nitrate contamination of groundwater is a problem world-wide. Nitrate from land use activities can leach out of the root zone of the crop into the deeper part of the unsaturated zone and ultimately contaminate the underlying groundwater resources. Nitrate travels with the groundwater and then discharges into surface water causing eutrophication of surface water bodies. To understand the source, fate, and future nitrogen loads to ground and surface water bodies, detailed knowledge of the groundwater flow dynamics is essential. Groundwater sampled at monitoring wells or discharges may not yet be in equilibrium with current land use intensity due to the time lag between leaching out of the root zone and arrival at the sampling location. Anoxic groundwater zones can act as nitrate sinks through microbial denitrification. However, the effect of denitrification on overall nitrate fluxes depends on the fraction of the groundwater flowing through such zones. We will show results from volcanic aquifers in the central North Island of New Zealand where age tracers clearly indicate that the groundwater discharges into large sensitive lakes like Lake Taupo and Lake Rotorua are not yet fully realising current land use intensity. The majority of the water discharging into these lakes is decades and up to over hundred years old. Therefore, increases in dairy farming over the last decades are not yet reflected in these old water discharges, but over time these increased nitrate inputs will eventually work their way through the large groundwater systems and increasing N loads to the lakes are to be expected. Anoxic zones are present in some of these aquifers, indicating some denitrification potential, however, age tracer results from nested piezo wells show young groundwater in oxic zones indicating active flow in these zones, while anoxic zones tend to have older water indicating poorer hydraulic conductivity in these zones. Consequently, to evaluate the effect of denitrification

  19. Prolongation of the lag time preceding peroxidation of serum lipids: a measure of antioxidant capacity.

    PubMed

    Pinchuk, Ilya; Lichtenberg, Dov

    2015-01-01

    Antioxidants inhibit oxidation processes and by this affect many biological processes. This, in turn, promotes continuing efforts to synthesize new efficient antioxidants and discover compounds of natural origin capable of preventing peroxidation. Although many assays have been developed to evaluate antioxidants, the search for improved protocols is still actual. The presented protocol is based on the effect of antioxidant on the kinetics of peroxidation of lipids in human blood serum. Specifically, we evaluate the capacity of antioxidant by the relative prolongation of lag phase (delay) of copper-induced peroxidation of lipids in unfractionated serum. The main advantage of the assay is that it implements inhibition of peroxidation in physiologically relevant system. We propose expressing the results of the assay either in terms of the relative prolongation of the lag per 1 μM of antioxidant or as the concentration of antioxidant required to double the lag. To allow for comparing the results with those of other assays, these results may be normalized and expressed in terms of the unitless "TROLOX equivalents."

  20. Viable count estimates of lag time responses for Salmonella typhimurium M48 subjected to abrupt osmotic shifts.

    PubMed

    Mellefont, L A; McMeekin, T A; Ross, T

    2005-12-15

    Generally, relative lag times (RLT; lag time divided by generation time) become extended as conditions become less favourable for growth. Mellefont et al. (2003, 2004) [Mellefont, L.A., McMeekin, T.A., Ross, T., 2003. The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of foodborne bacteria. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 83(3), 281-293; Mellefont, L.A., McMeekin, T.A., Ross, T., 2004. The effect of abrupt osmotic shifts on the lag phase duration of physiologically distinct populations of Salmonella typhimurium. Int. J. Food Microbiol. 92, 111-120] reported that abrupt osmotic shifts of Salmonella typhimurium M48 from optimal to low aw led to unexpectedly small RLTs at low aw. In this study, RLTs resulting from similar osmotic shifts were estimated by viable count (VC) and compared to turbidimetric estimates to test the hypothesis that the 'downturn' in RLT is an artefact of the turbidimetric technique used. No 'downturn' in RLT was observed with VC data and RLTs increased with increasing magnitude of osmotic shift. Anomalous turbidimetric estimates of lag time at low aw were confirmed as the likely source of the 'downturn' in RLT. The abrupt osmotic shifts resulted in a complex pattern of microbial population behaviour. Immediately after transfer from optimal aw to low aw, inactivation of a portion of the population occurred for all the conditions tested. The degree of inactivation became progressively larger with larger shifts in aw. The initial decline in population was followed by a period during which no change in numbers occurred, followed by growth that appeared, in most cases, to be exponential. At the lowest aws tested (< or =0.954), the growth response after the initial decline was at a rate slower than that of exponential phase growth. Due to the use of non-selective media containing pyruvate (to eliminate oxygen radicals), the observed patterns of inactivation, lag and regrowth at most aw conditions are unlikely to result from a temporary loss of

  1. Quantifying the time lag between organic matter production and export in the surface ocean: Implications for estimates of export efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stange, P.; Bach, L. T.; Le Moigne, F. A. C.; Taucher, J.; Boxhammer, T.; Riebesell, U.

    2017-01-01

    The ocean's potential to export carbon to depth partly depends on the fraction of primary production (PP) sinking out of the euphotic zone (i.e., the e-ratio). Measurements of PP and export flux are often performed simultaneously in the field, although there is a temporal delay between those parameters. Thus, resulting e-ratio estimates often incorrectly assume an instantaneous downward export of PP to export flux. Evaluating results from four mesocosm studies, we find that peaks in organic matter sedimentation lag chlorophyll a peaks by 2 to 15 days. We discuss the implications of these time lags (TLs) for current e-ratio estimates and evaluate potential controls of TL. Our analysis reveals a strong correlation between TL and the duration of chlorophyll a buildup, indicating a dependency of TL on plankton food web dynamics. This study is one step further toward time-corrected e-ratio estimates.

  2. Jet lag modification.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Emily; McGrane, Owen; Wedmore, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Athletes often are required to travel for sports participation, both for practice and competition. A number of those crossing multiple time zones will develop jet lag disorder with possible negative consequences on their performance. This review will discuss the etiology of jet lag disorder and the techniques that are available to shorten or minimize its effects. This includes both pharmacological and nonpharmacological approaches.

  3. Study of the time/phase lag of the peculiar 'heartbeat' variability in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mubashir; Misra, Ranjeev; Iqbal, Naseer

    GRS 1905+105 exhibits a variety of variability patterns on various timescales. These variability patterns have been classified in various classes based on flares, jet activity and periodicities in light curve. The rho class consists of a slow rise followed by a short bright pulse, with a time period roughly about ~50s-resemebling an electrocardiogram, thus the name "heartbeat". The generic model for this variability class consists of 'limit-cycle' behavior which is due to "inner" thermal-viscous instability. The energy dependent Fourier domain analysis of this state produces interesting features. At the fundamental frequency of the oscillation, the phase or time lag is non-monotonic as a function of energy, the lag increases up to ~10 keV and then decreases, while as the first harmonic time lag dependence is monotonic. We undertake a detailed theoretical study from first principles, combining various models like diskbb+power-law, an possible explanation of this peculiar phenomena. Our approach is to 1) generate light-curves in various energy bands and study the cross-spectrum as a function of energy 2) calculate numerically the intensity as the function of energy, and a set of varying parameters like Inner disk radius and oscillatory accretion rate. We then ought to compare with the observational data, to constrain our model. Our work will pave the way to study the class of variability in GRS 1915+105, which we believe is due to disk+corona mass and energy connection.

  4. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Lionello, R.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism (location, duration) in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present results from a one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200 and 500 light-seconds), maximum temperature reached (3 million degrees Kelvin and 10 million degrees Kelvin), and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by X-ray telescope/Be-thin filter and various Extreme Ultra Violet Atmospheric Imaging Assembly channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length. Additional results were computed using the zero-dimensional Enthalpy-Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) code in order to test the compatibility of the two codes and to investigate additional loop lengths. Initial results indicate that the long (greater than 5000 seconds) lags observed in the approximately 100 light-seconds loops of active regions can only be reproduced using photospheric abundances and much longer loop lengths. This result suggests that the observed time lags cannot be completely explained by impulsive heating.

  5. Lag Times in Reporting Injuries, Receiving Medical Care, and Missing Work: Associations With the Length of Work Disability in Occupational Back Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Besen, Elyssa; Harrell, Mason; Pransky, Glenn

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to examine the associations between lag times following occupational low back injury and the length of work disability. Methods: In a retrospective cohort study using workers’ compensation claims, random effects Tobit models were used to explore how disability length relates to three lag times: the number of days from the date of injury to reporting the injury, the number of days from the date of injury to medical care, and the number of days from the date of injury to initiating work disability. Results: In general, shorter lag times for each of the different lags were related to shorter lengths of disability. Conclusions: Decreasing the length of the lag times in reporting injuries, receiving medical care, and missing work may help to decrease the length of work disability for workers after low back injury. PMID:26445030

  6. EVOLUTION OF THE CROSS-CORRELATION AND TIME LAG OF 4U 1735-44 ALONG THE BRANCHES

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Yajuan; Zhang Haotong; Zhang Chengmin; Yuan Hailong; Dong Yiqiao; Zhao Yongheng; Zhang Yanxia; Qu Jinlu; Song Liming; Wang Dehua; Yin Hongxing

    2013-09-15

    We analyze the cross-correlation function between the soft and hard X-rays of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with RXTE data, and find anti-correlated soft and hard time lags of about a hecto-second. In the island state, the observations do not show any obvious correlations, and most observations of the banana branch show a positive correlation. However, anti-correlations are detected in the upper banana branch. These results are different from those of Z-sources (Cyg X-2, GX 5-1), where anti-correlations are detected in the horizontal branch and upper normal branch. In this case, the lag timescales of both this atoll and Z-sources are found to be similar, at a magnitude of several tens to hundreds of seconds. As a comparison, it is noted that anti-correlated lags lasting thousands of seconds have been reported from several black hole candidates in their intermediate states. In addition, for an observation containing four segments that show positive or anti-correlation, we analyze the spectral evolution with the hybrid model. In the observation, the anti-correlation is detected at the highest flux. The fitting results show that the Comptonized component is not the lowest at the highest flux, which suggests that the anti-correlation corresponds to the transition between the soft and hard states. Finally, we compare the corresponding results of atoll source 4U 1735-44 with those observed in Z-sources and black hole candidates, and the possible origins of the anti-correlated time lags are discussed.

  7. A suggested method for the prediction of the oxidation resistance of low density lipoprotein by determination of the lag time.

    PubMed

    Naghii, M R

    2002-01-01

    A simple clinical blood test, which measures the total antioxidant status of Low Density Lipoprotein (LDL) and therefore its vulnerability to oxidative stress is suggested, and as a first stage this was tried on a small sample of eight healthy adult males. The body's natural defence and repair systems try to handle all free radicals, but these systems are not hundred percent effective. Thereby, the role of antioxidants (particularly natural antioxidants) becomes evident and vitamins such as Vitamin C, Vitamin E, and compounds like beta-carotene are under especially extensive study. Vitamin C is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant acting in extracellular fluid, while Vitamin E is the most abundant fat-soluble antioxidant, and it protects the polyunsaturated fatty acids within the LDL from oxidation and helps to prevent the process of atherogenesis. The determination of 'lag-phase' during continuous monitoring of oxidation of LDL in vitro is a convenient and objective procedure for determining the susceptibility of LDL from different donors towards oxidation as well as of pro- and anti-oxidants. The Lag-time for LDL samples, obtained from eight healthy adult males was found to be between 40-50 minutes. The measurement of this Lag-phase could be a highly promising routine method for measuring the total antioxidant status of LDL.

  8. Effect of heat shock and recovery temperature on variability of single cell lag time of Cronobacter turicensis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y Zh; Métris, A; Stasinopoulos, D M; Forsythe, S J; Sutherland, J P

    2015-02-01

    The effect of heat stress and subsequent recovery temperature on the individual cellular lag of Cronobacter turicensis was analysed using optical density measurements. Low numbers of cells were obtained through serial dilution and the time to reach an optical density of 0.035 was determined. Assuming the lag of a single cell follows a shifted Gamma distribution with a fixed shape parameter, the effect of recovery temperature on the individual lag of untreated and sublethally heat treated cells of Cr. turicensis were modelled. It was found that the shift parameter (Tshift) increased asymptotically as the temperature decreased while the logarithm of the scale parameter (θ) decreased linearly with recovery temperature. To test the validity of the model in food, growth of low numbers of untreated and heat treated Cr. turicensis in artificially contaminated infant first milk was measured experimentally and compared with predictions obtained by Monte Carlo simulations. Although the model for untreated cells slightly underestimated the actual growth in first milk at low temperatures, the model for heat treated cells was in agreement with the data derived from the challenge tests and provides a basis for reliable quantitative microbiological risk assessments for Cronobacter spp. in infant milk.

  9. Jet Lag in Athletes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aaron; Galvez, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Context: Prolonged transmeridian air travel can impart a physical and emotional burden on athletes in jet lag and travel fatigue. Jet lag may negatively affect the performance of athletes. Study Type: Descriptive review. Evidence Acquisition: A Medline search for articles relating to jet lag was performed (1990-present), as was a search relating to jet lag and athletes (1983-January, 2012). The results were reviewed for relevance. Eighty-nine sources were included in this descriptive review. Results: Behavioral strategies are recommended over pharmacological strategies when traveling with athletes; pharmacological aides may be used on an individual basis. Strategic sleeping, timed exposure to bright light, and the use of melatonin are encouraged. Conclusions: There is strong evidence that mood and cognition are adversely affected by jet lag. Some measures of individual and team performance are adversely affected as well. PMID:23016089

  10. AN INTEGRATED MODEL FOR THE PRODUCTION OF X-RAY TIME LAGS AND QUIESCENT SPECTRA FROM HOMOGENEOUS AND INHOMOGENEOUS BLACK HOLE ACCRETION CORONAE

    SciTech Connect

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A. E-mail: pbecker@gmu.edu

    2016-04-20

    Many accreting black holes manifest time lags during outbursts, in which the hard Fourier component typically lags behind the soft component. Despite decades of observations of this phenomenon, the underlying physical explanation for the time lags has remained elusive, although there are suggestions that Compton reverberation plays an important role. However, the lack of analytical solutions has hindered the interpretation of the available data. In this paper, we investigate the generation of X-ray time lags in Compton scattering coronae using a new mathematical approach based on analysis of the Fourier-transformed transport equation. By solving this equation, we obtain the Fourier transform of the radiation Green’s function, which allows us to calculate the exact dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous coronal clouds. We use the new formalism to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. We show that our model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the time-averaged (quiescent) X-ray spectra for Cyg X-1 and GX 339-04, using a single set of coronal parameters for each source. The time lags are the result of impulsive bremsstrahlung injection occurring near the outer edge of the corona, while the time-averaged spectra are the result of continual distributed injection of soft photons throughout the cloud.

  11. An Integrated Model for the Production of X-Ray Time Lags and Quiescent Spectra from Homogeneous and Inhomogeneous Black Hole Accretion Coronae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroon, John J.; Becker, Peter A.

    2016-04-01

    Many accreting black holes manifest time lags during outbursts, in which the hard Fourier component typically lags behind the soft component. Despite decades of observations of this phenomenon, the underlying physical explanation for the time lags has remained elusive, although there are suggestions that Compton reverberation plays an important role. However, the lack of analytical solutions has hindered the interpretation of the available data. In this paper, we investigate the generation of X-ray time lags in Compton scattering coronae using a new mathematical approach based on analysis of the Fourier-transformed transport equation. By solving this equation, we obtain the Fourier transform of the radiation Green’s function, which allows us to calculate the exact dependence of the time lags on the Fourier frequency, for both homogeneous and inhomogeneous coronal clouds. We use the new formalism to explore a variety of injection scenarios, including both monochromatic and broadband (bremsstrahlung) seed photon injection. We show that our model can successfully reproduce both the observed time lags and the time-averaged (quiescent) X-ray spectra for Cyg X-1 and GX 339-04, using a single set of coronal parameters for each source. The time lags are the result of impulsive bremsstrahlung injection occurring near the outer edge of the corona, while the time-averaged spectra are the result of continual distributed injection of soft photons throughout the cloud.

  12. Modulation loops, time lag and relationship between cosmic ray intensity and tilt of the heliospheric current sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badruddin; Singh, M.; Singh, Y. P.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We study certain aspects of the solar modulation of galactic cosmic ray intensity during different solar activity cycles and in different polarity states of the heliosphere. Methods: We plotted modulation loops between the cosmic ray intensity and the tilt angle of the heliospheric current sheet during three solar activity cycles 21, 22 and 23 and obtained the area of modulation loops. The time lag between the tilt angle and the cosmic ray intensity in odd, even solar activity cycles and during A > 0, A < 0 polarity states of the heliosphere are determined using correlation analysis. Rate of intensity decrease with tilt angle during different solar and magnetic cycles are estimated from best fit method. Results: Marked differences during the two odd and the one even solar cycles, as well as during different polarity states of the solar magnetic field (A > 0 and A < 0) are found. We observe variations in finer features of modulation loops obtained using one, three, six and twelve rotation averaged data. We find that the time lag in even cycle (22) is much different from that in odd cycles (21, 23). Moreover, considerable difference in time lags are also observed during A > 0 and A < 0 polarity states of the heliosphere. We also find that the cosmic ray intensity decreases at much faster rate (and with better correlation) with increase in tilt angle during A < 0 than A > 0, indicating stronger response to the tilt angle changes during A < 0. These results are discussed in the light of 3D modulation models including the gradient and curvature drifts and the tilt of the heliospheric current sheet.

  13. ANTI-CORRELATED TIME LAGS IN THE Z SOURCE GX 5-1: POSSIBLE EVIDENCE FOR A TRUNCATED ACCRETION DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, K.; Choi, C. S.; Rao, A. R.

    2012-06-01

    We investigate the nature of the inner accretion disk in the neutron star source GX 5-1 by making a detailed study of time lags between X-rays of different energies. Using the cross-correlation analysis, we found anti-correlated hard and soft time lags of the order of a few tens to a few hundred seconds and the corresponding intensity states were mostly the horizontal branch (HB) and upper normal branch. The model independent and dependent spectral analysis showed that during these time lags the structure of the accretion disk significantly varied. Both eastern and western approaches were used to unfold the X-ray continuum and systematic changes were observed in soft and hard spectral components. These changes along with a systematic shift in the frequency of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) made it substantially evident that the geometry of the accretion disk is truncated. Simultaneous energy spectral and power density spectral study shows that the production of the horizontal branch oscillations (HBOs) is closely related to the Comptonizing region rather than the disk component in the accretion disk. We found that as the HBO frequency decreases from the hard apex to upper HB, the disk temperature increases along with an increase in the coronal temperature, which is in sharp contrast with the changes found in black hole binaries where the decrease in the QPO frequency is accompanied by a decrease in the disk temperature and a simultaneous increase in the coronal temperature. We discuss the results in the context of re-condensation of coronal material in the inner region of the disk.

  14. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, C. E.; Lionello, R.; Winebarger, A. R.

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present the results from a 1D hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200 and 500 Mm), maximum temperature reached (3MK and 10 MK0, and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by XRT/Be-thin and various EUV AIA channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed and tested using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length.

  15. Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Academic Performance: Cross-Lagged Associations from Adolescence to Young Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, Sari; Latvala, Antti; Rose, Richard J; Kujala, Urho M; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri

    2016-12-15

    Physical activity and academic performance are positively associated, but the direction of the association is poorly understood. This longitudinal study examined the direction and magnitude of the associations between leisure-time physical activity and academic performance throughout adolescence and young adulthood. The participants were Finnish twins (from 2,859 to 4,190 individuals/study wave) and their families. In a cross-lagged path model, higher academic performance at ages 12, 14 and 17 predicted higher leisure-time physical activity at subsequent time-points (standardized path coefficient at age 14: 0.07 (p < 0.001), age 17: 0.12 (p < 0.001) and age 24: 0.06 (p < 0.05)), whereas physical activity did not predict future academic performance. A cross-lagged model of co-twin differences suggested that academic performance and subsequent physical activity were not associated due to the environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our findings suggest that better academic performance in adolescence modestly predicts more frequent leisure-time physical activity in late adolescence and young adulthood.

  16. Leisure-Time Physical Activity and Academic Performance: Cross-Lagged Associations from Adolescence to Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Aaltonen, Sari; Latvala, Antti; Rose, Richard J.; Kujala, Urho M.; Kaprio, Jaakko; Silventoinen, Karri

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity and academic performance are positively associated, but the direction of the association is poorly understood. This longitudinal study examined the direction and magnitude of the associations between leisure-time physical activity and academic performance throughout adolescence and young adulthood. The participants were Finnish twins (from 2,859 to 4,190 individuals/study wave) and their families. In a cross-lagged path model, higher academic performance at ages 12, 14 and 17 predicted higher leisure-time physical activity at subsequent time-points (standardized path coefficient at age 14: 0.07 (p < 0.001), age 17: 0.12 (p < 0.001) and age 24: 0.06 (p < 0.05)), whereas physical activity did not predict future academic performance. A cross-lagged model of co-twin differences suggested that academic performance and subsequent physical activity were not associated due to the environmental factors shared by co-twins. Our findings suggest that better academic performance in adolescence modestly predicts more frequent leisure-time physical activity in late adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:27976699

  17. Self-Organized Near-Zero-Lag Synchronization Induced by Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity in Cortical Populations

    PubMed Central

    Matias, Fernanda S.; Carelli, Pedro V.; Mirasso, Claudio R.; Copelli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Several cognitive tasks related to learning and memory exhibit synchronization of macroscopic cortical areas together with synaptic plasticity at neuronal level. Therefore, there is a growing effort among computational neuroscientists to understand the underlying mechanisms relating synchrony and plasticity in the brain. Here we numerically study the interplay between spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and anticipated synchronization (AS). AS emerges when a dominant flux of information from one area to another is accompanied by a negative time lag (or phase). This means that the receiver region pulses before the sender does. In this paper we study the interplay between different synchronization regimes and STDP at the level of three-neuron microcircuits as well as cortical populations. We show that STDP can promote auto-organized zero-lag synchronization in unidirectionally coupled neuronal populations. We also find synchronization regimes with negative phase difference (AS) that are stable against plasticity. Finally, we show that the interplay between negative phase difference and STDP provides limited synaptic weight distribution without the need of imposing artificial boundaries. PMID:26474165

  18. Self-Organized Near-Zero-Lag Synchronization Induced by Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity in Cortical Populations.

    PubMed

    Matias, Fernanda S; Carelli, Pedro V; Mirasso, Claudio R; Copelli, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    Several cognitive tasks related to learning and memory exhibit synchronization of macroscopic cortical areas together with synaptic plasticity at neuronal level. Therefore, there is a growing effort among computational neuroscientists to understand the underlying mechanisms relating synchrony and plasticity in the brain. Here we numerically study the interplay between spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) and anticipated synchronization (AS). AS emerges when a dominant flux of information from one area to another is accompanied by a negative time lag (or phase). This means that the receiver region pulses before the sender does. In this paper we study the interplay between different synchronization regimes and STDP at the level of three-neuron microcircuits as well as cortical populations. We show that STDP can promote auto-organized zero-lag synchronization in unidirectionally coupled neuronal populations. We also find synchronization regimes with negative phase difference (AS) that are stable against plasticity. Finally, we show that the interplay between negative phase difference and STDP provides limited synaptic weight distribution without the need of imposing artificial boundaries.

  19. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals.

  20. Unravelling the community structure of the climate system by using lags and symbolic time-series analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tirabassi, Giulio; Masoller, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Many natural systems can be represented by complex networks of dynamical units with modular structure in the form of communities of densely interconnected nodes. Unraveling this community structure from observed data requires the development of appropriate tools, particularly when the nodes are embedded in a regular space grid and the datasets are short and noisy. Here we propose two methods to identify communities, and validate them with the analysis of climate datasets recorded at a regular grid of geographical locations covering the Earth surface. By identifying mutual lags among time-series recorded at different grid points, and by applying symbolic time-series analysis, we are able to extract meaningful regional communities, which can be interpreted in terms of large-scale climate phenomena. The methods proposed here are valuable tools for the study of other systems represented by networks of dynamical units, allowing the identification of communities, through time-series analysis of the observed output signals. PMID:27406342

  1. Simulated Time Lags of Hinode/XRT and SDO/AIA Lightcurves as an Indication of Loop Heating Scenario

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Caroline; Winebarger, Amy; Lionello, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The precise nature of the heating mechanism (location, duration) in coronal loops is still a matter of enormous research. We present results from a 1D hydrodynamic loop simulation of a coronal loop which was run using different parameters such as loops length (50, 200, and 500 Mm), maximum temperature reached (3MK and 10MK), and abundances. For each scenario the model outputs were used to calculate the corresponding lightcurves as seen by XRT/Be-thin and various EUV AIA channels. The lag time between the peak of these lightcurves was computed using cross-correlation and plotted as a function of loop length. Additional results were computed using the 0D EBTEL code in order to test the compatibility of the two codes and to investigate additional loop lengths. Initial results indicate that the long (greater than 5000s) lags observed in the approx. 100Mm loops of active regions can only be reproduced using photospheric abundances and much longer loop lengths.

  2. Quantifying causal coupling strength: A lag-specific measure for multivariate time series related to transfer entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Heitzig, Jobst; Marwan, Norbert; Kurths, Jürgen

    2012-12-01

    While it is an important problem to identify the existence of causal associations between two components of a multivariate time series, a topic addressed in Runge, Heitzig, Petoukhov, and Kurths [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.258701 108, 258701 (2012)], it is even more important to assess the strength of their association in a meaningful way. In the present article we focus on the problem of defining a meaningful coupling strength using information-theoretic measures and demonstrate the shortcomings of the well-known mutual information and transfer entropy. Instead, we propose a certain time-delayed conditional mutual information, the momentary information transfer (MIT), as a lag-specific measure of association that is general, causal, reflects a well interpretable notion of coupling strength, and is practically computable. Rooted in information theory, MIT is general in that it does not assume a certain model class underlying the process that generates the time series. As discussed in a previous paper [Runge, Heitzig, Petoukhov, and Kurths, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.108.258701 108, 258701 (2012)], the general framework of graphical models makes MIT causal in that it gives a nonzero value only to lagged components that are not independent conditional on the remaining process. Further, graphical models admit a low-dimensional formulation of conditions, which is important for a reliable estimation of conditional mutual information and, thus, makes MIT practically computable. MIT is based on the fundamental concept of source entropy, which we utilize to yield a notion of coupling strength that is, compared to mutual information and transfer entropy, well interpretable in that, for many cases, it solely depends on the interaction of the two components at a certain lag. In particular, MIT is, thus, in many cases able to exclude the misleading influence of autodependency within a process in an information-theoretic way

  3. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    SciTech Connect

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Mageras, Gig S.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients.

  4. Technical Note: Intrafractional changes in time lag relationship between anterior–posterior external and superior–inferior internal motion signals in abdominal tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Regmi, Rajesh; Lovelock, D. Michael; Zhang, Pengpeng; Pham, Hai; Xiong, Jianping; Yorke, Ellen D.; Goodman, Karyn A.; Wu, Abraham J.; Mageras, Gig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate constancy, within a treatment session, of the time lag relationship between implanted markers in abdominal tumors and an external motion surrogate. Methods: Six gastroesophageal junction and three pancreatic cancer patients (IRB-approved protocol) received two cone-beam CTs (CBCT), one before and one after treatment. Time between scans was less than 30 min. Each patient had at least one implanted fiducial marker near the tumor. In all scans, abdominal displacement (Varian RPM) was recorded as the external motion signal. Purpose-built software tracked fiducials, representing internal signal, in CBCT projection images. Time lag between superior–inferior (SI) internal and anterior–posterior external signals was found by maximizing the correlation coefficient in each breathing cycle and averaging over all cycles. Time-lag-induced discrepancy between internal SI position and that predicted from the external signal (external prediction error) was also calculated. Results: Mean ± standard deviation time lag, over all scans and patients, was 0.10 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.36 s). External signal lagged the internal in 17/18 scans. Change in time lag between pre- and post-treatment CBCT was 0.06 ± 0.07 s (range 0.01–0.22 s), corresponding to 3.1% ± 3.7% (range 0.6%–10.8%) of gate width (range 1.6–3.1 s). In only one patient, change in time lag exceeded 10% of the gate width. External prediction error over all scans of all patients varied from 0.1 ± 0.1 to 1.6 ± 0.4 mm. Conclusions: Time lag between internal motion along SI and external signals is small compared to the treatment gate width of abdominal patients examined in this study. Change in time lag within a treatment session, inferred from pre- to post-treatment measurements is also small, suggesting that a single measurement of time lag at the session start is adequate. These findings require confirmation in a larger number of patients. PMID:26127033

  5. From here to efficiency : time lags between the introduction of new technology and the achievement of fuel savings.

    SciTech Connect

    Mintz, M.; Vyas, A.; Wang, M.; Stodolsky, F.; Cuenca, R.; Gaines, L.

    1999-12-03

    In this paper, the energy savings of new technology offering significant improvements in fuel efficiency are tracked for over 20 years as vehicles incorporating that technology enter the fleet and replace conventional light-duty vehicles. Two separate analyses are discussed: a life-cycle analysis of aluminum-intensive vehicles and a fuel-cycle analysis of the energy and greenhouse gas emissions of double vs. triple fuel-economy vehicles. In both efforts, market-penetration modeling is used to simulate the rate at which new technology enters the new fleet, and stock-adjustment modeling is used to capture the inertia in turnover of new and existing current-technology vehicles. Together, these two effects--slowed market penetration and delayed vehicle replacement--increase the time lag between market introduction and the achievement of substantial energy savings. In both cases, 15-20 years elapse, before savings approach these levels.

  6. Direct Measurement Results of the Time Lag of LOS-Velocity Oscillations Between Two Heights in Solar Faculae and Sunspots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobanov, N.; Kolobov, D.; Kustov, A.; Chupin, S.; Chelpanov, A.

    2013-06-01

    We present an investigation of line-of-sight (LOS) velocity oscillations in solar faculae and sunspots. To study the phase relations between chromospheric and photospheric oscillations of the LOS velocity, we measured the time lag of the chromospheric signal relative to the photospheric one for several faculae and sunspots in a set of spectral line pairs. The measured time lags are different for different objects. The mean measured delay between the oscillations in the five-minute band in faculae is 50 s for the Si i 10 827 Å - He i 10 830 Å pair; for the pair Fe i 6569 Å - Hα 6563 Å the mean delay is 20 s; for the pair Fe i 4551 Å - Ba ii 4554 Å the mean delay is 7 s; for the pair Si i 8536 Å - Ca ii 8542 Å the mean delay is 20 s. For the oscillations in the three-minute band in sunspot umbrae the mean delay is 55 s for the Si i 10 827 Å - He i 10 830 Å pair; for the Fe i 6569 Å - Hα 6563 Å pair it was not possible to determine the delay; for the Fe i 4551 Å - Ba ii 4554 Å pair the mean delay is 6 s; for the Si i 8536 Å - Ca ii 8542 Å pair the mean delay is 21 s. Measured delays correspond to the wave propagation speed, which significantly exceeds the generally adopted speed of sound in the photosphere. This raises the question of the origin of these oscillations. The possibility that we deal with slow MHD waves is not ruled out.

  7. Time lag estimates for nitrate travel through the vadose zone in Southland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Scott; Chanut, Pierre; Ledgard, George; Rissmann, Clint

    2014-05-01

    A regional-scale study was carried out to calculate the travel time of a nitrate particle from the ground surface into shallow groundwater. The aim of the study was to obtain preliminary answers to two questions. Firstly, if leaching limits are set, how long would it take to see an improvement in shallow groundwater quality? Secondly, have groundwater nitrate concentrations reached equilibrium from recent dairy expansion in the region, or could we expect future increases? We applied a methodology that provides a balance between the detail and generalisation that is required for a regional-scale study. Steady-state advective transport through the vadose zone was modelled with water retention curves. These curves enable an estimate of the average volumetric water content of the vadose zone. The percentage saturation can then be used to calculate the vadose zone transit time if effective porosity, depth to the water table and annual average soil drainage are known. A time for mixing in the uppermost part of the aquifer has also been calculated. Two different vadose zone water retention curve models were used for comparison, the Brooks-Corey (1964), and the Van Genuchten (1980) methods. The water retention curves were parameterised by sediment texture via the Rawls and Brakensiek (1985) pedotransfer functions. Hydraulic properties were derived by positioning sediment textural descriptions on the Folk textural triangle, estimates of effective porosity from literature, and hydraulic conductivity values from aquifer tests. Uncertainty of parameter estimates was included by assigning standard deviations and appropriate probability distributions. Vadose zone saturation was modelled at 6,450 sites across the region with a Monte Carlo simulation involving 10,000 realisations. This generated a probability distribution of saturation for each site. Average volumetric water content of the vadose zone ranged from 8.5 to 40.7 % for the Brooks-Corey model and 12.9 to 36.3% for the

  8. The discovery and modeling of energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mir, Mubashir; Iqbal, Naseer; Pahari, Mayukh; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-07-01

    We report the discovery and modeling of enigmatic Energy dependent time-lags and fractional RMS of the heartbeat state in GRS 1915+105. The time-lags reveal the crucial information related to geometry of accretion flow, the emission regions and the relation between various spectral parameters. The lag and frms at the fundamental frequency show non-monotonic behavior with energy. The lag increases up to typically ˜10 keV and later shows a reversal and in some observations becomes hard(negative). However, the lags at the harmonic increase with energy and don't show any turn around at least till ˜20 keV. The frms at harmonic has similar non-monotonic behavior as at fundamental, however the variability amplitude is lesser as expected. The lag seen here can have magnitude of the order of seconds, and thus can't be accounted by light travel time effects or comptonization delays. The continuum X-ray spectra can roughly be described by a disk blackbody and a hard X-ray power-law component and from phase resolved spectroscopy it has been shown that the inner disk radius varies during the oscillation We propose the model based on the delayed response of inner disc (DRIOD) radius to the outer accretion rate i;e r_{in}(t)∝ dot{m}^β (t-τ_d). The fluctuating accretion rate varies the inner disk after a certain time delay t_d which could be of the order of the viscous propagation delays. The model very well explains the observed shape and nature of lags and frms at fundamental and harmonic frequencies. We present here the series of observations that constrain the four free parameters of our model. These parameters contain the vital information related to the nature of accretion flow in a highly periodic state like a heartbeat state.

  9. Lag time changes between capillary blood glucose and in-vivo interstitial glucose levels by HATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eikje, Natalja Skrebova

    2011-03-01

    Method of the lag/latency time (LT) measurement, calculation and interpretation can be simultaneously applied to study in vivo glucose diffusion from the capillary to the skin tissue, to calibrate spectroscopically measured glucose levels during real-time glucose monitoring of dynamic processes in the skin tissue and to study glucose optical properties in the living skin tissue. Based on previous reports on determining interstitial glucose levels and their LT's by HATR-FTIR spectroscopy, here the LT was calculated for each glucose absorbance level at about 1030-41, 1080, 1118 and 1153 cm-1 during oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) with different doses (5g, 20g, 75g). The LT showed dose-dependency and described intra-/inter-subject changes of skin glucose dynamics in healthy and diabetes subjects. The time required for glucose to diffuse from the capillary to the skin tissue was shorter in a diabetes subject, than in a healthy subject, independently on intaken dose of glucose. Nevertheless, in both subjects the LT changes ranged within 0-50 minutes. Measurement of the LT demonstrated a potential to provide insight to healthy and diabetic glucose dynamics between the blood and interstitial fluid compartments in the upper layer of the skin tissue. Also, the LT might be regarded as a method to calibrate dynamic measurements of glucose in vivo by this spectroscopy method and to characterize living skin tissue glucose optical properties.

  10. Quantifying the effect of water activity and storage temperature on single spore lag times of three moulds isolated from spoiled bakery products.

    PubMed

    Dagnas, Stéphane; Gougouli, Maria; Onno, Bernard; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P; Membré, Jeanne-Marie

    2017-01-02

    The inhibitory effect of water activity (aw) and storage temperature on single spore lag times of Aspergillus niger, Eurotium repens (Aspergillus pseudoglaucus) and Penicillium corylophilum strains isolated from spoiled bakery products, was quantified. A full factorial design was set up for each strain. Data were collected at levels of aw varying from 0.80 to 0.98 and temperature from 15 to 35°C. Experiments were performed on malt agar, at pH5.5. When growth was observed, ca 20 individual growth kinetics per condition were recorded up to 35days. Radius of the colony vs time was then fitted with the Buchanan primary model. For each experimental condition, a lag time variability was observed, it was characterized by its mean, standard deviation (sd) and 5(th) percentile, after a Normal distribution fit. As the environmental conditions became stressful (e.g. storage temperature and aw lower), mean and sd of single spore lag time distribution increased, indicating longer lag times and higher variability. The relationship between mean and sd followed a monotonous but not linear pattern, identical whatever the species. Next, secondary models were deployed to estimate the cardinal values (minimal, optimal and maximal temperatures, minimal water activity where no growth is observed anymore) for the three species. That enabled to confirm the observation made based on raw data analysis: concerning the temperature effect, A. niger behaviour was significantly different from E. repens and P. corylophilum: Topt of 37.4°C (standard deviation 1.4°C) instead of 27.1°C (1.4°C) and 25.2°C (1.2°C), respectively. Concerning the aw effect, from the three mould species, E. repens was the species able to grow at the lowest aw (awmin estimated to 0.74 (0.02)). Finally, results obtained with single spores were compared to findings from a previous study carried out at the population level (Dagnas et al., 2014). For short lag times (≤5days), there was no difference between lag time

  11. Jet lag prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... zones. Jet lag occurs when your body's biological clock is not set with the time zone you ... Your body follows a 24-hour internal clock called a circadian rhythm. It tells your body when to go to sleep and when to wake up. Cues from your environment, such ...

  12. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    PubMed Central

    Hocking, Daniel J.; O’Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O’Donnell, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network. PMID:26966662

  13. Rat Blastocysts from Nuclear Injection and Time-Lagged Enucleation and Their Commitment to Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hara, Hiromasa; Goto, Teppei; Takizawa, Akiko; Sanbo, Makoto; Jacob, Howard J; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Hochi, Shinichi; Hirabayashi, Masumi

    2016-04-01

    Pronucleus-like vesicle formation following premature chromosome condensation (PCC) of the donor cell nucleus is the key event for successful generation of cloned rodents by nuclear transplantation (NT). However in rat cloning, this change is difficult to induce in enucleated recipient oocytes because of their inability to maintain maturation-promoting factor levels. In this study, intact oocytes retrieved from nuclear-visualized H2B-tdTomato knock-in rats were injected with Venus-labeled cell nuclei. Because the incidence of PCC under MG-132 treatment significantly increased with the culture period (0%, 10.8%, 36.8%, and 87.5% at 0, 0.5, 1, and 2 h postinjection, respectively), the metaphase plate of the oocyte was removed 1-2 h after the nuclear injection. The NT-derived rat zygotes (n = 748) were activated with ionomycin/cycloheximide and transferred into temporal host mothers, resulting in the harvest of three blastocysts (0.4%) with Venus fluorescence. Two blastocysts were examined for their potential to commit to NT-derived embryonic stem cells (ntESCs). One ntESC line was established successfully and found to be competent in terms of karyotype, stem cell marker expression, and pluripotency. In conclusion, time-lagged enucleation of visualized oocyte nuclei allows the PCC incidence of donor nuclei and generation of NT blastocysts, and the blastocysts can commit to germline-competent ntESCs.

  14. Coming out of the starting blocks: extended lag time rearranges genetic diversity in introduced marine fishes of Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Gaither, Michelle R; Toonen, Robert J; Bowen, Brian W

    2012-10-07

    Biological invasions with known histories are rare, especially in the sea, and empirical studies of the genetic consequences are even rarer. Fifty-five years ago, the state of Hawai'i began a remarkable, if unintentional, 'experiment' with the introduction of three reef fishes, Lutjanus fulvus, Cephalopholis argus and Lutjanus kasmira. All have since expanded from the initial introduction of 2204 to 3163 individuals; however, historical records show that initially L. fulvus remained scarce, C. argus had modest population expansion and L. kasmira experienced rapid population growth. The consequences of differential population growth rates are apparent in F-statistics: Hawaiian L. fulvus demonstrate strong and significant haplotype frequency shifts from the founder location (F(ST) = 0.449), C. argus shows low but significant differentiation (F(ST) = 0.066) and L. kasmira is nearly identical to the founder location (F(ST) = 0.008). All three species had higher mtDNA diversity in the introduced range, which can be explained by multiple sources for L. fulvus and L. kasmira, but not for C. argus. We conclude that lag time before population expansion, in conjunction with genetic drift, has defined the genetic architecture of these three species in the introduced range.

  15. Coming out of the starting blocks: extended lag time rearranges genetic diversity in introduced marine fishes of Hawai‘i

    PubMed Central

    Gaither, Michelle R.; Toonen, Robert J.; Bowen, Brian W.

    2012-01-01

    Biological invasions with known histories are rare, especially in the sea, and empirical studies of the genetic consequences are even rarer. Fifty-five years ago, the state of Hawai‘i began a remarkable, if unintentional, ‘experiment’ with the introduction of three reef fishes, Lutjanus fulvus, Cephalopholis argus and Lutjanus kasmira. All have since expanded from the initial introduction of 2204 to 3163 individuals; however, historical records show that initially L. fulvus remained scarce, C. argus had modest population expansion and L. kasmira experienced rapid population growth. The consequences of differential population growth rates are apparent in F-statistics: Hawaiian L. fulvus demonstrate strong and significant haplotype frequency shifts from the founder location (FST = 0.449), C. argus shows low but significant differentiation (FST = 0.066) and L. kasmira is nearly identical to the founder location (FST = 0.008). All three species had higher mtDNA diversity in the introduced range, which can be explained by multiple sources for L. fulvus and L. kasmira, but not for C. argus. We conclude that lag time before population expansion, in conjunction with genetic drift, has defined the genetic architecture of these three species in the introduced range. PMID:22874747

  16. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags.

    PubMed

    Letcher, Benjamin H; Hocking, Daniel J; O'Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R; Nislow, Keith H; O'Donnell, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade(-1)) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade(-1)). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  17. A hierarchical model of daily stream temperature using air-water temperature synchronization, autocorrelation, and time lags

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Letcher, Benjamin; Hocking, Daniel; O'Neil, Kyle; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Nislow, Keith H.; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Water temperature is a primary driver of stream ecosystems and commonly forms the basis of stream classifications. Robust models of stream temperature are critical as the climate changes, but estimating daily stream temperature poses several important challenges. We developed a statistical model that accounts for many challenges that can make stream temperature estimation difficult. Our model identifies the yearly period when air and water temperature are synchronized, accommodates hysteresis, incorporates time lags, deals with missing data and autocorrelation and can include external drivers. In a small stream network, the model performed well (RMSE = 0.59°C), identified a clear warming trend (0.63 °C decade−1) and a widening of the synchronized period (29 d decade−1). We also carefully evaluated how missing data influenced predictions. Missing data within a year had a small effect on performance (∼0.05% average drop in RMSE with 10% fewer days with data). Missing all data for a year decreased performance (∼0.6 °C jump in RMSE), but this decrease was moderated when data were available from other streams in the network.

  18. Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization backstepping scheme in a class of continuous-time hyperchaotic systems--a symbolic-numeric computation approach.

    PubMed

    Yan, Zhenya

    2005-06-01

    First, a Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization of continuous-time dynamical systems is defined. Second, based on a backstepping design with one controller, a systematic, concrete, and automatic scheme is developed to investigate the Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between the drive system and response system with a strict-feedback form. Two identical hyperchaotic Tamasevicius-Namajunas-Cenys(TNC) systems as well as the hyperchaotic TNC system and hyperchaotic Rossler system are chosen to illustrate the proposed scheme. Numerical simulations are used to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme. The scheme can also be extended to study Q-S (lag or anticipated) synchronization between other dynamical systems with strict-feedback forms. With the aid of symbolic-numeric computation, the scheme can be performed to yield automatically the scalar controller in computer.

  19. Factors Influencing Time Lag between First Parental Concern and First Visit to Child Psychiatric Services in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujiwara, Takeo; Okuyama, Makiko; Funahashi, Keiichi

    2011-01-01

    The early assessment of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) is important to improving patient outcomes, allowing family members to prepare for and cope with symptoms, and assisting in plans for appropriate educational opportunities. However, little is known about factors that influence the time lag between the parents' first concerns and the first…

  20. Assimilation of real-time riometer measurements into models of 30 MHz polar cap absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil Christopher; Honary, Farideh

    2015-04-01

    Space weather events may adversely affect high frequency (HF) radio propagation, hence the ability to provide nowcasting and forecasting of HF radio absorption is key for industries that rely on HF communications. This paper presents methods of assimilating 30 MHz radio absorption measurements into two types of ionospheric polar cap absorption (PCA) model to improve their performance as nowcasting tools. Type 1 models calculate absorption as m times the square root of the flux of solar protons above an energy threshold, Et. Measurements from 14 riometers during 94 solar proton events (1995-2010) are assimilated by optimising the day and night values of m by linear regression. Further non-linear optimisations are demonstrated in which parameters such as Et are also optimised and additional terms characterise local time and seasonal variations. These optimisations reduce RMS errors by up to 36%. Type 2 models incorporate altitude profiles of electron and neutral densities and electron temperatures. Here the scale height of the effective recombination coefficient profile in the D-region is optimised by regression. Furthermore, two published models of the rigidity cut-off latitude (CL) are assessed by comparison with riometer measurements. A small improvement in performance is observed by introducing a 3-h lag in the geomagnetic index Kp in the CL models. Assimilating data from a single riometer in the polar cap reduces RMS errors below 1 dB with less than 0.2 dB bias. However, many high-latitude riometers now provide absorption measurements in near-real time and we demonstrate how these data may be assimilated by fitting a low-order spherical harmonic function to both the measurements and a PCA model with optimised parameters.

  1. Mapping agroecological zones and time lag in vegetation growth by means of Fourier analysis of time series of NDVI images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menenti, M.; Azzali, S.; Verhoef, W.; Van Swol, R.

    1993-01-01

    Examples are presented of applications of a fast Fourier transform algorithm to analyze time series of images of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index values. The results obtained for a case study on Zambia indicated that differences in vegetation development among map units of an existing agroclimatic map were not significant, while reliable differences were observed among the map units obtained using the Fourier analysis.

  2. Exploring Nitrogen Legacies and Time Lags in Anthropogenic Landscapes: A 200-Year Longitudinal Study of the Mississippi and Susquehanna Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, Kimberly; Basu, Nandita; Van Cappellen, Philippe

    2016-04-01

    Global flows of reactive nitrogen (N) have increased significantly over the last century in response to land-use change, agricultural intensification and elevated levels of atmospheric N. Despite widespread implementation of a range of conservation measures to mitigate the impacts of N-intensive agriculture, N concentrations in surface waters are in many cases remaining steady or continuing to increase. Such time lags to the recovery of surface water quality are increasingly being attributed to the presence of legacy N stores in subsurface reservoirs. It has remained unclear, however, what the magnitudes of such stores might be, and how they are partitioned between soil and groundwater reservoirs. In the present work, we have synthesized data from numerous sources to develop a comprehensive, 200-year dataset of N inputs to the land surface of the continental United States. We have concurrently developed a parsimonious, process-based model that utilizes this N input trajectory together with a travel time-based approach to simulate biogeochemical transformations of N along subsurface pathways. Model results allow us predict the magnitudes of legacy N in soil and groundwater pools and to predict long-term N-loading trajectories over the last century and into the future. We have applied this modeling approach to two major U.S. watersheds, the Mississippi River and Susquehanna River Basins, which are the sources of significant nutrient contamination to the Gulf of Mexico and Chesapeake Bay, respectively. Our results show significant N loading above baseline levels in both watersheds before the widespread use of commercial N fertilizers, largely due to 19th-century conversion of natural forest and grassland areas to row-crop agriculture, although the temporal patterns of this loading differed between the two watersheds due to differences in the trajectories of land-use change. Using the model, we estimate spatiotemporal patterns of N accumulation in both groundwater and

  3. Lead-lag relationships between global mean temperature and the atmospheric CO2 content in dependence of the type and time scale of the forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muryshev, Kirill E.; Eliseev, Alexey V.; Mokhov, Igor I.; Timazhev, Alexandr V.

    2017-01-01

    By employing an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC) developed at the A.M. Obukhov Institute of Atmospheric Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences (IAP RAS CM), mutual lags between global mean surface air temperature, T and the atmospheric CO2 content, q, in dependence of the type and time scale of the external forcing are explored. In the simulation, which follows the protocol of the Coupled Models Intercomparison Project, phase 5, T leads q for volcanically-induced climate variations. In contrast, T lags behind q for changes caused by anthropogenic CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. In additional idealized numerical experiments, driven by periodic external emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, T always lags behind q as expected. In contrast, if the model is driven by the periodic non-greenhouse radiative forcing, T leads q for the external forcing time scale ≤4 ×102 yr, while q leads T at longer scales. The latter is an example that lagged correlations do not necessarily represent causal relationships in a system. This apparently counter-intuitive result, however, is a direct consequence of i) temperature sensitivity of the soil carbon stock (which decreases if climate is warmed and increases if climate is cooled), ii) conservation of total mass of carbon in the system in the absence of external carbon emissions, iii) increased importance of the oceanic branch of the carbon cycle at longer time scales. The results obtained with an EMIC are further interpreted with a conceptual Earth system model consisting of an energy balance climate model and a globally averaged carbon cycle model. The obtained results have implications to the empirical studies attempting to understand the origins of the contemporary climate change by applying lead-lag relationships to empirical data.

  4. A mechanism-based approach for absorption modeling: the Gastro-Intestinal Transit Time (GITT) model.

    PubMed

    Hénin, Emilie; Bergstrand, Martin; Standing, Joseph F; Karlsson, Mats O

    2012-06-01

    Absorption models used in the estimation of pharmacokinetic drug characteristics from plasma concentration data are generally empirical and simple, utilizing no prior information on gastro-intestinal (GI) transit patterns. Our aim was to develop and evaluate an estimation strategy based on a mechanism-based model for drug absorption, which takes into account the tablet movement through the GI transit. This work is an extension of a previous model utilizing tablet movement characteristics derived from magnetic marker monitoring (MMM) and pharmacokinetic data. The new approach, which replaces MMM data with a GI transit model, was evaluated in data sets where MMM data were available (felodipine) or not available (diclofenac). Pharmacokinetic profiles in both datasets were well described by the model according to goodness-of-fit plots. Visual predictive checks showed the model to give superior simulation properties compared with a standard empirical approach (first-order absorption rate + lag-time). This model represents a step towards an integrated mechanism-based NLME model, where the use of physiological knowledge and in vitro–in vivo correlation helps fully characterize PK and generate hypotheses for new formulations or specific populations.

  5. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates.

    PubMed

    Fenton, O; Vero, S; Ibrahim, T G; Murphy, P N C; Sherriff, S C; Ó hUallacháin, D

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (t(T)) is divided into unsaturated (t(u)) and saturated (t(s)) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of t(T). In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of t(u) were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When t(u) estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from

  6. Consequences of using different soil texture determination methodologies for soil physical quality and unsaturated zone time lag estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenton, O.; Vero, S.; Ibrahim, T. G.; Murphy, P. N. C.; Sherriff, S. C.; Ó hUallacháin, D.

    2015-11-01

    Elucidation of when the loss of pollutants, below the rooting zone in agricultural landscapes, affects water quality is important when assessing the efficacy of mitigation measures. Investigation of this inherent time lag (tT) is divided into unsaturated (tu) and saturated (ts) components. The duration of these components relative to each other differs depending on soil characteristics and the landscape position. The present field study focuses on tu estimation in a scenario where the saturated zone is likely to constitute a higher proportion of tT. In such instances, or where only initial breakthrough (IBT) or centre of mass (COM) is of interest, utilisation of site and depth specific "simple" textural class or actual sand-silt-clay percentages to generate soil water characteristic curves with associated soil hydraulic parameters is acceptable. With the same data it is also possible to estimate a soil physical quality (S) parameter for each soil layer which can be used to infer many other physical, chemical and biological quality indicators. In this study, hand texturing in the field was used to determine textural classes of a soil profile. Laboratory methods, including hydrometer, pipette and laser diffraction methods were used to determine actual sand-silt-clay percentages of sections of the same soil profile. Results showed that in terms of S, hand texturing resulted in a lower index value (inferring a degraded soil) than that of pipette, hydrometer and laser equivalents. There was no difference between S index values determined using the pipette, hydrometer and laser diffraction methods. The difference between the three laboratory methods on both the IBT and COM stages of tu were negligible, and in this instance were unlikely to affect either groundwater monitoring decisions, or to be of consequence from a policy perspective. When tu estimates are made over the full depth of the vadose zone, which may extend to several metres, errors resulting from the use of

  7. A novel approach to genetic and environmental analysis of cross-lagged associations over time: the cross-lagged relationship between self-perceived abilities and school achievement is mediated by genes as well as the environment.

    PubMed

    Luo, Yu L L; Haworth, Claire M A; Plomin, Robert

    2010-10-01

    Using longitudinal cross-lagged analysis to infer causal directions of reciprocal effects is one of the most important tools in the developmental armamentarium. The strength of these analyses can be enhanced by analyzing the genetic and environmental aetiology underlying cross-lagged relationships, for which we present a novel approach here. Our approach is based on standard Cholesky decomposition. Standardized path coefficients are employed to assess genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations. We indicate how our model differs importantly from another approach that does not in fact analyze genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations. As an illustration, we apply our approach to the analysis of the cross-lagged relationships between self-perceived abilities and school achievement from age 9 to age 12. Self-perceived abilities of 3852 pairs of twins from the UK Twins Early Development Study were assessed using a self-report scale. School achievement was assessed by teachers based on UK National Curriculum criteria. The key cross-lagged association between self-perceived abilities at age 9 and school achievement at age 12 was mediated by genetic influences (28%) as well as shared (55%) and non-shared (16%) environment. The reverse cross-lagged association from school achievement at 9 to self-perceived abilities at 12 was primarily genetically mediated (73%). Unlike the approach to cross-lagged genetic analysis used in recent research, our approach assesses genetic and environmental contributions to cross-lagged associations per se. We discuss implications of finding that genetic factors contribute to the cross-lag between self-perceived abilities at age 9 and school achievement at age 12.

  8. Simultaneous Palpation of the Craniosacral Rate at the Head and Feet: Rate Comparison, Intrarater and Interrater Reliability, and Assessment of LAG Time.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Purpose. The purposes of this study were to test the assumption that craniosacral motion is constant throughout the human body, determine the...interrater and intrarater reliability of palpating the craniosacral rate at the head and feet, and determine if a lag time was present between the start of... craniosacral events at the head and feet. Subjects. Twenty-eight adult subjects and two craniosacral examiners. Method. With-in subjects repeated

  9. Using a deterministic time-lagged ensemble forecast with a probabilistic threshold for improving 6-15 day summer precipitation prediction in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jie, Weihua; Wu, Tongwen; Wang, Jun; Li, Weijing; Polivka, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    A Deterministic Time-lagged Ensemble Forecast using a Probabilistic Threshold (DEFPT) method is suggested for improving summer 6-15 day categorical precipitation prediction in China from the Beijing Climate Center Atmospheric General Circulation Model version 2.1 (BCC_AGCM2.1). It is based on a time-lagged ensemble system that consists of 13 ensemble members separated sequentially at 6 hour intervals lagging the last three days. The DEFPT is not intended to predict the probability of rainfall, but rather to forecast rainfall (yes/no) occurrence for different categories of precipitation at any model grid box. A given categorical precipitation is forecasted to occur at one gridbox only when the ensemble probability for that categorical precipitation exceeds a certain threshold. This method is useful for providing an estimate of whether precipitation events will occur to decision-makers based on probabilistic forecasts during days 6-15. A large number of hindcast experiments for 1996-2005 summers reveal that this threshold can be best (and empirically) set as 5/13 and 4/13 respectively for the 6-15 day prediction of 1 + mm (i.e., above 1 mm per day) and 5 + mm rainfall events, using the Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve, the Equitable Threat Score (ETS), the Hanssen and Kuipers (HK) score, and frequency bias (BIA) to achieve best prediction performance. With this set of thresholds, the DEFPT shows skill improvement over the corresponding single deterministic forecast using one initial value and the Time-Lagged Average Forecast (LAF) ensemble method. Similar improvements by the DEFPT are also found for the prediction of several other categories of precipitation between 1 + mm and 10 + mm per day. Application of DEFPT to larger ensemble size and BCC_AGCM version 2.2 with a higher horizontal resolution also demonstrates the effectiveness of the DEFPT for 6-15 day categorical precipitation forecasts.

  10. The buzz-lag effect.

    PubMed

    Cellini, Cristiano; Scocchia, Lisa; Drewing, Knut

    2016-10-01

    In the flash-lag illusion, a brief visual flash and a moving object presented at the same location appear to be offset with the flash trailing the moving object. A considerable amount of studies investigated the visual flash-lag effect, and flash-lag-like effects have also been observed in audition, and cross-modally between vision and audition. In the present study, we investigate whether a similar effect can also be observed when using only haptic stimuli. A fast vibration (or buzz, lasting less than 20 ms) was applied to the moving finger of the observers and employed as a "haptic flash." Participants performed a two-alternative forced-choice (2AFC) task where they had to judge whether the moving finger was located to the right or to the left of the stationary finger at the time of the buzz. We used two different movement velocities (Slow and Fast conditions). We found that the moving finger was systematically misperceived to be ahead of the stationary finger when the two were physically aligned. This result can be interpreted as a purely haptic analogue of the flash-lag effect, which we refer to as "buzz-lag effect." The buzz-lag effect can be well accounted for by the temporal-sampling explanation of flash-lag-like effects.

  11. Constraining the size of the Comptonizing medium by modelling the energy-dependent time lags of kHz QPOs of neutron star system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nagendra; Misra, Ranjeev

    2016-09-01

    We study the dependence of the estimated size and geometry of the medium on the time-averaged spectral model assumed and on the frequency of the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) in the framework of a thermal Comptonization model. We use the high-quality time lag and rms obtained during 1996 March 3 observation of 4U 1608-52 by RXTE as well as other observations of the source at different QPO frequencies where a single time lag between two broad energy bands has been reported. We compare the results obtained when assuming that the time-averaged spectra are represented by the spectrally degenerate `hot (kTb ≥ 1 keV)' and `cold (kTb ≤ 0.5 keV)' seed spectral models where Tb is seed source temperature. We find that for the `hot-seed' model the medium size is in the range of 0.3-2.0 km and the size decreases with increasing QPO frequency. On the other hand, for the `cold-seed' model, the range for the sizes is much larger 0.5-20 km and hence perhaps show no variation with QPO frequency. Our results emphasize the need for broad-band spectral information combined with high-frequency timing to lift this degeneracy. We further compare the rms as a function of energy for the upper kHz QPO, and indeed we find that the driver for this QPO should be temperature variations of the corona identical to the lower kHz QPO. However, the time lag reported for the upper kHz QPO is hard, which if confirmed would challenge the simple Comptonization model presented here.

  12. Time Variable Associated Absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, F. W.; Barlow, T. A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, R. D.; Junkkarinen, V. T.; Lyons, R. W.

    1994-05-01

    We discuss dramatic changes in the z_a ~ z_e absorption system of the z_e = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (Q0150-203). The C IV lambda 1550 and N V lambda 1240 doublets at z_a = 2.1344 strengthened by a factor of ~ 3 between the observations of Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1988, ApJS, 68, 539; measured November 1981) and our earliest measurements (November and December 1990). During this time, C IV in the z_a = 2.0083 system may also have strengthened. The variability of other lines in these systems is unknown. Continued monitoring is in progress. We consider several models of the z_a ~ z_e absorption environment, and conclude that the absorbing clouds are close to the QSO and photoionized by the QSO continuum. The variability timescale (<~2.9 yrs rest) requires gas densities gap 4000 cm(-3) to allow changes in the ionization balance. This minimum density, and the high ionization needed to produce the Ne VIII lambda 774 and O VI lambda 1035 absorptions reported previously (E. M. Burbidge et al., 1993, BAAS, 24, 1135), requires clouds <~200 pc from the QSO. The full range of absorption line ionizations (including C III lambda 977 and N III lambda 989) implies that the clouds are segregated, spanning a factor of gap 10 in distance or gap 100 in density. Across these regions the H I fraction varies from ~ 10(-3) to ~ 10(-6) . The total hydrogen column ranges from a few times 10(18) cm(-2) in the low ionization gas to ~ 10(20) cm(-2) where the Ne VIII lines form. The Lyman continuum is expected to be optically thin throughout, consistent with the measured absence of a Lyman edge. The metal abundances are roughly solar or above. Implications of these results are discussed. This work is supported by NASA grant NAG 5-1630.

  13. Use of sensitivity analysis to aid interpretation of a probabilistic Bacillus cereus spore lag time model applied to heat-treated chilled foods (REPFEDs).

    PubMed

    Membré, Jeanne-Marie; Kan-King-Yu, Denis; Blackburn, Clive de W

    2008-11-30

    The microbiological safety and quality of REfrigerated Processed Foods of Extended Durability (REPFEDs) relies on a combination of mild heat treatment and refrigeration, sometimes in combination with other inhibitory agents that are not effective when used alone. In this context, the output of a probabilistic model predicting the lag time of heat-treated Bacillus cereus spores under realistic heat-treatment profile and chilled supply-chain conditions, has been investigated using a sensitivity analysis technique. Indeed, knowing that there was uncertainty in the model (e.g. due to lack of data to build the model input probability density function), the objective of the analysis was to evaluate if the variability associated with some inputs (e.g. the consumers' refrigerator temperature values reported in Europe and US markets were different) had a significant impact on the model output, i.e. on the expected lag time of heat-treated B. cereus spores in REPFEDs. To do so, the uncertainty and variability associated with the various model inputs have been identified and then separated using a second order Monte Carlo decomposition. Concerning the variability, there was a significant difference between the chilled supply-chains (Europe, US) and between the raw material groups (low, medium or high contamination levels). For example, in the European market, after a heat treatment of 90 degrees C for 10 min, with a high raw material contamination level, the predicted 5th percentile of the lag time was 17 days, while it was 35 days with a low raw material contamination level. This was confirmed with an ANOVA. The impact of the uncertainty on the lag time has been illustrated graphically by building confidence intervals around its 5th percentile. A sensitivity analysis based upon uncertainty and variability decomposition is clearly a complex and time consuming exercise; however, it provides a greater confidence (greater transparency and better understanding) in the model

  14. Modelling the effect of essential oil of betel leaf (Piper betle L.) on germination, growth, and apparent lag time of Penicillium expansum on semi-synthetic media.

    PubMed

    Basak, Suradeep; Guha, Proshanta

    2015-12-23

    The current study aimed at characterizing the chemical components of betel leaf (Piper betle L. var. Tamluk Mitha) essential oil (BLEO) and modelling its effect on growth of Penicillium expansum on semi-synthetic medium. Gas chromatography-mass spectrophotometry (GC-MS) analysis of BLEO revealed the presence of different bioactive phenolic compounds in significant amounts. Among 46 different components identified, chavibetol (22.0%), estragole (15.8%), β-cubebene (13.6%), chavicol (11.8%), and caryophyllene (11.3%) were found to be the major compounds of BLEO. A disc diffusion and disc volatilization method were used to evaluate antifungal activity of the oil against a selected food spoilage mould. The logistic model was used to study the kinetics of spore germination. Prediction and validation of antifungal effect of BLEO was performed on semi-synthetic medium (apple juice agar) using predictive microbiological tools. The Baranyi and Roberts model was used to estimate maximum growth rate (μmax in mm/day) and apparent lag time (λ in days) of the mould. Secondary modelling was performed using a re-parameterized Monod-type equation based on cardinal values to study the effect of different BLEO concentration on estimated growth parameters. Emax (minimum concentration of oil at which mould growth was inhibited) and MIC (minimum inhibitory concentration of BLEO at which lag time is infinite) value of BLEO against P. expansum was estimated to be 0.56 and 0.74 μl/ml, respectively, which was found to be similar on potato dextrose agar (PDA) as well as apple juice agar (AJA) medium. The correlation between estimated growth parameters of the mould on both the media was obtained with satisfactory statistical indices (R(2) and RMSE). This study revealed inhibitory efficacy of BLEO on spore germination, mycelial growth and apparent lag time of P. expansum in a dose-dependent manner. Hence, BLEO has potential to be used as a natural food preservative.

  15. An Investigation of the Effects of the Time Lag due to Long Transmission Distances Upon Remote Control. Phase 1; Tracking Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, James L.

    1961-01-01

    A series of pursuit tracking tasks were performed incorporating a transport lag in the control loop. The target was a mixture of four sine waves, the fastest having a frequency of 16 cycles per minute at full speed. An attempt was made to design the experiments so that they would provide data applicable to remote control of a ground vehicle over long transmission distances. Three programs were run. In each the time lag was placed between the control and the display. In the first program a velocity control was used and the operator was told that his knob controlled a vehicle, the problem represented a road 9 and he was to drive his vehicle along the road 9 using the delayed vehicle position as feedback for whatever means he desired. The objective was not to match the display traces. In the second program a velocity control was used, and the operator was told that the problem trace represented a road and the delayed trace represented a vehicle and he was to keep them together. The objective was to match display traces. The third program was identical with the first, except that an acceleration control was used rather than a velocity control. Target speeds used were full speed, 1/2 speed, 1/4 speed, 1/8 speed, and 1/16 speed. Time lags were 1/4 second, l/2 second, 1 second, 1-1/2 second, 2 second, 3 second, and 6 seconds. The experimental results are presented in the last section of this report.

  16. Memory of the Lake Rotorua catchment - time lag of the water in the catchment and delayed arrival of contaminants from past land use activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenstern, Uwe; Daughney, Christopher J.; Stewart, Michael K.; McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    2013-04-01

    The transit time distribution of streamflow is a fundamental descriptor of the flowpaths of water through a catchment and the storage of water within it, controlling its response to landuse change, pollution, ecological degradation, and climate change. Significant time lags (catchment memory) in the responses of streams to these stressors and their amelioration or restoration have been observed. Lag time can be quantified via water transit time of the catchment discharge. Mean transit times can be in the order of years and decades (Stewart et al 2012, Morgenstern et al., 2010). If the water passes through large groundwater reservoirs, it is difficult to quantify and predict the lag time. A pulse shaped tracer that moves with the water can allow quantification of the mean transit time. Environmental tritium is the ideal tracer of the water cycle. Tritium is part of the water molecule, is not affected by chemical reactions in the aquifer, and the bomb tritium from the atmospheric nuclear weapons testing represents a pulse shaped tracer input that allows for very accurate measurement of the age distribution parameters of the water in the catchment discharge. Tritium time series data from all catchment discharges (streams and springs) into Lake Rotorua, New Zealand, allow for accurate determination of the age distribution parameters. The Lake Rotorua catchment tritium data from streams and springs are unique, with high-quality tritium data available over more than four decades, encompassing the time when the bomb-tritium moved through the groundwater system, and from a very high number of streams and springs. Together with the well-defined tritium input into the Rotorua catchment, this data set allows for the best understanding of the water dynamics through a large scale catchment, including validation of complicated water mixing models. Mean transit times of the main streams into the lake range between 27 and 170 years. With such old water discharging into the lake

  17. REVERBERATION MAPPING WITH INTERMEDIATE-BAND PHOTOMETRY: DETECTION OF BROAD-LINE Hα TIME LAGS FOR QUASARS AT 0.2 < z < 0.4

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Linhua; Shen, Yue; McGreer, Ian D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Morganson, Eric; Windhorst, Rogier A.

    2016-02-20

    We present a reverberation mapping (RM) experiment that combines broad- and intermediate-band photometry; it is the first such attempt targeting 13 quasars at 0.2 < z < 0.9. The quasars were selected to have strong Hα or Hβ emission lines that are located in one of three intermediate bands (with FWHM around 200 Å) centered at 8045, 8505, and 9171 Å. The imaging observations were carried out in the intermediate bands and the broad i and z bands using the prime-focus imager 90Prime on the 2.3 m Bok telescope. Because of the large (∼1 deg{sup 2}) field of view (FOV) of 90Prime, we included the 13 quasars within only five telescope pointings or fields. The five fields were repeatedly observed over 20–30 epochs that were unevenly distributed over a duration of 5–6 months. The combination of the broad- and intermediate-band photometry allows us to derive accurate light curves for both optical continuum emission (from the accretion disk) and line emission (from the broad-line region, or BLR). We detect Hα time lags between the continuum and line emission in six quasars. These quasars are at relatively low redshifts 0.2 < z < 0.4. The measured lags are consistent with the current BLR size–luminosity relation for Hβ at z < 0.3. While this experiment appears successful in detecting lags of the bright Hα line, further investigation is required to see if it can also be applied to the fainter Hβ line for quasars at higher redshifts. Finally we demonstrate that, by using a small telescope with a large FOV, intermediate-band photometric RM can be efficiently executed for a large sample of quasars at z > 0.2.

  18. Estimated lag time in global carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations produced by commercial nuclear power through 2009 with projections through 2030.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Neil M; Abramson, Lee R; Coleman, Fiona A B

    2012-03-01

    This study examines the past and future impact of nuclear reactors on anthropogenic carbon emissions to the atmosphere. If nuclear power had never been commercially developed, what additional global carbon emissions would have occurred? More than 44 y of global nuclear power have caused a lag time of at least 1.2 y in carbon emissions and CO2 concentrations through the end of 2009. This lag time incorporates the contribution of life cycle carbon emissions due to the construction and operation of nuclear plants. Cumulative global carbon emissions would have been about 13 Gt greater through 2009, and the mean annual CO2 concentration at Mauna Loa would have been ~2.7 ppm greater than without nuclear power. This study finds that an additional 14–17 Gt of atmospheric carbon emissions could be averted by the global use of nuclear power through 2030, for a cumulative total of 27–30 Gt averted during the period 1965–2030. This result is based on International Atomic Energy Agency projections of future growth in nuclear power from 2009–2030, modified by the recent loss or permanent shutdown of 14 reactors in Japan and Germany

  19. Time-lagged moment-to-moment interplay between negative affect and paranoia: new insights in the affective pathway to psychosis.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Ingrid; Simons, Claudia J P; Wigman, Johanna T W; Collip, Dina; Jacobs, Nele; Derom, Catherine; Thiery, Evert; van Os, Jim; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Wichers, Marieke

    2014-03-01

    Evidence suggests that affect plays a role in the development of psychosis but the underlying mechanism requires further investigation. This study examines the moment-to-moment dynamics between negative affect (NA) and paranoia prospectively in daily life. A female general population sample (n = 515) participated in an experience sampling study. Time-lagged analyses between increases in momentary NA and subsequent momentary paranoia were examined. The impact of childhood adversity, stress sensitivity (impact of momentary stress on momentary NA), and depressive symptoms on these time-lagged associations, as well as associations with follow-up self-reported psychotic symptoms (Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences and the Symptom Checklist-90-Revised) were investigated. Moments of NA increase resulted in a significant increase in paranoia over 180 subsequent minutes. Both stress sensitivity and depressive symptoms impacted on the transfer of NA to paranoia. Stress sensitivity moderated the level of increase in paranoia during the initial NA increase, while depressive symptoms increased persistence of paranoid feelings from moment to moment. Momentary paranoia responses to NA increases were associated with follow-up psychotic symptoms. Examination of microlevel momentary experience may thus yield new insights into the mechanism underlying co-occurrence of altered mood states and psychosis. Knowledge of the underlying mechanism is required in order to determine source and place where remediation should occur.

  20. Time-dependent phase lag of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles conjugated with biotargets studied with alternating current magnetic susceptometor for liquid phase immunoassays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, S. H.; Yang, H. C.; Horng, H. E.; Chieh, J. J.; Chen, K. L.; Chen, H. H.; Chen, J. Y.; Liu, C. I.; Liu, C. W.; Wang, L. M.

    2013-12-01

    In this work, the time-dependent phase lag θ of biofunctionalized magnetic nanoparticles (BMNs) conjugated with biotargets is studied with a home-made alternating current (ac) susceptometor for liquid phase immunoassays. The sensing unit of the ac susceptometor composed of excitation, pick-up, and compensation coils are balanced to 0.03 ppm. The BMNs are anti-goat C-reactive protein coated onto dextran-coated magnetic nanoparticles composed of Fe3O4, labeled as Fe3O4-antiCRP. The bio-targets are human CRP. As the human CRP is conjugated with reagents Fe3O4-antiCRP, the magnetic clusters of Fe3O4-antiCRP-CRP are formulated. Due to the clustering effect, the Brownian relaxation of BMNs will be depressed, which in turn enhances the effective relaxation time. By monitoring the dynamic phase lag, we demonstrate a sensitive platform of assaying human CRP. The detection platform is robust, easy to use and can be applied for assaying a wide variety of biotargets including viruses, proteins, tumor markers, chemicals, etc.

  1. Time-lagged ensemble simulations of the dispersion of the Eyjafjallajökull plume over Europe with COSMO-ART

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, H.; Förstner, J.; Vogel, B.; Hanisch, T.; Mühr, B.; Schättler, U.; Schad, T.

    2014-08-01

    An extended version of the German operational weather forecast model was used to simulate the ash dispersion during the eruption of the Eyjafjallajökull. As an operational forecast was launched every 6 hours, a time-lagged ensemble was obtained. Sensitivity runs show the ability of the model to simulate thin ash layers when an increased vertical resolution is used. Calibration of the model results with measured data allows for a quantitative forecast of the ash concentration. After this calibration an independent comparison of the simulated number concentration of 3 μm particles and observations at Hohenpeißenberg gives a correlation coefficient of 0.79. However, this agreement could only be reached after additional modifications of the emissions. Based on the time lagged ensemble the conditional probability of violation of a certain threshold is calculated. Improving the ensemble technique used in our study such probabilities could become valuable information for the forecasters advising the organizations responsible for the closing of the airspace.

  2. A new German Charité Jet Lag Scale for jet lag symptoms and application.

    PubMed

    Becker, Tanja; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Travelling across multiple time zones provokes adaptation of endogenous circadian rhythm to the new time zone. Within the context of previous studies, an English-language state-of-health questionnaire, the Columbia Jet Lag Scale, is the only sufficiently validated scale for jet lag and its symptoms. This study presents a new state-of-health questionnaire in German, one intended to achieve standardisation of surveys on jet lag. The questionnaire was applied to define the baseline for the prevalence of jet lag symptoms based on a reference group (n = 36). The jet lag score ascertained was subsequently applied to determine the frequency of jet lag in a group of 53 subjects. Systematic investigation of the frequency of jet lag symptoms had not been previously presented. Among the group of 53 travelling test subjects, 60% demonstrated moderate jet lag symptoms. Practitioner Summary: This introduction of the Charité Jet Lag Scale, the first German jet lag questionnaire, calls attention to this topic for the first time since a 2000 publication in Ergonomics. Our systematic investigation of jet lag frequency, with the new scale, determined moderate jet lag symptoms among 60% of subjects.

  3. Lagged correlation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curme, Chester

    Technological advances have provided scientists with large high-dimensional datasets that describe the behaviors of complex systems: from the statistics of energy levels in complex quantum systems, to the time-dependent transcription of genes, to price fluctuations among assets in a financial market. In this environment, where it may be difficult to infer the joint distribution of the data, network science has flourished as a way to gain insight into the structure and organization of such systems by focusing on pairwise interactions. This work focuses on a particular setting, in which a system is described by multivariate time series data. We consider time-lagged correlations among elements in this system, in such a way that the measured interactions among elements are asymmetric. Finally, we allow these interactions to be characteristically weak, so that statistical uncertainties may be important to consider when inferring the structure of the system. We introduce a methodology for constructing statistically validated networks to describe such a system, extend the methodology to accommodate interactions with a periodic component, and show how consideration of bipartite community structures in these networks can aid in the construction of robust statistical models. An example of such a system is a financial market, in which high frequency returns data may be used to describe contagion, or the spreading of shocks in price among assets. These data provide the experimental testing ground for our methodology. We study NYSE data from both the present day and one decade ago, examine the time scales over which the validated lagged correlation networks exist, and relate differences in the topological properties of the networks to an increasing economic efficiency. We uncover daily periodicities in the validated interactions, and relate our findings to explanations of the Epps Effect, an empirical phenomenon of financial time series. We also study bipartite community

  4. Understanding selection bias, time-lags and measurement bias in secondary data sources: Putting the Encyclopedia of Associations database in broader context.

    PubMed

    Bevan, Shaun; Baumgartner, Frank R; Johnson, Erik W; McCarthy, John D

    2013-11-01

    Secondary data gathered for purposes other than research play an important role in the social sciences. A recent data release has made an important source of publicly available data on associational interests, the Encyclopedia of Associations (EA), readily accessible to scholars (www.policyagendas.org). In this paper we introduce these new data and systematically investigate issues of lag between events and subsequent reporting in the EA, as these have important but under-appreciated effects on time-series statistical models. We further analyze the accuracy and coverage of the database in numerous ways. Our study serves as a guide to potential users of this database, but we also reflect upon a number of issues that should concern all researchers who use secondary data such as newspaper records, IRS reports and FBI Uniform Crime Reports.

  5. On the lag time between internal strain and basement involved thrust induced exhumation: The case of the Colombian Eastern Cordillera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora, Andrès; Blanco, Vladimir; Naranjo, Julian; Sanchez, Nelson; Ketcham, Richard A.; Rubiano, Jorge; Stockli, Daniel F.; Quintero, Isaid; Nemčok, Michal; Horton, Brian K.; Davila, Hamblet

    2013-07-01

    Thrust sheets accumulate internal strain before they start moving along discrete fault planes. However, there are no previous studies evaluating the time difference between initiation of strain and fault displacement. In this paper we use observations from the Eastern Cordillera of Colombia to evaluate this interval. We utilize multiple thermochronometers and paleothermometers to refine the timing of deformation. Based on these new data we build time-temperature path estimates that together with geometric outcrop-based structural analysis and fluid inclusions allow us to assign relative timing to features associated with strain, such as cleavage, veins and certain types of fractures, and compare that with the timing of thrusting. We find that cleavage was only formed close to maximum paleotemperatures, almost coeval with the onset of thrust-induced denudation by the Late Oligocene. The corresponding structural level of fold-related veins suggest that they were formed later but still when the country rocks were at temperatures higher than 160 °C, mostly during the Early Miocene and still coexisted with the latest stages of cleavage formation. Our data show that the main period of strain hardening was short (probably a few million years) and occurred before first-order basement thrusting was dominant, but was associated with second-order folding.

  6. Supermassive Black Holes with High Accretion Rates in Active Galactic Nuclei. IV. Hβ Time Lags and Implications for Super-Eddington Accretion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Pu; Hu, Chen; Lu, Kai-Xing; Huang, Ying-Ke; Cheng, Cheng; Qiu, Jie; Li, Yan-Rong; Zhang, Yang-Wei; Fan, Xu-Liang; Bai, Jin-Ming; Bian, Wei-Hao; Yuan, Ye-Fei; Kaspi, Shai; Ho, Luis C.; Netzer, Hagai; Wang, Jian-Min; SEAMBH Collaboration

    2015-06-01

    We have completed two years of photometric and spectroscopic monitoring of a large number of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) with very high accretion rates. In this paper, we report on the result of the second phase of the campaign, during 2013-2014, and the measurements of five new Hβ time lags out of eight monitored AGNs. All five objects were identified as super-Eddington accreting massive black holes (SEAMBHs). The highest measured accretion rates for the objects in this campaign are \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} ≳ 200, where \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} ={{\\dot{M}}\\bullet }/{{L}Edd}{{c}-2}, {{\\dot{M}}\\bullet } is the mass accretion rates, {{L}Edd} is the Eddington luminosity and c is the speed of light. We find that the Hβ time lags in SEAMBHs are significantly shorter than those measured in sub-Eddington AGNs, and the deviations increase with increasing accretion rates. Thus, the relationship between broad-line region size ({{R}_{Hβ }}) and optical luminosity at 5100 Å, {{R}_{Hβ }}-{{L}5100}, requires accretion rate as an additional parameter. We propose that much of the effect may be due to the strong anisotropy of the emitted slim-disk radiation. Scaling {{R}_{Hβ }} by the gravitational radius of the black hole (BH), we define a new radius-mass parameter (Y) and show that it saturates at a critical accretion rate of \\mathscr{\\dot{M}} {\\mkern 1mu} {{}c}=6˜ 30, indicating a transition from thin to slim accretion disk and a saturated luminosity of the slim disks. The parameter Y is a very useful probe for understanding the various types of accretion onto massive BHs. We briefly comment on implications to the general population of super-Eddington AGNs in the universe and applications to cosmology.

  7. GRB/GW Association: Long-Short GRB Candidates, Time Lag, Measuring Gravitational Wave Velocity, and Testing Einstein’s Equivalence Principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Hu, Yi-Ming; Fan, Yi-Zhong; Wei, Da-Ming

    2016-08-01

    Short-duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs) are widely believed to be powered by the mergers of compact binaries, such as binary neutron stars or possibly neutron star-black hole binaries. Though the prospect of detecting SGRBs with gravitational wave (GW) signals by the advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO)/VIRGO network is promising, no known SGRB has been found within the expected advanced LIGO/VIRGO sensitivity range for binary neutron star systems. We find, however, that the two long-short GRBs (GRB 060505 and GRB 060614) may be within the horizon of advanced GW detectors. In the upcoming era of GW astronomy, the merger origin of some long-short GRBs, as favored by the macronova signature displayed in GRB 060614, can be unambiguously tested. The model-dependent time lags between the merger and the onset of the prompt emission of the GRB are estimated. The comparison of such time lags between model predictions and the real data expected in the era of the GW astronomy would be helpful in revealing the physical processes taking place at the central engine (including the launch of the relativistic outflow, the emergence of the outflow from the dense material ejected during the merger, and the radiation of gamma rays). We also show that the speed of GWs, with or without a simultaneous test of Einstein’s equivalence principle, can be directly measured to an accuracy of ˜ 3× {10}-8 {cm} {{{s}}}-1 or even better in the advanced LIGO/VIRGO era.

  8. Exploring lag times between monthly atmospheric deposition and stream chemistry in Appalachian Forest using cross-correlation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although long-term reductions in surface water nitrogen and sulfate concentrations have been widely observed in response to reductions in atmospheric deposition, documenting and inter-relating transient variations in deposition and stream time series has proven problematical due to low signal-to-noi...

  9. 14C analyses quantify time lag between coca leaf harvest and street-level seizure of cocaine.

    PubMed

    Ehleringer, James R; Casale, John F; Barnette, Janet E; Xu, Xiaomei; Lott, Michael J; Hurley, Janet

    2012-01-10

    Measurements were made on the natural abundance (14)C content (Δ(14)C) of cocaine specimens seized between 2003 and 2009. The objective of this study was to determine the extent to which Δ(14)C analyses could quantify the "age" of recent cocaine seizures. Here "age" of a seized cocaine specimen is defined as the time period between when a coca leaf was harvested in South America and its seizure as cocaine at either the international or domestic street levels. Based on Δ(14)C analyses of seizure specimens, there were no statistically significant differences in the ages of domestic cocaine HCl and cocaine base specimens seized on the streets in different locations across the United States. Between 2007 and 2009, the average age of a street-level cocaine seizure in the United States was 24.6±1.1 months. Cocaine shipment seizures that were in excess of 150 kg during this time period had an average age of 18.2±1.4 months, whereas smaller shipment seizures were significantly older with an average age of 22.3±0.6 months. Analyses of the largest cocaine shipment seizures suggested that these seizures were composed of specimens with different ages, possibly representing accumulations over as much as a 31-month period.

  10. Global Characteristics of the Correlation and Time Lag Between Solar and Ionospheric Parameters in the 27-day Period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Choon-Ki; Han, Shin-Chan; Dieter,Bilitza; Ki-Weon,Seo

    2012-01-01

    The 27-day variations of topside ionosphere are investigated using the in-situ electron density measurements from the CHAMP planar Langmuir probe and GRACE K-band ranging system. As the two satellite systems orbit at the altitudes of approx. 370 km and approx. 480 km, respectively, the satellite data sets are greatly valuable for examining the electron density variations in the vicinity of F2-peak. In a 27-day period, the electron density measurements from the satellites are in good agreements with the solar flux, except during the solar minimum period. The time delays are mostly 1-2 day and represent the hemispherical asymmetry. The globally-estimated spatial patterns of the correlation between solar flux and in-situ satellite measurements show poor correlations in the (magnetic) equatorial region, which are not found from the ground measurements of vertically-integrated electron content. We suggest that the most plausible cause for the poor correlation is the vertical movement of ionization due to atmospheric dynamic processes that is not controlled by the solar extreme ultraviolet radiation.

  11. A test of basic psychological needs theory in young soccer players: time-lagged design at the individual and team levels.

    PubMed

    González, L; Tomás, I; Castillo, I; Duda, J L; Balaguer, I

    2016-09-27

    Within the framework of basic psychological needs theory (Deci & Ryan, 2000), multilevel structural equation modeling (MSEM) with a time-lagged design was used to test a mediation model examining the relationship between perceptions of coaches' interpersonal styles (autonomy supportive and controlling), athletes' basic psychological needs (satisfaction and thwarting), and indicators of well-being (subjective vitality) and ill-being (burnout), estimating separately between and within effects. The participants were 597 Spanish male soccer players aged between 11 and 14 years (M = 12.57, SD = 0.54) from 40 teams who completed a questionnaire package at two time points in a competitive season. Results revealed that at the individual level, athletes' perceptions of autonomy support positively predicted athletes' need satisfaction (autonomy, competence, and relatedness), whereas athletes' perceptions of controlling style positively predicted athletes' need thwarting (autonomy, competence, and relatedness). In turn, all three athletes' need satisfaction dimensions predicted athletes' subjective vitality and burnout (positively and negatively, respectively), whereas competence thwarting negatively predicted subjective vitality and competence and relatedness positively predicted burnout. At the team level, team perceptions of autonomy supportive style positively predicted team autonomy and relatedness satisfaction. Mediation effects only appeared at the individual level.

  12. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: Determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, G.; Dobbie, S.

    2009-05-01

    A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It was observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi) for Saharan dust particles varied from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although the spread in the onset RHi) for the Saharan dust samples were in agreement, the active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi) conditions were found to differ. This could be due to the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities on the nucleability parameter contact angle that is widely used in the ice cloud modeling. These calculations show that the surface irregularities can reduce the contact angle by approximately 10°.

  13. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, G.; Dobbie, S.

    2010-01-01

    A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It was observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi) for Saharan dust particles varied from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although the spread in the onset RHi for the three Saharan dust samples were in agreement, the active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi conditions were found to differ. This could be due to the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities on the nucleability parameter, contact angle that is widely used in ice cloud modeling. These calculations show that the surface irregularities can reduce the contact angle by approximately 10 degrees.

  14. Ice nucleation properties of mineral dust particles: Determination of onset RHi, IN active fraction, nucleation time-lag, and the effect of active sites on contact angles

    SciTech Connect

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Dobbie, Steven

    2010-01-08

    A newly developed ice nucleation experimental set up was used to investigate the heterogeneous ice nucleation properties of three Saharan and one Spanish dust particle samples. It is observed that the spread in the onset relative humidities with respect to ice (RHi) for Saharan dust particles varies from 104% to 110%, whereas for the Spanish dust from 106% to 110%. The elemental composition analysis shows a prominent Ca feature in the Spanish dust sample which could potentially explain the differences in nucleation threshold. Although spread in the onset RHi for Saharan dust samples were in agreement, their active fractions and nucleation time-lags calculated at various temperature and RHi conditions, for two Saharan dust samples, were not found to be in complete agreement. This could be because of the subtle variation in the elemental composition of the dust samples, and the surface irregularities like steps, cracks, cavities etc. A combination of classical nucleation theory and active site theory is used to understand the importance of these surface irregularities, expressed in terms of active sites, on the nucleability parameter (contact angle) that is widely used in the ice cloud modeling studies. These calculations show that the surface irregularities reduce the contact angle by approximately 10 degrees.

  15. A paired comparison between human skin and hairless guinea pig skin in vitro permeability and lag time measurements for 6 industrial chemicals.

    PubMed

    Frasch, H Frederick; Barbero, Ana M

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to measure and compare permeability coefficients (k(p)) and lag times (tau) in human skin and hairless guinea pig (HGP) skin. Paired experiments employed heat-separated epidermal membranes from human and HGP sources mounted on static in vitro diffusion cells. Infinite-dose, saturated aqueous solutions of 6 industrial chemicals were used as donors: aniline, benzene, 1,2- dichloroethane, diethyl phthalate, naphthalene, and tetrachloroethylene. No significant differences were found between human and HGP skin for either k(p) or tau for any of these chemicals (p >or= .24). HGP vs. human k(p) measurements, and HGP vs. human tau measurements, were highly correlated. For k(p), the slope of the linear correlation was close to unity (1.080 +/- 0.182) and the intercept close to 0 (0.015 +/- 0. 029 cm/h), with a correlation coefficient (r(2)) = 0.898. For tau, the slope was also close to unity (0.818 +/- 0.030) and the intercept close to 0 (-0.014 +/- 0.023 h), with r(2) = 0.994. These results suggest that HGP skin may serve as an excellent surrogate for human skin in in vitro dermal penetration studies.

  16. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, Marcio G. B.; Méndez, Mariano; Sanna, Andrea; Horvath, Jorge E.

    2013-08-01

    We studied the energy and frequency dependence of the Fourier time lags and intrinsic coherence of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations (kHz QPOs) in the neutron-star low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53, using a large data set obtained with the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer. We confirmed that, in both sources, the time lags of the lower kHz QPO are soft and their magnitude increases with energy. We also found that: (i) In 4U 1636-53, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at ˜ 30 μs in the QPO frequency range 500-850 Hz, and decrease to ˜ 10 μs when the QPO frequency increases further. In 4U 1608-52, the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO remain constant at 40 μs up to 800 Hz, the highest frequency reached by this QPO in our data. (ii) In both sources, the time lags of the upper kHz QPO are hard, independent of energy or frequency and inconsistent with the soft lags of the lower kHz QPO. (iii) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO remains constant at ˜0.6 between 5 and 12 keV, and drops to zero above that energy. The intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with being zero across the full energy range. (iv) In 4U 1636-53, the intrinsic coherence of the lower kHz QPO increases from ˜0 at ˜600 Hz to ˜1, and it decreases to ˜0.5 at 920 Hz; in 4U 1608-52, the intrinsic coherence is consistent with the same trend. (v) In both sources the intrinsic coherence of the upper kHz QPO is consistent with zero over the full frequency range of the QPO, except in 4U 1636-53 between 700 and 900 Hz where the intrinsic coherence marginally increases. We discuss our results in the context of scenarios in which the soft lags are either due to reflection off the accretion disc or up-/down-scattering in a hot medium close to the neutron star. We finally explore the connection between, on one hand the time lags and the intrinsic coherence of the kHz QPOs, and on the other the QPOs' amplitude and quality factor in

  17. Investigating evolutionary lag using the species-pairs evolutionary lag test (SPELT).

    PubMed

    Nunn, Charles L; Cooper, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    For traits showing correlated evolution, one trait may evolve more slowly than the other, producing evolutionary lag. The species-pairs evolutionary lag test (SPELT) uses an independent contrasts based approach to detect evolutionary lag on a phylogeny. We investigated the statistical performance of SPELT in relation to degree of lag, sample size (species pairs), and strength of association between traits. We simulated trait evolution under two models: one in which trait X changes during speciation and the lagging trait Y catches up as a function of time since speciation; and another in which trait X evolves in a random walk and the lagging trait Y is a function of X at a previous time period. Type I error rates under "no lag" were close to the expected level of 5%, indicating that the method is not prone to false-positives. Simulation results suggest that reasonable statistical power (80%) is reached with around 140 species pairs, although the degree of lag and trait associations had additional influences on power. We applied the method to two datasets and discuss how estimation of a branch length scaling parameter (κ) can be used with SPELT to detect lag.

  18. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control.

    PubMed

    Van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees' paranoid cognitions-representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability-link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control), both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome) are examined in interaction with employees' self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees' organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e., those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization.

  19. Paranoia as an Antecedent and Consequence of Getting Ahead in Organizations: Time-Lagged Effects Between Paranoid Cognitions, Self-Monitoring, and Changes in Span of Control

    PubMed Central

    Van Quaquebeke, Niels

    2016-01-01

    A 6-month, time-lagged online survey among 441 employees in diverse industries was conducted to investigate the role paranoia plays as an antecedent and as a consequence of advancement in organizations. The background of the study is the argument that it requires active social sense-making and behavioral adaptability to advance in organizations. The present paper thus explores the extent to which employees’ paranoid cognitions—representative of a heightened albeit suspicious sense-making and behavioral adaptability—link with their advancement in organizations (operationalized as changes in afforded span of control), both as an antecedent and an outcome. Following the strategy to illuminate the process by interaction analysis, both conditions (antecedent and outcome) are examined in interaction with employees’ self-monitoring, which is considered representative of a heightened but healthy sense-making and behavioral adaptability. Results support the expected interference interaction between paranoid cognitions and self-monitoring in that each can to some degree compensate for the other in explaining employees’ organizational advancement. Reversely, changes in span of control also affected paranoid cognitions. In particular, low self-monitors, i.e., those low in adaptive sense-making, reacted with heightened paranoid cognitions when demoted. In effect, the present study is thus the first to empirically support that paranoid cognitions can be a consequence but also a prerequisite for getting ahead in organizations. Practical advice should, however, be suspended until it is better understood whether and under what circumstances paranoia may relate not only to personally getting ahead but also to an increased effectiveness for the benefit of the organization. PMID:27713724

  20. Jet-Lag Syndrome

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-11-01

    around one third of travellers do not experience jet lag. In particular sleep disturbance is experienced by around 78% of subjects after a...transmeridian flight whereas after 3 nights only around 30% of subjects experienced disturbance. In another study 40% of subjects reported subjective weakness...reductions in SWS and REM sleep may be present. After westward flights the sleep disturbance may only last for two or three days. Sleep quality is

  1. Time lags of the kilohertz quasi-periodic oscillations in the low-mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Avellar, M. G. B.; Méndez, M.; Sanna, A.; Horvath, J. E.

    2014-10-01

    We studied the time lags and the coherence of the X-ray light curves of the neutron star low mass X-ray binaries 4U 1608-52 and 4U 1636-53. These quantities are frequency-dependent measures of the time or phase delay and of the degree of linear correlation between two X-ray light curves in two different energies bands; they encode information about the size and geometry of the medium that produces them.

  2. Time-resolved pump-probe spectroscopy of intraband absorption by a semiconductor nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leonov, Mikhail Y.; Rukhlenko, Ivan D.; Baranov, Alexander V.; Fedorov, Anatoly V.

    2013-09-01

    We develop a theory of time-resolved pump-probe optical spectroscopy of intraband absorption of a probe pulse inside an anisotropic semiconductor nanorod. The absorption is preceded by the absorption of the pump pulse resonant to an interband transition. It is assumed that the resonantly exited states of the nanorod are interrelated via the relaxation induced by their interaction with a bath. We reveal the conditions for which the absorption of the probe's pulse is governed by a simple formula regardless of the pulse's shape. This formula is useful for the analysis of the experimental data containing information on the relaxation parameters of the nanorod's electronic subsystem.

  3. Back to the basics. Number of general hospitals grows for the first time in years despite slim margins, lagging reimbursements and a tight market.

    PubMed

    Romano, Michael

    2004-01-12

    After slipping 16.5% in the past quarter-century, the number of community hospitals is on the rise despite slim margins, lagging reimbursements and a tight capital market. Growth is spurred by the attractive demographics of fast-growing suburban areas, changing consumer tastes and the lure of big business from baby boomers and the elderly. One new facility is Florida Hospital-Flagler, left.

  4. Wavelength-modulated tunable diode-laser absorption spectrometry for real-time monitoring of microbial growth.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jie; Xiang, Jindong; Axner, Ove; Ying, Chaofu

    2016-03-20

    It is important to monitor and assess the growth of micro-organisms under various conditions. Yet, thus far there has been no technique to do this with the required speed and accuracy. This work demonstrates swift and accurate assessment of the concentration of carbon dioxide that is produced by use of a wavelength-modulated tunable diode-laser based absorption spectroscopy (WM-TDLAS). It is shown by experiments on two types of bacteria, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans, that the technique can produce high signal-to-noise-ratio data from bacteria grown in confined spaces and exposed to limited amounts of nutrients that can be used for extraction of growth parameters by fitting of the Gompertz model. By applying the technique to S. aureus bacteria at various temperatures (in the 25°C to 42°C range), it is specifically shown that both the maximum growth rate and the so-called lag time have a strong temperature dependence (under the specific conditions with a maximum of the former at 37°C) that matches conventional models well for bacterial growth. Hence, it is demonstrated that WM-TDLAS monitoring CO2 is a user-friendly, non-intrusive, and label-free technique that swiftly, and with high signal-to-noise-ratio, can be used for rapid (on the Hz scale) and accurate assessment of bacterial growth.

  5. Cross-correlation and time-lag analysis of high frequency monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide (Eastern Pyrenees, Spain) to reveal cause-effect relationships between variables governing slope instability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulas, Marco; Moya, Jose; Corsini, Alessandro; Corominas, Jordi

    2015-04-01

    The Vallcebre landslide is a slow moving large landslide located 140 km north of Barcelona in the Eastern Pyrenees. Monitoring data of the Vallcebre landslide represent a singular case of multi parameter high-frequency monitoring system set up in 1996 and still ongoing. Data of movements and groundwater levels are measured and recorded with a frequency of 20 minutes in 6 boreholes distributed in the landslide, each one equipped with a wire extensometer and a piezometer, while rainfall is recorded by a specific gauge at the site. Data from 3 boreholes recorded during three full years of measurements (from 1999 to 2001) have been analyzed by means of a cross-correlation function in order to determine the reciprocal interdependency and the relative time lag between rainfall, groundwater and movement rate maxima and, ultimately, to evidence cause-effect processes occurring along the slope. It should be pinpointed that, in this specific case, rainfall is also a proxy for the discharge level of the stream eroding the toe of the landslide, that is believed to be one of the main instability factors. The cross-correlation function is a quite simple signal processing tool for measuring similarities of waveforms as function of an applied time-lag. Specifically, it was applied to study: i) the relations between rainfall and movement rate, so to highlight the relative time lag for rainfall to produce an effect in different points of the landslide; ii) the inter-dependencies between different movement rates in the three boreholes in order to determine the pattern of mobilization of the landslide (from up to down slope and vice-versa); iii) the response of groundwater with respect to rainfall, which reflects the local permeability; iv) the evolution of groundwater levels in the three monitoring points. Altogether, results confirm and constrain in time the retrogressive trend of movements in the landslide (in agreement with a 2D numerical model previously developed by Ferrari et

  6. Time-Resolved Broadband Cavity-Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy behind Shock Waves.

    PubMed

    Matsugi, Akira; Shiina, Hiroumi; Oguchi, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Kazuo

    2016-04-07

    A fast and sensitive broadband absorption technique for measurements of high-temperature chemical kinetics and spectroscopy has been developed by applying broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (BBCEAS) in a shock tube. The developed method has effective absorption path lengths of 60-200 cm, or cavity enhancement factors of 12-40, over a wavelength range of 280-420 nm, and is capable of simultaneously recording absorption time profiles over an ∼32 nm spectral bandpass in a single experiment with temporal and spectral resolutions of 5 μs and 2 nm, respectively. The accuracy of the kinetic and spectroscopic measurements was examined by investigating high-temperature reactions and absorption spectra of formaldehyde behind reflected shock waves using 1,3,5-trioxane as a precursor. The rate constants obtained for the thermal decomposition reactions of 1,3,5-trioxane (to three formaldehyde molecules) and formaldehyde (to HCO + H) agreed well with the literature data. High-temperature absorption cross sections of formaldehyde between 280 and 410 nm have been determined at the post-reflected-shock temperatures of 955, 1265, and 1708 K. The results demonstrate the applicability of the BBCEAS technique to time- and wavelength-resolved sensitive absorption measurements at high temperatures.

  7. Absorption of a Massive Scalar Field by Wormhole Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Juhua; Wang, Yongjiu; Jin, Yao

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of the test massive scalar field propagating in the background of a class of wormhole space-times. Basing on the quantum scattering theory, we analyze the Schrödinger-type scalar wave equation and compute transmission coefficients for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry with the WKB approximation. We numerically investigate its absorption cross section and analyze them in the high frequency regime. We find that the absorption cross section oscillates about the geometric optical value and the limit of absorption cross section is uniform in the high frequency regime.

  8. Absorption of a Massive Scalar Field by Wormhole Space-Times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hai; Chen, Juhua; Wang, Yongjiu; Jin, Yao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of the test massive scalar field propagating in the background of a class of wormhole space-times. Basing on the quantum scattering theory, we analyze the Schrödinger-type scalar wave equation and compute transmission coefficients for arbitrary coupling of the field to the background geometry with the WKB approximation. We numerically investigate its absorption cross section and analyze them in the high frequency regime. We find that the absorption cross section oscillates about the geometric optical value and the limit of absorption cross section is uniform in the high frequency regime.

  9. Melatonin and jet-lag.

    PubMed

    Samel, A

    1999-09-09

    Caused by time shift, a desynchronisation of the body clock from external zeitgebers occurs after transmeridian flight which leads to disturbances of sleep and circadian rhythms. These disturbances are not pathological and diminish within days. To achieve a faster resynchronisation than naturally, the hormone melatonin is often taken by business people and travelers, and--to some extent--by aircrew. The usefulness of the melatonin intake for alleviation of jet-lag is intensively discussed. Most field studies reporting about a favourable influence of melatonin on jet-lag, have been performed using questionnaires; few studies monitoring physiological circadian functions have found a better adjustment under melatonin treatment. However, from laboratory experiments is known that external melatonin is indeed capable to influence the circadian system. With respect to the efficacy of melatonin on better sleep and performance, there is a lack of information from field studies, and laboratory studies do not provide consistent results. Unequivocal estimations of the dosage of melatonin for best efficacy are not yet performed, although a range of different dosages have been tested. Recommendations about dosage, duration of medication and time of intake (which is of major importance for efficacy) do not rely on systematic examinations of the drug. Adverse effects of melatonin on sleepiness and impaired performance directly after intake of the drug are known. From studies is also derived that an inappropriate timing of intake causes sleep disturbances and unfavourable shifts of the circadian system. The administration of melatonin for influencing sleep and circadian rhythms cannot be recommended for aircrew. Flight physicians should refer to adverse and side effects of the hormone melatonin. Before any general recommendations for the use of melatonin can be presented, genuine clinical studies following good clinical practice should be performed.

  10. Simulation system for understanding the lag effect in fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Kawashima, Hiroki; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Matsubara, Kosuke; Iida, Hiroji; Sanada, Shigeru

    2013-07-01

    Real-time tumor tracking in external radiotherapy can be achieved by diagnostic (kV) X-ray imaging with a dynamic flat-panel detector (FPD). It is crucial to understand the effects of image lag for real-time tumor tracking. Our purpose in this study was to develop a lag simulation system based on the image lag properties of an FPD system. Image lag properties were measured on flat-field images both in direct- and indirect-conversion dynamic FPDs. A moving target with image lag was simulated based on the lag properties in all combinations of FPD types, imaging rates, exposure doses, and target speeds, and then compared with actual moving targets for investigation of the reproducibility of image lag. Image lag was simulated successfully and agreed well with the actual lag as well as with the predicted effect. In the indirect-conversion FPD, a higher dose caused greater image lag on images. In contrast, there were no significant differences among dose levels in a direct-conversion FPD. There were no relationships between target speed and amount of image blurring in either type of FPD. The maximum contour blurring and the rate of increase in pixel value due to image lag were 1.1 mm and 10.0 %, respectively, in all combinations of imaging parameters examined in this study. Blurred boundaries and changes in pixel value due to image lag were estimated under various imaging conditions with use of the simulation system. Our system would be helpful for a better understanding of the effects of image lag in fluoroscopic images.

  11. Social jet lag: Sleep-corrected formula.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, Konrad S

    2017-03-20

    Social jet lag is a term describing misalignment between social and biological times. In this article, it is argued that the currently used formula for social jet lag captures not only this misalignment, but also sleep debt resulting from sleep deprivation during workdays. It is proposed to adopt the sleep-corrected formula for social jet lag, which takes the form of the difference between the sleep onset on free days and workdays in the case of subjects with longer sleep and later (or equal) sleep onset on free days compared to workdays; it takes the form of the difference between the sleep offset on free days and workdays for subjects with longer sleep and earlier (or equal) sleep offset on workdays compared to free days.

  12. Lag-stabilized force feedback damping

    SciTech Connect

    Petterson, B.J.; Robinett, R.D.; Werner, J.C.

    1991-05-01

    A lag-stabilized, force feedback controller for damping initial and residual oscillations of a planar, cantilevered flexible arm has been analytically developed and experimentally implemented on a commercial robot. The controller feeds back force sensor measurements that are delayed in time and proportional to the displacement (angular orientation) of the arm in order to damp the oscillation. As a result of the lag (contrary to popular belief), the controlled robot system is stable and provides tunable performance on a Cincinnati Milacron T3-786 robot. 3 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Solving the Structure of Reaction Intermediates by Time-Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Q.; Hanson, J; Frenkel, A

    2008-01-01

    We present a robust data analysis method of time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments suitable for chemical speciation and structure determination of reaction intermediates. Chemical speciation is done by principal component analysis (PCA) of the time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge structure data. Structural analysis of intermediate phases is done by theoretical modeling of their extended x-ray absorption fine-structure data isolated by PCA. The method is demonstrated using reduction and reoxidation of Cu-doped ceria catalysts where we detected reaction intermediates and measured fine details of the reaction kinetics. This approach can be directly adapted to many time-resolved x-ray spectroscopy experiments where new rapid throughput data collection and analysis methods are needed.

  14. The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera house seating areas.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Jin Yong; Kim, Jae Ho; Ryu, Jong Kwan

    2015-03-01

    The effects of stage absorption on reverberation times in opera houses were investigated using computer simulations and scale model measurements. The reverberation time (RT) was measured in stalls seating with and without variable stage elements (e.g., fly curtains, side curtains, cycloramas, and stage sets). The absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling of the stage houses were varied accordingly. It was found that variable stage elements have a significant influence on reverberation times in seating areas, particularly for a reverberant stage house, due to the low absorption of the walls and ceiling in the stage house. It was also found that the absorption coefficients of the walls and ceiling should be over 0.5 to avoid RT decreases of over 10% due to the absorption of the variable stage elements. In addition, coupled room effects were investigated both with and without variable stage elements and the results show that double slope was not found in the opera houses investigated in this study.

  15. Nonshared environmental mediation of the association between deviant peer affiliation and adolescent externalizing behaviors over time: results from a cross-lagged monozygotic twin differences design.

    PubMed

    Burt, S Alexandra; McGue, Matt; Iacono, William G

    2009-11-01

    It has been argued that peers are the most important agent of adolescent socialization and, more specifically, that this socialization process occurs at the child-specific (or nonshared environmental) level (J. R. Harris, 1998; R. Plomin & Asbury, 2005). The authors sought to empirically evaluate this nonshared environmental peer influence hypothesis by examining the association between externalizing behaviors and deviant peer affiliation in a sample of 454 pairs of monozygotic (genetically identical) twins, assessed at ages 14 and 17, within a cross-lagged twin differences design. Results argued against a causal nonshared environmental influence of peer affiliation on the development of externalizing behaviors and in favor of nonshared environmental "selection." In particular, the twin with more externalizing behaviors at age 14 reported increased deviant peer affiliation relative to his or her co-twin 3 years later, regardless of his or her genetic predispositions toward externalizing behavior. Such findings suggest that adolescents with higher levels of externalizing behaviors select or shape (either intentionally or inadvertently) subsequent environmental experiences to involve increased affiliation with deviant peers. Implications are discussed.

  16. Femtosecond time-domain observation of atmospheric absorption in the near-infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, T. J.; Monchocé, Sylvain; Zhang, Chunmei; Brown, Graham G.; Corkum, P. B.; Villeneuve, D. M.

    2016-12-01

    As light propagates through a medium, absorption caused by electronic or rovibrational transitions is evident in the transmitted spectrum. The incident electromagnetic field polarizes the medium and the absorption is due to the imaginary part of the linear susceptibility. In the time domain, the field establishes a coherence in the medium that radiates out of phase with the initial field. This coherence can persist for tens of picoseconds in atmospheric molecules such as H2O . We propagate a few-cycle laser pulse centered at 1.8 μ m through the atmosphere and measure the long-lasting molecular coherence in the time domain by high-order harmonic cross correlation. The measured optical free-induction decay of the pulse is compared with a calculation based on the calculated rovibrational spectrum of H2O absorption.

  17. Rapid, Time-Division Multiplexed, Direct Absorption- and Wavelength Modulation-Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Alexander; Witzel, Oliver; Ebert, Volker

    2014-01-01

    We present a tunable diode laser spectrometer with a novel, rapid time multiplexed direct absorption- and wavelength modulation-spectroscopy operation mode. The new technique allows enhancing the precision and dynamic range of a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer without sacrificing accuracy. The spectroscopic technique combines the benefits of absolute concentration measurements using calibration-free direct tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (dTDLAS) with the enhanced noise rejection of wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS). In this work we demonstrate for the first time a 125 Hz time division multiplexed (TDM-dTDLAS-WMS) spectroscopic scheme by alternating the modulation of a DFB-laser between a triangle-ramp (dTDLAS) and an additional 20 kHz sinusoidal modulation (WMS). The absolute concentration measurement via the dTDLAS-technique allows one to simultaneously calibrate the normalized 2f/1f-signal of the WMS-technique. A dTDLAS/WMS-spectrometer at 1.37 μm for H2O detection was built for experimental validation of the multiplexing scheme over a concentration range from 50 to 3000 ppmV (0.1 MPa, 293 K). A precision of 190 ppbV was achieved with an absorption length of 12.7 cm and an averaging time of two seconds. Our results show a five-fold improvement in precision over the entire concentration range and a significantly decreased averaging time of the spectrometer. PMID:25405508

  18. The analysis of time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy based on positive matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Li, Zhu; Li, Bo; Shi, Guolong; Li, Minqiang; Yu, Daoyang; Liu, Jinhuai

    2013-08-01

    Time-resolved optical waveguide absorption spectroscopy (OWAS) makes use of an evanescent field to detect the polarized absorption spectra of sub-monomolecular adlayers. This technique is suitable for the investigation of kinetics at the solid/liquid interface of dyes, pigments, fluorescent molecules, quantum dots, metallic nanoparticles, and proteins with chromophores. In this work, we demonstrate the application of positive matrix factorization (PMF) to analyze time-resolved OWAS for the first time. Meanwhile, PCA is researched to compare with PMF. The absorption/desorption kinetics of Rhodamine 6G (R6G) onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic process of Meisenheimer complex between Cysteine and TNT are selected as samples to verify experimental system and analytical methods. The results are shown that time-resolved OWAS can well record the absorption/desorption of R6G onto a hydrophilic glass surface and the dynamic formation process of Meisenheimer complexes. The feature of OWAS extracted by PMF is dynamic and consistent with the results analyzed by the traditional function of time/wavelength-absorbance. Moreover, PMF prevents the negative factors from occurring, avoids contradicting physical reality, and makes factors more easily interpretable. Therefore, we believe that PMF will provide a valuable analysis route to allow processing of increasingly large and complex data sets.

  19. Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-12-02

    SIMPLE ROBUST FIXED LAG SMOOTHING by ~N. D. Le R.D. Martin 4 TECHNICAL RlEPORT No. 149 December 1988 Department of Statistics, GN-22 Accesion For...frLsD1ist Special A- Z Simple Robust Fixed Lag Smoothing With Application To Radar Glint Noise * N. D. Le R. D. Martin Department of Statistics, GN...smoothers. The emphasis here is on fixed-lag smoothing , as opposed to the use of existing robust fixed interval smoothers (e.g., as in Martin, 1979

  20. Real-time atmospheric absorption spectra for in-flight tuning of an airborne dial system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dombrowski, M.; Walden, H.; Schwemmer, G. K.; Milrod, J.; Korb, C. L.

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of atmospheric absorption spectra are displayed and used to precisely calibrate and fix the frequency of an Alexandrite laser to specific oxygen absorption features for airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) measurements of atmospheric pressure and temperature. The DIAL system used contains two narrowband tunable Alexandrite lasers: one is electronically scanned to tune to oxygen absorption features for on-line signals while the second is used to obtain off-line (nonabsorbed) atmospheric return signals. The lidar operator may select the number of shots to be averaged, the altitude, and altitude interval over which the signals are averaged using single key stroke commands. The operator also determines exactly which oxygen absorption lines are scanned by comparing the line spacings and relative strengths with known line parameters, thus calibrating the laser wavelength readout. The system was used successfully to measure the atmospheric pressure profile on the first flights of this lidar, November 20, and December 9, 1985, aboard the NASA Wallops Electra aircraft.

  1. The effective air absorption coefficient for predicting reverberation time in full octave bands.

    PubMed

    Wenmaekers, R H C; Hak, C C J M; Hornikx, M C J

    2014-12-01

    A substantial amount of research has been devoted to producing a calculation model for air absorption for pure tones. However, most statistical and geometrical room acoustic prediction models calculate the reverberation time in full octave bands in accordance with ISO 3382-1 (International Organization for Standardization, 2009). So far, the available methods that allow calculation of air absorption in octave bands have not been investigated for room acoustic applications. In this paper, the effect of air absorption on octave band reverberation time calculations is investigated based on calculations. It is found that the approximation method, as described in the standard ANSI S1.26 (American National Standards Institute, 1995), fails to estimate accurate decay curves for full octave bands. In this paper, a method is used to calculate the energy decay curve in rooms based on a summation of pure tones within the band. From this decay curve, which is found to be slightly concave upwards, T20 and T30 can be determined. For different conditions, an effective intensity attenuation coefficient mB ;eff for the full octave bands has been calculated. This mB ;eff can be used for reverberation time calculations, if results are to be compared with T20 or T30 measurements. Also, guidelines are given for the air absorption correction of decay curves, measured in a scale model.

  2. Time-resolved Absorption Spectra of the Laser-dressed Hydrogen Atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-05-01

    A theoretical study of the transient absorption spectra for the laser-dressed hydrogen atom based on the accurate numerical solution of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is presented. The timing of absorption is controlled by the time delay between an isolated extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulse and a dressing infrared (IR) field. We identify two different kinds of physical processes in the spectra. One is the formation of dressed states, signified by the appearance of sidebands between the XUV absorption lines separated by one IR-photon energy. We show that their population is maximized when the XUV pulse coincides with the zero-crossing of the IR field, and that their energy can be manipulated by using a chirped IR field. The other process is the dynamical AC Stark shift induced by the IR field and probed by the XUV pulse. Our calculations indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen atom leads to the multiple splittings of each XUV absorption line whose separations change in response to a slowly-varying IR envelope. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 states using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional 3-level model that neglects the dynamical AC Stark effects.

  3. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption.

    PubMed

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than approximately 1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  4. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-15

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than {approx}1 ns are recorded by the ''classical'' technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent ''pump-probe'' technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {l_brace}[Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and a less symmetric derivative{r_brace} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  5. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than ˜1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)3]2+ and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  6. Time-varying sodium absorption in the Type Ia supernova 2013gh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferretti, R.; Amanullah, R.; Goobar, A.; Johansson, J.; Vreeswijk, P. M.; Butler, R. P.; Cao, Y.; Cenko, S. B.; Doran, G.; Filippenko, A. V.; Freeland, E.; Hosseinzadeh, G.; Howell, D. A.; Lundqvist, P.; Mattila, S.; Nordin, J.; Nugent, P. E.; Petrushevska, T.; Valenti, S.; Vogt, S.; Wozniak, P.

    2016-07-01

    Context. Temporal variability of narrow absorption lines in high-resolution spectra of Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) is studied to search for circumstellar matter. Time series which resolve the profiles of absorption lines such as Na I D or Ca II H&K are expected to reveal variations due to photoionisation and subsequent recombination of the gases. The presence, composition, and geometry of circumstellar matter may hint at the elusive progenitor system of SNe Ia and could also affect the observed reddening law. Aims: To date, there are few known cases of time-varying Na I D absorption in SNe Ia, all of which occurred during relatively late phases of the supernova (SN) evolution. Photoionisation, however, is predicted to occur during the early phases of SNe Ia, when the supernovae peak in the ultraviolet. We attempt, therefore, to observe early-time absorption-line variations by obtaining high-resolution spectra of SNe before maximum light. Methods: We have obtained photometry and high-resolution spectroscopy of SNe Ia 2013gh and iPTF 13dge, to search for absorption-line variations. Furthermore, we study interstellar absorption features in relation to the observed photometric colours of the SNe. Results: Both SNe display deep Na I D and Ca II H&K absorption features. Furthermore, small but significant variations are detected in a feature of the Na I D profile of SN 2013gh. The variations are consistent with either geometric effects of rapidly moving or patchy gas clouds or photoionisation of Na I gas at R ≈ 1019 cm from the explosion. Conclusions: Our analysis indicates that it is necessary to focus on early phases to detect photoionisation effects of gases in the circumstellar medium of SNe Ia. Different absorbers such as Na I and Ca II can be used to probe for matter at different distances from the SNe. The nondetection of variations during early phases makes it possible to put limits on the abundance of the species at those distances. Full Tables 2 and 3 are only

  7. Quasar Absorption Lines: The Evolution of Galactic Gas Over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, J.

    1996-12-01

    A view of the formation and evolution of galaxies and structure over the whole history of the Universe requires observations both of stars and of gas. From the stars in galaxies, now observed in deep images back in time to less than a billion years past the Big Bang, we can study the evolution of galaxy morphology and of star formation rates. Direct observation of gas in the Universe at all epochs is also possible, using absorption spectra of quasars as a probe of intervening material. This absorption arises not only from the gas in developed galaxies and in their environments, but also from the clumps of gas that will eventually combine to form galaxies, and from the gas spread through the Universe that is gradually flowing into the galaxies. This study of gas through quasar absorption lines has opened the possibility of observing directly the formation of galaxies through the assembly of their gas over time. Furthermore, with high resolution spectroscopy, the substructures observed in absorption profiles provide information about the internal workings of galaxies. This talk will present an overview of progress toward a comprehensive picture of the formation and evolution of galaxies through quasar absorption line studies. The absorption profiles that are observed due to the passage of the quasar light through a given structure are a convolution of several properties of the gas, including its spatial and kinematic distribution, its chemical composition, and its state of ionization. Illustrative models will be utilized to show how these various factors affect the appearance of synthetic spectra. Beginning with the philosophy ``what you see is what you get'', the kinematic spectral signatures of higher redshift absorbers will be modeled by familiar components of nearby galaxies: a rotating disk, an isothermal halo, and gas in radial inflow. A combination of these basic models goes a long way toward producing a variety of complex absorption profiles which are in fact

  8. Is melatonin useful for jet lag?

    PubMed

    Tortorolo, Francisco; Farren, Florencia; Rada, Gabriel

    2015-12-21

    Jet lag syndrome is an exogenous circadian rhythm sleep disorder, frequently reported in travelers who cross multiple time zones in a short period of time. Oral melatonin -a pineal neurohormone normally produced during darkness and responsible for regulating the body's circadian rhythms- has been used as treatment for this condition. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening 30 databases, we identified four systematic reviews including 11 randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded the use of oral melatonin probably reduces symptoms associated with jet lag syndrome. It is not clear whether its use produces adverse effects; however, these would be probably mild.

  9. Time-resolved absorption studies of the ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Sou, I. K.; Wong, G. K. L.; Wong, K. S.

    2001-04-01

    The time-resolved differential absorption of the ZnSe/ZnSTe superlattice is studied using femtosecond pump-probe measurements. Transient spectral hole burning due to the initial nonthermal carrier distribution is observed at zero time delay and the carriers are thermalized within 0.5 ps. The high-energy tail of the differential absorption spectra was used to deduce the effective temperature of the thermalized carriers. Rapid hot-carrier cooling from a temperature of 763 to 450 K within the first 4 ps is observed, with carrier cooling slowing down hence. This initial fast hot-carrier cooling is consistent with the strong carrier-phonon interaction in large gap II-VI semiconductors.

  10. Randomly accelerated particle in a box: mean absorption time for partially absorbing and inelastic boundaries.

    PubMed

    Kotsev, Stanislav N; Burkhardt, Theodore W

    2005-04-01

    Consider a particle which is randomly accelerated by Gaussian white noise on the line segment 0absorption time T(x,v), where x and v denote the initial position and velocity, was calculated exactly by Masoliver and Porrà in 1995. We consider a more general boundary condition. On arriving at either boundary, the particle is absorbed with probability 1-p and reflected with probability p. The reflections are inelastic, with coefficient of restitution, r. With exact analytical and numerical methods and simulations, we study the mean absorption time as a function of p and r.

  11. Comparison between two models of absorption of matter waves by a thin time-dependent barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbier, Maximilien; Beau, Mathieu; Goussev, Arseni

    2015-11-01

    We report a quantitative, analytical, and numerical comparison between two models of the interaction of a nonrelativistic quantum particle with a thin time-dependent absorbing barrier. The first model represents the barrier by a set of time-dependent discontinuous matching conditions, which are closely related to Kottler boundary conditions used in stationary-wave optics as a mathematical basis for Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The second model mimics the absorbing barrier with an off-diagonal δ potential with a time-dependent amplitude. We show that the two models of absorption agree in their predictions in a semiclassical regime, the regime readily accessible in modern experiments with ultracold atoms.

  12. Time resolved metal line profile by near-ultraviolet tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vitelaru, C.; de Poucques, L.; Minea, T. M.; Popa, G.

    2011-03-01

    Pulsed systems are extensively used to produce active species such as atoms, radicals, excited states, etc. The tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TD-LAS) is successfully used to quantify the density of absorbing species, but especially for stationary or slow changing systems. The time resolved-direct absorption profile (TR-DAP) measurement method by TD-LAS, with time resolution of μs is proposed here as an extension of the regular use of diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The spectral narrowness of laser diodes, especially in the blue range (˜0.01 pm), combined with the nanosecond fast trigger of the magnetron pulsed plasma and long trace recording on the oscilloscope (period of second scale) permit the detection of the sputtered titanium metal evolution in the afterglow (˜ms). TR-DAP method can follow the time-dependence of the temperature (Doppler profile) and the density (deduced from the absorbance) of any medium and heavy species in a pulsed system.

  13. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-01-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption system of the z(sub e) = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at z(sub a) = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from z(sub e) strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other z(sub a) approximately equal z(sub e) absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 10(exp 18)/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 10(exp 20)/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link z(sub a) approximately equal to z(sub e) systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the

  14. NE VIII lambda 774 and time variable associated absorption in the QSO UM 675

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamann, Fred; Barlow, Thomas A.; Beaver, E. A.; Burbidge, E. M.; Cohen, Ross D.; Junkkarinen, Vesa; Lyons, R.

    1995-04-01

    We discuss measurements of Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption and the time variability of other lines in the za approximately equal ze absorption system of the ze = 2.15 QSO UM 675 (0150-203). The C IV lambda 1549 and N V 1240 doublets at za = 2.1340 (shifted approximately 1500 km/s from ze strengthened by a factor of approximately 3 between observations by Sargent, Boksenberg and Steidel (1981 November) and our earliest measurements (1990 November and December). We have no information on changes in other za approximately equal ze absorption lines. Continued monitoring since 1990 November shows no clear changes in any of the absorptions between approximately 1100 and 1640 A rest. The short timescale of the variability (less than or approximately equal to 2.9 yr rest) strongly suggests that the clouds are dense, compact, close to the QSO, and photoionized by the QSO continuum. If the line variability is caused by changes in the ionization, the timescale requires densities greater than approximately 4000/cu cm. Photoionization calculations place the absorbing clouds within approximately 200 pc of the continuum source. The full range of line ionizations (from Ne VIII lambda 774 to C III lambda 977) in optically thin gas (no Lyman limit) implies that the absorbing regions span a factor of more than approximately 10 in distance or approximately 100 in density. Across these regions, the total hydrogen (H I + H II) column ranges from a few times 1018/sq cm in the low-ionization gas to approximately 1020/sq cm where the Ne VIII doublet forms. The metallicity is roughly solar or higher, with nitrogen possibly more enhanced by factors of a few. The clouds might contribute significant line emission if they nearly envelop the QSO. The presence of highly ionized Ne VIII lambda 774 absorption near the QSO supports recent studies that link za approximately equal to ze systems with X-ray 'wamr absorbers. We show that the Ne VIII absorbing gas would itself produce measurable warm

  15. Three-dimensional time-dependent wave-packet calculations of OBrO absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Kai-Jun; Sun, Zhigang; Cong, Shu-Lin; Lou, Nanquan

    2005-08-01

    The absorption spectra of the C(A22)←X(B12) transition of the OBrO molecule are calculated using three-dimensional time-dependent wave-packet method in Radau coordinates for a total angular momentum J =0. The wave packet is propagated using the split operator technique associated with fast Fourier transform. Employing the basis functions obtained by one-dimensional Fourier grid Hamiltonian method, the initial wave packet is calculated directly on the three-dimensional Fourier grid. The numerical model is characterized by simplicity and efficiency. The ab initio potential surfaces for the C(A22) and X(B12) states are used in the calculation. The calculated absorption spectra of the C(A22)←X(B12) transition of OBrO molecule agree well with the experimental results.

  16. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a water window high-harmonic source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pertot, Yoann; Schmidt, Cédric; Matthews, Mary; Chauvet, Adrien; Huppert, Martin; Svoboda, Vit; von Conta, Aaron; Tehlar, Andres; Baykusheva, Denitsa; Wolf, Jean-Pierre; Wörner, Hans Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy (TR-XAS) has so far practically been limited to large-scale facilities, to subpicosecond temporal resolution, and to the condensed phase. We report the realization of TR-XAS with a temporal resolution in the low femtosecond range by developing a tabletop high-harmonic source reaching up to 350 electron volts, thus partially covering the spectral region of 280 to 530 electron volts, where water is transmissive. We used this source to follow previously unexamined light-induced chemical reactions in the lowest electronic states of isolated CF4+ and SF6+ molecules in the gas phase. By probing element-specific core-to-valence transitions at the carbon K-edge or the sulfur L-edges, we characterized their reaction paths and observed the effect of symmetry breaking through the splitting of absorption bands and Rydberg-valence mixing induced by the geometry changes.

  17. Lags of Prometheus and Pandora

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana, Thamiris; Winter, O.; Mourão, D. D.; Cruz, C. C.

    2013-05-01

    Abstract (2,250 Maximum Characters): Observational data obtained during Saturn's ring plane crossing of 1995 indicated angular lags for the predicted positions of Prometheus and Pandora. Using additional observational data the lags were confirmed, with Prometheus about 19 degrees ahead and Pandora about 25 degrees behind their predicted longitudes. Chaotic motion associated to a 121:118 mean motion resonance between the two satellites is the theory currently accepted to explain these lags. In the present work we return to this problem proposing that an analysis of the temporal evolution of the semi-major axis of the satellites in order to explain the lags. Due to the secular interaction between the satellites their apsidal lines are periodically anti-aligned every 6.2 years, producing close encounters between the two bodies. During these moments there is a stronger interaction that produces variations in their semi-major axis. The main point is that the data used to propagate the orbits of the satellites was obtained near to the moment of one of these close approaches.

  18. Real-time HF Radio Absorption Maps Incorporating Riometer and Satellite Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rogers, Neil; Honary, Farideh; Warrington, Mike; Stocker, Alan; Danskin, Donald

    2016-04-01

    A real-time model of HF radio propagation conditions is being developed as a service for aircraft communications at high latitudes. An essential component of this is a real-time map of the absorption of HF (3-30 MHz) radio signals in the D-region ionosphere. Empirical, climatological Polar Cap Absorption (PCA) models in common usage cannot account for day-to-day variations in ionospheric composition and are inaccurate during the large changes in recombination rate at twilight. However, parameters of such models may be optimised using an age-weighted regression to absorption measurements from riometers in Canada and Scandinavia. Such parameters include the day- and night-time sensitivity to proton flux as measured on a geostationary satellite (GOES). Modelling the twilight transition as a linear or Gauss error function over a range of solar-zenith angles (χl < χ < χu) is found to provide greater accuracy than 'Earth shadow' methods (as applied in the Sodankylä Ionospheric Chemistry (SIC) model, for example) due to a more gradual ionospheric response for χ < 90° . The fitted χl parameter is found to be most variable, with smaller values (as low as 60°) post-sunrise compared with pre-sunset. Correlation coefficients of model parameters between riometers are presented and these provide a means of appropriately weighting individual riometer contributions in an assimilative PCA model. At times outside of PCA events, the probability of absorption in the auroral zones is related to the energetic electron flux inside the precipitation loss cone, as measured on the polar-orbiting POES satellites. This varies with magnetic local time, magnetic latitude and geomagnetic activity, and its relation to the real-time solar wind - magnetospheric coupling function [Newell et al., 2007] will be presented. Reference: Newell, P. T., T. Sotirelis, K. Liou, C.-I. Meng, and F. J. Rich (2007), A nearly universal solar wind-magnetosphere coupling function inferred from 10

  19. Ultrafast recovery time and broadband saturable absorption properties of black phosphorus suspension

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yingwei; Huang, Guanghui; Chen, Jiazhang; Xiao, Si He, Jun; Mu, Haoran; Bao, Qiaoliang; Lin, Shenghuang

    2015-08-31

    As a new type of two-dimensional crystal material, black phosphorus (BP) exhibits excellent electronics and optical performance. Herein, we focus on carrier relaxation dynamics and nonlinear optical properties of BP suspension. Atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and optical transmission spectrum are employed to characterize the structure and linear optical properties of the BP. Additionally, pump-probe experiments at wavelength of 1550 nm were carried out to study the carrier dynamics in BP suspension, and ultrafast recovery time was observed (τ{sub s} = 24 ± 2 fs). Furthermore, we demonstrate the saturable absorption signals by open aperture Z-scan experiments at wavelengths of 1550 nm, 532 nm, and 680 nm. The results indicate that BP has broadband saturable absorption properties and the nonlinear absorption coefficients were determined to be β{sub 2} = −0.20 ± 0.08 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (532 nm), β{sub 2} = −0.12 ± 0.05 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (680 nm), and β{sub 2} = −0.15 ± 0.09 × 10{sup −3 }cm/GW (1550 nm)

  20. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide (1-), N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide (2-) and N-(2,5-di-tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide (3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45,000 cm(-1)). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0-->D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  1. The electronic absorption study of imide anion radicals in terms of time dependent density functional theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrzejak, Marcin; Sterzel, Mariusz; Pawlikowski, Marek T.

    2005-07-01

    The absorption spectra of the N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl) phthalimide ( 1-), N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-1,8-naphthalimide ( 2-) and N-(2,5-di- tert-butylphenyl)-perylene-3,4-dicarboximide ( 3-) anion radicals are studied in terms of time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). For these anion radicals a large number electronic states (from 30 to 60) was found in the visible and near-IR regions (5000-45000 cm -1). In these regions the TD/B3LYP treatment at the 6-1+G* level is shown to reproduce satisfactorily the empirical absorption spectra of all three anion radicals studied. The most apparent discrepancies between purely electronic theory and the experiment could be found in the excitation region corresponding to D0→ D1 transitions in the 2- and 3- molecules. For these species we argue that the structures seen in the lowest energy part of the absorptions of the 2- and 3- species are very likely due to Franck-Condon (FC) activity of the totally symmetric vibrations not studied in this Letter.

  2. The land-use legacy effect: Towards a mechanistic understanding of time-lagged water quality responses to land use/cover.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sherry L; Hayes, Daniel B; Kendall, Anthony D; Hyndman, David W

    2017-02-01

    Numerous studies have linked land use/land cover (LULC) to aquatic ecosystem responses, however only a few have included the dynamics of changing LULC in their analysis. In this study, we explicitly recognize changing LULC by linking mechanistic groundwater flow and travel time models to a historical time series of LULC, creating a land-use legacy map. We then illustrate the utility of legacy maps to explore relationships between dynamic LULC and lake water chemistry. We tested two main concepts about mechanisms linking LULC and lake water chemistry: groundwater pathways are an important mechanism driving legacy effects; and, LULC over multiple spatial scales is more closely related to lake chemistry than LULC over a single spatial scale. We applied statistical models to twelve water chemistry variables, ranging from nutrients to relatively conservative ions, to better understand the roles of biogeochemical reactivity and solubility on connections between LULC and aquatic ecosystem response. Our study illustrates how different areas can have long groundwater pathways that represent different LULC than what can be seen on the landscape today. These groundwater pathways delay the arrival of nutrients and other water quality constituents, thus creating a legacy of historic land uses that eventually reaches surface water. We find that: 1) several water chemistry variables are best fit by legacy LULC while others have a stronger link to current LULC, and 2) single spatial scales of LULC analysis performed worse for most variables. Our novel combination of temporal and spatial scales was the best overall model fit for most variables, including SRP where this model explained 54% of the variation. We show that it is important to explicitly account for temporal and spatial context when linking LULC to ecosystem response.

  3. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGES

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; ...

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  4. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  5. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  6. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  7. Time-resolved detection of temperature, concentration, and pressure in a shock tube by intracavity absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fjodorow, Peter; Fikri, Mustapha; Schulz, Christof; Hellmig, Ortwin; Baev, Valery M.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate the first application of intracavity absorption spectroscopy (ICAS) for monitoring species concentration, total pressure, and temperature in shock-tube experiments. ICAS with a broadband Er3+-doped fiber laser is applied to time-resolved measurements of absorption spectra of shock-heated C2H2. The measurements are performed in a spectral range between 6512 and 6542 cm-1, including many absorption lines of C2H2, with a time resolution of 100 µs and an effective absorption path length of 15 m. Up to 18-times increase of the total pressure and a temperature rise of up to 1200 K have been monitored. Due to the ability of simultaneously recording many absorption lines in a broad spectral range, the presented technique can also be applied to multi-component analysis of transient single-shot processes in reactive gas mixtures in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, or explosions.

  8. A Search for Spectral Hysteresis and Energy-dependent Time Lags from X-Ray and TeV Gamma-Ray Observations of Mrk 421

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeysekara, A. U.; Archambault, S.; Archer, A.; Benbow, W.; Bird, R.; Buchovecky, M.; Buckley, J. H.; Bugaev, V.; Cardenzana, J. V.; Cerruti, M.; Chen, X.; Ciupik, L.; Connolly, M. P.; Cui, W.; Eisch, J. D.; Falcone, A.; Feng, Q.; Finley, J. P.; Fleischhack, H.; Flinders, A.; Fortson, L.; Furniss, A.; Griffin, S.; Håkansson, M. HN.; Hanna, D.; Hervet, O.; Holder, J.; Humensky, T. B.; Kaaret, P.; Kar, P.; Kertzman, M.; Kieda, D.; Krause, M.; Kumar, S.; Lang, M. J.; Maier, G.; McArthur, S.; McCann, A.; Meagher, K.; Moriarty, P.; Mukherjee, R.; Nieto, D.; Ong, S. OR. A.; Otte, A. N.; Park, N.; Pelassa, V.; Pohl, M.; Popkow, A.; Pueschel, E.; Ragan, K.; Reynolds, P. T.; Richards, G. T.; Roache, E.; Sadeh, I.; Santander, M.; Sembroski, G. H.; Shahinyan, K.; Staszak, D.; Telezhinsky, I.; Tucci, J. V.; Tyler, J.; Wakely, S. P.; Weinstein, A.; Wilhelm, A.; Williams, D. A.; the VERITAS Collaboration; Ahnen, M. L.; Ansoldi, S.; Antonelli, L. A.; Antoranz, P.; Arcaro, C.; Babic, A.; Banerjee, B.; Bangale, P.; Barres de Almeida, U.; Barrio, J. A.; Becerra González, J.; Bednarek, W.; Bernardini, E.; Berti, A.; Biasuzzi, B.; Biland, A.; Blanch, O.; Bonnefoy, S.; Bonnoli, G.; Borracci, F.; Bretz, T.; Carosi, R.; Carosi, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Colin, P.; Colombo, E.; Contreras, J. L.; Cortina, J.; Covino, S.; Cumani, P.; Da Vela, P.; Dazzi, F.; De Angelis, A.; De Lotto, B.; de Oña Wilhelmi, E.; Di Pierro, F.; Doert, M.; Domínguez, A.; Dominis Prester, D.; Dorner, D.; Doro, M.; Einecke, S.; Eisenacher Glawion, D.; Elsaesser, D.; Engelkemeier, M.; Fallah Ramazani, V.; Fernández-Barral, A.; Fidalgo, D.; Fonseca, M. V.; Font, L.; Fruck, C.; Galindo, D.; García López, R. J.; Garczarczyk, M.; Gaug, M.; Giammaria, P.; Godinović, N.; Gora, D.; Guberman, D.; Hadasch, D.; Hahn, A.; Hassan, T.; Hayashida, M.; Herrera, J.; Hose, J.; Hrupec, D.; Hughes, G.; Idec, W.; Kodani, K.; Konno, Y.; Kubo, H.; Kushida, J.; Lelas, D.; Lindfors, E.; Lombardi, S.; Longo, F.; López, M.; López-Coto, R.; Majumdar, P.; Makariev, M.; Mallot, K.; Maneva, G.; Manganaro, M.; Mannheim, K.; Maraschi, L.; Marcote, B.; Mariotti, M.; Martínez, M.; Mazin, D.; Menzel, U.; Mirzoyan, R.; Moralejo, A.; Moretti, E.; Nakajima, D.; Neustroev, V.; Niedzwiecki, A.; Nievas Rosillo, M.; Nilsson, K.; Nishijima, K.; Noda, K.; Nogués, L.; Nöthe, M.; Paiano, S.; Palacio, J.; Palatiello, M.; Paneque, D.; Paoletti, R.; Paredes, J. M.; Paredes-Fortuny, X.; Pedaletti, G.; Peresano, M.; Perri, L.; Persic, M.; Poutanen, J.; Prada Moroni, P. G.; Prandini, E.; Puljak, I.; Garcia, J. R.; Reichardt, I.; Rhode, W.; Ribó, M.; Rico, J.; Saito, T.; Satalecka, K.; Schroeder, S.; Schweizer, T.; Shore, S. N.; Sillanpää, A.; Sitarek, J.; Snidaric, I.; Sobczynska, D.; Stamerra, A.; Strzys, M.; Surić, T.; Takalo, L.; Tavecchio, F.; Temnikov, P.; Terzić, T.; Tescaro, D.; Teshima, M.; Torres, D. F.; Torres-Albà, N.; Toyama, T.; Treves, A.; Vanzo, G.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Vovk, I.; Ward, J. E.; Will, M.; Wu, M. H.; Zanin, R.; the MAGIC Collaboration; Hovatta, T.; de la Calle Perez, I.; Smith, P. S.; Racero, E.; Baloković, M.

    2017-01-01

    Blazars are variable emitters across all wavelengths over a wide range of timescales, from months down to minutes. It is therefore essential to observe blazars simultaneously at different wavelengths, especially in the X-ray and gamma-ray bands, where the broadband spectral energy distributions usually peak. In this work, we report on three “target-of-opportunity” observations of Mrk 421, one of the brightest TeV blazars, triggered by a strong flaring event at TeV energies in 2014. These observations feature long, continuous, and simultaneous exposures with XMM-Newton (covering the X-ray and optical/ultraviolet bands) and VERITAS (covering the TeV gamma-ray band), along with contemporaneous observations from other gamma-ray facilities (MAGIC and Fermi-Large Area Telescope) and a number of radio and optical facilities. Although neither rapid flares nor significant X-ray/TeV correlation are detected, these observations reveal subtle changes in the X-ray spectrum of the source over the course of a few days. We search the simultaneous X-ray and TeV data for spectral hysteresis patterns and time delays, which could provide insight into the emission mechanisms and the source properties (e.g., the radius of the emitting region, the strength of the magnetic field, and related timescales). The observed broadband spectra are consistent with a one-zone synchrotron self-Compton model. We find that the power spectral density distribution at ≳4 × 10‑4 Hz from the X-ray data can be described by a power-law model with an index value between 1.2 and 1.8, and do not find evidence for a steepening of the power spectral index (often associated with a characteristic length scale) compared to the previously reported values at lower frequencies.

  9. Fiber-optic thermometer using temperature dependent absorption, broadband detection, and time domain referencing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Piltch, Nancy D.

    1986-01-01

    A fiber-optic thermometer based on temperature dependent absorption in Nd(3+) doped glass is demonstrated over the 298-573 K range. A broadband detection technique allows the use of the complete spectrum of a pulse modulated light emitting diode. A fiber-optic recirculating loop is employed to construct a reference channel in the time domain by generating a train of pulses from one initial pulse. A theoretical model is developed, and experimental data are shown to compare well with the theory. Possible sources of error and instability are identified, and ways to enhance the performance of the system are proposed.

  10. Subpicosecond Time-Resolved Absorption and Transient Gratings in Gallium-Arsenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katz, Alvin I.

    Carrier-carrier and intervalley scattering has been studied in submicron thick GaAs under intense photoexcitation by time resolved absorption and four wave mixing techniques using a femtosecond laser and amplifier system which was constructed as part of this thesis. The laser oscillator is a colliding pulse ring cavity passively modelocked (cpm) Rhodamine 6G dye laser. The saturable absorber is DODCI (3,3^' -diethyloxodicarbocyanine iodide). The oscillator produces pulses of 100 femtosecond duration and pulse energies of 50 picojoules at 620 nm and 115 megahertz repetition rate. The oscillator is pumped by a cw argon ion laser operating at a single line (514.5 nm). The amplifier system is a four stage amplifier pumped by a frequency doubled Q-switch Nd Yag laser. The electronics were constructed so as to allow the dye laser to trigger the pockel's cell of the Nd:Yag laser. The amplifier has a gain of 5 times 10^6; with an output pulse energy of 500 microjoules and a pulse width of 450 fs at a 20 hertz repetition rate. Pump and probe absorption techniques were used to measure the time evolution of the photoexcited carrier distribution function in GaAs. These measurements show that the electrons and holes do not achieve a Fermi-Dirac distribution until 800 femtoseconds after excitation. Time resolved four wave mixing techniques were used to study intervalley scattering in GaAs. Both the dispersive (real part of n) and absorption saturation (imaginary part of n) of the free carrier contributions to the dielectric function is included to correctly explain the data. For energies high above the band gap, the interband (bleaching) contribution is strongly dependent on the distribution of electrons among the different valleys (Gamma , L or X) of the conduction band and is opposite in sign from the intraband (dispersive) term. By using a three pulse transient grating experiment under the conditions of high pump intensity and probe energy (2.0 eV) much greater than the band

  11. LAG3 expression in active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Bonnie L; Mehra, Smriti; Ahsan, Muhammad H; Selman, Moises; Khader, Shabaana A; Kaushal, Deepak

    2015-03-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) is a highly successful pathogen because of its ability to persist in human lungs for long periods of time. MTB modulates several aspects of the host immune response. Lymphocyte-activation gene 3 (LAG3) is a protein with a high affinity for the CD4 receptor and is expressed mainly by regulatory T cells with immunomodulatory functions. To understand the function of LAG3 during MTB infection, a nonhuman primate model of tuberculosis, which recapitulates key aspects of natural human infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), was used. We show that the expression of LAG3 is highly induced in the lungs and particularly in the granulomatous lesions of macaques experimentally infected with MTB. Furthermore, we show that LAG3 expression is not induced in the lungs and lung granulomas of animals exhibiting latent tuberculosis infection. However, simian immunodeficiency virus-induced reactivation of latent tuberculosis infection results in an increased expression of LAG3 in the lungs. This response is not observed in nonhuman primates infected with non-MTB bacterial pathogens, nor with simian immunodeficiency virus alone. Our data show that LAG3 was expressed primarily on CD4(+) T cells, presumably by regulatory T cells but also by natural killer cells. The expression of LAG3 coincides with high bacterial burdens and changes in the host type 1 helper T-cell response.

  12. A table-top femtosecond time-resolved soft x-ray transient absorption spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Stephen; Loh, Zhi-Heng; Khalil, Munira; Correa, Raoul E.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-05-21

    A laser-based, table-top instrument is constructed to perform femtosecond soft x-ray transient absorption spectroscopy. Ultrashort soft x-ray pulses produced via high-order harmonic generation of the amplified output of a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser system are used to probe atomic core-level transient absorptions in atoms and molecules. The results provide chemically specific, time-resolved dynamics with sub-50-fs time resolution. In this setup, high-order harmonics generated in a Ne-filled capillary waveguide are refocused by a gold-coated toroidal mirror into the sample gas cell, where the soft x-ray light intersects with an optical pump pulse. The transmitted high-order harmonics are spectrally dispersed with a home-built soft x-ray spectrometer, which consists of a gold-coated toroidal mirror, a uniform-line spaced plane grating, and a soft x-ray CCD camera. The optical layout of the instrument, design of the soft x-ray spectrometer, and spatial and temporal characterization of the high-order harmonics are described. Examples of static and time-resolved photoabsorption spectra collected on this apparatus are presented.

  13. Preparation and evaluation of an oral delivery system for time-dependent colon release of insulin and selected protease inhibitor and absorption enhancer compounds.

    PubMed

    Del Curto, Maria Dorly; Maroni, Alessandra; Foppoli, Anastasia; Zema, Lucia; Gazzaniga, Andrea; Sangalli, Maria Edvige

    2009-12-01

    The aim of this work was to prepare and evaluate an oral dosage form intended for time-dependent colon delivery of insulin along with a selected protease inhibitor (camostat mesilate) and absorption enhancer (sodium glycocholate). A previously described release platform, which had proven potentially suitable for the protein delivery, was exploited. Insulin compatibility with the above-mentioned adjuvants was preliminarily evaluated. For this purpose, the drug and its main degradation products were assayed by HPLC in insulin powder mixtures with camostat mesilate and/or sodium glycocholate stored 12 months at 4 degrees C. No significant decrease in protein content or increase in degradation product percentages beyond Eur. Ph. 6th Ed. limits was highlighted. Moreover, calorimetric studies performed on physical and compacted binary insulin mixtures with camostat mesilate and sodium glycocholate showed that the thermal behavior of both adjuvants was unchanged. Subsequently, tablet cores with differing compositions were prepared and spray-coated with an aqueous HPMC solution in order to obtain pulsatile delivery systems. The coated units were demonstrated to concurrently release the drug and the adjuvants in a prompt and quantitative mode after consistent lag times. Based on these results, the device was proven a potential candidate for colon delivery of insulin and the selected adjuvants.

  14. Time-resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy for Electron Transport Study in Warm Dense Gold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jong-Won; Bae, Leejin; Engelhorn, Kyle; Heimann, Philip; Ping, Yuan; Barbrel, Ben; Fernandez, Amalia; Beckwith, Martha Anne; Cho, Byoung-Ick; GIST Team; IBS Team; LBNL Collaboration; SLAC Collaboration; LLNL Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    The warm dense Matter represents states of which the temperature is comparable to Fermi energy and ions are strongly coupled. One of the experimental techniques to create such state in the laboratory condition is the isochoric heating of thin metal foil with femtosecond laser pulses. This concept largely relies on the ballistic transport of electrons near the Fermi-level, which were mainly studied for the metals in ambient conditions. However, they were barely investigated in warm dense conditions. We present a time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy measured for the Au/Cu dual layered sample. The front Au layer was isochorically heated with a femtosecond laser pulse, and the x-ray absorption changes around L-edge of Cu, which was attached on the backside of Au, was measured with a picosecond resolution. Time delays between the heating of the `front surface' of Au layer and the alternation of x-ray spectrum of Cu attached on the `rear surface' of Au indicate the energetic electron transport mechanism through Au in the warm dense conditions. IBS (IBS-R012-D1) and the NRF (No. 2013R1A1A1007084) of Korea.

  15. Time resolved laser absorption spectroscopy in a self-pulsed microplasma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, X.; Rousseau, A.; Lagrange, J. F.; Sadeghi, N.

    2006-10-01

    It was recently shown that microplasmas of the microhollow cathode type geometry may operate in a self-pulsing regime for intermediate current (0.1-1 mA) [1]. At lower current (< 0.1 mA) the plasma is stable and located inside the hole; at higher current (> 1 mA) , the plasma is also stable but expands outside the hole on the cathode backside region. The self pulsing was attributed to the breakdown of the gas, outside the micro-hole, on the cathode backside. However, the mechanisms of the plasma ignition on the cathode backside are not understood and metastable atoms may play a major role. In the present work, time resolved diode laser absorption measurements have been performed through the micro-hole in the self-pulsing regime; the plasma hole ranges is in the range of 100 μm and the gas pressure ranges from 50 to 300 Torr; the feed gas is argon and the transition studied is 772.376 nm (Paschen notation 1s5-2p7). The objective is i) to measure the time evolution of the 1s5 metastable density, ii) deduce the gas temperature and plasma density from the absorption line profile. Similar results are performed in 3 electrodes configuration [1] A. Rousseau and X. Aubert J. Phys.D : Appl. Phys. 39 (2006) 1619--1622.

  16. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... entered by the Responsible Organization in the Service Management System database and is pending... toll free number's reservation in the Service Management System database and its conversion to working... Status. The toll free number has been reserved from the Service Management System database by...

  17. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... entered by the Responsible Organization in the Service Management System database and is pending... toll free number's reservation in the Service Management System database and its conversion to working... Status. The toll free number has been reserved from the Service Management System database by...

  18. 47 CFR 52.103 - Lag times.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... entered by the Responsible Organization in the Service Management System database and is pending... toll free number's reservation in the Service Management System database and its conversion to working... Status. The toll free number has been reserved from the Service Management System database by...

  19. No Time Lag in the Photoelectric Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, Paul; Saering, Bernd

    2010-01-01

    The photoelectric effect was discovered in the 19th century by Heinrich Hertz. It is interesting to note that the same scientist showed experimentally the wave nature of light, and thereby vindicated Maxwell's wave theory, and discovered the effect in which light shows corpuscular behavior. This paper describes a simple demonstration, enabling one…

  20. Effects of timing of food and fluid volume on cefetamet pivoxil absorption in healthy normal volunteers.

    PubMed Central

    Tam, Y K; Kneer, J; Dubach, U C; Stoeckel, K

    1990-01-01

    Cefetamet pivoxil (1,000 mg orally) absorption was evaluated in 16 male subjects (age, 23.4 +/- 1.7 years; weight, 73.9 +/- 7.0 kg) 1 h before (BE), with (WI), and 1 h after (AF) a standard breakfast. The time to peak concentration of cefetamet in plasma (Tmax) was increased from 3.25 +/- 1.44 h in the BE group to 4.31 +/- 1.54 and 4.13 +/- 1.54 h in the WI and AF groups, respectively (P less than 0.05). The maximum cefetamet concentration in plasma (Cmax) and the area under the plasma cefetamet concentration-time profiles (AUC) in the BE, WI, and AF groups were 5.50 +/- 1.06, 5.47 +/- 1.4, and 6.57 +/- 0.93 micrograms/ml and 38.2 +/- 10.1, 35.7 +/- 11.9, and 42.8 +/- 6.8 micrograms.h/ml, respectively. The Cmax and AUC values were not different between the BE and WI groups (P greater than 0.05). However, differences in these values were found between the WI and AF groups (P less than 0.05). The effect of fluid volume intake on cefetamet pivoxil (1,000 mg orally) absorption was evaluated in 12 male subjects (age, 23.8 +/- 2.3 years; weight, 74.9 +/- 9.0 kg) under fasted and WI conditions. Increasing fluid volume intake from 250 to 450 ml under the fasted condition had no effect on the absorption of the prodrug (Tmax, 2.50 +/- 0.52 versus 2.83 +/- 0.94 h; Cmax, 4.89 +/- 1.04 versus 4.84 +/- 0.89 micrograms/ml; AUC, 29.6 +/- 5.1 versus 30.7 +/- 7.1 micrograms.h/ml; P greater than 0.05. Thus, independent of fluid volume intake, cefetamet pivoxil absorption is enhanced when it is given within 1 h of a meal, and it is recommended that the prodrug should be taken during this period of increased bioavailability. PMID:2221865

  1. Small quantum absorption refrigerator in the transient regime: Time scales, enhanced cooling, and entanglement.

    PubMed

    Brask, Jonatan Bohr; Brunner, Nicolas

    2015-12-01

    A small quantum absorption refrigerator, consisting of three qubits, is discussed in the transient regime. We discuss time scales for coherent dynamics, damping, and approach to the steady state, and we study cooling and entanglement. We observe that cooling can be enhanced in the transient regime, in the sense that lower temperatures can be achieved compared to the steady-state regime. This is a consequence of coherent dynamics but can occur even when this dynamics is strongly damped by the dissipative thermal environment, and we note that precise control over couplings or timing is not needed to achieve enhanced cooling. We also show that the amount of entanglement present in the refrigerator can be much larger in the transient regime compared to the steady state. These results are of relevance to future implementations of quantum thermal machines.

  2. Evaluation of the Charité Jet Lag Scale: Further Assessment of Jet Lag Using a Method-Comparison Approach.

    PubMed

    Becker, Tanja; Penzel, Thomas; Fietze, Ingo

    2016-02-01

    The first German Charité Jet Lag Scale (CJS), based on the only validated English questionnaire, was introduced in a former study. In addition to providing further jet lag investigations, this second method-comparison study aims to evaluate the CJS. Consistent interviewing methods are essential for future research in identifying possible cross-cultural tendencies, advancing jet lag definition, and establishing potential alleviation methods. Jet lag in 17 German chorus members (5 male, 12 female, mean age 42.35 ± 13.06 years) was monitored on their 2½-week trip from Germany to Argentina and back by use of actigraphy, sleep diaries, and the CJS. Cronbach's alpha, Pearson and Lin correlations, and Bland-Altman diagrams were applied to assess CJS reliability and validity between all measurement methods. CJS study analysis results reconfirmed the prevalence of jet lag at approximately 60%. Moreover, the study assessed high Cronbach's alpha values and significant positive correlations for several corresponding and related sleep parameters and CJS items such as total sleep time (TST) and sleep onset latency (SOL). The confidence limits in the Bland-Altman diagrams remained within the limits of earlier studies (TST ± 1 h, SOL ± 30 min). Overall, jet lag measures in this study confirmed previous jet lag studies. Evidence indicates positive reliability and validity of the CJS, with lower specificity in some parameters. We conclude that the CJS is applicable for complex jet lag studies. The findings provide support for further development of the scale and its capability as a consistent jet lag interviewing method.

  3. Jet-lag and human performance.

    PubMed

    Loat, C E; Rhodes, E C

    1989-10-01

    The desynchronisation of an athlete's physiological and psychological cycles has adverse effects on his/her performance. The primary cause of dysrhythmia in an athlete is jet-lag, which is a rapid displacement across the earth's time zones and is often experienced while competing in international events and in continental leagues. General symptoms which arise from dysynchronization include malaise, appetite loss, tiredness during the day and disturbed sleep. The specific symptoms resulting from jet-lag are characterised as phase shifts in physiological and psychological cycles. These phase shifts occur in body temperature, ability to mobilise energy substrates, excretion of water and metabolites, arousal levels, sleep/wake cycles and reaction time. The severity of these adverse effects and therefore the time required for resynchronization depends on the ability to preset the bodily rhythms prior to flying, the number of time zones crossed, the direction of flight, the type of individual (introvert/extrovert), age, social interaction and activity, diet plan and prescribed use of chronobiotic drugs.

  4. Time-dependent excitation and ionization modelling of absorption-line variability due to GRB 080310

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vreeswijk, P. M.; Ledoux, C.; Raassen, A. J. J.; Smette, A.; De Cia, A.; Woźniak, P. R.; Fox, A. J.; Vestrand, W. T.; Jakobsson, P.

    2013-01-01

    We model the time-variable absorption of Fe II, Fe III, Si II, C II and Cr II detected in Ultraviolet and Visual Echelle Spectrograph (UVES) spectra of gamma-ray burst (GRB) 080310, with the afterglow radiation exciting and ionizing the interstellar medium in the host galaxy at a redshift of z = 2.42743. To estimate the rest-frame afterglow brightness as a function of time, we use a combination of the optical VRI photometry obtained by the RAPTOR-T telescope array, which is presented in this paper, and Swift's X-Ray Telescope (XRT) observations. Excitation alone, which has been successfully applied for a handful of other GRBs, fails to describe the observed column density evolution in the case of GRB 080310. Inclusion of ionization is required to explain the column density decrease of all observed Fe II levels (including the ground state 6D9/2) and increase of the Fe III 7S3 level. The large population of ions in this latter level (up to 10% of all Fe III) can only be explained through ionization of Fe II, as a large fraction of the ionized Fe II ions (we calculate 31% using the Flexible Atomic and Cowan codes) initially populate the 7S3 level of Fe III rather than the ground state. This channel for producing a significant Fe III 7S3 level population may be relevant for other objects in which absorption lines from this level, the UV34 triplet, are observed, such as broad absorption line (BAL) quasars and η Carinae. This provides conclusive evidence for time-variable ionization in the circumburst medium, which to date has not been convincingly detected. However, the best-fit distance of the neutral absorbing cloud to the GRB is 200-400 pc, i.e. similar to GRB-absorber distance estimates for GRBs without any evidence for ionization. We find that the presence of time-varying ionization in GRB 080310 is likely due to a combination of the super-solar iron abundance ([Fe/H] = +0.2) and the low H I column density (log N(H i) = 18.7) in the host of GRB 080310. Finally

  5. Melatonin, light therapy, and jet lag.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, N J; Lentz, M

    2001-01-01

    If you enter the words jet lag into your Internet search engine, multiple sites come up. Jet lag is a term common to all travelers, but what is it? The medication melatonin, available in most convenience stores, is marketed as a sleep agent or treatment for jet lag, but is it safe? Is it a sleeping pill? How is light therapy related to melatonin?

  6. [In situ temperature measurement by absorption spectroscopy based on time division multiplexing technology].

    PubMed

    Lou, Nan-zheng; Li, Ning; Weng, Chun-sheng

    2012-05-01

    Tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology is a kind of high sensitivity, high selectivity of non contacting gas in situ measurement technique. In the present paper, in situ gas temperature measurement of an open environment was achieved by means of direct scanning multiple characteristic lines of H2O and combined with least-squares algorithm. Through the use of HITRAN spectral database, the boundary effect on the gas temperature and concentration measurements was discussed in detail, and results showed that the combination of scanning multiple characteristic lines and least-squares algorithm can effectively reduce the boundary effect on the gas temperature measurements under the open environment. Experiments using time division multiplexing technology to simultaneously scan 7444.36, 7185.60, 7182.95 and 7447.48 cm(-1), the four characteristic H2O lines, the gas temperature of tubular furnace in the range of 573-973 K was measured under different conditions. The maximum temperature difference between absorption spectrum measurement and thermocouple signal was less than 52.4 K, and the maximum relative error of temperature measurement was 6.8%.

  7. Comparing lagged linear correlation, lagged regression, Granger causality, and vector autoregression for uncovering associations in EHR data

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Matthew E; Albers, David J; Hripcsak, George

    2016-01-01

    Time series analysis methods have been shown to reveal clinical and biological associations in data collected in the electronic health record. We wish to develop reliable high-throughput methods for identifying adverse drug effects that are easy to implement and produce readily interpretable results. To move toward this goal, we used univariate and multivariate lagged regression models to investigate associations between twenty pairs of drug orders and laboratory measurements. Multivariate lagged regression models exhibited higher sensitivity and specificity than univariate lagged regression in the 20 examples, and incorporating autoregressive terms for labs and drugs produced more robust signals in cases of known associations among the 20 example pairings. Moreover, including inpatient admission terms in the model attenuated the signals for some cases of unlikely associations, demonstrating how multivariate lagged regression models’ explicit handling of context-based variables can provide a simple way to probe for health-care processes that confound analyses of EHR data. PMID:28269874

  8. SPECTRAL LAGS AND THE LAG-LUMINOSITY RELATION: AN INVESTIGATION WITH SWIFT BAT GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Eskandarian, A.; Maximon, L. C.; Parke, W. C.; Stamatikos, M.; Sakamoto, T.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Gehrels, N.; Norris, J. P.

    2010-03-10

    Spectral lag, the time difference between the arrival of high-energy and low-energy photons, is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Norris et al. reported a correlation between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity of GRBs based on a limited sample. More recently, a number of authors have provided further support for this correlation using arbitrary energy bands of various instruments. In this paper, we report on a systematic extraction of spectral lags based on the largest Swift sample to date of 31 GRBs with measured redshifts. We extracted the spectral lags for all combinations of the standard Swift hard X-ray energy bands: 15-25 keV, 25-50 keV, 50-100 keV, and 100-200 keV and plotted the time dilation corrected lag as a function of isotropic peak luminosity. The mean value of the correlation coefficient for various channel combinations is -0.68 with a chance probability of {approx}0.7 x 10{sup -3}. In addition, the mean value of the power-law index is 1.4 +- 0.3. Hence, our study lends support to the existence of a lag-luminosity correlation, albeit with large scatter.

  9. Time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy for chemical kinetics.

    SciTech Connect

    Sheps, Leonid; Chandler, David W.

    2013-04-01

    Experimental measurements of elementary reaction rate coefficients and product branching ratios are essential to our understanding of many fundamentally important processes in Combustion Chemistry. However, such measurements are often impossible because of a lack of adequate detection techniques. Some of the largest gaps in our knowledge concern some of the most important radical species, because their short lifetimes and low steady-state concentrations make them particularly difficult to detect. To address this challenge, we propose a novel general detection method for gas-phase chemical kinetics: time-resolved broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (TR-BB-CEAS). This all-optical, non-intrusive, multiplexed method enables sensitive direct probing of transient reaction intermediates in a simple, inexpensive, and robust experimental package.

  10. Toward picosecond time-resolved X-ray absorption studies of interfacial photochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gessner, Oliver; Mahl, Johannes; Neppl, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    We report on the progress toward developing a novel picosecond time-resolved transient X-ray absorption spectroscopy (TRXAS) capability for time-domain studies of interfacial photochemistry. The technique is based on the combination of a high repetition rate picosecond laser system with a time-resolved X-ray fluorescent yield setup that may be used for the study of radiation sensitive materials and X-ray spectroscopy compatible photoelectrochemical (PEC) cells. The mobile system is currently deployed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and may be used in all operating modes (two-bunch and multi-bunch) of the synchrotron. The use of a time-stamping technique enables the simultaneous recording of TRXAS spectra with delays between the exciting laser pulses and the probing X-ray pulses spanning picosecond to nanosecond temporal scales. First results are discussed that demonstrate the viability of the method to study photoinduced dynamics in transition metal-oxide semiconductor (SC) samples under high vacuum conditions and at SC-liquid electrolyte interfaces during photoelectrochemical water splitting. Opportunities and challenges are outlined to capture crucial short-lived intermediates of photochemical processes with the technique. This work was supported by the Department of Energy Office of Science Early Career Research Program.

  11. Long-Lag, Wide-pulse Gamma-Ray Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.; Kazanas, D.; Scargle, . D.; Hakkila, J.; Giblin, T. W.

    2004-01-01

    Currently, the best available probe of the early phase of gamma-ray burst (GRB) jet attributes is the prompt gamma-ray emission, in which several intrinsic and extrinsic variables determine GRB pulse evolution. Bright, usually complex bursts have many narrow pulses that are difficult to model due to overlap. However, the relatively simple, long spectral lag, wide-pulse bursts may have simpler physics and are easier to model. In this work we analyze the temporal and spectral behavior of wide pulses in 24 long-lag bursts, using a pulse model with two shape parameters - width and asymmetry - and the Band spectral model with three shape parameters. We find that pulses in long-lag bursts are distinguished both temporally and spectrally from those in bright bursts: the pulses in long spectral lag bursts are few in number, and approximately 100 times wider (10s of seconds), have systematically lower peaks in vF(v), harder low-energy spectra and softer high-energy spectra. We find that these five pulse descriptors are essentially uncorrelated for our long-lag sample, suggesting that at least approximately 5 parameters are needed to model burst temporal and spectral behavior. However, pulse width is strongly correlated with spectral lag; hence these two parameters may be viewed as mutual surrogates. We infer that accurate formulations for estimating GRB luminosity and total energy will depend on several gamma-ray attributes, at least for long-lag bursts. The prevalence of long-lag bursts near the BATSE trigger threshold, their predominantly low vF(v) spectral peaks, and relatively steep upper power-law spectral indices indicate that Swift will detect many such bursts.

  12. Application of two-photon absorption in PWO scintillator for fast timing of interaction with ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Buganov, O.; Korjik, M.; Fedorov, A.; Nargelas, S.; Tamulaitis, G.; Tikhomirov, S.; Vaitkevičius, A.

    2015-12-01

    This work was aimed at searching for fast phenomena in scintillators in sub-10-ps range, a benchmark timing for the time response of radiation detectors in particle colliders. The pump-and-probe optical absorption technique with a tunable-wavelength parametric oscillator as the pump and a continuous-spectrum source as the probe beam was used to study lead tungstate PbWO4 (PWO) single crystals. It is shown that the rise time of the probe pulse absorption induced by the pump pulse is shorter than the pump pulse width of 200 fs. The approximately linear dependence of the probe absorption on the pump pulse energy density evidences that the induced absorption is caused by two-photon absorption involving one probe and one pump photon. We demonstrate that the intensity of the induced absorption at certain wavelengths is influenced by gamma irradiation, provided that an appropriate light polarization is selected. The application of the irradiation-sensitive nonlinearity for fast timing in radiation detectors is discussed.

  13. Analytical calculation of the mean time spent by photons inside an absorptive inclusion embedded in a highly scattering medium.

    PubMed

    Chernomordik, Victor; Hattery, David W; Gannot, Israel; Zaccanti, Giovanni; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2002-07-01

    The mean time spent by photons inside a nonlocalized optically abnormal embedded inclusion has been derived analytically. The accuracy of the results has been tested against Monte Carlo and experimental data. We show that for quantification of the absorption coefficient of absorptive inclusions, a corrective factor that takes into account the size of the inclusion is needed. This finding suggests that perturbation methods derived for very small inclusions which are used in inverse algorithms require a corrective factor to adequately quantify the differential absorption coefficient of nonlocalized targets embedded in optically turbid media.

  14. Energy-partition diagnostic for measuring time-resolved scattering and absorption in burst-mode laser ablation.

    PubMed

    Qian, Z; Schoenly, J E; Covarrubias, A; Lilge, L; Marjoribanks, R S

    2014-03-01

    We describe an energy-partition diagnostic based on integrating sphere principle for measuring absorption and scattering in plasma-mediated ablation by a high repetition-rate (133 MHz), pulsetrain-burst ultrafast-pulse laser. The system time-resolves the partition of elastically scattered laser light into specular reflection, diffuse reflection, and transmission, giving access to per-pulse absorption dynamics. Physical events such as optical breakdown and incubation effects in glass and aluminum are illustrated.

  15. Energy-partition diagnostic for measuring time-resolved scattering and absorption in burst-mode laser ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Z.; Schoenly, J. E.; Covarrubias, A.; Lilge, L.; Marjoribanks, R. S.

    2014-03-01

    We describe an energy-partition diagnostic based on integrating sphere principle for measuring absorption and scattering in plasma-mediated ablation by a high repetition-rate (133 MHz), pulsetrain-burst ultrafast-pulse laser. The system time-resolves the partition of elastically scattered laser light into specular reflection, diffuse reflection, and transmission, giving access to per-pulse absorption dynamics. Physical events such as optical breakdown and incubation effects in glass and aluminum are illustrated.

  16. Drug Lag and Key Regulatory Barriers in the Emerging Markets

    PubMed Central

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-01-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development. The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag. The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated. This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; ‘Western Approval’, local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation. PMID:21829782

  17. Lag phase of Salmonella enterica under osmotic stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, K; George, S M; Métris, A; Li, P L; Baranyi, J

    2011-03-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium was grown at salt concentrations ranging from 0.5 to 7.5% in minimal medium with and without added osmoprotectant and in a rich medium. In minimal medium, the cells showed an initial decline period, and consequently the definition of the lag time of the resultant log count curve was revised. The model of Baranyi and Roberts (Int. J. Food Microbiol. 23:277-294, 1994) was modified to take into account the initial decline period, based on the assumption that the log count curve of the total population was the sum of a dying and a surviving-then-growing subpopulation. The lag time was defined as the lag of the surviving subpopulation. It was modeled by means of a parameter quantifying the biochemical work the surviving cells carry out during this phase, the "work to be done." The logarithms of the maximum specific growth rates as a function of the water activity in the three media differed only by additive constants, which gave a theoretical basis for bias factors characterizing the relationships between different media. Models for the lag and the "work to be done" as a function of the water activity showed similar properties, but in rich medium above 5% salt concentrations, the data showed a maximum for this work. An accurate description of the lag time is important to avoid food wastage, which is an issue of increasing significance in the food industry, while maintaining food safety standards.

  18. Drug lag and key regulatory barriers in the emerging markets.

    PubMed

    Wileman, Harriet; Mishra, Arun

    2010-04-01

    There have been numerous investigations targeted at identifying whether a drug lag exists in the mature markets of the US, EU and Japan. This work focuses on the emerging markets because of the potential they hold for the future of the pharmaceutical industry as a consequence of rapid economic and political development.The aims of this work are to ascertain whether a drug lag exists in the emerging markets and how it has changed over time from the 1960s to the 2000s. It will also highlight key regulatory barriers which may contribute to drug lag.The date of the marketing authorisation (MA) approval by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) was used as a reference point. A comparison against the company database regarding emerging market specific approval enabled the difference in time and thus the drug lag for that particular market to be calculated.This work concludes that the overall relative drug lag in the emerging markets has decreased over time and that there are seven key regulatory barriers which need to be targeted in order to make further improvements; 'Western Approval', local clinical development (LCD), Certificate of Pharmaceutical Product (CPP), Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), pricing approval, document authentication and harmonisation.

  19. Effect of a Disintegration Mechanism on Wetting, Water Absorption, and Disintegration Time of Orodispersible Tablets

    PubMed Central

    Pabari, RM; Ramtoola, Z

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of disintegration mechanism of various types of disintegrants on the absorption ratio (AR), wetting time (WT), and disintegration time (DT) of orodispersible tablets (ODTs). ODTs were prepared by direct compression using mannitol as filler and disintegrants selected from a range of swellable, osmotic, and porous disintegrants. Tablets formed were characterized for their water AR, WT, and DT. The porosity and mechanical strength of the tablets were also measured. Results show that the DT of formulated ODTs was directly related to the WT and was a function of the disintegration mechanism of the disintegrant used. The lowest WT and DT were observed for tablets formulated using the osmotic disintegrant sodium citrate and these tablets also showed the lowest AR and porosity. The wetting and disintegration of tablets containing the highly swellable disintegrant, sodium starch glycollate, was slowest despite their high water AR and high tablet porosity. Rapid wetting and disintegration of ODTs were therefore not necessarily related to the porosity of the tablets. PMID:23112534

  20. Effect of a disintegration mechanism on wetting, water absorption, and disintegration time of orodispersible tablets.

    PubMed

    Pabari, Rm; Ramtoola, Z

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of disintegration mechanism of various types of disintegrants on the absorption ratio (AR), wetting time (WT), and disintegration time (DT) of orodispersible tablets (ODTs). ODTs were prepared by direct compression using mannitol as filler and disintegrants selected from a range of swellable, osmotic, and porous disintegrants. Tablets formed were characterized for their water AR, WT, and DT. The porosity and mechanical strength of the tablets were also measured. Results show that the DT of formulated ODTs was directly related to the WT and was a function of the disintegration mechanism of the disintegrant used. The lowest WT and DT were observed for tablets formulated using the osmotic disintegrant sodium citrate and these tablets also showed the lowest AR and porosity. The wetting and disintegration of tablets containing the highly swellable disintegrant, sodium starch glycollate, was slowest despite their high water AR and high tablet porosity. Rapid wetting and disintegration of ODTs were therefore not necessarily related to the porosity of the tablets.

  1. Time-Variable Complex Metal Absorption Lines in the Quasar HS 1603+3820

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Charlton, Jane C.; Tajitsu, Akito

    2005-08-01

    We present a new spectrum of the quasar HS 1603+3820 taken 1.28 yr (0.36 yr in the quasar rest frame) after a previous observation with Subaru+HDS. The new spectrum enables us to search for time variability as an identifier of intrinsic narrow absorption lines (NALs). This quasar shows a rich complex of C IV NALs within 60,000 km s-1 of the emission redshift. On the basis of covering factor analysis, Misawa et al. found that the C IV NAL system at zabs=2.42-2.45 (system A, at a shift velocity of vsh=8300-10,600 km s-1 relative to the quasar) was intrinsic to the quasar. With our new spectrum, we perform time variability analysis, as well as covering factor analysis, to separate intrinsic NALs from intervening NALs for eight C IV systems. Only system A, which was identified as an intrinsic system in the earlier paper by Misawa et al., shows a strong variation in line strength (Wobs~10.4-->19.1 Å). We speculate that a broad absorption line (BAL) could be forming in this quasar (i.e., many narrower lines will blend together to make a BAL profile). We illustrate the plausibility of this suggestion with the help of a simulation in which we vary the column densities and covering factors of the NAL complex. Under the assumption that a change of ionization state causes the variability, a lower limit can be placed on the electron density (ne>~3×104cm-3) and an upper limit on the distance from the continuum source (r<=6 kpc). On the other hand, if the motion of clumpy gas causes the variability (a more likely scenario), the crossing velocity and the distance from the continuum source are estimated to be vcross>8000 km s-1 and r<3 pc. In this case, the absorber does not intercept any flux from the broad emission line region, but only flux from the UV continuum source. If we adopt the dynamical model of Murray et al., we can obtain a much more strict constraint on the distance of the gas parcel from the continuum source, r<0.2 pc. Based on data collected at the Subaru

  2. Implications of Lag-Luminosity Relationship for Unified GRB Paradigms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, J. P.; White, Nicholas E. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Spectral lags (tau(sub lag)) are deduced for 1437 long (T(sub 90) greater than 2 s) BATSE gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) with peak flux F(sub p) greater than 0.25 photons cm(sup -2)/s, near to the BATSE trigger threshold. The lags are modeled to approximate the observed distribution in the F(sub p)-T(sub lag) plane, realizing a noise-free representation. Assuming a two-branch lag-luminosity relationship, the lags are self-consistently corrected for cosmological effects to yield distributions in luminosity, distance, and redshift. The results have several consequences for GRB populations and for unified gamma-ray/afterglow scenarios which would account for afterglow break times and gamma-ray spectral evolution in terms of jet opening angle, viewing angle, or a profiled jet with variable Lorentz factor: A component of the burst sample is identified - those with few, wide pulses, lags of a few tenths to several seconds, and soft spectra - whose Log[N]-Log[F(sub p)] distribution approximates a -3/2 power-law, suggesting homogeneity and thus relatively nearby sources. The proportion of these long-lag bursts increases from negligible among bright BATSE bursts to approx. 50% at trigger threshold. Bursts with very long lags, approx. 1-2 less than tau(sub lag) (S) less than 10, show a tendency to concentrate near the Supergalactic Plane with a quadrupole moment of approx. -0.10 +/- 0.04. GRB 980425 (SN 1998bw) is a member of this subsample of approx. 90 bursts with estimated distances less than 100 Mpc. The frequency of the observed ultra-low luminosity bursts is approx. 1/4 that of SNe Ib/c within the same volume. If truly nearby, the core-collapse events associated with these GRBs might produce gravitational radiation detectable by LIGO-II. Such nearby bursts might also help explain flattening of the cosmic ray spectrum at ultra-high energies, as observed by AGASA.

  3. Absorption Spectra and Photoreactivity of p-Aminobenzophenone by Time-dependent Density Functional Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xue-mei; Huang, Yao; Ma, Jian-yi; Li, Xiang-yuan

    2007-06-01

    The absorption spectral properties of para-aminobenzophenone (p-ABP) were investigated in gas phase and in solution by time-dependent density functional theory. Calculations suggest that the singlet states vary greatly with the solvent polarities. In various polar solvents, including acetonitrile, methanol, ethanol, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethyl formamide, the excited S1 states with charge transfer character result from π → π* transitions. However, in nonpolar solvents, cyclohexane, and benzene, the S1 states are the result of n → π* transitions related to local excitation in the carbonyl group. The excited T1 states were calculated to have ππ* character in various solvents. From the variation of the calculated excited states, the band due to π → π* transition undergoes a redshift with an increase in solvent polarity, while the band due to n → π* transition undergoes a blueshift with an increase in solvent polarity. In addition, the triplet yields and the photoreactivities of p-ABP in various solvents are discussed.

  4. In-Line Capacitance Sensor for Real-Time Water Absorption Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nurge, Mark A.; Perusich, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    A capacitance/dielectric sensor was designed, constructed, and used to measure in real time the in-situ water concentration in a desiccant water bed. Measurements were carried out with two experimental setups: (1) passing nitrogen through a humidity generator and allowing the gas stream to become saturated at a measured temperature and pressure, and (2) injecting water via a syringe pump into a nitrogen stream. Both water vapor generating devices were attached to a downstream vertically-mounted water capture bed filled with 19.5 g of Moisture Gone desiccant. The sensor consisted of two electrodes: (1) a 1/8" dia stainless steel rod placed in the middle of the bed and (2) the outer shell of the stainless steel bed concentric with the rod. All phases of the water capture process (background, heating, absorption, desorption, and cooling) were monitored with capacitance. The measured capacitance was found to vary linearly with the water content in the bed at frequencies above 100 kHz indicating dipolar motion dominated the signal; below this frequency, ionic motion caused nonlinearities in the water concentration/capacitance relationship. The desiccant exhibited a dielectric relaxation whose activation energy was lowered upon addition of water indicating either a less hindered rotational motion or crystal reorientation.

  5. Time-resolved contrast function and optical characterization of spatially varying absorptive inclusions at different depths in diffusing media.

    PubMed

    De Nicola, S; Esposito, R; Lepore, M; Indovina, P L

    2004-03-01

    The role of a spatially varying absorptive inhomogeneity located at different depths within a turbid material has been investigated. This inhomogeneity has been characterized by a spatially dependent Gaussian distribution of its absorption coefficient. The present study has been performed calculating the time-resolved contrast function in the framework of the first-order perturbative approach to the diffusion equation for a slab geometry and a coaxial measurement scheme. The model has allowed us to take into account different locations of the inclusion along the source-detector axis. The accuracy of time-resolved contrast predictions has been analyzed through comparisons with results of the finite element method that has been used to numerically solve the diffusion equation. Recovery of the absorption perturbation parameter of the inhomogeneity for different axial positions has also been investigated.

  6. MRI is unable to illustrate the absorption time of the absorbable TIGR mesh in humans: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Öberg, Stina; Andresen, Kristoffer; Møller, Jakob M.; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A male patient had a bilateral laparoscopic inguinal hernia repair in 2012. The right-sided hernia was treated with a permanent mesh, and the left-sided hernia received an absorbable mesh. The absorbable TIGR mesh has been proved to be completely absorbed and replaced by new connective tissue after 3 years in sheep. The patient was therefore followed for 3 years by annual magnetic resonance imagings (MRIs) to illustrate the absorption time in humans. During follow-up, the thickness of the absorbable mesh slightly decreased, and at the last clinical examination, the patient was without a recurrence. However, MRI failed to illustrate absorption of the TIGR mesh, perhaps since new connective tissue and the mesh material had the same appearance on the images. In conclusion, MRI was unable to confirm an absorption time of 3 years for the TIGR mesh, and further studies are needed to investigate if the mesh also completely absorbs in humans. PMID:26581219

  7. Pressure Lag in Tubing Used in Flight Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, Howard L; Rathert, George A , Jr

    1945-01-01

    Tests described in this report were undertaken to obtain a quantitative measure of the pressure lag in typical pressure-tubing systems used by the Ames Aeronautical Laboratory in flight research investigations. Lag measurements were made with both single-direction and oscillating pressure changes. Single-direction pressure changes were investigated to determine if the lag in orifice-pressure lines and in the research airspeed and altitude measuring systems of pursuit-type airplane undergoing flight tests was sufficient to cause an appreciable error in the record of a sudden pressure change. Oscillating pressure changes were investigated with particular reference to the accuracy of pressure peaks in pressure-distribution measurements during the time of buffeting conditions as found in stalls. (author)

  8. Time-resolved soft x-ray absorption setup using multi-bunch operation modes at synchrotrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stebel, L.; Malvestuto, M.; Capogrosso, V.; Sigalotti, P.; Ressel, B.; Bondino, F.; Magnano, E.; Cautero, G.; Parmigiani, F.

    2011-12-01

    Here, we report on a novel experimental apparatus for performing time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy in the sub-ns time scale using non-hybrid multi-bunch mode synchrotron radiation. The present setup is based on a variable repetition rate Ti:sapphire laser (pump pulse) synchronized with the ˜500 MHz x-ray synchrotron radiation bunches and on a detection system that discriminates and singles out the significant x-ray photon pulses by means of a custom made photon counting unit. The whole setup has been validated by measuring the time evolution of the L3 absorption edge during the melting and the solidification of a Ge single crystal irradiated by an intense ultrafast laser pulse. These results pave the way for performing synchrotron time-resolved experiments in the sub-ns time domain with variable repetition rate exploiting the full flux of the synchrotron radiation.

  9. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adámek, P.; Olejníček, J.; Hubička, Z.; Čada, M.; Kment, Š.; Kohout, M.; Do, H. T.

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the development and construction of an apparatus for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) for the diagnostics of pulsed plasma. A detailed description of the extension of a progressive method of laser absorption spectroscopy in continuous regime to a direct triggering method of the time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy (TR-LAS) is presented. The main advantage of the developed method is its capability to measure the time evolution of the whole absorption profile with a preset time resolution, which can be less than 1 μs. Therefore, the presented method of repetitive sampling applied on LAS in plasma processes is capable of simultaneous measurement of the density and kinetic temperature of selected particles. Its appropriate applications are to periodical processes in technological plasma, namely pulsed plasma discharges. The developed method of TR-LAS was applied to measurements of the temporal evolution of density and kinetic temperature of argon metastable species during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium and titanium dioxide thin films.

  10. System for time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy and its application to high-power impulse magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Adámek, P; Olejníček, J; Hubička, Z; Čada, M; Kment, Š; Kohout, M; Do, H T

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the development and construction of an apparatus for time-resolved tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) for the diagnostics of pulsed plasma. A detailed description of the extension of a progressive method of laser absorption spectroscopy in continuous regime to a direct triggering method of the time-resolved laser absorption spectroscopy (TR-LAS) is presented. The main advantage of the developed method is its capability to measure the time evolution of the whole absorption profile with a preset time resolution, which can be less than 1 μs. Therefore, the presented method of repetitive sampling applied on LAS in plasma processes is capable of simultaneous measurement of the density and kinetic temperature of selected particles. Its appropriate applications are to periodical processes in technological plasma, namely pulsed plasma discharges. The developed method of TR-LAS was applied to measurements of the temporal evolution of density and kinetic temperature of argon metastable species during high-power impulse magnetron sputtering of titanium and titanium dioxide thin films.

  11. A soft X-ray lag detected in Centaurus A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachibana, Yutaro; Kawamuro, Taiki; Ueda, Yoshihiro; Shidatsu, Megumi; Arimoto, Makoto; Yoshii, Taketoshi; Yatsu, Yoichi; Saito, Yoshihiko; Pike, Sean; Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2016-06-01

    We performed time-lag analysis on the X-ray light curves of Centaurus A (Cen A) obtained by the Gas Slit Camera (GSC) aboard the Monitor of All-sky X-ray Image (MAXI) in three energy bands (2-4 keV, 4-10 keV, and 10-20 keV). We discovered a soft X-ray lag relative to higher energies (soft lag) on a timescale of days in a flaring episode by employing the discrete correlation function (DCF) and the z-transformed discrete correlation function (ZDCF) method. In the episode, a peak and a centroid in the DCF and the ZDCF was observed at a soft lag of ˜ 5 d in 2-4 keV versus 4-10 keV and in 4-10 keV versus 10-20 keV, and ˜ 10 d in 2-4 keV versus 10-20 keV. We found it difficult to explain the observed X-ray variation by a single energy injection with the one-zone synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) model, in which the soft lags in these three energy bands reflect the different cooling times of the relativistic electrons, by assuming the magnetic field and minimum Lorentz factor estimated from a broad-band spectral energy distribution. Alternatively, if the phenomenon is interpreted as cooling of Comptonizing electrons in a corona covering the accretion disk, the temperature of the corona producing the variable X-rays should be ˜ 10 keV for reconciliation with the soft lag in the energy range of 2-20 keV.

  12. In-situ ultra-sensitive infrared absorption spectroscopy of biomolecule interactions in real time with plasmonic nanoantennas

    PubMed Central

    Adato, Ronen; Altug, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful biochemical analysis tool as it extracts detailed molecular structural information in a label-free fashion. Its molecular specificity renders the technique sensitive to the subtle conformational changes exhibited by proteins in response to a variety of stimuli. Yet, sensitivity limitations and the extremely strong absorption bands of liquid water severely limit infrared spectroscopy in performing kinetic measurements in biomolecules’ native, aqueous environments. Here we demonstrate a plasmonic chip-based technology that overcomes these challenges, enabling the in-situ monitoring of protein and nanoparticle interactions at high sensitivity in real time, even allowing the observation of minute volumes of water displacement during binding events. Our approach leverages the plasmonic enhancement of absorption bands in conjunction with a non-classical form of internal reflection. These features not only expand the reach of infrared spectroscopy to a new class of biological interactions but also additionally enable a unique chip-based technology. PMID:23877168

  13. In-situ ultra-sensitive infrared absorption spectroscopy of biomolecule interactions in real time with plasmonic nanoantennas.

    PubMed

    Adato, Ronen; Altug, Hatice

    2013-01-01

    Infrared absorption spectroscopy is a powerful biochemical analysis tool as it extracts detailed molecular structural information in a label-free fashion. Its molecular specificity renders the technique sensitive to the subtle conformational changes exhibited by proteins in response to a variety of stimuli. Yet, sensitivity limitations and the extremely strong absorption bands of liquid water severely limit infrared spectroscopy in performing kinetic measurements in biomolecules' native, aqueous environments. Here we demonstrate a plasmonic chip-based technology that overcomes these challenges, enabling the in-situ monitoring of protein and nanoparticle interactions at high sensitivity in real time, even allowing the observation of minute volumes of water displacement during binding events. Our approach leverages the plasmonic enhancement of absorption bands in conjunction with a non-classical form of internal reflection. These features not only expand the reach of infrared spectroscopy to a new class of biological interactions but also additionally enable a unique chip-based technology.

  14. Absorption and emission of radiation by a sourceless Abelian gauge wall in a Robertson-Walker space-time.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, J. R.

    1992-04-01

    A model of a sourceless Abelian "gauge wall" consisting of a singular magnetic field occupying the (y, z)-plane is examined in the context of a flat Robertson-Walker space-time background. Exact solutions are found for the gauge field structure function. The solutions may be static or time dependent. Dynamic solutions exist which describe the absorption and emission of gauge field radiation by the gauge wall.

  15. Mechanisms of Zero-Lag Synchronization in Cortical Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Gollo, Leonardo L.; Mirasso, Claudio; Sporns, Olaf; Breakspear, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Zero-lag synchronization between distant cortical areas has been observed in a diversity of experimental data sets and between many different regions of the brain. Several computational mechanisms have been proposed to account for such isochronous synchronization in the presence of long conduction delays: Of these, the phenomenon of “dynamical relaying” – a mechanism that relies on a specific network motif – has proven to be the most robust with respect to parameter mismatch and system noise. Surprisingly, despite a contrary belief in the community, the common driving motif is an unreliable means of establishing zero-lag synchrony. Although dynamical relaying has been validated in empirical and computational studies, the deeper dynamical mechanisms and comparison to dynamics on other motifs is lacking. By systematically comparing synchronization on a variety of small motifs, we establish that the presence of a single reciprocally connected pair – a “resonance pair” – plays a crucial role in disambiguating those motifs that foster zero-lag synchrony in the presence of conduction delays (such as dynamical relaying) from those that do not (such as the common driving triad). Remarkably, minor structural changes to the common driving motif that incorporate a reciprocal pair recover robust zero-lag synchrony. The findings are observed in computational models of spiking neurons, populations of spiking neurons and neural mass models, and arise whether the oscillatory systems are periodic, chaotic, noise-free or driven by stochastic inputs. The influence of the resonance pair is also robust to parameter mismatch and asymmetrical time delays amongst the elements of the motif. We call this manner of facilitating zero-lag synchrony resonance-induced synchronization, outline the conditions for its occurrence, and propose that it may be a general mechanism to promote zero-lag synchrony in the brain. PMID:24763382

  16. Ultrafast Time-Resolved Emission and Absorption Spectra of meso-Pyridyl Porphyrins upon Soret Band Excitation Studied by Fluorescence Up-Conversion and Transient Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Yeduru; Venkatesan, M; Ramakrishna, B; Bangal, Prakriti Ranjan

    2016-09-08

    A comprehensive study of ultrafast molecular relaxation processes of isomeric meso-(pyridyl) porphyrins (TpyPs) has been carried out by using femtosecond time-resolved emission and absorption spectroscopic techniques upon pumping at 400 nm, Soret band (B band or S2), in 4:1 dichloromethane (DCM) and tetrahydrofuran (THF) solvent mixture. By combined studies of fluorescence up-conversion, time-correlated single photon counting, and transient absorption spectroscopic techniques, a complete model with different microscopic rate constants associated with elementary processes involved in electronic manifolds has been reported. Besides, a distinct coherent nuclear wave packet motion in Qy state is observed at low-frequency mode, ca. 26 cm(-1) region. Fluorescence up-conversion studies constitute ultrafast time-resolved emission spectra (TRES) over the whole emission range (430-710 nm) starting from S2 state to Qx state via Qy state. Careful analysis of time profiles of up-converted signals at different emission wavelengths helps to reveal detail molecular dynamics. The observed lifetimes are as indicated: A very fast decay component with 80 ± 20 fs observed at ∼435 nm is assigned to the lifetime of S2 (B) state, whereas being a rise component in the region of between 550 and 710 nm emission wavelength pertaining to Qy and Qx states, it is attributed to very fast internal conversion (IC) occurring from B → Qy and B → Qx as well. Two distinct components of Qy emission decay with ∼200-300 fs and ∼1-1.5 ps time constants are due to intramolecular vibrational redistribution (IVR) induced by solute-solvent inelastic collisions and vibrational redistribution induced by solute-solvent elastic collision, respectively. The weighted average of these two decay components is assigned as the characteristic lifetime of Qy, and it ranges between 0.3 and 0.5 ps. An additional ∼20 ± 2 ps rise component is observed in Qx emission, and it is assigned to the formation time of

  17. Acoustical pipe lagging systems design and performance

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, R.D.; Chapnik, B.V.; Howe, B.

    1998-10-30

    HGC Engineering was retained by the PRC International at the American Gas Association, to undertake a study of acoustical pipe lagging systems. The study included gathering input from PRCI member companies regarding their concerns and their established material specifications for lagging systems; conducting a comprehensive acoustical measurement program; using the measured results in conjunction with computer modeling to identify optimal lagging configurations; and developing material specifications for several standardized lagging systems for use by PRCI member companies. For all the lagging configurations, the measurement and modeling results showed amplification of sound at frequencies less than about 315 Hz. This result is a well known phenomenon, widely discussed the published acoustical literature, which means that pipe lagging is only effective for controlling higher frequencies noise (above about 500 Hz). Fortunately, in many gas piping applications, it is this higher frequency range that is of concern. The measurement and modeling results further showed that the high frequency performance of a lagging system is dependent primarily on having sufficient jacket mass and insulation thickness. The performance can be improved using an intermediate mass loaded barrier layer.

  18. The lag RST turbulence model applied to vortical flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Churchfield, Matthew John

    The subject of this work is the application of Olsen and Coakley's Reynolds stress relaxation turbulence model, which they call the lag Reynold stress transport (RST) model, to wingtip vortex flows. The lag RST model is meant for general non-equilibrium turbulent flows, and has not been applied to vortical flows before this work. Such a model relaxes the Reynolds stresses toward their equilibrium value, determined by the Boussinesq approximation, at a rate depending on a model constant, alpha0, multiplied by the specific dissipation rate of the turbulence, o. The alpha 0 constant can be adjusted to vary the rate at which the Reynolds stress tensor relaxes toward its equilibrium value. It performs this relaxation by solving for the equilibrium Reynolds stresses using Wilcox's k-o model, but then uses a relaxation equation to solve for the actual Reynolds stress tensor. The lag RST turbulence model allows the principal axes of the Reynolds stress tensor to be misaligned with those of the mean strain rate tensor, something linear eddy viscosity models cannot do, but something that occurs in actual vortical flows. The lag RST model is used with the Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations to compute a one-dimensional, time-varying, line vortex with axial flow, called the q-vortex. Direct numerical simulation (DNS) data is available for comparison. Also, a modified version of the OVERFLOW code is used to solve the RANS and lag RST model equations in a three-dimensional wingtip vortex flow, for which there is experimental data. This work shows that computations performed with the lag RST model have a mean flow in much better agreement with the DNS or experimental data than those performed with the k-o model, the lag RST model's base. In fact, the lag RST model performs equally or better in this these flows than the well performing Spalart-Allmaras model with a correction for streamline curvature and rotation. As the lag parameter alpha0 is decreased, the amount

  19. AIR POLLUTION EPIDEMIOLOGY: CAN INFORMATION BE OBTAINED FROM THE VARIATIONS IN SIGNIFICANCE AND RISK AS A FUNCTION OF DAYS AFTER EXPOSURE (LAG STRUCTURE)?

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determine if analysis of lag structure from time series epidemiology, using gases, particles, and source factor time series, can contribute to understanding the relationships among various air pollution indicators. Methods: Analyze lag structure from an epidemiologic study of ca...

  20. Lag synchronization of Rossler system and Chua circuit via a scalar signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chuandong; Liao, Xiaofeng

    2004-08-01

    In this Letter, a chaotic lag synchronization scheme is proposed based on combining a nonlinear with lag-in-time observer design. Our approach leads to a systematic methodology, which guarantees the synchronization of a wide class of chaotic systems via a scalar signal. The proposed technique has been applied to synchronize two well-known chaotic systems: Rossler's system and Chua circuit.

  1. Finite-Difference Time Domain Solution of Light Scattering and Absorption by Particles in an Absorbing Medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Fu, Q.

    2002-01-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique has been extended to simulate light scattering and absorption by nonspherical particles embedded in an absorbing dielectric medium. A uniaxial perfectly matched layer (UPML) absorbing boundary condition is used to truncate the computational domain. When computing the single-scattering properties of a particle in an absorbing dielectric medium, we derive the single-scattering properties including scattering phase functions, extinction, and absorption efficiencies using a volume integration of the internal field. A Mie solution for light scattering and absorption by spherical particles in an absorbing medium is used to examine the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD code. It is found that the errors in the extinction and absorption efficiencies from the 3-D UPML FDTD are less than similar to 2%. The errors in the scattering phase functions are typically less than similar to 5%. The errors in the asymmetry factors are less than similar to 0.l%. For light scattering by particles in free space, the accuracy of the 3-D UPML FDTD scheme is similar to a previous model.

  2. Tailored pump-probe transient spectroscopy with time-dependent density-functional theory: controlling absorption spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walkenhorst, Jessica; De Giovannini, Umberto; Castro, Alberto; Rubio, Angel

    2016-05-01

    Recent advances in laser technology allow us to follow electronic motion at its natural time-scale with ultra-fast time resolution, leading the way towards attosecond physics experiments of extreme precision. In this work, we assess the use of tailored pumps in order to enhance (or reduce) some given features of the probe absorption (for example, absorption in the visible range of otherwise transparent samples). This type of manipulation of the system response could be helpful for its full characterization, since it would allow us to visualize transitions that are dark when using unshaped pulses. In order to investigate these possibilities, we perform first a theoretical analysis of the non-equilibrium response function in this context, aided by one simple numerical model of the hydrogen atom. Then, we proceed to investigate the feasibility of using time-dependent density-functional theory as a means to implement, theoretically, this absorption-optimization idea, for more complex atoms or molecules. We conclude that the proposed idea could in principle be brought to the laboratory: tailored pump pulses can excite systems into light-absorbing states. However, we also highlight the severe numerical and theoretical difficulties posed by the problem: large-scale non-equilibrium quantum dynamics are cumbersome, even with TDDFT, and the shortcomings of state-of-the-art TDDFT functionals may still be serious for these out-of-equilibrium situations.

  3. Transient Supersaturation Supports Drug Absorption from Lipid-Based Formulations for Short Periods of Time, but Ongoing Solubilization Is Required for Longer Absorption Periods.

    PubMed

    Crum, Matthew F; Trevaskis, Natalie L; Pouton, Colin W; Porter, Christopher J H

    2017-02-06

    The current studies sought to explore the impact of drug supersaturation and precipitation during the dispersion and digestion of lipid-based formulations (LBFs), on in vivo absorption using a coupled in vitro digestion-in vivo perfusion absorption model. Fenofibrate absorption was evaluated from a number of LBFs with different solubilization and supersaturation capacities, and conditions at the absorptive membrane manipulated by changing perfusion conditions, intestine segment lengths, and by the conduct of experiments in the presence or absence of suspended/precipitated drug. LBF dispersion and digestion resulted in varying periods of supersaturation across the different formulations. Even fleeting (5-10 min) periods of supersaturation were able to drive flux across a perfused 10 cm intestinal segment for up to 60 min, although over longer infusion periods (60-80 min) flux dropped in the absence of ongoing drug solubilization and supersaturation. In contrast, the presence or absence of precipitated/suspended drug, had little impact on drug flux. When perfused intestinal segment lengths were extended, the role of initial supersaturation was attenuated and ongoing solubilization conditions became the primary driver of absorptive flux. The data suggest that for highly permeable drugs such as fenofibrate, a short period of supersaturation at the absorptive membrane may be sufficient to drive absorptive drug flux in spite of significant drug precipitation on formulation dispersion or digestion in vitro. In contrast, where longer periods of absorption are required, for example, at higher doses, the requirement for ongoing solubilization and supersaturation becomes more apparent.

  4. Procedures for Calculating Cessation Lag

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental regulations aimed at reducing cancer risks usually have the effect of reducing exposure to a carcinogen at the time the regulation is inplemented. The reduction of cancer risk may occur shortly after the reduced exposure or after a consideravle period of time. The ...

  5. PROCEDURES FOR CALCULATING CESSATION LAG

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental regulations aimed at reducing cancer risks usually have the effect of reducing exposure to a carcinogen at the time the regulation is implemented. The reduction of cancer risk may occur shortly after the reduced exposure or after a considerable period of time. The t...

  6. A SOFT X-RAY REVERBERATION LAG IN THE AGN ESO 113-G010

    SciTech Connect

    Cackett, E. M.; Fabian, A. C.; Kara, E.; Zogbhi, A.; Reynolds, C.; Uttley, P.

    2013-02-10

    Reverberation lags have recently been discovered in a handful of nearby, variable active galactic nuclei (AGNs). Here, we analyze a {approx}100 ks archival XMM-Newton observation of the highly variable AGN, ESO 113-G010, in order to search for lags between hard, 1.5-4.5 keV, and soft, 0.3-0.9 keV, energy X-ray bands. At the lowest frequencies available in the light curve ({approx}< 1.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz), we find hard lags where the power-law-dominated hard band lags the soft band (where the reflection fraction is high). However, at higher frequencies in the range (2-3) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -4} Hz we find a soft lag of -325 {+-} 89 s. The general evolution from hard to soft lags as the frequency increases is similar to other AGNs where soft lags have been detected. We interpret this soft lag as due to reverberation from the accretion disk, with the reflection component responding to variability from the X-ray corona. For a black hole mass of 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} M{sub Sun} this corresponds to a light-crossing time of {approx}9 R{sub g} /c; however, dilution effects mean that the intrinsic lag is likely longer than this. Based on recent black hole mass scaling for lag properties, the lag amplitude and frequency are more consistent with a black hole a few times more massive than the best estimates, though flux-dependent effects could easily add scatter this large.

  7. Real-time monitoring of corks' water absorption using laser speckle temporal correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nassif, Rana; Abou Nader, Christelle; Pellen, Fabrice; Le Jeune, Bernard; Le Brun, Guy; Abboud, Marie

    2015-08-01

    Physical and mechanical properties of cork allow it solving many types of problems and make it suitable for a wide range of applications. Our objective consists into studying cork's water absorption by analyzing the dynamic speckle field using the temporal correlation method. Experimental results show that the medium was inert at first with the absence of activity, and as the cap cork was more and more immersed into water, the presence of the activity becomes more significant. This temporal parameter revealed the sensibility of biospeckle method to monitor the amount of absorbed water by cork caps.

  8. Real-time monitoring of reactive species in downstream etch reactor by VUV broad-band absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soriano, R.; Vallier, L.; Cunge, G.; Sadeghi, N.

    2016-09-01

    Plasma etching of nanometric size, high aspect-ratio structures is more challenging at each new technological node. Remote plasmas are beginning to find use when damages on nanostructures by ion bombardment become critical or when etching with high selectivity on different materials present on the wafer is necessary (i . e . tungsten oxide etching with fluorine and hydrogen containing plasmas in remote reactor from AMAT). Furthermore, it is expected that downstream plasma will replace many wet chemical etching processes to alleviate the issue of pattern collapses caused by capillary forces when nanometer size high aspect ratio structures are immersed in liquids. In these downstream plasmas, radicals are the main active species and a control of their density is of prime importance. Most of gases used and radicals produced in etching plasmas (HBr, BrCl, Br2, NF3, CH2F2,...) have strong absorption bands in the vacuum UV spectral region and we have shown that very low concentration of these species can be detected by VUV absorption. We have recently improved the technique by using a VUV CCD camera, instead of the PMT, which render possible the Broad-Band absorption spectroscopy in the 120-200 nm range, with a deuterium lamp, or a laser produced xenon arc lamp as light source. The multi-spectral detection ability of the CCD reduces the acquisition time to less than 1 second and can permit the real time control of the process control.

  9. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  10. Stabilized NADH as a Countermeasure for Jet Lag

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kay, Gary G.; Viirre, Erik; Clark, Jonathan

    2001-01-01

    Current remedies for jet lag (phototherapy, melatonin, stimulant, and sedative medications) are limited in efficacy and practicality. The efficacy of a stabilized, sublingual form of reduced nicotin amide adenine dinucleotide (NADH, ENADAlert, Menuco Corp.) as a countermeasure for jet lag was examined. Because NADH increases cellular production of ATP and facilitates dopamine synthesis, it may counteract the effects of jet lag on cognitive functioning and sleepiness. Thirty-five healthy, employed subjects participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Training and baseline testing were conducted on the West Coast before subjects flew overnight to the East Coast, where they would experience a 3-hour time difference. Upon arrival, individuals were randomly assigned to receive either 20 mg of sublingual stabilized ADH (n=18) or identical placebo tablets (n=17). All participants completed computer-administered tests (including CogScreen7) to assess changes in cognitive functioning, mood, and sleepiness in the morning and afternoon. Jet lag resulted in increased sleepiness for over half the participants and deterioration of cognitive functioning for approximately one third. The morning following the flight, subjects experienced lapses of attention in addition to disruptions in working memory, divided attention, and visual perceptual speed. Individuals who received NADH performed significantly better on 5 of 8 cognitive and psychomotor test measures (P less than or equal to 0.5) and showed a trend for better performance on the other three measures (P less than or equal to .l0). Subjects also reported less sleepiness compared with those who received placebo. No adverse effects were observed with NADH treatment. Stabilized NADH significantly reduced jet lag-induced disruptions of cognitive functioning, was easily administered, and was found to have no adverse side effects.

  11. Collective Dynamics of Oscillator Networks: Why do we suffer from heavy jet lag?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kori, Hiroshi

    The circadian rhythm of the entire body in mammals is orchestrated by a small tissue in the brain called the suprachiamatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN consists of a population of neurons, each of which exhibit circadian (i.e., approximately 24 h) gene expression. Neurons form a complex network and interact with each other using various types of neurotransmitters. The rhythmic gene expressions of individual cells in the SCN synchronize through such interaction. Jet-lag symptoms arise from temporal mismatch between the internal circadian clock orchestrated by the SCN and external solar time. It may take about one week or even longer to recover from jet lag after a long-distance trip. We recently found that recovery from jet lag is considerably accelerated in the knocked-out (KO) mice lacking the receptors of a certain neurotransmitter in the SCN. Importantly, all other properties of mice including sleep-awake rhythms and breeding seem to be intact. Only the response to the jet lag changes. It was also found that after a few days of jet lag, cells in the SCN desynchronize in the wild type (WT) mice, whereas they do not in KO mice. This desynchrony might be a main reason for heavy jet lag symptoms. To understand the mechanism underlying jet lag, we propose a simple model of the SCN, which is a network of phase oscillators. Despite its simplicity, this model can reproduce important dynamical properties of the SCN. For example, this model reproduces the desynchrony of oscillators after jet lag. Moreover, when intercellular interaction is weaker, this desynchrony is suppressed and the recover from jet lag is considerably accelerated. Our mathematical study provides a deeper understanding of jet lag and an idea how to circumvent heavy jet lag symptoms

  12. Selection of Temporal Lags When Modeling Economic and Financial Processes.

    PubMed

    Matilla-Garcia, Mariano; Ojeda, Rina B; Marin, Manuel Ruiz

    2016-10-01

    This paper suggests new nonparametric statistical tools and procedures for modeling linear and nonlinear univariate economic and financial processes. In particular, the tools presented help in selecting relevant lags in the model description of a general linear or nonlinear time series; that is, nonlinear models are not a restriction. The tests seem to be robust to the selection of free parameters. We also show that the test can be used as a diagnostic tool for well-defined models.

  13. Mitigating shear lag in tall buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, Himanshu; Goliya, Ravindra K.

    2015-09-01

    As the height of building increases, effect of shear lag also becomes considerable in the design of high-rise buildings. In this paper, shear lag effect in tall buildings of heights, i.e., 120, 96, 72, 48 and 36 stories of which aspect ratio ranges from 3 to 10 is studied. Tube-in-tube structural system with façade bracing is used for designing the building of height 120 story. It is found that bracing system considerably reduces the shear lag effect and hence increases the building stiffness to withstand lateral loads. Different geometric patterns of bracing system are considered. The best effective geometric configuration of bracing system is concluded in this study. Lateral force, as wind load is applied on the buildings as it is the most dominating lateral force for such heights. Wind load is set as per Indian standard code of practice IS 875 Part-3. For analysis purpose SAP 2000 software program is used.

  14. Jet Lag and Shift Work Disorder.

    PubMed

    Reid, Kathryn J; Abbott, Sabra M

    2015-12-01

    Jet lag and shift work disorder are circadian rhythm sleep-wake disorders resulting from behaviorally altering the sleep-wake schedule in relation to the external environment. Not everyone who experiences trans-meridian travel or performs shift work has a disorder. The prevalence of jet lag disorder is unclear, approximately 5%-10% of shift workers have shift work disorder. Treatment aims to realign the internal circadian clock with the external environment. Behavioral therapies include sleep hygiene and management of the light-dark and sleep schedule. Pharmacologic agents are used to treat insomnia and excessive sleepiness, and melatonin is used to facilitate sleep and circadian realignment.

  15. Ultrafast time-resolved absorption spectroscopy of geometric isomers of xanthophylls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niedzwiedzki, Dariusz M.; Enriquez, Miriam M.; LaFountain, Amy M.; Frank, Harry A.

    2010-07-01

    This paper presents an ultrafast optical spectroscopic investigation of the excited state energies, lifetimes and spectra of specific geometric isomers of neoxanthin, violaxanthin, lutein, and zeaxanthin. All- trans- and 15,15'- cis-β-carotene were also examined. The spectroscopy was done on molecules purified by HPLC frozen immediately to inhibit isomerization. The spectra were taken at 77 K to maintain the configurations and to provide better spectral resolution than seen at room temperature. The kinetics reveal that for all of the molecules except neoxanthin, the S 1 state lifetime of the cis isomers is shorter than that of the all- trans isomers. The S 1 excited state energies of all the isomers were determined by recording S 1 → S 2 transient absorption spectra. The results obtained in this manner at cryogenic temperatures provide an unprecedented level of precision in the measurement of the S 1 energies of these xanthophylls, which are critical components in light-harvesting pigment-protein complexes of green plants.

  16. White-light continuum probed femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic measurement of β-carotene under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Wei-Long; Zheng, Zhi-Ren; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Wu, Wen-Zhi; Li, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei; Huo, Ming-Ming; Liu, Zhi-Guo; Zhu, Rui-Bin; Zhao, Lian-Cheng; Su, Wen-Hui

    2012-04-01

    We have performed a femtosecond time-resolved absorption spectroscopic experiment of β-carotene in n-hexane solution under high pressure up to ˜1.0 GPa. Using white-light continuum in the visible spectral region as probe light, we found that the energy level of S1 state descends, whereas its lifetime becomes longer with the rising pressure. We ascribe this tendency deviating from the energy gap law to the viscosity effects on the Cdbnd C stretching vibrations, which is fully consistent with the microviscosity theory. This Letter may provide some insights on the light harvesting and photoprotection functions of carotenoids in photosynthetic organisms.

  17. Quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure instrument with millisecond time scale, optimized for in situ applications.

    PubMed

    Khalid, S; Caliebe, W; Siddons, P; So, I; Clay, B; Lenhard, T; Hanson, J; Wang, Q; Frenkel, A I; Marinkovic, N; Hould, N; Ginder-Vogel, M; Landrot, G L; Sparks, D L; Ganjoo, A

    2010-01-01

    In order to learn about in situ structural changes in materials at subseconds time scale, we have further refined the techniques of quick extended x-ray absorption fine structure (QEXAFS) and quick x-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) spectroscopies at beamline X18B at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The channel cut Si (111) monochromator oscillation is driven through a tangential arm at 5 Hz, using a cam, dc motor, pulley, and belt system. The rubber belt between the motor and the cam damps the mechanical noise. EXAFS scan taken in 100 ms is comparable to standard data. The angle and the angular range of the monochromator can be changed to collect a full EXAFS or XANES spectrum in the energy range 4.7-40.0 KeV. The data are recorded in ascending and descending order of energy, on the fly, without any loss of beam time. The QEXAFS mechanical system is outside the vacuum system, and therefore changing the mode of operation from conventional to QEXAFS takes only a few minutes. This instrument allows the acquisition of time resolved data in a variety of systems relevant to electrochemical, photochemical, catalytic, materials, and environmental sciences.

  18. Time-Resolved IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Hot-Electron Dynamics in Satellite and Upper Conduction Bands in GaP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavicchia, M. A.; Alfano, R. R.

    1995-01-01

    The relaxation dynamics of hot electrons in the X6 and X7 satellite and upper conduction bands in GaP was directly measured by femtosecond UV-pump-IR-probe absorption spectroscopy. From a fit to the induced IR-absorption spectra the dominant scattering mechanism giving rise to the absorption at early delay times was determined to be intervalley scattering of electrons out of the X7 upper conduction-band valley. For long delay times the dominant scattering mechanism is electron-hole scattering. Electron transport dynamics of the upper conduction band of GaP has been time resolved.

  19. Experimental station for laser-based picosecond time-resolved x-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorchies, F.; Fedorov, N.; Lecherbourg, L.

    2015-07-01

    We present an experimental station designed for time-resolved X-ray Absorption Near-Edge Spectroscopy (XANES). It is based on ultrashort laser-plasma x-ray pulses generated from a table-top 100 mJ-class laser at 10 Hz repetition rate. A high transmission (10%-20%) x-ray beam line transport using polycapillary optics allows us to set the sample in an independent vacuum chamber, providing high flexibility over a wide spectral range from 0.5 up to 4 keV. Some XANES spectra are presented, demonstrating 1% noise level in only ˜1 mn and ˜100 cumulated laser shots. Time-resolved measurements are reported, indicating that the time resolution of the entire experimental station is 3.3 ± 0.6 ps rms.

  20. Time-averaging approximation in the interaction picture: absorption line shapes for coupled chromophores with application to liquid water.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mino; Skinner, J L

    2011-10-21

    The time-averaging approximation (TAA), originally developed to calculate vibrational line shapes for coupled chromophores using mixed quantum/classical methods, is reformulated. In the original version of the theory, time averaging was performed for the full one-exciton Hamiltonian, while herein the time averaging is performed on the coupling (off-diagonal) Hamiltonian in the interaction picture. As a result, the influence of the dynamic fluctuations of the transition energies is more accurately described. We compare numerical results of the two versions of the TAA with numerically exact results for the vibrational absorption line shape of the OH stretching modes in neat water. It is shown that the TAA in the interaction picture yields theoretical line shapes that are in better agreement with exact results.

  1. Meaning Lag in the Information Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klapp, Orrin E.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses the meaning crisis in modern society in terms of information overload. Points out reasons for meaning lag: (1) slowness of meaning formation; (2) sparseness of social networks; (3) substitution of meaning of a lower quality as a compensation for lost meaning; and (4) information becoming noiselike. (PD)

  2. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  3. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  4. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  5. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  6. 46 CFR 98.25-30 - Lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Lagging. 98.25-30 Section 98.25-30 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) CARGO AND MISCELLANEOUS VESSELS SPECIAL CONSTRUCTION, ARRANGEMENT, AND OTHER PROVISIONS FOR CERTAIN DANGEROUS CARGOES IN BULK Anhydrous Ammonia in Bulk §...

  7. Fundamental understanding of drug absorption from a parenteral oil depot.

    PubMed

    Kalicharan, Raween W; Schot, Peter; Vromans, Herman

    2016-02-15

    Oil depots are parenteral drug formulations meant for sustained release of lipophilic compounds. Until now, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanism of drug absorption from oil depots is lacking. The aim of this paper was to fill this gap. A clinical study with healthy volunteers was conducted. An oil depot with nandrolone decanoate and benzyl alcohol was subcutaneously administered in the upper arm of female volunteers. Pharmacokinetic profiles of both substances were related to each other and to literature data. Benzyl alcohol absorbs much more rapidly than nandrolone. In detail, it appears that benzyl alcohol enters the central compartment directly, while nandrolone decanoate is recovered in serum after a lag time. This lag time is also seen in literature data, although not reported explicitly. The absorption of nandrolone is enhanced by the presence of benzyl alcohol. This is most likely an effect of altered oil viscosity and partition coefficient between the oil and aqueous phase. The absorption rate constant of compounds is found to be related to the logP of the solubilized prodrug. The absorption rate is however not only determined by the physico-chemical properties of the formulation but also by the tissue properties. Here, it is argued that lymphatic flow must be considered as a relevant parameter.

  8. On the time-dependent calculation of angular averaged vibronic absorption spectra with an application to molecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brüning, Christoph; Engel, Volker

    2017-01-01

    We introduce an efficient method to determine angular averaged absorption spectra for cases where electronic transitions take place to a manifold of N coupled excited states. The approach rests on the calculation of time-dependent auto-correlation functions which, upon Fourier-transform yield the spectrum. Assuming the Condon-approximation, it is shown that three wave-packet propagations are sufficient to calculate the spectrum. This is in contrast to a direct approach where it is necessary to perform N propagations to arrive at N2 cross-correlation functions. The reduction in computation time is of importance for larger molecular aggregates where the number N is determined by the aggregate size. We provide an example by determining spectra for macrocyclic dyes in different dipole-geometries.

  9. Absorption and injection models for open time-dependent quantum systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traversa, F. L.; Zhan, Z.; Oriols, X.

    2014-08-01

    In the time-dependent simulation of pure states dealing with transport in open quantum systems, the initial state is located outside of the active region of interest. Using the superposition principle and the analytical knowledge of the free time evolution of such a state outside the active region, together with absorbing layers and remapping, a model for a very significant reduction of the computational burden associated with the numerical simulation of open time-dependent quantum systems is presented. The model is specially suited to study (many-particle and high-frequency effects) quantum transport, but it can also be applied to any other research field where the initial time-dependent pure state is located outside of the active region. From numerical simulations of open quantum systems described by the (effective mass) Schrödinger and (atomistic) tight-binding equations, a reduction of the computational burden of about two orders of magnitude for each spatial dimension of the domain with a negligible error is presented.

  10. Time-Resolved O3 Chemical Chain Reaction Kinetics Via High-Resolution IR Laser Absorption Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulcke, Axel; Blackmon, Brad; Chapman, William B.; Kim, In Koo; Nesbitt, David J.

    1998-01-01

    Excimer laser photolysis in combination with time-resolved IR laser absorption detection of OH radicals has been used to study O3/OH(v = 0)/HO2 chain reaction kinetics at 298 K, (i.e.,(k(sub 1) is OH + 03 yields H02 + 02 and (k(sub 2) is H02 + 03 yields OH + 202). From time-resolved detection of OH radicals with high-resolution near IR laser absorption methods, the chain induction kinetics have been measured at up to an order of magnitude higher ozone concentrations ([03] less than or equal to 10(exp 17) molecules/cu cm) than accessible in previous studies. This greater dynamic range permits the full evolution of the chain induction, propagation, and termination process to be temporally isolated and measured in real time. An exact solution for time-dependent OH evolution under pseudo- first-order chain reaction conditions is presented, which correctly predicts new kinetic signatures not included in previous OH + 03 kinetic analyses. Specifically, the solutions predict an initial exponential loss (chain "induction") of the OH radical to a steady-state level ([OH](sub ss)), with this fast initial decay determined by the sum of both chain rate constants, k(sub ind) = k(sub 1) + k(sub 2). By monitoring the chain induction feature, this sum of the rate constants is determined to be k(sub ind) = 8.4(8) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/molecule/s for room temperature reagents. This is significantly higher than the values currently recommended for use in atmospheric models, but in excellent agreement with previous results from Ravishankara et al.

  11. Chronic jet lag impairs startle-induced locomotion in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Vaccaro, Alexandra; Birman, Serge; Klarsfeld, André

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous circadian clocks with ~24-h periodicity are found in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans. Daylight synchronizes these clocks to solar time. In humans, shift-work and jet lag perturb clock synchronization, and such perturbations, when repeated or chronic, are strongly suspected to be detrimental to healthspan. Here we investigated locomotor aging and longevity in Drosophila melanogaster with genetically or environmentally disrupted clocks. We compared two mutations in period (per, a gene essential for circadian rhythmicity in Drosophila), after introducing them in a common reference genetic background: the arrhythmic per(01), and per(T) which displays robust short 16-h rhythms. Compared to the wild type, both per mutants showed reduced longevity and decreased startle-induced locomotion in aging flies, while spontaneous locomotor activity was not impaired. The per(01) phenotypes were generally less severe than those of per(T), suggesting that chronic jet lag is more detrimental to aging than arrhythmicity in Drosophila. Interestingly, the adjustment of environmental light-dark cycles to the endogenous rhythms of the per(T) mutant fully suppressed the acceleration in the age-related decline of startle-induced locomotion, while it accelerated this decline in wild-type flies. Overall, our results show that chronic jet lag accelerates a specific form of locomotor aging in Drosophila, and that this effect can be alleviated by environmental changes that ameliorate circadian rhythm synchronization.

  12. Macro- to Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer: The Lagging Behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghazanfarian, Jafar; Shomali, Zahra; Abbassi, Abbas

    2015-07-01

    The classical model of the Fourier's law is known as the most common constitutive relation for thermal transport in various engineering materials. Although the Fourier's law has been widely used in a variety of engineering application areas, there are many exceptional applications in which the Fourier's law is questionable. This paper gathers together such applications. Accordingly, the paper is divided into two parts. The first part reviews the papers pertaining to the fundamental theory of the phase-lagging models and the analytical and numerical solution approaches. The second part wrap ups the various applications of the phase-lagging models including the biological materials, ultra-high-speed laser heating, the problems involving moving media, micro/nanoscale heat transfer, multi-layered materials, the theory of thermoelasticity, heat transfer in the material defects, the diffusion problems we call as the non-Fick models, and some other applications. It is predicted that the interest in the field of phase-lagging heat transport has grown incredibly in recent years because they show good agreement with the experiments across a wide range of length and time scales.

  13. Time-resolved temperature rise in a thin liquid film due to laser absorption.

    PubMed

    Cordero, María Luisa; Verneuil, Emilie; Gallaire, François; Baroud, Charles N

    2009-01-01

    The temperature increase of a thin water layer is investigated, both experimentally and numerically, when the layer is heated by an infrared laser. The laser is focused to a waist of 5.3 microm inside a 28 microm gap that contains fluorescent aqueous solutions between two glass slides. Temperature fields are measured using the temperature sensitivity of rhodamine-B, while correcting for thermal diffusion using rhodamine-101, which is insensitive to temperature. In the steady state, the shape of the hot region is well fitted with a Lorentzian function whose width ranges between 15 and 30 microm , increasing with laser power. At the same time, the maximum temperature rise ranges between 10 and 55 degrees C and can display a decrease at high laser powers. The total energy stored in the sample increases linearly with the laser power. The dynamics of the heating occurs with two distinct time scales: (i) a fast time ( tau_{Theta} = 4.2 ms in our case) which is the time taken to reach the maximum temperature at the laser position and the maximum temperature gradient, and (ii) a slow time scale for the spatial profile to reach its final width. The temperature field obtained numerically agrees quantitatively with the experiments for low laser powers but overpredicts the temperature rise while underpredicting the profile width for high powers. The total energy shows good agreement between experiments and simulations for all laser powers, suggesting that the discrepancies are due to a broadening of the laser, possibly due to a thermal lensing effect.

  14. Local network parameters can affect inter-network phase lags in central pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Jones, S R; Kopell, N

    2006-01-01

    Weakly coupled phase oscillators and strongly coupled relaxation oscillators have different mechanisms for creating stable phase lags. Many oscillations in central pattern generators combine features of each type of coupling: local networks composed of strongly coupled relaxation oscillators are weakly coupled to similar local networks. This paper analyzes the phase lags produced by this combination of mechanisms and shows how the parameters of a local network, such as the decay time of inhibition, can affect the phase lags between the local networks. The analysis is motivated by the crayfish central pattern generator used for swimming, and uses techniques from geometrical singular perturbation theory.

  15. Lag-luminosity relation in gamma-ray burst X-ray flares

    SciTech Connect

    Margutti, R.

    2010-10-15

    In strict analogy to prompt pulses, X-ray flares observed by Swift-XRT in long Gamma-Ray Bursts define a lag-luminosity relation: L{sub p,iso}{sup 0.3-10} k{sup eV} {infinity}t{sub lag}{sup -0.95{+-}0.23}. The lag-luminosity is proven to be a fundamental law extending {approx}5 decades in time and {approx}5 in energy. This is direct evidence that GRB X-ray flares and prompt gamma-ray pulses are produced by the same mechanism.

  16. Semiconductors Investigated by Time Resolved Raman Absorption and Photoluminescence Spectroscopy Using Femtosecond and Picosecond Laser Techniques.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-05

    if necessary and identify by block number) Picosecond Lasers, Femtosecond Lasers, Ring Cavity, Mode Locked Dye and Glass Lasers, Time-resolved...conductor processes. In addition, we have improved the stabil ity and shortened the pulse duration emitted from a mode - locked glass laser by at...pulse duration emitted from a mode -locked glass laser by at least a factor of two, by using heptamethine pyrylium #5 - a new saturable absorber. In the

  17. Time resolved spectra in the infrared absorption and emission from shock heated hydrocarbons. [in interstellar medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, S. H.; Borchardt, D. B.

    1990-01-01

    The wavelength range of a previously constructed multichannel fast recording spectrometer was extended to the mid-infrared. With the initial configuration, light intensities were recorded simultaneously with a silicon-diode array simultaneously at 20 adjacent wavelengths, each with a 20-micron time resolution. For studies in the infrared, the silicon diodes were replaced by a 20-element PbSe array of similar dimensions, cooled by a three-stage thermoelectric device. It is proposed that infrared emissions could be due to shock-heated low molecular-weight hydrocarbons. The full Swan band system appeared in time-integrated emission spectra from shock-heated C2H2; no soot was generated. At low resolution, the profiles on the high-frequency side of the black body maximum show no distinctive features. These could be fitted to Planck curves, with temperatures that declined with time from an initial high that was intermediate between T5 (no conversion) and T5(eq).

  18. SOFT LAGS IN NEUTRON STAR kHz QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATIONS: EVIDENCE FOR REVERBERATION?

    SciTech Connect

    Barret, Didier

    2013-06-10

    High frequency soft reverberation lags have now been detected from stellar mass and supermassive black holes. Their interpretation involves reflection of a hard source of photons onto an accretion disk, producing a delayed reflected emission, with a time lag consistent with the light travel time between the irradiating source and the disk. Independently of the location of the clock, the kHz quasi-periodic oscillation (QPO) emission is thought to arise from the neutron star boundary layer. Here, we search for the signature of reverberation of the kHz QPO emission, by measuring the soft lags and the lag energy spectrum of the lower kHz QPOs from 4U1608-522. Soft lags, ranging from {approx}15 to {approx}40 {mu}s, between the 3-8 keV and 8-30 keV modulated emissions are detected between 565 and 890 Hz. The soft lags are not constant with frequency and show a smooth decrease between 680 Hz and 890 Hz. The broad band X-ray spectrum is modeled as the sum of a disk and a thermal Comptonized component, plus a broad iron line, expected from reflection. The spectral parameters follow a smooth relationship with the QPO frequency, in particular the fitted inner disk radius decreases steadily with frequency. Both the bump around the iron line in the lag energy spectrum and the consistency between the lag changes and the inferred changes of the inner disk radius, from either spectral fitting or the QPO frequency, suggest that the soft lags may indeed involve reverberation of the hard pulsating QPO source on the disk.

  19. Time-resolved characterization of a filamentary argon discharge at atmospheric pressure in a capillary using emission and absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröter, Sandra; Pothiraja, Ramasamy; Awakowicz, Peter; Bibinov, Nikita; Böke, Marc; Niermann, Benedikt; Winter, Jörg

    2013-11-01

    An argon/nitrogen (0.999/0.001) filamentary pulsed discharge operated at atmospheric pressure in a quartz tube is characterized using voltage-current measurements, microphotography, optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and absorption spectroscopy. Nitrogen is applied as a sensor gas for the purpose of OES diagnostic. The density of argon metastable atoms Ar(3P2) is determined using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Using a plasma chemical model the measured OES data are applied for the characterization of the plasma conditions. Between intense positive pulses the discharge current oscillates with a damped amplitude. It is established that an electric current flows in this discharge not only through a thin plasma filament that is observed in the discharge image but also through the whole cross section of the quartz tube. A diffuse plasma fills the quartz tube during a time between intense current pulses. Ionization waves are propagating in this plasma between the spike and the grounded area of the tube producing thin plasma channels. The diameter of these channels increases during the pause between the propagation of ionization waves probably because of thermal expansion and diffusion. Inside the channels electron densities of ˜2 × 1013 cm-3, argon metastable densities ˜1014 cm-3 and a reduced electric field about 10 Td are determined.

  20. Time-resolved spectroscopic fluorescence imaging, transient absorption and vibrational spectroscopy of intact and photo-inhibited photosynthetic tissue.

    PubMed

    Lukins, Philip B; Rehman, Shakil; Stevens, Gregory B; George, Doaa

    2005-01-01

    Fluorescence, absorption and vibrational spectroscopic techniques were used to study spinach at the photosystem II (PS II), chloroplast and cellular levels and to determine the effects and mechanisms of ultraviolet-B (UV-B) photoinhibition of these structures. Two-photon fluorescence spectroscopic imaging of intact chloroplasts shows significant spatial variations in the component fluorescence spectra in the range 640-740 nm, indicating that the type and distribution of chlorophylls vary markedly with position in the chloroplast. The chlorophyll distributions and excitonic behaviour in chloroplasts and whole plant tissue were studied using picosecond time-gated fluorescence imaging, which also showed UV-induced kinetic changes that clearly indicate that UV-B induces both structural and excitonic uncoupling of chlorophylls within the light-harvesting complexes. Transient absorption measurements and low-frequency infrared and Raman spectroscopy show that the predominant sites of UV-B damage in PS II are at the oxygen-evolving centre (OEC) itself, as well as at specific locations near the OEC-binding sites.

  1. Atomic Resolution Mapping of the Excited-State Electronic Structure of Cu2O with Time-Resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, Patrick B.; Kuchibhatla, Satyanarayana V N T; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, Ponnusamy; Saraf, Laxmikant V.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Gaffney, Kelly J.

    2009-09-29

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that that the conduction band and valence band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  2. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, N.; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2009-09-01

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the OK edge and the CuL3 edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu3d and O2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the CuL3 - and OK -edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  3. Atomic resolution mapping of the excited-state electronic structure of Cu2O with time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Hillyard, P. W.; Kuchibhatla, S. V. N. T.; Glover, T. E.; Hertlein, M. P.; Huse, Nils; Nachimuthu, P.; Saraf, L. V.; Thevuthasan, S.; Gaffney, K. J.

    2010-05-02

    We have used time-resolved soft x-ray spectroscopy to investigate the electronic structure of optically excited cuprous oxide at the O K-edge and the Cu L3-edge. The 400 nm optical excitation shifts the Cu and O absorptions to lower energy, but does not change the integrated x-ray absorption significantly for either edge. The constant integrated x-ray absorption cross-section indicates that the conduction-band and valence-band edges have very similar Cu 3d and O 2p orbital contributions. The 2.1 eV optical band gap of Cu2O significantly exceeds the one eV shift in the Cu L3- and O K-edges absorption edges induced by optical excitation, demonstrating the importance of core-hole excitonic effects and valence electron screening in the x-ray absorption process.

  4. Time-Domain Hydrodynamic Forces on Rigid Dams With Reservoir Bottom Absorption of Energy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    the inverse Laplace transform operator. The first inverse Laplace transform in Eq. 32 is given by Zwillinger 1996 c · T−1 e−x/c· m · c2+s2...m · c2 + s2 = c · J0 m · c · t2 − x2, c · t x 33a The second inverse Laplace transform in Eq. 32 may be ob- tained using Eq. 33a...well-behaved” function of the time t. The complete Laplace inversion of Eq. 32 gives the unit- impulse response function as Bowman 1958 Fx,z,t = 4

  5. Why does lag affect the durability of memory-based automaticity: loss of memory strength or interference?

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Nicolas J; Rawson, Katherine A

    2013-10-01

    In Rickard, Lau, and Pashler's (2008) investigation of the lag effect on memory-based automaticity, response times were faster and proportion of trials retrieved was higher at the end of practice for short lag items than for long lag items. However, during testing after a delay, response times were slower and proportion of trials retrieved was lower for short lag items than for long lag items. The current study investigated the extent to which the lag effect on the durability of memory-based automaticity is due to interference or to the loss of memory strength with time. Participants repeatedly practiced alphabet subtraction items in short lag and long lag conditions. After practice, half of the participants were immediately tested and the other half were tested after a 7-day delay. Results indicate that the lag effect on the durability of memory-based automaticity is primarily due to interference. We discuss potential modification of current memory-based processing theories to account for these effects.

  6. How quickly do brains catch up with bodies? A comparative method for detecting evolutionary lag.

    PubMed Central

    Deaner, R O; Nunn, C L

    1999-01-01

    A trait may be at odds with theoretical expectation because it is still in the process of responding to a recent selective force. Such a situation can be termed evolutionary lag. Although many cases of evolutionary lag have been suggested, almost all of the arguments have focused on trait fitness. An alternative approach is to examine the prediction that trait expression is a function of the time over which the trait could evolve. Here we present a phylogenetic comparative method for using this 'time' approach and we apply the method to a long-standing lag hypothesis: evolutionary changes in brain size lag behind evolutionary changes in body size. We tested the prediction in primates that brain mass contrast residuals, calculated from a regression of pairwise brain mass contrasts on positive pairwise body mass contrasts, are correlated with the time since the paired species diverged. Contrary to the brain size lag hypothesis, time since divergence was not significantly correlated with brain mass contrast residuals. We found the same result when we accounted for socioecology, used alternative body mass estimates and used male rather than female values. These tests do not support the brain size lag hypothesis. Therefore, body mass need not be viewed as a suspect variable in comparative neuroanatomical studies and relative brain size should not be used to infer recent evolutionary changes in body size. PMID:10331289

  7. Lead-Lag Control for Helicopter Vibration and Noise Reduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gandhi, Farhan

    1995-01-01

    , meant to achieve lag motion amplitudes up to 45 degrees. In order to reduce the required actuation force, the blade hinges were moved to 40% of the blade radius to increase the rotating lag frequency to approximately 1/rev. The blade hinges were redesigned to produce a flap-lag coupling so the large flapwise aerodynamic loads could be exploited to actuate the blades in the lag direction. A wind tunnel test of this rotor concept revealed actuation and blade motion scheduling problems. The project was eventually discontinued due to these problems and high blade stresses. Around the same time, at Boelkow in Germany, a similar lead-lag rotor program was conducted under the leadership of Hans Derschmidt. Here, too, the blade hinges were moved outboard to 34% radius to reduce the actuation loads. The main difference between this and the United Aircraft program was the use of a mechanical actuation scheme with maximum lead-lag motions of 400. This program was also discontinued for unclear reasons. The present study is directed toward conducting a comprehensive analytical examination to evaluate the effectiveness of controlled lead-lag motions in reducing vibratory hub loads and increasing maximum flight speed. Since both previous studies on this subject were purely experimental, only a limited data set and physical understanding of the problem was obtained. With the currently available analytical models and computational resources, the present effort is geared toward developing an in-depth physical understanding of the precise underlying mechanisms by which vibration reduction may be achieved. Additionally, in recognition of the fact that large amplitude lead-lag motions would - (i) be difficult to implement, and (ii) produce very large blade stresses; the present study examines the potential of only moderate-to-small lead-lag motions for reduction of vibratory hub loads. Using such an approach, the emphasis is not on eliminating the periodic variations in tangential velocity

  8. The time-dependent emission of molecular iodine from Laminaria Digitata measured with incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixneuf, S.

    2009-04-01

    The release of molecular iodine (I2) from the oceans into the atmosphere has been recognized to correlate strongly with ozone depletion events and aerosol formation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL), which affects in turn global radiative forcing. The detailed mechanisms and dominant sources leading to the observed concentrations of I2 in the marine troposphere are still under intense investigation. In a recent campaign on the Irish west coast at Mace Head Atmospheric Research Station [1], it was found that significant levels of molecular iodine correlated with times of low tide, suggesting that the emission of air-exposed macro-algae may be a prime source of molecular iodine in coastal areas [2]. To further investigate this hypothesis we tried to detect the I2 emission of the brown seaweed Laminaria digitata, one of the most efficient iodine accumulators among living systems, directly by means of highly sensitive incoherent broadband cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (IBBCEAS) [3]. IBBCEAS combines a good temporal and spatial resolution with high molecule-specific detection limits [4] comparable to that of typical LP-DOAS. IBBCEAS thus complements LP-DOAS in the search for sources of tropospheric trace gases. In this presentation the first direct observation of the time dependence of molecular iodine emission from Laminaria digitata will be shown. Plants were studied under naturally occurring stress for quasi in situ conditions for many hours. Surprisingly, the release of I2 occurs in short, strong bursts with quasi-oscillatory behaviour, bearing similarities to well known "iodine clock reactions". References [1] Saiz-Lopez A. & Plane, J. M. C. Novel iodine chemistry in the marine boundary layer. Geophys. Res. Lett. 31, L04112 (2004) doi:10.1029/2003GL019215. [2] McFiggans, G., Coe, H., Burgess, R., Allan, J., Cubison, M., Alfarra, M. R., Saunders, R., Saiz-Lopez, A., Plane, J. M. C., Wevill, D. J., Carpenter, L. J., Rickard, A. R. & Monks, P. S. Direct

  9. X-ray absorption spectroscopy of titanium oxide by time dependent density functional calculations.

    PubMed

    Fronzoni, G; De Francesco, R; Stener, M; Causà, M

    2006-05-25

    The potentiality of the time dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) for the description of core excitation spectra (XAS) in transition metal oxides is analyzed, considering the rutile form of TiO(2) as a test case. Cluster models are adopted to mimic the bulk, embedded within an array of point charges to simulate the Madelung potential. All of the edges, titanium and oxygen K and titanium L edges, are considered, and the TDDFT results are compared with the experimental data in order to assess the performance of the theoretical approach in dealing with this complex class of compounds. Satisfactory results have been obtained for the Ti and O K edges, while in the case of the Ti L edge some discrepancies with the experiment are still present. The configuration mixing explicitly included in the TDDFT model strongly influences the distribution of the 2p metal oscillator strength. The origin of the spectral features is investigated with the help of the partial density of the virtual states (PDOS) calculated for each core hole considered, which can be qualitatively compared with the theoretical spectra calculated in the Kohn-Sham one-electron approach.

  10. A time-resolved single-pass technique for measuring optical absorption coefficients of window materials under 100 GPa shock pressures.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Zhou, Xianming; Li, Jiabo

    2008-12-01

    An experimental method was developed to perform time-resolved, single-pass optical absorption measurements and to determine absorption coefficients of window materials under strong shock compression up to approximately 200 GPa. Experimental details are described of (i) a configuration to generate an in situ dynamic, bright, optical source and (ii) a sample assembly with a lithium fluoride plate to essentially eliminate heat transfer from the hot radiator into the specimen and to maintain a constant optical source within the duration of the experiment. Examples of measurements of optical absorption coefficients of several initially transparent single crystal materials at high shock pressures are presented.

  11. Photocycles of bacteriorhodopsin in light- and dark-adapted purple membrane studied by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Hofrichter, J; Henry, E R; Lozier, R H

    1989-01-01

    Nanosecond time-resolved absorption spectra have been measured throughout the photocycle of bacteriorhodopsin in both light-adapted and dark-adapted purple membrane (PM). The data from dark-adapted samples are interpretable as the superposition of two photocycles arising independently from the all-trans and 13-cis retinal isomers that coexist in the dark-adapted state. The presence of a photocycle in dark-adapted PM which is indistinguishable from that observed for light-adapted PM under the same experimental conditions is demonstrated by the observation of the same five relaxation rates associated with essentially identical changes in the photoproduct spectra. This cycle is attributed to the all-trans component. The cycle of the 13-cis component is revealed by scaling the data measured for the light-adapted sample and subtracting it from the data on the dark-adapted mixture. At times less than 1 ms, the resulting difference spectra are nearly time-independent. The peak of the difference spectrum is near 600 nm, although there appears to be a slight (approximately 2 nm) blue-shift in the first few microseconds. Subsequently the amplitude of this spectrum decays and the peak of the difference spectrum shifts in two relaxations. Most of the amplitude of the photoproduct difference spectrum (approximately 80%) decays in a single relaxation having a time constant of approximately 35 ms. The difference spectrum remaining after this relaxation peaks at approximately 590 nm and is indistinguishable from the classical light-dark difference spectrum, which we find, in experiments performed on a much longer time scale, to peak at 588 nm. The decay of this remaining photo-product is not resolvable in the nanosecond kinetic experiments, but dark adaptation of a completely light-adapted sample is found to occur exponentially with a relaxation time of approximately 2,000 s under the conditions of our experiments. PMID:2819234

  12. REAL TIME CONTINUOUS MEASUREMENTS OF [CO2] AND δ13C AT MULTIPLE LOCATIONS USING CAVITY ENHANCED LASER ABSORPTION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAlexander, W. I.; Rau, G. H.; Dobeck, L.; Spangler, L.

    2009-12-01

    A commercial instrument (Los Gatos Research, model 908-0003) utilizing Cavity Enhanced Laser Absorption Spectroscopy was deployed in 2009 at the ZERT carbon release site (Bozeman, MT) for real time measurement of above-ground CO2 concentration and isotope ratio (δ13C). An automated switching system sampled 13 different locations in the field, as well as two known references, over an 8 day period. Real-time Keeling plots were constructed showing distinct signatures of soil (-27.0 ‰) and fossil (-56.0 ‰) sources compared to background air (-8.2 ‰). Instrument performance gave 0.2 ‰ precision with only 100 seconds of averaging per inlet. Sequential sampling of the various inlets gave a temporal and physical mapping of the CO2 release plume that is difficult to obtain using more conventional techniques. The figures show the nature and quality of the data from one of the locations. Details concerning instrument performance, systematics, calibration, and data processing will be discussed. Fig1: Time chart of CO2 concentration and isotope ratio δ13C from one of 13 sample inlet locations at ZERT release field, July, 2009. Fig2: Keeling plot of data from Fig1 illustrating the two source mixing of soil (-27 ‰) and fossil (-56 ‰) CO2 with background air.

  13. Time-resolved X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy of a Cobalt-Based Hydrogen Evolution System for Artificial Photosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Gimbert, Carolina; Lehmann, Carl; Southworth, Stephen; Llobet, Antoni; Argonne National Laboratory Team; Institut Català d'Investigació Química Collaboration

    2015-03-01

    Production of cost-effective hydrogen gas through solar power is an important challenge of the Department of Energy among other global industry initiatives. In natural photosynthesis, the oxygen evolving complex(OEC) can carry out four-electron water splitting to hydrogen with an efficiency of around 60%. Although, much progress has been carried out in determining mechanistic pathways of the OEC, biomimetic approaches have not duplicated Nature's efficiency in function. Over the past years, we have witnessed progress in developments of light harvesting modules, so called chromophore/catalytic assemblies. In spite of reportedly high catalytic activity of these systems, quantum yields of hydrogen production are below 40 % when using monochromatic light. Proper understanding of kinetics and bond making/breaking steps has to be achieved to improve efficiency of hydrogen evolution systems. This project shows the timing implementation of ultrafast X-ray absorption spectroscopy to visualize in ``real time'' the photo-induced kinetics accompanying a sequence of redox reactions in a cobalt-based molecular photocatalytic system. Formation of a Co(I) species followed by a Co(III) hydride species all the way towards hydrogen evolution is shown through time-resolved XANES.

  14. Triplet excimer formation of dibromocarbazole chromophores in methacrylate copolymer films measured by time-resolved phosphorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Ito, Shinzaburo; Yamamoto, Masahide ); Liebe, W.R.; Burkhart, R.D. ); Wada, Yoshio )

    1994-08-04

    Time-resolved phosphorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy have been carried out for studying the triplet states of the 3,6-dibromocarbazole (DBCz) chromophore in a solid matrix of methacrylate copolymer. poly[2-(3,6-dibromo-9-carbazoyl)ethyl methacrylate-co-methyl methacrylate]. The sample film containing 10% DBCz units showed critical behavior in the time-resolved phosphorescence spectra which altered the shape from the monomer state [sup 3]M* to two kinds of excimer states: E1 and E2 (460 and 510 nm at the maximum intensity, respectively). These excimeric species have identical profiles with those reported for poly(3,6-dibromo-9-vinylcarbazole), although the polymer structures are totally different. This result shows that the DBCz chromophores tend to take some preferential geometry which results in the formation of two distinct excimer sites in the polymer film. The spectral alteration with time was drastically accelerated by thermal activation in the temperature range 25-77 K. Iterative trapping and detrapping processes determine the rate of relaxation to the deeper traps, E1 and E2. 15 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Head Lag in Infancy: What Is It Telling Us?

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Lauren C.; Seefeldt, Kristin; Hilton, Claudia L.; Rogers, Cynthia L.; Inder, Terrie E.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. To investigate changes in head lag across postmenstrual age and define associations between head lag and (1) perinatal exposures and (2) neurodevelopment. METHOD. Sixty-four infants born ≤30 wk gestation had head lag assessed before and at term-equivalent age. Neurobehavior was assessed at term age. At 2 yr, neurodevelopmental testing was conducted. RESULTS. Head lag decreased with advancing postmenstrual age, but 58% (n = 37) of infants continued to demonstrate head lag at term. Head lag was associated with longer stay in the neonatal intensive care unit (p = .009), inotrope use (p = .04), sepsis (p = .02), longer endotracheal intubation (p = .01), and cerebral injury (p = .006). Head lag was related to alterations in early neurobehavior (p < .03), but no associations with neurodevelopment were found at 2 yr. CONCLUSION. Head lag was related to medical factors and early neurobehavior, but it may not be a good predictor of outcome when used in isolation. PMID:26709421

  16. Determination of absorption changes from moments of distributions of times of flight of photons: optimization of measurement conditions for a two-layered tissue model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liebert, Adam; Wabnitz, Heidrun; Elster, Clemens

    2012-05-01

    Time-resolved near-infrared spectroscopy allows for depth-selective determination of absorption changes in the adult human head that facilitates separation between cerebral and extra-cerebral responses to brain activation. The aim of the present work is to analyze which combinations of moments of measured distributions of times of flight (DTOF) of photons and source-detector separations are optimal for the reconstruction of absorption changes in a two-layered tissue model corresponding to extra- and intra-cerebral compartments. To this end we calculated the standard deviations of the derived absorption changes in both layers by considering photon noise and a linear relation between the absorption changes and the DTOF moments. The results show that the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper (superficial) layer increases (decreases) with the thickness of the superficial layer. It is confirmed that for the deeper layer the use of higher moments, in particular the variance of the DTOF, leads to an improvement. For example, when measurements at four different source-detector separations between 8 and 35 mm are available and a realistic thickness of the upper layer of 12 mm is assumed, the inclusion of the change in mean time of flight, in addition to the change in attenuation, leads to a reduction of the standard deviation of the absorption change in the deeper tissue layer by a factor of 2.5. A reduction by another 4% can be achieved by additionally including the change in variance.

  17. Time-resolved postdischarge absolute silicon monoxide density measurement by resonant absorption spectroscopy in a nonthermal atmospheric plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Motret, Olivier; Coursimault, Fabien; Pouvesle, Jean-Michel

    2006-11-01

    In this study we present the technique of resonant absorption spectroscopy diagnostic developed to estimate the density of silicon monoxide (SiO) molecules during the postdischarge of an atmospheric dielectric barrier discharge plasma. The ultraviolet (0,0) rovibrational band of the SiO(A {sup 1}{pi}-X {sup 1}{sigma}{sup +}) electronic transition was investigated. Effective values of absorption coefficient and absorption cross section for the rotational transitions under consideration were calculated. The SiO concentration was estimated by comparison between experimental and computed spectra. The self-absorption in the probe reactor was taken into account in the computed spectra.

  18. Four-Year Cross-Lagged Associations between Physical and Mental Health in the Medical Outcomes Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hays, Ron D.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Applied structural equation modeling to evaluation of cross-lagged panel models. Self-reports of physical and mental health at three time points spanning four-year interval were analyzed to illustrate cross-lagged analysis methodology. Data were analyzed from 856 patients with hypertension, diabetes, heart disease, or depression. Cross-lagged…

  19. Optical time of flight studies of lithium plasma in double pulse laser ablation: Evidence of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Sivakumaran, V.; Joshi, H. C.; Singh, R. K.; Kumar, Ajai

    2014-06-15

    The early stage of formation of lithium plasma in a collinear—double pulse laser ablation mode has been studied using optical time of flight (OTOF) spectroscopy as a function of inter-pulse delay time, the distance from the target surface and the fluence of the ablation lasers. The experimental TOF measurements were carried out for lithium neutral (670.8 nm and 610.3 nm), and ionic (548.4 nm and 478.8 nm) lines. These experimental observations have been compared with that for single pulse laser ablation mode. It is found that depending on the fluence and laser pulse shape of the first pre-ablation laser and the second main ablation laser, the plasma plume formation and its characteristic features can be described in terms of plume-plume or laser-plume interaction processes. Moreover, the enhancement in the intensity of Li neutral and ionic lines is observed when the laser-plume interaction is the dominant process. Here, we see the evidence of the role of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption process in the initial stage of formation of lithium plasma in this case.

  20. The Very Young Type Ia Supernova 2013dy: Discovery, and Strong Carbon Absorption in Early-time Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, WeiKang; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Kasen, Daniel; Nugent, Peter E.; Graham, Melissa; Wang, Xiaofeng; Valenti, Stefano; Ciabattari, Fabrizio; Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Shivvers, Isaac; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Cenko, S. Bradley; Balam, Dave; Howell, D. Andrew; Hsiao, Eric; Li, Weidong; Marion, G. Howie; Sand, David; Vinko, Jozsef; Wheeler, J. Craig; Zhang, JuJia

    2013-11-01

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ≈ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 ± 0.05 days (2.4 ± 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R 0 <~ 0.25 R ⊙, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 days after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of MB = -18.72 ± 0.03 mag ~17.7 days after first light.

  1. Real-time X-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction.

    PubMed

    Tokunag, Tetsu K; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Sutton, Steve R; Newville, Matthew; Lanzirotti, Antonio; Rao, William

    2008-04-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO2 is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires an understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30, and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC > or = 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC > or = 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  2. Real-time x-ray absorption spectroscopy of uranium, iron, and manganese in contaminated sediments during bioreduction

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Tetsu; Tokunaga, T.K.; Wan, J.; Kim, Y.; Sutton, S.R.; Newville, M.; Lanzirotti, A.; Rao, W.

    2008-01-15

    The oxidation status of uranium in sediments is important because the solubility of this toxic and radioactive element is much greater for U(VI) than for U(IV) species. Thus, redox manipulation to promote precipitation of UO{sub 2} is receiving interest as a method to remediate U-contaminated sediments. Presence of Fe and Mn oxides in sediments at much higher concentrations than U requires understanding of their redox status as well. This study was conducted to determine changes in oxidation states of U, Fe, and Mn in U-contaminated sediments from Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Oxidation states of these elements were measured in real-time and nondestructively using X-ray absorption spectroscopy, on sediment columns supplied with synthetic groundwater containing organic carbon (OC, 0, 3, 10, 30 and 100 mM OC as lactate) for over 400 days. In sediments supplied with OC {ge} 30 mM, 80% of the U was reduced to U(IV), with transient reoxidation at about 150 days. Mn(III,IV) oxides were completely reduced to Mn(II) in sediments infused with OC {ge} 3 mM. However, Fe remained largely unreduced in all sediment columns, showing that Fe(III) can persist as an electron acceptor in reducing sediments over long times. This result in combination with the complete reduction of all other potential electron acceptors supports the hypothesis that the reactive Fe(III) fraction was responsible for reoxidizing U(IV).

  3. THE VERY YOUNG TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA 2013dy: DISCOVERY, AND STRONG CARBON ABSORPTION IN EARLY-TIME SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Nugent, Peter E.; Graham, Melissa; Kelly, Patrick L.; Fox, Ori D.; Shivvers, Isaac; Clubb, Kelsey I.; Li, Weidong; Silverman, Jeffrey M.; Howie Marion, G.; Kasen, Daniel; Wang, Xiaofeng; Valenti, Stefano; Howell, D. Andrew; Ciabattari, Fabrizio; Cenko, S. Bradley; Balam, Dave; Hsiao, Eric; Sand, David; and others

    2013-11-20

    The Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) 2013dy in NGC 7250 (d ≈ 13.7 Mpc) was discovered by the Lick Observatory Supernova Search. Combined with a prediscovery detection by the Italian Supernova Search Project, we are able to constrain the first-light time of SN 2013dy to be only 0.10 ± 0.05 days (2.4 ± 1.2 hr) before the first detection. This makes SN 2013dy the earliest known detection of an SN Ia. We infer an upper limit on the radius of the progenitor star of R {sub 0} ≲ 0.25 R {sub ☉}, consistent with that of a white dwarf. The light curve exhibits a broken power law with exponents of 0.88 and then 1.80. A spectrum taken 1.63 days after first light reveals a C II absorption line comparable in strength to Si II. This is the strongest C II feature ever detected in a normal SN Ia, suggesting that the progenitor star had significant unburned material. The C II line in SN 2013dy weakens rapidly and is undetected in a spectrum 7 days later, indicating that C II is detectable for only a very short time in some SNe Ia. SN 2013dy reached a B-band maximum of M{sub B} = –18.72 ± 0.03 mag ∼17.7 days after first light.

  4. Resonance Raman and vibronic absorption spectra with Duschinsky rotation from a time-dependent perspective: Application to β-carotene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya; Kröner, Dominik; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    The time-dependent approach to electronic spectroscopy, as popularized by Heller and co-workers in the 1980s, is applied here in conjunction with linear-response, time-dependent density functional theory to study vibronic absorption and resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene, with and without a solvent. Two-state models, the harmonic and the Condon approximations are used in order to do so. A new code has been developed which includes excited state displacements, vibrational frequency shifts, and Duschinsky rotation, i.e., mode mixing, for both non-adiabatic spectroscopies. It is shown that Duschinsky rotation has a pronounced effect on the resonance Raman spectra of β-carotene. In particular, it can explain a recently found anomalous behaviour of the so-called ν1 peak in resonance Raman spectra [N. Tschirner, M. Schenderlein, K. Brose, E. Schlodder, M. A. Mroginski, C. Thomsen, and P. Hildebrandt, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 11, 11471 (2009)], 10.1039/b917341b, which shifts with the change in excitation wavelength.

  5. Algorithms for Computing the Lag Function.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-03-27

    and S. J. Giner Subject: Algorithms for Computing the Lag Function References: See p . 27 Abstract: This memorandum provides a scheme for the numerical...highly oscillatory, and with singularities at the end points. j -3- 27 March 1981 GHP:SJG:Ihz TABLE OF CONTENTS P age Abstract...0 -9 16 -9 1) 1 11 1 1 -8 3 -1 -t I -8 8 -1 -1 1i 1 2 -6 2 1 1 2 -6 2 1 1 1 3 -3 -1 1 3 -3 -1 1i 1 4 1 1 4 1 -10- 27 March 1981 (1- P : SJG: 1hz The

  6. Sequential and Coupled Proton and Electron Transfer Events in the S2 → S3 Transition of Photosynthetic Water Oxidation Revealed by Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zaharieva, Ivelina; Dau, Holger; Haumann, Michael

    2016-12-20

    The choreography of electron transfer (ET) and proton transfer (PT) in the S-state cycle at the manganese-calcium (Mn4Ca) complex of photosystem II (PSII) is pivotal for the mechanism of photosynthetic water oxidation. Time-resolved room-temperature X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at the Mn K-edge was employed to determine the kinetic isotope effect (KIE = τD2O/τH2O) of the four S transitions in a PSII membrane particle preparation in H2O and D2O buffers. We found a small KIE (1.2-1.4) for manganese oxidation by ET from Mn4Ca to the tyrosine radical (YZ(•+)) in the S0(n) → S1(+) and S1(n) → S2(+) transitions and for manganese reduction by ET from substrate water to manganese ions in the O2-evolving S3(n) → S0(n) step, but a larger KIE (∼1.8) for manganese oxidation in the S2(n) → S3(+) step (subscript, number of accumulated oxidizing equivalents; superscript, charge of Mn4Ca). Kinetic lag phases detected in the XAS transients prior to the respective ET steps were assigned to S3(+) → S3(n) (∼150 μs, H2O; ∼380 μs, D2O) and S2(+) → S2(n) (∼25 μs, H2O; ∼120 μs, D2O) steps and attributed to PT events according to their comparatively large KIE (∼2.4, ∼4.5). Our results suggest that proton movements and molecular rearrangements within the hydrogen-bonded network involving Mn4Ca and its bound (substrate) water ligands and the surrounding amino acid/water matrix govern to different extents the rates of all ET steps but affect particularly strongly the S2(n) → S3(+) transition, assigned as proton-coupled electron transfer. Observation of a lag phase in the classical S2 → S3 transition verifies that the associated PT is a prerequisite for subsequent ET, which completes Mn4Ca oxidation to the all-Mn(IV) level.

  7. Proposed human stratum corneum water domain in chemical absorption.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hanjiang; Jung, Eui-Chang; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard

    2016-08-01

    Compounds with varying physical and chemical properties may have different affinities to the stratum corneum (SC) and/or its intercellular lipids, keratin protein, and possible water domains. To better understand the mechanism of percutaneous absorption, we utilized 21 carbon-14 labeled chemicals, with wide hydrophilicity (log P = -0.05 to 6.17), and quantified their absorption/adsorption properties for a short incubation time (15 min) with regards to intact SC membrane, delipidized SC membrane and SC lipid. A facile method was developed for SC/lipid absorption, providing a more equivalent procedure and comparable data. SC lipid absorption of chemical solutes positively correlated with the octanol/water partition coefficient (log P). Differences between the percent dose of chemical absorption to intact SC and the total percent dose contributed by the protein and lipid domains suggest the possibility and significance of a water domain. Absorption rate experiments showed a longer lag time for intact SC than for delipidized SC or SC lipid, suggesting that the water domain may delay chemical binding to protein and lipid domains, and may be a factor in the resistance of many chemicals to current decontamination methods. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Effects of neuromuscular lags on controlling contact transitions

    PubMed Central

    Venkadesan, Madhusudhan; Valero-Cuevas, Francisco J.

    2009-01-01

    We present a numerical exploration of contact transitions with the fingertip. When picking up objects our fingertips must make contact at specific locations, and—upon contact—maintain posture while producing well-directed force vectors. However, the joint torques for moving the fingertip towards a surface (τm) are different from those for producing static force vectors (τf). We previously described the neural control of such abrupt transitions in humans, and found that unavoidable errors arise because sensorimotor time delays and lags prevent an instantaneous switch between different torques. Here, we use numerical optimization on a finger model to reveal physical bounds for controlling such rapid contact transitions. Resembling human data, it is necessary to anticipatorily switch joint torques to τf at about 30 ms before contact to minimize the initial misdirection of the fingertip force vector. This anticipatory strategy arises in our deterministic model from neuromuscular lags, and not from optimizing for robustness to noise/uncertainties. Importantly, the optimal solution also leads to a trade-off between the speed of force magnitude increase versus the accuracy of initial force direction. This is an alternative to prevailing theories that propose multiplicative noise in muscles as the driver of speed–accuracy trade-offs. We instead find that the speed–accuracy trade-off arises solely from neuromuscular lags. Finally, because our model intentionally uses idealized assumptions, its agreement with human data suggests that the biological system is controlled in a way that approaches the physical boundaries of performance. PMID:19218157

  9. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using a time correlation tracer method based on FTIR absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galle, B; Samuelsson, J; Svensson, B H; Borjesson, G

    2001-01-01

    Methane is an important climate gas contributing significantly to global warming. A large part of the anthropogenic emissions of methane comes from landfills. Due to the biogenic origin of these emissions and the inhomogeneous characteristics of landfills and their soil cover, these emissions show large spatial variation. Thus, development of reliable and cost-effective methods for measurements of these emissions is an important task and a challenge to the scientific community. Traditionally, field chamber methods have been used but also different area integrating methods based on downwind plume measurements. These measurements have been supported by meteorological data either directly from local measurements or by controlled release of tracer gas from the landfill providing the dispersion characteristics of the plume. In this paperwe describe a method,the Time Correlation Tracer method, combining controlled tracer gas release from the landfill with time-resolved concentration measurements downwind the landfill using FTIR absorption spectroscopy. The method has been tested and used on measurements at a landfill in southern Sweden over the past 1.5 years. The method has proven to be a usable method for measurements of total methane emission from landfills, and under favorable meteorological conditions we estimate an achievable accuracy of 15-30%. The real time analysis capability of the FTIR makes it possible to judge the success of the measurement already on site and to decide whether more measurements are necessary. The measurement strategy is relatively simple and straightforward, and one person can make a measurement from a medium sized landfill (1-4 ha) within a few days to a week depending on the meteorological situation.

  10. Influence of several factors on ignition lag in a compression-ignition engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrish, Harold C; Voss, Fred

    1932-01-01

    This investigation was made to determine the influence of fuel quality, injection advance angle, injection valve-opening pressure, inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed on the time lag of auto-ignition of a Diesel fuel oil in a single-cylinder compression-ignition engine as obtained from an analysis of indicator diagrams. Three cam-operated fuel-injection pumps, two pumps cams, and an automatic injection valve with two different nozzles were used. Ignition lag was considered to be the interval between the start of injection of the fuel as determined with a Stroborama and the start of effective combustion as determined from the indicator diagram, the latter being the point where 4.0 x 10(exp-6) pound of fuel had been effectively burned. For this particular engine and fuel it was found that: (1) for a constant start and the same rate of fuel injection up the point of cut-off, a variation in fuel quantity from 1.2 x 10(exp-4) to 4.1 x 10(exp-4) pound per cycle has no appreciable effect on the ignition lag; (2) injection advance angle increases or decreases the lag according to whether density, temperature, or turbulence has the controlling influence; (3) increase in valve-opening pressure slightly increases the lag; and (4) increase of inlet-air pressure, compression ratio, and engine speed reduces the lag.

  11. The Lag-Luminosity Relation in the GRB Source Frame: An Investigation with Swift BAT Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Stamatikos, M.; Dermer, C. D.; Sakamoto, T.; Sonbas, E.; Parke, W. C.; Maximon, L. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Bhat, P. N.; Eskandarian, A.; Gehrels, N.; Abeysekara, A. U.; Tollefson, K.; Norris, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    Spectral lag. which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high- and low-energy photons. is a common feature in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However. most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts). we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82 +/- 0.05 (chance probability of approx. 5.5 x 10(exp -5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, L(sub iso). with a best-fitting power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2. In addition, there is an anticorrelation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum.

  12. PERITONEAL ABSORPTION

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, P. F.; Miller, L. L.; Robscheit-Robbins, F. S.; Bale, W. F.; Whipple, G. H.

    1944-01-01

    The absorption of red cells from the normal peritoneum of the dog can be demonstrated by means of red cells labeled with radio-iron incorporated in the hemoglobin of these red cells. Absorption in normal dogs runs from 20 to 100 per cent of the amount given within 24 hours. Dogs rendered anemic by bleeding absorb red cells a little less rapidly—ranging from 5 to 80 per cent of the injected red cells. Doubly depleted dogs (anemic and hypoproteinemic) absorb even less in the three experiments recorded. This peritoneal absorption varies widely in different dogs and even in the same dog at different times. We do not know the factors responsible for these variations but there is no question about active peritoneal absorption. The intact red cells pass readily from the peritoneal cavity into lymph spaces in diaphragm and other areas of the peritoneum. The red cells move along the lymphatics and through the lymph glands with little or no phagocytosis and eventually into the large veins through the thoracic ducts. PMID:19871404

  13. Prediction of High-Valent Iron K-edge Absorption Spectra by Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, P.; Stieber, S. Chantal E.; Collins, Terrence J.; Que, Lawrence; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2011-01-01

    In recent years a number of high-valent iron intermediates have been identified as reactive species in iron-containing metalloproteins. Inspired by the interest in these highly reactive species, chemists have synthesized Fe(IV) and Fe(V) model complexes with terminal oxo or nitrido groups, as well as a rare example of an Fe(VI)-nitrido species. In all these cases, X-ray absorption spectroscopy has played a key role in the identification and characterization of these species, with both the energy and intensity of the pre-edge features providing spectroscopic signatures for both the oxidation state and the local site geometry. Here we build on a time-dependent DFT methodology for the prediction of Fe K- pre-edge features, previously applied to ferrous and ferric complexes, and extend it to a range of Fe(IV), Fe(V) and Fe(VI) complexes. The contributions of oxidation state, coordination environment and spin state to the spectral features are discussed. These methods are then extended to calculate the spectra of the heme active site of P450 Compound II and the non-heme active site of TauD. The potential for using these methods in a predictive manner is highlighted. PMID:21956429

  14. Time-dependent absorption of very high-energy gamma-rays from the Galactic center by pair-production

    SciTech Connect

    Abramowski, Attila; Horns, Dieter; Ripken, Joachim; Gillessen, Stefan; Eldik, Christopher van

    2008-12-24

    Very high energy (VHE) gamma-rays have been detected from the direction of the Galactic center. The H.E.S.S. Cherenkov telescopes have located this {gamma}-ray source with a preliminary position uncertainty of 8.5'' per axis (6'' statistic+6'' sytematic per axis). Within the uncertainty region several possible counterpart candidates exist: the Super Massive Black Hole Sgr A*, the Pulsar Wind Nebula candidate G359.95-0.04, the Low Mass X-Ray Binary-system J174540.0-290031, the stellar cluster IRS 13, as well as self-annihilating dark matter. It is experimentally very challenging to further improve the positional accuracy in this energy range and therefore, it may not be possible to clearly associate one of the counterpart candidates with the VHE-source. Here, we present a new method to investigate a possible link of the VHE-source with the near environment of Sgr A*(within approximately 1000 Schwarzschild radii). This method uses the time- and energy-dependent effect of absorption of VHE {gamma}-rays by pair-production (in the following named pair-eclipse) with low-energy photons of stars closely orbiting the SMBH Sgr A*.

  15. High-resolution molybdenum K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy analyzed with time-dependent density functional theory.

    PubMed

    Lima, Frederico A; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Weyhermüller, Thomas; Chandrasekaran, Perumalreddy; Glatzel, Pieter; Neese, Frank; DeBeer, Serena

    2013-12-28

    X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) is a widely used experimental technique capable of selectively probing the local structure around an absorbing atomic species in molecules and materials. When applied to heavy elements, however, the quantitative interpretation can be challenging due to the intrinsic spectral broadening arising from the decrease in the core-hole lifetime. In this work we have used high-energy resolution fluorescence detected XAS (HERFD-XAS) to investigate a series of molybdenum complexes. The sharper spectral features obtained by HERFD-XAS measurements enable a clear assignment of the features present in the pre-edge region. Time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) has been previously shown to predict K-pre-edge XAS spectra of first row transition metal compounds with a reasonable degree of accuracy. Here we extend this approach to molybdenum K-edge HERFD-XAS and present the necessary calibration. Modern pure and hybrid functionals are utilized and relativistic effects are accounted for using either the Zeroth Order Regular Approximation (ZORA) or the second order Douglas-Kroll-Hess (DKH2) scalar relativistic approximations. We have found that both the predicted energies and intensities are in excellent agreement with experiment, independent of the functional used. The model chosen to account for relativistic effects also has little impact on the calculated spectra. This study provides an important calibration set for future applications of molybdenum HERFD-XAS to complex catalytic systems.

  16. Disentangling the ambiguity of the lagged correlation function - analysis of the Walker circulation mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runge, Jakob; Kurths, Jürgen

    2013-04-01

    A first step towards the investigation of tropical climate variability and teleconnections is the analysis of observations. Lagged correlation analysis is commonly used to gain insights into interaction mechanisms between climatological processes, in particular to determine the time delay and strength of a mechanism. In this talk, such an analysis is discussed on the mechanism of the Walker circulation. The influence of serial correlation on lagged correlation functions and regressions is investigated and it is demonstrated how this influence can lead to ambiguous and misleading conclusions about the time delay and strength of an interaction mechanism. To overcome the issues arising in interpreting the lag and strength of a correlation, we propose to use graphical models that encode the lag-specific causality between multiple processes. In this framework a certain partial correlation measure is derived that allows to very specifically measure the time delay and strength of a coupling mechanism. This approach is then shown to yield a more precise picture of the interaction mechanism of the Walker circulation. The talk is intended to serve as a guideline to interpret lagged correlations and regressions and introduces a more powerful approach to analyze time delays and strengths of interaction mechanisms.

  17. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-01

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H2O, D2O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120±50fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D2O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H2O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D2O relative to H2O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H2O and D2O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  18. Time-resolved infrared absorption studies of the solvent-dependent vibrational relaxation dynamics of chlorine dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Bolinger, Joshua C.; Bixby, Teresa J.; Reid, Philip J.

    2005-08-22

    We report a series of time-resolved infrared absorption studies on chlorine dioxide (OClO) dissolved in H{sub 2}O, D{sub 2}O, and acetonitrile. Following the photoexcitation at 401 nm, the evolution in optical density for frequencies corresponding to asymmetric stretch of OClO is measured with a time resolution of 120{+-}50 fs. The experimentally determined optical-density evolution is compared with theoretical models of OClO vibrational relaxation derived from collisional models as well as classical molecular-dynamics (MD) studies. The vibrational relaxation rates in D{sub 2}O are reduced by a factor of 3 relative to H{sub 2}O consistent with the predictions of MD. This difference reflects modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling accompanying isotopic substitution of the solvent. Also, the geminate-recombination quantum yield for the primary photofragments resulting in the reformation of ground-state OClO is reduced in D{sub 2}O relative to H{sub 2}O. It is proposed that this reduction reflects enhancement of the dissociation rate accompanying vibrational excitation along the asymmetric-stretch coordinate. In contrast to H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the vibrational-relaxation dynamics in acetonitrile are not well described by the theoretical models. Reproduction of the optical-density evolution in acetonitrile requires significant modification of the frequency-dependent solvent-solute coupling derived from MD. It is proposed that this modification reflects vibrational-energy transfer from the asymmetric stretch of OClO to the methyl rock of acetonitrile. In total, the results presented here provide a detailed description of the solvent-dependent geminate-recombination and vibrational-relaxation dynamics of OClO in solution.

  19. Assessing dynamic spectral causality by lagged adaptive directed transfer function and instantaneous effect factor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan; He, Bin

    2014-07-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The nonzero covariance of the model's residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the "causal ordering" is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In this study, we first investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in time

  20. Assessing Dynamic Spectral Causality by Lagged Adaptive Directed Transfer Function and Instantaneous Effect Factor

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Haojie; Lu, Yunfeng; Zhu, Shanan

    2014-01-01

    It is of significance to assess the dynamic spectral causality among physiological signals. Several practical estimators adapted from spectral Granger causality have been exploited to track dynamic causality based on the framework of time-varying multivariate autoregressive (tvMVAR) models. The non-zero covariance of the model’s residuals has been used to describe the instantaneous effect phenomenon in some causality estimators. However, for the situations with Gaussian residuals in some autoregressive models, it is challenging to distinguish the directed instantaneous causality if the sufficient prior information about the “causal ordering” is missing. Here, we propose a new algorithm to assess the time-varying causal ordering of tvMVAR model under the assumption that the signals follow the same acyclic causal ordering for all time lags and to estimate the instantaneous effect factor (IEF) value in order to track the dynamic directed instantaneous connectivity. The time-lagged adaptive directed transfer function (ADTF) is also estimated to assess the lagged causality after removing the instantaneous effect. In the present study, we firstly investigated the performance of the causal-ordering estimation algorithm and the accuracy of IEF value. Then, we presented the results of IEF and time-lagged ADTF method by comparing with the conventional ADTF method through simulations of various propagation models. Statistical analysis results suggest that the new algorithm could accurately estimate the causal ordering and give a good estimation of the IEF values in the Gaussian residual conditions. Meanwhile, the time-lagged ADTF approach is also more accurate in estimating the time-lagged dynamic interactions in a complex nervous system after extracting the instantaneous effect. In addition to the simulation studies, we applied the proposed method to estimate the dynamic spectral causality on real visual evoked potential (VEP) data in a human subject. Its usefulness in

  1. Quick-EXAFS setup at the SuperXAS beamline for in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy with 10 ms time resolution

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Oliver; Nachtegaal, Maarten; Just, Justus; Lützenkirchen-Hecht, Dirk; Frahm, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The quick-EXAFS (QEXAFS) method adds time resolution to X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) and allows dynamic structural changes to be followed. A completely new QEXAFS setup consisting of monochromator, detectors and data acquisition system is presented, as installed at the SuperXAS bending-magnet beamline at the Swiss Light Source (Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). The monochromator uses Si(111) and Si(311) channel-cut crystals mounted on one crystal stage, and remote exchange allows an energy range from 4.0 keV to 32 keV to be covered. The spectral scan range can be electronically adjusted up to several keV to cover multiple absorption edges in one scan. The determination of the Bragg angle close to the position of the crystals allows high-accuracy measurements. Absorption spectra can be acquired with fast gridded ionization chambers at oscillation frequencies of up to 50 Hz resulting in a time resolution of 10 ms, using both scan directions of each oscillation period. The carefully developed low-noise detector system yields high-quality absorption data. The unique setup allows both state-of-the-art QEXAFS and stable step-scan operation without the need to exchange whole monochromators. The long-term stability of the Bragg angle was investigated and absorption spectra of reference materials as well as of a fast chemical reaction demonstrate the overall capabilities of the new setup. PMID:26698072

  2. LAG3 (CD223) as a cancer immunotherapy target.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Lawrence P; Marciscano, Ariel E; Drake, Charles G; Vignali, Dario A A

    2017-03-01

    Despite the impressive impact of CTLA4 and PD1-PDL1-targeted cancer immunotherapy, a large proportion of patients with many tumor types fail to respond. Consequently, the focus has shifted to targeting alternative inhibitory receptors (IRs) and suppressive mechanisms within the tumor microenvironment. Lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG3) (CD223) is the third IR to be targeted in the clinic, consequently garnering considerable interest and scrutiny. LAG3 upregulation is required to control overt activation and prevent the onset of autoimmunity. However, persistent antigen exposure in the tumor microenvironment results in sustained LAG3 expression, contributing to a state of exhaustion manifest in impaired proliferation and cytokine production. The exact signaling mechanisms downstream of LAG3 and interplay with other IRs remain largely unknown. However, the striking synergy between LAG3 and PD1 observed in multiple settings, coupled with the contrasting intracellular cytoplasmic domain of LAG3 as compared with other IRs, highlights the potential uniqueness of LAG3. There are now four LAG3-targeted therapies in the clinic with many more in preclinical development, emphasizing the broad interest in this IR. Given the translational relevance of LAG3 and the heightened interest in the impact of dual LAG3/PD1 targeting in the clinic, the outcome of these trials could serve as a nexus; significantly increasing or dampening enthusiasm for subsequent targets in the cancer immunotherapeutic pipeline.

  3. Jet lag, circadian rhythm sleep disturbances, and depression: the role of melatonin and its analogs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkatramanujam; Singh, Jarnail; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Brown, Gregory M; Spence, David Warren; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2010-11-01

    Traveling through several time zones results in a constellation of symptoms known as jet lag. These include reduced alertness, daytime fatigue, loss of appetite, reduced cognitive skills, and disruption of the sleep/wake cycle. In susceptible air travel passengers, jet lag may exacerbate affective illness and result in psychiatric morbidity. Dysregulation of circadian rhythms and melatonin secretion represent the common underlying factor in jet lag and other circadian disorders. Recent studies have established the effectiveness of strategically timed administration of melatonin and appropriate timed exposure to environmental schedules including light in counteracting the dysregulation (chronobiologic actions). With the introduction of melatonergic agonists such as ramelteon and tasimelteon, which have both a stronger affinity for MT₁ and MT₂ melatonin receptors and a longer half-life, new therapeutic options now exist for treating the sleep disturbances associated with jet lag. The melatonin analogs are unique inasmuch as they can also enhance daytime alertness. The recently introduced melatonergic antidepressant agomelatine, which has established its supremacy over other antidepressants in having a significant chronobiologic activity, represents a good choice for treating depressive symptoms that are associated with jet lag.

  4. TRACING THE REVERBERATION LAG IN THE HARD STATE OF BLACK HOLE X-RAY BINARIES

    SciTech Connect

    De Marco, B.; Ponti, G.; Nandra, K.; Muñoz-Darias, T.

    2015-11-20

    We report results obtained from a systematic analysis of X-ray lags in a sample of black hole X-ray binaries, with the aim of assessing the presence of reverberation lags and studying their evolution during outburst. We used XMM-Newton and simultaneous Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) observations to obtain broadband energy coverage of both the disk and the hard X-ray Comptonization components. In most cases the detection of reverberation lags is hampered by low levels of variability-power signal-to-noise ratio (typically when the source is in a soft state) and/or short exposure times. The most detailed study was possible for GX 339-4 in the hard state, which allowed us to characterize the evolution of X-ray lags as a function of luminosity in a single source. Over all the sampled frequencies (∼0.05–9 Hz), we observe the hard lags intrinsic to the power-law component, already well known from previous RXTE studies. The XMM-Newton soft X-ray response allows us to detail the disk variability. At low frequencies (long timescales) the disk component always leads the power-law component. On the other hand, a soft reverberation lag (ascribable to thermal reprocessing) is always detected at high frequencies (short timescales). The intrinsic amplitude of the reverberation lag decreases as the source luminosity and the disk fraction increase. This suggests that the distance between the X-ray source and the region of the optically thick disk where reprocessing occurs gradually decreases as GX 339-4 rises in luminosity through the hard state, possibly as a consequence of reduced disk truncation.

  5. Solvent effects on the excited-state processes of protochlorophyllide: a femtosecond time-resolved absorption study.

    PubMed

    Dietzek, B; Kiefer, W; Hermann, G; Popp, J; Schmitt, M

    2006-03-09

    The excited-state dynamics of protochlorophyllide a, a porphyrin-like compound and, as substrate of the NADPH/protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase, a precursor of chlorophyll biosynthesis, is studied by femtosecond absorption spectroscopy in a variety of solvents, which were chosen to mimic different environmental conditions in the oxidoreductase complex. In the polar solvents methanol and acetonitrile, the excited-state dynamics differs significantly from that in the nonpolar solvent cyclohexane. In methanol and acetonitrile, the relaxation dynamics is multiexponential with three distinguishable time scales of 4.0-4.5 ps for vibrational relaxation and vibrational energy redistribution of the initially excited S1 state, 22-27 ps for the formation of an intermediate state, most likely with a charge transfer character, and 200 ps for the decay of this intermediate state back to the ground state. In the nonpolar solvent cyclohexane, only the 4.5 ps relaxational process can be observed, whereas the intermediate intramolecular charge transfer state is not populated any longer. In addition to polarity, solvent viscosity also affects the excited-state processes. Upon increasing the viscosity by adding up to 60% glycerol to a methanolic solution, a deceleration of the 4 and 22 ps decay rates from the values in pure methanol is found. Apparently not only vibrational cooling of the S1 excited state is slowed in the more viscous surrounding, but the formation rate of the intramolecular charge transfer state is also reduced, suggesting that nuclear motions along a reaction coordinate are involved in the charge transfer. The results of the present study further specify the model of the excited-state dynamics in protochlorophyllide a as recently suggested (Chem. Phys. Lett. 2004, 397, 110).

  6. A forward bias method for lag correction of an a-Si flat panel detector

    SciTech Connect

    Starman, Jared; Tognina, Carlo; Partain, Larry; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2012-01-15

    Purpose: Digital a-Si flat panel (FP) x-ray detectors can exhibit detector lag, or residual signal, of several percent that can cause ghosting in projection images or severe shading artifacts, known as the radar artifact, in cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) reconstructions. A major contributor to detector lag is believed to be defect states, or traps, in the a-Si layer of the FP. Software methods to characterize and correct for the detector lag exist, but they may make assumptions such as system linearity and time invariance, which may not be true. The purpose of this work is to investigate a new hardware based method to reduce lag in an a-Si FP and to evaluate its effectiveness at removing shading artifacts in CBCT reconstructions. The feasibility of a novel, partially hardware based solution is also examined. Methods: The proposed hardware solution for lag reduction requires only a minor change to the FP. For pulsed irradiation, the proposed method inserts a new operation step between the readout and data collection stages. During this new stage the photodiode is operated in a forward bias mode, which fills the defect states with charge. A Varian 4030CB panel was modified to allow for operation in the forward bias mode. The contrast of residual lag ghosts was measured for lag frames 2 and 100 after irradiation ceased for standard and forward bias modes. Detector step response, lag, SNR, modulation transfer function (MTF), and detective quantum efficiency (DQE) measurements were made with standard and forward bias firmware. CBCT data of pelvic and head phantoms were also collected. Results: Overall, the 2nd and 100th detector lag frame residual signals were reduced 70%-88% using the new method. SNR, MTF, and DQE measurements show a small decrease in collected signal and a small increase in noise. The forward bias hardware successfully reduced the radar artifact in the CBCT reconstruction of the pelvic and head phantoms by 48%-81%. Conclusions: Overall, the

  7. X-ray absorption resonances near L2,3-edges from real-time propagation of the Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix.

    PubMed

    Kadek, Marius; Konecny, Lukas; Gao, Bin; Repisky, Michal; Ruud, Kenneth

    2015-09-21

    The solution of the Liouville-von Neumann equation in the relativistic Dirac-Kohn-Sham density matrix formalism is presented and used to calculate X-ray absorption cross sections. Both dynamical relaxation effects and spin-orbit corrections are included, as demonstrated by calculations of the X-ray absorption of SF6 near the sulfur L2,3-edges. We also propose an analysis facilitating the interpretation of spectral transitions from real-time simulations, and a selective perturbation that eliminates nonphysical excitations that are artifacts of the finite basis representation.

  8. Influence of excited-state absorption on time-resolved luminescence: general formalism and application to the phosphorescence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Palmeira, Tiago; Fedorov, Alexander; Berberan-Santos, Mário N

    2015-02-23

    The luminescence decay of a species in an absorbing medium whose optical thickness changes with time, as occurs with triplet-triplet absorption following excitation cut-off, is studied theoretically and experimentally. A general luminescence decay function based on a distribution of optical thicknesses is presented. A simple decay function previously used empirically is shown to result from an exponential distribution of optical thicknesses. The general approach introduced allows the adequate description of the phosphorescence decays of two polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, coronene and triphenylene (normal and perdeuterated forms for both molecules), in polymer films in the presence of excited-state absorption.

  9. Audibility of dispersion error in room acoustic finite-difference time-domain simulation in the presence of absorption of air.

    PubMed

    Saarelma, Jukka; Savioja, Lauri

    2016-12-01

    The finite-difference time-domain method has gained increasing interest for room acoustic prediction use. A well-known limitation of the method is a frequency and direction dependent dispersion error. In this study, the audibility of dispersion error in the presence of air absorption is measured. The results indicate that the dispersion error in the worst-case direction of the studied scheme gets masked by the air absorption at a phase velocity error percentage of 0.28% at the frequency of 20 kHz.

  10. The effects of structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling on soft inplane hingeless rotor stability in hover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bousman, William G.

    1990-01-01

    A 1.62-m-diameter rotor model was tested in hover to examine the effects of structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling on isolated rotor blade lead-lag stability. Flap-lag coupling was introduced by inclining the principal axes of the blade structure up to 60 degrees. Pitch-lag coupling was obtained either alone or in combination with flap-lag coupling through the use of skewed flexural hinges. The principal results confirm the predictions of theory, and show that both structural flap-lag and pitch-lag coupling when used separately are beneficial to blade stability. Moreover, when the couplings are combined, the lead-lag damping is significantly greater than it would be if the individual contributions were superimposed. Pitch-flap coupling is shown to have only a minor effect on blade lead-lag damping. Differences between theory and experiment observed at zero blade pitch and flexure angles during the initial testing were determined in a second test to be caused by stand flexibility. Other differences between theory and experiment warrant further investigation.

  11. Ultrasensitive, real-time analysis of biomarkers in breath using tunable external cavity laser and off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrakli, Ismail; Akman, Hatice

    2015-03-01

    A robust biomedical sensor for ultrasensitive detection of biomarkers in breath based on a tunable external cavity laser (ECL) and an off-axis cavity-enhanced absorption spectroscopy (OA-CEAS) using an amplitude stabilizer is developed. A single-mode, narrow-linewidth, tunable ECL is demonstrated. A broadly coarse wavelength tuning range of 720 cm-1 for the spectral range between 6890 and 6170 cm-1 is achieved by rotating the diffraction grating forming a Littrow-type external-cavity configuration. A mode-hop-free tuning range of 1.85 cm-1 is obtained. The linewidths below 140 kHz are recorded. The ECL is combined with an OA-CEAS to perform laser chemical sensing. Our system is able to detect any molecule in breath at concentrations to the ppbv range that have absorption lines in the spectral range between 1450 and 1620 nm. Ammonia is selected as target molecule to evaluate the performance of the sensor. Using the absorption line of ammonia at 6528.76 cm-1, a minimum detectable absorption coefficient of approximately 1×10-8 cm-1 is demonstrated for 256 averages. This is achieved for a 1.4-km absorption path length and a 2-s data-acquisition time. These results yield a detection sensitivity of approximately 8.6×10-10 cm-1 Hz-1/2. Ammonia in exhaled breath is analyzed and found in a concentration of 870 ppb for our example.

  12. Integration of the subarachnoid space and lymphatics: Is it time to embrace a new concept of cerebrospinal fluid absorption?

    PubMed Central

    Koh, Lena; Zakharov, Andrei; Johnston, Miles

    2005-01-01

    In most tissues and organs, the lymphatic circulation is responsible for the removal of interstitial protein and fluid but the parenchyma of the brain and spinal cord is devoid of lymphatic vessels. On the other hand, the literature is filled with qualitative and quantitative evidence supporting a lymphatic function in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) absorption. The experimental data seems to warrant a re-examination of CSF dynamics and consideration of a new conceptual foundation on which to base our understanding of disorders of the CSF system. The objective of this paper is to review the key studies pertaining to the role of the lymphatic system in CSF absorption. PMID:16174293

  13. A Quantitative Review and Meta-models of the Variability and Factors Affecting Oral Drug Absorption-Part II: Gastrointestinal Transit Time.

    PubMed

    Abuhelwa, Ahmad Y; Foster, David J R; Upton, Richard N

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to conduct a quantitative meta-analysis for the values of, and variability in, gastrointestinal (GI) transit times of non-disintegrating single-unit ("tablet") and multiple-unit ("pellets/multi-unit tablet") solid dosage forms, characterize the effect of food on the values and variability in these parameters and present quantitative meta-models of the distributions of GI transit times in the respective GI regions to help inform models of oral drug absorption. The literature was systemically reviewed for the values of, and the variability in, gastric, small intestinal and colonic transit times under fed and fasted conditions. Meta-analysis used the "metafor" package of the R language. Meta-models of GI transit were assumed to be log-normally distributed between the studied populations. Twenty-nine studies including 125 reported means and standard deviations were used in the meta-analysis. Caloric content of administered food increased variability and delayed the gastric transit of both pellets and tablets. Conversely, food caloric content reduced the variability but had no significant influence on the mean small intestinal transit time (SITT). Food had no significant effect on the transit time through the colon. The transit of pellets through the colon was significantly slower than that of single-unit tablets which is most likely related to their smaller size. GI transit times may influence the dissolution and absorption of oral drugs. The meta-models of GI transit times may be used as part of semi-physiological absorption models to characterize the influence of transit time on the dissolution, absorption and in vivo pharmacokinetic profiles of oral drugs.

  14. Elucidating light-induced charge accumulation in an artificial analogue of methane monooxygenase enzymes using time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Moonshiram, Dooshaye; Picón, Antonio; Vazquez-Mayagoitia, Alvaro; Zhang, Xiaoyi; Tu, Ming-Feng; Garrido-Barros, Pablo; Mahy, Jean-Pierre; Avenier, Frédéric; Aukauloo, Ally

    2017-02-28

    We report the use of time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the ns-μs time scale to track the light induced two electron transfer processes in a multi-component photocatalytic system, consisting of [Ru(bpy)3](2+)/ a diiron(iii,iii) model/triethylamine. EXAFS analysis with DFT calculations confirms the structural configurations of the diiron(iii,iii) and reduced diiron(ii,ii) states.

  15. Analysis and IbM simulation of the stages in bacterial lag phase: basis for an updated definition.

    PubMed

    Prats, Clara; Giró, Antoni; Ferrer, Jordi; López, Daniel; Vives-Rego, Josep

    2008-05-07

    The lag phase is the initial phase of a culture that precedes exponential growth and occurs when the conditions of the culture medium differ from the pre-inoculation conditions. It is usually defined by means of cell density because the number of individuals remains approximately constant or slowly increases, and it is quantified with the lag parameter lambda. The lag phase has been studied through mathematical modelling and by means of specific experiments. In recent years, Individual-based Modelling (IbM) has provided helpful insights into lag phase studies. In this paper, the definition of lag phase is thoroughly examined. Evolution of the total biomass and the total number of bacteria during lag phase is tackled separately. The lag phase lasts until the culture reaches a maximum growth rate both in biomass and cell density. Once in the exponential phase, both rates are constant over time and equal to each other. Both evolutions are split into an initial phase and a transition phase, according to their growth rates. A population-level mathematical model is presented to describe the transitional phase in cell density. INDividual DIScrete SIMulation (INDISIM) is used to check the outcomes of this analysis. Simulations allow the separate study of the evolution of cell density and total biomass in a batch culture, they provide a depiction of different observed cases in lag evolution at the individual-cell level, and are used to test the population-level model. The results show that the geometrical lag parameter lambda is not appropriate as a universal definition for the lag phase. Moreover, the lag phase cannot be characterized by a single parameter. For the studied cases, the lag phases of both the total biomass and the population are required to fully characterize the evolution of bacterial cultures. The results presented prove once more that the lag phase is a complex process that requires a more complete definition. This will be possible only after the phenomena

  16. Time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy of photoinduced insulator-metal transition in a colossal magnetoresistive manganite

    SciTech Connect

    Rini, M.; Tobey, R.; Wall, S.; Zhu, Y.; Tomioka, Y.; Tokura, Y.; Cavalleri, A.; Schoenlein, R.W.

    2008-08-01

    We studied the ultrafast insulator-metal transition in a manganite by means of picosecond X-ray absorption at the O K- and Mn L-edges, probing photoinduced changes in O-2p and Mn-3d electronic states near the Fermi level.

  17. Time-dependent models of radiatively driven stellar winds. I - Nonlinear evolution of instabilities for a pure absorption model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owocki, Stanley P.; Castor, John I.; Rybicki, George B.

    1988-01-01

    Numerical radiation-hydrodynamics simulations of the nonlinear evolution of instabilities in radiatively driven stellar winds have been performed. The results show a strong tendency for the unstable flow to form rather sharp rarefactions in which the highest speed material has very low density. The qualitative features of the model agree well with the reqirements of displaced narrow absorption components in UV lines.

  18. Toward an Understanding of GRB Prompt Emission Mechanism. I. The Origin of Spectral Lags

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uhm, Z. Lucas; Zhang, Bing

    2016-07-01

    Despite decades of investigations, the physical mechanism that powers the bright prompt γ-ray emission from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still not identified. One important observational clue that still has not been properly interpreted is the existence of time lags of broad light curve pulses in different energy bands, referred to as “spectral lags.” Here, we show that the traditional view invoking the high-latitude emission “curvature effect” of a relativistic jet cannot account for spectral lags. Rather, the observed spectral lags demand the sweep of a spectral peak across the observing energy band in a specific manner. The duration of the broad pulses and inferred typical Lorentz factor of GRBs require that the emission region be in an optically thin emission region far from the GRB central engine. We construct a simple physical model invoking synchrotron radiation from a rapidly expanding outflow. We show that the observed spectral lags appear naturally in our model light curves given that (1) the gamma-ray photon spectrum is curved (as observed), (2) the magnetic field strength in the emitting region decreases with radius as the region expands in space, and (3) the emission region itself undergoes rapid bulk acceleration as the prompt γ-rays are produced. These requirements are consistent with a Poynting-flux-dominated jet abruptly dissipating magnetic energy at a large distance from the engine.

  19. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE {gamma}-RAY/OPTICAL LAGS IN LUMINOUS BLAZARS

    SciTech Connect

    Janiak, Mateusz; Sikora, Marek; Moderski, Rafal; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Madejski, Greg M. E-mail: sikora@camk.edu.pl

    2012-12-01

    Blazars are strongly variable sources that occasionally show spectacular flares visible in various energy bands. These flares are often, but not always, correlated. In a number of cases, the peaks of optical flares are found to be somewhat delayed with respect to the {gamma}-ray peaks. One notable example of such a delay was found in 3C 279 by Hayashida et al. and interpreted as a result of steeper drop with a distance of the energy density of an external radiation field than of the magnetic energy density. In this paper, we demonstrate that, in general, depending on the respective energy density profile along the jet, such lags can have both signs and that they can take place for any ratio of these energy densities. We study the dependence of such lags on the ratio of these energy densities at a distance of a maximal energy dissipation in a jet, on their gradients, as well as on the time profile of the relativistic electron injection within the moving source. We show how prominent such lags can be, and their expected timescales. We suggest that studies of such lags can provide a powerful tool to resolve the structure of relativistic jets and their radiative environment. As an example we model the lag observed in 3C 279, showing that in this object the flare is produced at a distance of a few parsecs from the central black hole, consistent with our previous inferences based on the spectra and optical polarization properties.

  20. A common lag scenario in quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suresh, K.; Sabarathinam, S.; Thamilmaran, K.; Kurths, Jürgen; Dana, Syamal K.

    2016-08-01

    A large parameter mismatch can induce amplitude death in two instantaneously coupled oscillators. Alternatively, a time delay in the coupling can induce amplitude death in two identical oscillators. We unify the mechanism of quenching of oscillation in coupled oscillators, either by a large parameter mismatch or a delay coupling, by a common lag scenario that is, surprisingly, different from the conventional lag synchronization. We present numerical as well as experimental evidence of this unknown kind of lag scenario when the lag increases with coupling and at a critically large value at a critical coupling strength, amplitude death emerges in two largely mismatched oscillators. This is analogous to amplitude death in identical systems with increasingly large coupling delay. In support, we use examples of the Chua oscillator and the Bonhoeffer-van der Pol system. Furthermore, we confirm this lag scenario during the onset of amplitude death in identical Stuart-Landau system under various instantaneous coupling forms, repulsive, conjugate, and a type of nonlinear coupling.

  1. Application of autoregressive distributed lag model to thermal error compensation of machine tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Enming; Niu, Pengcheng; Fei, Yetai; Yan, Yan

    2011-12-01

    Since Thermal error in precision CNC machine tools cannot be ignored, it is essential to construct a simple and effective thermal error compensation mathematical model. In this paper, three modeling methods are introduced in detail. The first is multiple linear regression model; the second is congruence model, which combines multiple linear regression model with AR model of its residual error; and the third is autoregressive distributed lag model(ADL), which is compared and analyzed. Multiple linear regression analysis is used most commonly in thermal error compensation, since it is a simple and quick modeling method. But thermal error is nonlinear and interactive, so it is difficult to model a precise least squares model of thermal error. The congruence model and autoregressive distributed lag model belong to time series analysis method which has the advantage of establishing a precise mathematical model. The distinctions between the two models are that: the congruence model divides the parameter into two parts to estimate them respectively, but autoregressive distributed lag model estimates parameter uniformly, so congruence model is less accurate than autoregressive distributed lag model in modeling. This paper, based upon an actual example, concludes that autoregressive distributed lag model for thermal error of precision CNC machine tools is a good way to improve modeling accuracy.

  2. Decomposing the transfer entropy to quantify lag-specific Granger causality in cardiovascular variability.

    PubMed

    Faes, Luca; Nollo, Giandomenico

    2013-01-01

    We present a modification of the well known transfer entropy (TE) which makes it able to detect, besides the direction and strength of the information transfer between coupled processes, its exact timing. The approach follows a decomposition strategy which identifies--according to a lag-specific formulation of the concept of Granger causality--the set of time delays carrying significant information, and then assigns to each of these delays an amount of information transfer such that the total contribution yields the overall TE. We propose also a procedure for the practical estimation from time series data of the relevant delays and lag-specific TE in both bivariate and multivariate settings. The proposed approach is tested in simulations and in real cardiovascular time series, showing the feasibility of lag-specific TE estimation, the ability to reflect expected mechanisms of cardiovascular regulation, and the necessity of using the multivariate TE to properly assess time-lagged information transfer in the presence of multiple interacting systems.

  3. Aeromechanical stability augmentation using semi-active friction-based lead-lag damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Sandeep

    2005-11-01

    Lead-lag dampers are present in most rotors to provide the required level of damping in all flight conditions. These dampers are a critical component of the rotor system, but they also represent a major source of maintenance cost. In present rotor systems, both hydraulic and elastomeric lead-lag dampers have been used. Hydraulic dampers are complex mechanical components that require hydraulic fluids and have high associated maintenance costs. Elastomeric dampers are conceptually simpler and provide a "dry" rotor, but are rather costly. Furthermore, their damping characteristics can degrade with time without showing external signs of failure. Hence, the dampers must be replaced on a regular basis. A semi-active friction based lead-lag damper is proposed as a replacement for hydraulic and elastomeric dampers. Damping is provided by optimized energy dissipation due to frictional forces in semi-active joints. An actuator in the joint modulates the normal force that controls energy dissipation at the frictional interfaces, resulting in large hysteretic loops. Various selective damping strategies are developed and tested for a simple system containing two different frequency modes in its response, one of which needs to be damped out. The system reflects the situation encountered in rotor response where 1P excitation is present along with the potentially unstable regressive lag motion. Simulation of the system response is obtained to compare their effectiveness. Next, a control law governing the actuation in the lag damper is designed to generate the desired level of damping for performing adaptive selective damping of individual blade lag motion. Further, conceptual design of a piezoelectric friction based lag damper for a full-scale rotor is presented and various factors affecting size, design and maintenance cost, damping capacity, and power requirements of the damper are discussed. The selective semi-active damping strategy is then studied in the context of classical

  4. Temporal Ventriloquism: Sound Modulates the Flash-Lag Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vroomen, Jean; de Gelder, Beatrice

    2004-01-01

    A sound presented in close temporal proximity to a visual stimulus can alter the perceived temporal dimensions of the visual stimulus (temporal ventriloquism). In this article, the authors demonstrate temporal ventriloquism in the flash-lag effect (FLE), a visual illusion in which a flash appears to lag relative to a moving object. In Experiment…

  5. Determination of Watershed Lag Equation for Philippine Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriano, F. R.; Lagmay, A. M. F. A.; Uichanco, C.; Mendoza, J.; Sabio, G.; Punay, K. N.; Oquindo, M. R.; Horritt, M.

    2014-12-01

    Widespread flooding is a major problem in the Philippines. The country experiences heavy amount of rainfall throughout the year and several areas are prone to flood hazards because of its unique topography. Human casualties and destruction of infrastructure are some of the damages caused by flooding and the country's government has undertaken various efforts to mitigate these hazards. One of the solutions was to create flood hazard maps of different floodplains and use them to predict the possible catastrophic results of different rain scenarios. To produce these maps, different types of data were needed and part of that is calculating hydrological components to come up with an accurate output. This paper presents how an important parameter, the time-to-peak of the watershed (Tp) was calculated. Time-to-peak is defined as the time at which the largest discharge of the watershed occurs. This is computed by using a lag time equation that was developed specifically for the Philippine setting. The equation involves three measurable parameters, namely, watershed length (L), maximum potential retention (S), and watershed slope (Y). This approach is based on a similar method developed by CH2M Hill and Horritt for Taiwan, which has a similar set of meteorological and hydrological parameters with the Philippines. Data from fourteen water level sensors covering 67 storms from all the regions in the country were used to estimate the time-to-peak. These sensors were chosen by using a screening process that considers the distance of the sensors from the sea, the availability of recorded data, and the catchment size. Values of Tp from the different sensors were generated from the general lag time equation based on the Natural Resource Conservation Management handbook by the US Department of Agriculture. The calculated Tp values were plotted against the values obtained from the equation L0.8(S+1)0.7/Y0.5. Regression analysis was used to obtain the final equation that would be

  6. Analytical determination of the lag phase in grapes by remote measurement of trellis tension

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The lag phase (L) of grape berry growth is used to determine the timing of hand sampling for yield estimation. In commercial practice, growers apply scalars to measurements of berry of cluster masses under the assumption that fruit was assessed during L, which is the short period of slowest increase...

  7. Adolescents' Pregnancy Intentions, Wantedness, and Regret: Cross-Lagged Relations with Mental Health and Harsh Parenting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    East, Patricia L.; Chien, Nina C.; Barber, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    The authors used cross-lagged analyses to examine the across-time influences on and consequences of adolescents' pregnancy intentions, wantedness, and regret. One hundred pregnant Latina adolescents were studied during pregnancy and at 6 and 12 months postpartum. The results revealed 4 main findings: (a) similar to what has been found in adult…

  8. NAEP Gap Continuing for Charters: Sector's Scores Lag in Three out of Four Main Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robelen, Erik W.

    2008-01-01

    Nearly four years after a front-page story in "The New York Times" sparked a fierce debate by suggesting that charter school students nationally were lagging academically behind their peers in regular public schools, the national testing program that informed the controversy has generated far more data for researchers and advocates to scrutinize.…

  9. Detection of High Velocity Absorption Components in the He I Lines of Eta Carinae near the Time of Periastron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richardson, Noel D.; St-Jean, Lucas; Gull, Theodore R.; Madura, Thomas; Hillier, D. John; Teodoro, Mairan; Moffat, Anthony; Corcoran, Michael; Damineli, Augusto

    2014-01-01

    We have obtained a total of 58 high spectral resolution (R90,000) spectra of the massive binary star eta Carinae since 2012 in an effort to continue our orbital and long-term echelle monitoring of this extreme binary (Richardson et al. 2010, AJ, 139, 1534) with the CHIRON spectrograph on the CTIO 1.5 m telescope (Tokovinin et al. 2013, PASP, 125, 1336) in the 45507500A region. We have increased our monitoring efforts and observation frequency as the periastron event of 2014 has approached. We note that there were multiple epochs this year where we observe unusual absorption components in the P Cygni troughs of the He I triplet lines. In particular, we note high velocity absorption components related to the following epochs for the following lines: He I 4713: HJD 2456754- 2456795 (velocity -450 to -560 kms) He I 5876: HJD 2456791- 2456819 (velocity -690 to -800 kms) He I 7065: HJD 2456791- 2456810 (velocity -665 to -730 kms) Figures: Note that red indicates a high-velocity component noted above. He I 4713: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson4713.png He I 5876: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson5876.png He I 7065: http:www.astro.umontreal.carichardson7065.png These absorptions are likely related to the wind-wind collision region and bow shock, as suggested by the high-velocity absorption observed by Groh et al. (2010, AA, 519, 9) in the He I 10830 Atransition. In these cases, we suspect that we look along an arm of the shock cone and that we will see a fast absorption change from the other collision region shortly after periastron. We suspect that this is related to the multiple-components of the He II 4686 line that was noted by Walter (ATel6334), and is confirmed in our data. Further, high spectral resolution data are highly encouraged,especially for resolving powers greater than 50,000.These observations were obtained with the CTIO 1.5 m telescope, operated by the SMARTS Consortium, and were obtained through both SMARTS and NOAO programs 2012A-0216,2012B-0194

  10. Simulating One-Photon Absorption and Resonance Raman Scattering Spectra Using Analytical Excited State Energy Gradients within Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Daniel W.; Govind, Niranjan; van Dam, Hubertus J. J.; Jensen, Lasse

    2013-12-10

    A parallel implementation of analytical time-dependent density functional theory gradients is presented for the quantum chemistry program NWChem. The implementation is based on the Lagrangian approach developed by Furche and Ahlrichs. To validate our implementation, we first calculate the Stokes shifts for a range of organic dye molecules using a diverse set of exchange-correlation functionals (traditional density functionals, global hybrids, and range-separated hybrids) followed by simulations of the one-photon absorption and resonance Raman scattering spectrum of the phenoxyl radical, the well-studied dye molecule rhodamine 6G, and a molecular host–guest complex (TTFcCBPQT4+). The study of organic dye molecules illustrates that B3LYP and CAM-B3LYP generally give the best agreement with experimentally determined Stokes shifts unless the excited state is a charge transfer state. Absorption, resonance Raman, and fluorescence simulations for the phenoxyl radical indicate that explicit solvation may be required for accurate characterization. For the host–guest complex and rhodamine 6G, it is demonstrated that absorption spectra can be simulated in good agreement with experimental data for most exchange-correlation functionals. Finally, however, because one-photon absorption spectra generally lack well-resolved vibrational features, resonance Raman simulations are necessary to evaluate the accuracy of the exchange-correlation functional for describing a potential energy surface.

  11. The Lag-Luminosity Relation in the GRB Source-Frame: An Investigation with Swift BAT Bursts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ukwatta, T. N.; Dhuga, K. S.; Stamatikos, M.; Dermer, C. D.; Sakamoto, T.; Sonbas, E.; Parke, W. C.; Maximon, L. C.; Linnemann, J. T.; Bhat, P. N.; Eskandarian, A.; Gehrels, N.; Abeysekara, U.; Tollefson, K.; Norris, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Spectral lag, which is defined as the difference in time of arrival of high and low energy photons, is a common feature in Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Previous investigations have shown a correlation between this lag and the isotropic peak luminosity for long duration bursts. However, most of the previous investigations used lags extracted in the observer-frame only. In this work (based on a sample of 43 Swift long GRBs with known redshifts), we present an analysis of the lag-luminosity relation in the GRB source-frame. Our analysis indicates a higher degree of correlation -0.82+/-0.05 (chance probability of approx 5.5 X 10(exp -5) between the spectral lag and the isotropic peak luminosity, L(sub iso), with a best-fit power-law index of -1.2 +/- 0.2, such that L(sub iso) varies as lag(exp -1.2). In addition, there is an anti-correlation between the source-frame spectral lag and the source-frame peak energy of the burst spectrum, E(sub pk)(1 + z).

  12. The GEOS Retrospective Data Assimilation System: The 6-hour lag case

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Yan-Qiu; Todling, Ricardo; Guo, Jing; Cohn, Stephen E.; Navon, I. Michael; Yang, Yan; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The fixed-lag Kalman smoother (FLKS) has been proposed as a framework to construct data assimilation procedures capable of producing high-quality climate research datasets. Fixed-lag Kalman smoother-based systems, referred to as retrospective data assimilation systems, are an extension to three-dimensional filtering procedures with the added capability of incorporating observations not only in the past and present time of the estimate, but also at future times. A variety of simplifications are necessary to render retrospective assimilation procedures practical. In this article, we present an FLKS-based retrospective data assimilation system implementation for the Goddard Earth Observing System (GOES) Data Assimilation System (DAS). The practicality of this implementation comes from the practicality of its underlying (filter) analysis system, i.e., the physical-space statistical analysis system (PSAS). The behavior of two schemes is studied here. The first retrospective analysis (RA) scheme is designed simply to update the regular PSAS analyses with observations available at times ahead of the regular analysis times. Although our GEOS DAS implementation is general, results are only presented for when observations 6-hours ahead of the analysis time are used to update the PSAS analyses and thereby to calculate the so-called lag-1 retrospective analyses. Consistency tests for this RA scheme show that the lag-1 retrospective analyses indeed have better 6-hour predictive skills than the predictions from the regular analyses. This motivates the introduction of the second retrospective analysis scheme which, at each analysis time, uses the 6-hour retrospective analysis to replace the first-guess normally used in the PSAS analysis, and therefore allows the calculation of a revised (filter) PSAS analysis. Since in this scheme the lag-1 retrospective analyses influence the filter results, this procedure is referred to as the retrospective-based iterative analysis (RIA) scheme

  13. ABSORPTION ANALYZER

    DOEpatents

    Brooksbank, W.A. Jr.; Leddicotte, G.W.; Strain, J.E.; Hendon, H.H. Jr.

    1961-11-14

    A means was developed for continuously computing and indicating the isotopic assay of a process solution and for automatically controlling the process output of isotope separation equipment to provide a continuous output of the desired isotopic ratio. A counter tube is surrounded with a sample to be analyzed so that the tube is exactly in the center of the sample. A source of fast neutrons is provided and is spaced from the sample. The neutrons from the source are thermalized by causing them to pass through a neutron moderator, and the neutrons are allowed to diffuse radially through the sample to actuate the counter. A reference counter in a known sample of pure solvent is also actuated by the thermal neutrons from the neutron source. The number of neutrons which actuate the detectors is a function of a concentration of the elements in solution and their neutron absorption cross sections. The pulses produced by the detectors responsive to each neu tron passing therethrough are amplified and counted. The respective times required to accumulate a selected number of counts are measured by associated timing devices. The concentration of a particular element in solution may be determined by utilizing the following relation: T2/Ti = BCR, where B is a constant proportional to the absorption cross sections, T2 is the time of count collection for the unknown solution, Ti is the time of count collection for the pure solvent, R is the isotopic ratlo, and C is the molar concentration of the element to be determined. Knowing the slope constant B for any element and when the chemical concentration is known, the isotopic concentration may be readily determined, and conversely when the isotopic ratio is known, the chemical concentrations may be determined. (AEC)

  14. Photoinduced electron transfer between 2-methylanthraquinone and triethylamine in an ionic liquid: Time-resolved EPR and transient absorption spectroscopy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Guanglai; Wang, Yu; Fu, Haiying; Xu, Xinsheng; Cui, Zhifeng; Ji, Xuehan; Wu, Guozhong

    2015-02-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer between 2-methylanthraquinone (MeAQ) and triethylamine (TEA) in a room-temperature ionic liquid, 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]), was investigated by comparing the time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (TR-EPR) spectroscopy and the transient absorption spectroscopy. The results of TR-EPR spectroscopy, in which MeAQ was 8 mmol L-1 and TEA was 150 mmol L-1, indicated that the transient radical would exist longer time in [bmim][PF6] than in acetonitrile. At the delay time of 8 μs after laser excitation, the TR-EPR signal transformed from an emissive peak into an absorptive peak when the experiment was performed in [bmim][PF6]. The results of the transient absorption spectroscopy, in which MeAQ was 0.1 mmol L-1 and TEA was 2.2 mmol L-1, showed that the efficiency and the rate of the photoinduced electron transfer reaction in [bmim][PF6] were obviously lower than that in acetonitrile. It was concluded that various factors, such as concentration, viscosity and local structural transformation of the solution, have an influence on the process of photoinduced electron transfer in [bmim][PF6].

  15. Development and operation of a real-time data acquisition system for the NASA-LaRC differential absorption lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, C.

    1985-01-01

    Computer hardware and software of the NASA multipurpose differential absorption lidar (DIAL) sysatem were improved. The NASA DIAL system is undergoing development and experimental deployment for remote measurement of atmospheric trace gas concentration from ground and aircraft platforms. A viable DIAL system was developed with the capability of remotely measuring O3 and H2O concentrations from an aircraft platform. Test flights were successfully performed on board the NASA/Goddard Flight Center Electra aircraft from 1980 to 1984. Improvements on the DIAL data acquisition system (DAS) are described.

  16. Time-dependent X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) study on the transformation of zinc basic salt into bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II).

    PubMed

    Paek, Seung-Min; Jo, Won-Young; Park, Man; Choy, Jin-Ho

    2007-11-01

    Solid transchelation reaction was established for the synthesis of bis(N-oxopyridine-2-thionato) zinc (II), commonly known as zinc pyrithione (ZPT), to control particle size using zinc basic salt (ZBS) and aqueous sodium pyrithione solution. Distinguished from ZPT particles prepared by usual precipitation reaction, the obtained ZPT nanoparticles exhibited very narrow size distribution. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) at Zn K-edge was systematically examined to elucidate time-dependent local structural evolution during solid transchelation reaction. X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) analysis clearly revealed that local environment around zinc atoms transformed into pentahedron as reaction proceeded. Based on quantitative X-ray diffraction and XANES analysis, we made structural models. Theoretical XAS spectrum calculated with FEFF code could reproduce experimental one, suggesting that XAS analysis could be very powerful tool to probe phase transformation. Furthermore, according to extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) fitting results, Zn-O distance in reaction products gradually increased from 1.96 to 2.07 angstroms, suggesting that zinc atoms bounded with oxygen ones in ZBS were transchelated with pyrithione ligands. This study could be a strong evidence for the usefulness of XAS to study time-dependent structural transformation of nanocrystalline materials.

  17. Analysing the lag-growth rate relationship of Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Pin, Carmen; García, de Fernando Gonzalo D; Ordóñez, Juan A; Baranyi, József

    2002-03-01

    A generalised z-value concept has been applied to analyse the relationship between the lag and the growth rate of Yersinia enterocolitica at a range of temperature, atmospheric carbon dioxide and oxygen percentages. The product of the specific growth rate and the lag (the "work to be done" during the lag phase) is found to be independent of temperature. However, it does depend on the CO2 and O2 concentrations, though the effect of oxygen was less noticeable than the effect of carbon dioxide.

  18. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy of ferrioxalate photolysis with a laser plasma X-ray source and microcalorimeter array

    DOE PAGES

    O’Neil, Galen C.; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Joe, Young Il; ...

    2017-02-17

    The detailed pathways of photoactivity on ultrafast time scales are a topic of contemporary interest. Using a tabletop apparatus based on a laser plasma X-ray source and an array of cryogenic microcalorimeter X-ray detectors, we measured a transient X-ray absorption spectrum during the ferrioxalate photoreduction reaction. With these high-efficiency detectors, we observe the Fe K edge move to lower energies and the amplitude of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure reduce, consistent with a photoreduction mechanism in which electron transfer precedes disassociation. We provide quantitative limits on the Fe–O bond length change. Lastly, we review potential improvements to our measurementmore » technique, highlighting the future potential of tabletop X-ray science using microcalorimeter sensors.« less

  19. Real-time monitoring of glucose and phenols intestinal absorption through an integrated Caco-2TC7cells/biosensors telemetric device: Hypoglycemic effect of fruit phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Barberis, Antonio; Garbetta, Antonella; Cardinali, Angela; Bazzu, Gianfranco; D 'Antuono, Isabella; Rocchitta, Gaia; Fadda, Angela; Linsalata, Vito; D 'Hallewin, Guy; Serra, Andrea Pier; Minervini, Fiorenza

    2017-02-15

    An integrated device for real-time monitoring of glucose and phenols absorption, that consists of a sensors/biosensors system (SB) and a Caco-2TC7 human intestinal cell culture, is described in this study. The SB is composed of a glucose oxidase-based biosensor, a sentinel platinum sensor, a laccase/tyrosinase-based biosensor and a sentinel carbon sensor, all located in the basolateral compartment (BC) of a cell culture plate. Caco-2TC7 cells, differentiated on culture inserts, separated the apical compartment that simulates the intestinal lumen, from the BC which represented the bloodstream. The system recorded currents relative to glucose (1mM) absorption, obtaining bioavailability values (5.1%) comparable to HPLC analysis (4.8%). Phloridzin and phloretin, specific phenolic inhibitors of SGLT1 and GLUT2 glucose transporters, reduced the glucose transport of almost 10 times. They were minimally absorbed in the BC with a bioavailability of 0.13% and 0.49% respectively. The hypoglycemic potential of blueberry and pomegranate juices was also studied. In particular, the amount of glucose absorbed through the Caco-2TC7 monolayer was 8‰ for pomegranate and 1.7‰ for blueberry, demonstrating the potential hypoglycemic effect of the juices. Polyphenols absorption was also monitored by the SB and an increase was recorded during the first 50min in presence of both blueberry and pomegranate juices, then a constant decrease occurred. The proposed device has been developed as innovative tool for the dynamic monitoring of natural compounds effects on glucose absorption, in order to manage postprandial hyperglycemia.

  20. Lag and seasonality considerations in evaluating AVHRR NDVI response to precipitation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ji, Lei; Peters, Albert J.

    2005-01-01

    Assessment of the relationship between the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and precipitation is important in understanding vegetation and climate interaction at a large scale. NDVI response to precipitation, however, is difficult to quantify due to the lag and seasonality effects, which will vary due to vegetation cover type, soils and climate. A time series analysis was performed on biweekly NDVI and precipitation around weather stations in the northern and central U.S. Great Plains. Regression models that incorporate lag and seasonality effects were used to quantify the relationship between NDVI and lagged precipitation in grasslands and croplands. It was found that the time lag was shorter in the early growing season, but longer in the mid- to late-growing season for most locations. The regression models with seasonal adjustment indicate that the relationship between NDVI and precipitation over the entire growing season was strong, with R2 values of 0.69 and 0.72 for grasslands and croplands, respectively. We conclude that vegetation greenness can be predicted using current and antecedent precipitation, if seasonal effects are taken into account.

  1. Internet and Free Press Are Associated with Reduced Lags in Global Outbreak Reporting

    PubMed Central

    McAlarnen, Lindsey; Smith, Katherine; Brownstein, John S.; Jerde, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Background: Global outbreak detection and reporting have generally improved for a variety of infectious diseases and geographic regions in recent decades. Nevertheless, lags in outbreak reporting remain a threat to the global human health and economy. In the time between first occurrence of a novel disease incident and public notification of an outbreak, infected individuals have a greater possibility of traveling and spreading the pathogen to other nations. Shortening outbreak reporting lags has the potential to improve global health by preventing local outbreaks from escalating into global epidemics. Methods: Reporting lags between the first record and the first public report of an event were calculated for 318 outbreaks occurring 1996-2009. The influence of freedom of the press, Internet usage, per capita health expenditure, and cell phone subscriptions, on the timeliness of outbreak reporting was evaluated. Results: Freer presses and increasing Internet usage correlate with reduced time between the first record of an outbreak and the public report. Increasing Internet usage reduced the expected reporting lag from more than one month in nations without Internet users to one day in those where 75 of 100 people use the Internet. Conclusion: Advances in technology and the emergence of more open and free governments are associated with to improved global infectious disease surveillance. PMID:25642380

  2. Jet lag: therapeutic use of melatonin and possible application of melatonin analogs.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Venkataramanujan; Spence, D Warren; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R; Trakht, Ilya; Cardinali, Daniel P

    2008-01-01

    Each year millions of travelers undertake long distance flights over one or more continents. These multiple time zone flights produce a constellation of symptoms known as jet lag. Familiar to almost every intercontinental traveler is the experience of fatigue upon arrival in a new time zone, but almost as problematic are a number of other jet lag symptoms. These include reduced alertness, nighttime insomnia, loss of appetite, depressed mood, poor psychomotor coordination and reduced cognitive skills, all symptoms which are closely affected by both the length and direction of travel. The most important jet lag symptoms are due to disruptions to the body's sleep/wake cycle. Clinical and pathophysiological studies also indicate that jet lag can exacerbate existing affective disorders. It has been suggested that dysregulation of melatonin secretion and occurrence of circadian rhythm disturbances may be the common links which underlie jet lag and affective disorders. Largely because of its regulatory effects on the circadian system, melatonin has proven to be highly effective for treating the range of symptoms that accompany transmeridian air travel. Additionally, it has been found to be of value in treating mood disorders like seasonal affective disorder. Melatonin acts on MT(1) and MT(2) melatonin receptors located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nuclei, the site of the body's master circadian clock. Melatonin resets disturbed circadian rhythms and promotes sleep in jet lag and other circadian rhythm sleep disorders, including delayed sleep phase syndrome and shift-work disorder. Although post-flight melatonin administration works efficiently in transmeridian flights across less than 7-8 times zones, in the case longer distances, melatonin should be given by 2-3 days in advance to the flight. To deal with the unwanted side effects which usually accompany this pre-departure treatment (acute soporific and sedative effects in times that may not be wanted), the

  3. Modeling of the phase lag causing fluidelastic instability in a parallel triangular tube array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Ahmed; Weaver, David; Ziada, Samir

    2013-11-01

    Fluidelastic instability is considered a critical flow induced vibration mechanism in tube and shell heat exchangers. It is believed that a finite time lag between tube vibration and fluid response is essential to predict the phenomenon. However, the physical nature of this time lag is not fully understood. This paper presents a fundamental study of this time delay using a parallel triangular tube array with a pitch ratio of 1.54. A computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model was developed and validated experimentally in an attempt to investigate the interaction between tube vibrations and flow perturbations at lower reduced velocities Ur=1-6 and Reynolds numbers Re=2000-12 000. The numerical predictions of the phase lag are in reasonable agreement with the experimental measurements for the range of reduced velocities Ug/fd=6-7. It was found that there are two propagation mechanisms; the first is associated with the acoustic wave propagation at low reduced velocities, Ur<2, and the second mechanism for higher reduced velocities is associated with the vorticity shedding and convection. An empirical model of the two mechanisms is developed and the phase lag predictions are in reasonable agreement with the experimental and numerical measurements. The developed phase lag model is then coupled with the semi-analytical model of Lever and Weaver to predict the fluidelastic stability threshold. Improved predictions of the stability boundaries for the parallel triangular array were achieved. In addition, the present study has explained why fluidelastic instability does not occur below some threshold reduced velocity.

  4. TIDAL FRICTION AND TIDAL LAGGING. APPLICABILITY LIMITATIONS OF A POPULAR FORMULA FOR THE TIDAL TORQUE

    SciTech Connect

    Efroimsky, Michael; Makarov, Valeri V. E-mail: vvm@usno.navy.mil

    2013-02-10

    Tidal torques play a key role in rotational dynamics of celestial bodies. They govern these bodies' tidal despinning and also participate in the subtle process of entrapment of these bodies into spin-orbit resonances. This makes tidal torques directly relevant to the studies of habitability of planets and their moons. Our work begins with an explanation of how friction and lagging should be built into the theory of bodily tides. Although much of this material can be found in various publications, a short but self-consistent summary on the topic has been lacking in the hitherto literature, and we are filling the gap. After these preparations, we address a popular concise formula for the tidal torque, which is often used in the literature, for planets or stars. We explain why the derivation of this expression, offered in the paper by Goldreich and in the books by Kaula (Equation (4.5.29)) and Murray and Dermott (Equation (4.159)), implicitly sets the time lag to be frequency independent. Accordingly, the ensuing expression for the torque can be applied only to bodies having a very special (and very hypothetical) rheology which makes the time lag frequency independent, i.e., the same for all Fourier modes in the spectrum of tide. This expression for the torque should not be used for bodies of other rheologies. Specifically, the expression cannot be combined with an extra assertion of the geometric lag being constant, because at finite eccentricities the said assumption is incompatible with the constant-time-lag condition.

  5. Work-Family Conflict and Psychological Well-Being: Stability and Cross-Lagged Relations within One- and Six-Year Follow-Ups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rantanen, Johanna; Kinnunen, Ulla; Feldt, Taru; Pulkkinen, Lea

    2008-01-01

    The rank-order stability and cross-lagged relations between work-to-family conflict (WFC), family-to-work conflict (FWC), and psychological well-being were examined in two longitudinal studies with full two-wave panel designs. In Study 1 (n = 365), the time lag was one year, and in Study 2 (n = 153), six years. The Structural Equation Modeling…

  6. Modelling of capital asset pricing by considering the lagged effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukono; Hidayat, Y.; Bon, A. Talib bin; Supian, S.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper the problem of modelling the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM) with the effect of the lagged is discussed. It is assumed that asset returns are analysed influenced by the market return and the return of risk-free assets. To analyse the relationship between asset returns, the market return, and the return of risk-free assets, it is conducted by using a regression equation of CAPM, and regression equation of lagged distributed CAPM. Associated with the regression equation lagged CAPM distributed, this paper also developed a regression equation of Koyck transformation CAPM. Results of development show that the regression equation of Koyck transformation CAPM has advantages, namely simple as it only requires three parameters, compared with regression equation of lagged distributed CAPM.

  7. The Kinematics of the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    SciTech Connect

    Salmonson, J D

    2004-03-17

    Herein I review the argument that kinematics, i.e. relativistic motions of the emitting source in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), are the cause of the lag-luminosity relationship observed in bursts with known redshifts.

  8. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  9. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  10. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  11. 49 CFR 230.64 - Leaks under lagging.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION STEAM LOCOMOTIVE INSPECTION AND MAINTENANCE STANDARDS Boilers and Appurtenances Steam Leaks § 230.64 Leaks under lagging. The steam locomotive owner and/or operator shall take out...

  12. Burst Statistics Using the Lag-Luminosity Relationship

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Band, D. L.; Norris, J. P.; Bonnell, J. T.

    2003-01-01

    Using the lag-luminosity relation and various BATSE catalogs we create a large catalog of burst redshifts, peak luminosities and emitted energies. These catalogs permit us to evaluate the lag-luminosity relation, and to study the burst energy distribution. We find that this distribution can be described as a power law with an index of alpha = 1.76 +/- 0.05 (95% confidence), close to the alpha = 2 predicted by the original quasi-universal jet model.

  13. Charge transfer optical absorption and fluorescence emission of 4-(9-acridyl)julolidine from long-range-corrected time dependent density functional theory in polarizable continuum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kityk, A. V.

    2014-07-01

    A long-range-corrected time-dependent density functional theory (LC-TDDFT) in combination with polarizable continuum model (PCM) have been applied to study charge transfer (CT) optical absorption and fluorescence emission energies basing on parameterized LC-BLYP xc-potential. The molecule of 4-(9-acridyl)julolidine selected for this study represents typical CT donor-acceptor dye with strongly solvent dependent optical absorption and fluorescence emission spectra. The result of calculations are compared with experimental spectra reported in the literature to derive an optimal value of the model screening parameter ω. The first absorption band appears to be quite well predictable within DFT/TDDFT/PCM with the screening parameter ω to be solvent independent (ω≈0.245 Bohr-1) whereas the fluorescence emission exhibits a strong dependence on the range separation with ω-value varying on a rising solvent polarity from about 0.225 to 0.151 Bohr-1. Dipolar properties of the initial state participating in the electronic transition have crucial impact on the effective screening.

  14. Determination of drug absorption rate in time-variant disposition by direct deconvolution using beta clearance correction and end-constrained non-parametric regression.

    PubMed

    Neelakantan, S; Veng-Pedersen, P

    2005-11-01

    A novel numerical deconvolution method is presented that enables the estimation of drug absorption rates under time-variant disposition conditions. The method involves two components. (1) A disposition decomposition-recomposition (DDR) enabling exact changes in the unit impulse response (UIR) to be constructed based on centrally based clearance changes iteratively determined. (2) A non-parametric, end-constrained cubic spline (ECS) input response function estimated by cross-validation. The proposed DDR-ECS method compensates for disposition changes between the test and the reference administrations by using a "beta" clearance correction based on DDR analysis. The representation of the input response by the ECS method takes into consideration the complex absorption process and also ensures physiologically realistic approximations of the response. The stability of the new method to noisy data was evaluated by comprehensive simulations that considered different UIRs, various input functions, clearance changes and a novel scaling of the input function that includes the "flip-flop" absorption phenomena. The simulated input response was also analysed by two other methods and all three methods were compared for their relative performances. The DDR-ECS method provides better estimation of the input profile under significant clearance changes but tends to overestimate the input when there were only small changes in the clearance.

  15. Ultrafast Time-Resolved X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy of Ferrioxalate Photolysis with a Laser Plasma X-ray Source and Microcalorimeter Array.

    PubMed

    O'Neil, Galen C; Miaja-Avila, Luis; Joe, Young Il; Alpert, Bradley K; Balasubramanian, Mahalingam; Sagar, D M; Doriese, William; Fowler, Joseph W; Fullagar, Wilfred K; Chen, Ning; Hilton, Gene C; Jimenez, Ralph; Ravel, Bruce; Reintsema, Carl D; Schmidt, Dan R; Silverman, Kevin L; Swetz, Daniel S; Uhlig, Jens; Ullom, Joel N

    2017-03-02

    The detailed pathways of photoactivity on ultrafast time scales are a topic of contemporary interest. Using a tabletop apparatus based on a laser plasma X-ray source and an array of cryogenic microcalorimeter X-ray detectors, we measured a transient X-ray absorption spectrum during the ferrioxalate photoreduction reaction. With these high-efficiency detectors, we observe the Fe K edge move to lower energies and the amplitude of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure reduce, consistent with a photoreduction mechanism in which electron transfer precedes disassociation. These results are compared to previously published transient X-ray absorption measurements on the same reaction and found to be consistent with the results from Ogi et al. and inconsistent with the results of Chen et al. ( Ogi , Y. ; et al. Struct. Dyn. 2015 , 2 , 034901 ; Chen , J. ; Zhang , H. ; Tomov , I. V. ; Ding , X. ; Rentzepis , P. M. Chem. Phys. Lett. 2007 , 437 , 50 - 55 ). We provide quantitative limits on the Fe-O bond length change. Finally, we review potential improvements to our measurement technique, highlighting the future potential of tabletop X-ray science using microcalorimeter sensors.

  16. Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption spectroscopy data obtained using photosystem I particles with non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site.

    PubMed

    Makita, Hiroki; Hastings, Gary

    2016-06-01

    Time-resolved visible and infrared absorption difference spectroscopy data at both 298 and 77 K were obtained using cyanobacterial menB (-) mutant photosystem I particles with several non-native quinones incorporated into the A1 binding site. Data was obtained for photosystem I particles with phylloquinone (2-methyl-3-phytyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), 2-bromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-chloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dibromo-1,4-naphthoquinone, 2,3-dichloro-1,4-naphthoquinone, and 9,10-anthraquinone incorporated. Transient absorption data were obtained at 487 and 703 nm in the visible spectral range, and 1950-1100 cm(-1) in the infrared region. Time constants obtained from fitting the time-resolved infrared and visible data are in good agreement. The measured time constants are crucial for the development of appropriate kinetic models that can describe electron transfer processes in photosystem I, "Modeling Electron Transfer in Photosystem I" Makita and Hastings (2016) [1].

  17. Time-resolved diode laser infrared absorption spectroscopy of the nascent HCl in the infrared laser chemistry of 1,2-dichloro-1,1-difluoroethane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Peter; Quack, Martin; Seyfang, George

    1990-04-01

    The IR multiphoton excitation and the frequency, fluence and intensity dependence of the IR-laser chemical yields of CF 2ClCH 2Cl have been studied in the fluence range of 1 to 10 J cm -2 yielding a steady-state constant k(st)/ I=0.74×10 6 s -1 MW -1 cm 2 which is approximately independent of intensity. Time-resolved IR absorption spectroscopy with diode laser sources has been used to observe the nascent HCl during the first few 100 ns indicating a population inversion between the levels ν=1, J=4 and ν=2, J=5. At low reactant pressures ( p⩽10 Pa) the time-resolved measurement gives a steady-state rate constant consistent with the theoretical result adjusted to the static yield measurements. The capability of state-selective and time-resolved IR spectroscopy is thus demonstrated, giving real-time determinations of rate constants.

  18. Minimization of diauxic growth lag-phase for high-efficiency biogas production.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jee; Kim, Sang Hun

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a minimization method of a diauxic growth lag-phase for the biogas production from agricultural by-products (ABPs). Specifically, the effects of proximate composition on the biogas production and degradation rates of the ABPs were investigated, and a new method based on proximate composition combinations was developed to minimize the diauxic growth lag-phase. Experiments were performed using biogas potential tests at a substrate loading of 2.5 g VS/L and feed to microorganism ratio (F/M) of 0.5 under the mesophilic condition. The ABPs were classified based on proximate composition (carbohydrate, protein, and fat etc.). The biogas production patterns, lag phase, and times taken for 90% biogas production (T90) were used for the evaluation of the biogas production with biochemical methane potential (BMP) test. The high- or medium-carbohydrate and low-fat ABPs (cheese whey, cabbage, and skim milk) showed a single step digestion process and low-carbohydrate and high-fat ABPs (bean curd and perilla seed) showed a two-step digestion process. The mixture of high-fat ABPs and high-carbohydrate ABPs reduced the lag-phase and increased the biogas yield more than that from single ABP by 35-46%.

  19. Information-theoretic approach to lead-lag effect on financial markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiedor, Paweł

    2014-08-01

    Recently the interest of researchers has shifted from the analysis of synchronous relationships of financial instruments to the analysis of more meaningful asynchronous relationships. Both types of analysis are concentrated mostly on Pearson's correlation coefficient and consequently intraday lead-lag relationships (where one of the variables in a pair is time-lagged) are also associated with them. Under the Efficient-Market Hypothesis such relationships are not possible as all information is embedded in the prices, but in real markets we find such dependencies. In this paper we analyse lead-lag relationships of financial instruments and extend known methodology by using mutual information instead of Pearson's correlation coefficient. Mutual information is not only a more general measure, sensitive to non-linear dependencies, but also can lead to a simpler procedure of statistical validation of links between financial instruments. We analyse lagged relationships using New York Stock Exchange 100 data not only on an intraday level, but also for daily stock returns, which have usually been ignored.

  20. The Correlation of Spectral Lag Evolution with Prompt Optical Emission in GRB 080319B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Ukwatta, Tilan N.; Sakamoto, Takanori; Dhuga, Kalvir S.; Toma, Kenji; Pe'Er, Asaf; Mészáros, Peter; Band, David L.; Norris, Jay P.; Barthelmy, Scott D.; Gehrels, Neil

    2009-05-01

    We report on observations of correlated behavior between the prompt γ-ray and optical emission from GRB 080319B, which confirm that (i) they occurred within the same astrophysical source region and (ii) their respective radiation mechanisms were dynamically coupled. Our results, based upon a new cross-correlation function (CCF) methodology for determining the time-resolved spectral lag, are summarized as follows. First, the evolution in the arrival offset of prompt γ-ray photon counts between Swift-BAT 15-25 keV and 50-100 keV energy bands (intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag) appears to be anti-correlated with the arrival offset between prompt 15-350 keV γ-rays and the optical emission observed by TORTORA (extrinsic optical/γ-ray spectral lag), thus effectively partitioning the burst into two main episodes at ~T+28+/-2 sec. Second, the rise and decline of prompt optical emission at ~T+10+/-1 sec and ~T+50+/-1 sec, respectively, both coincide with discontinuities in the hard to soft evolution of the photon index for a power law fit to 15-150 keV Swift-BAT data at ~T+8+/-2 sec and ~T+48+/-1 sec. These spectral energy changes also coincide with intervals whose time-resolved spectral lag values are consistent with zero, at ~T+12+/-2 sec and ~T+50+/-2 sec. These results, which are robust across heuristic permutations of Swift-BAT energy channels and varying temporal bin resolution, have also been corroborated via independent analysis of Konus-Wind data. This potential discovery may provide the first observational evidence for an implicit connection between spectral lags and GRB emission mechanisms in the context of canonical fireball phenomenology. Future work includes exploring a subset of bursts with prompt optical emission to probe the unique or ubiquitous nature of this result.

  1. Comparison of nonlinear absorption and carrier recombination times in GaAs grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy and Bridgman processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Leonel P.; Murray, Joel; Carpenter, Amelia; Upchurch, Derek; Barnes, Jacob O.; Schunemann, Peter G.; Zawilski, Kevin; Guha, Shekhar

    2010-02-01

    μA 760 μm thick GaAs crystal was grown using HVPE. Transmission spectrum of this sample showed minimal absorption for light having photon energy below the bandgap energy, indicating the absence of the EL2 defects commonly found in Bridgman grown samples. Irradiance dependent absorption measured at 1.535 μm using 100 ns duration laser pulses showed increased nonlinear absorption in the HVPE grown GaAs compared to Bridgman grown samples. The dominant nonlinear absorption process in both samples was absorption due to free carriers generated by two-photon absorption. The HVPE grown sample showed higher nonlinear absorption due to longer carrier lifetimes.

  2. Time-Resolved Surface-Enhanced IR-Absorption Spectroscopy of Direct Electron Transfer to Cytochrome c Oxidase from R. sphaeroides

    PubMed Central

    Schwaighofer, Andreas; Steininger, Christoph; Hildenbrandt, David M.; Srajer, Johannes; Nowak, Christoph; Knoll, Wolfgang; Naumann, Renate L.C.

    2013-01-01

    Time-resolved surface-enhanced IR-absorption spectroscopy triggered by electrochemical modulation has been performed on cytochrome c oxidase from Rhodobacter sphaeroides. Single bands isolated from a broad band in the amide I region using phase-sensitive detection were attributed to different redox centers. Their absorbances changing on the millisecond timescale could be fitted to a model based on protonation-dependent chemical reaction kinetics established previously. Substantial conformational changes of secondary structures coupled to redox transitions were revealed. PMID:24359742

  3. Improving models of democracy: the example of lagged effects of economic development, education, and gender equality.

    PubMed

    Balaev, Mikhail

    2014-07-01

    The author examines how time delayed effects of economic development, education, and gender equality influence political democracy. Literature review shows inadequate understanding of lagged effects, which raises methodological and theoretical issues with the current quantitative studies of democracy. Using country-years as a unit of analysis, the author estimates a series of OLS PCSE models for each predictor with a systematic analysis of the distributions of the lagged effects. The second set of multiple OLS PCSE regressions are estimated including all three independent variables. The results show that economic development, education, and gender have three unique trajectories of the time-delayed effects: Economic development has long-term effects, education produces continuous effects regardless of the timing, and gender equality has the most prominent immediate and short term effects. The results call for the reassessment of model specifications and theoretical setups in the quantitative studies of democracy.

  4. Corotation lag limit on mass-loss rate from Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. S.; Siscoe, G. L.

    1987-01-01

    Considering rapid escape of H2O from Io during an early hot evolutionary epoch, an H2O plasma torus is constructed by balancing dissociation and ionization products against centrifugally driven diffusion, including for the first time the effects of corotation lag resulting from mass loading. Two fundamental limits are found as the mass injection rate increases: (1) an 'ignition' limit of 1.1 x 10 to the 6th kg/s, beyond which the torus cannot ionize itself and photoionization dominates; and (2) the ultimate mass loading limit of 1.3 x 10 to the 7th kg/s, which occurs when neutrals newly created by charge exchange and recombination cannot leave the torus, thereby bringing magnetospherically driven transport to a halt. Connecting this limit with the variations of Io's temperature in its early evolution epoch gives an estimate of the upper limit on the total mass loss from Io, about 3.0 x 10 to the 20th kg (for high-opacity nebula) and about 8.9 x 10 to the 20th kg (for low-opacity nebula). These limits correspond to eroding 8 km and 22 km of H2O from the surface. It is concluded that compared to the other Galilean satellites, Io was created basically dry.

  5. Multispecies absorption spectroscopy of detonation events at 100  kHz using a fiber-coupled, time-division-multiplexed quantum-cascade-laser system.

    PubMed

    Rein, Keith D; Roy, Sukesh; Sanders, Scott T; Caswell, Andrew W; Schauer, Frederick R; Gord, James R

    2016-08-10

    A mid-infrared fiber-coupled laser system constructed around three time-division-multiplexed quantum-cascade lasers capable of measuring the absorption spectra of CO, CO2, and N2O at 100 kHz over a wide range of operating pressures and temperatures is demonstrated. This system is first demonstrated in a laboratory burner and then used to measure temperature, pressure, and concentrations of CO, CO2, and N2O as a function of time in a detonated mixture of N2O and C3H8. Both fuel-rich and fuel-lean detonation cases are outlined. High-temperature fluctuations during the blowdown are observed. Concentrations of CO are shown to decrease with time for fuel-lean conditions and increase for fuel-rich conditions.

  6. Kalman filtering real-time measurements of H2O isotopologue ratios by laser absorption spectroscopy at 2.73 microm.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tao; Chen, Weidong; Kerstel, Erik; Fertein, Eric; Gao, Xiaoming; Koeth, Johannes; Rössner, Karl; Brückner, Daniela

    2010-03-01

    Kalman adaptive filtering was applied for the first time, to our knowledge, to the real-time simultaneous determination of water isotopic ratios using laser absorption spectroscopy at 2.73 microm. Measurements of the oxygen and hydrogen isotopologue ratios delta(18)O, delta(17)O, and delta(2)H in water showed a 1-sigma precision of 0.72 per thousand for delta(18)O, 0.48 per thousand for delta(17)O, and 0.84 per thousand for delta(2)H, while sampling the output of the tuned Kalman filter at 1 s time intervals. Using a standard running average technique, averaging over approximately 30 s is required to obtain the same level of precision.

  7. Application of Time-Dependent Density Functional and Natural Bond Orbital Theories to the UV-vis Absorption Spectra of Some Phenolic Compounds.

    PubMed

    Marković, Svetlana; Tošović, Jelena

    2015-09-03

    The UV-vis properties of 22 natural phenolic compounds, comprising anthraquinones, neoflavonoids, and flavonoids were systematically examined. The time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) approach in combination with the B3LYP, B3LYP-D2, B3P86, and M06-2X functionals was used to simulate the UV-vis spectra of the investigated compounds. It was shown that all methods exhibit very good (B3LYP slightly better) performance in reproducing the examined UV-vis spectra. However, the shapes of the Kohn-Sham molecular orbitals (MOs) involved in electronic transitions were misleading in constructing the MO correlation diagrams. To provide better understanding of redistribution of electron density upon excitation, the natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis was applied. Bearing in mind the spatial and energetic separations, as well as the character of the π bonding, lone pair, and π* antibonding natural localized molecular orbitals (NLMOs), the "NLMO clusters" were constructed. NLMO cluster should be understood as a part of a molecule characterized with distinguished electron density. It was shown that all absorption bands including all electronic transitions need to be inspected to fully understand the UV-vis spectrum of a certain compound, and, thus, to learn more about its UV-vis light absorption. Our investigation showed that the TDDFT and NBO theories are complementary, as the results from the two approaches can be combined to interpret the UV-vis spectra. Agreement between the predictions of the TDDFT approach and those based on the NLMO clusters is excellent in the case of major electronic transitions and long wavelengths. It should be emphasized that the approach for investigation of UV-vis light absorption based on the NLMO clusters is applied for the first time.

  8. SkyProbe: Real-Time Precision Monitoring in the Optical of the Absolute Atmospheric Absorption on the Telescope Science and Calibration Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuillandre, J.-C.; Magnier, E.; Sabin, D.; Mahoney, B.

    2016-05-01

    Mauna Kea is known for its pristine seeing conditions but sky transparency can be an issue for science operations since at least 25% of the observable (i.e. open dome) nights are not photometric, an effect mostly due to high-altitude cirrus. Since 2001, the original single channel SkyProbe mounted in parallel on the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT) has gathered one V-band exposure every minute during each observing night using a small CCD camera offering a very wide field of view (35 sq. deg.) encompassing the region pointed by the telescope for science operations, and exposures long enough (40 seconds) to capture at least 100 stars of Hipparcos' Tycho catalog at high galactic latitudes (and up to 600 stars at low galactic latitudes). The measurement of the true atmospheric absorption is achieved within 2%, a key advantage over all-sky direct thermal infrared imaging detection of clouds. The absolute measurement of the true atmospheric absorption by clouds and particulates affecting the data being gathered by the telescope's main science instrument has proven crucial for decision making in the CFHT queued service observing (QSO) representing today all of the telescope time. Also, science exposures taken in non-photometric conditions are automatically registered for a new observation at a later date at 1/10th of the original exposure time in photometric conditions to ensure a proper final absolute photometric calibration. Photometric standards are observed only when conditions are reported as being perfectly stable by SkyProbe. The more recent dual color system (simultaneous B & V bands) will offer a better characterization of the sky properties above Mauna Kea and should enable a better detection of the thinnest cirrus (absorption down to 0.01 mag., or 1%).

  9. sLORETA intracortical lagged coherence during breath counting in meditation-naïve participants

    PubMed Central

    Milz, Patricia; Faber, Pascal L.; Lehmann, Dietrich; Kochi, Kieko; Pascual-Marqui, Roberto D.

    2013-01-01

    We investigated brain functional connectivity comparing no-task resting to breath counting (a meditation exercise but given as task without referring to meditation). Functional connectivity computed as EEG coherence between head-surface data suffers from localization ambiguity, reference dependence, and overestimation due to volume conduction. Lagged coherence between intracortical model sources addresses these criticisms. With this analysis approach, experienced meditators reportedly showed reduced coherence during meditation, meditation-naïve participants have not yet been investigated. 58-channel EEG from 23 healthy, right-handed, meditation-naïve males during resting [3 runs] and breath counting [2 runs] was computed into sLORETA time series of intracortical electrical activity in 19 regions of interest (ROI) corresponding to the cortex underlying 19 scalp electrode sites, for each of the eight independent EEG frequency bands covering 1.5–44 Hz. Intracortical lagged coherences and head-surface conventional coherences were computed between the 19 regions/sites. During breath counting compared to resting, paired t-tests corrected for multiple testing revealed four significantly lower intracortical lagged coherences, but four significantly higher head-surface conventional coherences. Lowered intracortical lagged coherences involved left BA 10 and right BAs 3, 10, 17, 40. In conclusion, intracortical lagged coherence can yield results that are inverted to those of head-surface conventional coherence. The lowered functional connectivity between cognitive control areas and sensory perception areas during meditation-type breath counting compared to resting conceivably reflects the attention to a bodily percept without cognitive reasoning. The reductions in functional connectivity were similar but not as widespread as the reductions reported during meditation in experienced meditators. PMID:24860483

  10. A Correlation of Spectral Lag Evolution with Prompt Optical Emission in GRBs?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamatikos, Michael; Ukwatta, Tilan N.; Sakamoto, Taka; Dhuga, Kalvir S.

    2008-10-01

    We report on observations of correlated behavior between the prompt γ-ray and optical emission from GRB 080319B, which (i) strongly suggest that they occurred within the same astrophysical source region and (ii) indicate that their respective radiation mechanisms were most likely dynamically coupled. Our preliminary results, based upon a new cross-correlation function (CCF) methodology for determining the time-resolved spectral lag, are summarized as follows. First, the evolution in the arrival offset of prompt γ-ray photon counts between Swift-BAT 15-25 keV and 50-100 keV energy bands (intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag) appears to be anti-correlated with the arrival offset between prompt 15-350 keV γ-rays and the optical emission observed by TORTORA (extrinsic γ-ray/optical lag), thus effectively partitioning the burst into two main episodes at ~T+28+/-2 sec. Second, prompt optical emission is nested within intervals of both (a) trivial intrinsic γ-ray spectral lag (~T+12+/-2 and ~T+50+/-2 sec) with (b) discontinuities in the hard to soft evolution of the photon index for a power law fit to 15-150 keV Swift-BAT data (~T+8+/-2 and ~T+48+/-1 sec), both of which coincide with the rise (~T+10+/-1 sec) and decline (~T+50+/-1 sec) of prompt optical emission. This potential discovery, robust across heuristic permutations of BAT energy channels and varying temporal bin resolution, provides the first observational evidence for an implicit connection between spectral lag and the dynamics of shocks in the context of canonical fireball phenomenology.

  11. Mosquito Surveillance Revealed Lagged Effects of Mosquito Abundance on Mosquito-Borne Disease Transmission: A Retrospective Study in Zhejiang, China

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Song; Ling, Feng; Hou, Juan; Wang, Jinna; Fu, Guiming; Gong, Zhenyu

    2014-01-01

    Mosquito-borne diseases (MBDs) are still threats to public health in Zhejiang. In this study, the associations between the time-lagged mosquito capture data and MBDs incidence over five years were used to examine the potential effects of mosquito abundance on patterns of MBDs epidemiology in Zhejiang during 2008–2012. Light traps were used to collect adult mosquitoes at 11 cities. Correlation tests with and without time lag were performed to investigate the correlations between MBDs incidence rates and mosquito abundance by month. Selected MBDs consisted of Japanese encephalitis (JE), dengue fever (DF) and malaria. A Poisson regression analysis was performed by using a generalized estimating equations (GEE) approach, and the most parsimonious model was selected based on the quasi-likelihood based information criterion (QICu). We identified five mosquito species and the constituent ratio of Culex pipiens pallens, Culex tritaeniorhynchus, Aedes albopictus, Anopheles sinensis and Armigeres subalbatus was 66.73%, 21.47%, 6.72%, 2.83% and 2.25%, respectively. The correlation analysis without and with time lag showed that Culex mosquito abundance at a lag of 0 or 1 month was positively correlated with JE incidence during 2008–2012, Ae. albopictus abundance at a lag of 1 month was positively correlated with DF incidence in 2009, and An. sinensis abundance at a lag of 0–2 months was positively correlated with malaria incidence during 2008–2010. The Poisson regression analysis showed each 0.1 rise of monthly mosquito abundance corresponded to a positive increase of MBD cases for the period of 2008–2012. The rise of mosquito abundance with a lag of 0–2 months increased the risk of human MBDs infection in Zhejiang. Our study provides evidence that mosquito monitoring could be a useful early warning tool for the occurrence and transmission of MBDs. PMID:25393834

  12. Real-Time Analysis of Isoprene in Breath by Using Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopy with a Hollow Optical Fiber Gas Cell.

    PubMed

    Iwata, Takuro; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-12-05

    A breath analysis system based on ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy was developed by using a hollow optical fiber as a gas cell for real-time monitoring of isoprene in breath. The hollow optical fiber functions as an ultra-small-volume gas cell with a long path. The measurement sensitivity of the system was evaluated by using nitric-oxide gas as a gas sample. The evaluation result showed that the developed system, using a laser-driven, high-intensity light source and a 3-m-long, aluminum-coated hollow optical fiber, could successfully measure nitric-oxide gas with a 50 ppb concentration. An absorption spectrum of a breath sample in the wavelength region of around 200-300 nm was measured, and the measured spectrum revealed the main absorbing components in breath as water vapor, isoprene, and ozone converted from oxygen by radiation of ultraviolet light. The concentration of isoprene in breath was estimated by multiple linear regression. The regression analysis results showed that the proposed analysis system enables real-time monitoring of isoprene during the exhaling of breath. Accordingly, it is suitable for measuring the circadian variation of isoprene.

  13. Real-Time Analysis of Isoprene in Breath by Using Ultraviolet-Absorption Spectroscopy with a Hollow Optical Fiber Gas Cell

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Takuro; Katagiri, Takashi; Matsuura, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    A breath analysis system based on ultraviolet-absorption spectroscopy was developed by using a hollow optical fiber as a gas cell for real-time monitoring of isoprene in breath. The hollow optical fiber functions as an ultra-small-volume gas cell with a long path. The measurement sensitivity of the system was evaluated by using nitric-oxide gas as a gas sample. The evaluation result showed that the developed system, using a laser-driven, high-intensity light source and a 3-m-long, aluminum-coated hollow optical fiber, could successfully measure nitric-oxide gas with a 50 ppb concentration. An absorption spectrum of a breath sample in the wavelength region of around 200–300 nm was measured, and the measured spectrum revealed the main absorbing components in breath as water vapor, isoprene, and ozone converted from oxygen by radiation of ultraviolet light. The concentration of isoprene in breath was estimated by multiple linear regression. The regression analysis results showed that the proposed analysis system enables real-time monitoring of isoprene during the exhaling of breath. Accordingly, it is suitable for measuring the circadian variation of isoprene. PMID:27929387

  14. Towards lag phase of microbial populations at growth-limiting conditions: The role of the variability in the growth limits of individual cells.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, Juan S; Koutsoumanis, Konstantinos P

    2016-05-02

    The water activity (aw) growth limits of unheated and heat stressed Listeria monocytogenes individual cells were studied. The aw limits varied from 0.940 to 0.997 and 0.951 to 0.997 for unheated and heat stressed cells, respectively. Due to the above variability a decrease in aw results in the presence of a non-growing fraction in the population leading to an additional pseudo-lag in population growth. In this case the total apparent lag of the population is the sum of the physiological lag of the growing cells (time required to adjust to the new environment) and the pseudo-lag. To investigate the effect of aw on the above lag components, the growth kinetics of L. monocytogenes on tryptone soy agar with aw adjusted to values ranging from 0.997 to 0.940 was monitored. The model of B&R was fitted to the data for the estimation of the apparent lag. In order to estimate the physiological lag of the growing fraction of the inoculum, the model was refitted to the growth data using as initial population level the number of cells that were able to grow (estimated from the number of colonies formed on the agar at the end of storage) and excluding the rest data during the lag. The results showed that for the unheated cells the apparent lag was almost identical to the physiological lag for aw values ranging from 0.997 to 0.970, as the majority of the cells in the initial population was able to grow in these conditions. As the aw decreased from 0.970 to 0.940 however, the number of cells in the population which were able to grow, decreased resulting to an increase in the pseudo-lag. The maximum value of pseudo-lag was 13.1h and it was observed at aw=0.940 where 10% of the total inoculated cells were able to grow. For heat stressed populations a pseudo-lag started to increase at higher aw conditions (0.982) compared to unheated cells. In contrast to the apparent lag, a linear relation between physiological lag and aw was observed for both unheated and heat stressed cells.

  15. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  16. Determination of true optical absorption and scattering coefficient of wooden cell wall substance by time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Ryunosuke; Inagaki, Tetsuya; Tsuchikawa, Satoru

    2016-02-22

    The true absorption coefficient (μa) and reduced scattering coefficient (μ´s) of the cell wall substance in Douglas fir were determined using time-of-flight near infrared spectroscopy. Samples were saturated with hexane, toluene or quinolone to minimize the multiple reflections of light on the boundary between pore-cell wall substance in wood. μ´s exhibited its minimum value when the wood was saturated with toluene because the refractive index of toluene is close to that of the wood cell wall substance. The optical parameters of the wood cell wall substance calculated were μa = 0.030 mm(-1) and μ´s= 18.4 mm(-1). Monte Carlo simulations using these values were in good agreement with the measured time-resolved transmittance profiles.

  17. Transient absorption spectroscopy of laser shocked explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Mcgrane, Shawn D; Dang, Nhan C; Whitley, Von H; Bolome, Cindy A; Moore, D S

    2010-01-01

    Transient absorption spectra from 390-890 nm of laser shocked RDX, PETN, sapphire, and polyvinylnitrate (PVN) at sub-nanosecond time scales are reported. RDX shows a nearly linear increase in absorption with time after shock at {approx}23 GPa. PETN is similar, but with smaller total absorption. A broad visible absorption in sapphire begins nearly immediately upon shock loading but does not build over time. PVN exhibits thin film interference in the absorption spectra along with increased absorption with time. The absorptions in RDX and PETN are suggested to originate in chemical reactions happening on picosecond time scales at these shock stresses, although further diagnostics are required to prove this interpretation.

  18. Position representations lag behind targets in multiple object tracking.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christina J; Masom, David; Holcombe, Alex O

    2011-09-01

    In the multiple object tracking (MOT) task, observers can typically keep track of up to four moving objects. Little is known however about the extent to which object motion is used by observers during MOT. For example, direction and speed might be used to anticipate future positions. We here ask to what extent position reports lag behind targets or instead correspond to extrapolated positions. Using a range of different motion trajectory patterns, observers tracked 1-4 targets among distracters and reported the final position of one of the targets. On average, reports corresponded to previous positions rather than the final position. This lag varied across conditions from around 10 to 70ms of the object's trajectory. Although some have suggested that extrapolation occurs during MOT, we find no evidence of anticipation of future positions of targets. The significant increase in lag with speed of the object is consistent with slow or intermittent updating of object positions during tracking.

  19. Observer-based lag synchronization between two different complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, M.; Zhang, H. G.; Wang, Z. L.; Liang, H. J.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, some new criteria for lag synchronization between two or more complex networks are proposed based on the theory of state observer. Some adaptive controllers are designed to make the drive and response systems achieve lag synchronization, no matter whether the nodes in the two systems are with the same dynamical character or the coupling configuration matrices are nonidentical. In addition, based on the output coupling, the amount of coupling variables between two connected nodes is flexible, which can save a lot of channel resources, simplify the network topology and has more significant meanings in engineering applications. At last, the effects of the lag synchronization criteria are verified through some simulation experiments.

  20. Temporal Profiles and Spectral Lags of XRF 060218

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, En-Wei; Zhang, Bin-Bin; Stamatikos, Mike; Zhang, Bing; Norris, Jay; Gehrels, Neil; Zhang, Jin; Dai, Z. G.

    2006-01-01

    The spectral and temporal properties of the nonthermal emission of the nearby XRF 060218 in the 0.3-150 keV band are studied. We show that both the spectral energy distribution and the light-curve properties suggest the same origin of the nonthermal emission detected by Swift BAT and XRT. This event has the longest pulse duration and spectral lag observed to date among the known GRBs. The pulse structure and its energy dependence are analogous to typical GRBs,. By extrapolating the observed spectral lag to the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (CGRO) BATSE bands we find that the hypothesis that this event complies with the same luminosity-lag relation with bright GRBs cannot be ruled out at 2 sigma significance level. These intriguing facts, along with its compliance with the Amati relation, indicate that XRF 060218 shares the similar radiation physics as typical GRBs.

  1. On the thermal runaway of combustible fluids in lagging material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntosh, A. C.; Griffiths, J. F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper presents the mathematical foundations for a simple theory for investigating the phenomenon of ignition of flammable fluids in lagging material that are used for insulation of hot pipework, for transport of heat transfer fluids, or other similar situations. Experiments with porous material impregnated with a flammable fluid have simulated the self-heating known to occur when combustible liquids leak from a hot pipe into lagging surrounding the pipe or are split from another source on to the lagging. A theory to explain these findings is presented which shows that there is a watershed temperature beyond which substantial self-heating will take place. Although the theory does not take account of diffusion, it simulates the main physics of the phenomenon-that is, combustible fluid, which normally in the open air would evaporate and not be a hazard, can, within a porous medium, remain dispersed within the porous structure long enough for the exothermic oxidation to develop into ignition.

  2. The flash-lag effect during illusory chopstick rotation.

    PubMed

    Anstis, Stuart

    2007-01-01

    In the 'flash-lag' effect, a static object that is briefly flashed next to a moving object appears to lag behind the moving object. A flash was put up next to an intersection that appeared to be moving clockwise along a circular path but was actually moving counterclockwise [the chopstick illusion; Anstis, 1990, in AI and the Eye Eds A Blake, T Troscianko (London: John Wiley) pp 105 117; 2003, in Levels of Perception Eds L Harris, M Jenkin (New York: Springer) pp 90 93]. As a result, the flash appeared displaced clockwise. This was appropriate to the physical, not the subjective, direction of rotation, and it suggests that the flash-lag illusion occurs early in the visual system, before motion signals are parsed into moving objects.

  3. Circadian disruption and remedial interventions: effects and interventions for jet lag for athletic peak performance.

    PubMed

    Forbes-Robertson, Sarah; Dudley, Edward; Vadgama, Pankaj; Cook, Christian; Drawer, Scott; Kilduff, Liam

    2012-03-01

    Jet lag has potentially serious deleterious effects on performance in athletes following transmeridian travel, where time zones are crossed eastwards or westwards; as such, travel causes specific effects related to desynchronization of the athlete's internal body clock or circadian clock. Athletes are particularly sensitive to the effects of jet lag, as many intrinsic aspects of sporting performance show a circadian rhythm, and optimum competitive results require all aspects of the athlete's mind and body to be working in tandem at their peak efficiency. International competition often requires transmeridian travel, and competition timings cannot be adjusted to suit individual athletes. It is therefore in the interest of the individual athlete and team to understand the effects of jet lag and the potential adaptation strategies that can be adopted. In this review, we describe the underlying genetic and physiological mechanisms controlling the circadian clock and its inherent ability to adapt to external conditions on a daily basis. We then examine the fundamentals of the various adaptation stimuli, such as light, chronobiotics (e.g. melatonin), exercise, and diet and meal timing, with particular emphasis on their suitability as strategies for competing athletes on the international circuit. These stimuli can be artificially manipulated to produce phase shifts in the circadian rhythm to promote adaptation in the optimum direction, but care must be taken to apply them at the correct time and dose, as the effects produced on the circadian rhythm follow a phase-response curve, with pronounced shifts in direction at different times. Light is the strongest realigning stimulus and careful timing of light exposure and avoidance can promote adjustment. Chronobiotics such as melatonin can also be used to realign the circadian clock but, as well as timing and dosage issues, there are also concerns as to its legal status in different countries and with the World Anti

  4. On the Nature of QPO Phase Lags in Black Hole Candidates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai

    2012-01-01

    Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes. In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provides a feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and a time delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its non-linear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signal in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes to the nature of the power law spectral component and its variability.

  5. ON THE NATURE OF QUASI-PERIODIC OSCILLATION PHASE LAGS IN BLACK HOLE CANDIDATES

    SciTech Connect

    Shaposhnikov, Nikolai E-mail: lev@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov

    2012-06-20

    Observations of quasi-periodic oscillations (QPOs) in X-ray binaries hold a key to understanding many aspects of these enigmatic systems. Complex appearance of the Fourier phase lags related to QPOs is one of the most puzzling observational effects in accreting black holes (BHs). In this Letter we show that QPO properties, including phase lags, can be explained in a framework of a simple scenario, where the oscillating media provide feedback on the emerging spectrum. We demonstrate that the QPO waveform is presented by the product of a perturbation and time-delayed response factors, where the response is energy dependent. The essential property of this effect is its nonlinear and multiplicative nature. Our multiplicative reverberation model successfully describes the QPO components in energy-dependent power spectra as well as the appearance of the phase lags between signals in different energy bands. We apply our model to QPOs observed by the Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer in BH candidate XTE J1550-564. We briefly discuss the implications of the observed energy dependence of the QPO reverberation times and amplitudes on the nature of the power-law spectral component and its variability.

  6. Estimation of LDA signal frequency using the autocovariance (ACV) lag ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matovic, D.; Tropea, C.

    1989-08-01

    An algorithm to realize the ACV lag ratio method is introduced and applied to real Doppler signals as acquired using a transient recorder, and processed on a digital computer. Measurements using other time domain and frequency domain estimation techniques are also performed on the same data sets and compared using basic statistical parameters. Results are presented for comparisons with an estimate based on the power spectral density, since the time domain estimates investigated are unable to achieve meaningful results for signals with high noise content. The prospects of implementing the ACV lag ratio method in a dedicated processor are discussed and the potential advantages of such a processor are summarized. For applications in phase/Doppler anemometry, the cross-correlation of the two Doppler signals rather than the autocorrelation can be computed without having to modify the algorithm for frequency determination. Once the frequency is known, the phase difference can be immediately computed by examining the shift of the cross-correlation function maximum away from lag time zero. Thus both particle velocity and size can be recovered with no additional computation.

  7. The H + OCS hot atom reaction - CO state distributions and translational energy from time-resolved infrared absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nickolaisen, Scott L.; Cartland, Harry E.

    1993-01-01

    Time-resolved infrared diode laser spectroscopy has been used to probe CO internal and translational excitation from the reaction of hot H atoms with OCS. Product distributions should be strongly biased toward the maximum 1.4 eV collision energy obtained from 278 nm pulsed photolysis of HI. Rotations and vibrations are both colder than predicted by statistical density of states theory, as evidenced by large positive surprisal parameters. The bias against rotation is stronger than that against vibration, with measurable population as high as v = 4. The average CO internal excitation is 1920/cm, accounting for only 13 percent of the available energy. Of the energy balance, time-resolved sub-Doppler line shape measurements show that more than 38 percent appears as relative translation of the separating CO and SH fragments. Studies of the relaxation kinetics indicate that some rotational energy transfer occurs on the time scale of our measurements, but the distributions do not relax sufficiently to alter our conclusions. Vibrational distributions are nascent, though vibrational relaxation of excited CO is unusually fast in the OCS bath, with rates approaching 3 percent of gas kinetic for v = 1.

  8. Theoretical and Experimental Study of Ignition Lag and Engine Knock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Frtiz A F

    1939-01-01

    The author believes, on the basis of experimental ignition-lag data, that the character of a fuel cannot be stated in terms of a single constant (such as octane or cetane number) but that at least two and generally three constants are required. Thus no correlation between knock ratings can be expected if in one set of tests the charge temperature was varied while in the other the charge pressure was varied. For this reason, he favors knock rating being based on an equation characterizing the ignition lag of the fuel as a function of pressure and temperature of the charge.

  9. The Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping Project: First Broad-line Hβ and Mg ii Lags at z ≳ 0.3 from Six-month Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Horne, Keith; Grier, C. J.; Peterson, Bradley M.; Denney, Kelly D.; Trump, Jonathan R.; Sun, Mouyuan; Brandt, W. N.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Green, Paul J.; Greene, Jenny E.; Hall, Patrick B.; Ho, Luis C.; Jiang, Linhua; Kinemuchi, Karen; McGreer, Ian D.; Petitjean, Patrick; Richards, Gordon T.; Schneider, Donald P.; Strauss, Michael A.; Tao, Charling; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Zu, Ying; Pan, Kaike; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Ge, Jian; Oravetz, Daniel; Simmons, Audrey

    2016-02-01

    Reverberation mapping (RM) measurements of broad-line region (BLR) lags in z\\gt 0.3 quasars are important for directly measuring black hole masses in these distant objects, but so far there have been limited attempts and success given the practical difficulties of RM in this regime. Here we report preliminary results of 15 BLR lag measurements from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Reverberation Mapping (SDSS-RM) project, a dedicated RM program with multi-object spectroscopy designed for RM over a wide redshift range. The lags are based on the 2014 spectroscopic light curves alone (32 epochs over six months) and focus on the Hβ and Mg ii broad lines in the 100 lowest-redshift (z\\lt 0.8) quasars included in SDSS-RM; they represent a small subset of the lags that SDSS-RM (including 849 quasars to z˜ 4.5) is expected to deliver. The reported preliminary lag measurements are for intermediate-luminosity quasars at 0.3≲ z\\lt 0.8, including nine Hβ lags and six Mg ii lags, for the first time extending RM results to this redshift-luminosity regime and providing direct quasar black hole mass estimates over approximately half of cosmic time. The Mg ii lags also increase the number of known Mg ii lags by several fold and start to explore the utility of Mg ii for RM at high redshift. The location of these new lags at higher redshifts on the observed BLR size-luminosity relationship is statistically consistent with previous Hβ results at z\\lt 0.3. However, an independent constraint on the relationship slope at z\\gt 0.3 is not yet possible owing to the limitations in our current sample. Our results demonstrate the general feasibility and potential of multi-object RM for z\\gt 0.3 quasars.

  10. A 2A2<--X 2B1 absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule: A three-dimensional time-dependent wave packet study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhigang; Lou, Nanquan; Nyman, Gunnar

    2005-02-01

    Time-dependent wave packet calculations of the (A 2A2←X 2B1) absorption and Raman spectra of the OClO molecule are reported. The Fourier grid Hamiltonian method in three dimensions is employed. The X 2B1 ground state ab initio potential energy surface reported by Peterson [J. Chem. Phys. 109, 8864 (1998)] is used together with his corresponding A 2A2 state surface or the revised surface of the A 2A2 state by Xie and Guo [Chem. Phys. Lett. 307, 109 (1999)]. Radau coordinates are used to describe the vibrations of a nonrotating OClO molecule. The split-operator method combined with fast Fourier transform is applied to propagate the wave function. We find that the ab initio A 2A2 potential energy surface better reproduces the detailed structures of the absorption spectrum at long wavelength, while the revised surface of the A 2A2 state, consistent with the work of Xie and Guo, better reproduces the overall shape and the energies of the vibrational levels. Both surfaces of the A 2A2 state can reasonably reproduce the experimental Raman spectra but neither does so in detail for the numerical model employed in the present work.

  11. Fast time response measurements of gaseous nitrous acid using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer: HONO emission source from vehicle exhausts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yongquan Q.; Schwab, James J.; Demerjian, Kenneth L.

    2008-02-01

    We present the measurement of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) using a tunable diode laser absorption spectrometer. This method utilizes one strong absorption feature at 1713.511cm-1, which is free of interference and suitable for ambient HONO measurements. The detection limit for a 1-second integration time is determined to be better than 200 pptv. The measurement method has been demonstrated by sampling room air over an 11-day period. HONO mixing ratios ranged from below the detection limit (<=200 pptv) to 4.8 ppbv, with a mean value of 0.73 ppbv. A number of elevated HONO events lasting from several seconds up to hours were observed and have been associated with roadway traffic adjacent to the building where the measurements were performed. The variation in the ratio of HONO/NOx and its anti-correlation with ambient NOx measurements indicate that the source of HONO in this measurement study is mainly from the direct emission of traffic exhausts and local heterogeneous reactions. The demonstrated application of TDLAS fast response measurement technology is capable of providing new information on the sources and sinks of HONO in the environment.

  12. Excited state molecular structure determination in disordered media using laser pump/x-ray probe time-domain x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L. X.; Chemistry

    2003-01-01

    Advances in X-ray technologies provide opportunities for solving structures of photoexcited state molecules with short lifetimes. Using X-ray pulses from a modern synchrotron source, the structure of a metal-to-ligand-charge-transfer (MLCT) excited state of CuI(dmp)2+ (dmp 1/4 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) was investigated by laser pump/X-ray probe X-ray absorption fine structure (LPXP-XAFS) in fluid solution at room temperature on a nanosecond time scale. The experimental requirements for such pump-probe XAFS are described in terms of technical challenges: (1) conversion of optimal excited state population, (2) synchronization of the pump laser pulse and probe Xray pulse, and (3) timing of the detection. Using a laser pump pulse for the photoexcitation, a photoluminescent MLCT excited state of CuI(dmp)2(BArF), (dmp 1/4 2,9-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline), BArF 1/4 tetrakis(3,5-bis(trifluoromethylphenyl)borate) with a lifetime of 98{+-}5 ns was created. Probing the structure of this state at its optimal concentration using an X-ray pulse cluster with a total duration of 14.2 ns revealed that (1) a Cu{sup II} center was generated via a whole charge transfer; (2) the copper in the MLCT state bound an additional ligand to form a penta-coordinate complex with a likely trigonal bipyramidal geometry; and (3) the average Cu-N bond length increases in the MLCT excited state by 0.07 . In contrast to previously reported literature, the photoluminescence of this pentacoordinate MLCT state was not quenched upon ligation with the fifth ligand. On the basis of experimental results, we propose that the absorptive and emissive states have distinct geometries. The results represent X-ray characterization of a molecular excited state in fluid solution on a nanosecond time scale.

  13. Direct time integration of Maxwell's equations in linear dispersive media with absorption for scattering and propagation of femtosecond electromagnetic pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joseph, Rose M.; Hagness, Susan C.; Taflove, Allen

    1991-01-01

    The initial results for femtosecond pulse propagation and scattering interactions for a Lorentz medium obtained by a direct time integration of Maxwell's equations are reported. The computational approach provides reflection coefficients accurate to better than 6 parts in 10,000 over the frequency range of dc to 3 x 10 to the 16th Hz for a single 0.2-fs Gaussian pulse incident upon a Lorentz-medium half-space. New results for Sommerfeld and Brillouin precursors are shown and compared with previous analyses. The present approach is robust and permits 2D and 3D electromagnetic pulse propagation directly from the full-vector Maxwell's equations.

  14. 46 CFR 36.30-1 - Lagged tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lagged tanks-TB/ALL. 36.30-1 Section 36.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Periodic Inspections § 36.30-1 Lagged tanks—TB/ALL. (a) Lagged tanks shall have part of the lagging removed on...

  15. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor–Visual Temporal Recalibration

    PubMed Central

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor–visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor–visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor–visual temporal recalibration. PMID:26778983

  16. 46 CFR 36.30-1 - Lagged tanks-TB/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lagged tanks-TB/ALL. 36.30-1 Section 36.30-1 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY TANK VESSELS ELEVATED TEMPERATURE CARGOES Periodic Inspections § 36.30-1 Lagged tanks—TB/ALL. (a) Lagged tanks shall have part of the lagging removed on...

  17. Awareness of Temporal Lag is Necessary for Motor-Visual Temporal Recalibration.

    PubMed

    Tsujita, Masaki; Ichikawa, Makoto

    2015-01-01

    Consistent exposure to a temporal lag between observers' voluntary action and its visual feedback induced recalibration of temporal order perception between a motor action and a visual stimulus. It remains unclear what kinds of processing underlie this motor-visual temporal recalibration. This study examined the necessity of awareness of a temporal lag between a motor action and its visual feedback for motor-visual temporal recalibration. In Experiment 1, we allocated observers to either the multiple-step or single-step lag conditions. In the multiple-step lag condition, we first inserted a small temporal lag and subsequently increased it with progress of the adaptation period, to make observers unaware of the temporal lag during the adaptation period. In the single-step lag condition, we instructed observers about the temporal lag before adaptation, and inserted a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of the adaptation period to ensure that they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration only in the single-step lag condition. In Experiment 2, we exposed all observers to a substantial temporal lag from the beginning of adaptation period with no instruction about insertion of the temporal lag. We asked observers at the end of the experiment whether they were aware of the temporal lag. We found significant recalibration for only observers who were aware of the lag. These results suggest that awareness of the temporal lag plays a crucial role in motor-visual temporal recalibration.

  18. Estimating the absorption coefficient of the bottom layer in four-layered turbid mediums based on the time-domain depth sensitivity of near-infrared light reflectance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Chie; Shimada, Miho; Tanikawa, Yukari; Hoshi, Yoko

    2013-09-01

    Expanding our previously proposed "time segment analysis" for a two-layered turbid medium, this study attempted to selectively determine the absorption coefficient (μa) of the bottom layer in a four-layered human head model with time-domain near-infrared measurements. The difference curve in the temporal profiles of the light attenuation between an object and a reference medium, which are obtained from Monte Carlo simulations, is divided into segments along the time axis, and a slope for each segment is calculated to obtain the depth-dependent μa(μaseg). The reduced scattering coefficient (μs') of the reference is determined by curve fitting with the temporal point spread function derived from the analytical solution of the diffusion equation to the time-resolved reflectance of the object. The deviation of μaseg from the actual μa is expressed by a function of the ratio of μaseg in an earlier time segment to that in a later segment for mediums with different optical properties and thicknesses of the upper layers. Using this function, it is possible to determine the μa of the bottom layer in a four-layered epoxy resin-based phantom. These results suggest that the method reported here has potential for determining the μa of the cerebral t