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Sample records for absorption laser induced

  1. Transient radiation-induced absorption in laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, Paul J.

    1994-06-01

    Transient radiation-induced absorption losses in laser materials have been measured using a pulsed nuclear reactor. Reactor pulse widths of 70 to 90 microsecond(s) and absorbed doses of 1 to 7.5 krad have been used. Transmission recovery times and peak absorption coefficients are given. Materials tested include LiNbO3, GSGG, silica substrates, and filter glasses used in the laser cavity. The filter glasses are tested at discrete wavelengths in the range 440 - 750 nm. Lithium niobate, MgO-doped LiNbO3, GSGG, and the silica substrates are tested at 1061 nm.

  2. Transient light absorption induced in glassby femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Blonskii, I V; Kadan, V N; Pavlov, I A; Kryuchkov, N N; Shpotyuk, O I

    2009-10-31

    The dynamics of the transient light absorption induced in K8 optical glass by filamented femtosecond laser pulses have been studied using time-resolved transmitted-light microscopy at wavelengths from 450 to 700 nm. The transient absorption measured as a function of probe beam wavelength is compared to that predicted by the Drude plasma model. We conclude that, just 450 fs after a pump pulse, the transient absorption is dominated by transient electronic states, presumably, self-trapped excitons, with an excitation energy of 2.6 - 2.7 eV. These states are filled with free-carriers from a long-lived plasma, which acts as a 'carrier reservoir'. The relaxation of transient absorption has two components. The slow component, with {tau}{sub 1} {approx} 17-17.5 ps, is governed by the plasma thermalisation time, whereas the second, with {tau}{sub 1} >> 300 ps, is determined by the plasma lifetime. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  3. Temperature activated absorption during laser-induced damage: The evolution of laser-supported solid-state absorption fronts

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D; Shen, N; Demange, P

    2010-10-26

    Previously we have shown that the size of laser induced damage sites in both KDP and SiO{sub 2} is largely governed by the duration of the laser pulse which creates them. Here we present a model based on experiment and simulation that accounts for this behavior. Specifically, we show that solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts are generated during a damage event and that these fronts propagate at constant velocities for laser intensities up to 4 GW/cm{sup 2}. It is the constant absorption front velocity that leads to the dependence of laser damage site size on pulse duration. We show that these absorption fronts are driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport, and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. In addition to the practical application of selecting an optimal laser for pre-initiation of large aperture optics, this work serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  4. Calibration optimization of laser-induced deflection signal for measuring absorptance of laser components.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaorong; Li, Bincheng

    2015-03-10

    Different configurations of the laser-induced deflection (LID) technique have been developed recently to measure the absolute bulk and coating absorption of laser components directly. In order to obtain the absolute absorptance value of the surface or coating of a laser component, a reference sample with the same geometry and material as the test sample and with resist heating mounted on the surface of the reference sample was employed to calibrate LID signals. Due to the difference in the excitation approaches in measuring LID signals of the test and reference samples (laser beam irradiation versus surface resist heating), this calibration procedure may bring significant errors in the determination of the absorptance of the test sample. In this paper, theoretical models describing the temperature rise distributions within a test sample excited with flat-top beam irradiation and within a reference sample excited with surface resist heating are developed. Based on these temperature models and the finite-element analysis method, the LID signals used to determine the absorptance of the surface or coating of a laser component and the corresponding calibration error are analyzed. The computation results show that the calibration error depends largely on the probe beam position for normal or transverse LID signals and may be minimized by optimizing the probe beam geometry. PMID:25968359

  5. Laser photothermal spectroscopy of light-induced absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A

    2013-01-31

    Basic methods of laser photothermal spectroscopy, which are used to study photoinduced absorption in various media, are briefly considered. Comparative analysis of these methods is performed and the latest results obtained in this field are discussed. Different schemes and examples of their practical implementation are considered. (review)

  6. Red-shift law of intense laser-induced electro-absorption in solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hong-Xiang; Zu, Hao-Yue; Wu, Shao-Yi; Sun, Kai; Zu, Xiao-Tao

    2014-02-01

    A theoretical study on the red-shift of laser-induced electro-absorption is presented. It is found that laser-induced red-shift scales with the cube root of the pump laser intensity in the optical tunneling regime and has an obvious deviation from this scale in the multi-photon regime. Our results show that in the optical tunneling regime, the laser-induced red shift has the same law as that in the direct current (DC) approximation. Though the scales are the same in the optical tunneling regime, the physical pictures in the two cases are quite different. The electro-absorption in the DC case is a tunneling-assisted transition process, while the laser-induced electro-absorption is a mixed multi-photon process.

  7. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2011-11-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  8. Direct and absolute absorption measurements in optical materials and coatings by laser induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.

    2012-01-01

    Different strategies of the laser induced deflection (LID) technique for direct and absolute absorption measurements are presented. Besides selected strategies for bulk and coating absorption measurements, respectively, a new strategy is introduced allowing the transfer of the LID technique to very small samples and to significantly increase the sensitivity for materials with a very weak photo-thermal response. Additionally, an emphasis is placed on the importance of the calibration procedure. The electrical calibration of the LID setup is compared to two other approaches that use either doped samples or highly absorptive reference samples in combination with numerical simulations. Applying the LID technique, we report on the characterization of AR coated LBO crystals used in high power NIR/VIS laser applications. The comparison of different LBO crystals shows that there are significant differences in both, the AR coating and the LBO bulk absorption. These differences are much larger at 515 nm than at 1030 nm. Absorption spectroscopy measurements combining LID technique with a high power OPO laser system indicate that the coating process affects the LBO bulk absorption properties. Furthermore, the change of the absorption upon 1030 nm laser irradiation of a Nd:YVO4 laser crystal is investigated and compared to recent results. Finally, Ytterbium doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers are characterized with respect to the absorption induced attenuation at 1550 nm in order to compare these data with the total attenuation obtained for the subsequently manufactured laser active fibers.

  9. Sandwich concept: enhancement for direct absorption measurements by laser-induced deflection (LID) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Ch.; Bublitz, S.; Paa, W.

    2012-11-01

    The new sandwich concept for absolute photo-thermal absorption measurements using the laser induced deflection (LID) technique is introduced and tested in comparison to the standard LID concept. The sandwich concept's idea is the decoupling of the optical materials for the pump and probe beams by placing a sample of investigation in between two optical (sandwich) plates. The pump beam is guided through the sample whereas the probe beams are deflected within the sandwich plates by the thermal lens that is generated by heat transfer from the irradiated sample. Electrical simulation and laser experiments reveal that using appropriate optical materials for the sandwich plates, the absorption detection limit for photo-thermally insensitive materials can be lowered by up to two orders of magnitude. Another advantage of the sandwich concept, the shrinking of the currently required minimum sample size, was used to investigate the laser induced absorption change in a Nd:YVO4 crystal at 1030nm. It was found that the absorption in Nd:YVO4 lowers due to the laser irradiation but partially recovers during irradiation breaks. Furthermore, absorption spectroscopy has been performed at two LBO crystals in the wavelength range 410...600nm to study the absorption structure around the SHG wavelengths of common high power lasers based on Neodymium doped laser crystals.

  10. Transient radiation-induced absorption in the materials for a GSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, P. J.

    1993-11-01

    Materials used in the optical elements of a 1,061 m GSGG (gadolinium scandium gallium garnet) laser have been tested for transient radiation-induced absorption. The transient radiation-induced absorption in KK1, Schott S7005 and S7010, and M382 glasses have been determined for discrete wavelengths in the range 440-750 nm. Also, the transient radiation-induced absorption in 'pure' and MgO doped LiNbO3 has been measured at 1,061 nm. Mathematical expressions composed of exponentials are fitted to the data.

  11. Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brannon, P. J.

    1994-11-01

    This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO3 Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

  12. Transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for the DOI laser

    SciTech Connect

    Brannon, P.J.

    1995-01-01

    This is the final report on a series of experiments concerned with transient radiation-induced absorption in materials for a Cr,Nd:GSGG laser. Both the Sandia National Laboratories SPR III pulsed reactor and the Hermes III pulsed X-ray machine are used as radiation sources. The time dependence and the magnitude of the induced absorption in filter glasses and in doped and undoped LiNbO{sub 3} Q-switch materials have been measured. Gain has been observed in Cr,Nd:GSGG, the laser medium, when it is irradiated by X-rays.

  13. Influence of laser radiation on induced absorption spectra of pure quartz glass optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dianov, Y. M.; Karpechev, V. N.; Korniyenko, L. S.; Rybaltovskiy, A. O.; Chernov, P. V.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of laser radiation on radiation color centers and their associated induced absorption in the spectra of irradiated glass optical fibers is investigated. The glass fiber specimens employed had 40 to 50 micron diameter cores made of day pure quartz glass. The optical fibers were 6 to 20 meters long, produced by chemical precipitation from the gaseous phase and clad with reflecting borosilicate glass. Spectral measurements of the induced absorption in the ultraviolet region were made using an FEU-71 photodetector and a sounding radiation source. The stimulated laser emission power in the cross section of the optical fiber was measured by a photodiode; the absorption spectra were recorded by the fragment method. Eight different types of color centers were isolated whose bands cover practically the entire observed absorption spectra. The connection found between color centers and a 340 nm absorption band, and color center with absorption in the infrared band, indicate that absorption in the ultraviolet band can have a significant influence on the amount of induced absorption in the infrared band.

  14. All solid-state mid-IR laser development, nonlinear absorption investigation and laser-induced damage study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Torrey J.

    In this research, nonlinear optical absorption coefficients and laser-induced damage thresholds are measured in Ge and GaSb, which are materials that are used in IR detectors. Using a simultaneous fitting technique to extract nonlinear absorption coefficients from data at two pulse widths, two-photon and free-carrier absorption coefficients are measured in Ge and GaSb at 2.05 and 2.5 mum for the first time. At these wavelengths, nonlinear absorption is the primary damage mechanism, and damage thresholds at picosecond and nanosecond pulse widths were measured and agreed well with modeled thresholds using experimentally measured parameters. The damage threshold for a single-layer Al2O 3 anti-reflective coating on Ge was 55% or 35% lower than the uncoated threshold for picosecond or nanosecond pulses, respectively. It was necessary to develop a pulsed 2.5 mum wavelength laser to conduct these measurements, as prior lasers at this wavelength possessed insufficient pulse energy to induce nonlinear absorption or damage these materials. Using a Cr2+ :ZnSe gain medium, a 3.1 mJ pulse energy laser was created whose peak power exceeded all Cr2+:ZnSe literature by a factor of eight. The characteristics of the laser include nanosecond pulse width, 52% slope efficiency, beam quality of M2 = 1.4, Gaussian spatial profile and a spectral line width of 110 nm.

  15. Bismuth doped fiber laser and study of unsaturable loss and pump induced absorption in laser performance.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Mridu P; Yoo, Seongwoo; Sahu, Jayanta

    2008-12-01

    A short Bi doped fiber laser operating in the wavelength region of 1160-1179 nm has been demonstrated. The influence of unsaturable loss on laser performance is investigated. Excited state absorption in Bi doped germano-alumino silicate fiber is reported in the 900-1300 nm wavelength range under 800 and 1047 nm pumping. Bi luminescence and fluorescence decay properties under different pumping wavelengths are also investigated. PMID:19065243

  16. Annealing of induced absorption in quartz glasses by ArF laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, P B; Sergeev, A P

    2010-11-13

    Annealing of individual bands of electron-beam-induced absorption (IA) in the region of 150 - 400 nm in KS-4V, KU-1, and Corning 7980 (ArF Grade) quartz glasses by ArF laser radiation is studied. It is shown that the phototransformation of the IA spectra occurs mainly due to a significant decrease in the amplitudes of bands at {lambda} = 183.5, 213, and 260 nm. The role played by interstitial oxygen, hydrogen, and chlorine in the formation and relaxation of glass defects is considered. (effects of laser radiation on matter. laser plasma)

  17. KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption in silica glasses produced by melting synthetic silica powder

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzuu, Nobu; Sasaki, Toshiya; Kojima, Tatsuya; Tanaka, Jun-ichiro; Nakamura, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Hideharu

    2013-07-07

    KrF- and ArF-excimer-laser-induced absorption of silica glasses produced by electric melting and flame fusion of synthetic silica powder were investigated. The growth of KrF-laser-induced absorption was more gradual than that of ArF-laser-induced absorption. Induced absorption spectra exhibited a peak at about 5.8 eV, of which the position and width differed slightly among samples and laser species. Widths of ArF-laser-induced absorption spectra were wider than those of KrF-laser-induced spectra. KrF-laser-induced absorption is reproducible by two Gaussian absorption bands peaking at 5.80 eV with full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 0.62 eV and at 6.50 eV with FWHM of 0.74 eV. For reproduction of ArF-laser-induced absorption, Gaussian bands at 5.41 eV with FWHM of 0.62 eV was necessary in addition to components used for reproducing KrF-laser-induced absorption. Based on the discussion of the change of defect structures evaluated from change of absorption components, we proposed that the precursor of the 5.8-eV band ascribed to E Prime center ({identical_to}Si{center_dot}) is {identical_to}Si-H HO-Si{identical_to} structures formed by the reaction between strained Si-O-Si bonds and interstitial H{sub 2} molecules during the irradiation.

  18. Picosecond laser induced electric field modulation of carotenoid absorption bands

    SciTech Connect

    Gosztola, D.; Yamada, Hiroko; Wasielewski, M.R.

    1994-04-01

    We present a new and unique way of forming an intense electric field near a molecule in order to induce electrochromism. We have done this by creating an electron-hole pair within close proximity to, but electronically isolated form, a polarizable molecule. The molecular system that we have utilized consists of a zinc porphyrin -- pyromellitic diimide light induced charge transfer complex held rigidly proximate to a {beta}-carotene using a calix[4]arene linkage. The formation of the charge separated state of the porphyrin-diimide results in a dipole formed by the 8.4 {Angstrom} separation of the electron-hole pair. The electric field from this dipole was found to induce electrochromism in the carotene.

  19. [Laser induced breakdown spectra of coal sample and self-absorption of the spectral line].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-yin; Ji, Hui; Jin, Yi-dong

    2014-12-01

    The LIBS of one kind of household fuel coal was obtained with the first harmonic output 532 nm of an Nd·YAG laser as radiation source. With the assignment of the spectral lines, it was found that besides the elements C, Si, Mg, Fe, Al, Ca, Ti, Na and K, which are reported to be contained in coal, the presented sample also contains trace elements, such as Cd, Co, Hf, Ir, Li, Mn, Ni, Rb, Sr, V, W, Zn, Zr etc, but the spectral lines corresponding to O and H elements did not appear in the spectra. This is owing to the facts that the transition probability of H and O atoms is small and the energy of the upper level for transition is higher. The results of measurement also show that the intensity of spectral line increases with the laser pulse energy and self-absorption of the spectral lines K766.493 nm and K769.921 nm will appear to some extent. Increasing laser energy further will make self-absorption more obvious. The presence of self-absorption can be attributed to two factors. One is the higher transition rate of K atoms, and the other is that the increase in laser intensity induces the enhancement of the particle number density in the plasma. PMID:25881446

  20. Laser induced deflection (LID) method for absolute absorption measurements of optical materials and thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mühlig, Christian; Bublitz, Simon; Paa, Wolfgang

    2011-05-01

    We use optimized concepts to measure directly low absorption in optical materials and thin films at various laser wavelengths by the laser induced deflection (LID) technique. An independent absolute calibration, using electrical heaters, is applied to obtain absolute absorption data without the actual knowledge of the photo-thermal material properties. Verification of the absolute calibration is obtained by measuring different silicon samples at 633 nm where all laser light, apart from the measured reflection/scattering, is absorbed. Various experimental results for bulk materials and thin films are presented including measurements of fused silica and CaF2 at 193 nm, nonlinear crystals (LBO) for frequency conversion and AR coated fused silica for high power material processing at 1030 nm and Yb-doped silica raw materials for high power fiber lasers at 1550 nm. In particular for LBO the need of an independent calibration is demonstrated since thermal lens generation is dominated by stress-induced refractive index change which is in contrast to most of the common optical materials. The measured results are proven by numerical simulations and their influence on the measurement strategy and the obtained accuracy are shown.

  1. Hydrogen Balmer Series Self-Absorption Measurement in Laser-Induced Air Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian

    2015-05-01

    In experimental studies of laser-induced plasma, we use focused Nd:YAG laser radiation to generate optical breakdown in laboratory air. A Czerny-Turner type spectrometer and an ICCD camera are utilized to record spatially and temporally resolved spectra. Time-resolved spectroscopy methods are employed to record plasma dynamics for various time delays in the range of 0.300 microsecond to typically 10 microsecond after plasma initiation. Early plasma emission spectra reveal hydrogen alpha and ionized nitrogen lines for time delays larger than 0.3 microsecond, the hydrogen beta line emerges from the free-electron background radiation later in the plasma decay for time delays in excess of 1 microsecond. The self-absorption analyses include comparisons of recorded data without and with the use of a doubling mirror. The extent of self-absorption of the hydrogen Balmer series is investigated for various time delays from plasma generation. There are indications of self-absorption of hydrogen alpha by comparison with ionized nitrogen lines at a time delay of 0.3 microsecond. For subsequent time delays, self-absorption effects on line-widths are hardly noticeable, despite the fact of the apparent line-shape distortions. Of interest are comparisons of inferred electron densities from hydrogen alpha and hydrogen beta lines as the plasma decays, including assessments of spatial variation of electron density.

  2. Pressure measurement in supersonic air flow by differential absorptive laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, G. C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey

    2007-06-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach 2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, the streamwise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature, and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  3. Pressure Measurement in Supersonic Air Flow by Differential Absorptive Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Herring, Gregory C.; Balla, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Nonintrusive, off-body flow barometry in Mach-2 airflow has been demonstrated in a large-scale supersonic wind tunnel using seedless laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA). The static pressure of the gas flow is determined with a novel differential absorption measurement of the ultrasonic sound produced by the LITA pump process. Simultaneously, stream-wise velocity and static gas temperature of the same spatially-resolved sample volume were measured with this nonresonant time-averaged LITA technique. Mach number, temperature and pressure have 0.2%, 0.4%, and 4% rms agreement, respectively, in comparison with known free-stream conditions.

  4. Observation by photothermal microscopy of increased silica absorption in laser damage induced by gold nanoparticles.

    SciTech Connect

    Bonneau, F.; Combis, P.; Rullier, J. L.; Commandre, M.; During, A.; Natoli, J. Y.; Pellin, M. J.; Savina, M. R.; Cottancin, E.; Pellarin, M.

    2003-11-10

    In order to understand laser-induced damage in glass, we subjected engineered SiO{sub 2} thin films containing sub-micron gold inclusions to high fluences, and observed the results using several means of analysis. We found decoupling in time between the emission of gold and that of silicon with samples containing gold spheres of diameter 3 nm. We have analyzed the changes in the silica optical absorption at 1064 nm, using photothermal deflection microscopy. We find, upon exceeding a sharp fluence threshold, a thousand-fold increase in absorption of the silica matrix around the inclusion. We conclude that ions from the inclusion permeate the surrounding silica, and form a highly absorbent mixture.

  5. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials. PMID:24938656

  6. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew C.; Wilks, Scott C.; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen B.; Baring, Matthew G.

    2014-06-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top particle accelerators, ultrafast imaging systems and laser fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. Here using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show for the first time that f exhibits a theoretical maximum and minimum. These bounds constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  7. Bulk resonance absorption induced by relativistic effects in laser-plasma interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Ding Wenjun; Sheng, Z.-M.; Zhang, J.; Yu, M. Y.

    2009-04-15

    Resonance absorption in relativistic laser-plasma interaction is studied via two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. As the laser intensity increases from the linear regime, the absorption rate first decreases due to relativistic modulation of the electron plasma oscillations excited at the mode conversion layer. However, the trend reverses after a critical intensity. The reversal can be attributed to the fact that the relativistic critical layer depends on the local intensity of the laser pulse, so that instead of occurring in a thin layer, resonance absorption occurs in a plasma bulk region, leading absorption rate increase. The reflected-light spectrum also shows broadening and splitting of the harmonics at high laser intensities, which can be attributed to critical-surface oscillations driven by the laser ponderomotive force.

  8. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, David A.; Keller, Richard A.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be related to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10.sup.-5 cm.sup.-1 has been demonstrated using this technique.

  9. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1982-06-08

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be rlated to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10/sup -5/ cm/sup -1/ has been demonstrated using this technique.

  10. Apparatus and method for measurement of weak optical absorptions by thermally induced laser pulsing

    DOEpatents

    Cremers, D.A.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-10-01

    The thermal lensing phenomenon is used as the basis for measurement of weak optical absorptions when a cell containing the sample to be investigated is inserted into a normally continuous-wave operation laser-pumped dye laser cavity for which the output coupler is deliberately tilted relative to intracavity circulating laser light, and pulsed laser output ensues, the pulsewidth of which can be related to the sample absorptivity by a simple algorithm or calibration curve. A minimum detection limit of less than 10[sup [minus]5] cm[sup [minus]1] has been demonstrated using this technique. 6 figs.

  11. Calculations and experimental demonstration of multi-photon absorption governing fs laser-induced damage in titania.

    PubMed

    Jupé, Marco; Jensen, Lars; Melninkaitis, Andrius; Sirutkaitis, Valdas; Ristau, Detlev

    2009-07-20

    Laser damage phenomena are governed by a number of different effects for the respective operation modes and pulse durations. In the ultra short pulse regime the electronic structure in the dielectric coating and the substrate material set the prerequisite for the achieved laser damage threshold of an optical component. Theoretical considerations have been done to assess the impact of contributing ionization phenomena in order to find a valid description for laser-induced damage in the femtosecond (fs) domain. Subsequently, a special set of sample has been designed to verify these considerations via ISO certified laser damage testing. Examining the theoretical and experimental data reveals the importance of multi-photon absorption for the optical breakdown. For titania, the influence of multi-photon absorption has been clearly shown by a quantized wavelength characteristic of the laser damage threshold. PMID:19654628

  12. Femtosecond Laser-Induced Upconversion Luminescence in Rare-Earth Ions by Nonresonant Multiphoton Absorption.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yunhua; Xu, Cheng; Zheng, Ye; Yang, Chengshuai; Liu, Pei; Jia, Tianqing; Qiu, Jianrong; Sun, Zhenrong; Zhang, Shian

    2016-07-21

    The upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions has attracted considerable interest because of its important applications in photoelectric conversion, color display, laser device, multiplexed biolabeling, and security printing. Previous studies mainly explored the upconversion luminescence generation through excited state absorption, energy transfer upconversion, and photon avalanche under the continuous wave laser excitation. Here, we focus on the upconversion luminescence generation through a nonresonant multiphoton absorption by using the intense femtosecond pulsed laser excitation and study the upconversion luminescence intensity control by varying the femtosecond laser phase and polarization. We show that the upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions under the intense femtosecond laser field excitation is easy to be obtained due to the nonresonant multiphoton absorption through the nonlinear interaction between light and matter, which is not available by the continuous wave laser excitation in previous works. We also show that the upconversion luminescence intensity can be effectively controlled by varying the femtosecond pulsed laser phase and polarization, which can open a new technological opportunity to generate and control the upconversion luminescence of rare-earth ions and also can be further extended to the relevant application areas. PMID:27367751

  13. Absorption of laser radiation by femtosecond laser-induced plasma of air and its emission characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilyin, A. A.; Golik, S. S.; Shmirko, K. A.

    2015-11-01

    The energy absorbed by femtosecond laser plasma has nonlinear dependence on incident laser energy. The threshold power for plasma formation is 5.2 GW. Emission of nitrogen molecule, nitrogen molecule ion, atomic oxygen (unresolved triplet O I 777 nm) and nitrogen (triplet N I 742.4, 744.3 and 746.8 nm) lines is detected. Molecular emission consists of second positive and firs negative systems of nitrogen. Time-resolved spectroscopy of plasmas shows short molecular line emission (up to 1 ns) and long atomic line emission (up to 150 ns).

  14. Petawatt laser absorption bounded

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Matthew; Wilks, Scott; Tabak, Max; Libby, Stephen; Baring, Matthew

    2014-10-01

    The interaction of petawatt (1015 W) lasers with solid matter forms the basis for advanced scientific applications such as table-top relativistic particle accelerators, ultrafast charged particle imaging systems and fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. Key metrics for these applications relate to absorption, yet conditions in this regime are so nonlinear that it is often impossible to know the fraction of absorbed light f, and even the range of f is unknown. In this presentation, using a relativistic Rankine-Hugoniot-like analysis, we show how to derive the theoretical maximum and minimum of f. These boundaries constrain nonlinear absorption mechanisms across the petawatt regime, forbidding high absorption values at low laser power and low absorption values at high laser power. Close agreement is shown with several dozens of published experimental data points and simulation results, helping to confirm the theory. For applications needing to circumvent the absorption bounds, these results will accelerate a shift from solid targets, towards structured and multilayer targets, and lead the development of new materials.

  15. Two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements of neutral density in a helicon plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Galante, M. E.; Magee, R. M.; Scime, E. E.

    2014-05-15

    We have developed a new diagnostic based on two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). We use a high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup −1}) laser to probe the ground state of neutral hydrogen, deuterium and krypton with spatial resolution better than 0.2 cm, a time resolution of 10 ns, and a measurement cadence of 20 Hz. Here, we describe proof-of-principle measurements in a helicon plasma source that demonstrate the TALIF diagnostic is capable of measuring neutral densities spanning four orders of magnitude; comparable to the edge neutral gradients predicted in the DIII-D tokamak pedestal. The measurements are performed in hydrogen and deuterium plasmas and absolute calibration is accomplished through TALIF measurements in neutral krypton. The optical configuration employed is confocal, i.e., both light injection and collection are accomplished with a single lens through a single optical port in the vacuum vessel. The wavelength resolution of the diagnostic is sufficient to separate hydrogen and deuterium spectra and we present measurements from mixed hydrogen and deuterium plasmas that demonstrate isotopic abundance measurements are feasible. Time resolved measurements also allow us to explore the evolution of the neutral hydrogen density and temperature and effects of wall recycling. We find that the atomic neutral density grows rapidly at the initiation of the discharge, reaching the steady-state value within 1 ms. Additionally, we find that neutral hydrogen atoms are born with 0.08 eV temperatures, not 2 eV as is typically assumed.

  16. A simplified physical model of pressure wave dynamics and acoustic wave generation induced by laser absorption in the retina.

    PubMed

    Till, S J; Milsom, P K; Rowlands, G

    2004-07-01

    Shock waves have been proposed in the literature as a mechanism for retinal damage induced by ultra-short laser pulses. For a spherical absorber, we derive a set of linear equations describing the propagation of pressure waves. We show that the formation of shock fronts is due to the form of the absorber rather than the inclusion of nonlinear terms in the equations. The analytical technique used avoids the need for a Laplace transform approach and is easily applied to other absorber profiles. Our analysis suggests that the 'soft' nature of the membrane surrounding retinal melanosomes precludes shock waves as a mechanism for the retinal damage induced by ultra-short pulse lasers. The quantitative estimates of the pressure gradients induced by laser absorption which are made possible by this work, together with detailed meso-scale or molecular modelling, will allow alternative damage mechanisms to be identified. PMID:15210319

  17. High-speed laser-induced fluorescence and spark plug absorption sensor diagnostics for mixing and combustion studies in engines.

    PubMed

    Cundy, Michael; Schucht, Torsten; Thiele, Olaf; Sick, Volker

    2009-02-01

    Simultaneous high-speed in-cylinder measurements of laser-induced fluorescence of biacetyl as a fuel tracer and mid-infrared broadband absorption of fuel and combustion products (water and carbon dioxide) using a spark plug probe are compared in an optical engine. The study addresses uncertainties and the applicability of absorption measurements at a location slightly offset to the spark plug when information about mixing at the spark plug is desired. Absorbance profiles reflect important engine operation events, such as valve opening and closing, mixing, combustion, and outgassing from crevices. PMID:19183588

  18. Dynamics of Light-Absorption Variations Induced in a Bismuth Silicate Crystal by Visible Laser Illumination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khudyakova, E. S.; Kisteneva, M. G.; Shandarov, S. M.; Kornienko, T. A.; Tolstik, A. L.; Kargin, Yu. F.

    2015-01-01

    We present the results of experimental studies of the dynamics of the photoinduced optical absorption in a bismuth silicate crystal subject to continuous laser irradiation with wavelengths of 532 and 655 nm. The semiconductor-laser light beam with the wavelength λ = 655 nm causes the crystal bleaching at this wavelength, whereas its exposure to a shorter-wavelength irradiation from the optical-spectrum green region with a wavelength of 532 nm increases the optical absorption at both wavelengths, of 532 and 655 nm. The experimental results are interpreted using the theoretical model which assumes that the crystal has deep defect centers of two types so that an electron at each of these centers can be in one of the states characterized by different photoionization cross sections.

  19. Influence of Crystallinity on the Bulk Laser-Induced Damage Threshold and Absorption of Laser Light in CsLiB6O10 Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Tomosumi; Ono, Richi; Yap, Yoke Khin; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo

    2001-02-01

    The relationships among the bulk laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), dislocation density and absorption of laser light in CsLiB6O10 (CLBO) were investigated. A newly developed synthesis process allows the growth of CLBO crystals with a LIDT of 2.5-fold higher than that grown by the conventional top-seeded solution growth (TSSG) technique. High-quality CLBO possesses lower dislocation density (6.6× 103/cm2) than conventional CLBO (˜ 15.0× 103/cm2). The absorption of laser light in CLBO was characterized by measuring the temperature increase on the crystal output surface during the generation of fourth-harmonic (@266 nm) light of Nd:YAG lasers. At a UV power of 5 W, the maximum temperature increase was 6°C for high-quality CLBO, which was ˜ 30% lower than that generated on conventional CLBO crystal. Thus, the reduction of dislocation density can suppress the absorption of laser light, which helps to enhance the resistance of CLBO against laser-induced damage and alleviate thermal dephasing during the high-power generation of UV light.

  20. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurement of atomic oxygen density in an atmospheric pressure air plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conway, J.; Gogna, G. S.; Gaman, C.; Turner, M. M.; Daniels, S.

    2016-08-01

    Atomic oxygen number density [O] is measured in an air atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) using two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence (TALIF). Gas flow is fixed at 8 slpm, the RF power coupled into the plasma jet varied between 5 W and 20 W, and the resulting changes in atomic oxygen density measured. Photolysis of molecular oxygen is employed to allow in situ calibration of the TALIF system. During calibration, O2 photo-dissociation and two-photon excitation of the resulting oxygen atoms are achieved within the same laser pulse. The atomic oxygen density produced by photolysis is time varying and spatially non-uniform which needs to be corrected for to calibrate the TALIF system for measurement of atomic oxygen density in plasma. Knowledge of the laser pulse intensity I 0(t), wavelength, and focal spot size allows correction factors to be determined using a rate equation model. Atomic oxygen is used for calibration and measurement, so the laser intensity can be increased outside the TALIF quadratic laser power dependence region without affecting the calibration reliability as the laser power dependence will still be the same for both. The atomic O density results obtained are not directly benchmarked against other known density measurement techniques. The results show that the plasma jet atomic oxygen content increases as the RF power coupled into the plasma increases.

  1. Laser-Induced Surface Damage of Optical Materials: Absorption Sources, Initiation, Growth, adn Mitigation

    SciTech Connect

    Papernov, S.; Schmid, A.W.

    2009-04-07

    Susceptibility to laser damage of optical-material surfaces originates from the nature of the surface as a transitional structure between optical-material bulk and its surroundings. As such, it requires technological processing to satisfy figure and roughness requirements and is also permanently subjected to environmental exposure. Consequently, enhanced absorption caused by mechanical structural damage or incorporation and sorption of microscale absorbing defects, even layers of organic materials, is always characteristic for optical-material surfaces. In this review physics of interaction of pulsed-laser radiation with surface imperfections for different types of optical materials (metals, semiconductors, dielectrics, etc.), mechanisms of damage initiation, damage morphology, and damage-site growth under repetitive pulse irradiation are discussed. Consideration is also given here to the surface treatments leading to the reduction of damage initiation sites, such as laser cleaning and conditioning, removal of the surface layers affected by the grinding/polishing process, and mitigation of the damage growth at already formed damage sites.

  2. A two photon absorption laser induced fluorescence diagnostic for fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Magee, R. M.; Galante, M. E.; McCarren, D.; Scime, E. E.; Boivin, R. L.; Brooks, N. H.; Groebner, R. J.; Hill, D. N.; Porter, G. D.

    2012-10-15

    The quality of plasma produced in a magnetic confinement fusion device is influenced to a large extent by the neutral gas surrounding the plasma. The plasma is fueled by the ionization of neutrals, and charge exchange interactions between edge neutrals and plasma ions are a sink of energy and momentum. Here we describe a diagnostic capable of measuring the spatial distribution of neutral gas in a magnetically confined fusion plasma. A high intensity (5 MW/cm{sup 2}), narrow bandwidth (0.1 cm{sup -1}) laser is injected into a hydrogen plasma to excite the Lyman {beta} transition via the simultaneous absorption of two 205 nm photons. The absorption rate, determined by measurement of subsequent Balmer {alpha} emission, is proportional to the number of particles with a given velocity. Calibration is performed in situ by filling the chamber to a known pressure of neutral krypton and exciting a transition close in wavelength to that used in hydrogen. We present details of the calibration procedure, including a technique for identifying saturation broadening, measurements of the neutral density profile in a hydrogen helicon plasma, and discuss the application of the diagnostic to plasmas in the DIII-D tokamak.

  3. Charge transfer processes and ultraviolet induced absorption in Yb:YAG single crystal laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rydberg, S.; Engholm, M.

    2013-06-01

    Charge transfer (CT) transitions and UV induced color centers in Yb:YAG single crystals have been investigated. A simultaneous pair formation of a stable Yb2+ ion and a hole related (O-) color center (hole polaron) are observed through a CT-process. Slightly different types of hole related color centers are formed in Yb:YAG crystals containing small levels of iron impurities. Furthermore, excitation spectroscopy on the UV irradiated Yb:YAG samples could confirm an energy transfer process between Yb3+ and Yb2+ ions. The findings are important for an increased knowledge of the physical loss mechanisms observed in Yb-doped laser materials, such as the nonlinear decay process in Yb:YAG crystals as well as the photodarkening phenomenon in Yb-doped fiber lasers.

  4. Energy absorption behavior of polyurea coatings under laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jajam, Kailash; Lee, Jaejun; Sottos, Nancy

    2015-06-01

    Energy absorbing, lightweight, thin transparent layers/coatings are desirable in many civilian and military applications such as hurricane resistant windows, personnel face-shields, helmet liners, aircraft canopies, laser shields, blast-tolerant sandwich structures, sound and vibration damping materials to name a few. Polyurea, a class of segmented block copolymer, has attracted recent attention for its energy absorbing properties. However, most of the dynamic property characterization of polyurea is limited to tensile and split-Hopkinson-pressure-bar compression loading experiments with strain rates on the order of 102 and 104 s-1, respectively. In the present work, we report the energy absorption behavior of polyurea thin films (1 to 2 μm) subjected to laser-induced dynamic tensile and mixed-mode loading. The laser-generated high amplitude stress wave propagates through the film in short time frames (15 to 20 ns) leading to very high strain rates (107 to 108 s-1) . The substrate stress, surface velocity and fluence histories are inferred from the displacement fringe data. On comparing input and output fluences, test results indicate significant energy absorption by the polyurea films under both tensile and mixed-mode loading conditions. Microscopic examination reveals distinct changes in failure mechanisms under mixed-mode loading from that observed under pure tensile loading. Office of Naval Research MURI.

  5. Two-photon absorption-induced photoacoustic imaging of Rhodamine B dyed polyethylene spheres using a femtosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gregor; Bouchal, Klaus-Dieter; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter; Berer, Thomas

    2013-09-23

    In the present paper we demonstrate the possibility to image dyed solids, i.e. Rhodamine B dyed polyethylene spheres, by means of two-photon absorption-induced photoacoustic scanning microscopy. A two-photon luminescence image is recorded simultaneously with the photoacoustic image and we show that location and size of the photoacoustic and luminescence image match. In the experiments photoacoustic signals and luminescence signals are generated by pulses from a femtosecond laser. Photoacoustic signals are acquired with a hydrophone; luminescence signals with a spectrometer or an avalanche photo diode. In addition we derive the expected dependencies between excitation intensity and photoacoustic signal for single-photon absorption, two-photon absorption and for the combination of both. In order to verify our setup and evaluation method the theoretical predictions are compared with experimental results for liquid and solid specimens, i.e. a carbon fiber, Rhodamine B solution, silicon, and Rhodamine B dyed microspheres. The results suggest that the photoacoustic signals from the Rhodamine B dyed microspheres do indeed stem from two-photon absorption. PMID:24104130

  6. Calibration-free laser-induced plasma analysis of a metallic alloy with self-absorption correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirvani-Mahdavi, Hamidreza; Shoursheini, Seyede Zahra; Gholami, Hamid; Dini-Torkamani, Ziba; Ghahari-Korani, Sare

    2014-12-01

    Identification and concentration measurement of constituent elements of a metallic alloy is demonstrated by calibration-free laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (CF-LIBS) according to a special peak intensity-based model and considering the self-absorption effect. In this procedure, which is based on the line pair ratio method, the effect of line widths, though needs to be theoretically considered, may be approximately ignored. This is mainly true for the multiplet lines, but this property, in the case of some generic spectral lines in a measured spectrum, can be sometimes regarded. Initially, the optical penetration depth and therefrom self-absorption coefficient of each selected spectral line is calculated using the experimental (self-absorbed) intensity of the line. Then, the true (non-self-absorbed) intensity, which is basis of the conventional CF-LIBS calculation, is obtained through a recursive algorithm implemented by the MATLAB programming. In the experimental examination, the recorded spectrum reflects that the metallic alloy is consisted of gold, copper and silver. The concentration of elements is calculated with and without regarding self-absorption correction using 27 trios of spectral lines related to the elements. The average concentrations signify that the measurement error relative to the certified value for the concentration of the gold is modified from 3.56 % in the normal way to 0.34 % after applying self-absorption correction.

  7. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1987-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  8. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C. Paul; Rockwood, Stephen D.; Jensen, Reed J.; Lyman, John L.; Aldridge, III, Jack P.

    1977-01-01

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, in the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO.sub.2 laser light may be used to highly enrich .sup.34 S in natural SF.sub.6 and .sup.11 B in natural BCl.sub.3.

  9. Laser isotope separation by multiple photon absorption

    DOEpatents

    Robinson, C.P.; Rockwood, S.D.; Jensen, R.J.; Lyman, J.L.; Aldridge, J.P. III.

    1987-04-07

    Multiple photon absorption from an intense beam of infrared laser light may be used to induce selective chemical reactions in molecular species which result in isotope separation or enrichment. The molecular species must have a sufficient density of vibrational states in its vibrational manifold that, is the presence of sufficiently intense infrared laser light tuned to selectively excite only those molecules containing a particular isotope, multiple photon absorption can occur. By this technique, for example, intense CO[sub 2] laser light may be used to highly enrich [sup 34]S in natural SF[sub 6] and [sup 11]B in natural BCl[sub 3]. 8 figs.

  10. Atomic Emission, Absorption and Fluorescence in the Laser-induced Plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Winefordner, J. D.

    2009-01-22

    The main result of our efforts is the development and successful application of the theoretical model of laser induced plasma (LIP) that allows a back-calculation of the composition of the plasma (and the condensed phase) based on the observable plasma spectrum. The model has an immediate experimental input in the form of LIP spectra and a few other experimentally determined parameters. The model is also sufficiently simple and, therefore, practical. It is conveniently interfaced in a graphical user-friendly form for using by students and any laboratory personnel with only minimal training. In our view, the model opens up the possibility for absolute analysis, i.e. the analysis which requires no standards and tedious calibration. The other parts of this proposal (including plasma diagnostics) were somewhat subordinate to this main goal. Plasma diagnostics provided the model with the necessary experimental input and led to better understanding of plasma processes. Another fruitful direction we pursued was the use of the correlation analysis for material identification and plasma diagnostics. Through a number of computer simulations we achieved a clear understanding of how, where and why this approach works being applied to emission spectra from a laser plasma. This understanding will certainly improve the quality of forensic and industrial analyses where fast and reliable material identification and sorting are required.

  11. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  12. Simulation study of the thermal and the thermoelastic effects induced by pulsed laser absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Young; Jang, Kyungmin; Yang, Seung-Jin; Baek, Jun-Hyeok; Park, Jong-Rak; Yeom, Dong-Il; Kim, Ji-Sun; Kim, Hyung-Sik; Jun, Jae-Hoon; Chung, Soon-Cheol

    2016-04-01

    We studied the thermal and the mechanical effects induced by pulsed laser absorption in human skin by numerically solving the heat-transfer and the thermoelastic wave equations. The simulation of the heat-transfer equation yielded the spatiotemporal distribution of the temperature increase in the skin, which was then used in the driving term of the thermoelastic wave equation. We compared our simulation results for the temperature increase and the skin displacements with the measured and numerical results, respectively. For the comparison, we used a recent report by Jun et al. [Sci. Rep. 5, 11016 (2015)], who measured in vivo skin temperature and performed numerical simulation of the thermoelastic wave equation using a simple assumption about the temporal evolution of the temperature distribution, and found their results to be in good agreement with our results. In addition, we obtained solutions for the stresses in the human skin and analyzed their dynamic behaviors in detail.

  13. Intervalence-Band Absorption Saturation And Optically Induced Damage Of GaAs By Pulsed CO2 Laser Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, R. B.; Christie, W. H.; Eby, R. E.; Darken, L. S.; Mills, B. E.

    1985-11-01

    The absorption of CO2, laser radiation in p-type GaAs is dominated by direct free-hole transitions between states in the heavy- and light-hole bands. For laser intensities on the order of 10 MW/cm2, the absorption associated with these transitions in moderately Zn-doped GaAs begins to saturate in a manner predicted by an inhomogeneously broadened two-level model. For heavily Zn-doped samples (>1018 cm -3), large areas of the surface are found to melt at comparable laser energy densities, in contrast to the lightly doped samples in which the damage initially occurs in small localized sites. As the energy density of the CO2 laser radiation is progressively increased, the surface topography of the samples shows signs of ripple patterns, high local stress, vaporization of material, and exfoliation of solid GaAs fragments. X-ray emission data taken on the laser-melted samples show that there is a loss of As, compared to Ga, from the surface during the high temperature cycling. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) measurements are used to study the diffusion of oxygen from the native oxide and the incorporation of trapped oxygen in the near-surface region of the GaAs samples that have been melted by a CO2 laser pulse. We find that oxygen trapping does occur, and that the amount and depth of the oxygen signal depends on the laser energy density and number of laser shots.

  14. Resonant absorption effects induced by polarized laser light irradiating thin foils in the TNSA regime of ion acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Badziak, J.; Rosinski, M.; Zaras-Szydlowska, A.; Pfeifer, M.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-04-01

    Thin foils were irradiated by short pulsed lasers at intensities of 1016‑19W/cm2 in order to produce non-equilibrium plasmas and ion acceleration from the target-normal-sheath-acceleration (TNSA) regime. Ion acceleration in forward direction was measured by SiC detectors and ion collectors used in the time-of-flight configuration. Laser irradiations were employed using p-polarized light at different incidence angles with respect to the target surface and at different focal distances from the target surface. Measurements demonstrate that resonant absorption effects, due to the plasma wave excitations, enhance the plasma temperature and the ion acceleration with respect to those performed without to use of p-polarized light. Dependences of the ion flux characteristics on the laser energy, wavelength, focal distance and incidence angle will be reported and discussed.

  15. Electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Xihua; Sheng Jiteng; Xiao Min

    2011-10-15

    We conduct theoretical studies on electromagnetically induced absorption via incoherent collisions in an inhomogeneously broadened ladder-type three-level system with the density-matrix approach. The effects of the collision-induced coherence decay rates as well as the probe laser field intensity on the probe field absorption are examined. It is shown that with the increase of the collisional decay rates in a moderate range, a narrow dip due to electromagnetically induced transparency superimposed on the Doppler-broadened absorption background can be turned into a narrow peak under the conditions that the probe field intensity is not very weak as compared to the pump field, which results from the enhancement of constructive interference and suppression of destructive interference between one-photon and multiphoton transition pathways. The physical origin of the collision-assisted electromagnetically induced absorption is analyzed with a power-series solution of the density-matrix equations.

  16. Study of the laser-induced decomposition of energetic materials at static high-pressure by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebert, Philippe; Saint-Amans, Charles

    2013-06-01

    A detailed description of the reaction rates and mechanisms occurring in shock-induced decomposition of condensed explosives is very important to improve the predictive capabilities of shock-to-detonation transition models. However, direct measurements of such experimental data are difficult to perform during detonation experiments. By coupling pulsed laser ignition of an explosive in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) with time-resolved streak camera recording of transmitted light, it is possible to make direct observations of deflagration phenomena at detonation pressure. We have developed an experimental set-up that allows combustion front propagation rates and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy measurements. The decomposition reactions are initiated using a nanosecond YAG laser and their kinetics is followed by time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. The results obtained for two explosives, nitromethane (NM) and HMX are presented in this paper. For NM, a change in reactivity is clearly seen around 25 GPa. Below this pressure, the reaction products are essentially carbon residues whereas at higher pressure, a transient absorption feature is first observed and is followed by the formation of a white amorphous product. For HMX, the evolution of the absorption as a function of time indicates a multi-step reaction mechanism which is found to depend on both the initial pressure and the laser fluence.

  17. Interaction of wide-band-gap single crystals with 248-nm excimer laser irradiation. X. Laser-induced near-surface absorption in single-crystal NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K.H.; Langford, S.C.; Dickinson, J.T.; Hess, W.P.

    2005-02-15

    Ultraviolet laser-induced desorption of neutral atoms and molecules from nominally transparent, ionic materials can yield particle velocities consistent with surface temperatures of a few thousand kelvin even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser absorption required for this surface heating has been often overlooked. In this work, we report simultaneous neutral emission and laser transmission measurements on single-crystal NaCl exposed to 248-nm excimer laser radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near-surface region to account for the observed particle velocities. We show that the laser absorption grows from low values over several pulses and saturates at values sufficient to account for the surface temperatures required to explain the observed particle velocity distributions. The growth of absorption in these early pulses is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the emission intensities. The diffuse reflectance spectra acquired after exposure suggest that near-surface V-type centers are responsible for most of the absorption at 248 nm in single-crystal NaCl.

  18. Excitation/Detection Strategies for OH Planar Laser-Induced Fluorescence Measurements in the Presence of Interfering Fuel Signal and Absorption Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Anderson, Robert C.; Hicks, Yolanda R.

    2011-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) excitation/detection methods have been applied to obtain spatial distributions of the hydroxyl [OH] reacting intermediary and hydrocarbon [HC] primary species in laminar and turbulent combustion reactions. In this report, broadband and narrowband excitation/filtering techniques are explored to identify an optimal experimental configuration yielding significant fluorescent signal with low absorption losses. The combustion environments analyzed include 1) a laminar non-premixed methane/air flame and 2) a turbulent, non-premixed Jet-A/air fueled flame within a lean flame tube combustor. Hydrocarbon-based fuel and OH were excited via the R1 (1), R1(10) and R2(7) transitions of the A(sup 2)Epsilon(+) X(sup 2)pi(1,0) band using a broadband Nd:YAG pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and narrowband Nd:YAG/dye laser with ultraviolet frequency extension (UVX) package. Variables tested for influence on fluorescent signal and absorption characteristics were excitation line, laser energy, exciting linewidth, combustion reactants, and test flow conditions. Results are intended to guide the transition from a dye/UVX laser to an OPO system for performing advanced diagnostics of low-emission combustion concepts.

  19. Spatial and temporal characterization of a distilled water plasma using Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) - Effect of self-absorption on plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Boussaiedi, S.; Hannachi, R.; Ghalila, H.; BenLakhdar, Z.; Taieb, G.

    2007-09-19

    The spatio-temporal evolution of the plasma induced by interaction of a Nd-YAG laser pulse with the surface of distilled water is described. The temporal evolution from 200 ns after the plasma creation to 2200 ns of the H{sub {alpha}} and H{sub {beta}} lines are reported. Supposing the Local Themodynamic Equilibrium (LTE), the two plasma parameters: electron density and temperature are determined, including the influence of the self-absorption on its measurements. The spatial evolution of the H{sub {beta}} intensity and of the electron density are given.

  20. Two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence on O and O{sub 3} in a dc plasma for oxidation of aluminum

    SciTech Connect

    Knechten, K.; Kniknie, B.J.; Engeln, R.; Swagten, H.J.M.; Koopmans, B.; Sanden, M.C.M. van de; Jonge, W.J.M. de

    2004-11-01

    It has been conjectured that atomic oxygen and ozone can have a great influence on the plasma oxidation of ultrathin aluminum for magnetic tunnel junctions. In order to measure the density of O and ozone, two-photon absorption laser induced fluorescence measurements are performed in the dc glow plasma that is used for the oxidation process. It was found that ozone is much more abundantly present compared to atomic oxygen. Using in situ, real-time ellipsometry measurements, we prove that ozone is not directly involved in the oxidation process.

  1. Fabrication of PDMS (poly-dimethyl siloxane) molding and 3D structure by two-photon absorption induced by an ultrafast laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Shin Wook; Lee, Seong Ku; Cho, Mi Jung; Kong, Hong Jin; Yang, Dong-Yol; Park, Sang-hu; Lim, Tae-woo; Kim, Ran Hee; Lee, Kwang-Sup

    2004-12-01

    Multi-photon absorption phenomena induced by ultra fast laser have been considered for many applications of microfabrications such as metal ablation, glass etching and photopolymerization. Among the applications, the photopolymerization by two-photon absorption (TPA) has been regarded as a new microfabricating method. It is possible to be used in photo mask correcting, diffractive optical element and micro machining. The TPA photopolymerization is made possible to fabricate a complicated three dimensional structure which the conventional photomask technology has not been able to make. Furthermore the TPA photopolymerization process applied to a two dimensional structure fabrication may take shorter time than the old process since the absence of etching and deposition processes. Recently we have made a simple 3D structure and applied the technique to PDMS(poly-dimethyl siloxane) molding.

  2. Carcinogenic damage to deoxyribonucleic acid is induced by near-infrared laser pulses in multiphoton microscopy via combination of two- and three-photon absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadiarnykh, Oleg; Thomas, Giju; Van Voskuilen, Johan; Sterenborg, Henricus J. C. M.; Gerritsen, Hans C.

    2012-11-01

    Nonlinear optical imaging modalities (multiphoton excited fluorescence, second and third harmonic generation) applied in vivo are increasingly promising for clinical diagnostics and the monitoring of cancer and other disorders, as they can probe tissue with high diffraction-limited resolution at near-infrared (IR) wavelengths. However, high peak intensity of femtosecond laser pulses required for two-photon processes causes formation of cyclobutane-pyrimidine-dimers (CPDs) in cellular deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) similar to damage from exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) light. Inaccurate repair of subsequent mutations increases the risk of carcinogenesis. In this study, we investigate CPD damage that results in Chinese hamster ovary cells in vitro from imaging them with two-photon excited autofluorescence. The CPD levels are quantified by immunofluorescent staining. We further evaluate the extent of CPD damage with respect to varied wavelength, pulse width at focal plane, and pixel dwell time as compared with more pronounced damage from UV sources. While CPD damage has been expected to result from three-photon absorption, our results reveal that CPDs are induced by competing two- and three-photon absorption processes, where the former accesses UVA absorption band. This finding is independently confirmed by nonlinear dependencies of damage on laser power, wavelength, and pulse width.

  3. Interaction of Wide-Band-Gap Single Crystals with 248-nm Excimer Laser Irradiation: X. Laser-Induced Near-Surface Absorption in Single-Crystal NaCl

    SciTech Connect

    Nwe, K H.; Langford, Stephen C.; Dickinson, J T.; Hess, Wayne P.

    2005-02-15

    Ultraviolet laser-induced desorption of neutral atoms and molecules from nominally transparent, ionic materials can yield particle velocities consistent with surface temperatures of a few thousand Kelvin, even in the absence of visible surface damage. The origin of the laser required for this surface heating has been often overlooked. In this work, we report simultaneous neutral emission and laser transmission measurements on single crystal NaCl exposed to 248-nm excimer laser radiation. As much as 20% of the incident radiation at 248 nm must be absorbed in the near surface region to account for the observed particle velocities. We show that the laser absorption grows from low values over several pulses and saturates at values sufficient to account for the surface temperatures required to explain the observed particle velocity distributions. The growth of absorption in these early pulses is accompanied by a corresponding increase in the emission intensities. Diffuse reflectance spectra acquired after exposure suggest that near surface V-type centers are responsible for most of the absorption at 248 nm in single crystal NaCl.

  4. Laser absorption phenomena in flowing gas devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, P. K.; Otis, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation is presented of inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of CW CO2 laser radiation in flowing gases seeded with alkali metals. In order to motivate this development, some simple models are described of several space missions which could use laser powered rocket vehicles. Design considerations are given for a test call to be used with a welding laser, using a diamond window for admission of laser radiation at power levels in excess of 10 kW. A detailed analysis of absorption conditions in the test cell is included. The experimental apparatus and test setup are described and the results of experiments presented. Injection of alkali seedant and steady state absorption of the laser radiation were successfully demonstrated, but problems with the durability of the diamond windows at higher powers prevented operation of the test cell as an effective laser powered thruster.

  5. Temperature-insensitive laser frequency locking near absorption lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostinski, Natalie; Olsen, Ben A.; Marsland, Robert; McGuyer, Bart H.; Happer, William

    2011-03-01

    Combined magnetically induced circular dichroism and Faraday rotation of an atomic vapor are used to develop a variant of the dichroic atomic vapor laser lock that eliminates lock sensitivity to temperature fluctuations of the cell. Operating conditions that eliminate first-order sensitivity to temperature fluctuations can be determined by low-frequency temperature modulation. This temperature-insensitive gyrotropic laser lock can be accurately understood with a simple model, that is in excellent agreement with observations in potassium vapor at laser frequencies in a 2 GHz range about the 770.1 nm absorption line. The methods can be readily adapted for other absorption lines.

  6. Temperature-insensitive laser frequency locking near absorption lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kostinski, Natalie; Olsen, Ben A.; Marsland, Robert III; McGuyer, Bart H.; Happer, William

    2011-03-15

    Combined magnetically induced circular dichroism and Faraday rotation of an atomic vapor are used to develop a variant of the dichroic atomic vapor laser lock that eliminates lock sensitivity to temperature fluctuations of the cell. Operating conditions that eliminate first-order sensitivity to temperature fluctuations can be determined by low-frequency temperature modulation. This temperature-insensitive gyrotropic laser lock can be accurately understood with a simple model, that is in excellent agreement with observations in potassium vapor at laser frequencies in a 2 GHz range about the 770.1 nm absorption line. The methods can be readily adapted for other absorption lines.

  7. Switching from "absorption within transparency" to "transparency within transparency" in an electromagnetically induced absorption dominated transition.

    PubMed

    Dahl, Katrin; Molella, Luca Spani; Rinkleff, Rolf-Hermann; Danzmann, Karsten

    2008-05-01

    The absorption of a resonant coupling laser driving a closed degenerate two-level system in an atomic cesium beam was investigated as a function of the detuning of a second laser probing the same transition. The measurements were performed for four different polarization combinations of the two laser beams. Except for the beams of counterrotating polarizations all coupling-laser absorption profiles showed "absorption within transparency," i.e., the absorption in the region around the two-photon resonance was smaller than the absorption corresponding to the one-photon transition induced by the coupling laser, and an extra absorption peak was observed on this curve at the two-photon resonance. With regard to the beams of counterrotating polarizations we observed a switch from absorption within transparency to "transparency within transparency" when the probe-laser power exceeded the constant coupling-laser power. In other words, the cesium ensemble became mostly transparent to the coupling-laser beam at the two-photon resonance. PMID:18451960

  8. Transient Infrared Measurement of Laser Absorption Properties of Porous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marynowicz, Andrzej

    2016-06-01

    The infrared thermography measurements of porous building materials have become more frequent in recent years. Many accompanying techniques for the thermal field generation have been developed, including one based on laser radiation. This work presents a simple optimization technique for estimation of the laser beam absorption for selected porous building materials, namely clinker brick and cement mortar. The transient temperature measurements were performed with the use of infrared camera during laser-induced heating-up of the samples' surfaces. As the results, the absorbed fractions of the incident laser beam together with its shape parameter are reported.

  9. OH measurement by laser light absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perner, D.

    1986-01-01

    Since the first attempt to measure atmospheric hydroxyl radicals by optical absorption in 1975 (Perner et al., 1976) this method has been continuously developed further and its major obstacles and limitations are known today. The laser beam needs to be expanded in order to reduce the beam divergence. At the same time the energy density of the laser beam which produces OH via ozone photolysis is reduced to such an extent that the self-produced OH concentration ranges well below the atmospheric value. Atmospheric absorptions should be observed over a wide spectral range so that not only the OH radicals are properly identified by several rotational lines but their absorption can be corrected for interfering absorptions from other air constituents as SO2, CH2O, CS2, etc., which can be identified in a wide spectral range with more confidence. Air turbulence demands fast spectral scanning or probing on and off the absorption line. Energy requirements should be kept small in field operations. In the experiment frequency doubled dye laser pulses at 308 nm are produced. The picosecond light pulses are expected to show a smooth profile (light intensity against wavelength) which will be broadened to the required spectral width according to the uncertainty principle. The pump laser will be an optoacoustically modulated Nd:YAG laser.

  10. Bandgap engineering of InGaAsP/InP laser structure by photo-absorption-induced point defects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaleem, Mohammad; Nazir, Sajid; Saqib, Nazar Abbas

    2016-03-01

    Integration of photonic components on the same photonic wafer permits future optical communication systems to be dense and advanced performance. This enables very fast information handling between photonic active components interconnected through passive optical low loss channels. We demonstrate the UV-Laser based Quantum Well Intermixing (QWI) procedure to engineer the band-gap of compressively strained InGaAsP/InP Quantum Well (QW) laser material. We achieved around 135nm of blue-shift by simply applying excimer laser (λ= 248nm). The under observation laser processed material also exhibits higher photoluminescence (PL) intensity. Encouraging experimental results indicate that this simple technique has the potential to produce photonic integrated devices and circuits.

  11. Ultra-violet and resonant laser ablation coupled with microwave induced plasma atomic emission spectrometry and determination of tin in nickel based alloys by electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption and laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaodong

    Chapter 1 reviews laser ablation in analytical atomic spectrometry. Laser ablation is categorized into two functions: one is used as a sample introduction method, the other function is used as a microprobe analysis method. Both fundamental and applicational aspects are reviewed with the citations of related papers. This chapter also serves as an introduction to the work which is described in chapter 2 and chapter 3 as laser ablation is a relatively new research area for the research group. In chapter 2, instrumentation for excimer (308nm) laser ablation of samples was coupled with a microwave induced plasma (MLP), and evaluated for its potential as an approach to solid sampling for atomic emission spectrometry. Operating parameters were optimized, and the effects of laser repetition rate and number of laser shots on the emission signal were investigated. The UV excimer laser removed more material than would be expected of an infrared laser of similar energy. The chromium detection limit in the solid steel sample was estimated to be about 500 mug/g. In chapter 3, a wavelength tunable optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser was used to ablate a steel sample into the same apparatus described in chapter 2. The emission signal for the elements was selectively enhanced when the ablation wavelength was tuned to be in resonance with any atomic transition of that element. This was the first report of the observation of resonant ablation by use of optical detection, as prior reports of resonant ablation have used mass spectrometric detectors. Chapter 4 reviews the publications in laser excited atomic fluorescence spectrometry in recent eight years. The focus of the review is on recent development on new instruments and applications of this technique. Chapter 5 studies the determination of tin in nickel-based alloys with laser excited atomic fluorescence in a graphite furnace. Zeeman electrothermal atomizer atomic absorption spectrometry and inductively coupled plasma mass

  12. Wavelength mismatch effect in electromagnetically induced absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharti, Vineet; Wasan, Ajay; Natarajan, Vasant

    2016-07-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the phenomenon of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) in a 4-level system consisting of vee and ladder subsystems. The four levels are coupled using one weak probe field, and two strong control fields. We consider an experimental realization using energy levels of Rb. This necessitates dealing with different conditions of wavelength mismatch-near-perfect match where all three wavelengths are approximately equal; partial mismatch where the wavelength of one control field is less than the other fields; and complete mismatch where all three wavelengths are unequal. We present probe absorption profiles with Doppler averaging at room temperature to account for experiments in a room temperature Rb vapor cell. Our analysis shows that EIA resonances can be studied using Rydberg states excited with diode lasers.

  13. Absolute atomic oxygen density measurements for nanosecond-pulsed atmospheric-pressure plasma jets using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, C.; Carter, C.

    2014-12-01

    Nanosecond-pulsed plasma jets that are generated under ambient air conditions and free from confinement of electrodes have become of great interest in recent years due to their promising applications in medicine and dentistry. Reactive oxygen species that are generated by nanosecond-pulsed, room-temperature non-equilibrium He-O2 plasma jets among others are believed to play an important role during the bactericidal or sterilization processes. We report here absolute measurements of atomic oxygen density in a 1 mm-diameter He/(1%)O2 plasma jet at atmospheric pressure using two-photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy. Oxygen number density on the order of 1013 cm-3 was obtained in a 150 ns, 6 kV single-pulsed plasma jet for an axial distance up to 5 mm above the device nozzle. Temporally resolved O density measurements showed that there are two maxima, separated in time by 60-70 µs, and a total pulse duration of 260-300 µs. Electrostatic modeling indicated that there are high-electric-field regions near the nozzle exit that may be responsible for the observed temporal behavior of the O production. Both the field-distribution-based estimation of the time interval for the O number density profile and a pulse-energy-dependence study confirmed that electric-field-dependent, direct and indirect electron-induced processes play important roles for O production.

  14. Laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Arutiunian, R. V.; Bol'Shov, L. A.; Kanevskii, M. F.; Kondrashov, V. V.

    1987-07-01

    The propagation of laser absorption waves in metallic capillaries was studied experimentally and numerically during pulsed exposure to CO2 laser radiation. The dependence of the plasma front propagation rate on the initial air pressure in the capillary is determined. In a broad range of parameters, the formation time of the optically opaque plasma layer is governed by the total laser pulse energy from the beginning of the exposure to the instant screening appears, and is weakly dependent on the pulse shape and gas pressure.

  15. Effect of hydrogen concentration in conventional and IAD coatings on the absorption and laser-induced damage at 10.6 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahe, Manfred; Ristau, Detlev; Schmidt, Holger

    1993-06-01

    In this paper, data of single layers of YbF3, BaF2, YF3, and NaF and multilayer coatings produced by conventional thermal evaporation (boat, e-beam) and ion assisted deposition (IAD) are compared. Hydrogen concentration depth profiling was performed using nuclear reaction analysis based on the reaction 1H(15N, (alpha) (gamma) )12C. Absorption was measured with the aid of a laser calorimeter and a cw CO2 laser. A computer-controlled test facility with a TEA CO2 laser was used for determining the 1-on-1 damage thresholds of the coatings. The results point out that the absorption and damage behavior of coatings for the CO2 laser wavelength are related to the total amount of species containing hydrogen. Most of the IAD coatings exhibit a lower hydrogen contamination than conventional thin films.

  16. Laser Absorption by Over-Critical Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, J.; Tonge, J.; Fiuza, F.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    Absorption of high intensity laser light by matter has important applications to emerging sciences and technology, such as Fast Ignition ICF and ion acceleration. As such, understanding the underlying mechanisms of this absorption is key to developing these technologies. Critical features which distinguish the interaction of high intensity light - defined here as a laser field having a normalized vector potential greater than unity - are that the reaction of the material to the fields results in sharp high-density interfaces; and that the movement of the electrons is in general relativistic, both in a fluid and a thermal sense. The results of these features are that the absorption mechanisms are qualitatively distinct from those at lower intensities. We will review previous work, by our group and others, on the absorption mechanisms, and highlight current research. We will show that the standing wave structure of the reflected laser light is key to particle dynamics for normally incident lasers. The authors acknowledge the support of the Department of Energy under contract DE-NA 0001833 and the National Science Foundation under contract ACI 1339893.

  17. CO2 Laser Absorption in Ablation Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Eckel, Hans-Albert; Tegel, Jochen; Schall, Wolfgang O.

    2006-05-02

    The impulse formation by laser ablation is limited by the premature absorption of the incident laser radiation in the initially produced cloud of ablation products. The power fraction of a CO2 laser pulse transmitted through a small hole in a POM sample for pulse energies of 35 to 150 J focused on a spot of 2 cm2 has been compared with the incident power. The plasma formation in vacuum and in air of 3500 Pa and the spread of the shock wave with velocities of 1.6 to 2.4 km/s in the low pressure air was observed by Schlieren photography. A sharp edged dark zone with a maximum extension of 10 to 12 mm away from the target surface develops within 5 {mu}s independently of the pressure and is assumed to be a plasma. In order to find out, if this is also the zone where the majority of the incident laser radiation is absorbed, a CO2 probe laser beam was directed through the expansion cloud parallel to and at various distances from the sample surface. The time behavior of the absorption signal of the probe beam has been measured and an absorption wave could be observed.

  18. Diode laser absorption sensors for combustion control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Zhou

    Combustion is the most widely used energy conversion technique in the world. Diode-laser absorption sensors offer significant opportunities and advantages for in situ measurements of multiple combustion parameters such as temperature and species concentration due to their high sensitivity, high spectral resolution, fast time response, robustness and non-intrusive character. The overall objective of this thesis is to design and develop time-resolved and real-time tunable diode laser sensors with the potential for combustion control. A crucial element in the design of a tunable-diode-laser optical-absorption-based sensor is the selection of optimum transitions. The strategy and spectroscopic criteria for selecting optimum wavelength regions and absorption line combinations are developed. The development of this design-rule approach establishes a new paradigm to optimize tunable diode laser sensors for target applications. The water vapor spectrum in the 1-2 mum near-infrared region is systematically analyzed to find the best absorption transition pairs for sensitive measurement of temperature in the target combustion environment using a single tunable diode laser. Two sensors are developed in this work. The first sensor is a 1.8 mum, single-laser temperature sensor based on direct absorption scans. Successful time-resolved measurements in a variety of laboratory and practical devices are presented and used to identify potential improvements, and design rules for a second-generation sensor are developed based on the lessons learned. The second generation sensor is a 1.4 mum, single-laser temperature sensor using water vapor absorption detected by wavelength-modulation spectroscopy (WMS), which facilitates rapid data analysis and a 2 kHz real-time data rate in the combustion experiments reported here. Demonstration experiments in a heated cell and a forced Hencken burner confirm the sensitivity and accuracy of the sensors. The first application of TDL thermometry to a

  19. Influence of nanorod absorption spectrum width on superluminality effect for laser pulse propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, Vyacheslav A.; Lysak, Tatiana M.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the influence of the finite absorption spectrum width on the soliton formation and superluminality phenomenon at a femtosecond pulse propagation in a medium with noble nanoparticles. These effects take place if a positive phase-amplitude grating is induced by laser radiation. We take into account the two-photon absorption (TPA) of laser radiation by nanorods, and time-dependent nanorod aspect ratio changing due to their melting or reshaping because of laser energy absorption, and the nanorod absorption spectrum width. On the basis of computer simulation we demonstrate these effects in a medium with positive phase-amplitude grating, induced by laser radiation, if a weak laser energy absorption takes place on the laser pulse dispersion length.

  20. Infrared absorption of fs-laser textured CVD diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvani, P.; Bellucci, A.; Girolami, M.; Orlando, S.; Valentini, V.; Polini, R.; Mezzetti, A.; Di Fonzo, F.; Trucchi, D. M.

    2016-03-01

    Nanoscale periodic texturing on polycrystalline CVD diamond surface was performed to obtain a significant increase in optical absorptance to visible and near-infrared radiation. Surface texturing, obtained by the use of fs-laser ultrashort pulses, has been demonstrated to induce a controlled periodicity of ripples of about 170 nm and length of several µm, able to drastically increase the diamond capability of interacting with solar radiation from its intrinsic visible blindness. Ultraviolet and visible Raman spectroscopy has been used to confirm the absence of non-diamond phases resulting from the process for the fs-laser-textured sample. Moreover, here we investigate the optical properties in the range 200 nm-25 µm. Absorbance of fs-laser-textured CVD diamond is considerably higher than the untreated one at every wavelength, resulting in a remarkable increase in the emittance: It points out the need for an optimization of process parameters to enhance the selective absorption capability.

  1. Absorption spectroscopy with quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kosterev, A. A.; Curl, R. F.; Tittel, F. K.; Gmachl, C.; Capasso, F.; Sivco, D. L.; Baillargeon, J. N.; Hutchinson, A. L.; Cho, A. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Novel pulsed and cw quantum cascade distributed feedback (QC-DFB) lasers operating near lambda=8 micrometers were used for detection and quantification of trace gases in ambient air by means of sensitive absorption spectroscopy. N2O, 12CH4, 13CH4, and different isotopic species of H2O were detected. Also, a highly selective detection of ethanol vapor in air with a sensitivity of 125 parts per billion by volume (ppb) was demonstrated.

  2. Laser modulation of optical absorption in ZnSe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Major, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The possibility of producing and detecting laser induced modulation of absorption (LIMA) in ZnSe crystals using a moderate laser intensity of about 6 mw output was investigated. The modulation is smaller than that previously obtained with higher laser photon flux, but is not too difficult to detect. Modulation of the order of a few parts in 10 to the 5th power, up to one part in 10 to the 4th power appears typical at the present. LIMA pulse shapes were recorded with varying system resolutions at a half dozen wavelengths in the visible, from 4800 A to 6000 A. Detailed data were taken, particularly at 5000 A, for a range of time intervals following laser pulse turn-on. Quantitative study of the excitation and decay kinetics of these is underway, though analysis is not complete. Major features are discussed with attention centered upon the detailed measurements made most recently at 5000 A.

  3. Laser engines operating by resonance absorption.

    PubMed

    Garbuny, M; Pechersky, M J

    1976-05-01

    The coherence properties and power levels of lasers available at present lend themselves to the remote operation of mechanical engines by resonance absorption in a working gas. Laser radiation is capable of producing extremely high temperatures in a gas. Limits to the achievable temperatures in the working gas of an engine are imposed by the solid walls and by loss of resonance absorption due to thermal saturation, bleaching, and dissociation. However, it is shown that by proper control of the laser beam in space, time, and frequency, as well as by choice of the absorbing gas, these limits are to a great extent removed so that very high temperatures are indeed attainable. The working gas is largely monatomic, preferably helium with the addition of a few volume percent of an absorber. Such a gas mixture, internally heated, permits an optimization of the expansion ratio, with resulting thermal efficiencies and work ratios, not achievable in conventional engines. A relationship between thermal efficiency and work ratio is derived that is quite general for the optimization condition. The performance of laser piston engines, turbines, and the Stirling cycle based on these principles is discussed and compared with conventional engine operation. Finally, a brief discussion is devoted to the possibility and concepts for the direct conversion of selective vibrational or electronic excitation into mechanical work, bypassing the translational degrees of freedom. PMID:20165143

  4. UV laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorn, Hans-Peter; Brauers, Theo; Neuroth, Rudolf

    1994-01-01

    Long path Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) using a picosecond UV laser as a light source was developed in our institute. Tropospheric OH radicals are measured by their rotational absorption lines around 308 nm. The spectra are obtained using a high resolution spectrograph. The detection system has been improved over the formerly used optomechanical scanning device by application of a photodiode array which increased the observed spectral range by a factor of 6 and which utilizes the light much more effectively leading to a considerable reduction of the measurement time. This technique provides direct measurements of OH because the signal is given by the product of the absorption coefficient and the OH concentration along the light path according to Lambert-Beers law. No calibration is needed. Since the integrated absorption coefficient is well known the accuracy of the measurement essentially depends on the extent to which the OH absorption pattern can be detected in the spectra. No interference by self generated OH radicals in the detection lightpath has been observed. The large bandwidth (greater than 0.15 nm) and the high spectral resolution (1.5 pm) allows absolute determination of interferences by other trace gas absorptions. The measurement error is directly accessible from the absorption-signal to baseline-noise ratio in the spectra. The applicability of the method strongly depends on visibility. Elevated concentrations of aerosols lead to considerable attenuation of the laser light which reduces the S/N-ratio. In the moderately polluted air of Julich, where we performed a number of OH measurement spectra. In addition absorption features of unidentified species were frequently detected. A quantitative deconvolution even of the known species is not easy to achieve and can leave residual structures in the spectra. Thus interferences usually increase the noise and deteriorate the OH detection sensitivity. Using diode arrays for sensitive

  5. Methane overtone absorption by intracavity laser spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obrien, James J.

    1990-01-01

    Interpretation of planetary methane (CH4) visible-near IR spectra, used to develop models of planetary atmospheres, has been hampered by a lack of suitable laboratory spectroscopic data. The particular CH4 spectral bands are due to intrinsically weak, high overtone-combination transitions too complex for classical spectroscopic analysis. The traditional multipass cell approach to measuring spectra of weakly absorbing species is insufficiently sensitive to yield reliable results for some of the weakest CH4 absorption features and is difficult to apply at the temperatures of the planetary environments. A time modulated form of intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS), has been shown to provide effective absorption pathlengths of 100 to 200 km with sample cells less than 1 m long. The optical physics governing this technique and the experimental parameters important for obtaining reliable, quantitative results are now well understood. Quantitative data for CH4 absorption obtained by ILS have been reported recently. Illustrative ILS data for CH4 absorption in the 619.7 nm and 681.9 nm bands are presented. New ILS facilities at UM-St. Louis will be used to measure CH4 absorption in the 700 to 1000 nm region under conditions appropriate to the planetary atmospheres.

  6. Mitigation of scattering defect and absorption of DKDP crystals by laser conditioning.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yueliang; Zhao, Yuanan; Hu, Guohang; Peng, Xiaocong; Chang, Junxiu; Xie, Xiaoyi; He, Jun; Guo, Meng; Shao, Jianda

    2015-06-15

    The variation of scattering and absorption in DKDP crystals by laser conditioning was investigated by combining light scattering technique and on-site transmittance measurement technique. Laser-induced disappearance of scattering defects was observed, and variation of transmittance was achieved. Using Mie theory, a kind of absorbing defects, aside from scattering defect, was discovered. Moreover, the experimental results demonstrated that the absorption of crystal could be mitigated by laser conditioning. PMID:26193600

  7. Influence of liquid medium with different absorption and its layer thickness on bovine bone tibia ablation induced by CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuwei; Chen, Chuanguo; Zhang, Xianzeng; Zhan, Zhenlin; Xie, Shusen

    2014-11-01

    Liquid-assisted laser ablation has been investigated in laser surface cleaning, laser osteotomy, and dental tissue ablation. However, the actual mechanism of liquid-assisted ablation is not clear yet. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of liquid medium with different absorption and the liquid thickness on laser ablation efficiency. A pulsed CO2 laser was employed to ablate bovine bone tibia under liquid layer which varied from 0.6 mm to 2 mm. The applied pulse power level was set at 5 w and each crater was produced with six laser pulses. The results showed that the ablation cross-section area produced with various levels of pure water thickness (0.6, 0.8, 1 and 2 mm)were lower than under ink, and the ablation depth gradually decreased as the water layer becoming thicker. The biggest cross-section area in liquid thickness of ink was 0.8mm, but as the layer thicker than 0.8 mm the ablation depth decreased suddenly. There was thermal damage seen on samples in all of the groups, but less in pure water.

  8. Energy Absorption Structure of Laser Supported Detonation Wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Yamaguchi, Toshikazu; Hatai, Keigo; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2010-05-01

    In Repetitive Pulsed (RP) laser propulsion, when the high energy laser beam is focused in the thruster, Laser Supported Detonation (LSD) wave is generated. This LSD wave converts the laser energy to the enthalpy of the blast wave, which will then apply impulse to the wall of the thruster. Therefore, the energy absorption structure and sustaining condition of LSD wave are important to be understood, which was still not clear though some visualized experiments have been conducted by Ushio et al. before. In this paper, 2-wavelength Mach-Zehnder interferometry is brought to investigate the electron density distribution of LSD area. At the same time, the temperature of the laser induced plasma is measured by an emission spectroscopy experiment, and calculated based on the assumption of local thermal equilibrium. The results show that in LSD, the electron density has a peak (as high as 2×1024[m-3]) behind the shock wave. The irradiated laser can be entirely absorbed before reaching the position of this peak. As a result, a new peak is always generating in front of the old one and this propagating has the same velocity as that of the blast wave. In this way, high heating ratio is sustained right after the shock front. However, as the laser pulse energy becomes lower, the propagating peak cannot catch up with the blast wave anymore, which leads to a termination of the LSD wave. From this study, it is found that for sustaining the LSD wave, a sufficiently thin laser absorption layer is necessary.

  9. Laser induced nuclear reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Ledingham, Ken; McCanny, Tom; Graham, Paul; Fang Xiao; Singhal, Ravi; Magill, Joe; Creswell, Alan; Sanderson, David; Allott, Ric; Neely, David; Norreys, Peter; Santala, Marko; Zepf, Matthew; Watts, Ian; Clark, Eugene; Krushelnick, Karl; Tatarakis, Michael; Dangor, Bucker; Machecek, Antonin; Wark, Justin

    1998-12-16

    Dramatic improvements in laser technology since 1984 have revolutionised high power laser technology. Application of chirped-pulse amplification techniques has resulted in laser intensities in excess of 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. In the mid to late eighties, C. K. Rhodes and K. Boyer discussed the possibility of shining laser light of this intensity onto solid surfaces and to cause nuclear transitions. In particular, irradiation of a uranium target could induce electro- and photofission in the focal region of the laser. In this paper it is shown that {mu}Ci of {sup 62}Cu can be generated via the ({gamma},n) reaction by a laser with an intensity of about 10{sup 19} Wcm{sup -2}.

  10. Tomographic laser absorption spectroscopy using Tikhonov regularization.

    PubMed

    Guha, Avishek; Schoegl, Ingmar

    2014-12-01

    The application of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) to flames with nonhomogeneous temperature and concentration fields is an area where only few studies exist. Experimental work explores the performance of tomographic reconstructions of species concentration and temperature profiles from wavelength-modulated TDLAS measurements within the plume of an axisymmetric McKenna burner. Water vapor transitions at 1391.67 and 1442.67 nm are probed using calibration-free wavelength modulation spectroscopy with second harmonic detection (WMS-2f). A single collimated laser beam is swept parallel to the burner surface, where scans yield pairs of line-of-sight (LOS) data at multiple radial locations. Radial profiles of absorption data are reconstructed using Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, which suppresses the amplification of experimental noise that is typically observed for reconstructions with high spatial resolution. Based on spectral data reconstructions, temperatures and mole fractions are calculated point-by-point. Here, a least-squares approach addresses difficulties due to modulation depths that cannot be universally optimized due to a nonuniform domain. Experimental results show successful reconstructions of temperature and mole fraction profiles based on two-transition, nonoptimally modulated WMS-2f and Tikhonov regularized Abel inversion, and thus validate the technique as a viable diagnostic tool for flame measurements. PMID:25607968

  11. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials.

    PubMed

    Cross, P L; Barnes, N P; Skolaut, M W; Storm, M E

    1990-02-20

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiency for six Nd laser materials was calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO(4), Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials. PMID:20556185

  12. Blackbody absorption efficiencies for six lamp pumped Nd laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, Patricia L.; Barnes, Norman P.; Skolaut, Milton W., Jr.; Storm, Mark E.

    1990-01-01

    Utilizing high resolution spectra, the absorption efficiencies for six Nd laser materials were calculated as functions of the effective blackbody temperature of the lamp and laser crystal size. The six materials were Nd:YAG, Nd:YLF, Nd:Q-98 Glass, Nd:YVO4, Nd:BEL, and Nd:Cr:GSGG. Under the guidelines of this study, Nd:Cr:GSGG's absorption efficiency is twice the absorption efficiency of any of the other laser materials.

  13. Resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption in short, intense laser irradiated plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Ge, Z. Y.; Zhuo, H. B.; Ma, Y. Y.; Yang, X. H.; Yu, T. P.; Zou, D. B.; Yin, Y.; Shao, F. Q.; Yu, W.; Luan, S. X.; Zhou, C. T.; Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics, Beijing 100088 ; Peng, X. J.

    2013-07-15

    An analytical model for laser-plasma interaction during the oblique incidence by an ultrashort ultraintense p-polarized laser on a solid-density plasma is proposed. Both the resonant absorption and not-so-resonant absorption are self-consistently included. Different from the previous theoretical works, the physics of resonant absorption is found to be valid in more general conditions as the steepening of the electron density profile is considered. Even for a relativistic intensity laser, resonant absorption can still exist under certain plasma scale length. For shorter plasma scale length or higher laser intensity, the not-so-resonant absorption tends to be dominant, since the electron density is steepened to a critical level by the ponderomotive force. The laser energy absorption rates for both mechanisms are discussed in detail, and the difference and transition between these two mechanisms are presented.

  14. Induced Transparency and Absorption in Coupled Microresonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, David D.; Chang, Hongrok

    2004-01-01

    We review the conditions for the occurrence of coherence phenomena in passive coupled optical microresonators. We derive the effective steady-state response and determine conditions for induced transparency and absorption in these systems.

  15. High-intensity laser heating in liquids: Multiphoton absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Longtin, J.P.; Tien, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    At high laser intensities, otherwise transparent liquids can absorb strongly by the mechanism of multiphoton absorption, resulting in absorption and heating several orders of magnitude greater than classical, low-intensity mechanisms. The use of multiphoton absorption provides a new mechanism for strong, controlled energy deposition in liquids without bulk plasma formation, shock waves, liquid ejection, etc., which is of interest for many laser-liquid applications, including laser desorption of liquid films, laser particle removal, and laser water removal from microdevices. This work develops a microscopically based model of the heating during multiphoton absorption in liquids. The dependence on pulse duration, intensity, wavelength, repetition rate, and liquid properties is discussed. Pure water exposed to 266 nm laser radiation is investigated, and a novel heating mechanism for water is proposed that uses multiple-wavelength laser pulses.

  16. Laser-induced bioluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Hickman, G.D.; Lynch, R.V. III

    1981-01-01

    A project has been initiated to determine the feasibility of developing a complete airborne remote sensing system for rapidly mapping high concentration patches of bioluminescent organisms in the world's oceans. Conceptually, this system would be composed of a laser illuminator to induce bioluminescence and a low light level image intensifier for detection of light. Initial laboratory measurements consisted of using a 2-J flash lamp pulsed optical dye laser to excite bioluminescence in the marine dinoflagellate Pyrocustis lunula at ambient temperature using Rhodamine 6G as the lasing dye (585 nm) and a laser pulse width of 1 microsec. After a latency period of 15-20 msec, the bioluminescence maximum occurred in the blue (480 nm is the wavelength maximum for most dinoflagellate bioluminescence) with the peaking occurring approximately 65 msec after the laser pulse. Planned experiments will investigate the effect of different excitation wavelengths and energies at various temperatures and salinities of the cultures.

  17. Observation of femtosecond-laser-induced ablation plumes of aluminum using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Yasuaki; Oguri, Katsuya; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2006-11-27

    The dynamics of the laser ablation plume expansion of aluminum was investigated by using space- and time-resolved soft x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Blueshifts of the Al L-shell photoabsorption edge indicating the state of aluminum were observed in the plumes, which were generated by irradiating an aluminum target with 120 fs near-infrared pulses at an intensity of 10{sup 14} W/cm{sup 2}. The spatiotemporal evolution of the plumes exhibited a multilayer structure consisting of vaporized aluminum and condensed aluminum particles, following the expansion of plasma, with expansion velocities of 10{sup 4} m/s for the atomic state and 10{sup 3} m/s for the condensed state.

  18. Chlorine analysis by diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Koch, J; Zybin, A; Niemax, K

    2000-04-01

    The general characteristics of Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry (DLAAS) in low pressure plasmas particularly with respect to the detection of non-metals are comprehensively recapitulated and discussed. Furthermore, a detector, which is based on DLAAS in a microwave-induced low pressure plasma as an alternative technique for halogene-specific analysis of volatile compounds and polymeric matrices is described. The analytical capability of the technique is demonstrated on the chlorine-specific analysis of ablated polymer fragments as well as gas chromatographically separated hydrocarbons. Since the measurements were carried out by means of a balanced-heterodyne detection scheme, different technical noise contributions, such as laser excess and RAM noise could efficiently be suppressed and the registered absorption was limited only by the principal shot noise. Thus, in the case of the polymer analysis a chlorine-specific absolute detection limit of 10 pg could be achieved. Furthermore, fundamental investigations concerning the influence of hydrocarbons on the dissociation capability of the microwave induced plasma were performed. For this purpose, the carbon-, chlorine- and hydrogen-specific stoichiometry of the compounds were empirically determined. Deviations from the expected proportions were found to be insignificant, implying the possibility of internal standardization relative to the response of a reference sample. PMID:12953476

  19. Attosecond transient absorption in dense gases: Exploring the interplay between resonant pulse propagation and laser-induced line-shape control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Gaarde, Mette B.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) spectral line shapes in an optically thick helium gas under near-infrared (IR) perturbation. In our experimental and theoretical work, we systematically vary the IR intensity, time-delay, gas density, and IR polarization parameters to study line-shape modifications induced by collective interactions in a regime beyond the single-atom response of a thin, dilute gas. In both experiment and theory, we find that specific features in the frequency-domain absorption profile, and their evolution with propagation distance, can be attributed to the interplay between resonant attosecond pulse propagation and IR-induced phase shifts. Our calculations show that this interplay also manifests itself in the time domain, with the IR pulse influencing the reshaping of the XUV pulse propagating in the resonant medium.

  20. Absorption homogenization at wavy melt films by CO2-lasers in contrast to 1 μm-wavelength lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Alexander F. H.

    2015-02-01

    For wavy metal melts, across a wide range of their topology parameters, lasers with about 1 μm wavelength experience the highest Fresnel absorption around the shoulders of the waves. Calculations show that this induces a strong peak of the absorbed power density of the laser beam. The high temperature gradients have the potential to cause very local boiling and growth of the valleys. In contrast, for a certain parameter category the small Brewster angle for the CO2-laser partially homogenizes the temperatures by elevated absorption at domains of grazing incidence. This has the potential to cause opposite consequences on the process, like wave smoothing.

  1. Laser engines operating by resonance absorption. [thermodynamic feasibility study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Pechersky, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    Basic tutorial article on the thermodynamic feasibility of laser engines at the present state of the art. Three main options are considered: (1) laser power applied externally to a heat reservoir (boiler approach); (2) internal heating of working fluid by resonance absorption; and (3) direct conversion of selective excitation into work. Only (2) is considered practically feasible at present. Basic concepts and variants, efficiency relations, upper temperature limits of laser engines, selection of absorbing gases, engine walls, bleaching, thermodynamic cycles of optimized laser engines, laser-powered turbines, laser heat pumps are discussed. Photon engines and laser dissociation engines are also considered.

  2. Light-induced changes in subband absorption in a-Si:H using photoluminescence absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, S. Q.; Taylor, P. C.; Nitta, S.

    1991-08-01

    We have used the photoluminescence (PL) generated in a thin-film sample of a-Si:H to probe low absorption levels by measuring the absorption of the PL as it travels down the length of the film in a waveguide mode. This technique, which we have called PL absorption spectroscopy of PLAS, allows the measurement of values of the absorption coefficient α down to about 0.1 cm-1. Because this technique probes the top and bottom surfaces of the a-Si:H sample, it is important to separate surface from bulk absorption mechanisms. An improved sample geometry has been employed to facilitate this separation. One sample consisted of an a-Si1-xNix:H/a-Si:H/ a-Si1-xNx:H/NiCr layered structure where the silicon nitride layers served as the cladding layers for the waveguide. In a second sample the a-Si:H layer was interrupted near the middle for two separate, thin (100 Å) layers of a-Si1-xNx:H in order to check for the importance of the absorption at the silicon/silicon nitride interfaces in these PLAS measurements. Changes in the below-gap absorption on light soaking were examined using irradiation from an Ar+ laser (5145 Å, ˜200 mW/cm2 for 5.5 hours at 300 K). The silicon/silicon nitride interface is responsible for an absorption which has a shoulder near 1.2 eV while the bulk a-Si:H absorption exhibits no such shoulder. The metastable, optically-induced increase in the below gap absorption appears to come entirely from the bulk of the a-Si:H. These low temperature PLAS measurements are compared with those obtained at 300 K by photothermal deflection spectroscopy.

  3. Laser induced ignition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liedl, G.; Schuöcker, D.; Geringer, B.; Graf, J.; Klawatsch, D.; Lenz, H. P.; Piock, W. F.; Jetzinger, M.; Kapus, P.

    2007-05-01

    Nowadays, combustion engines and other combustion processes play an overwhelming and important role in everyday life. As a result, ignition of combustion processes is of great importance, too. Usually, ignition of a combustible material is defined in such a way that an ignition initiates a self-sustained reaction which propagates through the inflammable material even in the case that the ignition source has been removed. In most cases, a well defined ignition location and ignition time is of crucial importance. Spark plugs are well suited for such tasks but suffer from some disadvantages, like erosion of electrodes or restricted positioning possibilities. In some cases, ignition of combustible materials by means of high power laser pulses could be beneficial. High power lasers offer several different possibilities to ignite combustible materials, like thermal ignition, resonant ignition or optical breakdown ignition. Since thermal and resonant ignitions are not well suited on the requirements mentioned previously, only optical breakdown ignition will be discussed further. Optical breakdown of a gas within the focal spot of a high power laser allows a very distinct localization of the ignition spot in a combustible material. Since pulse duration is usually in the range of several nanoseconds, requirements on the ignition time are fulfilled easily, too. Laser peak intensities required for such an optical breakdown are in the range of 10 11 W/cm2. The hot plasma which forms during this breakdown initiates the following self-propagating combustion process. It has been shown previously that laser ignition of direct injection engines improves the fuel consumption as well as the exhaust emissions of such engines significantly. The work presented here gives a brief overview on the basics of laser induced ignition. Flame propagation which follows a successful ignition event can be distinguished into two diffrent regimes. Combustion processes within an engine are usually

  4. Method and apparatus for enhancing laser absorption sensitivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, Christopher R. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A simple optomechanical method and apparatus is described for substantially reducing the amplitude of unwanted multiple interference fringes which often limit the sensitivities of tunable laser absorption spectrometers. An exterior cavity is defined by partially transmissible surfaces such as a laser exit plate, a detector input, etc. That cavity is spoiled by placing an oscillating plate in the laser beam. For tunable diode laser spectroscopy in the mid-infrared region, a Brewster-plate spoiler allows the harmonic detection of absorptances of less than 10 to the -5 in a single laser scan. Improved operation is achieved without subtraction techniques, without complex laser frequency modulation, and without distortion of the molecular lineshape signal. The technique is applicable to tunable lasers operating from UV to IR wavelengths and in spectrometers which employ either short or long pathlengths, including the use of retroreflectors or multipass cells.

  5. Laser supported solid state absorption fronts in silica

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W; Bude, J D

    2010-02-09

    We develop a model based on simulation and experiment that explains the behavior of solid-state laser-supported absorption fronts generated in fused silica during high intensity (up to 5GW/cm{sup 2}) laser exposure. We find that the absorption front velocity is constant in time and is nearly linear in laser intensity. Further, this model can explain the dependence of laser damage site size on these parameters. This behavior is driven principally by the temperature-activated deep sub band-gap optical absorptivity, free electron transport and thermal diffusion in defect-free silica for temperatures up to 15,000K and pressures < 15GPa. The regime of parameter space critical to this problem spans and extends that measured by other means. It serves as a platform for understanding general laser-matter interactions in dielectrics under a variety of conditions.

  6. Applications of absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lizhu; Tian, Guang; Li, Jingsong; Yu, Benli

    2014-01-01

    Infrared laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) is a promising modern technique for sensing trace gases with high sensitivity, selectivity, and high time resolution. Mid-infrared quantum cascade lasers, operating in a pulsed or continuous wave mode, have potential as spectroscopic sources because of their narrow linewidths, single mode operation, tunability, high output power, reliability, low power consumption, and compactness. This paper reviews some important developments in modern laser absorption spectroscopy based on the use of quantum cascade laser (QCL) sources. Among the various laser spectroscopic methods, this review is focused on selected absorption spectroscopy applications of QCLs, with particular emphasis on molecular spectroscopy, industrial process control, combustion diagnostics, and medical breath analysis. PMID:25239063

  7. Radiant energy absorption studies for laser propulsion. [gas dynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caledonia, G. E.; Wu, P. K. S.; Pirri, A. N.

    1975-01-01

    A study of the energy absorption mechanisms and fluid dynamic considerations for efficient conversion of high power laser radiation into a high velocity flow is presented. The objectives of the study are: (1) to determine the most effective absorption mechanisms for converting laser radiation into translational energy, and (2) to examine the requirements for transfer of the absorbed energy into a steady flow which is stable to disturbances in the absorption zone. A review of inverse Bremsstrahlung, molecular and particulate absorption mechanisms is considered and the steady flow and stability considerations for conversion of the laser power to a high velocity flow in a nozzle configuration is calculated. A quasi-one-dimensional flow through a nozzle was formulated under the assumptions of perfect gas.

  8. Absorption coefficients of a hydrogen plasma for laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The formalism for the calculation of the absorption of radiation by a hydrogen plasma at common laboratory conditions is summarized. The hydrogen plasma absorption coefficient for laser radiation has been computed for a wide range of electron densities and temperatures (10,000-40,000 K). The results of this computation are presented in a graphical form that permits a determination of the absorption coefficient for the following laser wavelengths: 0.176, 0.325, 0.337, 0.442, 0.488, 0.515, 0.633, 0.694, 1.06, 1.15, 2.36, 3.39, 5.40 and 10.6 microns. The application of these results and laser radiation absorption measurements to plasma diagnostics is discussed briefly.

  9. Powerful laser pulse absorption in partly homogenized foam plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cipriani, M.; Gus'kov, S. Yu.; De Angelis, R.; Andreoli, P.; Consoli, F.; Cristofari, G.; Di Giorgio, G.; Ingenito, F.; Rupasov, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    The internal volume structure of a porous medium of light elements determines unique features of the absorption mechanism of laser radiation; the characteristics of relaxation and transport processes in the produced plasma are affected as well. Porous materials with an average density larger than the critical density have a central role in enhancing the pressure produced during the ablation by the laser pulse; this pressure can exceed the one produced by target direct irradiation. The problem of the absorption of powerful laser radiation in a porous material is examined both analytically and numerically. The behavior of the medium during the process of pore filling in the heated region is described by a model of viscous homogenization. An expression describing the time and space dependence of the absorption coefficient of laser radiation is therefore obtained from the model. A numerical investigation of the absorption of a nanosecond laser pulse is performed within the present model. In the context of numerical calculations, porous media with an average density larger than the critical density of the laser-produced plasma are considered. Preliminary results about the inclusion of the developed absorption model into an hydrodynamic code are presented.

  10. SiC absorption of near-infrared laser radiation at high temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adelmann, B.; Hellmann, R.

    2016-07-01

    We report on a theoretical and experimental investigation of the temperature-dependent optical absorption of nitrogen-doped 4H-SiC for a temperature range between room temperature and the decomposition point. The theoretical model is based on free carrier absorption including the temperature dependence of the electron mobility. With respect to laser material processing of silicon carbide, the analysis focusses on a near-infrared wavelength range. At room temperature, the calculated absorption is in excellent agreement to transmission and reflection measurements. For the experimental study of the absorption at higher temperatures induced by intense 1070-nm laser irradiation, a two-color pyrometer is employed with the thermal emission of the laser interaction zone being collected coaxial to the impinging laser. Exemplarily, the simulated temperature-dependent absorption is used to determine the heating of a 0.4-mm-thick 4H-SiC specimen during laser irradiation and compared to the experimentally determined temperature. In an initial time domain of the irradiation with an attained temperature below 1350 K, the simulated and measured temperatures are in good agreement. Above 1350 K, however, the measured temperature reveals a sharp and fast increase up to 2100 K which is not predicted by the model. This discrepancy is attributed to a strong additional absorption mechanism caused by carbonization at the surface which is confirmed by EDX analysis.

  11. Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy Measurement of SOx using Tunable Infrared Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuchi, Tetsuo

    The absorption characteristics of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and sulfur trioxide (SO3) in the infrared region were measured using a quantum cascade laser and an absorption cell of length 1 m heated to 150°C. The laser was scanned over the wavelength range 6.9-7.4 μm, which included the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3. Measurement results showed that the absorption bands of SO2 and SO3 partially overlapped, with peaks at 7.28 μm and 7.35 μm for SO2 and 7.14 μm and 7.25 μm for SO3. These results showed the possbility of using infrared laser absorption spectroscopy for measurement of sulfur oxides (SOx) in flue gas. For SO3 measurement, infrared absorption spectroscopy was shown to be more suitable than ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy. The absorption characteristics of open air in the same wavelength region showed that the interference due to water vapor must be efficiently removed to perform SOx measurement in flue gas.

  12. Ultra-Short Laser Absorption In Solid Targets

    SciTech Connect

    Harfouche, A.; Bendib, A.

    2008-09-23

    With the rapid development and continuously improving technology of subpicosecond laser pulse generation, new interesting physical problems are now investigated. Among them the laser light absorption in solid targets. During the interaction with solid targets, high intensity laser pulses are absorbed by electrons in optical skin depths, leading to rapid ionization before that significant ablation of solid material takes place. The ultra-short laser is absorbed in the overdense plasma through the electron-ion collisions (normal skin effect) or collisionless mechanisms (anomalous skin effect or sheath inverse bremsstrahlung). These two regimes depend on the laser intensity, the plasma temperature and the ionization state Z. In this work we solve numerically the Fokker-Planck equation to compute the electron distribution function in the skin layer. In the second step we compute the surface impedance and we deduce the absorption coefficient.

  13. Kinetic Approach for Laser-Induced Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Omar, Banaz; Rethfeld, Baerbel

    2008-10-22

    Non-equilibrium distribution functions of electron gas and phonon gas excited with ultrashort intense laser pulses are calculated for laser-induced plasmas occurring in solids. The excitation during femtosecond irradiation and the subsequent thermalization of the free electrons, as well as the dynamics of phonons are described by kinetic equations. The microscopic collision processes, such as absorption by inverse bremsstrahlung, electron-electron collisions, and electron-phonon interactions are considered by complete Boltzmann collision integrals. We apply our kinetic approach for gold by taking s-band electron into account and compare it with the case of excitation of d-band electrons.

  14. Study of photoinduced absorption by the method of modified laser photothermal radiometry

    SciTech Connect

    Skvortsov, L A; Maksimov, E M; Tuchkov, A A

    2008-10-31

    The application of the method of modified laser photothermal radiometry for studying the photoinduced absorption in thin films is considered. The sensitivity of the method is estimated. The mechanism of induced near-IR absorption in titanium dioxide films is proposed and the nature of surface defects responsible for this process is explained. It is shown that kinetic equations describing monomolecular recombination are consistent with the experimental dependences for the thermal activation energy of defects equal to 0.17{+-}0.04 eV. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  15. Comparision of laser-induced and classical ultasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederhauser, Joel J.; Jaeger, Michael; Frenz, Martin

    2003-06-01

    A classical medical ultrasound system was combined with a pulsed laser source to allow laser-induced ultrasound imaging (optoacoustics). Classical ultrasound is based on reflection and scattering of an incident acoustic pulse at internal tissue structures. Laser-induced ultrasound is generated in situ by heating optical absorbing structures, such as blood vessels, with a 5 ns laser pulse (few degrees or fraction of degree), which generates pressure transients. Laser-induced ultrasound probes optical properties and therefore provides much higher contrast and complementary information compared to classical ultrasound. An ultrasound array transducer in combination with a commercial medical imaging system was used to record acoustic transients of both methods. Veins and arteries in a human forearm were identified in vivo using classical color doppler and oxygenation dependent optical absorption at 660 nm and 1064 nm laser wavelength. Safety limits of both methods were explored. Laser-induced ultrasound seems well suited to improve classical ultrasound imaging of subcutaneous regions.

  16. Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Espana, A.; Joly, A.G.; Hess, W.P.; Dickinson, J.T.

    2004-01-01

    As advances continue to be made in laser technology there is an increasing demand for materials that have high thresholds for laser-induced damage. Laser damage occurs when light is absorbed, creating defects in the crystal lattice. These defects can lead to the emission of atoms, ions and molecules from the sample. One specific field where laser damage is of serious concern is semiconductor lithography, which is beginning to use light at a wavelength of 157 nm. CaF2 is a candidate material for use in this new generation of lithography. In order to prevent unnecessary damage of optical components, it is necessary to understand the mechanisms for laser damage and the factors that serve to enhance it. In this research, we study various aspects of laser interactions with CaF2, including impurity absorbance and various forms of damage caused by incident laser light. Ultraviolet (UV) laser light at 266 nm with both femtosecond (fs) and nanosecond (ns) pulse widths is used to induce ion and neutral particle emission from cleaved samples of CaF2. The resulting mass spectra show significant differences suggesting that different mechanisms for desorption occur following excitation using the different pulse durations. Following irradiation by ns pulses at 266 nm, multiple single-photon absorption from defect states is likely responsible for ion emission whereas the fs case is driven by a multi-photon absorption process. This idea is further supported by the measurements made of the transmission and reflection of fs laser pulses at 266 nm, the results of which reveal a non-linear absorption process in effect at high incident intensities. In addition, the kinetic energy profiles of desorbed Ca and K contaminant atoms are different indicating that a different mechanism is responsible for their emission as well. Overall, these results show that purity plays a key role in the desorption of atoms from CaF2 when using ns pulses. On the other hand, once the irradiance reaches high

  17. Absorption of a laser light pulse in a dense plasma.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehlman-Balloffet, G.

    1973-01-01

    An experimental study of the absorption of a laser light pulse in a transient, high-density, high-temperature plasma is presented. The plasma is generated around a metallic anode tip by a fast capacitive discharge occurring in vacuum. The amount of transmitted light is measured for plasmas made of different metallic ions in the regions of the discharge of high electronic density. Variation of the transmission during the laser pulse is also recorded. Plasma electrons are considered responsible for the very high absorption observed.

  18. Measurement of plasma temperature and density using laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Stallcop, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    A laser radiation absorption technique, suitable for temporal measurement of the electron density, the temperature, or a simultaneous determination of both, in an LTE plasma, is discussed. The theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient for a hydrogen plasma is outlined; some results are presented for visible wavelengths. Measurements of electron density and temperature are presented and shown to be in good agreement with those values obtained by other methods. Finally, the possible use of the argon ion laser for simultaneous electron density and temperature measurement is discussed, and the theoretical curves necessary for its application to hydrogen plasma diagnostics are shown.

  19. Stabilized master laser system for differential absorption lidar.

    PubMed

    Dinovitser, Alex; Hamilton, Murray W; Vincent, Robert A

    2010-06-10

    Wavelength accuracy and stability are key requirements for differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We present a control and timing design for the dual-stabilized cw master lasers in a pulsed master-oscillator power-amplifier configuration, which forms a robust low-cost water-vapor DIAL transmitter system. This design operates at 823 nm for water-vapor spectroscopy using Fabry-Perot-type laser diodes. However, the techniques described could be applied to other laser technologies at other wavelengths. The system can be extended with additional off-line or side-line wavelengths. The on-line master laser is locked to the center of a water absorption line, while the beat frequency between the on-line and the off-line is locked to 16 GHz using only a bandpass microwave filter and low-frequency electronics. Optical frequency stabilities of the order of 1 MHz are achieved. PMID:20539344

  20. Heat exchange model in absorption chamber of water-direct-absorption-typed laser energy meter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng Wei, Ji; Qun Sun, Li; Zhang, Kai; Hu, XiaoYang; Zhou, Shan

    2015-04-01

    The interaction between laser and water flow is very complicated in the absorption chamber of a high energy laser (HEL) energy meter which directly uses water as an absorbing medium. Therefore, the heat exchange model cannot be studied through traditional methods, but it is the most important factor to improve heat exchange efficiency in the absorption chamber. After the exchanges of heat and mass were deeply analyzed, experimental study and numerical fitting were brought out. The original testing data of laser power and water flow temperature at one moment were utilized to calculate those at the next moment, and then the calculated temperature curve was compared with the measured one. If the two curves matched well, the corresponding coefficient was obtained. Meanwhile, numerous experiments were performed to study the effects of laser power, duration, focal spot scale, and water flow rate on heat exchange coefficient. In addition, the relationship between water phase change and heat exchange was analyzed. The heat exchange coefficient was increased by optimizing the construction of the absorption chamber or increasing water flow rate. The results provide the reference for design of water-direct-absorption-typed HEL energy meters, as well as for analysis of the interaction between other similar lasers and water flow.

  1. LASER PLASMA AND LASER APPLICATIONS: Plasma transparency in laser absorption waves in metal capillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisimov, V. N.; Kozolupenko, A. P.; Sebrant, A. Yu

    1988-12-01

    An experimental investigation was made of the plasma transparency to heating radiation in capillaries when absorption waves propagated in these capillaries as a result of interaction with a CO2 laser pulse of 5-μs duration. When the length of the capillary was in excess of 20 mm, total absorption of the radiation by the plasma was observed at air pressures of 1-100 kPa. When the capillary length was 12 mm, a partial recovery of the transparency took place. A comparison was made with the dynamics and recovery of the plasma transparency when breakdown of air took place near the free surface.

  2. Improving sensitivity of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy using laser plasmas interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Il'in, Alexey A.; Golik, Sergey S.; Nagorny, Ivan G.; Bulanov, Alexey V.

    2006-11-01

    Laser plasmas interaction and spectral characteristics of plasma were investigated at a laser breakdown in a normal atmosphere with the purpose of improving laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy sensitivity. Colliding plasmas interaction was investigated depending on mechanism of absorption wave of laser radiation and distance between foci. Laser supported detonation wave, breakdown wave and fast wave of ionization are absorption wave observed in experiment. It was shown that seed electrons for cascade breakdown in front of fast wave of ionization is occurred due to oxygen molecules photoionization. Molecular emission and collapse of intensity of plasma continuum during the initial moments of laser plasma expansion were registered. The line/continuum ratio was essentially increased in case of laser plasmas interaction. Thus laser plasmas interaction improves sensitivity of LIBS.

  3. Laser induced fluorescence of dental caries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albin, S.; Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1988-01-01

    Significant differences between the optical spectra taken from sound regions of teeth and carious regions have been observed. These differences appear both in absorption and in laser induced fluorescence spectra. Excitation by the 488 nm line of an argon ion laser beam showed a peak in the emission intensity around 553 nm for the sound dental material while the emission peak from the carious region was red-shifted by approximately 40 nm. The relative absorption of carious region was significantly higher at 488 nm; however its fluorescence intensity peak was lower by an order of magnitude compared to the sound tooth. Implications of these results for a safe, reliable and early detection of dental caries are discussed.

  4. Laser absorption via quantum electrodynamics cascades in counter propagating laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grismayer, T.; Vranic, M.; Martins, J. L.; Fonseca, R. A.; Silva, L. O.

    2016-05-01

    A model for laser light absorption in electron-positron plasmas self-consistently created via QED cascades is described. The laser energy is mainly absorbed due to hard photon emission via nonlinear Compton scattering. The degree of absorption depends on the laser intensity and the pulse duration. The QED cascades are studied with multi-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations complemented by a QED module and a macro-particle merging algorithm that allows to handle the exponential growth of the number of particles. Results range from moderate-intensity regimes ( ˜ 10 PW ) where the laser absorption is negligible to extreme intensities ( > 100 PW ) where the degree of absorption reaches 80%. Our study demonstrates good agreement between the analytical model and simulations. The expected properties of the hard photon emission and the generated pair-plasma are investigated, and the experimental signatures for near-future laser facilities are discussed.

  5. Stability of absorption phenomena in laser-thermal propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merkle, C. L.; Tsai, Y.-L. P.

    1984-01-01

    The mean flow and stability characteristics of laser absorption phenomena in a choked converging-diverging nozzle are considered. Calculations are presented for a given nozzle geometry and a series of laser intensities. Gas absorptivities corresponding to a hydrogen-cesium mixture are used with different initial temperatures being selected to investigate the effects of changes in the shape of the k-T curve. Both stability and mean flow calculations are limited to the one-dimensional case. The mean flow results show a decrease in mass flow as laser power is increased, along with increasingly steep temperature profiles. Calculations span regions of partial and complete absorption. One region is found where multiple solutions exist. Local stability results indicate the u-c characteristic is the only unstable mode in the unheated case. Laser heat addition makes this mode more unstable and also destabilizes the u-characteristic. Numerical calculations of disturbance propagation show that the instability of the u-c disturbances is counteracted by their reflection to u + c disturbances at the upstream end. The growth of the u-disturbances is localized in regions where the temperature profile is steep and they are damped in other regions. The increasing destabilization that is observed with increased laser power is probably the reason for difficulty in obtaining converged mean flow solutions at high laser intensities.

  6. Nonlinear ionization mechanism dependence of energy absorption in diamond under femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Cong; Jiang Lan; Li Xin; Wang Feng; Yuan Yanping; Lu Yongfeng

    2013-04-14

    We present first-principles calculations for nonlinear photoionization of diamond induced by the intense femtosecond laser field. A real-time and real-space time-dependent density functional theory with the adiabatic local-density approximation is applied to describe the laser-material interactions in the Kohn-Sham formalism with the self-interaction correction. For a certain laser wavelength, the intensity dependence of energy absorption on multiphoton and/or tunnel ionization mechanisms is investigated, where laser intensity regions vary from 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2} to 10{sup 16} W/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the effect of laser wavelength on energy absorption at certain ionization mechanism is discussed when the Keldysh parameter is fixed. Theoretical results show that: (1) at the fixed laser wavelength, the relationship between the energy absorption and laser intensity shows a good fit of E = c{sub M}I{sup N} (N is the number of photons absorbed to free from the valence band) when multiphoton ionization dominates; (2) while when tunnel ionization becomes significant, the relationship coincides with the expression of E = c{sub T}I{sup n} (n < N).

  7. Waveguide and Plasmonic Absorption-Induced Transparency.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiaolan; Rodrigo, Sergio G; Zhang, Lei; Samorì, Paolo; Genet, Cyriaque; Martín-Moreno, Luis; Hutchison, James A; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2016-04-26

    Absorption-induced transparency (AIT) is one of the family of induced transparencies that has emerged in recent decades in the fields of plasmonics and metamaterials. It is a seemingly paradoxical phenomenon in which transmission through nanoholes in gold and silver is dramatically enhanced at wavelengths where a physisorbed dye layer absorbs strongly. The origin of AIT remains controversial, with both experimental and theoretical work pointing to either surface (plasmonic) or in-hole (waveguide) mechanisms. Here, we resolve this controversy by carefully filling nanoholes in a silver film with dielectric material before depositing dye on the surface. Our experiments and modeling show that not only do plasmonic and waveguide contributions to AIT both exist, but they are spectrally identical, operating in concert when the dye is both in the holes and on the surface. PMID:27063480

  8. Planar laser-driven ablation model for nonlocalized absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Dahmani, F.; Kerdja, T. )

    1991-05-01

    A model for planar laser-driven ablation is presented. Nonlocalized inverse bremsstrahlung absorption of laser energy at a density {ital n}{sub 1}{lt}{ital n}{sub {ital c}} is assumed. A steady-state solution in the conduction zone is joined to a rarefaction wave in the underdense plasma. The calculations relate all steady-state fluid quantities to only the material, absorbed intensity, and laser wavelength. The theory agrees well with results from a computer hydrodynamics code MEDUSA (Comput. Phys. Commun. {bold 7}, 271 (1974)) and experiments.

  9. REMOTE MONITORING OF GASEOUS POLLUTANTS BY DIFFERENTIAL ABSORPTION LASER TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single-ended laser radar (LIDAR) system was designed, built, and successfully operated to measure range-resolved concentrations of NO2, SO2, and O3 in the atmosphere using a Differential Absorption of Scattered Energy (DASE) LIDAR technique. The system used a flash-lamp pumped ...

  10. Correlation between laser absorption and radiation conversion efficiency in laser produced tin plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukuma, Hiraku Hosoda, Tatsuya; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishimura, Hiroaki; Sunahara, Atsushi; Yanagida, Tatsuya; Tomuro, Hiroaki; Kouge, Kouichiro; Kodama, Takeshi

    2015-09-21

    The correlation between the laser absorption and the conversion efficiency (CE) for 13.5 nm extreme ultraviolet (EUV) light in a laser-produced tin plasma was investigated. The absorption rate α and the CE were measured simultaneously for a laser-pre-formed low-density tin target as a function of the time delay between the pre-pulse and the main laser pulse. A clear and positive correlation between α and CE was found with increasing delay time; however, the CE decreases rapidly at longer delay times. This result is partly attributed to a reduction in the absorption rate, but is mainly attributed to the self-absorption of EUV light in excessively long-scale plasmas.

  11. Low Level Laser Therapy: laser radiation absorption in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giacomo, Paola; Orlando, Stefano; Dell'Ariccia, Marco; Brandimarte, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    In this paper we report the results of an experimental study in which we have measured the transmitted laser radiation through dead biological tissues of various animals (chicken, adult and young bovine, pig) in order to evaluate the maximum thickness through which the power density could still produce a reparative cellular effect. In our experiments we have utilized a pulsed laser IRL1 ISO model (based on an infrared diode GaAs, λ=904 nm) produced by BIOMEDICA s.r.l. commonly used in Low Level Laser Therapy. Some of the laser characteristics have been accurately studied and reported in this paper. The transmission results suggest that even with tissue thicknesses of several centimeters the power density is still sufficient to produce a cell reparative effect.

  12. Automatic Locking of Laser Frequency to an Absorption Peak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, Grady J.

    2006-01-01

    An electronic system adjusts the frequency of a tunable laser, eventually locking the frequency to a peak in the optical absorption spectrum of a gas (or of a Fabry-Perot cavity that has an absorption peak like that of a gas). This system was developed to enable precise locking of the frequency of a laser used in differential absorption LIDAR measurements of trace atmospheric gases. This system also has great commercial potential as a prototype of means for precise control of frequencies of lasers in future dense wavelength-division-multiplexing optical communications systems. The operation of this system is completely automatic: Unlike in the operation of some prior laser-frequency-locking systems, there is ordinarily no need for a human operator to adjust the frequency manually to an initial value close enough to the peak to enable automatic locking to take over. Instead, this system also automatically performs the initial adjustment. The system (see Figure 1) is based on a concept of (1) initially modulating the laser frequency to sweep it through a spectral range that includes the desired absorption peak, (2) determining the derivative of the absorption peak with respect to the laser frequency for use as an error signal, (3) identifying the desired frequency [at the very top (which is also the middle) of the peak] as the frequency where the derivative goes to zero, and (4) thereafter keeping the frequency within a locking range and adjusting the frequency as needed to keep the derivative (the error signal) as close as possible to zero. More specifically, the system utilizes the fact that in addition to a zero crossing at the top of the absorption peak, the error signal also closely approximates a straight line in the vicinity of the zero crossing (see Figure 2). This vicinity is the locking range because the linearity of the error signal in this range makes it useful as a source of feedback for a proportional + integral + derivative control scheme that

  13. Measurement of transient gas flow parameters by diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolshov, M. A.; Kuritsyn, Yu A.; Liger, V. V.; Mironenko, V. R.; Nadezhdinskii, A. I.; Ponurovskii, Ya Ya; Leonov, S. B.; Yarantsev, D. A.

    2015-04-01

    An absorption spectrometer based on diode lasers is developed for measuring two-dimension maps of temperature and water vapour concentration distributions in the combustion zones of two mixing supersonic flows of fuel and oxidiser in the single run regime. The method of measuring parameters of hot combustion zones is based on detection of transient spectra of water vapour absorption. The design of the spectrometer considerably reduces the influence of water vapour absorption along the path of a sensing laser beam outside the burning chamber. The optical scheme is developed, capable of matching measurement results in different runs of mixture burning. A new algorithm is suggested for obtaining information about the mixture temperature by constructing the correlation functions of the experimental spectrum with those simulated from databases. A two-dimensional map of temperature distribution in a test chamber is obtained for the first time under the conditions of plasma-induced combusion of the ethylene - air mixture.

  14. Diode-laser-based ultraviolet absorption sensor for nitric oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, S. F.; Barron-Jimenez, R.; Anderson, T. N.; Lucht, R. P.; Caton, J. A.; Walther, T.

    2002-07-01

    An all-solid-state continuous-wave laser system for ultraviolet absorption measurements of the nitric oxide (NO) molecule has been developed and demonstrated. The single-mode, tunable output of a 10-mW, 395-nm external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) is sum-frequency-mixed with the output of a 115-mW, frequency-doubled, diode-pumped Nd:YAG laser in a beta-barium-borate crystal to produce 40 nW of tunable radiation at 226.8 nm. The wavelength of the 395-nm ECDL is then scanned over NO absorption lines to produce fully resolved absorption spectra. Initial results from mixtures of NO in nitrogen in a room-temperature gas cell are discussed. The estimated NO detection limit of the system for a demonstrated absorption sensitivity of 2×10-3 is 0.2 ppm per meter of path length for 300 K gas. The estimated accuracy of the measurements is ±10%.

  15. Determination of the rate constants of molecular processes regulating the level of induced absorption in a laser based on an aqueous-micellar solution of rhodamine 6G with lamp pumping

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, M.B.; Snegov, M.I.; Cherkasov, A.S.

    1987-03-01

    A method of determining the average lifetime tau of the products responsible for inverse induced absorption in aqueous--micellar solutions of rhodamine 6G (R6G) on lamp pumping based on a comparison of threshold intensities of excitation (W/sub th/) in the resonators of a laser with a different Q is proposed. Using the value of tau found (0.2 ..mu..sec) and experimental data on the change in W/sub th/ with the concentration of cyclooctatetraene (COT) added to the solution the rate constant of quenching of the absorbing products by COT molecules (K/sub q/ = 2.6 x 10/sup 7/ M/sup -1/sec/sup -1/) was determined. In the assumption that the absorbing products are triplet dye molecules, the value of the rate constant of interconversion (K/sub 32/) of R6G into an aqueous--micellar solution (K/sub 32/ = 1.3 x 10/sup 7/ sec/sup -1/) was determined. A comparison was made of the values of the constants found with the corresponding values known from the literature.

  16. Two photon absorption in high power broad area laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dogan, Mehmet; Michael, Christopher P.; Zheng, Yan; Zhu, Lin; Jacob, Jonah H.

    2014-03-01

    Recent advances in thermal management and improvements in fabrication and facet passivation enabled extracting unprecedented optical powers from laser diodes (LDs). However, even in the absence of thermal roll-over or catastrophic optical damage (COD), the maximum achievable power is limited by optical non-linear effects. Due to its non-linear nature, two-photon absorption (TPA) becomes one of the dominant factors that limit efficient extraction of laser power from LDs. In this paper, theoretical and experimental analysis of TPA in high-power broad area laser diodes (BALD) is presented. A phenomenological optical extraction model that incorporates TPA explains the reduction in optical extraction efficiency at high intensities in BALD bars with 100μm-wide emitters. The model includes two contributions associated with TPA: the straightforward absorption of laser photons and the subsequent single photon absorption by the holes and electrons generated by the TPA process. TPA is a fundamental limitation since it is inherent to the LD semiconductor material. Therefore scaling the LDs to high power requires designs that reduce the optical intensity by increasing the mode size.

  17. A new photoacoustic method based on the modulation of the light induced absorption coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, S.; Wenisch, C.; Müller, F. A.; Gräf, S.

    2016-04-01

    The present study reports on a new photoacoustic (PA) measurement method that is suitable for the investigation of light induced absorption effects including e.g. excited state absorption. Contrary to the modulation of the radiation intensity used in conventional PA-methods, the key principle of this novel setup is based on the modulation of the induced absorption coefficient by light. For this purpose, a pump-probe setup with a pulsed pump laser beam and a continuous probe laser beam is utilized. In this regime, the potential influence of heat on the PA-signal is much smaller when compared to arrangements with pulsed probe beam and continuous pump beam. Beyond that, the negative effect of thermal lenses can be neglected. Thus, the measurement technique is well-suited for materials exhibiting a strong absorption at the pump wavelength. The quantitative analysis of the induced absorption coefficient was achieved by the calibration of the additional PA-signal caused by the continuous probe laser to the PA-signal resulting from the pulsed pump laser using thallium bromoiodide (KRS-5) as sample material.

  18. NASA three-laser airborne differential absorption lidar system electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, R. J.; Copeland, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    The system control and signal conditioning electronics of the NASA three laser airborne differential absorption lidar (DIAL) system are described. The multipurpose DIAL system was developed for the remote measurement of gas and aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere. A brief description and photographs of the majority of electronics units developed under this contract are presented. The precision control system; which includes a master control unit, three combined NASA laser control interface/quantel control units, and three noise pulse discriminator/pockels cell pulser units; is described in detail. The need and design considerations for precision timing and control are discussed. Calibration procedures are included.

  19. Laser-induced fluorescence of fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Haibo; Yuan Zhijun; Zhou Jun; Dong Jingxing; Wei Yunrong; Lou Qihong

    2011-07-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of high-purity fused silica irradiated by ArF excimer laser is studied experimentally. LIF bands of the fused silica centered at 281 nm, 478 nm, and 650 nm are observed simultaneously. Furthermore, the angular distribution of the three fluorescence peaks is examined. Microscopic image of the laser modified fused silica indicates that scattering of the generated fluorescence by laser-induced damage sites is the main reason for the angular distribution of LIF signals. Finally, the dependence of LIF signals intensities of the fused silica on laser power densities is presented. LIF signals show a squared power density dependence, which indicates that laser-induced defects are formed mainly via two-photon absorption processes.

  20. Monitoring PVD metal vapors using laser absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, D.G.; Anklam, T.M.; Berzins, L.V.; Hagans, K.G.

    1994-04-01

    Laser absorption spectroscopy (LAS) has been used by the Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS) program for over 10 years to monitor the co-vaporization of uranium and iron in its separators. During that time, LAS has proven to be an accurate and reliable method to monitor both the density and composition of the vapor. It has distinct advantages over other rate monitors, in that it is completely non-obtrusive to the vaporization process and its accuracy is unaffected by the duration of the run. Additionally, the LAS diagnostic has been incorporated into a very successful process control system. LAS requires only a line of sight through the vacuum chamber, as all hardware is external to the vessel. The laser is swept in frequency through an absorption line of interest. In the process a baseline is established, and the line integrated density is determined from the absorption profile. The measurement requires no hardware calibration. Through a proper choice of the atomic transition, a wide range of elements and densities have been monitored (e.g. nickel, iron, cerium and gadolinium). A great deal of information about the vapor plume can be obtained from the measured absorption profiles. By monitoring different species at the same location, the composition of the vapor is measured in real time. By measuring the same density at different locations, the spatial profile of the vapor plume is determined. The shape of the absorption profile is used to obtain the flow speed of the vapor. Finally, all of the above information is used evaluate the total vaporization rate.

  1. Role of beam absorption in plasma during laser welding

    SciTech Connect

    SEMAK,V.V.; STEELE,R.J.; FUERSCHBACH,PHILLIP W.; DAMKROGER,BRIAN K.

    2000-05-15

    The relationship between beam focus position and penetration depth in CW laser welding was studied numerically and experimentally for different welding conditions. Calculations were performed using a transient hydrodynamic model that incorporates the effect of evaporation recoil pressure and the associated melt expulsion. The simulation results are compared with measurements made on a series of test welds obtained using a 1650 W CO{sub 2} laser. The simulations predict, and the experiments confirm, that maximum penetration occurs with a specific location of the beam focus, with respect to the original sample surface, and that this relationship depends on the processing conditions. In particular, beam absorption in the plasma has a significant effect on the relationship between penetration and focus position. When the process parameters result in strong beam absorption in the keyhole plasma, the maximum penetration will occur when the laser focus is at or above the sample surface. In a case of weak absorption however, the penetration depth reaches its maximum value when the beam focus is located below the sample surface. In all cases, the numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  2. Short Pulse Laser Absorption and Energy Partition at Relativistic Laser Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, R; Chen, H; Ping, Y; Dyer, G; Wilks, S; Chung, H; Kemp, A; Hanson, S; Widmann, K; Fournier, K; Faenov, A; Pikuz, T; Niles, A; Beiersdorfer, P

    2007-02-27

    We have performed experiments at the COMET and Calisto short pulse laser facilities to make the first comprehensive measurements of the laser absorption and energy partition in solid targets heated with an ultrashort laser pulse focused to relativistic laser intensities (>10 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}). The measurements show an exceedingly high absorption for P polarized laser-target interactions above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. Additionally, the hot electron population is observed to markedly increase at the same intensity range. An investigation of the relaxation process was initiated u using time sing time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} spectroscopy. Measurements of the time time-resolved K{sub {alpha}} radiation suggest a 10-20 ps relativistic electron relaxation time. However modeling difficulties of these data are apparent and a more detailed investigation on this subject matter is warranted.

  3. Measurement of Apparent Thermal Conductivity and Laser Absorptivity of Individual Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jin-hui; Wang, Hai-dong; Hu, Yu-dong; Ma, Wei-gang; Zhang, Xing

    2015-11-01

    The apparent thermal conductivity (ATC) and laser absorptivity (α ) are important properties of miro/nano materials but a challenge to measure due to their small size. In this paper, a simple and effective method employing Raman spectroscopy together with electrical heating is developed to measure thermal properties of micro/nano wires. The sample used in the experiment is very simple and easy to fabricate. The ATC is obtained by measuring the temperature difference induced by changing the electrical heating power; the laser heating power is neither neglected nor needed. Using the laser heating temperature rise and the measured ATC, the absorbed laser power can be calculated. Three individual carbon fibers were studied using the presented method.

  4. Absorption spectroscopy characterization measurements of a laser-produced Na atomic beam

    SciTech Connect

    Ching, C.H.; Bailey, J.E.; Lake, P.W.; Filuk, A.B.; Adams, R.G.; McKenney, J.

    1996-06-01

    This work describes a pulsed Na atomic beam source developed for spectroscopic diagnosis of a high-power ion diode on the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator II. The goal is to produce a {approximately} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3}-density Na atomic beam that can be injected into the diode acceleration gap to measure electric and magnetic fields from the Stark and Zeeman effects through laser-induced-fluorescence or absorption spectroscopy. A {approximately} 10 ns fwhm, 1.06 {micro}m, 0.6 J/cm{sup 2} laser incident through a glass slide heats a Na-bearing thin film, creating a plasma that generates a sodium vapor plume. A {approximately} 1 {micro}sec fwhm dye laser beam tuned to 5,890 {angstrom} is used for absorption measurement of the Na I resonant doublet by viewing parallel to the film surface. The dye laser light is coupled through a fiber to a spectrograph with a time-integrated CCD camera. A two-dimensional mapping of the Na vapor density is obtained through absorption measurements at different spatial locations. Time-of-flight and Doppler broadening of the absorption with {approximately} 0.1 {angstrom} spectral resolution indicate that the Na neutral vapor temperature is about 0.5 to 2 eV. Laser-induced-fluorescence from {approximately} 1 {times} 10{sup 12}-cm{sup {minus}3} Na I 3s-3p lines observed with a streaked spectrograph provides a signal level sufficient for {approximately} 0.06 {angstrom} wavelength shift measurements in a mock-up of an ion diode experiment.

  5. Laser-Induced Damage of Calcium Fluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Espana, Aubrey L.; Joly, Alan G.; Hess, Wayne P.; Dickinson, J T.

    2004-12-01

    Radiation damage of materials has long been of fundamental interest, especially since the growth of laser technology. One such source of damage comes from UV laser light. Laser systems continue to move into shorter wavelength ranges, but unfortunately are limited by the damage threshold of their optical components. For example, semiconductor lithography is making its way into the 157nm range and requires a material that can not only transmit this light (air cannot), but also withstand the highly energetic photons present at this shorter wavelength. CaF2, an alkaline earth halide, is the chosen material for vacuum UV 157 nm excimer radiation. It can transmit light down to 120 nm and is relatively inexpensive. Although it is readily available through natural and synthetic sources, it is often times difficult to find in high purity. Impurities in the crystal can result in occupied states in the band gap that induce photon absorption [2] and ultimately lead to the degradation of the material. In order to predict how well CaF2 will perform under irradiation of short wavelength laser light, one must understand the mechanisms for laser-induced damage. Laser damage is often a two-step process: initial photons create new defects in the lattice and subsequent photons excite these defects. When laser light is incident on a solid surface there is an initial production of electron-hole (e-h) pairs, a heating of free electrons and a generation of local heating around optically absorbing centers [3]. Once this initial excitation converts to the driving energy for nuclear motion, the result is an ejection of atoms, ions and molecules from the surface, known as desorption or ablation [3]. Secondary processes further driving desorption are photoabsorption, successive excitations of self-trapped excitons (STE's) and defects, and ionization of neutrals by incident laser light [3]. The combination of laser-induced desorption and the alterations to the electronic and geometrical

  6. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1976-01-01

    Laser-based spectrophotometric methods which have been proposed for the detection of trace concentrations of gaseous contaminants include Raman backscattering (LIDAR) and passive radiometry (LOPAIR). Remote sensing techniques using laser spectrometry are presented and in particular a simple long-path laser absorption method (LOLA), which is capable of resolving complex mixtures of closely related trace contaminants at ppm levels is discussed. A number of species were selected for study which are representative of those most likely to accumulate in closed environments, such as submarines or long-duration manned space flights. Computer programs were developed which will permit a real-time analysis of the monitored atmosphere. Estimates of the dynamic range of this monitoring technique for various system configurations, and comparison with other methods of analysis, are given.

  7. Experimental evidence and theoretical modeling of two-photon absorption dynamics in the reduction of intensity noise of solid-state Er:Yb lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Amili, Abdelkrim; Kervella, Gaël; Alouini, Mehdi

    2013-04-01

    A theoretical and experimental investigation of the intensity noise reduction induced by two-photon absorption in a Er,Yb:Glass laser is reported. The time response of the two-photon absorption mechanism is shown to play an important role on the behavior of the intensity noise spectrum of the laser. A model including an additional rate equation for the two-photon-absorption losses is developed and allows the experimental observations to be predicted.

  8. Absorption-Ablation-Excitation Mechanism of Laser-Cluster Interactions in a Nanoaerosol System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D.; Long, Marshall B.

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16 GW /cm2 , the scattering cross section of TiO2 clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal SlE , Peclet PeE , and Damköhler DaE numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where SlE≫1 , PeE≫1 , and DaE≪1 , the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption.

  9. Absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism of laser-cluster interactions in a nanoaerosol system.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yihua; Li, Shuiqing; Zhang, Yiyang; Tse, Stephen D; Long, Marshall B

    2015-03-01

    The absorption-ablation-excitation mechanism in laser-cluster interactions is investigated by measuring Rayleigh scattering of aerosol clusters along with atomic emission from phase-selective laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy. For 532 nm excitation, as the laser intensity increases beyond 0.16  GW/cm^{2}, the scattering cross section of TiO_{2} clusters begins to decrease, concurrent with the onset of atomic emission of Ti, indicating a scattering-to-ablation transition and the formation of nanoplasmas. With 1064 nm laser excitation, the atomic emissions are more than one order of magnitude weaker than that at 532 nm, indicating that the thermal effect is not the main mechanism. To better clarify the process, time-resolved measurements of scattering signals are examined for different excitation laser intensities. For increasing laser intensity, the cross section of clusters decreases during a single pulse, evincing the shorter ablation delay time and larger ratios of ablation clusters. Assessment of the electron energy distribution during the ablation process is conducted by nondimensionalizing the Fokker-Planck equation, with analogous Strouhal Sl_{E}, Peclet Pe_{E}, and Damköhler Da_{E} numbers defined to characterize the laser-induced aerothermochemical environment. For conditions where Sl_{E}≫1, Pe_{E}≫1, and Da_{E}≪1, the electrons are excited to the conduction band by two-photon absorption, then relax to the bottom of the conduction band by electron energy loss to the lattice, and finally serve as the energy transfer media between laser field and lattice. The relationship between delay time and excitation intensity is well correlated by this simplified model with quasisteady assumption. PMID:25793812

  10. Ultrafast laser-induced changes in optical properties of semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Chirila, C. C.; Lim, Freda C. H.; Gavaza, M. G.

    2012-04-01

    We study the effect of laser radiation on optical properties of semiconductors of industrial interest. The material is pumped with a laser of chosen central frequency, for which the absorption is maximal, thus inducing electron dynamics, which modifies the optical properties. By using an improved theoretical model, we study ultrafast dynamic changes in the refraction index and reflectivity corresponding to a wide frequency-interval of probing radiation and identify that interval where these optical changes are most significant.

  11. Element-selective trace detection of toxic species in environmental samples using chromatographic techniques and derivative diode laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koch, J.; Zybin, A.; Niemax, K.

    1998-10-01

    Very sensitive laser absorption techniques based on a double-beam scheme with logarithmic processing of the detector signals and wavelength modulation of laser diodes are presented. Detection limits equivalent to 10-7 absorption per square root of detection bandwidth are obtained if sufficient laser power is available and if the absorption is also subject to additional modulation. The analytical versatility of these techniques is demonstrated by quantitative analysis of very low concentrations of (i) Cr(VI) species in tap water and (ii) chlorinated poly-aromatics (chlorophenols) in plant extracts, both after chromatographic separation. The atomic absorption measurements were performed in an air-acetylene flame (Cr) and in a low-pressure microwave-induced plasma (chlorophenols).

  12. Transient absorption spectra of the laser-dressed hydrogen atom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murakami, Mitsuko; Chu, Shih-I.

    2013-10-01

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption spectra of laser-dressed hydrogen atoms, based on numerical solutions of the time-dependent Schrödinger equation. The timing of absorption is controlled by the delay between an extreme ultra violet (XUV) pulse and an infrared (IR) laser field. The XUV pulse is isolated and several hundred attoseconds in duration, which acts as a pump to drive the ground-state electron to excited p states. The subsequent interaction with the IR field produces dressed states, which manifest as sidebands between the 1s-np absorption spectra separated by one IR-photon energy. We demonstrate that the population of dressed states is maximized when the timing of the XUV pulse coincides with the zero crossing of the IR field, and that their energies can be manipulated in a subcycle time scale by adding a chirp to the IR field. An alternative perspective to the problem is to think of the XUV pulse as a probe to detect the dynamical ac Stark shifts. Our results indicate that the accidental degeneracy of the hydrogen excited states is removed while they are dressed by the IR field, leading to large ac Stark shifts. Furthermore, we observe the Autler-Townes doublets for the n=2 and 3 levels using the 656 nm dressing field, but their separation does not agree with the prediction by the conventional three-level model that neglects the dynamical ac Stark shifts.

  13. Transient absorption and reshaping of ultrafast XUV light by laser-dressed helium

    SciTech Connect

    Gaarde, Mette B.; Schafer, Kenneth J.; Buth, Christian; Tate, Jennifer L.

    2011-01-15

    We present a theoretical study of transient absorption and reshaping of extreme ultraviolet (XUV) pulses by helium atoms dressed with a moderately strong infrared (IR) laser field. We formulate the atomic response using both the frequency-dependent absorption cross section and a time-frequency approach based on the time-dependent dipole induced by the light fields. The latter approach can be used in cases when an ultrafast dressing pulse induces transient effects, and/or when the atom exchanges energy with multiple frequency components of the XUV field. We first characterize the dressed atom response by calculating the frequency-dependent absorption cross section for XUV energies between 20 and 24 eV for several dressing wavelengths between 400 and 2000 nm and intensities up to 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. We find that for dressing wavelengths near 1600 nm, there is an Autler-Townes splitting of the 1s{yields}2p transition that can potentially lead to transparency for absorption of XUV light tuned to this transition. We study the effect of this XUV transparency in a macroscopic helium gas by incorporating the time-frequency approach into a solution of the coupled Maxwell-Schroedinger equations. We find rich temporal reshaping dynamics when a 61-fs XUV pulse resonant with the 1s{yields}2p transition propagates through a helium gas dressed by an 11-fs, 1600-nm laser pulse.

  14. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  15. Electron density compression and oscillating effects on laser energy absorption in overdense plasma targets.

    PubMed

    Ge, Z Y; Zhuo, H B; Yu, W; Yang, X H; Yu, T P; Li, X H; Zou, D B; Ma, Y Y; Yin, Y; Shao, F Q; Peng, X J

    2014-03-01

    An analytical model for energy absorption during the interaction of an ultrashort, ultraintense laser with an overdense plasma is proposed. Both the compression effect of the electron density profile and the oscillation of the electron plasma surface are self-consistently included, which exhibit significant influences on the laser energy absorption. Based on our model, the general scaling law of the compression effect depending on laser strength and initial density is derived, and the temporal variation of the laser absorption due to the boundary oscillating effect is presented. It is found that due to the oscillation of the electron plasma surface, the laser absorption rate will vibrate periodically at ω or 2ω frequency for the p-polarized and s-polarized laser, respectively. The effect of plasma collision on the laser absorption has also been investigated, which shows a considerable rise in absorption with increasing electron-ion collision frequency for both polarizations. PMID:24730955

  16. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. I - Theoretical calculation of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcop, J. R.

    1974-01-01

    The theory for calculating the absorption of laser radiation by hydrogen is outlined for the temperatures and pressures of common laboratory plasmas. Nonhydrogenic corrections for determining the absorption by helium are also included. The coefficients for the absorption of He-Ne laser radiation at the wavelengths of 0.633, 1.15, and 3.39 microns in a H plasma is presented for temperatures in the range from 10,000 to 40,000 K and electron number densities in the range from 10 to the 15th power to 10 to the 18th power per cu cm. The total absorption of a H-He plasma calculated from this theory is compared with the measured absorption. The theoretical composition of the H-He absorption is analyzed with respect to the significant absorption processes, inverse bremsstrahlung, photoionization, resonance excitation, and photodetachment.

  17. Parametric distortion of the optical absorption edge of a magnetic semiconductor by a strong laser field

    SciTech Connect

    Nunes, O.A.C.

    1985-09-15

    The influence of a strong laser field on the optical absorption edge of a direct-gap magnetic semiconductor is considered. It is shown that as the strong laser intensity increases the absorption coefficient is modified so as to give rise to an absorption tail below the free-field forbidden gap. An application is made for the case of the EuO.

  18. Laser plasma diagnostics and self-absorption measurements of the Hβ Balmer series line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, Ghaneshwar; Parigger, Christian G.; Surmick, David M.; EL Sherbini, Ashraf M.

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the peak-separation of the Balmer series hydrogen beta line was measured to determine the electron density of laser-induced plasma from spatially and temporally resolved spectra collected in laboratory air at standard ambient temperature and pressure. The self-absorption phenomenon is investigated by using a mirror that retro-reflects the emitted radiation through the plasma. The experimental data with and without the mirror were analyzed with available hydrogen beta computer simulations. Hardly any self-absorption was found as indicated by the correction factors that only marginally differ from unity. The obtained electron density values are also compared with the electron densities from nearby nitrogen lines. The hydrogen beta Hβ peak-separation method yields reliable results for an electron density of the order of 1 ×1017cm-3 for time delays of 5 μs from plasma generation, which confirms that self-absorption is insignificant for such electron densities.

  19. Water vapor-nitrogen absorption at CO2 laser frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, J. C.; Thomas, M. E.; Nordstrom, R. J.; Damon, E. K.; Long, R. K.

    1979-01-01

    The paper reports the results of a series of pressure-broadened water vapor absorption measurements at 27 CO2 laser frequencies between 935 and 1082 kaysers. Both multiple traversal cell and optoacoustic (spectrophone) techniques were utilized together with an electronically stabilized CW CO2 laser. Comparison of the results obtained by these two methods shows remarkable agreement, indicating a precision which has not been previously achieved in pressure-broadened studies of water vapor. The data of 10.59 microns substantiate the existence of the large (greater than 200) self-broadening coefficients determined in an earlier study by McCoy. In this work, the case of water vapor in N2 at a total pressure of 1 atm has been treated.

  20. Pulsed laser linescanner for a backscatter absorption gas imaging system

    DOEpatents

    Kulp, Thomas J.; Reichardt, Thomas A.; Schmitt, Randal L.; Bambha, Ray P.

    2004-02-10

    An active (laser-illuminated) imaging system is described that is suitable for use in backscatter absorption gas imaging (BAGI). A BAGI imager operates by imaging a scene as it is illuminated with radiation that is absorbed by the gas to be detected. Gases become "visible" in the image when they attenuate the illumination creating a shadow in the image. This disclosure describes a BAGI imager that operates in a linescanned manner using a high repetition rate pulsed laser as its illumination source. The format of this system allows differential imaging, in which the scene is illuminated with light at least 2 wavelengths--one or more absorbed by the gas and one or more not absorbed. The system is designed to accomplish imaging in a manner that is insensitive to motion of the camera, so that it can be held in the hand of an operator or operated from a moving vehicle.

  1. Investigation of two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in a fluorenyl-based chromophore.

    PubMed

    Li, Changwei; Yang, Kun; Feng, Yan; Su, Xinyan; Yang, Junyi; Jin, Xiao; Shui, Min; Wang, Yuxiao; Zhang, Xueru; Song, Yinglin; Xu, Hongyao

    2009-12-01

    Two-photon absorption induced excited state absorption in the solution of a new fluorenyl-based chromophore is investigated by a time-resolved pump-probe technique using femtosecond pulses. With the help of an additional femtosecond open-aperture Z-scan technique, numerical simulations based on a three-energy level model are used to interpret the experimental results, and we determine the nonlinear optical parameters of this new chromophore uniquely. Large two-photon absorption cross section and excited state absorption cross section for singlet excited state are obtained, indicating a good candidate for optical limiting devices. Moreover, the influence of two-beam coupling induced energy transfer in neat N,N'-dimethylformamide solvent is also considered, although this effect is strongly restrained by the instantaneous two-photon absorption. PMID:19894682

  2. Nitrogen-induced absorption of oxygen in the Herzberg continuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shardanand, MR.

    1977-01-01

    Total absorption of O2 induced by collisions with N2 has been measured at room temperature in the Hersberg continuum using a one meter normal incidence grating monochromator. The enhanced absorption is ascribed to the formation of O2-O2 and O2-N2 dimers. The interaction constants for these dimers are determined and utilized to investigate their effect on the absorption of solar radiation in the stratosphere.

  3. Laser-induced iodine desorption from impregnated polystyrene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Filho, A.; Leite, N. F.; Miranda, L. C. M.; Stempniak, R. A.

    1989-07-01

    The Ar+ laser-stimulated desorption of iodine molecules from an impregnated polystyrene film was investigated. The photoprocess induces a color change (from red to the transparent) and leaves in the film a marked print, which is related to the laser beam characteristics. The experimental data was fitted using a set of differential equations relating the time dependence of the film temperature and absorption coefficient. At low-power levels (<25 mW), the time evolution of the laser transmitted power could be well matched to the experimental data. The wavelength dependence of the marking process was also studied and the relative contribution of photodissociative and photothermal processes was inferred.

  4. Mid-infrared absorption spectroscopy using quantum cascade lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haibach, Fred; Erlich, Adam; Deutsch, Erik

    2011-06-01

    Block Engineering has developed an absorption spectroscopy system based on widely tunable Quantum Cascade Lasers (QCL). The QCL spectrometer rapidly cycles through a user-selected range in the mid-infrared spectrum, between 6 to 12 μm (1667 to 833 cm-1), to detect and identify substances on surfaces based on their absorption characteristics from a standoff distance of up to 2 feet with an eye-safe laser. It can also analyze vapors and liquids in a single device. For military applications, the QCL spectrometer has demonstrated trace explosive, chemical warfare agent (CWA), and toxic industrial chemical (TIC) detection and analysis. The QCL's higher power density enables measurements from diffuse and highly absorbing materials and substrates. Other advantages over Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy include portability, ruggedness, rapid analysis, and the ability to function from a distance through free space or a fiber optic probe. This paper will discuss the basic technology behind the system and the empirical data on various safety and security applications.

  5. Implementation of real-time multiple reflection and Fresnel absorption of laser beam in keyhole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Jung-Ho; Na, Suck-Joo

    2006-12-01

    A computational analysis of laser keyhole welding is achieved. The main driving force to make the molten pool as a narrow and deep keyhole is the recoil pressure induced by evaporation of the material. Also, the multiple reflection effect on the keyhole wall plays an important role in making the keyhole deeper and raising its total energy absorption rate. Multiple reflection and Fresnel absorption are implemented simultaneously with the proposed ray tracing technique in a discrete grid cell system during the simulation for every single time step. In particular, the Fresnel absorption model is chosen as an energy transfer mechanism from laser beam to workpiece. With all the governing equations including continuity, momentum and energy equation, the VOF method is adopted to trace the free surface of the molten pool. Simulation results are compared with the experimental ones to verify its validity. A pulsed Nd : YAG laser was used for keyhole welding experiments on mild steel plates of 7 mm thickness. It was observed that the generated keyhole maintains its solidified shape without any closing phenomenon both in the experiments and in the simulations.

  6. Multiwavelength diode-laser absorption spectroscopy using external intensity modulation by semiconductor optical amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Karagiannopoulos, Solon; Cheadle, Edward; Wright, Paul; Tsekenis, Stylianos; McCann, Hugh

    2012-12-01

    A novel opto-electronic scheme for line-of-sight Near-IR gas absorption measurement based on direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) is reported. A diode-laser-based, multiwavelength system is designed for future application in nonintrusive, high temporal resolution tomographic imaging of H2O in internal combustion engines. DAS is implemented with semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) to enable wavelength multiplexing and to induce external intensity modulation for phase-sensitive detection. Two overtone water transitions in the Near-IR have been selected for ratiometric temperature compensation to enable concentration measurements, and an additional wavelength is used to account for nonabsorbing attenuation. A wavelength scanning approach was used to evaluate the new modulation technique, and showed excellent absorption line recovery. Fixed-wavelength, time-division-multiplexing operation with SOAs has also been demonstrated. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time SOAs have been used for modulation and switching in a spectroscopic application. With appropriate diode laser selection this scheme can be also used for other chemical species absorption measurements. PMID:23207374

  7. Near infrared laser penetration and absorption in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasouri, Babak; Murphy, Thomas E.; Berberoglu, Halil

    2014-02-01

    For understanding the mechanisms of low level laser/light therapy (LLLT), accurate knowledge of light interaction with tissue is necessary. In this paper, we present a three dimensional, multi-layer Monte Carlo simulation tool for studying light penetration and absorption in human skin. The skin is modeled as a three-layer participating medium, namely epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous, where its geometrical and optical properties are obtained from the literature. Both refraction and reflection are taken into account at the boundaries according to Snell's law and Fresnel relations. A forward Monte Carlo method was implemented and validated for accurately simulating light penetration and absorption in absorbing and anisotropically scattering media. Local profiles of light penetration and volumetric absorption densities were simulated for uniform as well as Gaussian profile beams with different spreads at 155 mW average power over the spectral range from 1000 nm to 1900 nm. The results show the effects of beam profiles and wavelength on the local fluence within each skin layer. Particularly, the results identify different wavelength bands for targeted deposition of power in different skin layers. Finally, we show that light penetration scales well with the transport optical thickness of skin. We expect that this tool along with the results presented will aid researchers resolve issues related to dose and targeted delivery of energy in tissues for LLLT.

  8. Molecular fragmentation induced by a femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosmidis, Constantine E.; Ledingham, Kenneth W. D.; Kilic, H. S.; McCanny, T.; Singhal, Raghunandan P.; Smith, D.; Langley, Andrew J.

    1998-07-01

    The 90 femtosecond laser induced fragmentation at 375 nm for a number of different nitro-molecules is compared to that induced by a nanosecond laser at the same wavelength by means of time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The potential of femtosecond laser mass spectrometry for analytical purposes is discussed.

  9. Investigation of bulk laser damage and absorption of laser light in CsLiB6O10 crystals (Abstract Only)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Tomosumi; Yamamoto, Masashi; Akamatsu, Shigenori; Nishioka, Muneyuki; Yoshimura, Masashi; Mori, Yusuke; Sasaki, Takatomo; Yoshida, Kunio

    2004-06-01

    High-power solid-state ultraviolet (UV) lasers by using a have been in high demand because of their convenient operation procedure. An effective technique for UV generation is cascaded sum-frequency generation pumped by the output of near-IR solids-state lasers. The performance of such solid-state UV lasers appears to depend on the ability and reliability of nonlinear optical (NLO) crystals that are employed for laser frequency conversion. Discovery of CsLiB6O10(CLBO) crystals have enabled the production of such practical high-power all solid-state UV lasers. In 2001, UV output power up to 23.0 W by fourth harmonic generation of Nd:YAG laser was achieved. It is fact that laser-induced damage of NLO crystal is a limiting factor on reliable operation of high-power solid-state UV lasers. Bulk laser-induced damage of NLO crystal is related to the crystal's quality. In this paper, we have investigated the relationship among the bulk laser-induced damage threshold (LIDT), dislocation density and absorption of laser light in CLBO crystals with various crystallinity. The bulk LIDT of CLBO increased with decreasing dislocation density. High-quality crystals with a higher LIDT (15 - 18 GW/cm2) have a lower dislocation density of 6.6 x 103/cm2 than that of conventional CLBO (~15.0 x 103/cm2). The relationships between crystal quality and absorption of laser light will be presented.

  10. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Franta, Benjamin Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija

    2015-12-14

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  11. Simultaneous high crystallinity and sub-bandgap optical absorptance in hyperdoped black silicon using nanosecond laser annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franta, Benjamin; Pastor, David; Gandhi, Hemi H.; Rekemeyer, Paul H.; Gradečak, Silvija; Aziz, Michael J.; Mazur, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Hyperdoped black silicon fabricated with femtosecond laser irradiation has attracted interest for applications in infrared photodetectors and intermediate band photovoltaics due to its sub-bandgap optical absorptance and light-trapping surface. However, hyperdoped black silicon typically has an amorphous and polyphasic polycrystalline surface that can interfere with carrier transport, electrical rectification, and intermediate band formation. Past studies have used thermal annealing to obtain high crystallinity in hyperdoped black silicon, but thermal annealing causes a deactivation of the sub-bandgap optical absorptance. In this study, nanosecond laser annealing is used to obtain high crystallinity and remove pressure-induced phases in hyperdoped black silicon while maintaining high sub-bandgap optical absorptance and a light-trapping surface morphology. Furthermore, it is shown that nanosecond laser annealing reactivates the sub-bandgap optical absorptance of hyperdoped black silicon after deactivation by thermal annealing. Thermal annealing and nanosecond laser annealing can be combined in sequence to fabricate hyperdoped black silicon that simultaneously shows high crystallinity, high above-bandgap and sub-bandgap absorptance, and a rectifying electrical homojunction. Such nanosecond laser annealing could potentially be applied to non-equilibrium material systems beyond hyperdoped black silicon.

  12. Laser speckle effects on hard target differential absorption lidar

    SciTech Connect

    MacKerrow, E.P.; Tiee, J.J.; Fite, C.B.

    1996-04-01

    Reflection of laser light from a diffuse surface exhibits a complex interference pattern known as laser speckle. Measurement of the reflected intensity from remote targets, common to ``hard-target`` differential absorption lidar (DIAL) requires consideration of the statistical properties of the reflected light. The authors have explored the effects of laser speckle on the noise statistics for CO{sub 2} DIAL. For an ensemble of independent speckle patterns it is predicted that the variance for the measured intensity is inversely proportional to the number of speckle measured. They have used a rotating drum target to obtain a large number of independent speckle and have measured the predicted decrease in the variance after correlations due to system drifts were accounted for. Measurements have been made using both circular and linear polarized light. These measurements show a slight improvement in return signal statistics when circular polarization is used. The authors have conducted experiments at close range to isolate speckle phenomena from other phenomena, such as atmospheric turbulence and platform motion thus allowing them to gain a full understanding of speckle. They have also studied how to remove correlation in the data due to albedo inhomogeneities producing a more statistically independent ensemble of speckle patterns. They find that some types of correlation are difficult to remove from the data.

  13. High power laser heating of low absorption materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, K.; Ogloza, A.; Thomas, J.; Talghader, J.

    2014-09-01

    A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO2 and SiO2 were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7 ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17 kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13 MW/cm2, on 500 μm diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500 μm to 5 mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m2) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W / m ṡ tan - 1 ( √ t / m ) in the transition region between the two.

  14. High power laser heating of low absorption materials

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, K.; Talghader, J.; Ogloza, A.; Thomas, J.

    2014-09-28

    A model is presented and confirmed experimentally that explains the anomalous behavior observed in continuous wave (CW) excitation of thermally isolated optics. Distributed Bragg Reflector (DBR) high reflective optical thin film coatings of HfO₂ and SiO₂were prepared with a very low absorption, about 7 ppm, measured by photothermal common-path interferometry. When illuminated with a 17 kW CW laser for 30 s, the coatings survived peak irradiances of 13 MW/cm², on 500 μm diameter spot cross sections. The temperature profile of the optical surfaces was measured using a calibrated thermal imaging camera for illuminated spot sizes ranging from 500 μm to 5 mm; about the same peak temperatures were recorded regardless of spot size. This phenomenon is explained by solving the heat equation for an optic of finite dimensions and taking into account the non-idealities of the experiment. An analytical result is also derived showing the relationship between millisecond pulse to CW laser operation where (1) the heating is proportional to the laser irradiance (W/m²) for millisecond pulses, (2) the heating is proportional to the beam radius (W/m) for CW, and (3) the heating is proportional to W/m∙ tan⁻¹(√(t)/m) in the transition region between the two.

  15. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guddala, Sriram; Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-01

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm2.

  16. Thermally induced nonlinear optical absorption in metamaterial perfect absorbers

    SciTech Connect

    Guddala, Sriram Kumar, Raghwendra; Ramakrishna, S. Anantha

    2015-03-16

    A metamaterial perfect absorber consisting of a tri-layer (Al/ZnS/Al) metal-dielectric-metal system with top aluminium nano-disks was fabricated by laser-interference lithography and lift-off processing. The metamaterial absorber had peak resonant absorbance at 1090 nm and showed nonlinear absorption for 600ps laser pulses at 1064 nm wavelength. A nonlinear saturation of reflectance was measured to be dependent on the average laser power incident and not the peak laser intensity. The nonlinear behaviour is shown to arise from the heating due to the absorbed radiation and photo-thermal changes in the dielectric properties of aluminium. The metamaterial absorber is seen to be damage resistant at large laser intensities of 25 MW/cm{sup 2}.

  17. Electromagnetically induced absorption in a three-resonator metasurface system

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Ningning; Qu, Kenan; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Agarwal, Girish S.; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking the quantum phenomena in metamaterials through coupled classical resonators has attracted enormous interest. Metamaterial analogs of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) enable promising applications in telecommunications, light storage, slow light and sensing. Although the EIT effect has been studied extensively in coupled metamaterial systems, excitation of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) through near-field coupling in these systems has only been sparsely explored. Here we present the observation of the EIA analog due to constructive interference in a vertically coupled three-resonator metamaterial system that consists of two bright and one dark resonator. The absorption resonance is one of the collective modes of the tripartite unit cell. Theoretical analysis shows that the absorption arises from a magnetic resonance induced by the near-field coupling of the three resonators within the unit cell. A classical analog of EIA opens up opportunities for designing novel photonic devices for narrow-band filtering, absorptive switching, optical modulation, and absorber applications. PMID:26023061

  18. Electromagnetically induced absorption in a three-resonator metasurface system.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueqian; Xu, Ningning; Qu, Kenan; Tian, Zhen; Singh, Ranjan; Han, Jiaguang; Agarwal, Girish S; Zhang, Weili

    2015-01-01

    Mimicking the quantum phenomena in metamaterials through coupled classical resonators has attracted enormous interest. Metamaterial analogs of electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) enable promising applications in telecommunications, light storage, slow light and sensing. Although the EIT effect has been studied extensively in coupled metamaterial systems, excitation of electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) through near-field coupling in these systems has only been sparsely explored. Here we present the observation of the EIA analog due to constructive interference in a vertically coupled three-resonator metamaterial system that consists of two bright and one dark resonator. The absorption resonance is one of the collective modes of the tripartite unit cell. Theoretical analysis shows that the absorption arises from a magnetic resonance induced by the near-field coupling of the three resonators within the unit cell. A classical analog of EIA opens up opportunities for designing novel photonic devices for narrow-band filtering, absorptive switching, optical modulation, and absorber applications. PMID:26023061

  19. Refraction and absorption of x rays by laser-dressed atoms.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Young, L.

    2010-06-01

    X-ray refraction and absorption by neon atoms under the influence of an 800 nm laser with an intensity of 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} is investigated. For this purpose, we use an ab initio theory suitable for optical strong-field problems. Its results are interpreted in terms of a three-level model. On the Ne 1s {yields} 3p resonance, we find electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) for x rays. Our work opens novel perspectives for ultrafast x-ray pulse shaping.

  20. Photothermal and photochemical effects of laser light absorption by indocyanine green (ICG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaseen, Mohammad A.; Diagaradjane, Parmeswaran; Pikkula, Brian M.; Yu, Jie; Wong, Michael S.; Anvari, Bahman

    2005-04-01

    Indocyanine Green (ICG) is clinically used as a fluorescent dye for imaging purposes. Its rapid circulation kinetics and minimal toxicity has prompted investigation into ICG's utility as a photosentitizer for therapeutic applications. Traditionally, optically mediated tumor therapy has focused on photodynamic therapy, which employs a photochemical mechanism resulting from the absorption of low intensity CW laser light by localized photosensitizers such as Photofrin II, Benzoporphyrin Derivative (BPD), ICG. Treatment of cutaneous vascular malformations such as port-wine stains, on the other hand, is based on a photothermal mechanism resulting from the absorption of high intensity pulsed laser light by hemoglobin. In this study, we compared the effectiveness of combining photochemical and photothermal mechanisms during application of ICG in conjunction with laser irradiation with the intention that the combined approach may lead to a reduction in the threshold dose of pulsed laser light required to treat hypervascular malformations. The blood vessels in rabbit ears were used as an in vivo model for targeted vasculature. Irradiation of the ears with IR light (λ=785 nm, Δτ = 3 min, Io = 120 mW) was used to elicit photochemical damage, while photothermal damage was brought about using pulses from a ruby laser (λ=694 nm, τ = 3 ms) with different fluences. For the combined modality, photochemical damage was induced first and followed by photothermal irradiation. This modality was compared with photothermal irradiation alone. The effectiveness of each irradiation scheme was assessed using histopathological analysis. We present preliminary data that suggests that pretreatment with photodynamic therapy before photothermal coagulation results in more severe vascular damage with lower photothermal fluence levels. The results of this study provide the foundation work for further exploration of the therapeutic potentials of photochemical and photothermal effects during

  1. Polyethylene laser welding based on optical absorption variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galtieri, G.; Visco, A.; Nocita, D.; Torrisi, L.; Ceccio, G.; Scolaro, C.

    2016-04-01

    Polymeric materials, both pure and containing nanostructures, can be prepared as thin sheets in order to produce joints with an interface between an optically transparent sheet and an optically absorbent substrate to be welded by infrared pulsed laser irradiation. The Laser Transmission Welding (LTW) technique has been successfully applied in order to join two or more thermoplastic polymeric sheets that must have a similar chemical composition. In this research work, polymeric joints of Ultra High Molecular Weight Polyethylene sheets were realized, characterized and welded. Some polymer sheets were doped, at different concentrations, with carbon nano-particles absorbent the laser radiation. A pulsed laser operating in the wavelength region 532 nm with intensity of the order of 109 Watt/cm2 was employed to be transmitted by the transparent polymer and to be absorbed by the carbon enriched surface. At the interface of the two polymers the released energy induces melting, that is assisted by pressure, producing a fast and resistant welding zone. Mechanical and optical characterizations and surface analyses are presented and discussed.

  2. Modeling of Laser Induced Damage in NIF UV Optics

    SciTech Connect

    Feit, M D; Rubenchik, A M

    2001-02-21

    Controlling damage to nominally transparent optical elements such as lenses, windows and frequency conversion crystals on high power lasers is a continuing technical problem. Scientific understanding of the underlying mechanisms of laser energy absorption, material heating and vaporization and resultant mechanical damage is especially important for UV lasers with large apertures such as NIF. This LDRD project was a single year effort, in coordination with associated experimental projects, to initiate theoretical descriptions of several of the relevant processes. In understanding laser damage, we distinguish between damage initiation and the growth of existent damage upon subsequent laser irradiation. In general, the effect of damage could be ameliorated by either preventing its initiation or by mitigating its growth. The distinction comes about because initiation is generally due to extrinsic factors such as contaminants, which provide a means of local laser energy absorption. Thus, initiation tends to be local and stochastic in nature. On the other hand, the initial damaging event appears to modify the surrounding material in such a way that multiple pulse damage grows more or less regularly. More exactly, three ingredients are necessary for visible laser induced damage. These are adequate laser energy, a mechanism of laser energy absorption and mechanical weakness. For damage growth, the material surrounding a damage site is already mechanically weakened by cracks and probably chemically modified as well. The mechanical damage can also lead to electric field intensification due to interference effects, thus increasing the available laser energy density. In this project, we successfully accounted for the pulselength dependence of damage threshold in bulk DKDP crystals with the hypothesis of small absorbers with a distribution of sizes. We theoretically investigated expected scaling of damage initiation craters both to baseline detailed numerical simulations

  3. Laser Induced Surface Chemical Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stinespring, Charter D.; Freedman, Andrew

    1990-02-01

    Studies of the thermal and photon-induced surface chemistry of dimethyl cadmium (DMCd) and dimethyl tellurium (DMTe) on GaAs(100) substrates under ultrahigh vacuum conditions have been performed for substrate temperatures in the range of 123 K to 473 K. Results indicate that extremely efficient conversion of admixtures of DMTe and DMCd to CdTe can be obtained using low power (5 - 10 mJ cm-2) 193 nm laser pulses at substrate temperatures of 123 K. Subsequent annealing at 473 K produces an epitaxial film.

  4. Nanosecond light induced, thermally tunable transient dual absorption bands in a-Ge₅As₃₀Se₆₅ thin film.

    PubMed

    Khan, Pritam; Saxena, Tarun; Jain, H; Adarsh, K V

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report the first observation of nanosecond laser induced transient dual absorption bands, one in the bandgap (TA₁) and another in the sub-bandgap (TA₂) regions of a-Ge₅As₃₀Se₆₅ thin films. Strikingly, these bands are thermally tunable and exhibit a unique contrasting characteristic: the magnitude of TA₁ decreases while that of TA₂ increases with increasing temperature. Further, the decay kinetics of these bands is strongly influenced by the temperature, which signifies a strong temperature dependent exciton recombination mechanism. The induced absorption shows quadratic and the decay time constant shows linear dependence on the laser beam fluence. PMID:25300520

  5. Infrared Pulse-laser Long-path Absorption Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Using a Raman-shifted Dye Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minato, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo; Sasano, Yasuhiro

    1992-01-01

    A pulsed laser source is effective in infrared laser long-path absorption measurements when the optical path length is very long or the reflection from a hard target is utilized, because higher signal-to-noise ratio is obtained in the detection of weak return signals. We have investigated the performance of a pulse-laser long-path absorption system using a hydrogen Raman shifter and a tunable dye laser pumped by a Nd:YAG laser, which generates second Stokes radiation in the 2-micron region.

  6. Improved Sensitivity for Frequency Modulation Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shum, Chi-Man

    1990-01-01

    We have developed and implemented a two-tone harmonic frequency modulation technique to reduce the residue amplitude modulation (RAM) background in frequency modulation (FM) laser absorption spectroscopy. This RAM noise, generated during electro-optically phase modulating the laser carrier, is several orders of magnitude larger than the shot-noise detection limit. When our two-tone method was used, the RAM signal was reduced by a factor of 4. We have also provided a thorough signal-to-noise analysis which leads to a detection limit consistent with out experimental results. A vital element in the work of FM spectroscopy is the electro-optic phase modulator. We have designed and fabricated two phase modulators, both employing a lithium tantalate single crystal. The first device is a broad -band design called the traveling wave phase modulator. With microstrip transmission line construction techniques, the impedance of the device is matched to 50 Omega within a bandwidth of more than 500 MHz. The second modulator was a novel design built to provide enhanced modulation index at a resonant frequency tunable over a frequency range of approximately 350 MHz. This resonant modulator can provide the same modulation efficiency as that from the traveling wave device with as much as 50% less modulation power. Both modulators have useful applications in FM spectroscopy depending on the experimental conditions.

  7. Femtosecond x-ray absorption spectroscopy with hard x-ray free electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Katayama, Tetsuo; Togashi, Tadashi; Tono, Kensuke; Kameshima, Takashi; Inubushi, Yuichi; Sato, Takahiro; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Obara, Yuki; Misawa, Kazuhiko; Bhattacharya, Atanu; Kurahashi, Naoya; Ogi, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Toshinori

    2013-09-23

    We have developed a method of dispersive x-ray absorption spectroscopy with a hard x-ray free electron laser (XFEL), generated by a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) mechanism. A transmission grating was utilized for splitting SASE-XFEL light, which has a relatively large bandwidth (ΔE/E ∼ 5 × 10{sup −3}), into several branches. Two primary split beams were introduced into a dispersive spectrometer for measuring signal and reference spectra simultaneously. After normalization, we obtained a Zn K-edge absorption spectrum with a photon-energy range of 210 eV, which is in excellent agreement with that measured by a conventional wavelength-scanning method. From the analysis of the difference spectra, the noise ratio was evaluated to be ∼3 × 10{sup −3}, which is sufficiently small to trace minute changes in transient spectra induced by an ultrafast optical laser. This scheme enables us to perform single-shot, high-accuracy x-ray absorption spectroscopy with femtosecond time resolution.

  8. Nonlinear absorption mechanisms during femtosecond laser surface ablation of silica glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayarny, D. A.; Ionin, A. A.; Kudryashov, S. I.; Saraeva, I. N.; Startseva, E. D.; Khmelnitskii, R. A.

    2016-03-01

    Spatial profiles of single-shot microcraters produced by tightly focused femtosecond laser pulses with variable pulse energies are measured by means of a laser confocal microscope. Dependences of crater depth on laser intensity at different pulse energies appear as overlapping saturating curves with the same threshold, indicating the presence of nonlinear absorption and absence of nonlocal ablation effects. A monotonic twofold increase in absorption nonlinearity is related to the transition from minor defect-band absorption to fundamental band-to-band absorption.

  9. FTIR-spectrometer-determined absorption coefficients of seven hydrazine fuel gases - Implications for laser remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molina, L. T.; Grant, W. B.

    1984-01-01

    The absorption spectra of three hydrazines and four of their air-oxidation products were measured in the 9-12-micron spectral region with a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectrometer with a 0.05-kayser resolution to determine absorption coefficients at CO2 and tunable diode laser wavelengths. The measurements agreed well with published CO2 laser determinations for many of the absorption coefficients, except where the published values are thought to be in error. The coefficients were then used to estimate the sensitivity for remote detection of these gases using CO2 and tunable diode lasers in long-path differential absorption measurements.

  10. Temperature-dependent 780-nm laser absorption by engineering grade aluminum, titanium, and steel alloy surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Wu, Sheldon S. Q.; Kanz, V. Keith; LeBlanc, Mary M.; Lowdermilk, W. Howard; Rotter, Mark D.; Stanley, Joel R.

    2014-07-17

    When modeling laser interaction with metals for various applications it requires a knowledge of absorption coefficients for real, commercially available materials with engineering grade (unpolished, oxidized) surfaces. But, most currently available absorptivity data pertain to pure metals with polished surfaces or vacuum-deposited thin films in controlled atmospheres. A simple laboratory setup is developed for the direct calorimetric absorptivity measurements using a diode-array laser emitting at 780 nm. A scheme eliminating the effect of convective and radiative losses is implemented. Futhermore, the obtained absorptivity results differ considerably from existing data for polished pure metals and are essential for the development of predictive laser-material interaction models.

  11. Collision--induced absorption in dense atmospheres of cool stars

    SciTech Connect

    Borysow, Aleksandra; Joergensen, Uffe Graae

    1999-04-01

    In the atmosphere of the Sun the major interaction between the matter and the radiation is through light absorption by ions (predominantly the negative ion of hydrogen atoms), neutral atoms and a small amount of polar molecules. The majority of stars in the universe are, however, cooler and denser than our Sun, and for a large fraction of these, the above absorption processes are very weak. Here, collision-induced absorption (CIA) becomes the dominant opacity source. The radiation is absorbed during very short mutual passages ('collisions') of two non-polar molecules (and/or atoms), while their electric charge distributions are temporarily distorted which gives rise to a transient dipole moment. We present here a review of the present-day knowledge about the impact of collision-induced absorption processes on the structure and the spectrum of such stars.

  12. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-07-11

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency rejection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multi-layer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  13. Laser induced damage in multilayer dielectric gratings due to ultrashort laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, B.W.; Stuart, B.C.; Feit, M.D.; Rubenchik, A.M.; Perry, M.D.

    1995-05-26

    Chirped pulse amplification is increasingly used to produce intense ultrashort laser pulses. When high-efficiency gratings are the dispersive element, as in the LLNL Petawatt laser, their susceptibility to laser induced damage constitutes a limitation on the peak intensities that can be reached. To obtain robust gratings, it is necessary to understand the causes of short-pulse damage, and to recognize the range of design options for high efficiency gratings. Metal gratings owe their high efficiency to their high conductivity. To avoid the inevitable light absorption that accompanies conductivity, we have developed designs for high efficiency reflection gratings that use only transparent dielectric materials. These combine the reflectivity of a multilayer dielectric stack with a diffraction grating. We report here our present understanding of short-pulse laser induced damage, as it applies to dielectric gratings.

  14. Laser-induced fluorescence of formaldehyde in combustion using third harmonic Nd:YAG laser excitation.

    PubMed

    Brackmann, Christian; Nygren, Jenny; Bai, Xiao; Li, Zhongshan; Bladh, Henrik; Axelsson, Boman; Denbratt, Ingemar; Koopmans, Lucien; Bengtsson, Per-Erik; Aldén, Marcus

    2003-12-01

    Formaldehyde (CH2O) is an important intermediate species in combustion processes and it can through laser-induced fluorescence measurements be used for instantaneous flame front detection. The present study has focussed on the use of the third harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser at 355 nm as excitation wavelength for formaldehyde, and different dimethyl ether (C2H6O) flames were used as sources of formaldehyde in the experiments. The investigations included studies of the overlap between the laser profile and the absorption lines of formaldehyde, saturation effects and the potential occurrence of laser-induced photochemistry. The technique was applied for detection of formaldehyde in an internal combustion engine operated both as a spark ignition engine and as a homogenous charge compression ignition engine. PMID:14607232

  15. Effect of crystallinity on the bulk laser damage and UV absorption of CLBO crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, R.; Kamimura, T.; Fukumoto, S.; Yap, Y. K.; Yoshimura, M.; Mori, Y.; Sasaki, T.; Yoshida, K.

    2002-04-01

    The influence of crystal defects on bulk laser damage and UV absorption in CsLiB 6O 10 (CLBO) crystals was investigated. A CLBO crystal grown by the solution stirring method had a 2.5-fold higher laser-induced damage threshold (maximum) than conventional CLBO crystals. This highly damage-resistant CLBO crystal had a lower dislocation density (best value, 6.6×10 3/cm 2) than conventional CLBO crystals (best value, 15.0×10 3/cm 2). The temperature increase during UV generation on the output surface of highly damage-resistant CLBzO crystal was lower than that detected in conventional CLBO crystal.

  16. Absorption of laser radiation in a H-He plasma. II - Experimental measurement of the absorption coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billman, K. W.; Rowley, P. D.; Stallcop, J. R.; Presley, L.

    1974-01-01

    The absorption coefficients of 0.633-, 1.15-, and 3.39-micron laser radiation for a homogeneous H-He plasma have been measured in the temperature range from 12.2 to 21.7 (x 1000 K) and in the electron number density range 0.45 to 6.5 (x 10 to the 17th power per cu cm). Good agreement is found between the experimentally determined total absorption for each of the wavelengths and that calculated from theory. Furthermore, because the 3.39-micron absorption is dominated by inverse bremsstrahlung, while the 0.633-micron absorption is dominated by photoionization and resonance absorption, the experiment indicates a correct assessment by the theory of these individual absorption mechanisms.

  17. Investigation into the absorptivity change in metals with increased laser power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blidegn, M. Sc. K.; Olsen, Flemming O.

    1997-04-01

    At first glance the low absorptivity of metals in the infrared (IR) makes the use of YAG or carbon-dioxide lasers in metal processing very inefficient. However, it has been demonstrated that the absorptivity can reach significantly higher levels during the high power laser interaction. An increase which cannot be explained by the increase in temperature only. The interaction between laser light and metals is a major physical phenomena in laser material processing and when modeling processes the Drude free electron model or simplifications, such as the Hagen-Rubens relation, have often been used. This paper discusses the need to extend the Drude model taking into account interband transitions and anormal skin effect at low light intensities and a multiphoton absorption model in order to describe the increase in the absorptivity at high intensities. The model is compared with experimental results carried out at low power, and tested on experimental absorptivity measurements at high power YAG laser pulses, found in literature.

  18. A novel design of plasmon-induced absorption sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qi; Zhai, Xiang; Wang, Ling-Ling; Luo, Xin; Liu, Gui-Dong; Liu, Jian-Ping; Xia, Sheng-Xuan

    2016-06-01

    We present a plasmon-induced absorption (PIA) sensor formed by using a notched metallic film and a metallic ground plane separated by dielectric gratings, suggesting perfect absorption and high sensitivity up to ∼105. The absorption mechanism for the narrow-band sensor involves the phase-dependent coupling between the localized surface plasmon resonance and the Fabry–Perot resonance. The intensity and lineshape of the PIA resonance can be controlled by optimizing the coupling distance and thickness of the dielectric gratings, respectively. In particular, the underlying physics and critical condition for pronounced PIA resonance are illustrated by the coupled Lorentzian oscillator model.

  19. Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy using mid-IR quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medhi, G.; Muravjov, A. V.; Saxena, H.; Fredricksen, C. J.; Brusentsova, T.; Peale, R. E.; Edwards, O.

    2011-06-01

    Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (ICLAS) at IR wavelengths offers an opportunity for spectral sensing with sufficient sensitivity to detect vapors of low vapor pressure compounds such as explosives. Reported here are key enabling technologies for this approach, including multi-mode external-cavity quantum cascade lasers and a scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer to analyze the laser mode spectrum in the presence of a molecular intracavity absorber. Reported also is the design of a compact integrated data acquisition and control system. Applications include military and commercial sensing for threat compounds, chemical gases, biological aerosols, drugs, and banned or invasive plants or animals, bio-medical breath analysis, and terrestrial or planetary atmosphere science.

  20. Intracavity Dye-Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IDLAS) for application to planetary molecules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Todd M.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Time-resolved, quasi-continuous wave, intracavity dye-laser absorption spectroscopy is applied to the investigation of absolute absorption coefficients for vibrational-rotational overtone bands of water at visible wavelengths. Emphasis is placed on critical factors affecting detection sensitivity and data analysis. Typical generation-time dependent absorption spectra are given.

  1. Laser induced biological heating analyzed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Phue

    1985-08-01

    A quantitative analysis of the vaporization of tumors by pulsed CO2 lasers, incision by CW CO2 lasers, tissue coagulation by argon lasers, thermal killing of cancerous cells by He-Ne lasers, and the application of heat by CO2 lasers is presented. Although the calculations are based on a simplified skin model, it may prove useful in clinical treatments.

  2. Q-Switched Alexandrite Laser-induced Chrysiasis

    PubMed Central

    Victor Ross, E.

    2015-01-01

    -switched laser. Also, treatment with a long-pulsed laser should be entertained in patients with either idiopathic or laser-induced chrysiasis. (JClinAesthetDermatol. 2015;8(9):48-53.) Chrysiasis is a distinctive blue-gray pigmentation of light exposed skin occurring in individuals who are receiving parenteral gold therapy.1 The 755nm Q-switched alexandrite laser is effective for the treatment of facial lentigines since the melanin granules absorb a high proportion of the laser energy and other chromophores offer little competitive absorption.2 The authors describe a woman who developed chrysiasis at Q-switched alexandrite laser treatment sites and whose dyschromia was successfully treated with a sequential series of laser sessions using a long-pulsed alexandrite laser, followed by a nonablative fractional laser and an ablative carbon dioxide laser. PMID:26430491

  3. Photonic band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption and emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummer, Karikkuzhi Variyath; Vijaya, Ramarao

    2015-01-01

    An enhancement in photonic band-edge-induced absorption and emission from rhodamine-B dye doped polystyrene pseudo gap photonic crystals is studied. The band-edge-induced enhancement in absorption is achieved by selecting the incident angle of the excitation beam so that the absorption spectrum of the emitter overlaps the photonic band edge. The band-edge-induced enhancement in emission, on the other hand, is possible with and without an enhancement in band-edge-induced absorption, depending on the collection angle of emission. Through a simple set of measurements with suitably chosen angles for excitation and emission, we achieve a maximum enhancement of 70% in emission intensity with band-edge-induced effects over and above the intrinsic emission in the case of self-assembled opals. This is a comprehensive effort to interpret tunable lasing in opals as well as to predict the wavelength of lasing arising as a result of band-edge-induced distributed feedback effects.

  4. Theory of absorption rate of carriers in fused silica under intense laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Hongxiang; Xiang, Xia; Zheng, WG; Yuan, XD; Wu, SY; Jiang, XD; Gao, Fei; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Sun, Kai

    2010-11-15

    A quantum non-perturbation theory for phonon-assisted photon absorption of conduction band electron in intense laser was developed. By carrying out the calculation in fused silica at wavelengths from ultraviolet to infrared in terawatt intensity laser, we show that the Non-perturbation approach can make a uniform description of energy absorption rate at both short wavelengths and long wavelengths on TW / cm2 intensity laser.

  5. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, H.; Stricker, J.; Wesner, D. A.; Kreutz, E. W.

    1995-02-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of different polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitrile (SAN), polybutadieneterephthalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylene (POM) were treated by excimer-laser radiation at 248 nm in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification and ablation to increase surface roughness. Therefore, the laser-processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the ablation depth, optical penetration depth, absorption coefficient and ablation threshold are determined. The metallization of pretreated (laser, wet chemical and plasma etching) polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes were electroplating and physical vapour deposition (PVD). The adhesion of the deposited films is measured with scratch and tape test methods in order to determine the regimes of suitable surface modification for metallization.

  6. Laser Thomson Scattering, Raman Scattering and laser-absorption diagnostics of high pressure microdischarges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Vincent M.; Belostotskiy, Sergey G.; Economou, Demetre J.; Sadeghi, Nader

    2010-05-01

    Laser scattering experiments were performed in high pressure (100s of Torr) parallel-plate, slot-type DC microdischarges operating in argon or nitrogen. Laser Thomson Scattering (LTS) and Rotational Raman Scattering were employed in a novel, backscattering, confocal configuration. LTS allows direct and simultaneous measurement of both electron density (ne) and electron temperature (Te). For 50 mA current and over the pressure range of 300 - 700 Torr, LTS yielded Te = 0.9 ± 0.3 eV and ne = (6 ± 3)·1013 cm-3, in reasonable agreement with the predictions of a mathematical model. Rotational Raman spectroscopy (RRS) was employed for absolute calibration of the LTS signal. RRS was also applied to measure the 3D gas temperature (Tg) in nitrogen DC microdischarges. In addition, diode laser absorption spectroscopy was employed to measure the density of argon metastables (1s5 in Paschen notations) in argon microdischarges. The gas temperature, extracted from the width of the absorption profile, was compared with Tg values obtained by optical emission spectroscopy.

  7. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  8. Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric Bryant

    1995-01-01

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties by the use of intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam. An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions. Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and NO_2-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from {~ }0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of {~}1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of {~} 10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of NO_2 . The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot |chi^{(1) }|^2 or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas by the use of a technique of wavelength -division multiplexing

  9. Laser-induced thermal acoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cummings, Eric B.

    Laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) is a new technique for remote nonintrusive measurement of thermophysical gas properties. LITA involves forming, via opto-acoustic effects, grating-shaped perturbations of gas properties using intersecting beams from a short-pulse laser. A third beam scatters coherently into a signal beam off the perturbation grating via acousto-optical effects. The evolution of the gas perturbations modulates the scattered signal beam. Accurate values of the sound speed, transport properties, and composition of the gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal beam.An analytical expression for the spectrum, absolute magnitude, and time history of the LITA signal is derived. The optoacoustic effects of thermalization and electrostriction are treated. Finite beam-diameter, beam-duration, and thermalization-rate effects are included in the analysis. The expression accurately models experimental signals over a wide range of gas conditions.Experimental tests using LITA have been conducted on pure and [...]-seeded air and helium at pressures ranging from ~0.1 kPa-14 MPa. Carbon dioxide has been explored near its liquid-vapor critical point. Accuracies of 0.1% in sound speed measurements have been achieved in these tests. Accuracies of ~1% have been achieved in measurements of thermal diffusivity, although beam misalignment effects have typically degraded this accuracy by a factor of ~10-20. Using LITA, susceptibility spectra have been taken of approximately a femtogram of [...]. The effects of fluid motion and turbulence have been explored. LITA velocimetry has been demonstrated, in which the Doppler shift of light scattered from a flowing fluid is measured. LITA velocimetry requires no particle seeding, has a coherent signal beam, and can be applied to pulsed flows. LITA has also been applied to measure single-shot [...] or "Rayleigh scattering" spectra of a gas using a technique of wavelength-division multiplexing, called multiplex LITA. The LITA

  10. Observation of an electromagnetically induced change of absorption in multilevel rubidium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yong-Qing; Jin, Shao-Zheng; Xiao, Min

    1995-03-01

    A 64.4% reduction in absorption at the rubidium D2 line is observed when a pumping field at 775.8 nm is tuned on resonance to the transition between the excited states 5P3/2 and 5D5/2. As the pumping field is tuned off resonance, an absorption peak appears at the side of the Doppler-broadened D2 line. This modification in absorption is related to pumping-induced atomic coherence in this three-level ladder-type system. This experiment is done in a Rb vapor cell at room temperature and with cw diode lasers for both pumping and probe beams in a Doppler-free configuration.

  11. Multiphoton absorption is probably not the primary threshold damage mechanism for femtosecond laser pulse exposures in the retinal pigment epithelium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Randolph D.; Johnson, Thomas E.

    2004-07-01

    Laser induced breakdown has the lowest energy threshold in the femtosecond domain, and is responsible for production of threshold ocular lesions. It has been proposed that multiphoton absorption may also contribute to ultrashort-pulse tissue damage, based on the observation that 33 fs, 810 nm pulse laser exposures caused more DNA breakage in cultured, primary RPE cells, compared to CW laser exposures delivering the same average power. Subsequent studies, demonstrating two-photon excitation of fluorescence in isolated RPE melanosomes, appeared to support the role of multiphoton absorption, but mainly at suprathreshold irradiance. Additional experiments have not found a consistent difference in the DNA strand breakage produced by ultrashort and CW threshold exposures. DNA damage appears to be dependent on the amount of melanin pigmentation in the cells, rather than the pulsewidth of the laser; current studies have found that, at threshold, CW and ultrashort pulse laser exposures produce almost identical amounts of DNA breakage. A theoretical analysis suggest that the number of photons delivered to the RPE melanosome during a single 33-fsec pulse at the ED50 irradiance is insufficient to produce multiphoton excitation. This result appears to exclude the melanosome as a locus for two- or three-photon excitation; however, a structure with a larger effective absorption cross-section than the melanosome may interact with the laser pulses. One possibility is that the nuclear chromatin acts as a unit absorber of photons resulting in DNA damage, but this does not explain the near equivalence of ultrashort and CW exposures in the comet assay model. This equivalence indicated that multiphoton absorption is not a major contributor to the ultrashort pulse laser damage threshold in the near infrared.

  12. LASER METHODS IN MEDICINE: Light absorption in blood during low-intensity laser irradiation of skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barun, V. V.; Ivanov, A. P.

    2010-06-01

    An analytical procedure is proposed for describing optical fields in biological tissues inhomogeneous in the depth direction, such as human skin, with allowance for multiple scattering. The procedure is used to investigate the depth distribution of the optical power density in homogeneous and multilayer dermis when the skin is exposed to a laser beam. We calculate the absorbed laser power spectra for oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin at different depths in relation to the absorption selectivity of these haemoglobin derivatives and the spectral dependence of the optical power density and demonstrate that the spectra vary considerably with depth. A simple exponential approximation is proposed for the depth distribution of the power density in the epidermis and dermis.

  13. Contrasting levels of absorption of intense femtosecond laser pulses by solids

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Cui, Y. Q.; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Brijesh, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    The absorption of ultraintense, femtosecond laser pulses by a solid unleashes relativistic electrons, thereby creating a regime of relativistic optics. This has enabled exciting applications of relativistic particle beams and coherent X-ray radiation, and fundamental leaps in high energy density science and laboratory astrophysics. Obviously, central to these possibilities lies the basic problem of understanding and if possible, manipulating laser absorption. Surprisingly, the absorption of intense light largely remains an open question, despite the extensive variations in target and laser pulse structures. Moreover, there are only few experimental measurements of laser absorption carried out under very limited parameter ranges. Here we present an extensive investigation of absorption of intense 30 femtosecond laser pulses by solid metal targets. The study, performed under varying laser intensity and contrast ratio over four orders of magnitude, reveals a significant and non-intuitive dependence on these parameters. For contrast ratio of 10−9 and intensity of 2 × 1019 W cm−2, three observations are revealed: preferential acceleration of electrons along the laser axis, a ponderomotive scaling of electron temperature, and red shifting of emitted second-harmonic. These point towards the role of J × B absorption mechanism at relativistic intensity. The experimental results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:26648399

  14. Contrasting levels of absorption of intense femtosecond laser pulses by solids.

    PubMed

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Cui, Y Q; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D; Chatterjee, Gourab; Brijesh, P; Sheng, Z M; Kumar, G Ravindra

    2015-01-01

    The absorption of ultraintense, femtosecond laser pulses by a solid unleashes relativistic electrons, thereby creating a regime of relativistic optics. This has enabled exciting applications of relativistic particle beams and coherent X-ray radiation, and fundamental leaps in high energy density science and laboratory astrophysics. Obviously, central to these possibilities lies the basic problem of understanding and if possible, manipulating laser absorption. Surprisingly, the absorption of intense light largely remains an open question, despite the extensive variations in target and laser pulse structures. Moreover, there are only few experimental measurements of laser absorption carried out under very limited parameter ranges. Here we present an extensive investigation of absorption of intense 30 femtosecond laser pulses by solid metal targets. The study, performed under varying laser intensity and contrast ratio over four orders of magnitude, reveals a significant and non-intuitive dependence on these parameters. For contrast ratio of 10(-9) and intensity of 2 × 10(19)W cm(-2), three observations are revealed: preferential acceleration of electrons along the laser axis, a ponderomotive scaling of electron temperature, and red shifting of emitted second-harmonic. These point towards the role of J × B absorption mechanism at relativistic intensity. The experimental results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations. PMID:26648399

  15. Contrasting levels of absorption of intense femtosecond laser pulses by solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Prashant Kumar; Cui, Y. Q.; Adak, Amitava; Lad, Amit D.; Chatterjee, Gourab; Brijesh, P.; Sheng, Z. M.; Kumar, G. Ravindra

    2015-12-01

    The absorption of ultraintense, femtosecond laser pulses by a solid unleashes relativistic electrons, thereby creating a regime of relativistic optics. This has enabled exciting applications of relativistic particle beams and coherent X-ray radiation, and fundamental leaps in high energy density science and laboratory astrophysics. Obviously, central to these possibilities lies the basic problem of understanding and if possible, manipulating laser absorption. Surprisingly, the absorption of intense light largely remains an open question, despite the extensive variations in target and laser pulse structures. Moreover, there are only few experimental measurements of laser absorption carried out under very limited parameter ranges. Here we present an extensive investigation of absorption of intense 30 femtosecond laser pulses by solid metal targets. The study, performed under varying laser intensity and contrast ratio over four orders of magnitude, reveals a significant and non-intuitive dependence on these parameters. For contrast ratio of 10-9 and intensity of 2 × 1019 W cm-2, three observations are revealed: preferential acceleration of electrons along the laser axis, a ponderomotive scaling of electron temperature, and red shifting of emitted second-harmonic. These point towards the role of J × B absorption mechanism at relativistic intensity. The experimental results are supported by particle-in-cell simulations.

  16. Efficient energy absorption of intense ps-laser pulse into nanowire target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habara, H.; Honda, S.; Katayama, M.; Sakagami, H.; Nagai, K.; Tanaka, K. A.

    2016-06-01

    The interaction between ultra-intense laser light and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes is investigated to demonstrate efficient laser-energy absorption in the ps laser-pulse regime. Results indicate a clear enhancement of the energy conversion from laser to energetic electrons and a simultaneously small plasma expansion on the surface of the target. A two-dimensional plasma particle calculation exhibits a high absorption through laser propagation deep into the nanotube array, even for a dense array whose structure is much smaller than the laser wavelength. The propagation leads to the radial expansion of plasma perpendicular to the nanotubes rather than to the front side. These features may contribute to fast ignition in inertial confinement fusion and laser particle acceleration, both of which require high current and small surface plasma simultaneously.

  17. Interaction of Laser Induced Micro-shockwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leela, Ch.; Bagchi, Suman; Tewari, Surya P.; Kiran, P. Prem

    Laser induced Shock Waves (LISWs) characterized by several optical methods provide Equation of State (EOS) for a variety of materials used in high-energy density physics experiments at Mbar pressures [1, 2]. Other applications include laser spark ignition for fuel-air mixtures, internal combustion engines, pulse detonation engines, laser shock peening [3], surface cleaning [4] and biological applications (SW lithotripsy) [5] to name a few.

  18. Study Of Laser-Induced Copolymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miner, Gilda A.; Meador, Willard E.; Chang, C. Ken

    1993-01-01

    Report describes experiments on photopolymerization of styrene/maleic anhydride copolymer published as part of Laser Polymerization Program at NASA Langley Research Center. Presents basic study of copolymerization of styrene and maleic anhydride under laser-induced initiation and polymerization. Helps to clarify different theories on such initiation and represents significant advances in understanding of basic processes.

  19. Laser-induced jet formation in liquid films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasz, Frederik; Arnold, Craig

    2014-11-01

    The absorption of a focused laser pulse in a liquid film generates a cavitation bubble on which a narrow jet can form. This is the basis of laser-induced forward transfer (LIFT), a versatile printing technique that offers an alternative to inkjet printing. We study the influence of the fluid properties and laser pulse energy on jet formation using numerical simulations and time-resolved imaging. At low energies, surface tension causes the jet to retract without transferring a drop, and at high energies, the bubble breaks up into a splashing spray. We explore the parameter space of Weber number, Ohnesorge number, and ratio of film thickness to maximum bubble radius, revealing regions where uniform drops are transferred.

  20. Methane Absorption Coefficients in the 750-940 nm region derived from Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectral Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.

    2002-09-01

    The absorption spectrum of methane has been recorded in the visible to near-IR region using the intracavity laser spectroscopy technique. Spectra are recorded at high spectral resolution for narrow overlapping intervals in the region for room and 77 K temperature methane samples. After spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function, absorption coefficients are derived. These will be presented (750-940 nm for room temperature methane; 850-920 nm for 77 K methane) and compared with results reported by other workers. Future work in this area also will be indicated. Support from NASA's Planetary Atmospheres Program (NAG5-6091 and a Major Equipment Grant) is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Water vapor continuum: Whether collision-induced absorption is involved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigasin, A. A.

    2014-11-01

    In a series of recent publications, the idea is pursued to shed a new light on the theory of the water vapor continuum absorption invoking the mechanism of collision-induced absorption. In the opinion of the present author, a portion of theoretical suggestions on this subject is biased and may thus lead to untenable conclusions about the nature of the continuum. The most typical drawback consists of improper consideration of statistics in the ensemble of interacting monomers that lead to embedding incorrect statistical weights to various types of molecular pairs which can form. The current note aims at clarifying the term “collision-induced absorption” in order to avoid incongruity in understanding the nature of the water vapor continuum.

  2. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  3. Induced absorption and annihilation in hadronic hydrogen atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pomerantsev, Vladimir N.; Popov, Vladimir P.

    2012-05-01

    The induced absorption or annihilation in the collisions of the hydrogen hadronic atoms in the excited states with ordinary hydrogen have been described in a unified manner with the elastic scattering, Stark transitions, and Coulomb de-excitation in the framework of a close-coupling approach including both the open and closed channels corresponding to both the stationary and non-stationary states of hadronic atom. The general features of the induced absorption cross sections have been studied in a wide range of the complex energy-shift values. The total and differential cross sections of all processes have been calculated for π - p, K - p, and bar p p atoms with the principal quantum numbers n = 2 - 8 and kinetic energy from 0.001 eV up to 100 eV.

  4. Offsets in fiber-coupled diode laser hygrometers caused by parasitic absorption effects and their prevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchholz, B.; Ebert, V.

    2014-07-01

    Large systematic errors in absorption spectrometers (AS) can be caused by ‘parasitic’ optical absorption (parA) outside the measurement region. In particular, calibration-free direct tunable diode laser AS (dTDLAS) can take advantage of an effective parA-compensation to provide correct absolute values. However, parA also negatively affects calibrated AS in calibration frequency and stability. A common strategy to suppress parA in TDLAS systems is to fiber-couple the light source and even the detector. However, this can be a critical approach if the TDL spectrometer is validated/calibrated under laboratory conditions in ambient humidity and used afterwards in much drier and variable conditions, for example in aircrafts. This paper shows that, e.g., ‘hermetically sealed’ butterfly packages, despite fiber coupling, can possess fixed as well as variable parA sections. Two new methods for absolute parA-quantification in dTDLAS were developed, including a novel, fiber-coupled, parA-free I0-detector for permanent parA-monitoring. Their dependences on ambient humidity/pressure and temporal behavior were studied. For the example of a 1.4 µm dTDLAS hygrometer SEALDH-II with a commercial DFB-laser module and an extractive 1.5 m path cell, we quantified the parA-induced signal offsets and their dependence on cell pressure. The conversion of parA-uncertainty into H2O signal uncertainty was studied and an updated uncertainty budget including parA-uncertainty was derived. The studies showed that parA in commercial laser modules can cause substantial, systematic concentration offsets of ≈25 ppmv fixed and ≈100 ppmv variable offsets for one meter absorption path. Applying our parA-quantification techniques these offsets could be compensated by a factor of 20 to an overall offset uncertainty of 4.5 ppmv m-1. Finally, we developed an innovative, integrated, µ-pumped closed-loop air drying unit for the parA minimization and temporal stabilization in airborne laser

  5. Monitoring spacecraft atmosphere contaminants by laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinfeld, J. I.

    1975-01-01

    Data were obtained which will provide a test of the accuracy of the differential absorption method for trace contaminant detection in many-component gas mixtures. The necessary accurate absorption coefficient determinations were carried out for several gases; acetonitrile, 1,2-dichloroethane, Freon-113, furan, methyl ethyl ketone, and t-butyl alcohol. The absorption coefficients are displayed graphically. An opto-acoustic method was tested for measuring absorbance, similar to the system described by Dewey.

  6. One-step fabrication of submicrostructures by low one-photon absorption direct laser writing technique with local thermal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Dam Thuy Trang; Tong, Quang Cong; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-01-01

    In this work, local thermal effect induced by a continuous-wave laser has been investigated and exploited to optimize the low one-photon absorption (LOPA) direct laser writing (DLW) technique for fabrication of polymer-based microstructures. It was demonstrated that the temperature of excited SU8 photoresist at the focusing area increases to above 100 °C due to high excitation intensity and becomes stable at that temperature thanks to the use of a continuous-wave laser at 532 nm-wavelength. This optically induced thermal effect immediately completes the crosslinking process at the photopolymerized region, allowing obtain desired structures without using the conventional post-exposure bake (PEB) step, which is usually realized after the exposure. Theoretical calculation of the temperature distribution induced by local optical excitation using finite element method confirmed the experimental results. LOPA-based DLW technique combined with optically induced thermal effect (local PEB) shows great advantages over the traditional PEB, such as simple, short fabrication time, high resolution. In particular, it allowed the overcoming of the accumulation effect inherently existed in optical lithography by one-photon absorption process, resulting in small and uniform structures with very short lattice constant.

  7. Detection of metal vapour in the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch by resonance absorption of laser light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lins, Günter; Verleger, Jobst

    1996-03-01

    The electron emission mechanism which is active at the cathode of a pseudospark switch leads to thermal overloading of emission sites followed by the evaporation of cathode material. As a consequence, metal vapour should be present very shortly after the beginning of current flow. However, it has never been possible to observe metal vapour by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) prior to the cessation of current. In the present work resonance absorption of laser light was used to detect molybdenum vapour from the cathode during the high-current phase of a pseudospark switch. To observe the narrow-band absorption the laser light which had passed the switch was introduced into a molybdenum hollow cathode lamp where it caused fluorescence from molybdenum vapour. The intensity of the fluorescence light from the hollow cathode lamp was proportional to the intensity of the laser light left after the absorption process in the pseudospark. For a current amplitude of 12 kA and a pulse duration of 0022-3727/29/3/040/img1, it is shown that molybdenum vapour is definitely present shortly after the current maximum, well before the current stops flowing. The neutral vapour density in the high-current phase is estimated to amount to at least 0022-3727/29/3/040/img2. It is concluded that LIF fails to detect metal vapour prior to the cessation of current, mainly because the fluorescence process is severely disturbed by electronic collisions which deplete the upper fluorescence level.

  8. Line shape studies in CW dye laser intracavity absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, P.; Brink, G. O.; Spence, S.; Lakkaraju, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    The line shape of the signals observed by intracavity absorption in an atomic beam of barium is studied as a function of absorber density. Complex structure is observed consisting of both absorption and enhancement features. Comparison is made with models of intracavity absorption, and it is concluded that the rate equation model in its present form does not explain the structure. On the other hand the super-regen model does seem able to partially account for the observed structure. The complexity of the line shape will directly affect those workers who are using intracavity absorption as a spectroscopic technique.

  9. Laser Induced Chemical Liquid Phase Deposition (LCLD)

    SciTech Connect

    Nanai, Laszlo; Balint, Agneta M.

    2012-08-17

    Laser induced chemical deposition (LCLD) of metals onto different substrates attracts growing attention during the last decade. Deposition of metals onto the surface of dielectrics and semiconductors with help of laser beam allows the creation of conducting metal of very complex architecture even in 3D. In the processes examined the deposition occurs from solutions containing metal ions and reducing agents. The deposition happens in the region of surface irradiated by laser beam (micro reactors). Physics -chemical reactions driven by laser beam will be discussed for different metal-substrate systems. The electrical, optical, mechanical properties of created interfaces will be demonstrated also including some practical-industrial applications.

  10. Laser Absorption Measurements of CO at Elevated Pressures behind Reflected Shock Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camou, A.; Vivanco, J. E.; Cusano, D. M.; Petersen, E. L.

    Laser absorption spectroscopy has played a major role in combustion measurements and temperature sensing. Laser spectroscopy techniques offer non-intrusive measurements that can predict gas composition in combustion systems such as IC engines and power plants, as well as in the atmosphere.

  11. Saturated absorption in a rotational molecular transition at 2.5 THz using a quantum cascade laser

    SciTech Connect

    Consolino, L. Campa, A.; Ravaro, M.; Mazzotti, D.; Bartalini, S.; De Natale, P.; Vitiello, M. S.

    2015-01-12

    We report on the evidence of saturation effects in a rotational transition of CH{sub 3}OH around 2.5 THz, induced by a free-running continuous-wave quantum cascade laser (QCL). The QCL emission is used for direct-absorption spectroscopy experiments, allowing to study the dependence of the absorption coefficient on gas pressure and laser intensity. A saturation intensity of 25 μW/mm{sup 2}, for a gas pressure of 17 μbar, is measured. This result represents the initial step towards the implementation of a QCL-based high-resolution sub-Doppler THz spectroscopy, which is expected to improve by orders of magnitude the precision of THz spectrometers.

  12. Tunable Optomechanically Induced Absorption in a Hybrid Optomechanical System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiong; Zhao, Yun-Hui; He, Zhi; Yao, Chun-Mei

    2016-03-01

    We study the tunable optomechanically induced absorption (OMIA) with the quantized field in the system, which consists of a driven cavity and a mechanical resonator with a super-conducting charge qubit via Jaynes-Cummings interaction. Such a OMIA can be achieved by controlling the strength of the Jaynes-Cummings interaction. Moreover, our work shows this OMIA for the quantized fields can be robust against cavity decay in somehow. With the combination of optomechanically induced transparency (OMIT), our proposal may have paved a new avenue towards quantum photon router.

  13. Laser-induced caesium-137 decay

    SciTech Connect

    Barmina, E V; Simakin, A V; Shafeev, G A

    2014-08-31

    Experimental data are presented on the laser-induced beta decay of caesium-137. We demonstrate that the exposure of a gold target to a copper vapour laser beam (wavelengths of 510.6 and 578.2 nm, pulse duration of 15 ns) for 2 h in an aqueous solution of a caesium-137 salt reduces the caesium-137 activity by 70%, as assessed from the gamma activity of the daughter nucleus {sup 137m}Ba, and discuss potential applications of laser-induced caesium-137 decay in radioactive waste disposal. (letters)

  14. Intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy with narrow-ridge microfluidic quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Belkin, Mikhail A; Loncar, Marko; Lee, Benjamon G; Pflugl, Christian; Audet, Ross; Diehl, Laurent; Capasso, Federico; Bour, David; Corzine, Scott; Hofler, Gloria

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate microfluidic laser intra-cavity absorption spectroscopy with mid-infrared lambda approximately 9mum quantum cascade lasers. A deepetched narrow ridge waveguide laser is placed in a microfluidic chamber. The evanescent tails of the laser mode penetrate into a liquid on both sides of the ridge. The absorption lines of the liquid modify the laser waveguide loss, resulting in significant changes in the laser emission spectrum and the threshold current. A volume of liquid as small as ~10pL may, in principle, be sufficient for sensing using the proposed technique. This method, similar to the related gas-phase technique, shows promise as a sensitive means of detecting chemicals in small volumes of solutions. PMID:19547483

  15. Laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thayer, David A.; Lin, Yuting; Luk, Alex; Gulsen, Gultekin

    2012-08-01

    Due to the strong scattering nature of biological tissue, optical imaging beyond the diffusion limit suffers from low spatial resolution. In this letter, we present an imaging technique, laser-induced photo-thermal magnetic imaging (PMI), which uses laser illumination to induce temperature increase in a medium and magnetic resonance imaging to map the spatially varying temperature, which is proportional to absorbed energy. This technique can provide high-resolution images of optical absorption and can potentially be used for small animal as well as breast cancer and lymph node imaging. First, we describe the theory of PMI, including the modeling of light propagation and heat transfer in tissue. We also present experimental data with corresponding predictions from theoretical models, which show excellent agreement.

  16. Optical properties of laser-induced heavily doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindra, N. M.; Mhoronge, J. F.; Jouanne, M.

    1985-09-01

    An analysis of experimental studies (Slaoui et al., 1983) of the optical properties of laser-induced heavily doped Si layers is presented. The analysis has been made on the basis of models like those of Penn (1962) and Breckenridge et al. (1974). The calculations show that, in general, the effective number of electrons contributing to optically induced electronic transitions, increases as does the imaginary part of the complex dielectric constant. This reflects an increased absorption coefficient for these As-doped samples. These studies have been carried out on samples of Si heavily doped by ion-implantation followed by a laser-annealing process. The conclusions based on these studies are seen to be in accord with those of Aspnes et al. (1984) and Vina and Cardona (1984).

  17. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Dual Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2009-07-01

    The rapid global expansion of nuclear energy is motivating the expedited development of new safeguards technology to mitigate potential proliferation threats arising from monitoring gaps within the uranium enrichment process. Current onsite enrichment level monitoring methods are limited by poor sensitivity and accuracy performance. Offsite analysis has better performance, but this approach requires onsite hand sampling followed by time-consuming and costly post analysis. These limitations make it extremely difficult to implement comprehensive safeguards accounting measures that can effectively counter enrichment facility misuse. In addition, uranium enrichment by modern centrifugation leads to a significant proliferation threat, since the centrifuge cascades can quickly produce a significant quantity of highly enriched uranium (HEU). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is developing an engineered safeguards approach having continuous aerosol particulate collection and uranium isotope analysis to provide timely detection of HEU production in a low enriched uranium facility. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy, to characterize the 235U/238U isotopic ratio by subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths arising from differences in each isotope’s nuclear mass, volume, and spin (hyperfine structure for 235U). Environmental sampling media is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes a 10 to 20-µm sample diameter. The ejected plasma forms a plume of atomic vapor. A plume for a sample containing uranium has atoms of the 235U and 238U isotopes present. Tunable diode lasers are directed through the plume to selectively excite each isotope and their presence is detected by monitoring absorbance signals on a shot-to-shot basis. Single-shot detection sensitivity approaching the femtogram range and abundance uncertainty

  18. Tunable diode laser measurements of HO2NO2 absorption coefficients near 12.5 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    May, R. D.; Molina, L. T.; Webster, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A tunable diode laser spectrometer has been used to measure absorption coefficients of peroxynitric acid (HO2NO2) near the 803/cm Q branch. HO2NO2 concentrations in a low-pressure flowing gas mixture were determined from chemical titration procedures and UV absorption spectroscopy. The diode laser measured absorption coefficients, at a spectral resolution of better than 0.001/cm, are about 10 percent larger than previous Fourier transform infrared measurements made at a spectral resolution of 0.06/cm.

  19. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser - Quantification for a narrowband absorber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brobst, William D.; Allen, John E., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors including transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power is presented for a CW dye laser with a narrow-band absorber (NO2). A Beer-Lambert type relationship is found over a small but useful range of these parameters. Quantitative measurement of intracavity absorption from the dye laser spectral profiles showed enhancements up to 12,000 (for pump powers near lasing threshold) when compared to extracavity measurements. The definition of an intracavity absorption coefficient allowed the determination of accurate transition strength ratios, demonstrating the reliability of the method.

  20. Laser-induced photodynamic effects at silica nanocomposite based on cadmium sulphide quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Voznesenskiy, S S; Sergeev, A A; Galkina, A N; Kulchin, Yu N; Shchipunov, Yu A; Postnova, I V

    2014-01-27

    In this paper we study the laser-induced modification of optical properties of nanocomposite based on cadmium sulphide quantum dots encapsulated into thiomalic acid shell which were embedded into a porous silica matrix. We found red shift of luminescence of the nanocomposite when exposed to laser radiation at λ = 405 nm. Using pump-probe method and Small-Angle X-ray Scattering technique it was found that laser radiation at λ = 405 nm also increases the absorption coefficient of the nanocomposite in 15 times due to agglomeration of quantum dots. The modification of absorption properties is fully reversible. PMID:24515219

  1. Experimental Studies of Laser-Induced Breakdown in Transparent Dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, C W

    2003-09-23

    The mechanisms by which transparent dielectrics damage when exposed to high power laser radiation has been of scientific and technological interest since the invention of the laser. In this work, a set of three experiments are presented which provide insight into the damage initiation mechanisms and the processes involved in laser-induced damage. Using an OPO (optical parametric oscillator) laser, we have measured the damage thresholds of deuterated potassium dihydrogen phosphate (DKDP) from the near ultraviolet into the visible. Distinct steps, whose width is of order K{sub b}T, are observed in the damage threshold at photon energies associated with the number of photons (3{yields}2 or 4{yields}3) needed to promote a ground state electron across the energy gap. The wavelength dependence of the damage threshold suggests that a primary mechanism for damage initiation in DKDP is a multi-photon process in which the order is reduced through excited defect state absorption. In-situ fluorescence microscopy, in conjunction with theoretical calculations by Liu et al., has been used to establish that hydrogen displacement defects are potentially responsible for the reduction in the multi-photon cross-section. During the damage process, the material absorbs energy from the laser pulse and produces an ionized region that gives rise to broadband emission. By performing a time-resolved investigation of this emission, we demonstrate both that it is blackbody in nature, and we provide the first direct measurement of the localized temperature during and following laser damage initiation for various optical materials. For excitation using nanosecond laser pulses, the plasma, when confined in the bulk, is in thermal equilibrium with the lattice. These results allow for a detailed characterization of temperature, pressure, and electron densities occurring during laser-induced damage.

  2. Experimental studies of a zeeman-tuned xenon laser differential absorption apparatus.

    PubMed

    Linford, G J

    1973-06-01

    A Zeeman-tuned cw xenon laser differential absorption device is described. The xenon laser was tuned by axial magnetic fields up to 5500 G generated by an unusually large water-cooled dc solenoid. Xenon laser lines at 3.37 micro, 3.51 micro, and 3.99 micro were tuned over ranges of 6 A, 6 A, and 11 A, respectively. To date, this apparatus has been used principally to study the details of formaldehyde absorption lines lying near the 3 .508-micro xenon laser transition. These experiments revealed that the observed absorption spectrum of formaldehyde exhibits a sufficiently unique spectral structure that the present technique may readily be used to measure relative concentrations of formaldehyde in samples of polluted air. PMID:20125492

  3. Absorptivity modulation on wavy molten steel surfaces: The influence of laser wavelength and angle of incidence

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, A. F. H.

    2012-10-08

    The modulation of the angle-dependent Fresnel absorptivity across wavy molten steel surfaces during laser materials processing, like drilling, cutting, or welding, has been calculated. The absorptivity is strongly altered by the grazing angle of incidence of the laser beam on the processing front. Owing to its specific Brewster-peak characteristics, the 10.64 {mu}m wavelength CO{sub 2}-laser shows an opposite trend with respect to roughness and angle-of-incidence compared to lasers in the wavelength range of 532-1070 nm. Plateaus or rings of Brewster-peak absorptivity can lead to hot spots on a wavy surface, often in close proximity to cold spots caused by shadow domains.

  4. Laser-Beam-Absorption Chemical-Species Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gersh, Michael; Goldstein, Neil; Lee, Jamine; Bien, Fritz; Richtsmeier, Steven

    1996-01-01

    Apparatus measures concentration of chemical species in fluid medium (e.g., gaseous industrial process stream). Directs laser beam through medium, and measures intensity of beam after passage through medium. Relative amount of beam power absorbed in medium indicative of concentration of chemical species; laser wavelength chosen to be one at which species of interest absorbs.

  5. Intracavity absorption of CO 2 laser radiation by chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Hawat, Sh.

    2008-05-01

    Intracavity absorption method was applied to determine the absorption coefficients of trichlorofluorocarbon CCl 3F (CFC-11), dichlorodifluorocarbon CF 2Cl 2 (CFC-12) and chlorodifluorocarbon CHClF 2 (CFC-22) vs. the pressure in the cell inside the cavity of a tunable CO 2 laser at different spectral lines on branches 9R and 10P. The laser output power was measured vs. the gas pressure at different spectral lines on branches 9R, 9P, 10R and 10P of CO 2 molecule transitions. A strong absorption was observed for lines of 9R and 10P branches, whereas a weak absorption was noticed for lines of 9P and 10R branches. The calculation of absorption coefficients was restricted for 9R and 10P due to the oscillating variation of the output power of CO 2 laser vs. the CFC pressure, which was occurred for the lines of 9P and 10R. On the basis of absorption coefficients, the absorption cross-sections for CFC-12 were calculated and compared with the absorption cross-sections found from the previous experiment (where the cell was located outside the cavity), NIST and HITRAN databases, respectively. The obtained data could be useful for CFC gases detection as pollutants in the atmosphere.

  6. Tunable diode laser measurements of CH3OOH absorption cross-sections near 1320 CM-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, K. H.; Brockmann, K. J.; Bechara, J.

    Infrared absorption spectra and absorption cross-sections in the C-H deformation band of CH3OOH near 1320 cm-1 have been measured with a tunable diode laser spectrometer. Methylhydroperoxide concentrations in a slowly flowing gas mixture were determined by UV absorption. Peak absorption cross-sections of the strongest lines observed were found to lie in the range (0.5 -1.5) × 10-18 cm² under near Doppler-limited conditions. The dependence of the peak absorption cross-sections on total air pressure in the range 2.5-90 torr was also investigated, and the possibility of CH3OOH atmospheric mixing ratio measurement with a tunable diode laser assessed.

  7. Numerical Investigation of Laser Absorption and Drive Experiments of CH Spherical Shells on the OMEGA Laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Knauer, J. P.; Seka, W.; Jaanimagi, P. A.; Stoeckl, C.

    2002-11-01

    Hydrodynamic codes contain an important free parameter, the flux limiter, which models the effect of nonlocal transport in the Spitzer--Härm diffusion representation of the thermal electron conduction. The flux limiter affects independently the absorption fraction and the target drive. Experiments were carried out on the OMEGA laser to measure the absorption fraction and the shell dynamics in order to improve the application of the flux limiter. The absorbed energy was obtained from plasma calorimeters and time-resolved measurement of the reflected light, both through the focusing lenses and outside the lenses. Imaging of the shell emission during the implosion and measuring the neutron production history with the neutron temporal diagnostics (NTD) provided accurate timing of the target implosion. The targets were 15-μm-CH and Si-doped CH shells of 930- and 1100-μm diameters, filled with 15 atm of D_2, irradiated by either 1-ns square pulses or shaped pulses. Simulations with the one-dimensional code LILAC with varying flux-limiter values are compared with the experimental mesurements. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460.

  8. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capoen, Bruno; Chahadih, Abdallah; El Hamzaoui, Hicham; Cristini, Odile; Bouazaoui, Mohamed

    2013-06-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  9. Laser-induced growth of nanocrystals embedded in porous materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Space localization of the linear and nonlinear optical properties in a transparent medium at the submicron scale is still a challenge to yield the future generation of photonic devices. Laser irradiation techniques have always been thought to structure the matter at the nanometer scale, but combining them with doping methods made it possible to generate local growth of several types of nanocrystals in different kinds of silicate matrices. This paper summarizes the most recent works developed in our group, where the investigated nanoparticles are either made of metal (gold) or chalcogenide semiconductors (CdS, PbS), grown in precursor-impregnated porous xerogels under different laser irradiations. This review is associated to new results on silver nanocrystals in the same kind of matrices. It is shown that, depending on the employed laser, the particles can be formed near the sample surface or deep inside the silica matrix. Photothermal and/or photochemical mechanisms may be invoked to explain the nanoparticle growth, depending on the laser, precursor, and matrix. One striking result is that metal salt reduction, necessary to the production of the corresponding nanoparticles, can efficiently occur due to the thermal wrenching of electrons from the matrix itself or due to multiphoton absorption of the laser light by a reducer additive in femtosecond regime. Very localized semiconductor quantum dots could also be generated using ultrashort pulses, but while PbS nanoparticles grow faster than CdS particles due to one-photon absorption, this better efficiency is counterbalanced by a sensitivity to oxidation. In most cases where the reaction efficiency is high, particles larger than the pores have been obtained, showing that a fast diffusion of the species through the interconnected porosity can modify the matrix itself. Based on our experience in these techniques, we compare several examples of laser-induced nanocrystal growth in porous silica xerogels, which allows

  10. Dynamics of femtosecond laser absorption of fused silica in the ablation regime

    SciTech Connect

    Lebugle, M. Sanner, N.; Varkentina, N.; Sentis, M.; Utéza, O.

    2014-08-14

    We investigate the ultrafast absorption dynamics of fused silica irradiated by a single 500 fs laser pulse in the context of micromachining applications. A 60-fs-resolution pump-probe experiment that measures the reflectivity and transmissivity of the target under excitation is developed to reveal the evolution of plasma absorption. Above the ablation threshold, an overcritical plasma with highly non-equilibrium conditions is evidenced in a thin layer at the surface. The maximum electron density is reached at a delay of 0.5 ps after the peak of the pump pulse, which is a strong indication of the occurrence of electronic avalanche. The results are further analyzed to determine the actual feedback of the evolution of the optical properties of the material on the pump pulse. We introduce an important new quantity, namely, the duration of absorption of the laser by the created plasma, corresponding to the actual timespan of laser absorption by inverse Bremsstrahlung. Our results indicate an increasing contribution of plasma absorption to the total material absorption upon raising the excitation fluence above the ablation threshold. The role of transient optical properties during the energy deposition stage is characterized and our results emphasize the necessity to take it into account for better understanding and control of femtosecond laser-dielectrics interaction.

  11. Laser-induced structural modifications in glass using a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamaki, Takayuki; Nakazumi, Shinya; Nakamura, Keigo; Ono, Shunsuke

    2013-03-01

    In this paper, we present the investigation results on laser-induced structural modifications in a BK7 glass sample (OHARA, S-BSL7) by use of a femtosecond laser and a CO2 laser system. A femtosecond fiber laser system (wavelength: 1.06 μm, pulse duration: 250 fs) generates 1 MHz ultrashort laser pulses with a pulse energy up to 2 μJ, and a CO2 laser system generates CW (continuous wave) laser beam with a wavelength of 10.6 μm. Both laser beams were simultaneously irradiated on a BK7 glass substrate (30 mm × 5 mm × 0.7 mm thick). The structural modifications regions were created by translating the glass sample perpendicular to the laser axis with a distance of 1 mm and a scan speed of 0.1 mm/s. The dependence of structural modifications on the laser energy of femtosecond laser pulses and the power of CO2 laser beam were investigated. The results have demonstrated that the refractive index change region with the width of 3 μm was created with simultaneously irradiation of two laser beams although the structural modification regions, which were produced with only femtosecond laser pulses, were surface ablation. And the surface ablation regions were changed to the refractive index change regions as the energy of CO2 laser beam increase to more than 2W.

  12. Metal surface nitriding by laser induced plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomann, A. L.; Boulmer-Leborgne, C.; Andreazza-Vignolle, C.; Andreazza, P.; Hermann, J.; Blondiaux, G.

    1996-10-01

    We study a nitriding technique of metals by means of laser induced plasma. The synthesized layers are composed of a nitrogen concentration gradient over several μm depth, and are expected to be useful for tribological applications with no adhesion problem. The nitriding method is tested on the synthesis of titanium nitride which is a well-known compound, obtained at present by many deposition and diffusion techniques. In the method of interest, a laser beam is focused on a titanium target in a nitrogen atmosphere, leading to the creation of a plasma over the metal surface. In order to understand the layer formation, it is necessary to characterize the plasma as well as the surface that it has been in contact with. Progressive nitrogen incorporation in the titanium lattice and TiN synthesis are studied by characterizing samples prepared with increasing laser shot number (100-4000). The role of the laser wavelength is also inspected by comparing layers obtained with two kinds of pulsed lasers: a transversal-excited-atmospheric-pressure-CO2 laser (λ=10.6 μm) and a XeCl excimer laser (λ=308 nm). Simulations of the target temperature rise under laser irradiation are performed, which evidence differences in the initial laser/material interaction (material heated thickness, heating time duration, etc.) depending on the laser features (wavelength and pulse time duration). Results from plasma characterization also point out that the plasma composition and propagation mode depend on the laser wavelength. Correlation of these results with those obtained from layer analyses shows at first the important role played by the plasma in the nitrogen incorporation. Its presence is necessary and allows N2 dissociation and a better energy coupling with the target. Second, it appears that the nitrogen diffusion governs the nitriding process. The study of the metal nitriding efficiency, depending on the laser used, allows us to explain the differences observed in the layer features

  13. Transformation of electromagnetically induced transparency into absorption in a thermal potassium optical cell with spin preserving coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gozzini, S.; Lucchesini, A.; Marinelli, C.; Marmugi, L.; Gateva, S.; Tsvetkov, S.; Cartaleva, S.

    2016-03-01

    We report a new experimental approach where an order of magnitude enhancement of the electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) resonance contrast, thus making it similar to that of the EIT resonance contrast is observed under the same conditions. The EIA signal results from the interaction of a weak probe beam with a ground state that has been driven by the pump (counter-propagating) beam. Probe absorption spectra are presented where the laser frequency is slowly detuned over the D1 line of 39K vapor contained in a cell with a PDMS antirelaxation coating. In addition to the frequency detuning, a magnetic field orthogonal to the laser beams is scanned around zero value at a higher rate. With both laser beams linearly polarized, an EIT resonance is observed. However, changing the pump beam polarization from linear to circular reverses the resonance signal from EIT to EIA.

  14. Zeeman effect induced by intense laser light.

    PubMed

    Stambulchik, E; Maron, Y

    2014-08-22

    We analyze spectral line shapes of hydrogenlike species subjected to fields of electromagnetic waves. It is shown that the magnetic component of an electromagnetic wave may significantly influence the spectra. In particular, the Zeeman effect induced by a visible or infrared light can be experimentally observed using present-day powerful lasers. In addition, the effect may be used for diagnostics of focused beam intensities achieved at existing and newly built laser facilities. PMID:25192094

  15. Heat pump processes induced by laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garbuny, M.; Henningsen, T.

    1980-01-01

    A carbon dioxide laser system was constructed for the demonstration of heat pump processes induced by laser radiation. The system consisted of a frequency doubling stage, a gas reaction cell with its vacuum and high purity gas supply system, and provisions to measure the temperature changes by pressure, or alternatively, by density changes. The theoretical considerations for the choice of designs and components are dicussed.

  16. Model studies of laser absorption computed tomography for remote air pollution measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, D. C., Jr.; Byer, R. L.

    1982-01-01

    Model studies of the potential of laser absorption-computed tomography are presented which demonstrate the possibility of sensitive remote atmospheric pollutant measurements, over kilometer-sized areas, with two-dimensional resolution, at modest laser source powers. An analysis of this tomographic reconstruction process as a function of measurement SNR, laser power, range, and system geometry, shows that the system is able to yield two-dimensional maps of pollutant concentrations at ranges and resolutions superior to those attainable with existing, direct-detection laser radars.

  17. On-Line Wavelength Calibration of Pulsed Laser for CO2 Differential Absorption LIDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, Chengzhi; Ma, Xin; Han, Ge; Liang, Ailin; Gong, Wei

    2016-06-01

    Differential absorption lidar (DIAL) remote sensing is a promising technology for atmospheric CO2 detection. However, stringent wavelength accuracy and stability are required in DIAL system. Accurate on-line wavelength calibration is a crucial procedure for retrieving atmospheric CO2 concentration using the DIAL, particularly when pulsed lasers are adopted in the system. Large fluctuations in the intensities of a pulsed laser pose a great challenge for accurate on-line wavelength calibration. In this paper, a wavelength calibration strategy based on multi-wavelength scanning (MWS) was proposed for accurate on-line wavelength calibration of a pulsed laser for CO2 detection. The MWS conducted segmented sampling across the CO2 absorption line with appropriate number of points and range of widths by using a tunable laser. Complete absorption line of CO2 can be obtained through a curve fitting. Then, the on-line wavelength can be easily found at the peak of the absorption line. Furthermore, another algorithm called the energy matching was introduced in the MWS to eliminate the backlash error of tunable lasers during the process of on-line wavelength calibration. Finally, a series of tests was conducted to elevate the calibration precision of MWS. Analysis of tests demonstrated that the MWS proposed in this paper could calibrate the on-line wavelength of pulsed laser accurately and steadily.

  18. Latent laser-induced graphitization of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Basic features and mechanism of femtosecond laser graphitization of diamond surface were studied in the two regimes of irradiation: (1) by an intensive (>10 J/cm2) single shot and (2) by a train of pulses with near-threshold intensity (~1-10 J/cm2). Special attention was paid to the so-called accumulative regime, when multipulse laser treatment results in prolonged delay of an appearance of crystal modification of the crystal. The light absorption mechanisms dominating in each regime are discussed. The experiments with fundamental (800 nm), second (400 nm) and third (266 nm) harmonics of Ti-sapphire laser (100 fs) have revealed that thermally stimulated processes play an essential role in latent diamond graphitization.

  19. Electromagnetically induced transparency with noisy lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao Yanhong; Wang Tun; Baryakhtar, Maria; Jiang Liang; Lukin, Mikhail D.; Van Camp, Mackenzie; Crescimanno, Michael; Hohensee, Michael; Walsworth, Ronald L.; Phillips, David F.; Yelin, Susanne F.

    2009-10-15

    We demonstrate and characterize two coherent phenomena that can mitigate the effects of laser phase noise for electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT): a laser-power-broadening-resistant resonance in the transmitted intensity cross correlation between EIT optical fields, and a resonant suppression of the conversion of laser phase noise to intensity noise when one-photon noise dominates over two-photon-detuning noise. Our experimental observations are in good agreement with both an intuitive physical picture and numerical calculations. The results have wide-ranging applications to spectroscopy, atomic clocks, and magnetometers.

  20. Laser-induced electric breakdown in solids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloembergen, N.

    1974-01-01

    A review is given of recent experimental results on laser-induced electric breakdown in transparent optical solid materials. A fundamental breakdown threshold exists characteristic for each material. The threshold is determined by the same physical process as dc breakdown, namely, avalanche ionization. The dependence of the threshold on laser pulse duration and frequency is consistent with this process. The implication of this breakdown mechanism for laser bulk and surface damage to optical components is discussed. It also determines physical properties of self-focused filaments.

  1. Ultraviolet radiation induced discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Gilson, Verle A.; Schriever, Richard L.; Shearer, James W.

    1978-01-01

    An ultraviolet radiation source associated with a suitable cathode-anode electrode structure, disposed in a gas-filled cavity of a high pressure pulsed laser, such as a transverse electric atmosphere (TEA) laser, to achieve free electron production in the gas by photoelectric interaction between ultraviolet radiation and the cathode prior to the gas-exciting cathode-to-anode electrical discharge, thereby providing volume ionization of the gas. The ultraviolet radiation is produced by a light source or by a spark discharge.

  2. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Renaudin, P.; Blancard, C.; Cosse, P.; Faussurier, G.; Lecherbourg, L.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-02

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  3. X-Ray Absorption Spectroscopy Of Thin Foils Irradiated By An Ultra-short Laser Pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renaudin, P.; Lecherbourg, L.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Audebert, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Shepherd, R.

    2007-08-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum and the 2p-3d absorption lines of bromine were measured over an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. Assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium, spectral opacity calculations have been performed using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI diagnostic to compare to the measured absorption spectra. A good agreement is obtained when non-equilibrium effects due to non-stationary atomic physics are negligible at the x-ray probe time.

  4. Thermal characterization of nanofluids using laser induced thermal lens technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurian, Achamma; Kumar, Rajesh B.; George, Sajan D.

    2009-08-01

    A laser induced thermal lens technique has been employed to evaluate the dynamic thermal parameter, the thermal diffusivity, of gold nanofluids. Gold nanoparticles were synthesized by citrate reduction of HAuCl4 in water. The UVVIS optical absorption spectra show an absorption peak around 540 nm owing to surface Plasmon resonance band of the gold particles. The thermal diffusivity of gold nanoparticles was evaluated by knowing the time constant of transient thermal lens obtained by fitting the experimental curve to the theoretical model of the mode-matched thermal lens. Analyses of the results show that the nanofluid exhibits lower thermal diffusivity value in comparison to the host medium, water. Further investigations also reveal that the concentration of nanoparticles in the fluid have influence on the measured thermal diffusivity value. Results are interpreted in terms of interfacial thermal resistance around the nanoparticles as well as on the clustering of nanoparticles.

  5. Laser-induced surface modification and metallization of polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frerichs, Hartmut; Wesner, David A.; Kreutz, Ernst-Wolfgang

    1995-04-01

    Laser-induced surface modification of various polymers is presented as a suitable pretreatment of surfaces in a two-step metallization process. Materials such as polyamide (PA), polypropylene (PP), polystyrene (PS), polycarbonate (PC), acrylbutadienestyrene (ABS), styreneacrylnitril (SAN), polybutadieneterphtalate (PBT), and polyoxymethylen (POM) were treated by excimer laser radiation ((lambda) equals 248 nm) in air. The aim of this study is to investigate different processing regimes of surface modification. Therefore the laser processing variables fluence F, repetition rate v and pulse number N are varied and the absorption coefficient, optical penetration depth, ablation depth and ablation threshold are determined. The surface morphology and surface roughness are studied by optical surface profilometry and secondary electron microscopy (SEM). The influence of laser treatment on chemical composition of modified and ablated surfaces is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Depending on the processing parameters and materials properties different microstructures and values of surface roughness are generated on the micrometer length scale. Pretreatment for the subsequent metallization is performed with laser radiation, wet chemical and plasma etching. The metallization of polymers is investigated for different surface morphologies. The used metallization processes are electroplating and physical vapor deposition (PVD). Adhesion of the deposited films, measured with scratch and tape test methods, is used as a criterion for determining regimes of suitable surface modification for subsequent metallization.

  6. Liquid explosions induced by X-ray laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stan, Claudiu; Laksmono, Hartawan; Sierra, Raymond; McQueen, Trevor; Milathianaki, Despina; Koglin, Jason; Lane, Thomas; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth; Hayes, Matt; Guillet, Serge; Botha, Sabine; Nass, Karol; Schlichting, Ilme; Shoeman, Robert; Stone, Howard; Boutet, Sébastien

    2015-11-01

    Sudden generation and release of enough energy to vaporize matter are encountered in systems that range from supernovae explosions and asteroid impacts to applications in fusion energy generation, materials processing, and laser surgery. Understanding these strong explosions is important to both fundamental science and technical applications. We studied a new type of microexplosion, induced by absorption of X-ray pulses from a free-electron laser in micron-sized drops and jets of water. These explosions are related to, but different from, those observed in experiments performed with optical lasers. Unlike explosions caused by optical lasers, X-ray laser explosions produce symmetric expansion patterns that are simpler to rationalize. The release of energy initially concentrated in a small region inside drops and jets leads to ballistic vapor flow and inertial liquid flow. The kinematics of these flows indicates that the conversion of the energy deposited by X-rays into flow has a scaling that is similar to the one encountered in shock waves.

  7. Absorption of human skin and its detecting platform in the process of laser cosmetology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong-Lin; Ouyang, Li; Wang, Yang

    2000-10-01

    Because of the melanin, hemoglobin and water molecules, etc. contained, light absorption of human skin tissue changes with wavelength of light. This is the principle used in laser cosmetology for treating pigment diseases and vascular lesion diseases as well as skin decoration such as body tattooing, eyebrow tattooing, etc. The parameters of treatment used in laser cosmetology principally come from the research of the skin tissue optical characteristics of whites, and it is not suitable for the Oriental. The absorption spectrum of yellow race alive skin has been researched. The detecting platform for use in the measuring of vivi-tissue absorption spectrum has been developed which using opto-electronic nondestructive testing and virtual instrument techniques. The degree of pathological changes of skin can be detected by this platform also, thus the shortcoming of dosage selection in laser clinical treatments which have been decided only by naked eye observation and past experience of doctors can be solved.

  8. Absorption spectroscopy in hollow-glass waveguides using infrared laser diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, Thomas A.; Kelly, James F.; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hartman, John S.; Sharpe, Steven W.; Sams, Robert L.

    2002-07-10

    Hollow-glass waveguides may be a viable technology that, in some cases, may supplant heavier multi-pass cells such as White or Herriott cells for performing trace detection using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. We report here a series of experiments for testing the suitability of waveguides for infrared spectroscopy. The loss characteristics of 1 mm bore diameter waveguides have been measured for straight and coiled lengths. Using direct absorption spectroscopy we have found that the absorption pathlength is approximately equal to the physical length of the waveguide. Broadband FM diode laser spectroscopy produces a comparable signal-to-noise ratio with less than a second of signal averaging. Finally, we have also performed near-infrared spectroscopy of nitrous oxide flowing through a waveguide using a telecommunications diode laser.

  9. Mestastable State Population in Laser Induced Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwong, V. H. S.; Kyriakides, C.; Ward, W. K.

    2006-01-01

    Laser induced plasma has been used as a source of neutrals and ions in the study of astrophysical plasmas. The purity of state of this source is essential in the determination of collision parameters such as the charge transfer rate coefficients between ions and neutrals. We will show that the temperature of the laser induced plasma is a rapidly decreasing function of time. The temperature is initially high but cools off rapidly through collisions with the expanding plasma electrons as the plasma recombines and streams into the vacuum. This rapid expansion of the plasma, similar to a supersonic jet, drastically lowers the internal energy of the neutrals and ions.

  10. Collision-induced vibrational absorption in molecular hydrogens

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, S.P.

    1993-05-01

    Collision induced absorption (CIA) spectra of the first overtone bands of H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, and HD have been recorded for gas densities up to 500 amagat at 77-300 K. Analyses of these spectra reveal that (1) contrary to the observations in the fundamental bands, the contribution of the isotropic overlap interaction to the first overtone bands is negligible, (2) the squares of the matrix elements B{sub 32}(R)/ea{sub o} [= {lambda}{sub 32} exp(-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) + 3 (R/a{sub o}){sup -4}] where the subscripts 3 and 2 represent L and {lambda}, respectively, account for the absorption intensity of the bands and (3) the mixed term, 2,3 {lambda}{sub 32} exp (-(R-{sigma})/{rho}{sub 32}) <{vert_bar}Q{vert_bar}> <{alpha}> (R/a){sup -4}, gives a negative contribution. In the CIA spectra of H{sub 2} in its second overtone region recorded at 77, 201 and 298 K for gas densities up to 1000 amagat, a dip in the Q branch with characteristic Q{sub p} and Q{sub R} components has been observed. The analysis of the absorption profiles reveals, in addition to the previously known effects, the occurrence of the triple-collision transitions of H{sub 2} of the type Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) + Q{sub 1}(J) for the first time. From the profile analysis the absorption coefficient of these transitions is obtained.

  11. Optoacoustic measurements of water vapor absorption at selected CO laser wavelengths in the 5-micron region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menzies, R. T.; Shumate, M. S.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of water vapor absorption were taken with a resonant optoacoustical detector (cylindrical pyrex detector, two BaF2 windows fitted into end plates at slight tilt to suppress Fabry-Perot resonances), for lack of confidence in existing spectral tabular data for the 5-7 micron region, as line shapes in the wing regions of water vapor lines are difficult to characterize. The measurements are required for air pollution studies using a CO laser, to find the differential absorption at the wavelengths in question due to atmospheric constituents other than water vapor. The design and performance of the optoacoustical detector are presented. Effects of absorption by ambient NO are considered, and the fixed-frequency discretely tunable CO laser is found suitable for monitoring urban NO concentrations in a fairly dry climate, using the water vapor absorption data obtained in the study.

  12. Intracavity absorption with a continuous wave dye laser: quantification for a narowband absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Brobst, W.D.; Allen J.E. Jr.

    1987-09-01

    Although it is recognized as a very sensitive detection technique, the general application of intracavity absorption to areas such as chemical kinetics and photochemistry has been somewhat limited. Concerns are frequently expressed about the nonlinear nature, experimental difficulty, and reliability of the technique. To allay some of these objections, the dependence of intracavity absorption on factors such as transition strength, concentration, absorber path length, and pump power has been investigated experimentally for a cw dye laser with a narrowband absorber (NO/sub 2/). For this case a Beer-Lambert type relationship has been confirmed over a useful range of these parameters. The extent of intracavity absorption was quantitatively measured directly from the dye laser spectral profiles and, when compared to extracavity measurements, indicated enhancements as high as 12,000 for pump powers near lasing threshold. By defining an intracavity absorption coefficient, it was possible to demonstrate the reliability of the method by obtaining accurate transition strength ratios.

  13. Femtosecond laser-induced surface structures on carbon fibers.

    PubMed

    Sajzew, Roman; Schröder, Jan; Kunz, Clemens; Engel, Sebastian; Müller, Frank A; Gräf, Stephan

    2015-12-15

    The influence of different polarization states during the generation of periodic nanostructures on the surface of carbon fibers was investigated using a femtosecond laser with a pulse duration τ=300  fs, a wavelength λ=1025  nm, and a peak fluence F=4  J/cm². It was shown that linear polarization results in a well-aligned periodic pattern with different orders of magnitude concerning their period and an alignment parallel and perpendicular to fiber direction, respectively. For circular polarization, both types of uniform laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) patterns appear simultaneously with different dominance in dependence on the position at the fiber surface. Their orientation was explained by the polarization-dependent absorptivity and the geometrical anisotropy of the carbon fibers. PMID:26670499

  14. Spectral control of an alexandrite laser for an airborne water-vapor differential absorption lidar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponsardin, Patrick; Grossmann, Benoist E.; Browell, Edward V.

    1994-01-01

    A narrow-linewidth pulsed alexandrite laser has been greatly modified for improved spectral stability in an aircraft environment, and its operation has been evaluated in the laboratory for making water-vapor differential absorption lidar measurements. An alignment technique is described to achieve the optimum free spectral range ratio for the two etalons inserted in the alexandrite laser cavity, and the sensitivity of this ratio is analyzed. This technique drastically decreases the occurrence of mode hopping, which is commonly observed in a tunable, two-intracavity-etalon laser system. High spectral purity (greater than 99.85%) at 730 nm is demonstrated by the use of a water-vapor absorption line as a notch filter. The effective cross sections of 760-nm oxygen and 730-nm water-vapor absorption lines are measured at different pressures by using this laser, which has a finite linewidth of 0.02 cm(exp -1) (FWHM). It is found that for water-vapor absorption linewidths greater than 0.04 cm(exp -1) (HWHM), or for altitudes below 10 km, the laser line can be considered monochromatic because the measured effective absorption cross section is within 1% of the calculated monochromatic cross section. An analysis of the environmental sensitivity of the two intracavity etalons is presented, and a closed-loop computer control for active stabilization of the two intracavity etalons in the alexandrite laser is described. Using a water-vapor absorption line as a wavelength reference, we measure a long-term frequency drift (approximately 1.5 h) of less than 0.7 pm in the laboratory.

  15. Unraveling Shock-Induced Chemistry Using Ultrafast Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. S.

    2009-12-01

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps rise times, sufficient for investigation of fast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to micro-engineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures.

  16. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David S

    2009-01-01

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation of fast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to micro-engineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures.

  17. Unraveling shock-induced chemistry using ultrafast lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, David Steven

    2010-12-06

    The exquisite time synchronicity between shock and diagnostics needed to unravel chemical events occurring in picoseconds has been achieved using a shaped ultrafast laser pulse to both drive the shocks and interrogate the sample via a multiplicity of optical diagnostics. The shaped laser drive pulse can produce well-controlled shock states of sub-ns duration with sub-10 ps risetimes, sufficient for investigation offast reactions or phase transformations in a thin layer with picosecond time resolution. The shock state is characterized using ultrafast dynamic ellipsometry (UDE) in either planar or Gaussian spatial geometries, the latter allowing measurements of the equation of state of materials at a range of stresses in a single laser pulse. Time-resolved processes in materials are being interrogated using UDE, ultrafast infrared absorption, ultrafast UV/visible absorption, and femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy. Using these tools we showed that chemistry in an energetic thin film starts only after an induction time of a few tens of ps, an observation that allows differentiation between proposed shock-induced reaction mechanisms. These tools are presently being applied to a variety of energetic and reactive sample systems, from nitromethane and carbon disulfide, to microengineered interfaces in tunable energetic mixtures. Recent results will be presented, and future trends outlined.

  18. [The Research for Trace Ammonia Escape Monitoring System Based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-fang; Wang, Fei; Yu, Li-bin; Yan, Jian-hua; Cen, Ke-fa

    2015-06-01

    In order to on-line measure the trace ammonia slip of the commercial power plant in the future, this research seeks to measure the trace ammonia by using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy under ambient temperature and pressure, and at different temperatures, and the measuring temperature is about 650 K in the power plant. In recent years lasers have become commercially available in the near-infrared where the transitions are much stronger, and ammonia's spectroscopy is pretty complicated and the overlapping lines are difficult to resolve. A group of ammonia transitions near 4 433.5 cm(-1) in the v2 +v3 combination band have been thoroughly selected for detecting lower concentration by analyzing its absorption characteristic and considering other absorption interference in combustion gases where H2O and CO2 mole fraction are very large. To illustrate the potential for NH3 concentration measurements, predictions for NH3, H2O and CO2 are simultaneously simulated, NH3 absorption lines near 4 433.5 cm(-1) wavelength meet weaker H2O absorption than the commercial NH3 lines, and there is almost no CO2 absorption, all the parameters are based on the HITRAN database, and an improved detection limit was obtained for interference-free NH3 monitoring, this 2.25 μm band has line strengths several times larger than absorption lines in the 1.53 μm band which was often used by NH3 sensors for emission monitoring and analyzing. The measurement system was developed with a new Herriott cell and a heated gas cell realizing fast absorption measurements of high resolution, and combined with direct absorption and wavelenguh modulation based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy at different temperatures. The lorentzian line shape is dominant at ambient temperature and pressure, and the estimated detectivity is approximately 0.225 x 10(-6) (SNR = 1) for the directed absorption spectroscopy, assuming a noise-equivalent absorbance of 1 x 10(-4). The heated cell

  19. Laser frequency locking based on the normal and abnormal saturated absorption spectroscopy of 87Rb

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian-Hong, Wan; Chang, Liu; Yan-Hui, Wang

    2016-04-01

    We present a practical method to avoid the mis-locking phenomenon in the saturated-absorption-spectrum laser-frequency-locking system and set up a simple theoretical model to explain the abnormal saturated absorption spectrum. The method uses the normal and abnormal saturated absorption spectra of the same transition 52S1/2, F = 2–52P3/2, F‧ = 3 saturated absorption of the 87Rb D2 resonance line. After subtracting these two signals with the help of electronics, we can obtain a spectrum with a single peak to lock the laser. In our experiment, we use the normal and inverse signals of the transitions 52S1/2, F = 2–52P3/2, F‧ = 3 saturated absorption of the 87Rb D2 resonance line to lock a 780-nm distributed feedback (DFB) diode laser. This method improves the long-term locking performance and is suitable for other kinds of diode lasers. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11174015).

  20. Multiphoton absorption in CsLiB6O10 with femtosecond infrared laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, J. N. Babu; Naik, V. B.; Elizabeth, Suja; Bhat, H. L.; Venkatram, N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2008-09-01

    Nonlinear absorption and refraction characteristics of cesium lithium borate (CsLiB6O10) crystal have been studied using Z-scan technique. Ti:sapphire laser with 110 fs pulse width operating at 800 nm wavelength and pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz is used as the source of photons. Intensity of the laser pulse is varied from 0.541 to 1.283 T W/cm2 to estimate the intensity dependence of multiphoton absorption coefficients. Using the theory of multiphoton absorption proposed by Sutherland [Handbook of Nonlinear Optics, in 2nd ed., edited by D. G. McLean and S. Kirkpatrick, Dekker, New York (2003)], found that open aperture Z-scan data fit well for the five-photon absorption (5PA) process. 5PA coefficients are obtained by fitting the expressions into the open aperture experimental data for various peak intensities (I00). The nonlinear refractive index n2 estimated from closed aperture Z-scan experiment is 1.075×10-4 cm2/T W at an input peak intensity of 0.723 T W/cm2. The above experiment when repeated with a 532 nm, 6 ns pulsed laser led to an irreversible damage of the sample resulting in an asymmetric open aperture Z-scan profile. This indicates that it is not possible to observe multiphoton absorption in this regime of pulse width using 532 nm laser.

  1. Measurement of UV absorption of single living cell for cell manipulation using NIR femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Sung-Hak; Chang, Won-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Hong, Jong Wook

    2009-02-01

    Optical UV absorption of single human living cells ranging from 200 nm to 360 nm was measured in situ for the study of cell manipulation using the near-infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser . Human breast living cells of MCF-10A, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 were used in this experiment. The selective photo-disruptions of single living cell and its sub-organelle (nucleus) were also demonstrated using the tightly focused 790 nm wavelength femtosecond laser with pulse duration of 110 fs. It was found that each living cell has its own absorption spectrum in UV wavelength ranges. It was also inferred that intrinsic absorption spectrum is attributed to the amount of DNA and protein of living cell. For the study of photo-disruption of single cell using the multi-photon absorption excited by the NIR femtosecond laser pulse, the origin UV absorption spectrum of targeted living cell is important and fundamental information to understand nonlinear interaction between NIR ultrashort, high-intensity laser light and transparent living cell.

  2. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-01

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ˜ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  3. Decomposition of NO studied by infrared emission and CO laser absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, R. K.; Flower, W. L.; Monat, J. P.; Kruger, C. H.

    1974-01-01

    A diagnostic technique for monitoring the concentration of NO using absorption of CO laser radiation was developed and applied in a study of the decomposition kinetics of NO. Simultaneous measurements of infrared emission by NO at 5.3 microns were also made to validate the laser absorption technique. The data were obtained behind incident shocks in NO-N2O-Ar (or Kr) mixtures, with temperatures in the range 2400-4100 K. Rate constants for dominant reactions were inferred from comparisons with computer simulations of the reactive flow.

  4. Tunable diode-laser absorption measurements of methane at elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagali, V.; Chou, S. I.; Baer, D. S.; Hanson, R. K.; Segall, J.

    1996-07-01

    A diode-laser sensor system based on absorption spectroscopy techniques has been developed to monitor CH4 nonintrusively in high-temperature environments. Fundamental spectroscopic parameters, including the line strengths of the transitions in the R(6) manifold of the 2 nu 3 band near 1.646 mu m, have been determined from high-resolution absorption measurements in a heated static cell. In addition, a corrected expression for the CH 4 partition function has been validated experimentally over the temperature range from 400 to 915 K. Potential applications of the diode-laser sensor system include process control, combustion measurements, and atmospheric monitoring.

  5. Non-degenerate two photon absorption enhancement for laser dyes by precise lock-in detection

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, B.; Katan, C.; Bjorgaard, J. A.; Kobayashi, T.

    2015-12-15

    This study demonstrates a measurement system for a non-degenerate two-photon absorption (NDTPA) spectrum. The NDTPA light sources are a white light super continuum beam (WLSC, 500 ∼ 720 nm) and a fundamental beam (798 nm) from a Ti:Sapphire laser. A reliable broadband NDTPA spectrum is acquired in a single-shot detection procedure using a 128-channel lock-in amplifier. The NDTPA spectra for several common laser dyes are measured. Two photon absorption cross section enhancements are found in the experiment and validated by theoretical calculation for all of the chromophores.

  6. Nonlinear Interaction of Elliptical Laser Beam with Collisional Plasma: Effect of Linear Absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshav, Walia; Sarabjit, Kaur

    2016-01-01

    In the present work, nonlinear interaction of elliptical laser beam with collisional plasma is studied by using paraxial ray approximation. Nonlinear differential equations for the beam width parameters of semi-major axis and semi-minor axis of elliptical laser beam have been set up and solved numerically to study the variation of beam width parameters with normalized distance of propagation. Effects of variation in absorption coefficient and plasma density on the beam width parameters are also analyzed. It is observed from the analysis that extent of self-focusing of beam increases with increase/decrease in plasma density/absorption coefficient.

  7. Excited-state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occuring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelength resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed form the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  8. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliewer, Michael L.; Powell, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics in laser-pumped, rare-earth-doped, solid-state laser materials are investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y3Al5O12:Nd(3+) in an optical cavity. It is found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited-state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process is an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  9. Excited state absorption of pump radiation as a loss mechanism in solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kliewer, M.L.; Powell, R.C.

    1989-08-01

    The characteristics of optical pumping dynamics occurring in laser-pumped rare earth-doped, solid-state laser materials were investigated by using a tunable alexandrite laser to pump Y/sub 3/Al/sub 5/O/sub 12/:Nd/sup 3+/ in an optical cavity. It was found that the slope efficiency of the Nd laser operation depends strongly on the wavelength of the pump laser. For pump wavelengths resulting in low slope efficiencies, intense fluorescence emission is observed from the sample in the blue-green spectral region. This is attributed to the excited state absorption of pump photons which occurs during radiationless relaxation from the pump band to the metastable state. This type of process will be an important loss mechanism for monochromatic pumping of laser systems at specific pump wavelengths.

  10. Sources of hot electrons in laser-plasma interaction with emphasis on Raman and turbulence absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Estabrook, K.; Kruer, W.L.; Phillion, D.W.; Turner, R.E.; Campbell, E.M.

    1982-04-06

    Heating targets with high power lasers results in a sizable fraction of the absorbed energy going into electrons of temperature much greater than thermal which can pre-heat the pellet core and accelerate fast ion blowoff which results in poor momentum transfer and hence poor compression efficiency. The present emphasis is to build lasers of higher frequency, ..omega../sub 0/, which at the same W/cm/sup 2/ results in more absorption into cooler electrons. Two physical reasons are that the laser can propagate to a higher electron density, n, infinity..omega../sub 0//sup 2/ resulting in more collisional inverse bremsstrahlung absorption proportional to n, and because the hot temperatures from some plasma absorption processes increase as the oscillatory velocity of an electron in the laser electric field v/sub 0//c = eE/(m/sub e/..omega../sub 0/). The heated electron temperatures from other plasma processes (Raman for example approx.(m/sub e//2)v/sup 2//sub phase/ and the higher laser frequency helps by increasing the competing collisional absorption and decreasing the Raman gain.

  11. Wavelength and temperature dependence of continuous-wave laser absorptance in Kapton thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palm, William J.; Marciniak, Michael A.; Perram, Glen P.; Gross, Kevin C.; Bailey, William F.; Walters, Craig T.

    2012-12-01

    Optical properties and laser damage characteristics of thin-film aluminized Kapton were investigated. Spectral absorptance of virgin and irradiated samples was measured from the Kapton side of multilayered insulation over 0.2 to 15 μm wavelengths at both room temperature and 150°C. The laser-damage parameters of penetration time and maximum temperature were then measured in a vacuum environment at laser wavelengths of 1.07 and 10.6 μm. Differences in damage behavior at these two wavelengths were observed due to differences in starting absorption properties at these wavelengths. During laser irradiation, the Kapton thin film was observed with a calibrated FLIR thermal imager in the 8 to 9.2 μm band to determine its temperature evolution. Spectral radiance throughout the mid- and long-wave infrared was also observed with a Fourier transform spectrometer, allowing temperature-dependent spectral emittance to be determined. Kapton emittance increased after the material heated past approximately 500°C, and continued to increase as it cooled posttest. This evolving temperature-dependent spectral emittance successfully predicts the increasing absorptance that led to shortened penetration times and increased heating rates for the 1.07 μm laser. For tests with constant absorptance and no material breakdown, a simplified one-dimensional thermal conduction and radiation model successfully predicts the temporally evolving temperature.

  12. Theory of x-ray absorption by laser-aligned symmetric-top molecules.

    SciTech Connect

    Buth, C.; Santra, R.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

    2008-01-01

    We devise a theory of x-ray absorption by symmetric-top molecules which are aligned by an intense optical laser. Initially, the density matrix of the system is composed of the electronic ground state of the molecules and a thermal ensemble of rigid-rotor eigenstates. We formulate equations of motion of the two-color (laser plus x rays) rotational-electronic problem. The interaction with the laser is assumed to be nonresonant; it is described by an electric dipole polarizability tensor. X-ray absorption is approximated as a one-photon process. It is shown that the equations can be separated such that the interaction with the laser can be treated independently of the x rays. The laser-only density matrix is propagated numerically. After each time step, the x-ray absorption is calculated. We apply our theory to study adiabatic alignment of bromine molecules (Br2). The required dynamic polarizabilities are determined using the ab initio linear response methods coupled-cluster singles (CCS), second-order approximate coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CC2), and coupled-cluster singles and doubles (CCSD). For the description of x-ray absorption on the {sigma}g1s-->{sigma}u4p resonance, a parameter-free two-level model is used for the electronic structure of the molecules. Our theory opens up novel perspectives for the quantum control of x-ray radiation.

  13. Laser-induced gas vortices.

    PubMed

    Steinitz, Uri; Prior, Yehiam; Averbukh, Ilya Sh

    2012-07-20

    Recently, several femtosecond-laser techniques have demonstrated molecular excitation to high rotational states with a preferred sense of rotation. We consider collisional relaxation in a dense gas of such unidirectionally rotating molecules, and suggest that due to angular momentum conservation, collisions lead to the generation of macroscopic vortex gas flows. This argument is supported using the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo method, followed by a computational gas-dynamic analysis. PMID:22861845

  14. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Column via Space Borne Laser Absorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heaps, WIlliam S.

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the budget of carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere it is necessary to develop a global high precision understanding of the carbon dioxide column. In order to uncover the 'missing sink that is responsible for the large discrepancies in the budget as we presently understand it calculation has indicated that measurement accuracy on the order of 1 ppm is necessary. Because typical column average CO2 has now reached 380 ppm this represents a precision on the order of .25% for these column measurements. No species has ever been measured from space at such a precision. In recognition of the importance of understanding the CO2 budget in order to evaluate its impact on global warming the National Research Council in its decadal survey report to NASA recommended planning for a laser based total CO2 mapping mission in the near future. The extreme measurement accuracy requirements on this mission places very strong requirements on the laser system used for the measurement. This work presents an analysis of the characteristics necessary in a laser system used to make this measurement. Consideration is given to the temperature dependence, pressure broadening, and pressure shift of the CO2 lines themselves and how these impact the laser system characteristics Several systems for meeting these requirements that are under investigation at various institutions in the US as well as Europe will be discussed.

  15. Vacuum heating versus skin layer absorption of intense femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, D.; Mulser, P.

    2007-02-15

    The crossing of the narrow skin layer in solid targets by electrons in a time shorter than a laser cycle represents one of the numerous collisionless absorption mechanisms of intense laser-matter interaction. This kinetic effect is studied at normal and oblique laser beam incidence and particle injection by a test particle approach in an energy interval extending into the relativistic domain. Three main results obtained are the strong dependence of the energy gain by the single particle on the instant of injection relative to the phase of the light wave, the reflection of the particles primarily contributing to absorption well in front of the target rather than in the Debye layer, and the low degree of absorption hardly exceeding the 10% limit. The simulation results offer a more unambiguous interpretation of the absorption mechanism often referred to as ''vacuum heating.'' In particular, it is clearly revealed that the absorption in the vacuum region prevails on that originating from the skin layer. Relativistic ponderomotive effects are also tested, however their contribution to absorption is not significant.

  16. Thermophysics Characterization of Multiply Ionized Air Plasma Absorption of Laser Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See; Rhodes, Robert; Turner, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The impact of multiple ionization of air plasma on the inverse Bremsstrahlung absorption of laser radiation is investigated for air breathing laser propulsion. Thermochemical properties of multiply ionized air plasma species are computed for temperatures up to 200,000 deg K, using hydrogenic approximation of the electronic partition function; And those for neutral air molecules are also updated for temperatures up to 50,000 deg K, using available literature data. Three formulas for absorption are calculated and a general formula is recommended for multiple ionization absorption calculation. The plasma composition required for absorption calculation is obtained by increasing the degree of ionization sequentially, up to quadruple ionization, with a series of thermal equilibrium computations. The calculated second ionization absorption coefficient agrees reasonably well with that of available data. The importance of multiple ionization modeling is demonstrated with the finding that area under the quadruple ionization curve of absorption is found to be twice that of single ionization. The effort of this work is beneficial to the computational plasma aerodynamics modeling of laser lightcraft performance.

  17. Laser induced plasma on copper target, a non-equilibrium model

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeziane, Amina Ait Liani, Bachir; Parisse, Jean-Denis

    2014-02-15

    The aim of this work is to present a comprehensive numerical model for the UV laser ablation of metal targets, it focuses mainly on the prediction of laser induced plasma thresholds, the effect of the laser-plasma interaction, and the importance of the electronic non-equilibrium in the laser induced plume and its expansion in the background gas. This paper describes a set of numerical models for laser-matter interaction between 193-248 and 355 nm lasers and a copper target. Along with the thermal effects inside the material resulting from the irradiation of the latter with the pulsed laser, the laser-evaporated matter interaction and the plasma formation are thoroughly modelled. In the laser induced plume, the electronic nonequilibrium and the laser beam absorption have been investigated. Our calculations of the plasmas ignition thresholds on copper targets have been validated and compared to experimental as well as theoretical results. Comparison with experiment data indicates that our results are in good agreement with those reported in the literature. Furthermore, the inclusion of electronic non-equilibrium in our work indicated that this important process must be included in models of laser ablation and plasma plume formation.

  18. Spectroscopy During Laser Induced Shock Wave Lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelhardt, R.; Meyer, W.; Hering, P.

    1988-06-01

    In the course of laser induced shock wave lithotripsy (LISL) by means of a flashlamp pumped dye laser a plasma is formed on the stone's surface. Spectral analysis of the plasma flash leads to chemical stone analysis during the procedure. A time resolved integral analysis of scattered and laser induced fluorescence light makes stone detection possible and avoids tissue damage. We used a 200 μm fiber to transmit a 2 μs, 50 mJ pulse to the stone's surface and a second 200 μ fiber for analysis. This transmission system is small and flexible enough for controlled endoscopic use in the treatment of human ureter or common bile duct stones. Under these conditions the stone selective effect of lasertripsy leads only to minor tissue injury.

  19. Seedless Laser Velocimetry Using Heterodyne Laser-Induced Thermal Acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Roger C.; Balla, R. Jeffrey; Herring, G. C.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A need exists for a seedless equivalent of laser Doppler velocimetry (LDV) for use in low-turbulence or supersonic flows or elsewhere where seeding is undesirable or impractical. A compact laser velocimeter using heterodyne non-resonant laser-induced thermal acoustics (LITA) to measure a single component of velocity is described. Neither molecular (e.g. NO2) nor particulate seed is added to the flow. In non-resonant LITA two beams split from a short-pulse pump laser are crossed; interference produces two counterpropagating sound waves by electrostriction. A CW probe laser incident on the sound waves at the proper angle is directed towards a detector. Measurement of the beating between the Doppler-shifted light and a highly attenuated portion of the probe beam allows determination of one component of flow velocity, speed of sound, and temperature. The sound waves essentially take the place of the particulate seed used in LDV. The velocimeter was used to study the flow behind a rearward-facing step in NASA Langley Research Center's Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel. Comparison is made with pitot-static probe data in the freestream over the range 0 m/s - 55 m/s. Comparison with LDV is made in the recirculation region behind the step and in a well-developed boundary layer in front of the step. Good agreement is found in all cases.

  20. Isotope Enrichment Detection by Laser Ablation - Laser Absorption Spectrometry: Automated Environmental Sampling and Laser-Based Analysis for HEU Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Bushaw, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    The global expansion of nuclear power, and consequently the uranium enrichment industry, requires the development of new safeguards technology to mitigate proliferation risks. Current enrichment monitoring instruments exist that provide only yes/no detection of highly enriched uranium (HEU) production. More accurate accountancy measurements are typically restricted to gamma-ray and weight measurements taken in cylinder storage yards. Analysis of environmental and cylinder content samples have much higher effectiveness, but this approach requires onsite sampling, shipping, and time-consuming laboratory analysis and reporting. Given that large modern gaseous centrifuge enrichment plants (GCEPs) can quickly produce a significant quantity (SQ ) of HEU, these limitations in verification suggest the need for more timely detection of potential facility misuse. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing an unattended safeguards instrument concept, combining continuous aerosol particulate collection with uranium isotope assay, to provide timely analysis of enrichment levels within low enriched uranium facilities. This approach is based on laser vaporization of aerosol particulate samples, followed by wavelength tuned laser diode spectroscopy to characterize the uranium isotopic ratio through subtle differences in atomic absorption wavelengths. Environmental sampling (ES) media from an integrated aerosol collector is introduced into a small, reduced pressure chamber, where a focused pulsed laser vaporizes material from a 10 to 20-µm diameter spot of the surface of the sampling media. The plume of ejected material begins as high-temperature plasma that yields ions and atoms, as well as molecules and molecular ions. We concentrate on the plume of atomic vapor that remains after the plasma has expanded and then cooled by the surrounding cover gas. Tunable diode lasers are directed through this plume and each isotope is detected by monitoring absorbance

  1. Beyond the single-atom response in absorption line shapes: probing a dense, laser-dressed helium gas with attosecond pulse trains.

    PubMed

    Liao, Chen-Ting; Sandhu, Arvinder; Camp, Seth; Schafer, Kenneth J; Gaarde, Mette B

    2015-04-10

    We investigate the absorption line shapes of laser-dressed atoms beyond the single-atom response, by using extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulse trains to probe an optically thick helium target under the influence of a strong infrared (IR) field. We study the interplay between the IR-induced phase shift of the microscopic time-dependent dipole moment and the resonant-propagation-induced reshaping of the macroscopic XUV pulse. Our experimental and theoretical results show that as the optical depth increases, this interplay leads initially to a broadening of the IR-modified line shape, and subsequently, to the appearance of new, narrow features in the absorption line. PMID:25910116

  2. Laser-absorption sensing of gas composition of products from coal gasification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffries, Jay B.; Sur, Ritobrata; Sun, Kai; Hanson, Ronald K.

    2014-06-01

    A prototype in-situ laser-absorption sensor for the real-time composition measurement (CO, CH4, H2O and CO2) of synthesis gas products of coal gasification (called here syngas) was designed, tested in the laboratory, and demonstrated during field-measurement campaigns in a pilot-scale entrained flow gasifier at the University of Utah and in an engineering-scale, fluidized-bed transport gasifier at the National Carbon Capture Center (NCCC). The prototype design and operation were improved by the lessons learned from each field test. Laser-absorption measurements are problematic in syngas flows because efficient gasifiers operate at elevated pressures (10-50 atm) where absorption transitions are collision broadened and absorption transitions that are isolated at 1 atm become blended into complex features, and because syngas product streams can contain significant particulate, producing significant non-absorption scattering losses of the transmission of laser light. Thus, the prototype sensor used a new wavelength-scanned, wavelength-modulation spectroscopy strategy with 2f-detection and 1f-normalization (WMS-2f/1f) that can provide sensitive absorption measurements of species with spectra blended by collision broadening even in the presence of large non-absorption laser transmission losses (e.g., particulate scattering, beam steering, etc.). The design of the sensor for detection of CO, CH4, H2O and CO2 was optimized for the specific application of syngas monitoring at the output of large-scale gasifiers. Sensor strategies, results and lessons learned from these field measurement campaigns are discussed.

  3. Bulk damage and absorption in fused silica due to high-power laser applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nürnberg, F.; Kühn, B.; Langner, A.; Altwein, M.; Schötz, G.; Takke, R.; Thomas, S.; Vydra, J.

    2015-11-01

    Laser fusion projects are heading for IR optics with high broadband transmission, high shock and temperature resistance, long laser durability, and best purity. For this application, fused silica is an excellent choice. The energy density threshold on IR laser optics is mainly influenced by the purity and homogeneity of the fused silica. The absorption behavior regarding the hydroxyl content was studied for various synthetic fused silica grades. The main absorption influenced by OH vibrational excitation leads to different IR attenuations for OH-rich and low-OH fused silica. Industrial laser systems aim for the maximum energy extraction possible. Heraeus Quarzglas developed an Yb-doped fused silica fiber to support this growing market. But the performance of laser welding and cutting systems is fundamentally limited by beam quality and stability of focus. Since absorption in the optical components of optical systems has a detrimental effect on the laser focus shift, the beam energy loss and the resulting heating has to be minimized both in the bulk materials and at the coated surfaces. In collaboration with a laser research institute, an optical finisher and end users, photo thermal absorption measurements on coated samples of different fused silica grades were performed to investigate the influence of basic material properties on the absorption level. High purity, synthetic fused silica is as well the material of choice for optical components designed for DUV applications (wavelength range 160 nm - 260 nm). For higher light intensities, e.g. provided by Excimer lasers, UV photons may generate defect centers that effect the optical properties during usage, resulting in an aging of the optical components (UV radiation damage). Powerful Excimer lasers require optical materials that can withstand photon energy close to the band gap and the high intensity of the short pulse length. The UV transmission loss is restricted to the DUV wavelength range below 300 nm and

  4. Quantum Cascade Laser Absorption Spectroscopy as a Plasma Diagnostic Tool: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Welzel, Stefan; Hempel, Frank; Hübner, Marko; Lang, Norbert; Davies, Paul B.; Röpcke, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    The recent availability of thermoelectrically cooled pulsed and continuous wave quantum and inter-band cascade lasers in the mid-infrared spectral region has led to significant improvements and new developments in chemical sensing techniques using in-situ laser absorption spectroscopy for plasma diagnostic purposes. The aim of this article is therefore two-fold: (i) to summarize the challenges which arise in the application of quantum cascade lasers in such environments, and, (ii) to provide an overview of recent spectroscopic results (encompassing cavity enhanced methods) obtained in different kinds of plasma used in both research and industry. PMID:22163581

  5. Monitoring Temperature in High Enthalpy Arc-heated Plasma Flows using Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Marcel Nations; Chang, Leyen S.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Nawaz, Anuscheh; Taunk, Jaswinder S.; Driver, David M.; Raiche, George

    2013-01-01

    A tunable diode laser sensor was designed for in situ monitoring of temperature in the arc heater of the NASA Ames IHF arcjet facility (60 MW). An external cavity diode laser was used to generate light at 777.2 nm and laser absorption used to monitor the population of electronically excited oxygen atoms in an air plasma flow. Under the assumption of thermochemical equilibrium, time-resolved temperature measurements were obtained on four lines-of-sight, which enabled evaluation of the temperature uniformity in the plasma column for different arcjet operating conditions.

  6. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Miaja-Avila, L; O'Neil, G C; Uhlig, J; Cromer, C L; Dowell, M L; Jimenez, R; Hoover, A S; Silverman, K L; Ullom, J N

    2015-03-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼10(6) photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >10(7) laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  7. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-01-01

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ∼106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments. PMID:26798792

  8. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also presentmore » data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.« less

  9. Laser plasma x-ray source for ultrafast time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Miaja-Avila, L.; O'Neil, G. C.; Uhlig, J.; Cromer, C. L.; Dowell, M. L.; Jimenez, R.; Hoover, A. S.; Silverman, K. L.; Ullom, J. N.

    2015-03-02

    We describe a laser-driven x-ray plasma source designed for ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy. The source is comprised of a 1 kHz, 20 W, femtosecond pulsed infrared laser and a water target. We present the x-ray spectra as a function of laser energy and pulse duration. Additionally, we investigate the plasma temperature and photon flux as we vary the laser energy. We obtain a 75 μm FWHM x-ray spot size, containing ~106 photons/s, by focusing the produced x-rays with a polycapillary optic. Since the acquisition of x-ray absorption spectra requires the averaging of measurements from >107 laser pulses, we also present data on the source stability, including single pulse measurements of the x-ray yield and the x-ray spectral shape. In single pulse measurements, the x-ray flux has a measured standard deviation of 8%, where the laser pointing is the main cause of variability. Further, we show that the variability in x-ray spectral shape from single pulses is low, thus justifying the combining of x-rays obtained from different laser pulses into a single spectrum. Finally, we show a static x-ray absorption spectrum of a ferrioxalate solution as detected by a microcalorimeter array. Altogether, our results demonstrate that this water-jet based plasma source is a suitable candidate for laboratory-based time-resolved x-ray absorption spectroscopy experiments.

  10. Laser-induced swelling of transparent glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logunov, S.; Dickinson, J.; Grzybowski, R.; Harvey, D.; Streltsov, A.

    2011-08-01

    We describe the process of forming bumps on the surface of transparent glasses such as display glasses with moderate thermal expansion ˜3.2 × 10 -6 K -1 and high coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) glasses, e.g. soda-lime glasses with CTE ˜9 × 10 -6 K -1 using high-power ultra-violet (UV) lasers at a wavelength where glass is transparent. We characterize the effect with optical dynamic measurements. The process relies on increased glass absorption from color-center generation and leads to glass swelling with bumps formation. The bump height may constitute more than 10% of the thickness of the glass sample. The required exposure time is relatively short ˜1 s, and depends on the glass properties, laser power, its repetition rate, and focusing conditions. A brief review of the potential applications for these bumps is provided.

  11. Minute Concentration Measurements of Simple Hydrocarbon Species Using Supercontinuum Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jihyung; Traina, Nicholas; Halloran, Michael; Lee, Tonghun

    2016-06-01

    Minute concentration measurements of simple hydrocarbon gases are demonstrated using near-infrared supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy. Absorption-based gas sensors, particularly when combined with optical fiber components, can significantly enhance diagnostic capabilities to unprecedented levels. However, these diagnostic techniques are subject to limitations under certain gas sensing applications where interference and harsh conditions dominate. Supercontinuum laser absorption spectroscopy is a novel laser-based diagnostic technique that can exceed the above-mentioned limitations and provide accurate and quantitative concentration measurement of simple hydrocarbon species while maintaining compatibility with telecommunications-grade optical fiber components. Supercontinuum radiation generated using a highly nonlinear photonic crystal fiber is used to probe rovibrational absorption bands of four hydrocarbon species using full-spectral absorption diagnostics. Absorption spectra of methane (CH4), acetylene (C2H2), and ethylene (C2H4) were measured in the near-infrared spectrum at various pressures and concentrations to determine the accuracy and feasibility of the diagnostic strategy. Absorption spectra of propane (C3H8) were subsequently probed between 1650 nm and 1700 nm, to demonstrate the applicability of the strategy. Measurements agreed very well with simulated spectra generated using the HITRAN database as well as with previous experimental results. Absorption spectra of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 were then analyzed to determine their respective measurement accuracy and detection limit. Concentration measurements integrated from experimental results were in very good agreement with independent concentration measurements. Calculated detection limits of CH4, C2H2, and C2H4 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure are 0.1%, 0.09%, and 0.17%, respectively. PMID:27091905

  12. Effects of thermal motion on electromagnetically induced absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Tilchin, E.; Wilson-Gordon, A. D.; Firstenberg, O.

    2011-05-15

    We describe the effect of thermal motion and buffer-gas collisions on a four-level closed N system interacting with strong pump(s) and a weak probe. This is the simplest system that experiences electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) due to transfer of coherence via spontaneous emission from the excited state to the ground state. We investigate the influence of Doppler broadening, velocity-changing collisions (VCC), and phase-changing collisions (PCC) with a buffer gas on the EIA spectrum of optically active atoms. In addition to exact expressions, we present an approximate solution for the probe absorption spectrum, which provides physical insight into the behavior of the EIA peak due to VCC, PCC, and the wave-vector difference between the pump and probe beams. VCC are shown to produce a wide pedestal at the base of the EIA peak, which is scarcely affected by the pump-probe angular deviation, whereas the sharp central EIA peak becomes weaker and broader due to the residual Doppler-Dicke effect. Using diffusionlike equations for the atomic coherences and populations, we construct a spatial-frequency filter for a spatially structured probe beam and show that Ramsey narrowing of the EIA peak is obtained for beams of finite width.

  13. In vivo laser-induced breakdown in the rabbit eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cain, Clarence P.; DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Noojin, Gary D.; Amnotte, Rodney E.; Roach, William P.

    1995-05-01

    Threshold measurements for femtosecond laser pulsewidths have been made for retinal minimum visible lesions (MVLs) in Dutch Belted rabbit and rhesus monkey eyes. Laser-induced breakdown (LIB) thresholds in biological materials including vitreous, normal saline, tap water, and ultrapure water have been measured and reported using an artificial eye. We have recorded on video the first LIB causing bubble formation in any eye in vivo using albino rabbit eyes (New Zealand white) with 120- femtosecond (fs) pulses and pulse energies as low as 5 microjoules ((mu) J). These bubbles were clearly formed anterior to the retina within the vitreous humor and, with 60 (mu) J of energy, they lasted for several seconds before disappearing and leaving no apparent damage to the retina. We believe this to be true LIB because of the lack of pigmentation or melanin granules within the albino rabbit eye (thus no absorptive elements) and because of the extremely high peak powers within the 5-(mu) J, 120-fs laser pulse. These high peak powers produce self-focusing of the pulse within the vitreous. The bubble formation at the breakdown site acts as a limiting mechanism for energy transmission and may explain why high-energy femotsecond pulses at energies up to 100 (mu) J sometimes do not cause severe damage in the pigmented rabbit eye. This fact may also explain why it is so difficult to produce hemorrhagic lesions in either the rabbit or primate eye with 100-fs laser pulses.

  14. Confocal Laser Induced Fluorescence of Argon Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scime, Earl; Soderholm, Mark

    2015-11-01

    Laser Induced Fluorescence (LIF) provides measurements of flow speed, temperature and when absolutely calibrated, density of ions or neutrals in a plasma. Traditionally, laser induced fluorescence requires two ports on a plasma device. One port is used for laser injection and the other is used for fluorescence emission collection. Traditional LIF is tedious and time consuming to align. These difficulties motivate the development of an optical configuration that requires a single port and remains fully aligned at all times; confocal LIF. Our confocal optical design employs a single two inch diameter lens to both inject the laser light and collect the stimulated emission from an argon plasma. A pair of axicon lenses create an annular beam path for the emission collection and the pump laser light is confined inside the annulus of the collection beam. The measurement location is scanned radially by manually adjusting the final focusing lens position. Here we present optical modeling of and initial results from the axicon based confocal optical system. The confocal measurements are compared to traditional, two-port, LIF measurements over the same radial range. This work is supported by US National Science Foundation grant number PHY-1360278.

  15. Propagation and absorption of high-intensity femtosecond laser radiation in diamond

    SciTech Connect

    Kononenko, V V; Konov, V I; Gololobov, V M; Zavedeev, E V

    2014-12-31

    Femtosecond interferometry has been used to experimentally study the photoexcitation of the electron subsystem of diamond exposed to femtosecond laser pulses of intensity 10{sup 11} to 10{sup 14} W cm{sup -2}. The carrier concentration has been determined as a function of incident intensity for three harmonics of a Ti : sapphire laser (800, 400 and 266 nm). The results demonstrate that, in a wide range of laser fluences (up to those resulting in surface and bulk graphitisation), a well-defined multiphoton absorption prevails. We have estimated nonlinear absorption coefficients for pulsed radiation at λ = 800 nm (four-photon transition) and at 400 and 266 nm (indirect and direct two-photon transitions, respectively). It has also been shown that, at any considerable path length of a femtosecond pulse in diamond (tens of microns or longer), the laser beam experiences a severe nonlinear transformation, determining the amount of energy absorbed by the lattice, which is important for the development of technology for diamond photostructuring by ultrashort pulses. The competition between wave packet self-focusing and the plasma defocusing effect is examined as a major mechanism governing the propagation of intense laser pulses in diamond. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  16. Phase measurement of fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoon-Seok; Lee, Hee Jung; Moon, Han Seb

    2013-09-23

    We report the phase measurement of a fast light pulse in electromagnetically induced absorption (EIA) of the 5S₁/₂ (F = 2)-5P₃/₂ (F' = 3) transition of ⁸⁷Rb atoms. Using a beat-note interferometer method, a stable measurement without phase dithering of the phase of the probe pulse before and after it has passed through the EIA medium was achieved. Comparing the phases of the light pulse in air and that of the fast light pulse though the EIA medium, the phase of the fast light pulse at EIA resonance was not shifted and maintained to be the same as that of the free-space light pulse. The classical fidelity of the fast light pulse according to the advancement of the group velocity by adjusting the atomic density was estimated to be more than 97%. PMID:24104135

  17. Laser-Induced Fluorescence in Gaseous [I[subscript]2] Excited with a Green Laser Pointer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2007-01-01

    A green laser pointer could be used in a flashy demonstration of laser-induced fluorescence in the gas phase by directing the beam of the laser through a cell containing [I[subscript]2] at its room temperature vapor pressure. The experiment could be used to provide valuable insight into the requirements for laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and the…

  18. Preferential light absorption in atheromas in vitro. Implications for laser angioplasty.

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M R; Deutsch, T F; Mathews-Roth, M M; Margolis, R; Parrish, J A; Oseroff, A R

    1986-01-01

    Laser angioplasty, the in situ ablation of arterial obstructions with laser radiation, has been demonstrated in animal models and early clinical trials. A problem with this technique, however, is the possibility of thermal damage to adjacent or underlying normal tissues that also absorb the radiation. Using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere and a specially constructed tunable-dye laser-based spectrophotometer, we evaluated the transmittance and remittance of human cadaveric atheromas and adjacent normal aorta from 250 to 1,300 nm to identify wavebands where there is preferential light absorption by atheromas. Data were analyzed by both the Kubelka-Munk formalism and a Beer's law model. Both methods indicate that atheromas absorb more than normal aorta between 420 and 530 nm. At 470 nm the average Kubelka-Munk absorption coefficient of atheromas from 10 cadavers was 54 +/- 9 cm-1 compared with 26 +/- 6 cm-1 for normal aortic specimens from seven cadavers. Yellow chromophores responsible for the atheroma absorbance were extractable with xylenes. Thin-layer chromatography and absorption spectra identified the extracted chromophores as predominantly consisting of a mix of carotenoids, which are known constituents of atheromatous lesions. Preferential absorption of blue light by carotenoids in atheromas may permit selective ablation of atheromatous obstructions with appropriate pulses of laser radiation. PMID:3722380

  19. Trace gas absorption spectroscopy using laser difference-frequency spectrometer for environmental application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W.; Cazier, F.; Boucher, D.; Tittel, F. K.; Davies, P. B.

    2001-01-01

    A widely tunable infrared spectrometer based on difference frequency generation (DFG) has been developed for organic trace gas detection by laser absorption spectroscopy. On-line measurements of concentration of various hydrocarbons, such as acetylene, benzene, and ethylene, were investigated using high-resolution DFG trace gas spectroscopy for highly sensitive detection.

  20. Element selective detection of molecular species applying chromatographic techniques and diode laser atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Kunze, K; Zybin, A; Koch, J; Franzke, J; Miclea, M; Niemax, K

    2004-12-01

    Tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (DLAAS) combined with separation techniques and atomization in plasmas and flames is presented as a powerful method for analysis of molecular species. The analytical figures of merit of the technique are demonstrated by the measurement of Cr(VI) and Mn compounds, as well as molecular species including halogen atoms, hydrogen, carbon and sulfur. PMID:15561625

  1. The laser absorption spectrometer - A new remote sensing instrument for atmospheric pollution monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    An instrument capable of remotely monitoring trace atmospheric constituents is described. The instrument, called a laser absorption spectrometer, can be operated from an aircraft or spacecraft to measure the concentration of selected gases in three dimensions. This device will be particularly useful for rapid determination of pollutant levels in urban areas.

  2. Five-Channel Infrared Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Combustion Product Monitoring Aboard Manned Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Borgentun, Carl E.; Bagheri, Mahmood; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.

    2014-01-01

    Continuous combustion product monitoring aboard manned spacecraft can prevent chronic exposure to hazardous compounds and also provides early detection of combustion events. As future missions extend beyond low-Earth orbit, analysis of returned environmental samples becomes impractical and safety monitoring should be performed in situ. Here, we describe initial designs of a five-channel tunable laser absorption spectrometer to continuously monitor combustion products with the goal of minimal maintenance and calibration over long-duration missions. The instrument incorporates dedicated laser channels to simultaneously target strong mid-infrared absorption lines of CO, HCl, HCN, HF, and CO2. The availability of low-power-consumption semiconductor lasers operating in the 2 to 5 micron wavelength range affords the flexibility to select absorption lines for each gas with maximum interaction strength and minimal interference from other gases, which enables the design of a compact and mechanically robust spectrometer with low-level sensitivity. In this paper, we focus primarily on absorption line selection based on the availability of low-power single-mode semiconductor laser sources designed specifically for the target wavelength range.

  3. Portable 4.6 Micrometers Laser Absorption Spectrometer for Carbon Monoxide Monitoring and Fire Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Ryan M.; Frez, Clifford; Forouhar, Siamak; May, Randy D.; Ruff, Gary A.

    2013-01-01

    The air quality aboard manned spacecraft must be continuously monitored to ensure crew safety and identify equipment malfunctions. In particular, accurate real-time monitoring of carbon monoxide (CO) levels helps to prevent chronic exposure and can also provide early detection of combustion-related hazards. For long-duration missions, environmental monitoring grows in importance, but the mass and volume of monitoring instruments must be minimized. Furthermore, environmental analysis beyond low-Earth orbit must be performed in-situ, as sample return becomes impractical. Due to their small size, low power draw, and performance reliability, semiconductor-laser-based absorption spectrometers are viable candidates for this purpose. To reduce instrument form factor and complexity, the emission wavelength of the laser source should coincide with strong fundamental absorption lines of the target gases, which occur in the 3 to 5 micrometers wavelength range for most combustion products of interest, thereby reducing the absorption path length required for low-level concentration measurements. To address the needs of current and future NASA missions, we have developed a prototype absorption spectrometer using a semiconductor quantum cascade laser source operating near 4.6 micrometers that can be used to detect low concentrations of CO with a compact single-pass absorption cell. In this study, we present the design of the prototype instrument and report on measurements of CO emissions from the combustion of a variety of aerospace plastics.

  4. Infrared-laser spectroscopy using a long-pathlength absorption cell

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.C.; Briesmeister, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The absorption measurements in an ordinary cell may require typically a few torr pressure of sample gas. At these pressures the absorption lines are usually pressure-broadened and, therefore, closely spaced transitions are poorly resolved even at diode-laser resolution. This situation is greatly improved in Doppler-limited spectroscopy at extremely low sample pressures. Two very long-pathlength absorption cells were developed to be used in conjunction with diode lasers. They were designed to operate at controlled temperatures with the optical pathlength variable up to approx. 1.5 km. Not only very low sample pressures are used for studies with such cells but also the spectroscopic sensitivity is enhanced over conventional methods by a factor of 10/sup 3/ to 10/sup 4/, improving the analytical capability of measuring particle densities to the order of 1 x 10'' molecules/cm/sup 3/. This paper presents some analytical aspects of the diode laser spectroscopy using the long-pathlength absorption cells in the areas of absorption line widths, pressure broadening coefficients, isotope composition measurements and trace impurity analysis.

  5. Dual-laser absorption spectroscopy of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasci, E.; Odintsova, T. A.; Castrillo, A.; De Vizia, M. D.; Merlone, A.; Bertiglia, F.; Moretti, L.; Gianfrani, L.

    2016-04-01

    Spectroscopic parameters (line intensity factor, pressure self-broadening, and shifting coefficients) of C2H2 at 1.4 μ m were accurately measured using a dual-laser approach, based upon the technique of optical phase locking. This generated an absolute frequency scale underneath the absorption spectra. A pair of extended-cavity diode lasers was used. One of them, the probe laser, is forced to maintain a precise frequency offset from a reference laser, which is an optical frequency standard based on noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy. Laser-gas interaction takes place inside an isothermal multipass cell that is stabilized at the temperature of the triple point of water. The fidelity in the observation of the shape associated to the Pe(14) line of the 2 ν3+ν5 band allowed us to measure the spectroscopic parameters, with a global uncertainty for the line strength of 0.22%.

  6. On the role of multiphoton light absorption in pulsed laser nanoablation of diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komlenok, M. S.; Kononenko, V. V.; Gololobov, V. M.; Konov, V. I.

    2016-02-01

    The rates of multipulse nanoablation of the diamond surface in air by pico- and nanosecond laser pulses that cause singlephoton, two-photon, three-photon and four-photon absorption in diamond are measured. In the experiments the radiation of ArF, KrF and Ti : Al2O3 lasers and the second harmonic of the Yb : YAG laser was used. The power dependence of the material etching rate on the fluence of laser pulses was found. The power exponent of this dependence appeared to be twice lower than that found earlier for femtosecond pulses. We discuss the causes of the difference in the nanoablation regularities for 'short' and 'long' laser pulses.

  7. Laser damage in silicon: Energy absorption, relaxation, and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rämer, A. Rethfeld, B.; Osmani, O.

    2014-08-07

    Silicon irradiated with an ultrashort 800 nm-laser pulse is studied theoretically using a two temperature description that considers the transient free carrier density during and after irradiation. A Drude model is implemented to account for the highly transient optical parameters. We analyze the importance of considering these density-dependent parameters as well as the choice of the Drude collision frequency. In addition, degeneracy and transport effects are investigated. The importance of each of these processes for resulting calculated damage thresholds is studied. We report damage thresholds calculations that are in very good agreement with experimental results over a wide range of pulse durations.

  8. Laser-induced lipolysis on adipose cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solarte, Efrain; Gutierrez, O.; Neira, Rodrigo; Arroyave, J.; Isaza, Carolina; Ramirez, Hugo; Rebolledo, Aldo F.; Criollo, Willian; Ortiz, C.

    2004-10-01

    Recently, a new liposuction technique, using a low-level laser (LLL) device and Ultrawet solution prior to the procedure, demonstrated the movement of fat from the inside to the outside of the adipocyte (Neira et al., 2002). To determine the mechanisms involved, we have performed Scanning and Transmission Electron Microscopy studies; Light transmittance measurements on adipocyte dilutions; and a study of laser light propagation in adipose tissue. This studies show: 1. Cellular membrane alterations. 2. LLL is capable to reach the deep adipose tissue layer, and 3. The tumescence solution enhances the light propagation by clearing the tissue. MRI studies demonstrated the appearance of fat on laser treated abdominal tissue. Besides, adipocytes were cultivated and irradiated to observe the effects on isolated cells. These last studies show: 1. 635 nm-laser alone is capable of mobilizing cholesterol from the cell membrane; this action is enhanced by the presence of adrenaline and lidocaine. 2. Intracellular fat is released from adipocytes by co joint action of adrenaline, aminophyline and 635 nm-laser. Results are consistent with a laser induced cellular process, which causes fat release from the adipocytes into the intercellular space, besides the modification of the cellular membranes.

  9. Quantifying pulsed laser induced damage to graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Marc; Caldwell, Joshua D.; Bezares, Francisco J.; Robinson, Jeremy; Anderson, Travis; Chun, Hayden; Tadjer, Marko

    2011-11-21

    As an emerging optical material, graphene's ultrafast dynamics are often probed using pulsed lasers yet the region in which optical damage takes place is largely uncharted. Here, femtosecond laser pulses induced localized damage in single-layer graphene on sapphire. Raman spatial mapping, SEM, and AFM microscopy quantified the damage. The resulting size of the damaged area has a linear correlation with the optical fluence. These results demonstrate local modification of sp{sup 2}-carbon bonding structures with optical pulse fluences as low as 14 mJ/cm{sup 2}, an order-of-magnitude lower than measured and theoretical ablation thresholds.

  10. Modeling of Laser-Induced Metal Combustion

    SciTech Connect

    Boley, C D; Rubenchik, A M

    2008-02-20

    Experiments involving the interaction of a high-power laser beam with metal targets demonstrate that combustion plays an important role. This process depends on reactions within an oxide layer, together with oxygenation and removal of this layer by the wind. We present an analytical model of laser-induced combustion. The model predicts the threshold for initiation of combustion, the growth of the combustion layer with time, and the threshold for self-supported combustion. Solutions are compared with detailed numerical modeling as benchmarked by laboratory experiments.

  11. Dynamics of femtosecond laser ablation studied with time-resolved x-ray absorption fine structure imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Oguri, Katsuya; Okano, Yasuaki; Nishikawa, Tadashi; Nakano, Hidetoshi

    2009-04-01

    We studied the dynamics of the femtosecond laser ablation of aluminum in an energy range well above the ablation threshold with the ultrafast time-resolved x-ray-absorption fine structure imaging technique. Analyzing the spectral structures near the L absorption edge that appeared in one-dimensional images of soft-x-ray absorbance, we successfully identified doubly and singly charged ions, neutral atoms, liquid nanoparticles, and possible atomic clusters in the expanding ablation plume. We also clarified that the ejected particles depend strongly on the laser irradiation intensity. The spatiotemporal evolution of the ablation particles allows us to estimate the spatial distribution of atomic density and the ejection velocity of each type of particle. In particular, we discuss the temporal sequence of the particle ejection in the early stages of plume expansion. Our experimental results strongly support the idea that photomechanical fragmentation and vaporization are dominant mechanisms for the production of liquid nanoparticles and neutral atoms, respectively, in femtosecond laser ablation induced in an irradiation intensity range of 10{sup 14}-10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2}.

  12. Airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer for IPDA Measurements of Tropospheric CO2: Recent Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.

    2008-01-01

    The National Research Council's decadal survey on Earth Science and Applications from Space[1] recommended the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission for launch in 2013-2016 as a logical follow-on to the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO) which is scheduled for launch in late 2008 [2]. The use of a laser absorption measurement technique provides the required ability to make day and night measurements of CO2 over all latitudes and seasons. As a demonstrator for an approach to meeting the instrument needs for the ASCENDS mission we have developed the airborne Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) which uses the Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) Spectrometer [3] technique operating in the 2 micron wavelength region.. During 2006 a short engineering checkout flight of the CO2LAS was conducted and the results presented previously [4]. Several short flight campaigns were conducted during 2007 and we report results from these campaigns.

  13. Determination of absorption coefficient based on laser beam thermal blooming in gas-filled tube.

    PubMed

    Hafizi, B; Peñano, J; Fischer, R; DiComo, G; Ting, A

    2014-08-01

    Thermal blooming of a laser beam propagating in a gas-filled tube is investigated both analytically and experimentally. A self-consistent formulation taking into account heating of the gas and the resultant laser beam spreading (including diffraction) is presented. The heat equation is used to determine the temperature variation while the paraxial wave equation is solved in the eikonal approximation to determine the temporal and spatial variation of the Gaussian laser spot radius, Gouy phase (longitudinal phase delay), and wavefront curvature. The analysis is benchmarked against a thermal blooming experiment in the literature using a CO₂ laser beam propagating in a tube filled with air and propane. New experimental results are presented in which a CW fiber laser (1 μm) propagates in a tube filled with nitrogen and water vapor. By matching laboratory and theoretical results, the absorption coefficient of water vapor is found to agree with calculations using MODTRAN (the MODerate-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database) and HITRAN (the HIgh-resolution atmospheric TRANsmission molecular absorption database). PMID:25090334

  14. Studies of fullerene absorption and production using an infrared free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Affatigato, M.; Haglund, R.F.; Ying, Z.C.; Compton, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    Tunable photon sources such as free-electron lasers are potentially valuable tools in spectroscopic studies of fullerenes, a new class of carbon materials with unique cage structures. We have used the infrared free-electron-laser facility at Vanderbilt University to study the infrared absorption of gas-phase fullerene molecules and also to investigate the effects of an infrared laser in the synthesis and crystallization of fullerene materials. In one experiment, fullerene vapor was created in a heat pipe through which the FEL beam was passed; the transmission of the FEL beam relative to a reference detector was measured as a function of wavelength. A large (>10%) absorption of the IR laser was observed when it passed through C{sub 60} vapor at {approximately}800{degrees}C. Due to the broad spectral width of the FEL as well as spectral congestion, no spectral peaks were seen when the laser wavelength was tuned across a T{sub 1u}C{sub 60} IR mode near 7.0 {mu}. However, it is expected that the vibrational features can be resolved experimentally by passing the transmitted beam through a monochromator. In a separate experiment, the FEL beam was focused onto a surface of graphite or graphite/metal mixture target. Various fullerene molecules, including endohedral types, were produced when the soot was recovered from the ablation chamber. The yield of the products was measured to be {approximately}0.4 g/J of the incident laser energy. However, both the yield and the product distribution are virtually, the same as those in experiments using a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. This suggests that the laser wavelength is not a crucial parameter in making fullerenes by laser ablation. Even when the laser is at resonance with one of the vibrational modes of C{sub 60}, the fullerene production is neither substantially enhanced nor suppressed.

  15. Laser skin welding using water absorption and heat management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halder, Rabindra K.; Katz, Alvin; Savage, Howard E.; Kartazayev, Vladimir; McCormick, Steven A.; Budansky, Yury; Paul, Misu; Rosen, Richard B.; Alfano, Robert R.

    2005-04-01

    Laser skin welding (LSW) is being pursued for scarless wound healing. We present a new LSW approach using a contact glass slide over the sample and rapid scanning of the laser beam around the area to be welded. This led to dramatic improvement in welding efficacy. A 400 mW beam at 1455 nm with a focused spot diameter of 80 μm in air was scanned at a rate of 5mm/second over a 5mm line of incision in 5 mm x 20 mm human skin samples. Histological analysis of the welded samples using hematoxyline and eosin under unpolarized light showed full-thickness full-length weld, and that with picrosirius red F3BA stain under polarized light revealed that there was no appreciable damage. Measured tensile strength of 2.1 kg/cm2 is markedly greater than our previous LSW results of 1.05 +/- 0.19 kg/cm2, which is greater than the typical values of 0.4 kg/cm2 obtained using sutures.

  16. A review of infrared laser energy absorption and subsequent healing in the cornea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Latica L.; Johnson, Thomas E.; Neal, Thomas A.

    2004-07-01

    The purpose of this review is to compile information on the optical and healing properties of the cornea when exposed to infrared lasers. Our long-term goal is to optimize the treatment parameters for corneal injuries after exposure to infrared laser systems. The majority of the information currently available in the literature focuses on corneal healing after therapeutic vision correction surgery with LASIK or PRK. Only a limited amount of information is available on corneal healing after injury with an infrared laser system. In this review we will speculate on infrared photon energy absorption in corneal injury and healing to include the role of the tear layer. The aim of this review is to gain a better understanding of infrared energy absorption in the cornea and how it might impact healing.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) Aircraft Measurements of CO2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christensen, Lance E.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzies, Robert T.; Jacob, Joseph C.; Hyon, Jason

    2011-01-01

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) utilizes Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) at 2.05 microns to obtain CO2 column mixing ratios weighted heavily in the boundary layer. CO2LAS employs a coherent detection receiver and continuous-wave Th:Ho:YLF laser transmitters with output powers around 100 milliwatts. An offset frequency-locking scheme coupled to an absolute frequency reference enables the frequencies of the online and offline lasers to be held to within 200 kHz of desired values. We describe results from 2009 field campaigns when CO2LAS flew on the Twin Otter. We also describe spectroscopic studies aimed at uncovering potential biases in lidar CO2 retrievals at 2.05 microns.

  18. Maskless direct laser writing with visible light: Breaking through the optical resolving limit with cooperative manipulations of nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Jingsong; Wang, Rui

    2014-03-28

    In this work, the resolving limit of maskless direct laser writing is overcome by cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion, where the nonlinear reverse saturation absorption can induce the formation of below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot, and the thermal diffusion manipulation can make the heat quantity at the central region of energy absorption spot propagate along the thin film thickness direction. The temperature at the central region of energy absorption spot transiently reaches up to melting point and realizes nanolithography. The sample “glass substrate/AgInSbTe” is prepared, where AgInSbTe is taken as nonlinear reverse saturation absorption thin film. The below diffraction-limited energy absorption spot is simulated theoretically and verified experimentally by near-field spot scanning method. The “glass substrate/Al/AgInSbTe” sample is prepared, where the Al is used as thermal conductive layer to manipulate the thermal diffusion channel because the thermal diffusivity coefficient of Al is much larger than that of AgInSbTe. The direct laser writing is conducted by a setup with a laser wavelength of 650 nm and a converging lens of NA=0.85, the lithographic marks with a size of about 100 nm are obtained, and the size is only about 1/10 the incident focused spot. The experimental results indicate that the cooperative manipulation from nonlinear reverse saturation absorption and thermal diffusion is a good method to realize nanolithography in maskless direct laser writing with visible light.

  19. CW CO2 Laser Induced Chemical Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pola, Joseph

    1989-05-01

    CW CO2 laser driven reactions between sulfur hexafluoride and carbon oxide, carbon suboxide, carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide proceed at subatmospheric pressures and yield fluorinated carbon compounds and sulfur tetrafluoride. CW CO2 laser driven reactions of organic compounds in the presence of energy-conveying sulfur hexafluoride show reaction course different from that normally observed due to elimination of reactor hot surface effects. The examples concern the decomposition of polychlorohydrocarbons, 2-nitropropane, tert.-butylamine, allyl chloride, spirohexane, isobornyl acetate and the oxidation of haloolefins. CW CO2 laser induced fragmentation of 1-methyl-l-silacyclobutanes and 4-silaspiro(3.4)octane in the presence of sulfur hexafluoride is an effective way for preparation and deposition of stable organosilicon polymers.

  20. Laser-Induced Incandescence: Detection Issues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWal, Randall L.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental LII (laser-induced incandescence) measurements were performed in a laminar gasjet flame to test the sensitivity of different LII signal collection strategies to particle size. To prevent introducing a particle size dependent bias in the LII signal, signal integration beginning with the excitation laser pulse is necessary . Signal integration times extending to 25 or 100 nsec after the laser pulse do not produce significant differences in radial profiles of the LII signal due to particle size effects with longer signal integration times revealing a decreased sensitivity to smaller primary particles. Long wavelength detection reduces the sensitivity of the LII signal to primary particle size. Excitation of LII using 1064 nm light is recommended to avoid creating photochemical interferences thus allowing LII signal collection to occur during the excitation pulse without spectral interferences.

  1. Laser induced mechanisms controlling the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zeming; Vitrant, Guy; Lefkir, Yaya; Bakhti, Said; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-21

    This paper describes a model to simulate changes in the size distribution of metallic nanoparticles (NPs) in TiO2 films upon continuous wave light excitation. Interrelated laser induced physical and chemical processes initiated directly by photon absorption or by plasmon induced thermal heating are considered. Namely the model takes into account the NP coalescence, Ostwald ripening, the reduction of silver ions and the oxidation of metallic NPs, competitive mechanisms that can lead to counter-intuitive behaviors depending on the exposure conditions. Theoretical predictions are compared successfully to the experimental results deduced from a thorough analysis of scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) pictures of Ag:TiO2 films processed with a scanning visible laser beam at different speeds. Ag:TiO2 systems are considered for many applications in solar energy conversion, photocatalysis or secured data printing. Numerical investigations of such a system provide a better understanding of light induced growth and shrinking processes and open up prospects for designing more efficient photocatalytic devices based on metal NP doped TiO2 or for improving the size homogeneity in self-organized metallic NP patterns, for instance. PMID:27539293

  2. Excimer laser absorption on PMMA plate and on cornea: a practical approach using volume luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digulescu, Petre P.; Carstocea, Benone D.; Sterian, Livia

    2001-04-01

    Excimer laser refractive surgery used in Ophthalmology in order to treat the human eye refraction problems has been performed over 10 years around the world. However a systematic approach of the physical phenomena and especially of the absorption on the cornea during the laser treatment is missing in the literature and the doctors are usually using empiric nomograms in order to achieve good results. The theoretical approach is difficult because of the complexity of the phenomena interconnected each to the others. The UV excimer laser beam used to controllably ablate the cornea is highly absorbed in the air and also is supplementary absorbed in the plume generated almost instantaneous as consequence of the ablation on the cornea. Because of this non-linear proces the energy of the laser beam delivered to the eye must be calibrated before each intervention on a patient. The purpose of the present work is to develop a mathematical model of the excimer laser absorption on PMMA and on human cornea based on a new physical notion, the Volume Luminance. The Volume Luminance is defined as volume density of the intensity of laser radiation. A brief theory of the Volume Luminance is also presented.

  3. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in laser speckle rheology measurements

    PubMed Central

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K.

    2014-01-01

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  4. Correction of optical absorption and scattering variations in Laser Speckle Rheology measurements.

    PubMed

    Hajjarian, Zeinab; Nadkarni, Seemantini K

    2014-03-24

    Laser Speckle Rheology (LSR) is an optical technique to evaluate the viscoelastic properties by analyzing the temporal fluctuations of backscattered speckle patterns. Variations of optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients further modulate speckle fluctuations, posing a critical challenge for quantitative evaluation of viscoelasticity. We compare and contrast two different approaches applicable for correcting and isolating the collective influence of absorption and scattering, to accurately measure mechanical properties. Our results indicate that the numerical approach of Monte-Carlo ray tracing (MCRT) reliably compensates for any arbitrary optical variations. When scattering dominates absorption, yet absorption is non-negligible, diffusing wave spectroscopy (DWS) formalisms perform similar to MCRT, superseding other analytical compensation approaches such as Telegrapher equation. The computational convenience of DWS greatly simplifies the extraction of viscoelastic properties from LSR measurements in a number of chemical, industrial, and biomedical applications. PMID:24663983

  5. Origin of the plasma scalds in dielectric coatings induced by 1 ω laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hu; Qi, Hongji; Zhao, Jiaoling; Wang, Bin; Chai, Yingjie; Yu, Zhen; Shao, Jianda

    2016-04-01

    The plasma scalds initiated by a 1053 nm ( 1 ω ) nanosecond laser are separated from the defect-induced damage pits, which is verified as a result of the ionization wavefront with the subnanosecond laser. Considering the beam reflection from solid-state absorption fronts during the damage process, a theoretical scalding threshold about 6.84 J / cm 2 ( 12 ns ) based on the energy required to start an air avalanche is evaluated and agrees well with the experimental scalding threshold. The occurrence order of the initial explosion and subsequent ionization wavefront is verified to explain most of the damage morphologies caused by the 1 ω laser. In addition to the significance in laser conditioning or cleaning for a high-power laser system, the results also indicate that through the occurrence of plasma scalds it is possible to mark the onset time of air plasma during laser-coating interaction.

  6. Laser-induced electron capture mass spectrometry

    PubMed

    Wang; Giese

    2000-02-15

    Two techniques are reported for detection of electrophorederivatized compounds by laser-induced electron capture time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LI-EC-TOF-MS). In both cases, a nitrogen laser is used to induce the electron capture. The analyte is deposited in a matrix consisting of a compound with a low ionization potential such as benzo[ghi]perylene in the first technique, where the electron for electron capture apparently comes from this matrix. In the second technique, the analyte is deposited on a silver surface in the absence of matrix. It seems that "monoenergetic" ions instantly desorb from the target surface in the latter case, since the peak width in the continuous extraction mode essentially matches the pulse width of the laser (4 ns). Ten picomoles of 3-O-(pentafluorobenzyl)-alpha-estradiol were detected at a S/N > or = 50, where the spot size of the laser was approximately 0.25% of the sample spot. It is attractive that simple conditions can enable sensitive detection of electrophores on routine TOF-MS equipment. The technique can be anticipated to broaden the range of analytes in both polarity and size that can be detected by EC-MS relative to the range for GC/EC-MS. PMID:10701262

  7. Laser-induced heating in optical traps.

    PubMed

    Peterman, Erwin J G; Gittes, Frederick; Schmidt, Christoph F

    2003-02-01

    In an optical tweezers experiment intense laser light is tightly focused to intensities of MW/cm(2) in order to apply forces to submicron particles or to measure mechanical properties of macromolecules. It is important to quantify potentially harmful or misleading heating effects due to the high light intensities in biophysical experiments. We present a model that incorporates the geometry of the experiment in a physically correct manner, including heat generation by light absorption in the neighborhood of the focus, balanced by outward heat flow, and heat sinking by the glass surfaces of the sample chamber. This is in contrast to the earlier simple models assuming heat generation in the trapped particle only. We find that in the most common experimental circumstances, using micron-sized polystyrene or silica beads, absorption of the laser light in the solvent around the trapped particle, not in the particle itself, is the most important contribution to heating. To validate our model we measured the spectrum of the Brownian motion of trapped beads in water and in glycerol as a function of the trapping laser intensity. Heating both increases the thermal motion of the bead and decreases the viscosity of the medium. We measured that the temperature in the focus increased by 34.2 +/- 0.1 K/W with 1064-nm laser light for 2200-nm-diameter polystyrene beads in glycerol, 43.8 +/- 2.2 K/W for 840-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, 41.1 +/- 0.7 K/W for 502-nm polystyrene beads in glycerol, and 7.7 +/- 1.2 K/W for 500-nm silica beads and 8.1 +/- 2.1 K/W for 444-nm silica beads in water. Furthermore, we observed that in glycerol the heating effect increased when the bead was trapped further away from the cover glass/glycerol interface as predicted by the model. We show that even though the heating effect in water is rather small it can have non-negligible effects on trap calibration in typical biophysical experimental circumstances and should be taken into consideration when

  8. Self-organized pattern formation in laser-induced multiphoton ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschlinger, Robert; Nolte, Stefan; Peschel, Ulf

    2014-05-01

    We use finite-difference time-domain modeling to investigate plasma generation induced by multiphoton absorption of intense laser light in dielectrics with tiny inhomogeneities. Plasma generation is found to be strongly amplified around nanometer-sized inhomogeneities as present in glasses. Each inhomogeneity acts as the seed of a plasma structure growing against the direction of light propagation. Plasma structures originating from randomly distributed inhomogeneities are found to interact strongly and to organize in regularly spaced planes oriented perpendicularly to the laser polarization. We discuss similarities between our results and nanogratings in fused silica written by laser beams with spatially homogeneous as well as radial and azimuthal polarizations.

  9. Absorption and scattering of laser radiation by the diffusion flame of aviation kerosene

    SciTech Connect

    Gvozdev, S V; Glova, A F; Dubrovskii, V Yu; Durmanov, S T; Krasyukov, A G; Lysikov, A Yu; Smirnov, G V; Solomakhin, V B

    2012-04-30

    The absorption coefficient of the radiation of a repetitively pulsed Nd : YAG laser with an average output power up to 6 W and of a cw ytterbium optical fibre laser with an output power up to 3 kW was measured in the diffusion flame of aviation kerosene burning on a free surface in the atmospheric air. The absorption coefficient as a function of flame length, radiation power, and radiation intensity, which was varied in the {approx}10{sup 3} - 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} W cm{sup -2} range, was obtained for two distances (1 and 2 cm) between the laser beam axis and the surface. The coefficient of radiation absorption by kerosene flame was compared with that in ethanol and kerosene - ethanol mixture flames. The radiation power scattered by a small segment of the kerosene flame irradiated by Nd : YAG laser radiation was measured as a function of longitudinal and azimuthal coordinates. An estimate was made of the total scattered radiation power.

  10. Kinetics of the Reaction C2H + O2 from 193 to 350 K Using Laser Flash Kinetic Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opansky, Brian J.; Seakins, Paul W.; Pedersen, Jens Olaf P.; Leone, Stephen R.

    1993-01-01

    Rate coefficients for the reaction C2H + O2 are measured from 193 to 350 K by using transient absorption spectroscopy with an infrared color center laser. Ethynyl radicals are produced by pulsed laser photolysis of C2H2 in a temperature variable flow cell and a tunable color center laser probes the transient removal Of C2H ((bar-X(sup 2))Sigma(+))(0,0,0)) in absorption. The rate coefficient has a slight negative temperature dependence over the range 193-350 K which can be expressed as k(O2) = (1.5 +/- 0.3) x 10(exp -11) exp((230 +/- 36)/T) Cu cm/(Molecule.s). The lack of a pressure dependence under our experimental conditions strongly suggests that the HCCOO* complex is short lived with respect to encountering a collision and rapidly dissociates to products without competition from collisional stabilization to HCCOO or collisionally induced dissociation to reactants.

  11. Application systems for the intracorporal laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy using the Nd:YAG Q-switched laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Klaus H.; Eichenlaub, M.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Wondrazek, Fritz

    1990-06-01

    For the laser-induced shockwave lithotripsy the electromagnetic energy of a laser light pulse is converted intracorporally into the acoustic energy of a shock wave. The lithotriptor is based on a specially developed, Q-switched Nd:YAG laser whose high power light pulses (70 mJ, 25 ns) are coupled into a flexible quartz fiber of 600 pim core diameter. Using focussing elements energy densities higher than 6 1O J m2 can be achieved resulting in an optical breakdown in water followed by a shock wave. As a result of different absorption mechanisms the breakdown threshold can be decreased by placing a metallic target into the laser beam. The different shockwave formations of such optomechanical transducers have been measured. First clinical applications have been performed.

  12. Multi-phonon-assisted absorption and emission in semiconductors and its potential for laser refrigeration

    SciTech Connect

    Khurgin, Jacob B.

    2014-06-02

    Laser cooling of semiconductors has been an elusive goal for many years, and while attempts to cool the narrow gap semiconductors such as GaAs are yet to succeed, recently, net cooling has been attained in a wider gap CdS. This raises the question of whether wider gap semiconductors with higher phonon energies and stronger electron-phonon coupling are better suitable for laser cooling. In this work, we develop a straightforward theory of phonon-assisted absorption and photoluminescence of semiconductors that involves more than one phonon and use to examine wide gap materials, such as GaN and CdS and compare them with GaAs. The results indicate that while strong electron-phonon coupling in both GaN and CdS definitely improves the prospects of laser cooling, large phonon energy in GaN may be a limitation, which makes CdS a better prospect for laser cooling.

  13. Change of electrical conductivity of Ar welding arc under resonant absorption of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozakov, R.; Emde, B.; Pipa, A. V.; Huse, M.; Uhrlandt, D.; Hermsdorf, J.; Wesling, V.

    2015-03-01

    Experimental investigations of the impact of resonant laser absorption by a tungsten inert gas welding arc in argon are presented. The intensity increase of the arc’s radiation between the laser entrance height and the anode are observed, as well as the variation of arc voltage due to the presence of the laser beam. High-speed camera recordings from different directions combined with absolutely calibrated spectroscopic measurements allow the reconstruction of the three-dimensional emission coefficient profiles without the assumption of axial symmetry. The obtained data are evaluated within the framework of local thermodynamic equilibrium. The local increase in the temperature and conductivity due to the influence of the laser is determined. Changes in the electrical conductivity obtained from the optical measurements coincide well with the measured voltage drop, and show significant redistribution of the current density profile near the anode in particular.

  14. Elemental biological imaging by differential absorption with a laser-produced x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, C.; Mercer, I.; Svanberg, S.; Herrlin, K.

    1996-01-01

    We demonstrate the novel application of hard x rays emitted by a laser-produced plasma for differential imaging of elements. An x-ray-emitting laser-produced plasma, obtained by the focusing of radiation from a 10-Hz terawatt laser, is used for biological imaging. The x-ray source can be arranged to yield characteristic x-ray emission lines with photon energies that bridge the K absorption edge of a chosen atomic species. One can obtain element-specific radiographs by recording transillumination images for different target materials on digital image plates and by subsequently subtracting or dividing the images. Successful phantom and experimental animal imaging are performed utilizing tantalum and gadolinium as target materials for the terawatt laser and gadolinium as the imaged contrast agent.

  15. Temperature and pressure dependence of dichloro-difluoromethane (CF2C12) absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements were performed to determine the pressure and temperature dependence of CFM-12 absorption coefficients for CO2 waveguide laser radiation. The absorption coefficients of CFM-12 for CO2 waveguide laser radiation were found to have no spectral structure within small spectral bandwidths around the CO2 waveguide laser lines in the CO2 spectral band for pressures above 20 torr. All of the absorption coefficients for the CO2 laser lines studied are independent of pressure above 100 torr, except for the P(36) laser CO2 spectral band. The absorption coefficients associated with the P(42) line in the same band showed the greatest change with temperature, and it also has the largest value of all the lines studied.

  16. Single shot thermometry using laser induced thermal grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Pubo; Guan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Wang, Sheng; Li, Guohua; Ye, Jingfeng; Hu, Zhiyun

    2015-05-01

    With the concern of environmental protection and reducing the fossil fuel consumption, combustion processes need to be more efficient and less contaminable. Therefore, the ability to obtain important thermophysical parameters is crucial to combustion research and combustor design. Traditional surveying techniques were difficult to apply in a confined space, especially the physically intrusions of detectors can alter the combustion processes. Laser-based diagnostic techniques, like CARS, SVRS, PLIF and TDLAS, allow the in situ, non-intrusive, spatially and temporally resolved measurements of combustion parameters in hostile environments. We report here a new non-intrusive optical diagnostic technique, based on laser-induced thermal grating. Thermal gratings generated in NO2/N2 binary mixtures, arise from the nonlinear interaction between the medium and the light radiation from the interference of two pulsed, frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers (532 nm). This leads to the formation of a dynamic grating through the resonant absorption and the subsequent collisional relaxation. By the temporally resolved detection of a continuous wave, frequency-doubled Nd:YVO4 probe laser beam (671 nm) diffracted by LITG. The temporal behavior of the signal is a function of the local temperature and other properties of gas, various parameters of the target gas can be extracted by analyzing the signal. The accurate singleshot temperature measurements were carried out at different test conditions using a stainless steel pressurized cell, data averaged on 100 laser shots were compared with simultaneously recorded thermocouple data, and the results were consistent with each other. The LITG signal is shown to grow with increasing the gas pressure and is spatially coherent, which makes the LITG thermometry technique a promising candidate in high pressure environments.

  17. Diode laser absorption sensors for gas-dynamic and combustion flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, M. G.

    1998-01-01

    Recent advances in room-temperature, near-IR and visible diode laser sources for tele-communication, high-speed computer networks, and optical data storage applications are enabling a new generation of gas-dynamic and combustion-flow sensors based on laser absorption spectroscopy. In addition to conventional species concentration and density measurements, spectroscopic techniques for temperature, velocity, pressure and mass flux have been demonstrated in laboratory, industrial and technical flows. Combined with fibreoptic distribution networks and ultrasensitive detection strategies, compact and portable sensors are now appearing for a variety of applications. In many cases, the superior spectroscopic quality of the new laser sources compared with earlier cryogenic, mid-IR devices is allowing increased sensitivity of trace species measurements, high-precision spectroscopy of major gas constituents, and stable, autonomous measurement systems. The purpose of this article is to review recent progress in this field and suggest likely directions for future research and development. The various laser-source technologies are briefly reviewed as they relate to sensor applications. Basic theory for laser absorption measurements of gas-dynamic properties is reviewed and special detection strategies for the weak near-IR and visible absorption spectra are described. Typical sensor configurations are described and compared for various application scenarios, ranging from laboratory research to automated field and airborne packages. Recent applications of gas-dynamic sensors for air flows and fluxes of trace atmospheric species are presented. Applications of gas-dynamic and combustion sensors to research and development of high-speed flows aeropropulsion engines, and combustion emissions monitoring are presented in detail, along with emerging flow control systems based on these new sensors. Finally, technology in nonlinear frequency conversion, UV laser materials, room

  18. The absorption and radiation of a tungsten plasma plume during nanosecond laser ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Moscicki, T. Hoffman, J.; Chrzanowska, J.

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, the effect of absorption of the laser beam and subsequent radiation on the dynamics of a tungsten plasma plume during pulsed laser ablation is analyzed. Different laser wavelengths are taken into consideration. The absorption and emission coefficients of tungsten plasma in a pressure range of 0.1–100 MPa and temperature up to 70 000 K are presented. The shielding effects due to the absorption and radiation of plasma may have an impact on the course of ablation. The numerical model that describes the tungsten target heating and the formation of the plasma and its expansion were made for 355 nm and 1064 nm wavelengths of a Nd:YAG laser. The laser beam with a Gaussian profile was focused to a spot size of 0.055 mm{sup 2} with a power density of 1 × 10{sup 9 }W/cm{sup 2} (10 ns full width half maximum pulse duration). The plasma expands into air at ambient pressure of 1 mPa. The use of the shorter wavelength causes faster heating of the target, thus the higher ablation rate. The consequences of a higher ablation rate are slower expansion and smaller dimensions of the plasma plume. The higher plasma temperature in the case of 1064 nm is due to the lower density and lower plasma radiation. In the initial phase of propagation of the plasma plume, when both the temperature and pressure are very high, the dominant radiation is emission due to photo-recombination. However, for a 1064 nm laser wavelength after 100 ns of plasma expansion, the radiation of the spectral lines is up to 46.5% of the total plasma radiation and should not be neglected.

  19. Quantification of laser local hyperthermia induced by gold plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yakunin, Alexander N; Avetisyan, Yuri A; Tuchin, Valery V

    2015-05-01

    This paper discusses one of the key problems of laser-induced tissue/cell hyperthermia mediated by gold nanoparticles, namely, quantifying and precise prediction of the light exposure to provide a controllable local heating impact on living organisms. The distributions of such parameters as an efficiency factor of absorption, differential and integral absorbing power of a nanoparticle, temperature increment, and Arrhenius damage integral were used to quantify nanoparticle effectiveness in the two-dimensional coordinate space “laser wavelength (λ) × radius of gold nanoparticles (R).” It was found that the fulfillment of required spatial and temporal characteristics of temperature fields in the vicinity of nanoparticle determines the optimal λ and R. As a result, the area in the space (λ × R) with a minimal criticality to alterations of the local hyperthermia may be significantly displaced from the position of the plasmonic resonance. The aspects of generalization of the proposed methodology for the analysis of local hyperthermia using nanoparticles of different shapes (nanoshells, nanorods, nanostars) and short pulse laser radiation are discussed. PMID:25629389

  20. Laser-induced wavelength-controlled self-assembly of colloidal quasi-resonant quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Tsipotan, Aleksey S; Gerasimova, Marina A; Slabko, Vitaliy V; Aleksandrovsky, Aleksandr S

    2016-05-16

    Self-assembly of colloidal semiconductor quantum dots controlled solely by laser-induced interaction is demonstrated for the first time. Pairs of CdTe nanoparticles are formed under irradiation with nanosecond pulses at wavelengths 555 or 560 nm. Formation of pairs is justified by corresponding changes of absorption spectra. Conditions of the experiment are in excellent agreement with those predicted by the theory of laser-induced dipole-dipole interaction of QDs. The fraction of QDs assembled into pairs is up to 47%. PMID:27409936

  1. Absorption of CO2-laser radiation in a hypocycloidal-pinch plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. H.; Mcfarland, D. R.

    1976-01-01

    Absorption of a 50-J pulsed CO2 laser beam in the plasma produced in a hypocycloidal-pinch apparatus was studied. The apparatus consists of three disk electrodes with a 5-cm hole on the axis. The current sheets are snow-plowed toward the center of the hole to produce a plasma with a density greater than 10 to the 18th/cu cm and a temperature near 1 keV which emits soft X rays for 5 microsec. IR detectors measured the laser radiation incident onto, transmitted through, and scattered from the plasma as functions of time. For a period up to 70 microsec from the onset of X-ray emission, neither transmitted nor scattered laser radiation was observed above the detector threshold of 0.3% of the incident flux. This indicates effective absorption of the laser beam (greater than 99%) and that the particle confinement time extends far beyond the energy confinement time of 5 microsec. Thus, the plasma in this apparatus appears much more amenable to laser heating than that in a theta pinch.

  2. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S; Phillips, Mark C

    2014-03-18

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  3. Chemical detection and laser wavelength stabilization employing spectroscopic absorption via laser compliance voltage sensing

    DOEpatents

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Phillips, Mark C.

    2016-01-12

    Systems and methods are disclosed that provide a direct indication of the presence and concentration of an analyte within the external cavity of a laser device that employ the compliance voltage across the laser device. The systems can provide stabilization of the laser wavelength. The systems and methods can obviate the need for an external optical detector, an external gas cell, or other sensing region and reduce the complexity and size of the sensing configuration.

  4. Increased Hydrogel Swelling Induced by Absorption of Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Nam, Changwoo; Zimudzi, Tawanda J; Geise, Geoffrey M; Hickner, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    The water and small molecule uptake behavior of amphiphilic diacrylate terminated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMSDA)/poly(ethylene glycol diacrylate) (PEGDA) cross-linked hydrogels were studied using attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. These hydrogel networks absorbed more water as the PEGDA content of the network increased. In contrast to typical osmotic deswelling behavior that occurs when liquid water equilibrated hydrogels are immersed in small molecule solutions with water activities less than unity, water-swollen gels immersed in 2-acrylamido-2-methylpropanesulfonic acid (AMPS-H) solutions rapidly regained their water content within 4 min following an initial deswelling response. In situ ATR-FTIR analysis of the hydrogel film during the dynamic swelling experiment indicated that small molecule absorption into the gel played an important role in inducing gel reswelling in low water activity solutions. This aspect of polymer gel water uptake and interaction with small molecules is important for optimizing hydrogel coatings and hydrophilic polymer applications where there is an interaction between the internal chemical structure of the gel and electrolytes or other molecules in solution. PMID:27159118

  5. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-04-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories.

  6. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water.

    PubMed

    Lousada, Cláudio M; Soroka, Inna L; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  7. Gamma radiation induces hydrogen absorption by copper in water

    PubMed Central

    Lousada, Cláudio M.; Soroka, Inna L.; Yagodzinskyy, Yuriy; Tarakina, Nadezda V.; Todoshchenko, Olga; Hänninen, Hannu; Korzhavyi, Pavel A.; Jonsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    One of the most intricate issues of nuclear power is the long-term safety of repositories for radioactive waste. These repositories can have an impact on future generations for a period of time orders of magnitude longer than any known civilization. Several countries have considered copper as an outer corrosion barrier for canisters containing spent nuclear fuel. Among the many processes that must be considered in the safety assessments, radiation induced processes constitute a key-component. Here we show that copper metal immersed in water uptakes considerable amounts of hydrogen when exposed to γ-radiation. Additionally we show that the amount of hydrogen absorbed by copper depends on the total dose of radiation. At a dose of 69 kGy the uptake of hydrogen by metallic copper is 7 orders of magnitude higher than when the absorption is driven by H2(g) at a pressure of 1 atm in a non-irradiated dry system. Moreover, irradiation of copper in water causes corrosion of the metal and the formation of a variety of surface cavities, nanoparticle deposits, and islands of needle-shaped crystals. Hence, radiation enhanced uptake of hydrogen by spent nuclear fuel encapsulating materials should be taken into account in the safety assessments of nuclear waste repositories. PMID:27086752

  8. Spatial resolved temperature measurement based on absorption spectroscopy using a single tunable diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xilong; Li, Fei; Chen, Lihong; Zhang, Xinyu

    2010-03-01

    A novel method based on wavelength-multiplexed line-of-sight absorption and profile fitting for non-uniform flow field measurement is reported. A wavelength scanning combing laser temperature and current modulation WMS scheme is used to implement the wavelength-multiplexed-profile fitting method. Second harmonic (2f) signal of eight H2O transitions features near 7,170 cm-1 are measured in one period using a single tunable diode laser. Spatial resolved temperature distribution upon a CH4/air premixed flat flame burner is obtained. The result validates the feasibility of strategy for non-uniform flow field diagnostics by means of WMS-2f TDLAS.

  9. Advances in Diode-Laser-Based Water Vapor Differential Absorption Lidar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spuler, Scott; Repasky, Kevin; Morley, Bruce; Moen, Drew; Weckwerth, Tammy; Hayman, Matt; Nehrir, Amin

    2016-06-01

    An advanced diode-laser-based water vapor differential absorption lidar (WV-DIAL) has been developed. The next generation design was built on the success of previous diode-laser-based prototypes and enables accurate measurement of water vapor closer to the ground surface, in rapidly changing atmospheric conditions, and in daytime cloudy conditions up to cloud base. The lidar provides up to 1 min resolution, 150 m range resolved measurements of water vapor in a broad range of atmospheric conditions. A description of the instrument and results from its initial field test in 2014 are discussed.

  10. Three-photon absorption of radiation from a Ti:sapphire laser by methylstyrylbenzene

    SciTech Connect

    Meshalkin, Yu P; Svetlichnyi, Valerii A; Svetlichnaya, N N; Kopylova, T N

    2005-07-31

    It is shown that 2,2'-di-methylstyrylbenzene (bis-MSB) at a concentration of 10{sup -3} M in 1-methyl-2-pyrrolidone can fluoresce at 420 nm upon excitation by a 708-nm femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. The dependence of the fluorescence intensity on the excitation power proved to be cubic. The three-photon absorption cross section of bis-MSB was estimated as (1.61{+-}0.10)x10{sup -79} cm{sup 6} s{sup 2} phot{sup -2}. bis-MSB is recommended as a cubic standard to normalise laser powers in three-photon measurements. (nonlinear optical phenomena)

  11. Pressure-induced phase transformations during femtosecond-laser doping of silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Matthew J.; Lin, Yu-Ting; Sher, Meng-Ju; Winkler, Mark T.; Mazur, Eric; Gradečak, Silvija

    2011-09-01

    Silicon hyperdoped with chalcogens via femtosecond-laser irradiation exhibits unique near-unity sub-bandgap absorptance extending into the infrared region. The intense light-matter interactions that occur during femtosecond-laser doping produce pressure waves sufficient to induce phase transformations in silicon, resulting in the formation of metastable polymorphic phases, but their exact formation mechanism and influence on the doping process are still unknown. We report direct observations of these phases, describe their formation and distribution, and consider their potential impact on sub-bandgap absorptance. Specifically, the transformation from diamond cubic Si-I to pressure-induced polymorphic crystal structures (amorphous Si, Si-XII, and Si-III) during femtosecond-laser irradiation was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Amorphous Si, Si-XII, and Si-III were found to form in femtosecond-laser doped silicon regardless of the presence of a gaseous or thin-film dopant precursor. The rate of pressure loading and unloading induced by femtosecond-laser irradiation kinetically limits the formation of pressure-induced phases, producing regions of amorphous Si 20 to 200 nm in size and nanocrystals of Si-XII and Si-III. The surface texturing that occurs during femtosecond-laser irradiation produces inhomogeneous pressure distributions across the surface and causes delayed development of high-pressure silicon polymorphs over many laser pulses. Finally, we find that the polymorph phases disappear during annealing more rapidly than the sub-bandgap absorptance decreases, enabling us to decouple these two processes through post-treatment annealing.

  12. Discrimination of bacteria on food using laser-induced bacterial autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.; Plagmann, Manfred

    2000-12-01

    This paper updates progress on work1 in detecting bacterial auto-fluorescence against various food backgrounds using Laser-Induced Fluorescence (LIE). The fluorescence of bacteria and various meat products has been measured in order to find suitable excitation and detection wavelengths for discriminative imaging. The optical absorption of bacteria, meat and fish tissue was measured to provide a starting point for the fluorescence measurements. The bacteria measured was Escherichia Coli, and the food tissue products were, lamb, pork, chicken and fish. All absorption spectra have a peak around 400nm and most muscle tissue types have lower absorption around 325nm giving a good low contrast fluorescent background for the F. Coli. However, other tissue types such as fat, skin and bone skin have higher absorption levels and hence fluorescence. Three interference filters can be used to selectively sample the fluorescence spectra to generate a three point intensity ratio that can be used to discriminate between fluorescence of the various tissue types and E. Coli. The best fluorescence discrimination was achieved using the HeCd laser wavelength of 325nm. However in our current experimental setup there is not enough optical power at 325nm for direct laser imaging. We are currently working to increase UV laser excitation levels by using a dye laser to pump a frequency doubling crystal.

  13. Application of the method of laser-induced fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fateeva, Natalia L.; Matvienko, Gennadii G.

    2004-02-01

    Great attention is now paid to ecology of the environment, in whic plants are of great importance. However the present methods of biophysical analysis of plant states are very labor-intensive and require a lot of time. The structure of protein-pigment complexes is known to break in different dissolvents that results in the shift of maxima of chlorophyll absorption and fluorescence bands. That is why development of methods for remote diagnostics of plants is of great scientific and practical interest. They would make it possible to determine species and state of plants rather quickly and accurately. We have developed a setup and methods for optical diagnostics of the physiological state of plants to investigate the dynamics of the fastest part of fluorescence of plants in vivo. The method of laser-induced fluorescence makes it possible to observe the level of vegetative development of living plants, as well as their state under the impact of some stress factors.

  14. Laser-induced hydrocarbon contamination in vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riede, Wolfgang; Allenspacher, Paul; Schröder, Helmut; Wernham, Denny; Lien, Yngve

    2005-12-01

    We investigated laser-induced deposition processes on BK7 substrates under the influence of pulsed Q-switched Nd:YAG laser radiation, starting from small toluene partial pressures in a background vacuum environment. The composition and structure of the deposit was analyzed using microscopic methods like Nomarski DIC, dark-field and white-light interference microscopy, TEM, EDX and XPS. We found a distinct threshold for deposition built-up dependant on the partial pressure of toluene (0.2 J/cm2 at 0.1 mbar, 0.8 J/cm2 at 0.01 mbar toluene). The deposits strictly followed the spherical geometry of the laser spot. No deposit accumulated on MgF2 AR coated BK7 samples even at high toluene partial pressures. The onset of deposit was accompanied by periodic surface ripples formation. EDX and XPS analysis showed a carbon-like layer which strongly absorbed the 1 μm laser radiation. The typical number of shots applied was 50 000. In addition, long term lifetime tests of more than 5 Mio. shots per site were run.

  15. Laser-induced autofluorescence study of caries model in vitro.

    PubMed

    Borisova, Ekaterina; Uzunov, Tzonko; Avramov, Latchezar

    2006-04-01

    Laser-induced autofluorescence spectra of teeth irradiated by a 337 nm nitrogen laser were measured during in vitro caries formation through initial enamel demineralization and introducing of carious bacterial flora in the lesions developed. Spectra obtained from sound teeth consist of an intensive maximum at 480-500 nm and secondary maximum at 430-450 nm. In the process of caries formation, we observed an increase in the intensity at 430-450 nm and the appearance of two maxima in the red spectral region-at 590-650 nm. The intensity increase at 430-450 nm was related to the tooth demineralization. Bacteria presence and their metabolism products induced an increase in the absorption in the UV-blue spectral region at 350-420 nm and the appearance of a fluorescence signal in the long-wave spectral region at 590-650 nm. From the point of view of tissue optics, these results allow caries to be considered as consisting of two different phenomena-tissue destruction and bacterial flora and its metabolism products increase. The results could be used to obtain a more complete picture of caries formation on the base of its fluorescent properties. PMID:16568211

  16. Laser-induced grating spectroscopy of cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrovic, Mark S.; Suchocki, Andrzej; Powell, Richard C.; Cantwell, Gene; Aldridge, Jeff

    1989-08-01

    Laser-induced transient gratings produced by two-photon absorption of picosecond pulses at 1.064 μm were used to examine the room-temperature nonlinear optical responses of CdTe crystals with different types of conductivity. Pulse-probe degenerate four-wave mixing measurements of grating dynamics on subnanosecond time scales were used to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient (Da) of charge carriers in the crystals. The value of Da =3.0 cm2 s-1 which was obtained is in very good agreement with theoretical estimates. A long-lived contribution to the signal consistent with a trapped charge photorefractive effect was observed at large grating spacings for n-type conductivity, and is tentatively attributed to a larger trap density in this sample. Measurements of the relative scattering efficiencies of successive diffracted orders in the Raman-Nath regime allowed for calculation of the laser-induced change in the index of refraction, due to the creation of free carriers. The value of Δn=4×10-4 which was obtained is in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  17. Blue satellites of absorption spectrum study of sodium based excimer-pumped alkali vapor laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Shu; Gai, Baodong; Guo, Jingwei; Tan, Yannan; Liu, Jinbo; Li, Hui; Cai, Xianglong; Shi, Zhe; Liu, Wanfa; Jin, Yuqi; Sang, Fengting

    2015-02-01

    Sodium based excimer-pump alkali laser (Na-XPAL) is expected to be an efficient method to generate sodium beacon light, but the information about the spectroscopic characters of Na-XPAL remains sparse so far. In this work, we utilized the relative fluorescence intensity to study the absorption spectrum of blue satellites of complexes of sodium with different collision partners. The yellow fluorescence of Na D1 and D2 line was clearly visible. After processing the fluorescence intensity and the input pumping laser relative intensity, we obtained the Na-CH4 system's blue satellites was from 553nm to 556nm. Meanwhile, we experimentally demonstrated the Na-Ar and Na-Xe system's wavelength range of blue satellites. Also, it was observed that the Na-Xe system's absorption was stronger than the other two systems.

  18. Development of a narrow-band, tunable, frequency-quadrupled diode laser for UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Koplow, J P; Kliner, D A; Goldberg, L

    1998-06-20

    A compact, lightweight, low-power-consumption source of tunable, narrow-bandwidth blue and UV radiation is described. In this source, a single-longitudinal-mode diode laser seeds a pulsed, GaAlAs tapered amplifier whose ~860-nm output is frequency quadrupled by two stages of single-pass frequency doubling. Performance of the laser system is characterized over a wide range of amplifier duty cycles (0.1-1.0), pulse durations (50 ns-1.0 mus), peak currents (absorption spectra of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide near 215 nm; the SO(2) spectrum was found to have significantly more structure and higher peak absorption cross sections than previously reported. PMID:18273363

  19. UV laser-induced DNA photochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Minton, K.W.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies examining the effects of UV laser irradiation of nucleosides and nucleotides have determined that qualitative and quantitative differences exist between irradiation at low and high intensities. Multi-photon events involving the singlet and triplet excited states of DNA bases occur following irradiation at high intensity, leading to degradation of bases due to intra-molecular bond cleavage; such events are not seen following irradiation at low intensity. This work extends these studies. Salmon sperm and plasmid DNA were irradiated at low (3.15 [times] 10[sup 7] W/m[sup 2]), intermediate (2.5 [times] 10[sup 9] and 1.16 [times] 10[sup 10] W/m[sup 2]), and high (1.25 [times] 10[sup 11] W/m[sup 2]) intensities, using a KrF excimer laser emitting at 248 nm. DNA damage was then assayed, with the following findings; (1) pyrimidine cyclobutane dimer and bipyrimidine T(6-4)C photoadduct formation was reduced at high intensity relative to low intensity; (2) free thymine and thymine fragments were released from DNA at high intensity, but not at low intensity; (3) DNA strand break formation increased with increasing intensity; (4) double-stranded breaks occurred in DNA at high intensity. A mathematical model describing the effect of high intensity UV radiation on plasmid DNa conformation was developed and fit to experimental data on strand breaks. Using the model, dose constants for single- and double-stranded breaks were determined and found to increase with intensity. These results are consistent with the absorption of a second photon by long-lived triplet excited states of DNA following irradiation at high intensity, but not low intensity. Absorption of two photons leads to the depopulation of triplet excited states in DNA through ionization and fragmentation of bases, causing decreased levels of pyrimidine dimer formation and increased amounts of strand breakage in DNA components, and help extend our understanding of DNA-UV light interactions.

  20. Fragmentation process induced by microsecond laser pulses during lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, K.; Delacrétaz, G.; Salathé, R. P.

    1992-07-01

    A fiber optic stress sensing technique is applied to evaluate the fragmentation mechanism for pulsed dye-laser lithotripsy. We demonstrate for the first time that the fragmentation process with microsecond laser pulses originates from the shock wave induced by the cavitation bubble collapse. This shock occurs some hundreds of microseconds after the laser pulse. The shock induced by the plasma expansion, which occurs during laser irradiation, has a minor effect.

  1. Near-infrared spectrum of ZrF by intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harms, Jack C.; O'Brien, Leah C.; Ni, Ann; Mahkdoom, Bilal; O'Brien, James J.

    2015-04-01

    The (1, 1) band of the CΩ = 3/2 - X2Δ3/2 transition of ZrF has been recorded at high resolution using intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy. The ZrF molecules were produced using a Zr-lined copper hollow cathode sputter source with a trace amount of SF6 as a fluoride source. Molecular constants from the analysis are presented and compared with previous work.

  2. Narrow-band, tunable, semiconductor-laser-based source for deep-UV absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Kliner, D A; Koplow, J P; Goldberg, L

    1997-09-15

    Tunable, narrow-bandwidth (<200-MHz), ~215-nm radiation was produced by frequency quadrupling the ~860-nm output of a high-power, pulsed GaAlAs tapered amplifier seeded by an external-cavity diode laser. Pulsing the amplifier increased the 860 nm?215 nm conversion efficiency by 2 orders of magnitude with respect to cw operation. Detection of nitric oxide and sulfur dioxide by high-resolution absorption spectroscopy was demonstrated. PMID:18188256

  3. JPL Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer Data Processing Results for the 2010 Flight Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacob, Joseph C.; Spiers, Gary D.; Menzie, Robert T.; Christensen, Lance E.

    2011-01-01

    As a precursor to and validation of the core technology necessary for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days,and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission, we flew JPL's Carbon Dioxide Laser Absorption Spectrometer (CO2LAS) in a campaign of five flights onboard NASA's DC-8 Airborne Laboratory in July 2010. This is the latest in a series of annual flight campaigns that began in 2006, and our first on the DC-8 aircraft.

  4. X-ray absorption lines - Signature for preheat level in non-explosive laser implosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaakobi, B.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Delettrez, J. A.; Bourke, P.; Soures, J. M.; Hooper, C. F.; Deckman, H.

    1980-08-01

    The measured X-ray spectrum from thick glass shells imploded with two TW six-beam laser pulses displayed absorption by transitions of Si ions. This indicates the existence around the time of peak compression of a cooler (less than approximately 200 eV) layer surrounding the hot innermost glass layer, of density times thickness approximately 0.0006 g/sq cm. This temperature is indicative of the preheat level ealier in the implosion.

  5. Near-ultraviolet absorption annealing in hafnium oxide thin films subjected to continuous-wave laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papernov, Semyon; Kozlov, Alexei A.; Oliver, James B.; Kessler, Terrance J.; Shvydky, Alexander; Marozas, Brendan

    2014-12-01

    Hafnium oxide (HfO2) is the most frequently used high-index material in multilayer thin-film coatings for high-power laser applications ranging from near-infrared to near-ultraviolet (UV). Absorption in this high-index material is also known to be responsible for nanosecond-pulse laser-damage initiation in multilayers. In this work, modification of the near-UV absorption of HfO2 monolayer films subjected to irradiation by continuous-wave (cw), 355-nm or 351-nm laser light focused to produce power densities of the order of ˜100 kW/cm2 is studied. Up to a 70% reduction in absorption is found in the areas subjected to irradiation. Temporal behavior of absorption is characterized by a rapid initial drop on the few-tens-of-seconds time scale, followed by a longer-term decline to a steady-state level. Absorption maps generated by photothermal heterodyne imaging confirm the permanent character of the observed effect. Nanosecond-pulse, 351-nm and 600-fs, 1053-nm laser-damage tests performed on these cw laser-irradiated areas confirm a reduction of absorption by measuring up to 25% higher damage thresholds. We discuss possible mechanisms responsible for near-UV absorption annealing and damage-threshold improvement resulting from irradiation by near-UV cw laser light.

  6. Laser-induced fluorescence imaging of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Peter J.

    1998-12-01

    This paper outlines a method for optically detecting bacteria on various backgrounds, such as meat, by imaging their laser induced auto-fluorescence response. This method can potentially operate in real-time, which is many times faster than current bacterial detection methods, which require culturing of bacterial samples. This paper describes the imaging technique employed whereby a laser spot is scanned across an object while capturing, filtering, and digitizing the returned light. Preliminary results of the bacterial auto-fluorescence are reported and plans for future research are discussed. The results to date are encouraging with six of the eight bacterial strains investigated exhibiting auto-fluorescence when excited at 488 nm. Discrimination of these bacterial strains against red meat is shown and techniques for reducing background fluorescence discussed.

  7. Nanodot formation induced by femtosecond laser irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Abere, M. J.; Kang, M.; Goldman, R. S.; Yalisove, S. M.; Chen, C.; Rittman, D. R.; Phillips, J. D.; Torralva, B.

    2014-10-20

    The femtosecond laser generation of ZnSe nanoscale features on ZnSe surfaces was studied. Irradiation with multiple exposures produces 10–100 nm agglomerations of nanocrystalline ZnSe while retaining the original single crystal structure of the underlying material. The structure of these nanodots was verified using a combination of scanning transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. The nanodots continue to grow hours after irradiation through a combination of bulk and surface diffusion. We suggest that in nanodot formation the result of ultrafast laser induced point defect formation is more than an order of magnitude below the ZnSe ultrafast melt threshold fluence. This unique mechanism of point defect injection will be discussed.

  8. Laser-induced autofluorescence of caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Hibst, Raimund; Flemming, Gabriela; Schneckenburger, Herbert

    1993-07-01

    The laser induced autofluorescence from carious regions of human teeth was studied using a krypton ion laser at 407 nm as an excitation source, a fiberoptical detection system combined with a polychromator and an optical multichannel analyzer. In addition, time-resolved and time-gated fluorescence measurements in the nanosecond range were carried out. It was found that carious regions contain different fluorophores which emit in the red spectral range. The emission spectra with maxima around 590 nm, 625 nm and 635 nm are typical for metalloporphyrins, copro- and protoporphyrin. During excitation the fluorescence was bleached. Non-carious regions showed a broad fluorescence band with a maximum in the short-wavelength spectral region with shorter fluorescence decay times than the carious regions. Therefore, caries can be detected by spectral analysis of the autofluorescence as well as by determination of the fluorescence decay times or by time-gated imaging.

  9. 1- and 2-photon absorption by laser-cooled 85Rb using an optical nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, L.; Daly, M.; Chormaic, S. Nic

    2012-09-01

    The characteristics of a cold cloud of 85Rb can be non-destructively examined using an optical nanofiber. The nanofiber is a submicron-diameter cylindrical waveguide fabricated from commercially-available optical fiber using a heat-and-pull rig. The nanofiber can be used as a 'dark' or 'bright' probe depending on whether laser light is coupled into the nanofiber. We demonstrate the use of an optical nanofiber as an absorption spectroscopy tool for cold atoms. A frequency-scanned probe beam is launched through the nanofiber and the resonant light is absorbed at the waist of the nanofiber by nearby cold 85Rb atoms. We present recent singlephoton absorption results and comment on the role of surface interactions. Future work on 2-photon absorption using excited state electronic transitions in 85Rb is discussed.

  10. Femtosecond laser printing of living cells using absorbing film-assisted laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Szabó, Gábor; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Kafetzopoulos, Dimitris; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2012-01-01

    The applicability of a femtosecond KrF laser in absorbing film-assisted, laser-induced forward transfer of living cells was studied. The absorbing materials were 50-nm-thick metal films and biomaterials (gelatine, Matrigel, each 50 μm thick, and polyhydroxybutyrate, 2 μm). The used cell types were human neuroblastoma, chronic myeloid leukemia, and osteogenic sarcoma cell lines, and primary astroglial rat cells. Pulses of a 500-fs KrF excimer laser focused onto the absorbing layer in a 250-μm diameter spot with 225 mJ/cm2 fluence were used to transfer the cells to the acceptor plate placed at 0.6 mm distance, which was a glass slide either pure or covered with biomaterials. While the low-absorptivity biomaterial absorbing layers proved to be ineffective in transfer of cells, when applied on the surface of acceptor plate, the wet gelatine and Matrigel layers successfully ameliorated the impact of the cells, which otherwise did not survive the arrival onto a hard surface. The best short- and long-term survival rate was between 65% and 70% for neuroblastoma and astroglial cells. The long-term survival of the transferred osteosarcoma cells was low, while the myeloid leukemia cells did not tolerate the procedure under the applied experimental conditions.

  11. Laser-induced gas-surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, T. J.

    Chemical reactions in homogeneous systems activated by laser radiation have been extensively investigated for more than a decade. The applications of lasers to promote gas-surface interactions have just been realized in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to examine the fundamental processes involved in laser-induced gas-surface chemical interactions. Specifically, the photon-enhanced adsorption, adsorbate-adsorbate and adsorbate-solid reactions, product formation and desorption processes are discussed in detail. The dynamic processes involved in photoexcitation of the electronic and vibrational states, the energy transfer and relaxation in competition with chemical interactions are considered. These include both single and multiple photon adsorption, and fundamental and overtone transitions in the excitation process, and inter- and intra-molecular energy transfer, and coupling with phonons, electron-hole pairs and surface plasmons in the energy relaxation process. Many current experimental and theoretical studies on the subject are reviewed and discussed with the goal of clarifying the relative importance of the surface interaction steps and relating the resulting concepts to the experimentally observed phenomena. Among the many gas-solid systems that have been investigated, there has been more extensive use of CO adsorbed on metals, and SF 6 and XeF 2 interactions with silicon as examples to illustrate the many facets of the electronically and vibrationally activated surface processes. Results on IR laser stimulated desorption of C 5H 5N and C 5D 5N molecules from various solid surfaces are also presented. It is clearly shown that rapid intermolecular energy exchange and molecule to surface energy transfer can have important effects on photodesorption cross sections and isotope selectivities. It is concluded that utilization of lasers in gas-surface studies not only can provide fundamental insight into the mechanism and dynamics involved in heterogeneous

  12. Laser ablation laser induced fluorescence for sensitive detection of heavy metals in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godwal, Yogesh

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy LIBS is a fast non-contact technique for the analysis of the elemental composition using spectral information of the emission from a laser-induced plasma. For the LIBS studies in this thesis the focus has been in using very low energy, microjoule pulses in order to give high spatial resolution and minimize the laser system requirements. This is a regime that we refer to as microLIBS. Under such conditions it is important to maximize the signal detected to give the lowest limit of detection LOD possible. One technique to improve the signal to noise ratios is by coupling LIBS with Laser Induced Fluorescence. This is a technique where the first pulse creates a vapor plume and the second pulse tuned to a resonant absorption line of the species of interest re-excites the plume. We term this technique as Laser ablation Laser Induced Fluorescence LA-LIF. We have been investigating the performance of LA-LIF at low pulse energies (≤ 1 mJ for both pulses) for the detection of elemental contaminants in water. This technique allows reasonable performance compared to high energy single-pulse LIBS, but at a much reduced total energy expenditure. This allows LODs in the parts per billion range ppb range which typically cannot be obtained with low energy single pulse probing of the systems. This approach or exceeds the sensitivities which can be obtained with many shots using much larger energy systems. In this thesis we investigated the performance of LIBS at low pulse energies for the detection of Pb as a contaminant in water. An LOD of 70 ppb was obtained for an accumulation of 100 shots with the ablation laser pulse energy of 250 muJ and an excitation laser pulse energy of 8 muJ. A systematic study of the detector conditions was made for the system for the detection of Pb. Scaling laws for the LOD in terms of the pump and probe energies were measured and also the effect of detector gain, the gate delay and the gate width were studied. In

  13. Laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using electromagnetically induced transparency in a cascade system

    SciTech Connect

    Abel, R. P.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Bason, M. G.; Pritchard, J. D.; Weatherill, K. J.; Raitzsch, U.; Adams, C. S.

    2009-02-16

    We demonstrate laser frequency stabilization to excited state transitions using cascade electromagnetically induced transparency. Using a room temperature Rb vapor cell as a reference, we stabilize a first diode laser to the D{sub 2} transition and a second laser to a transition from the intermediate 5P{sub 3/2} state to a highly excited state with principal quantum number n=19-70. A combined laser linewidth of 280{+-}50 kHz over a 100 {mu}s time period is achieved. This method may be applied generally to any cascade system and allows laser stabilization to an atomic reference in the absence of a direct absorption signal.

  14. Raman thermometry: Effective temperature of the nonuniform temperature field induced by a Gaussian laser

    SciTech Connect

    Očenášek, Jan Voldřich, Josef

    2015-12-21

    Raman spectroscopy is a widely applied analytical technique with numerous applications that is based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light, which is typically provided by a laser. Irradiation of a sample by a laser beam is always accompanied by an increase in the sample temperature, which may be unwanted or may be beneficial for studying temperature-related effects and determining thermal parameters. This work reports analyses of the temperature field induced by a Gaussian laser to calculate the Raman scattered intensity related to each temperature value of the nonuniform field present on the sample. The effective temperature of the probed field, calculated as an average weighted by the laser intensity, is demonstrated to be about 70% of the maximum temperature irrespective of the absorption coefficient or the laser focus. Finally, using crystalline silicon as a model material, it is shown that this effective value closely approximates the temperature value identified from the thermally related peak shift.

  15. Measurement of Gas Temperature in Negative Hydrogen Ion Source by Wavelength-Modulated Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishiyama, S.; Sasaki, K.; Nakano, H.; Goto, M.; Kisaki, M.; Tsumori, K.; NIFS-NBI Team

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of the energy distribution of hydrogen atom is important and essential to understand the production mechanism of its negative ion (H-) in cesium-seeded negative ion sources. In this work, we evaluated the temperature of atomic hydrogen in the large-scale arc-discharge negative hydrogen ion source in NIFS by wavelength-modulated laser absorption spectroscopy. The laser beam was passed through the adjacent region to the grid electrode for extracting negative ions. The frequency of the laser was scanned slowly over the whole range of the Doppler width (100 GHz in 1s). A sinusoidal frequency modulation at 600 Hz with a width of 30 GHz was superposed onto the slow modulation. The transmitted laser was detected using a photodiode, and its second harmonic component of the sinusoidal modulation was amplified using a lock-in amplifier. The obtained spectrum was in good agreement with an expected spectrum of the Doppler-broadened Balmer- α line. The estimated temperature of atomic hydrogen was approximately 3000 K. The absorption increased with the arc-discharge power, while the temperature was roughly independent of the power. This work is supported by the NIFS Collaboration Research Program NIFS13KLER021.

  16. Research of fiber carbon dioxide sensing system based laser absorption spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yubin; Zhang, Tingting; Li, Yanfang; Zhao, Yanjie; Wang, Chang; Liu, Tongyu

    2012-02-01

    Carbon dioxide is one of the important gas need to be detected in coal mine safety. In the mine limited ventilation environment, Concentration of carbon dioxide directly affects the health of coal miners. Carbon dioxide is also one of important signature Gas in spontaneous combustion forecasting of coal goaf area, it is important to accurately detect concentration of carbon dioxide in coal goaf area. This paper proposed a fiber carbon dioxide online sensing system based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy. The system used laser absorption spectroscopy and optical fiber sensors combined, and a near-infrared wavelength 1608nm fiber-coupled distributed feedback laser (DFB) as a light source and a 7cm length gas cell, to achieve a high sensitivity concentration detection of carbon dioxide gas. The technical specifications of sensing system can basically meet the need of mine safety.

  17. Light absorption in blood during low-intensity laser irradiation of skin

    SciTech Connect

    Barun, V V; Ivanov, A P

    2010-06-23

    An analytical procedure is proposed for describing optical fields in biological tissues inhomogeneous in the depth direction, such as human skin, with allowance for multiple scattering. The procedure is used to investigate the depth distribution of the optical power density in homogeneous and multilayer dermis when the skin is exposed to a laser beam. We calculate the absorbed laser power spectra for oxy- and deoxyhaemoglobin at different depths in relation to the absorption selectivity of these haemoglobin derivatives and the spectral dependence of the optical power density and demonstrate that the spectra vary considerably with depth. A simple exponential approximation is proposed for the depth distribution of the power density in the epidermis and dermis. (laser methods in medicine)

  18. Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging velocimetry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Naibo; Halls, Benjamin R; Stauffer, Hans U; Danehy, Paul M; Gord, James R; Roy, Sukesh

    2016-05-15

    Selective two-photon absorptive resonance femtosecond-laser electronic-excitation tagging (STARFLEET), a nonseeded ultrafast-laser-based velocimetry technique, is demonstrated in reactive and nonreactive flows. STARFLEET is pumped via a two-photon resonance in N2 using 202.25 nm 100 fs light. STARFLEET greatly reduces the per-pulse energy required (30 μJ/pulse) to generate the signature FLEET emission compared to the conventional FLEET technique (1.1 mJ/pulse). This reduction in laser energy results in less energy deposited in the flow, which allows for reduced flow perturbations (reactive and nonreactive), increased thermometric accuracy, and less severe damage to materials. Velocity measurements conducted in a free jet of N2 and in a premixed flame show good agreement with theoretical velocities, and further demonstrate the significantly less intrusive nature of STARFLEET. PMID:27176968

  19. Performance improvements in temperature reconstructions of 2-D tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Doo-Won; Jeon, Min-Gyu; Cho, Gyeong-Rae; Kamimoto, Takahiro; Deguchi, Yoshihiro; Doh, Deog-Hee

    2016-02-01

    Performance improvement was attained in data reconstructions of 2-dimensional tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS). Multiplicative Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (MART) algorithm was adopted for data reconstruction. The data obtained in an experiment for the measurement of temperature and concentration fields of gas flows were used. The measurement theory is based upon the Beer-Lambert law, and the measurement system consists of a tunable laser, collimators, detectors, and an analyzer. Methane was used as a fuel for combustion with air in the Bunsen-type burner. The data used for the reconstruction are from the optical signals of 8-laser beams passed on a cross-section of the methane flame. The performances of MART algorithm in data reconstruction were validated and compared with those obtained by Algebraic Reconstruction Technique (ART) algorithm.

  20. Laser induced surface stress on water droplets.

    PubMed

    Wang, Neng; Lin, Zhifang; Ng, Jack

    2014-10-01

    Laser induced stress on spherical water droplets is studied. At mechanical equilibrium, the body stress vanishes therefore we consider only the surface stress. The surface stress on sub-wavelength droplets is slightly weaker along the light propagation direction. For larger droplets, due to their light focusing effect, the forward stress is significantly enhanced. For a particle roughly 3 micron in radius, when it is excited at whispering gallery mode with Q ∼ 10⁴ by a 1 Watt Gaussian beam, the stress can be enhanced by two orders of magnitude, and can be comparable with the Laplace pressure. PMID:25321955

  1. Analysis of Gain and Absorption Spectra of Gallium Nitride-based Laser Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melo, Thiago

    Laser diodes (LDs) based on the III-Nitride material system, (Al,In,Ga)N, stand to satisfy a number of application needs, and their huge market segment has been further growing with the use of LDs for full color laser projection. All commercially available GaN-based devices are based on the conventional c-plane (polar) orientation of this material. However, strong polarization fields caused by strained quantum-well (QW) layers on c-plane induce the quantum-confined Stark effect (QCSE), which leads to reduced radiative recombination rate and are aggravated when more indium is added into the QW(s) in order to achieve longer wavelengths. A promising solution for this is the use of nonpolar and semipolar crystal growth orientations. Elimination or mitigation of polarization-related fields within the QWs grown along these novel orientations is observed and one expects increased radiative recombination rate and stabilization of the wavelength emission with respect to the injection current. In order to have more insights on the advantages of using the novel crystal orientations of the III-Nitride material system, we compare the gain of LD structures fabricated from c-plane, nonpolar and semipolar GaN substrates. Using thesegmented contact method, single-pass gain spectra of LD epitaxial structures at wafer level are compared for the different crystal orientations as well as the single-pass absorption coefficient spectrum of the active region material and its dependence on reversed bias. Experimental gain spectra under continuous-wave (CW) operation of actual industry LDs fabricated from c-plane and nonpolar/semipolar GaN-based materials emitting wavelengths in the visible are then presented, using the Hakki-Paoli technique at high resolution. Measurements of the transparency current density, total losses and differential modal gain curves up to threshold are analyzed and compared between nonpolar/semipolar and c-plane LDs in violet and blue spectral regions regions. In a

  2. Laser induced damage in optical materials: tenth ASTM symposium.

    PubMed

    Glass, A J; Guenther, A H

    1979-07-01

    The tenth annual Symposium on Optical Materials for High Power Lasers (Boulder Damage Symposium) was held at the National Bureau of Standards in Boulder, Colorado, 12-14 September 1978. The symposium was held under the auspices of ASTM Committee F-1, Subcommittee on Laser Standards, with the joint sponsorship of NBS, the Defense Advanced Research Project Agency, the Department of Energy, and the Office of Naval Research. About 175 scientists attended, including representatives of the United Kingdom, France, Canada, Japan, West Germany, and the Soviet Union. The symposium was divided into sessions concerning the measurement of absorption characteristics, bulk material properties, mirrors and surfaces, thin film damage, coating materials and design, and breakdown phenomena. As in previous years, the emphasis of the papers presented was directed toward new frontiers and new developments. Particular emphasis was given to materials for use from 10.6 microm to the UV region. Highlights included surface characterization, thin film-substrate boundaries, and advances in fundamental laser-matter threshold interactions and mechanisms. The scaling of damage thresholds with pulse duration, focal area, and wavelength was also discussed. In commemoration of the tenth symposium in this series, a number of comprehensive review papers were presented to assess the state of the art in various facets of laser induced damage in optical materials. Alexander J. Glass of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and Arthur H. Guenther of the Air Force Weapons Laboratory were co-chairpersons. The eleventh annual symposium is scheduled for 30-31 October 1979 at the National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, Colorado. PMID:20212622

  3. The temperature dependence of collision-induced absorption by oxygen near 6 microns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orlando, John J.; Tyndall, Geoffrey S.; Nickerson, Karen E.; Calvert, Jack G.

    1991-01-01

    Coefficients for oxygen absorption in the infrared induced by collisions with O2 and N2 are reported over the range 1400-1800/cm and 225-356 K. These coefficients are used to calculate the absorption for O2 in air as a function of temperature and wavenumber, and comparisons are made with previous determinations. In addition, structured absorption features superimposed on the broad collision-induced absorption band, which were observed at all temperatures studied, are interpreted in terms of the presence of (O2)2 and O2-N2 van der Waals molecules.

  4. Valence state change and defect centers induced by infrared femtosecond laser in Yb:YAG crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinshun; Liu, Yang; Zhao, Panjuan; Guo, Zhongyi; Li, Yan; Qu, Shiliang

    2015-04-01

    The broad band upconversion luminescence in Yb3+:YAG crystal has been observed in experiments under the irradiation of focused infrared femtosecond laser. The dependence of the fluorescence intensity on the pump power shows that the upconversion luminescence is due to simultaneous two-photon absorption process, which indicates that the broad emission bands at 365 and 463 nm could be assigned to the 5d → 4f transitions of Yb2+ ions and the one at 692 nm could be attributed to the electron-hole recombination process on (Yb2+-F+) centers. The absorption spectra of the Yb:YAG crystal samples before and after femtosecond laser irradiation, and after further annealing reveal that permanent valence state change of Yb ions from Yb3+ to Yb2+ and (Yb2+-F+) centers have been induced by infrared femtosecond laser irradiation in Yb3+:YAG crystal.

  5. Influence of ambient air pressure on the energy conversion of laser-breakdown induced blast waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Komurasaki, Kimiya; Arakawa, Yoshihiro

    2013-09-01

    Influence of ambient pressure on energy conversion efficiency from a Nd : glass laser pulse (λ = 1.053 µm) to a laser-induced blast wave was investigated at reduced pressure. Temporal incident and transmission power histories were measured using sets of energy meters and photodetectors. A half-shadowgraph half-self-emission method was applied to visualize laser absorption waves. Results show that the blast energy conversion efficiency ηbw decreased monotonically with the decrease in ambient pressure. The decrease was small, from 40% to 38%, for the pressure change from 101 kPa to 50 kPa, but the decrease was considerable, to 24%, when the pressure was reduced to 30 kPa. Compared with a TEA-CO2-laser-induced blast wave (λ = 10.6 µm), higher fraction absorption in the laser supported detonation regime ηLSD of 90% was observed, which is influenced slightly by the reduction of ambient pressure. The conversion fraction ηbw/ηLSD≈90% was achieved at pressure >50 kPa, which is significantly higher than that in a CO2 laser case.

  6. X-ray absorption of a warm dense aluminum plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecherbourg, L.; Renaudin, P.; Bastiani-Ceccotti, S.; Geindre, J.-P.; Blancard, C.; Cossé, P.; Faussurier, G.; Shepherd, R.; Audebert, P.

    2007-05-01

    Point-projection K-shell absorption spectroscopy has been used to measure absorption spectra of transient aluminum plasma created by an ultra-short laser pulse. The 1s-2p and 1s-3p absorption lines of weakly ionized aluminum were measured for an extended range of densities in a low-temperature regime. Independent plasma characterization was obtained using frequency domain interferometry diagnostic (FDI) that allows the interpretation of the absorption spectra in terms of spectral opacities. A detailed opacity code using the density and temperature inferred from the FDI reproduce the measured absorption spectra except in the last stage of the recombination phase.

  7. Laser-Induced Magnetic Dipole Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hintze, Christian; Bücker, Dennis; Domingo Köhler, Silvia; Jeschke, Gunnar; Drescher, Malte

    2016-06-16

    Pulse electron paramagnetic resonance measurements of nanometer scale distance distributions have proven highly effective in structural studies. They exploit the magnetic dipole-dipole coupling between spin labels site-specifically attached to macromolecules. The most commonly applied technique is double electron-electron resonance (DEER, also called pulsed electron double resonance (PELDOR)). Here we present the new technique of laser-induced magnetic dipole (LaserIMD) spectroscopy based on optical switching of the dipole-dipole coupling. In a proof of concept experiment on a model peptide, we find, already at a low quantum yield of triplet excitation, the same sensitivity for measuring the distance between a porphyrin and a nitroxide label as in a DEER measurement between two nitroxide labels. On the heme protein cytochrome C, we demonstrate that LaserIMD allows for distance measurements between a heme prosthetic group and a nitroxide label, although the heme triplet state is not directly observable by an electron spin echo. PMID:27163749

  8. Laser Induced Fluorescence of the Iodine Ion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargus, William

    2014-10-01

    Iodine (I2) has been considered as a potential electrostatic spacecraft thruster propellant for approximately 2 decades, but has only recently been demonstrated. Energy conversion efficiency appears to be on par with xenon without thruster modification. Intriguingly, performance appears to exceed xenon at high acceleration potentials. As part of a continuing program for the development of non-intrusive plasma diagnostics for advanced plasma spacecraft propulsion, we have identified the I II 5d5D4 o state as metastable, and therefore containing a reservoir of excited state ions suitable for laser probing. The 5d5D4 o - 6p5P3 transition at 695.878 nm is convenient for diode laser excitation with the 5s5S2 o - 6p5P3 transition at 516.12 nm as an ideal candidate for non-resonant fluorescence collection. We have constructed a Penning type iodine microwave discharge lamp optimized for I II production for table-top measurements. This work demonstrates I II laser-induced fluorescence in a representative iodine discharge and will validate our previous theoretical work based on the limited available historical I II spectral data.

  9. In situ combustion measurements of CO with diode-laser absorption near 2.3 microm.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Maiorov, M; Baer, D S; Garbuzov, D Z; Connolly, J C; Hanson, R K

    2000-10-20

    In situ measurements of CO concentration were recorded with tunable diode-laser absorption spectroscopy techniques in both the exhaust and the immediate post-flame regions of an atmospheric-pressure flat-flame burner operating on ethylene air. Two room-temperature cw single-mode InGaAsSb/AlGaAsSb diode lasers operating near 2.3 microm were tuned over individual transitions in the CO first overtone band (v' = 2 <-- v" = 0) to record high-resolution absorption line shapes in the exhaust duct [79 cm above the burner, approximately 470 K; R(15) transition at 4311.96 cm(-1)] and the immediate postflame zone [1.5 cm above the burner, 1820-1975 K; R(30) transition at 4343.81 cm(-1)]. The CO concentration was determined from the measured absorption and the gas temperature, which was monitored with type-S thermocouples. For measurements in the exhaust duct, the noise-equivalent absorbance was approximately 3 x 10(-5) (50-kHz detection bandwidth, 50-sweep average, 0.1-s total measurement time), which corresponds to a CO detection limit of 1.5 ppm m at 470 K. Wavelength modulation spectroscopy techniques were used to improve the detection limit in the exhaust to approximately 0.1 ppm m (approximately 500-Hz detection bandwidth, 20-sweep average, 0.4-s total measurement time). For measurements in the immediate postflame zone, the measured CO concentrations in the fuel-rich flames were in good agreement with chemical equilibrium predictions. These experiments demonstrate the utility of diode-laser absorption sensors operating near 2.3 microm for in situ combustion emission monitoring and combustion diagnostics. PMID:18354555

  10. The temperature measurement research for high-speed flow based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di, Yue; Jin, Yi; Jiang, Hong-liang; Zhai, Chao

    2013-09-01

    Due to the particularity of the high-speed flow, in order to accurately obtain its' temperature, the measurement system should has some characteristics of not interfereing with the flow, non-contact measurement and high time resolution. The traditional measurement method cannot meet the above requirements, however the measurement method based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) technology can meet the requirements for high-speed flow temperature measurement. When the near-infared light of a specific frequency is through the media to be measured, it will be absorbed by the water vapor molecules and then the transmission light intensity is detected by the detector. The temperature of the water vapor which is also the high-speed flow temperature, can be accurately obtained by the Beer-Lambert law. This paper focused on the research of absorption spectrum method for high speed flow temperature measurement with the scope of 250K-500K. Firstly, spectral line selection method for low temperature measurement of high-speed flow is discussed. Selected absorption lines should be isolated and have a high peak absorption within the range of 250-500K, at the same time the interference of the other lines should be avoided, so that a high measurement accuracy can be obtained. According to the near-infrared absorption spectra characteristics of water vapor, four absorption lines at the near 1395 nm and 1409 nm are selected. Secondly, a system for the temperature measurement of the water vapor in the high-speed flow is established. Room temperature are measured through two methods, direct absorption spectroscopy (DAS) and wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) ,the results show that this system can realize on-line measurement of the temperature and the measurement error is about 3%. Finally, the system will be used for temperature measurement of the high-speed flow in the shock tunnel, its feasibility of measurement is analyzed.

  11. Relaxation dynamics of femtosecond-laser-induced temperature modulation on the surfaces of metals and semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Yoann; Derrien, Thibault J.-Y.; Bulgakova, Nadezhda M.; Gurevich, Evgeny L.; Mocek, Tomáš

    2016-06-01

    Formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) is a complicated phenomenon which involves periodic spatial modulation of laser energy absorption on the irradiated surface, transient changes in optical response, surface layer melting and/or ablation. The listed processes strongly depend on laser fluence and pulse duration as well as on material properties. This paper is aimed at studying the spatiotemporal evolution of a periodic modulation of the deposited laser energy, once formed upon irradiation of metal (Ti) and semiconductor (Si) surfaces. Assuming that the incoming laser pulse interferes with a surface electromagnetic wave, the resulting sinusoidal modulation of the absorbed laser energy is introduced into a two-dimensional two-temperature model developed for titanium and silicon. Simulations reveal that the lattice temperature modulation on the surfaces of both materials following from the modulated absorption remains significant for longer than 50 ps after the laser pulse. In the cases considered here, the partially molten phase exists 10 ps in Ti and more than 50 ps in Si, suggesting that molten matter can be subjected to temperature-driven relocation toward LIPSS formation, due to the modulated temperature profile on the material surfaces. Molten phase at nanometric distances (nano-melting) is also revealed.

  12. Erbium:YAG laser resurfacing increases skin permeability and the risk of excessive absorption of antibiotics and sunscreens: the influence of skin recovery on drug absorption.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woan-Ruoh; Shen, Shing-Chuan; Al-Suwayeh, Saleh A; Li, Yi-Ching; Fang, Jia-You

    2012-06-01

    While laser skin resurfacing is expected to result in reduced barrier function and increased risk of drug absorption, the extent of the increment has not yet been systematically investigated. We aimed to establish the skin permeation profiles of tetracycline and sunscreens after exposure to the erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) laser during postoperative periods. Physiological and histopathological examinations were carried out for 5 days after laser treatment on nude mice. Percutaneous absorption of the permeants was determined by an in vitro Franz cell. Ablation depths varied in reaching the stratum corneum (10 μm, 2.5 J/cm²) to approach the epidermis (25 μm, 6.25 J/cm²) and upper dermis (40 μm, 10 J/cm²). Reepithelialization evaluated by transepidermal water loss was complete within 2-4 days and depended on the ablation depth. Epidermal hyperplasia was observed in the 40-μm-treated group. The laser was sufficient to disrupt the skin barrier and allow the transport of the permeants into and across the skin. The laser fluence was found to play an important role in modulating skin absorption. A 25-μm ablation depth increased tetracycline flux 84-fold. A much smaller enhancement (3.3-fold) was detected for tetracycline accumulation within the skin. The laser with different fluences produced enhancement of oxybenzone skin deposition of 3.4-6.4-fold relative to the untreated group. No penetration across the skin was shown regardless of whether titanium dioxide was applied to intact or laser-treated skin. However, laser resurfacing increased the skin deposition of titanium dioxide from 46 to 109-188 ng/g. Tetracycline absorption had recovered to the level of intact skin after 5 days, while more time was required for oxybenzone absorption. The in vivo skin accumulation and plasma concentration revealed that the laser could increase tetracycline absorption 2-3-fold. The experimental results indicated that clinicians should be cautious when determining the

  13. Atmospheric solar absorption measurements in the 9-11 micron region using a diode laser heterodyne spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harward, C. N.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    A tunable diode laser heterodyne radiometer was developed for ground based measurements of atmospheric solar absorption spectra in the 9 to 12 micron spectral range. The performance and operating characteristics of this tunable infrared heterodyne radiometer (TIHR) is discussed along with recently measured heterodyne solar absorption spectra in the 10 to 11 micron spectral region.

  14. AN INTERCOMPARISON CF THE INTEGRATING PLATE AND THE LASER TRANSMISSION METHODS FOR DETERMINATION OF AEROSOL ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, M.; Charlson, R.J.; Rosen, H.; Novakov, T.

    1980-07-01

    The absorption coefficients determined by the integrating plate method and the laser transmission method are found to be comparable and highly correlated. Furthermore, a high correlation is found between these absorption coefficients and the carbon content of the aerosol in urbanized regions.

  15. Measurement of CO2 laser absorption by tin plasma emanating extreme ultraviolet light for photo-lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsukuma, Hiraku; Yoshida, Kensuke; Hosoda, Tatsuya; Yogo, Akifumi; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Nishihara, Katsunobu; Sunahara, Atsushi; Somekawa, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Hiroaki

    2014-10-01

    Laser-driven tin plasma has been studied as a light source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) at 13.5 nm (+/- 1% in-band width) for the next-generation semiconductor manufacturing. By using CO2 laser as a driver, high conversion efficiency (CE) has been attained in previous works by optimizing optical thickness for EUV radiation. Radiation hydorodynamic simulation predicts, however, that absorption coefficient for CO2 laser is as high as 50% for a tin plasma generated with a single laser pulse mainly due to short plasma scale. The relatively low absorption is a crucial problem for efficient generation of EUV light. In order to solve this problem and to increase the energy absorption, a double pulse method has been proposed where plasma scale length is extended by pre-pulse irradiation. Therefore, it is important to measure CO2 laser absorption rate precisely in order to optimize plasma conditions. For this purpose we designed an integrating sphere for CO2 laser. Laser absorption was measured for tin plasmas generated under various conditions including target geometries. We will show experimental results and discuss on guidelines for getting higher CE. This study has been partly supported by Strategic Innovation Program for Energy Conservation Technologies in 2013 from New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) of Japan.

  16. Broadband optical absorption enhancement of N719 dye in ethanol by gold-silver alloy nanoparticles fabricated under laser ablation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Azawi, Mohammed A.; Bidin, Noriah; Abbas, Khaldoon N.; Bououdina, Mohamed; Azzez, Shrook A.

    2016-04-01

    The formation of gold-silver alloy nanoparticles (Au-Ag alloy NPs) by a two-step process with a pulsed Nd:YAG laser without any additives is presented. Mixtures of Au and Ag colloidal suspensions were separately obtained by 1064-nm laser ablation of metallic targets immersed in ethanol. Subsequently, the as-mixed colloidal suspensions were reirradiated by laser-induced heating at the second-harmonic generation (532 nm) for different irradiation periods of time. The absorption spectra and morphology of the colloidal alloys were studied as a function of exposure time to laser irradiation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed the formation of monodispersed spherical nanoparticles with a homogeneous size distribution in all the synthesized samples. UV-vis and photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements were also employed to characterize the changes in the light absorption and emission of N719 dye solution with different concentrations of Au-Ag colloidal alloys, respectively. The localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) of Au-Ag alloy NPs enhanced the absorption and fluorescence peak of the dye solution. The mixture of dye molecules with a higher concentration of alloy NPs exhibited an additional coupling of dipole moments with the LSPR, thereby contributing to the improvement of the optical properties of the mixture.

  17. Absorption modulation enhancement of Azo-polymer film induced by plasmonic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiangxian; Zhang, Douguo; Fu, Qiang; Ming, Hai; Wu, Wenxuan; Zhang, Qijin

    2012-11-01

    A thin photochromic film on top of the resist layer can be used as a virtual mask to fabricate super-resolution lithography patterns. In this letter, based on the azobenzene polymer, the absorption intensity of the 365nm LED is effectively modulated by 532nm laser, the modulation degree reaches to 87%.When the silver nanocubes are dropped onto the surface of the polymer film, the modulation degree is significantly higher than that without the nanoparticles in the same intensity of 532nm laser due to the field enhancement of excitation of surface plasmons. The absorption modulation features of the polymer film are favorable for the further smaller line width nanolithography.

  18. Mid-IR laser absorption diagnostics for hydrocarbon vapor sensing in harsh environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klingbeil, Adam Edgar

    Fuel/air stoichiometry is an important parameter in modern combustion devices because it has a profound influence on efficiency, power, and pollutant formation. As engine technologies continue to advance, diagnostics and sensors are becoming essential for studying fundamental combustion processes and characterizing performance of combustion-based engines. Optical-absorption diagnostics have been used previously to probe various species in these environments and to infer quantities such as concentration, temperature, pressure, and velocity. However, there have been only a limited number of demonstrations of optical diagnostics for hydrocarbon fuels. This thesis describes the development of mid-IR optical-absorption sensors for time-resolved measurements of hydrocarbon species to infer critical parameters such as concentration and temperature. These sensors provide the necessary sensitivity and time resolution for measurements in shock tubes, pulse detonation engines, and internal combustion engines. Different aspects of the research conducted are summarized below. An FTIR spectrometer is used to measure the temperature-dependent absorption spectra of a selection of hydrocarbon species and blended fuels in the ˜3.3 mum region of the fundamental C-H stretching vibration. This spectroscopic library provides the first high-temperature spectral information for many of the species studied and facilitates development of sensitive diagnostics for various applications. This unique database also enables modelling of the absorption spectra of blended fuels such as gasoline. An ethylene and propane diagnostic is designed for measuring fuel concentration in a pulse detonation engine using a fixed-wavelength helium-neon laser. Time-resolved measurements during fired tests of a repetitively pulsed engine reveal non-ideal cycle-to-cycle interactions that cause a substantial amount of fuel to leave the engine unburned. By quantifying the fuel loading and identifying the amount of

  19. Bidirectional antimonide laser diodes: application to the development of an infrared probe based on absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vicet, A.; Cousin, B.; Jahjah, M.; El Kaim, Y.; Rouillard, Y.; Jaillard, B.

    2011-07-01

    We present a study of a sensor probe based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy, using antimonide-based diode lasers emitting at 2.3 and 2.6 μm. The lasers were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy in the IES laboratory. The active regions are based on InGaAsSb/AlGaAsSb quantum wells grown on a GaSb(N) substrate. The diode lasers operate at room temperature in a continuous wave (CW) regime and exhibit 5 mW of emitted power. A linear optical setup using the two emitting facets of the diode lasers was developed. By using a second derivative detection by wavelength modulation spectroscopy, we obtained a CH4 detection limit of 9 ppm m. The sensor is designed to be used in soil and to measure CH4, CO2 and H2O, which are important constituents of the soil atmosphere generated by anaerobic digestion, microbial respiration or water transfer.

  20. Development and applications of laser-induced incandescence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderwal, Randy L.; Dietrich, Daniel L.; Zhou, Zhiquang; Choi, Mun Y.

    1995-01-01

    Several NASA-funded investigations focus on soot processes and radiative influences of soot in diffusion flames given their simplicity, practical significance, and potential for theoretical modeling. Among the physical parameters characterizing soot, soot volume fraction, f(sub v), a function of particle size and number density, is often of chief practical interest in these investigations, as this is the geometrical property that directly impacts radiative characteristics and the temperature field of the flame and is basic to understanding soot growth and oxidation processes. Diffusion flames, however, present a number of challenges to the determination of f(sub v) via traditional extinction measurements. Laser-induced incandescence (LII) possesses several advantages compared to line-of-sight extinction techniques for determination of f(sub v). Since LII is not a line-of-sight technique, similar to fluorescence, it possesses geometric versatility allowing spatially resolved measurements of f(sub v) in real time in nonaxisymmetric systems without using deconvolution techniques. The spatial resolution of LII is determined by the detector and imaging magnification used. Neither absorption by polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH's) nor scattering contributes to the signal. Temporal capabilities are limited only by the laser pulse and camera gate duration, with measurements having been demonstrated with 10 ns resolution. Because of these advantages, LII should be applicable to a variety of combustion processes involving both homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. Our work has focussed on characterization of the technique as well as exploration of its capabilities and is briefly described.

  1. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liseykina, T.; Mulser, P.; Murakami, M.

    2015-03-15

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term “vacuum heating.” The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.3−1.2)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2} in the plasma target with the electron density of n{sub e}λ{sup 2}∼10{sup 23}cm{sup −3}μm{sup 2}, the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain Iλ{sup 2}≅(10{sup 18}−10{sup 20}) Wcm{sup −2}μm{sup 2}, a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range Iλ{sup 2}≅(0.14−3.5)×10{sup 21} Wcm{sup −2}

  2. Collisionless absorption, hot electron generation, and energy scaling in intense laser-target interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liseykina, T.; Mulser, P.; Murakami, M.

    2015-03-01

    Among the various attempts to understand collisionless absorption of intense and superintense ultrashort laser pulses, a whole variety of models and hypotheses has been invented to describe the laser beam target interaction. In terms of basic physics, collisionless absorption is understood now as the interplay of the oscillating laser field with the space charge field produced by it in the plasma. A first approach to this idea is realized in Brunel's model the essence of which consists in the formation of an oscillating charge cloud in the vacuum in front of the target, therefore frequently addressed by the vague term "vacuum heating." The investigation of statistical ensembles of orbits shows that the absorption process is localized at the ion-vacuum interface and in the skin layer: Single electrons enter into resonance with the laser field thereby undergoing a phase shift which causes orbit crossing and braking of Brunel's laminar flow. This anharmonic resonance acts like an attractor for the electrons and leads to the formation of a Maxwellian tail in the electron energy spectrum. Most remarkable results of our investigations are the Brunel like spectral hot electron distribution at the relativistic threshold, the minimum of absorption at I λ 2 ≅ ( 0.3 - 1.2 ) × 10 21 Wcm - 2 μ m 2 in the plasma target with the electron density of n e λ 2 ˜ 10 23 cm - 3 μ m 2 , the drastic reduction of the number of hot electrons in this domain and their reappearance in the highly relativistic domain, and strong coupling, beyond expectation, of the fast electron jets with the return current through Cherenkov emission of plasmons. The hot electron energy scaling shows a strong dependence on intensity in the moderately relativistic domain I λ 2 ≅ ( 10 18 - 10 20 ) Wcm - 2 μ m 2 , a scaling in vague accordance with current published estimates in the range I λ 2 ≅ ( 0.14 - 3.5 ) × 10 21 Wcm - 2 μ m 2 , and again a distinct power increase beyond I = 3.5 × 10 21 Wcm

  3. Near resonant absorption by atoms in intense fluctuating laser fields. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, S.J.

    1994-01-01

    The objective of this program was to make quantitative measurements of the effects of higher-order phase/frequency correlations in a laser beam on nonlinear optical absorption processes in atoms. The success of this program was due in large part to a unique experimental capability for modulating the extracavity beam of a stabilized ({approx_lt}200 kHz) continuous-wave laser with statistically-well-characterized stochastic phase (or frequency) fluctuations, in order to synthesize laser bandwidths to {approximately}20 MHz (depending on noise amplitude), with profiles variable between Gaussian and Lorentzian (depending on noise bandwidth). Laser driven processes investigated included the following: (1) the optical Autler-Towns effect in the 3S{sub 1/2} (F = 2, M{sub F} = 2) {yields} 3P{sub 3/2} (F = 3, M{sub F} = 3) two- level Na resonance, using a weak probe to the 4D{sub 5/2} level; (2) the variance and spectra of fluorescence intensity fluctuations in the two-level Na resonance; (3) the Hanle effect in the {sup 1}S{sub 0} {minus} {sup 3}P{sub 1}, transition at {lambda} = 555.6 nm in {sup 174} Yb; (4) absorption (and gain) of a weak probe, when the probe is a time-delayed replica of the resonant (with the two-level Na transition) pump laser; and (5) four-wave-mixing in a phase-conjugate geometry, in a sodium cell, and, finally, in a diffuse atomic sodium beam. The experimental results from these several studies have provided important confirmation of advanced theoretical methods.

  4. The melanosome: threshold temperature for explosive vaporization and internal absorption coefficient during pulsed laser irradiation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, S L; McAuliffe, D J

    1991-06-01

    The explosive vaporization of melanosomes in situ in skin during pulsed laser irradiation (pulse duration less than 1 microsecond) is observed as a visible whitening of the superficial epidermal layer due to stratum corneum disruption. In this study, the ruby laser (694 nm) was used to determine the threshold radiant exposure, H0 (J/cm2), required to elicit whitening for in vitro black (Negroid) human skin samples which were pre-equilibrated at an initial temperature, Ti, of 0, 20, or 50 degrees C. A plot of H0 vs Ti yields a straight line whose x-intercept indicates the threshold temperature of explosive vaporization to be 112 +/- 7 degrees C (SD, N = 3). The slope, delta H0/delta Ti, specifies the internal absorption coefficient, mua, within the melanosome: mua = -rho C/(slope(1 + 7.1 Rd)), where rho C is the product of density and specific heat, and Rd is the total diffuse reflectance from the skin. A summary of the absorption spectrum (mua) for the melanosome interior (351-1064 nm) is presented based on H0 data from this study and the literature. The in vivo absorption spectrum (380-820 nm) for human epidermal melanin was measured by an optical fiber spectrophotometer and is compared with the melanosome spectrum. PMID:1886936

  5. Initial Results of Optical Vortex Laser Absorption Spectroscopy in the HYPER-I Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshimura, Shinji; Asai, Shoma; Aramaki, Mitsutoshi; Terasaka, Kenichiro; Ozawa, Naoya; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Morisaki, Tomohiro

    2015-11-01

    Optical vortex beams have a potential to make a new Doppler measurement, because not only parallel but perpendicular movement of atoms against the beam axis causes the Doppler shift of their resonant absorption frequency. As the first step of a proof-of-principle experiment, we have performed the optical vortex laser absorption spectroscopy for metastable argon neutrals in an ECR plasma produced in the HYPER-I device at the National Institute for Fusion Science, Japan. An external cavity diode laser (TOPTICA, DL100) of which center wavelength was 696.735 nm in vacuum was used for the light source. The Hermite-Gaussian (HG) beam was converted into the Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam (optical vortex) by a computer-generated hologram displayed on the spatial light modulator (Hamamatsu, LCOS-SLM X10468-07). In order to make fast neutral flow across the LG beam, a high speed solenoid valve system was installed on the HYPER-I device. Initial results including the comparison of absorption spectra for HG and LG beams will be presented. This study was supported by NINS young scientists collaboration program for cross-disciplinary study, NIFS collaboration research program (NIFS13KOAP026), and JSPS KAKENHI grant number 15K05365.

  6. A model for the spectral dependence of optically induced absorption in amorphous silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.

    1990-01-01

    A model based on transitions from localized band tail states to states above the mobility edge is used to explain the broad band induced absorptions observed in recent pump-probe experiments. The model gives the observed decrease of absorption with frequency at subband gap photo energies and high carrier densities (of about 10 to the 20th/cu cm). At lower carrier densities, the absorption has a maximun which is sensitive to the spatial extent of the band tail states.

  7. On the measurement of pressure induced shift by diode lasers and harmonic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosa, M.; Ciucci, A.; Pelliccia, D.; Gabbanini, C.; Gozzini, S.; Lucchesini, A.

    1998-02-01

    We present an analysis of the line shape of ro-vibrational molecular absorptions, in case of frequency modulation spectroscopy with diode lasers, and in the presence of a residual amplitude modulation. Subtle effects, such as pressure induced shift, can be measured with sufficient accuracy also for the weak transition lines of the overtone and the combination bands of the molecules, under the proviso of considering the correct fit function in order to avoid possible systematic errors. Some results are given for acetylene overtone absorptions in the derivative spectroscopy limit (small amplitude of modulation) and in the case of large amplitude of modulation.

  8. Ultraviolet femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation of silicon: Ablation efficiency and laser-induced plasma expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Xianzhong; Mao, Xianglei; Greif, Ralph; Russo, Richard E.

    2004-03-23

    Femtosecond laser ablation of silicon in air was studied and compared with nanosecond laser ablation at ultraviolet wavelength (266 nm). Laser ablation efficiency was studied by measuring crater depth as a function of pulse number. For the same number of laser pulses, the fs-ablated crater was about two times deeper than the ns-crater. The temperature and electron number density of the pulsed laser-induced plasma were determined from spectroscopic measurements. The electron number density and temperature of fs-pulse plasmas decreased faster than ns-pulse plasmas due to different energy deposition mechanisms. Images of the laser-induced plasma were obtained with femtosecond time-resolved laser shadowgraph imaging. Plasma expansion in both the perpendicular and the lateral directions to the laser beam were compared for femtosecond and nanosecond laser ablation.

  9. Femtosecond laser pulse induced birefringence in optically isotropic glass.

    SciTech Connect

    Vawter, Gregory Allen; Luk, Ting Shan; Guo, Junpeng; Yang, Pin; Burns, George Robert

    2003-07-01

    We used a regeneratively amplified Ti:sapphire femtosecond laser to create optical birefringence in an isotropic glass medium. Between two crossed polarizers, regions modified by the femtosecond laser show bright transmission with respect to the dark background of the isotropic glass. This observation immediately suggests that these regions possess optical birefringence. The angular dependence of transmission through the laser-modified region is consistent with that of an optically birefringent material. Laser-induced birefringence is demonstrated in different glasses, including fused silica and borosilicate glass. Experimental results indicate that the optical axes of laser-induced birefringence can be controlled by the polarization direction of the femtosecond laser. The amount of laser-induced birefringence depends on the pulse energy level and number of accumulated pulses.

  10. Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) in low pressure flames

    SciTech Connect

    Scherer, J.J.; Rakestraw, D.J.

    1996-12-31

    The authors have employed Infrared Cavity Ringdown Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (IR-CRLAS) as a diagnostic tool for combustion chemistry studies. High resolution rovibrational absorption spectra have been obtained in low pressure laminar flames in the mid-infrared employing a pulsed single mode optical parametric oscillator (OPO) laser system. The high sensitivity and generality of IR-CRLAS for combustion studies is demonstrated in a variety of flames and is shown to be robust even in sooting environments with high temperature gradients. The ability to obtain spatially resolved data is also demonstrated in one dimensional laminar flame studies. These preliminary results indicate the potential of IR-CRLAS as a combustion diagnostic which is capable of obtaining absolute concentrations of reactants, intermediates, and products simultaneously within a narrow spectral region. In this demonstration, two information rich mid-infrared spectral regions (1.6 and 3-4 microns) have been probed at Doppler-limited resolution with an effective laser bandwidth of < 0.007 cm{sup -1}.

  11. The airborne Laser Absorption Spectrometer - A new instrument of remote measurement of atmospheric trace gases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shumate, M. S.; Menzies, R. T.

    1978-01-01

    The Laser Absorption Spectrometer is a portable instrument developed by JPL for remote measurement of trace gases from an aircraft platform. It contains two carbon dioxide lasers, two optical heterodyne receivers, appropriate optics to aim the lasers at the ground and detect the backscattered energy, and signal processing and recording electronics. Operating in the differential-absorption mode, it is possible to monitor one atmospheric gas at a time and record the data in real time. The system can presently measure ozone, ethylene, water vapor, and chlorofluoromethanes with high sensitivity. Airborne measurements were made in early 1977 from the NASA/JPL twin-engine Beechcraft and in May 1977 from the NASA Convair 990 during the ASSESS-II Shuttle Simulation Study. These flights resulted in measurements of ozone concentrations in the lower troposphere which were compared with ground-based values provided by the Air Pollution Control District. This paper describes the details of the instrument and results of the airborne measurements.

  12. Amount-ratio determinations of water isotopologues by dual-laser absorption spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillo, Antonio; Dinesan, Hemanth; Casa, Giovanni; Galzerano, Gianluca; Laporta, Paolo; Gianfrani, Livio

    2012-11-01

    We propose a method for the measurements of the 17O/16O isotope amount ratio in water, based upon the use of a pair of offset-frequency locked extended-cavity diode lasers at 1.39 μm. This method enables one to acquire absorption spectra with an extremely high fidelity, exploiting the highly accurate, absolute, and repeatable frequency axis. One of the two lasers, namely the so-called slave laser, is continuously scanned across a pair of H216O and H217O lines at 7183.5 cm-1 and it interacts with a water vapor sample inside a multiple reflections cell, thus producing absorption spectra with a signal-to-noise ratio of the order of 4000 for a detection bandwidth of 1 kHz. The determination of the isotope amount ratio is performed through a careful analysis of the acquired spectra, by using semiclassical line profiles. In this respect, the influence of the choice of the line shape model is investigated. The experimental reproducibility of the spectrometer has been carefully assessed by means of an Allan variance analysis. Finally, the application of the Kalman filtering technique has shown that a precision of 0.6‰ can be achieved, from repeated spectral acquisitions over a time span of 6000 s.

  13. Laser-filamentation-induced water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled with different ambient gases.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yonghong; Sun, Haiyi; Liu, Jiansheng; Liang, Hong; Ju, Jingjing; Wang, Tiejun; Tian, Ye; Wang, Cheng; Liu, Yi; Chin, See Leang; Li, Ruxin

    2016-04-01

    We investigated femtosecond laser-filamentation-induced airflow, water condensation and snow formation in a cloud chamber filled respectively with air, argon and helium. The mass of snow induced by laser filaments was found being the maximum when the chamber was filled with argon, followed by air and being the minimum with helium. We also discussed the mechanisms of water condensation in different gases. The results show that filaments with higher laser absorption efficiency, which result in higher plasma density, are beneficial for triggering intense airflow and thus more water condensation and precipitation. PMID:27137026

  14. The AC-Stark Effect in Nitric Oxide Induced by Rapidly Swept Continuous Wave Quantum Cascade Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Duxbury, Geoffrey; Kelly, James F.; Blake, Thomas A.; Langford, Nigel

    2012-05-07

    A large AC Stark effect has been observed when nitric oxide, at low pressure in a long optical path (100 m) Herriot cell, is subjected to infrared radiation from a rapidly swept, continuous wave infrared quantum cascade laser. As the frequency sweep rate of the laser is increased, an emission signal induced by rapid passage, occurs after the laser frequency has passed through the resonance of a molecular absorption line. At very high sweep rates a laser field-induced splitting of the absorptive part of the signal is observed, due to the AC Stark effect. This splitting is related to the Autler-Townes mixing of the hyperfine transitions, which lie within the lambda doublet components of the transition, under the Doppler broadened envelope.

  15. Lasing effects in a laser-induced plasma plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagli, Lev; Gaft, Michael

    2015-11-01

    We have studied coherent emission from optically pumped preliminarily created laser induced plasma and demonstrate the possibility to create laser sources based on laser plasma as an active medium. The effect was studied in detail with Al plasma, and preliminary but promising results were also obtained with other atoms from the 13th and 14th groups of the periodic table. These lasers may be used as coherent light sources in a variety of optical applications.

  16. Electromagnetically Induced Guiding of Counter-propagating Lasers in Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    First Author = G. Shvets; A. Pukhov

    1998-05-01

    The interaction of counter-propagating laser pulses in a plasma is considered. When the frequencies of the two lasers are close, nonlinear modification of the refraction index results in the mutual focusing of the two beams. A short (of order the plasma period) laser pulse can also be nonlinearly focused by a long counter-propagating beam which extends over the entire guiding length. This phenomenon of electromagnetically induced guiding can be utilized in laser-driven plasma accelerators.

  17. Equivalent of a cartilage tissue for simulations of laser-induced temperature fields

    SciTech Connect

    Kondyurin, A V; Sviridov, A P

    2008-07-31

    The thermal and optical properties of polyacrylamide hydrogels and cartilages are studied by the method of IR laser radiometry. The thermal diffusivity, heat capacity, and the effective absorption coefficient at a wavelength of 1.56 {mu}m measured for polyacrylamide gel with 70% water content and the degree of cross-linking 1:9 and for the nasal septum cartilage proved to be close. This allows the use of polyacrylamide hydrogels as equivalents of cartilages in simulations of laser-induced temperature fields. (biophotonics)

  18. Improvement in Suppression of Pulsed Nd:YAG Laser Light With Iodine Absorption Cells for Filtered Rayleigh Scattering Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seasholtz, Richard G.; Buggele, Alvin E

    1997-01-01

    Filtered Rayleigh scattering using iodine absorption cells is an effective technique for obtaining density, temperature, and velocity measurements in high speed confined flows. By tuning a single frequency laser to a strong iodine absorption line, stray scattered laser light can be greatly suppressed. For example, the minimum transmission predicted by an iodine absorption model calculation is less than 10(exp -5) at the 18788.44/cm line using a 200 mm absorption cell containing iodine vapor at 0.46 T. Measurements obtained by other researches using a CW Nd:YAG laser agree with the model calculations. However, measurements made by us and by others using Q-switched, injection-seeded, frequency doubled Nd:YAG lasers only show minimum transmission of about 3 x 10(exp -3). This greatly reduces the applicability of the filtered Rayleigh scattering technique using these lasers in experiments having large amounts of stray scattered laser light. The purposes of the present study are to characterize the spectrum of the excess light transmitted by the iodine cell and to make changes to the laser to reduce the transmitted laser light. Transmission data as a function of laser frequency for the iodine absorption line at 18788.44/cm are presented. A planar mirror Fabry-Perot interferometer was used to characterize the frequency spectrum of the light passed through the cell. Measurements taken with the laser tuned to the center of the iodine absorption line show the light transmitted through the iodine cell to have a component with a bandwidth of about 40 GHz. This is probably caused by other modes in the laser that exist in spite of the single frequency injection beam. A second broadband component was also observed, possibly caused by the laser flash lamps or by fluorescence. An intracavity etalon was installed in the laser oscillator cavity to suppress the 40 GHz component. Measurements taken with the etalon tuned to the injection frequency showed a reduction in the transmitted

  19. Ultraviolet versus infrared: Effects of ablation laser wavelength on the expansion of laser-induced plasma into one-atmosphere argon gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qianli; Motto-Ros, Vincent; Laye, Fabrice; Yu, Jin; Lei, Wenqi; Bai, Xueshi; Zheng, Lijuan; Zeng, Heping

    2012-03-01

    Laser-induced plasma from an aluminum target in one-atmosphere argon background has been investigated with ablation using nanosecond ultraviolet (UV: 355 nm) or infrared (IR: 1064 nm) laser pulses. Time- and space-resolved emission spectroscopy was used as a diagnostics tool to have access to the plasma parameters during its propagation into the background, such as optical emission intensity, electron density, and temperature. The specific feature of nanosecond laser ablation is that the pulse duration is significantly longer than the initiation time of the plasma. Laser-supported absorption wave due to post-ablation absorption of the laser radiation by the vapor plume and the shocked background gas plays a dominant role in the propagation and subsequently the behavior of the plasma. We demonstrate that the difference in absorption rate between UV and IR radiations leads to different propagation behaviors of the plasma produced with these radiations. The consequence is that higher electron density and temperature are observed for UV ablation. While for IR ablation, the plasma is found with lower electron density and temperature in a larger and more homogenous axial profile. The difference is also that for UV ablation, the background gas is principally evacuated by the expansion of the vapor plume as predicted by the standard piston model. While for IR ablation, the background gas is effectively mixed to the ejected vapor at least hundreds of nanoseconds after the initiation of the plasma. Our observations suggest a description by laser-supported combustion wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by UV laser, while that by laser-supported detonation wave for the propagation of the plasma produced by IR laser. Finally, practical consequences of specific expansion behavior for UV or IR ablation are discussed in terms of analytical performance promised by corresponding plasmas for application with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

  20. Temperature dependences of mechanisms responsible for the water-vapor continuum absorption. II. Dimers and collision-induced absorption.

    PubMed

    Leforestier, C; Tipping, R H; Ma, Q

    2010-04-28

    We investigated the magnitude and temperature dependence (T dependence) of the dimer absorption in the region of 0-600 cm(-1) and the collision-induced absorption (CIA) in the region of 0-1150 cm(-1). Together with our previous study of the self water-vapor continuum contributions resulting from far-wing line shapes of the allowed H(2)O lines in the infrared window between 800 and 1150 cm(-1), we find that the three mechanisms have completely different T dependence behaviors. The dimer absorption has the strongest negative T dependence and the continuum absorption from far wings of the allowed lines has a moderately strong negative one. Meanwhile, the CIA exhibits a mild T dependence. In addition, their T dependence patterns are quite different. The T dependence of the far-wing theory varies significantly as the frequency of interest omega varies. For CIA, in general, its T dependence is mildly negative, but becomes slightly positive in the window region between the H(2)O bands. In contrast, the T dependence of the dimer absorption varies slightly as omega varies. In the microwave and submillimeter region, its T dependence becomes uniform. Concerning the relative importance for each of these three mechanisms, we find that in the infrared widow, the far-wing contributions are the dominant source of the self-continuum. Within the band, its contributions are definitely responsible for the measured continuum data. But, it is impossible to draw quantitatively conclusions on its relative importance unless one is able to improve the accuracy of the local line calculations significantly. On the other hand, within the pure rotational band, the dimer absorptions are a minor contributor to the self-continuum measurements, and its role becomes more important in the microwave and submillimeter regions. Finally, based on our study we conclude that contributions to the self-continuum from CIA in the frequency region of 0-1150 cm(-1) are negligible. PMID:20441270

  1. Tunable Diode Laser Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy for Detection of Potassium under Optically Thick Conditions.

    PubMed

    Qu, Zhechao; Steinvall, Erik; Ghorbani, Ramin; Schmidt, Florian M

    2016-04-01

    Potassium (K) is an important element related to ash and fine-particle formation in biomass combustion processes. In situ measurements of gaseous atomic potassium, K(g), using robust optical absorption techniques can provide valuable insight into the K chemistry. However, for typical parts per billion K(g) concentrations in biomass flames and reactor gases, the product of atomic line strength and absorption path length can give rise to such high absorbance that the sample becomes opaque around the transition line center. We present a tunable diode laser atomic absorption spectroscopy (TDLAAS) methodology that enables accurate, calibration-free species quantification even under optically thick conditions, given that Beer-Lambert's law is valid. Analyte concentration and collisional line shape broadening are simultaneously determined by a least-squares fit of simulated to measured absorption profiles. Method validation measurements of K(g) concentrations in saturated potassium hydroxide vapor in the temperature range 950-1200 K showed excellent agreement with equilibrium calculations, and a dynamic range from 40 pptv cm to 40 ppmv cm. The applicability of the compact TDLAAS sensor is demonstrated by real-time detection of K(g) concentrations close to biomass pellets during atmospheric combustion in a laboratory reactor. PMID:26938713

  2. Dielectric breakdown induced by picosecond laser pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.; Bechtel, J. H.; Bloembergen, N.

    1976-01-01

    The damage thresholds of transparent optical materials were investigated. Single picosecond pulses at 1.06 microns, 0.53 microns and 0.35 microns were obtained from a mode locked Nd-YAG oscillator-amplifier-frequency multiplier system. The pulses were Gaussian in space and time and permitted the determination of breakdown thresholds with a reproducibility of 15%. It was shown that the breakdown thresholds are characteristic of the bulk material, which included nine alkali halides, five different laser host materials, KDP, quartz, sapphire and calcium fluoride. The extension of the damage data to the ultraviolet is significant, because some indication was obtained that two- and three-photon absorption processes begin to play a role in determining the threshold. Throughout the visible region of the spectrum the threshold is still an increasing function of frequency, indicating that avalanche ionization is the dominant factor in determining the breakdown threshold. This was confirmed by a detailed study of the damage morphology with a high resolution microscope just above the threshold. The influence of self focusing is discussed, and evidence for beam distortion below the power threshold for complete self focusing is presented, confirming the theory of Marburger.

  3. Reflection-Absorption Infrared Spectroscopy of Thin Films Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-02-04

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with < 1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  4. Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy of thin films using an external cavity quantum cascade laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phillips, Mark C.; Craig, Ian M.; Blake, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental demonstrations using a broadly tunable external cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) to perform Reflection-Absorption InfraRed Spectroscopy (RAIRS) of thin layers and residues on surfaces. The ECQCL compliance voltage was used to measure fluctuations in the ECQCL output power and improve the performance of the RAIRS measurements. Absorption spectra from self-assembled monolayers of a fluorinated alkane thiol and a thiol carboxylic acid were measured and compared with FTIR measurements. RAIRS spectra of the explosive compounds PETN, RDX, and tetryl deposited on gold substrates were also measured. Rapid measurement times and low noise were demonstrated, with <1E-3 absorbance noise for a 10 second measurement time.

  5. Space Launch System Base Heating Test: Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Ron; Carr, Zak; MacLean, Matthew; Dufrene, Aaron; Mehta, Manish

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes the Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) measurement of several water transitions that were interrogated during a hot-fire testing of the Space Launch Systems (SLS) sub-scale vehicle installed in LENS II. The temperature of the recirculating gas flow over the base plate was found to increase with altitude and is consistent with CFD results. It was also observed that the gas above the base plate has significant velocity along the optical path of the sensor at the higher altitudes. The line-by-line analysis of the H2O absorption features must include the effects of the Doppler shift phenomena particularly at high altitude. The TDLAS experimental measurements and the analysis procedure which incorporates the velocity dependent flow will be described.

  6. Measurement of exhaled nitric oxide in beef cattle using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roller, C. B.; Holland, B. P.; McMillen, G.; Step, D. L.; Krehbiel, C. R.; Namjou, K.; McCann, P. J.

    2007-03-01

    Measurement of nitric oxide (NO) in the expired breath of crossbred calves received at a research facility was performed using tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. Exhaled NO (eNO) concentrations were measured using NO absorption lines at 1912.07 cm-1 and employing background subtraction. The lower detection limit and measurement precision were determined to be ˜330 parts in 1012 per unit volume. A custom breath collection system was designed to collect lower airway breath of spontaneously breathing calves while in a restraint chute. Breath was collected and analyzed from calves upon arrival and periodically during a 42 day receiving period. There was a statistically significant relationship between eNO, severity of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in terms of number of times treated, and average daily weight gain over the first 15 days postarrival. In addition, breathing patterns and exhaled CO2 showed a statistically significant relationship with BRD morbidity.

  7. On-column double-beam laser absorption detection for capillary electrophoresis

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Y.; Yeung, E.S. )

    1993-08-01

    Double-beam laser absorption detection in capillary electrophoresis (CE) has been developed. This is based on the direct subtraction of reference and signal photocurrents by an electronic circuit, under feedback control, to reduce background noise. A simple equation for calculating concentrations has been proposed and was confirmed by experimental results. A practical noise-to-signal ratio of 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]5] in intensity is achieved. This is 5 times lower than that of commercial CE systems. For absorbance detection, as low as 2 [times] 10[sup [minus]8] M malachite green can be detected. This corresponds to a 25-fold improvement of detection limit over commercial systems. This gain in detectability results from both a reduction in intensity fluctuations (noise) and an increase in the effective absorption path length (signal). 22 refs., 6 figs.

  8. Intracavity laser absorption spectroscopy of D 2O between 11 400 and 11 900 cm -1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, O. V.; Mazzotti, F.; Leshchishina, O. M.; Tennyson, J.; Campargue, A.

    2007-03-01

    The weak absorption spectrum of dideuterated water, D 2O, has been recorded by Intracavity Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (ICLAS) between 11 400 and 11 900 cm -1. This spectrum is dominated by the 3 ν1 + ν2 + ν3 and the ν1 + ν2 + 3 ν3 centered at 11 500.25 and 11 816.64 cm -1, respectively. A total of 530 energy levels belonging to eight vibrational states were determined. The rovibrational assignment process of the 840 lines attributed to D 2O was mostly based on the results of new variational calculations consisting in a refinement of the potential energy surface of Shirin et al. [J. Chem. Phys., 120 (2004) 206] on the basis of recent experimental observations, and a dipole moment surface from Schwenke and Partridge [J. Chem. Phys. 113 (2000) 6592]. The overall agreement between these calculations and the observed spectrum is very good both for the line positions and the line intensities.

  9. Absorption Spectra and Absorption Coefficients for Methane in the 750-940 nm region obtained by Intracavity Laser Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, J. J.; Cao, H.

    2000-10-01

    Methane spectral features are prominent in the reflected sunlight spectra from the outer planets and some of their major satellites and can provide useful information on the atmospheres of those bodies. Methane bands occurring in the visible to near-IR region are particularly important because for many of these planetary bodies, methane bands occurring in the IR are saturated. Spectral observations of these bodies also are being made at increasingly higher resolution. In order to interpret the planetary spectra, laboratory data for methane obtained at appropriate sample conditions and spectral resolution are required. Since the visible to near-IR spectrum of methane is intrinsically weak, sensitive techniques are required to perform the laboratory measurements. We have employed the intracavity laser spectroscopy (ILS) technique to record methane spectrum in the visible to near-IR region. New results for room temperature methane in the 10,635 - 13,300 cm-1 region and for liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K) methane in the 10,860 - 11,605 cm-1 region will be presented. Spectra throughout the more strongly absorbing sections will be shown. These spectra are acquired at a resolution of 400,000 - 500,000 and are calibrated using iodine reference spectra acquired from an extra-cavity cell at nearly the same time as when the methane data are recorded. From the spectra, absorption coefficients are determined and these are presented as averages over 1 Å and 1 cm-1 intervals. In order to obtain the results, spectra are deconvolved for the instrument function using a Fourier transform technique. The validity of the approach is verified from studies of isolated oxygen lines in the A band occurring around 760 nm. Good agreement is observed between the intensity values determined from the FT deconvolution and integration method and those derived by fitting the observed line profiles to Voigt line-shapes convoluted with the instrument function. The methane results are compared

  10. Mapping of lead, magnesium and copper accumulation in plant tissues by laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy and laser-ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, J.; Galiová, M.; Novotný, K.; Červenka, R.; Reale, L.; Novotný, J.; Liška, M.; Samek, O.; Kanický, V.; Hrdlička, A.; Stejskal, K.; Adam, V.; Kizek, R.

    2009-01-01

    Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) were utilized for mapping the accumulation of Pb, Mg and Cu with a resolution up to 200 μm in a up to cm × cm area of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) leaves. The results obtained by LIBS and LA-ICP-MS are compared with the outcomes from Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and Thin-Layer Chromatography (TLC). It is shown that laser-ablation based analytical methods can substitute or supplement these techniques mainly in the cases when a fast multi-elemental mapping of a large sample area is needed.

  11. Optoelectric patterning: Effect of electrode material and thickness on laser-induced AC electrothermal flow.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Avanish; Khor, Jian-Wei; Clayton, Katherine N; Williams, Stuart J; Pan, Xudong; Kinzer-Ursem, Tamara; Wereley, Steve

    2016-02-01

    Rapid electrokinetic patterning (REP) is an emerging optoelectric technique that takes advantage of laser-induced AC electrothermal flow and particle-electrode interactions to trap and translate particles. The electrothermal flow in REP is driven by the temperature rise induced by the laser absorption in the thin electrode layer. In previous REP applications 350-700 nm indium tin oxide (ITO) layers have been used as electrodes. In this study, we show that ITO is an inefficient electrode choice as more than 92% of the irradiated laser on the ITO electrodes is transmitted without absorption. Using theoretical, computational, and experimental approaches, we demonstrate that for a given laser power the temperature rise is controlled by both the electrode material and its thickness. A 25-nm thick Ti electrode creates an electrothermal flow of the same speed as a 700-nm thick ITO electrode while requiring only 14% of the laser power used by ITO. These results represent an important step in the design of low-cost portable REP systems by lowering the material cost and power consumption of the system. PMID:26613811

  12. Computed tomography measurement of gaseous fuel concentration by infrared laser light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawazoe, Hiromitsu; Inagaki, Kazuhisa; Emi, Y.; Yoshino, Fumio

    1997-11-01

    A system to measure gaseous hydrocarbon distributions was devised, which is based on IR light absorption by C-H stretch mode of vibration and computed tomography method. It is called IR-CT method in the paper. Affection of laser light power fluctuation was diminished by monitoring source light intensity by the second IR light detector. Calibration test for methane fuel was carried out to convert spatial data of line absorption coefficient into quantitative methane concentration. This system was applied to three flow fields. The first is methane flow with lifted flame which is generated by a gourd-shaped fuel nozzle. Feasibility of the IR-CT method was confirmed through the measurement. The second application is combustion field with diffusion flame. Calibration to determine absorptivity was undertaken, and measured line absorption coefficient was converted spatial fuel concentration using corresponding temperature data. The last case is modeled in cylinder gas flow of internal combustion engine, where gaseous methane was led to the intake valve in steady flow state. The fuel gas flow simulates behavior of gaseous gasoline which is evaporated at intake valve tulip. Computed tomography measurement of inner flow is essentially difficult because of existence of surrounding wall. In this experiment, IR laser beam was led to planed portion by IR light fiber. It is found that fuel convection by airflow takes great part in air-fuel mixture formation and the developed IR-CT system to measure fuel concentration is useful to analyze air-fuel mixture formation process and to develop new combustors.

  13. Supersonic Mass Flux Measurements via Tunable Diode Laser Absorption and Non-Uniform Flow Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Leyen S.; Strand, Christopher L.; Jeffries, Jay B.; Hanson, Ronald K.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gaffney, Richard L.; Capriotti, Diego P.

    2011-01-01

    Measurements of mass flux are obtained in a vitiated supersonic ground test facility using a sensor based on line-of-sight (LOS) diode laser absorption of water vapor. Mass flux is determined from the product of measured velocity and density. The relative Doppler shift of an absorption transition for beams directed upstream and downstream in the flow is used to measure velocity. Temperature is determined from the ratio of absorption signals of two transitions (lambda(sub 1)=1349 nm and lambda(sub 2)=1341.5 nm) and is coupled with a facility pressure measurement to obtain density. The sensor exploits wavelength-modulation spectroscopy with second-harmonic detection (WMS-2f) for large signal-to-noise ratios and normalization with the 1f signal for rejection of non-absorption related transmission fluctuations. The sensor line-of-sight is translated both vertically and horizontally across the test section for spatially-resolved measurements. Time-resolved measurements of mass flux are used to assess the stability of flow conditions produced by the facility. Measurements of mass flux are within 1.5% of the value obtained using a facility predictive code. The distortion of the WMS lineshape caused by boundary layers along the laser line-of-sight is examined and the subsequent effect on the measured velocity is discussed. A method for correcting measured velocities for flow non-uniformities is introduced and application of this correction brings measured velocities within 4 m/s of the predicted value in a 1630 m/s flow.

  14. Dysregulation of epithelial Na+ absorption induced by inhibition of the kinases TORC1 and TORC2

    PubMed Central

    Mansley, Morag K; Wilson, Stuart M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Although the serum and glucocorticoid-inducible protein kinase 1 (SGK1) appears to be involved in controlling epithelial Na+ absorption, its role in this physiologically important ion transport process is undefined. As SGK1 activity is dependent upon target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-catalysed phosphorylation of SGK1-Ser422, we have explored the effects of inhibiting TORC2 and/or TORC1 upon the hormonal control of Na+ absorption. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Na+ absorption was quantified electrometrically in mouse cortical collecting duct cells (mpkCCD) grown to confluence on permeable membranes. Kinase activities were assessed by monitoring endogenous protein phosphorylation, with or without TORC1/2 inhibitors (TORIN1 and PP242) and the TORC1 inhibitor: rapamycin. KEY RESULTS Inhibition of TORC1/2 (TORIN1, PP242) suppressed basal SGK1 activity, prevented insulin- and dexamethasone-induced SGK1 activation, and caused modest (10–20%) inhibition of basal Na+ absorption and substantial (∼80%) inhibition of insulin/dexamethasone-induced Na+ transport. Inhibition of TORC1 did not impair SGK1 activation or insulin-induced Na+ transport, but did inhibit (∼80%) dexamethasone-induced Na+ absorption. Arginine vasopressin stimulated Na+ absorption via a TORC1/2-independent mechanism. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Target of rapamycin complex 2, but not TORC1, is important to SGK1 activation. Signalling via phosphoinositide-3-kinase/TORC2/SGK1 can explain insulin-induced Na+ absorption. TORC2, but not TORC1, is also involved in glucocorticoid-induced SGK1 activation but its role is permissive. Glucocorticoid-induced Na+ transport displayed a requirement for TORC1 activity. Therefore, TORC1 and TORC2 contribute to the regulation of Na+ absorption. Pharmacological manipulation of TORC1/2 signalling may provide novel therapies for Na+-sensitive hypertension. PMID:20735411

  15. Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy of Metastable Atoms in Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Hoang Tung Do; Hippler, Rainer

    2008-09-07

    Spatial density profile of neon metastable produced in dusty plasma was investigated by means of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The line averaged measured density drops about 30% with the presence of dust particles. The observations provide evidence for a significant interaction between atoms and powder particles which are important for energy transfer from plasma to particles. The power per unit area absorbed by dust particles due to the collision of metastable atoms with dust particle surface is about some tens of mW/m{sup 2}.

  16. Absorption spectrum of the laser-populated 3D metastable levels in barium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlsten, J. L.; Mcilrath, T. J.; Parkinson, W. H.

    1975-01-01

    This paper deals with the details of the absorption spectrum of the 3D metastable term in barium. The 3D term was selectively populated with a tuneable dye laser. The fundamental triplet series (6s5d 3D-6snf 3F) is identified and extended out to n = 32. In addition, the absolute photoionization cross section was measured at 303 nm. The relative cross section from 303 to 250 nm was also measured with the absolute scale set by the measurement at 303 nm and was found to be nearly constant in the wavelength region measured.

  17. Primary Gas Thermometry by Means of Laser-Absorption Spectroscopy: Determination of the Boltzmann Constant

    SciTech Connect

    Casa, G.; Castrillo, A.; Galzerano, G.; Wehr, R.; Merlone, A.; Di Serafino, D.; Laporta, P.; Gianfrani, L.

    2008-05-23

    We report on a new optical implementation of primary gas thermometry based on laser-absorption spectrometry in the near infrared. The method consists in retrieving the Doppler broadening from highly accurate observations of the line shape of the R(12) {nu}{sub 1}+2{nu}{sub 2}{sup 0}+{nu}{sub 3} transition in CO{sub 2} gas at thermodynamic equilibrium. Doppler width measurements as a function of gas temperature, ranging between the triple point of water and the gallium melting point, allowed for a spectroscopic determination of the Boltzmann constant with a relative accuracy of {approx}1.6x10{sup -4}.

  18. In situ ozone data for comparison with laser absorption remote sensor: 1980 PEPE/NEROS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdougal, D. S.; Lee, R. B., III; Bendura, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    Several sets of in situ ozone (O3) measurements were made by a NASA aircraft in support of the laser absorption spectrometer (LAS) remote sensor. These measurements were designed to provide comparative O3 data for the LAS sensor. The LAS, which was flown on a second aircraft, remotely measured the vertical burden of O3 from the aircraft to the surface. In situ results of the air quality (O3 and B sub scat) and meteorological (temperature and dewpoint) parameters for three correlative missions are presented. The aircraft flight plans, in situ concentration profiles and vertical burdens, and measurement errors are summarized.

  19. X-ray absorption study of pulsed laser deposited boron nitride films

    SciTech Connect

    Chaiken, A.; Terminello, L.J.; Wong, J.; Doll, G.L.; Sato, T.

    1994-02-02

    B and N K-edge x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements have been performed on three BN thin films grown on Si substrates using ion- assisted pulsed laser deposition. Comparison of the films` spectra to those of several single-phase BN powder standards shows that the films consist primarily of sp{sup 2} bonds. Other features in the films`s spectra suggest the presence of secondary phases, possibly cubic or rhombohedral BN. Films grown at higher deposition rates and higher ion-beam voltages are found to be more disordered, in agreement with previous work.

  20. Investigation of laser-induced iodine fluorescence for the measurement of density in compressible flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdaniel, J. C., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    Laser induced fluorescence is an attractive nonintrusive approach for measuring molecular number density in compressible flows although this technique does not produce a signal that is directly related to the number density. Saturation and frequency detuned excitation are explored as means for minimizing the quenching effect using iodine as the molecular system because of its convenient absorption spectrum. Saturation experiments indicate that with available continuous wave laser sources of Gaussian transverse intensity distribution only partial saturation could be achieved in iodine at the pressures of interest in gas dynamics. Using a fluorescence lineshape theory, it is shown that for sufficiently large detuning of a narrow bandwidth laser from a molecular transition, the quenching can be cancelled by collisional broadening over a large range of pressures and temperatures. Experimental data obtained in a Mach 4.3 underexpanded jet of nitrogen seeded with iodine for various single mode argon laser detunings from a strong iodine transition at 5145 A are discussed.

  1. Properties of defect-induced multiple pulse laser damage of transmission components.

    PubMed

    Ma, Bin; Zhang, Li; Lu, Menglei; Wang, Ke; Jiao, Hongfei; Zhang, Jinlong; Cheng, Xinbin; Yang, Liming; Wang, Zhanshan

    2016-09-01

    When the number of laser pulses increases, the laser-induced damage threshold of the optical components gradually declines. The magnitude and tendency of this reduced threshold are associated with various factors. Furthermore, this reduced threshold is conclusively determined by the limiting factors or defect characteristics that trigger damage to optical components. Then, fully understanding the damage properties of different kinds of defects will contribute to the optimization of the performance and lifetime of the optical components. In this study, the statistical and deterministic characterizations of the fatigue effect are used to evaluate the properties of the multiple pulse laser damage of transmission components. First, the influence of spot sizes and polishing materials on the properties of the multiple pulse laser damage of optical components is discussed. Then, the structural, absorptive, and mixed artificial defects are fabricated, and the damage characteristics are evaluated and analyzed. Finally, the damage mechanism of different factors has been clarified. PMID:27607284

  2. Natural gas pipeline leak detector based on NIR diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiaoming; Fan, Hong; Huang, Teng; Wang, Xia; Bao, Jian; Li, Xiaoyun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2006-09-01

    The paper reports on the development of an integrated natural gas pipeline leak detector based on diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The detector transmits a 1.653 μm DFB diode laser with 10 mW and detects a fraction of the backscatter reflected from the topographic targets. To eliminate the effect of topographic scatter targets, a ratio detection technique was used. Wavelength modulation and harmonic detection were used to improve the detection sensitivity. The experimental detection limit is 50 ppm m, remote detection for a distance up to 20 m away topographic scatter target is demonstrated. Using a known simulative leak pipe, minimum detectable pipe leak flux is less than 10 ml/min.

  3. Natural gas pipeline leak detector based on NIR diode laser absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xiaoming; Fan, Hong; Huang, Teng; Wang, Xia; Bao, Jian; Li, Xiaoyun; Huang, Wei; Zhang, Weijun

    2006-09-01

    The paper reports on the development of an integrated natural gas pipeline leak detector based on diode laser absorption spectroscopy. The detector transmits a 1.653 microm DFB diode laser with 10 mW and detects a fraction of the backscatter reflected from the topographic targets. To eliminate the effect of topographic scatter targets, a ratio detection technique was used. Wavelength modulation and harmonic detection were used to improve the detection sensitivity. The experimental detection limit is 50 ppmm, remote detection for a distance up to 20 m away topographic scatter target is demonstrated. Using a known simulative leak pipe, minimum detectable pipe leak flux is less than 10 ml/min. PMID:16563854

  4. Absorption of high-contrast, intense short laser pulses on solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kemp, Andreas; Divol, Laurent

    2014-10-01

    We study the interaction of a 10 J / 100 fs intense laser pulse with solid aluminum using 1D and 2D kinetic / collisional particle simulations. In particular we are interested in an accurate description of the early phase of the interaction where the target is still cold, assuming that no plasma formation has set in before the arrival of the pulse. While most of the laser pulse is reflected, penetration of light into the skin layer and collisional heating lead to fast heating of the skin layer, and an increasing absorption of light into several groups of energetic electrons. We discuss details of the resulting electron spectrum, and plasma conditions expected immediately behind the interaction region under realistic conditions. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Laser-induced changes on optical band gap of amorphous and crystallized thin films of Se 75S 25-xAG x

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ghamdi, A. A.; Khan, Shamshad A.

    2009-11-01

    Optical band gap of amorphous, crystallized, laser induced amorphous and laser induced crystallized films of Se 75S 25-xAg x ( x=4, 6 and 8) glassy alloys was studied from absorption spectra. The amorphous and crystallized films were induced by pulse laser for 10 min. After laser irradiation on amorphous and crystalline films, optical band gap was measured. It has been found that the mechanism of the optical absorption follows the rule of indirect transition. The amorphous thin films show an increase in the optical band gap, while the crystallized (thermally annealed) thin films show a decrease in the optical band gap by inducing laser irradiation. Crystallization and amorphization of chalcogenide films were accompanied with the change in the optical band gap. The change in optical energy gap could be determined by identification of the transformed phase. These results are interpreted in terms of concentration of localized states due to shift in Fermi level.

  6. Spectroscopic monitoring on irradiation-induced formation of AuAg alloy nanoparticles by femtosecond laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbani, Yuliati; Nakamura, Takahiro; Sato, Shunichi

    2016-02-01

    The interaction of an intense femtosecond laser pulses with a neat liquid solvent has been known to produce a number of highly reactive species that are useful to induce chemical reactions in the solution through the nonlinear absorption processes. When metal ions are present in the solution, they are assumed to readily reduce by ions, radicals, molecules or excited states generated photolytically from the solvent resulting in the formation of zerovalent metal nanoalloys. If two kinds of metal precursors are involved in a reduction process, the alloying process is expected. In this work, irradiation-induced synthesis of AuAg bimetallic nanoparticle at different laser-pulse energies was examined to investigate the formation mechanism in the presence of NH4OH in the initial solution. At a given laser pulse energy (5.8 mJ/pulse), the time evolution of the UV-visible absorption spectra showed that the formation of AuAg nanoalloys most likely begin with the formation of Ag-riched alloy nanoparticles. As the reduction is started, the absorption spectrum of solution was closer to that of pure Ag nanoparticles. This indicates that the reduction rate of Ag is relatively greater than that of Au nanoparticle in the presence of ammonia. The single peak position then shifts to the red region as the irradiation time increases. After 10 min, the peak positions are between pure silver and gold peaks indicating the alloying process occurs at this stage. At low pulse energy (1.0 mJ/pulse), there was an induction time for several minutes before the absorption is detectable, and hence the alloying process is also delayed (after 20 minutes irradiation). While the formation rate of nanoparticles is more pronounced at high laser pulse energy, the formation yield is relatively the same for both laser pulse energies.

  7. Volume of a laser-induced microjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamoto, Sennosuke; Hayasaka, Keisuke; Noguchi, Yuto; Tagawa, Yoshiyuki

    2015-11-01

    Needle-free injection systems are of great importance for medical treatments. In spite of their great potential, these systems are not commonly used. One of the common problems is strong pain caused by diffusion shape of the jet. To solve this problem, the usage of a high-speed highly-focused microjet as needle-free injection system is expected. It is thus crucial to control important indicators such as ejected volume of the jet for its safe application. We conduct experiments to reveal which parameter influences mostly the ejected volume. In the experiments, we use a glass tube of an inner diameter of 500 micro-meter, which is filled with the liquid. One end is connected to a syringe and the other end is opened. Radiating the pulse laser instantaneously vapors the liquid, followed by the generation of a shockwave. We find that the maximum volume of a laser-induced bubble is approximately proportional to the ejected volume. It is also found that the occurrence of cavitation does not affect the ejected volume while it changes the jet velocity.

  8. Microlens array induced light absorption enhancement in polymer solar cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqing; Elshobaki, Moneim; Ye, Zhuo; Park, Joong-Mok; Noack, Max A; Ho, Kai-Ming; Chaudhary, Sumit

    2013-03-28

    Over the last decade, polymer solar cells (PSCs) have attracted a lot of attention and highest power conversion efficiencies (PCE) are now close to 10%. Here we employ an optical structure - the microlens array (MLA) - to increase light absorption inside the active layer, and PCE of PSCs increased even for optimized devices. Normal incident light rays are refracted at the MLA and travel longer optical paths inside the active layers. Two PSC systems - poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl):(6,6)-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) and poly[[9-(1-octylnonyl)-9H-carbazole-2,7-diyl]-2,5-thiophenediyl-2,1,3-benzothiadiazole-4,7-diyl-2,5-thiophenediyl]:(6,6)-phenyl C71 butyric acid methyl ester (PCDTBT:PC70BM) - were investigated. In the P3HT:PCBM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and the PCE of an optimized device by ∼4.3%. In the PCDTBT:PC70BM system, MLA increased the absorption, absolute external quantum efficiency, and PCE by more than 10%. In addition, simulations incorporating optical parameters of all structural layers were performed and they support the enhancement of absorption in the active layer with the assistance of MLA. Our results show that utilizing MLA is an effective strategy to further increase light absorption in PSCs, in which optical losses account for ∼40% of total losses. MLA also does not pose materials processing challenges to the active layers since it is on the other side of the transparent substrate. PMID:23407762

  9. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-15

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  10. Dynamics of optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahdieh, Mohammad Hossein; Akbari Jafarabadi, Marzieh

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an optical breakdown in air induced by single and double nanosecond laser pulses was studied. A high power Nd:YAG laser beam was used for producing optical breakdown plasma in the air. The dynamics of breakdown plasma were studied using an optical probe beam. A portion of the laser beam was used, as the probe beam and was aligned to propagate (perpendicular to the pump beam) through the breakdown region. The transmission of the probe beam (through the breakdown region) was temporally measured for both single and double pulse irradiations. The results were used to describe the evolution of the induced plasma in both conditions. These results show that the plasma formation time and its absorptivity are strongly dependent on the single or double pulse configurations.

  11. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided. PMID:26814360

  12. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided.

  13. Laser-Induced Spallation of Microsphere Monolayers.

    PubMed

    Hiraiwa, Morgan; Stossel, Melicent; Khanolkar, Amey; Wang, Junlan; Boechler, Nicholas

    2016-08-01

    The detachment of a semiordered monolayer of polystyrene microspheres adhered to an aluminum-coated glass substrate is studied using a laser-induced spallation technique. The microsphere-substrate adhesion force is estimated from substrate surface displacement measurements obtained using optical interferometry, and a rigid-body model that accounts for the inertia of the microspheres. The estimated adhesion force is compared with estimates obtained using an adhesive contact model together with interferometric measurements of the out-of-plane microsphere contact resonance, and with estimated work of adhesion values for the polystyrene-aluminum interface. Scanning electron microscope images of detached monolayer regions reveal a unique morphology, namely, partially detached monolayer flakes composed of single hexagonal close packed crystalline domains. This work contributes to the fields of microsphere adhesion and contact dynamics, and demonstrates a unique monolayer delamination morphology. PMID:27409715

  14. Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhe; Yuan, Ting-Bi; Hou, Zong-Yu; Zhou, Wei-Dong; Lu, Ji-Dong; Ding, Hong-Bin; Zeng, Xiao-Yan

    2014-08-01

    Laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) has been regarded as a future superstar for chemical analysis for years due to its unique features such as little or no sample preparation, remote sensing, and fast and multi-element analysis. Chinese LIBS community is one of the most dynamically developing communities in the World. The aim of the work is to inspect what have been done in China for LIBS development and, based on the understanding of the overall status, to identify the challenges and opportunities for the future development. In this paper, the scientific contributions from Chinese LIBS community are reviewed for the following four aspects: fundamentals, instrumentation, data processing and modeling, and applications; and the driving force of LIBS development in China is analyzed, the critical issues for successful LIBS application are discussed, and in our opinion, the potential direction to improve the technology and to realize large scale commercialization in China is proposed.

  15. Microcantilever Actuation by Laser Induced Photoacoustic Waves.

    PubMed

    Gao, Naikun; Zhao, Dongfang; Jia, Ran; Liu, Duo

    2016-01-01

    We present here a combined theoretical and experimental investigation on effective excitation of microcantilever by using photoacoustic waves. The photoacoustic waves arose from a vibrating Al foil induced by an intensity-modulated laser. We demonstrate that, superior to photothermal excitation, this new configuration avoids direct heating of the microcantilever, thus minimizing undesired thermal effects on the vibration of microcantilever, while still keeps the advantage of being a remote, non-contact excitation method. We also measured the vibration amplitude of the microcantilever as a function of distance between the microcantilever and the Al foil and found that the amplitudes decay gradually according to the inverse distance law. This method is universal and can be adopted in bio-microelectromechanical systems (BioMEMs) for the detection of small signals where detrimental thermal effects must be avoided. PMID:26814360

  16. Laser-induced fluorescence-cued, laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy biological-agent detection

    SciTech Connect

    Hybl, John D.; Tysk, Shane M.; Berry, Shaun R.; Jordan, Michael P

    2006-12-01

    Methods for accurately characterizing aerosols are required for detecting biological warfare agents. Currently, fluorescence-based biological agent sensors provide adequate detection sensitivity but suffer from high false-alarm rates. Combining single-particle fluorescence analysis with laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) provides additional discrimination and potentially reduces false-alarm rates. A transportable UV laser-induced fluorescence-cued LIBS test bed has been developed and used to evaluate the utility of LIBS for biological-agent detection. Analysis of these data indicates that LIBS adds discrimination capability to fluorescence-based biological-agent detectors.However, the data also show that LIBS signatures of biological agent simulants are affected by washing. This may limit the specificity of LIBS and narrow the scope of its applicability in biological-agent detection.

  17. Numerical Investigation of Radiative Heat Transfer in Laser Induced Air Plasmas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, J.; Chen, Y. S.; Wang, T. S.; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Radiative heat transfer is one of the most important phenomena in the laser induced plasmas. This study is intended to develop accurate and efficient methods for predicting laser radiation absorption and plasma radiative heat transfer, and investigate the plasma radiation effects in laser propelled vehicles. To model laser radiation absorption, a ray tracing method along with the Beer's law is adopted. To solve the radiative transfer equation in the air plasmas, the discrete transfer method (DTM) is selected and explained. The air plasma radiative properties are predicted by the LORAN code. To validate the present nonequilibrium radiation model, several benchmark problems are examined and the present results are found to match the available solutions. To investigate the effects of plasma radiation in laser propelled vehicles, the present radiation code is coupled into a plasma aerodynamics code and a selected problem is considered. Comparisons of results at different cases show that plasma radiation plays a role of cooling plasma and it lowers the plasma temperature by about 10%. This change in temperature also results in a reduction of the coupling coefficient by about 10-20%. The present study indicates that plasma radiation modeling is very important for accurate modeling of aerodynamics in a laser propelled vehicle.

  18. Movement of magnetic domain walls induced by single femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandig, O.; Shokr, Y. A.; Vogel, J.; Valencia, S.; Kronast, F.; Kuch, W.

    2016-08-01

    We present a microscopic investigation of how the magnetic domain structure in ultrathin films changes after direct excitation by single ultrashort laser pulses. Using photoelectron emission microscopy in combination with x-ray magnetic circular dichroism in the resonant absorption of soft x rays, we find that individual laser pulses of ≈60 fs duration and a central wavelength of 800 nm lead to clear changes in the domain structure of a Co layer of three atomic monolayers thickness in an epitaxial Co/Cu/Ni trilayer on a Cu(001) single-crystal substrate. A relatively small enhancement of the sample base temperature by 40 K is sufficient to lower the threshold of laser fluence for domain wall motion by about a factor of two. Pump-probe measurements with a laser fluence just below this threshold indicate that the laser-induced demagnetization of the sample is far from complete in these experiments. Although the domain wall motion appears similar to thermal domain wall fluctuations, quantitatively it cannot be explained by pure thermal activation of domain wall motion by the transient rise of sample temperature after the laser pulse, but it is likely to be triggered by a laser-induced depinning of domain walls.

  19. Radiation absorption in different kinds of tissue analysis: ex vivo study with supercontinuum laser source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornaini, Carlo; Merigo, Elisabetta; Selleri, Stefano; Cucinotta, Annamaria

    2016-03-01

    With the introduction of more and more new wavelengths, one of the main problems of medical laser users was centered on the study of laser-tissue interactions with the aim of determining the ideal wavelength for their treatments. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine, by means of the utilization of a supercontinuum source, the amount of transmitted energy of different wavelengths in different organ samples obtained by Sprague Dawley rats. Supercontinuum light is generated by exploiting high optical non-linearity in a material and it combines the broadband attributes of a lamp with the spatial coherence and high brightness of laser. Even if the single transmission measurement does not allow us to separate out the respective contribution of scattering and absorption, it gives us an evaluation of the wavelengths not interacting with the tissue. In this way, being possible to determine what of the laser wavelengths are not useful or active in the different kinds of tissue, physicians may choose the proper device for his clinical treatments.

  20. Real-time process control using diode-laser absorption sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Baer, D.S.; Furlong, E.R.; Hanson, R.K.

    1996-12-31

    A multiplexed diode-laser sensor system, based on absorption spectroscopy techniques and comprised of two InGaAsP diode lasers and fiber-optic components, has been developed to measure temperature and species concentration non-intrusively over a single path for closed-loop process control. The system was applied to measure and control the gas temperature in the post-flame gases 6 mm above the surface of a Hencken burner (multiple CH{sub 4}-air diffusion flames). The wavelengths of the lasers were independently current-tuned across H{sub 2}O transitions near 1343 nm (v{sub 1} + v{sub 3} band) and 1392 nm (2v{sub 1}, v{sub 1} + v{sub 3} bands). Temperature was determined from the ratio of measured peak absorbances, and H{sub 2}O concentration was determined from the measured peak absorbance of one transition set at the measured temperature. A closed-loop feedback system was demonstrated to control the mean temperature and the amplitude of temperature fluctuations at particular frequencies by appropriately modulating the fuel flow rate. The results obtained demonstrate the potential of multiplexed diode lasers for rapid, continuous, in situ measurements and control of gasdynamic parameters in high-temperature combustion flowfields and other environments with difficult optical access.

  1. Standoff gas leak detectors based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frish, M. B.; Wainner, R. T.; Green, B. D.; Laderer, M. C.; Allen, M. G.

    2005-11-01

    Trace gas sensing and analysis by Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) has become a robust and reliable technology accepted for industrial process monitoring and control, quality assurance, environmental sensing, plant safety, and infrastructure security. Sensors incorporating well-packaged wavelength-stabilized near-infrared (1.2 to 2.0 μm) laser sources sense over a dozen toxic or industrially-important gases. A large emerging application for TDLAS is standoff sensing of gas leaks, e.g. from natural gas pipelines. The Remote Methane Leak Detector (RMLD), a handheld standoff TDLAS leak survey tool that we developed, is replacing traditional leak detection tools that must be physically immersed within a leak to detect it. Employing a 10 mW 1.6 micron DFB laser, the RMLD illuminates a non-cooperative topographic surface, up to 30 m distant, and analyzes returned scattered light to deduce the presence of excess methane. The eye-safe, battery-powered, 6-pound handheld RMLD enhances walking pipeline survey rates by more than 30%. When combined with a spinning or rastering mirror, the RMLD serves as a platform for mobile leak mapping systems. Also, to enable high-altitude surveying and provide aerial disaster response, we are extending the standoff range to 3000 m by adding an EDFA to the laser transmitter.

  2. Open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy for acquisition of fugitive emission flux data.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Eben D; Shores, Richard C; Thompson, Edgar L; Harris, D Bruce; Thorneloe, Susan A; Varma, Ravi M; Hashmonay, Ram A; Modrak, Mark T; Natschke, David F; Gamble, Heather A

    2005-05-01

    Air pollutant emission from unconfined sources is an increasingly important environmental issue. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed a ground-based optical remote-sensing method that enables direct measurement of fugitive emission flux from large area sources. Open-path Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (OP-FTIR) has been the primary technique for acquisition of pollutant concentration data used in this emission measurement method. For a number of environmentally important compounds, such as ammonia and methane, open-path tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (OP-TDLAS) is shown to be a viable alternative to Fourier transform spectroscopy for pollutant concentration measurements. Near-IR diode laser spectroscopy systems offer significant operational and cost advantages over Fourier transform instruments enabling more efficient implementation of the measurement strategy. This article reviews the EPA's fugitive emission measurement method and describes its multipath tunable diode laser instrument. Validation testing of the system is discussed. OP-TDLAS versus OP-FTIR correlation testing results for ammonia (R2 = 0.980) and methane (R2 = 0.991) are reported. Two example applications of tunable diode laser-based fugitive emission measurements are presented. PMID:15991674

  3. Hot-Electron Temperature and Laser-Light Absorption in Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect

    Haines, M. G.; Wei, M. S.; Beg, F. N.; Stephens, R. B.

    2009-01-30

    Experimental data [F. N. Beg et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 447 (1997)] indicate that for intense short-pulse laser-solid interactions at intensities up to 5x10{sup 18} W cm{sup -2} the hot-electron temperature {proportional_to}(I{lambda}{sup 2}){sup 1/3}. A fully relativistic analytic model based on energy and momentum conservation laws for the laser interaction with an overdense plasma is presented here. A general formula for the hot-electron temperature is found that closely agrees with the experimental scaling over the relevant intensity range. This scaling is much lower than ponderomotive scaling. Examination of the electron forward displacement compared to the collisionless skin depth shows that electrons experience only a fraction of a laser-light period before being accelerated forward beyond the laser light's penetration region. Inclusion of backscattered light in a modified model indicates that light absorption approaches 80%-90% for intensity >10{sup 19} W cm{sup -2}.

  4. Laser-Induced-Fluorescence Photogrammetry and Videogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danehy, Paul; Jones, Tom; Connell, John; Belvin, Keith; Watson, Kent

    2004-01-01

    surface of the target. The improved method is denoted laser-induced-fluorescence photogrammetry.

  5. Laser-induced periodic surface structuring of biopolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez, Susana; Rebollar, Esther; Oujja, Mohamed; Martín, Margarita; Castillejo, Marta

    2013-03-01

    We report here on a systematic study about the formation of laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) on biopolymers. Self-standing films of the biopolymers chitosan, starch and the blend of chitosan with the synthetic polymer poly (vinyl pyrrolidone), PVP, were irradiated in air with linearly polarized laser beams at 193, 213 and 266 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 6-17 ns. The laser-induced periodic surface structures were topographically characterized by atomic force microscopy and the chemical modifications induced by laser irradiation were inspected via Raman spectroscopy. Formation of LIPSS parallel to the laser polarization direction, with periods similar to the laser wavelength, was observed at efficiently absorbed wavelengths in the case of the amorphous biopolymer chitosan and its blend with PVP, while formation of LIPSS is prevented in the crystalline starch biopolymer.

  6. Laser-induced resonant structure in electron-atom scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flegel, A. V.; Frolov, M. V.; Manakov, N. L.; Starace, Anthony F.

    2009-11-01

    Orders of magnitude increases are predicted in the cross sections for electron-atom scattering accompanied by absorption or emission of n laser photons for incident electron energies at which the electron, by emitting μ laser photons, can be captured by the atom to form a negative ion. Resonance enhancements are most significant in the plateau region (n gg μ) of the scattered electron spectrum, whose shape is predicted to replicate that of the ion's (n + μ)-photon detachment spectrum.

  7. Optical beam induced current measurements based on two-photon absorption process in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Hamad, H.; Raynaud, C.; Bevilacqua, P.; Tournier, D.; Planson, D.; Vergne, B.

    2014-02-24

    Using a pulsed green laser with a wavelength of 532 nm, a duration pulse of ∼1 ns, and a mean power varying between 1 and 100 mW, induced photocurrents have been measured in 4H-SiC bipolar diodes. Considering the photon energy (2.33 eV) and the bandgap of 4H-SiC (3.2 eV), the generation of electron-hole pair by the conventional single photon absorption process should be negligible. The intensity of the measured photocurrents depends quadratically on the power beam intensity. This clearly shows that they are generated using two-photon absorption process. As in conventional OBIC (Optical Beam Induced Current), the measurements give an image of the electric field distribution in the structure under test, and the minority carrier lifetime can be extracted from the decrease of the photocurrent at the edge of the structure. The extracted minority carrier lifetime of 210 ns is consistent with results obtained in case of single photon absorption.

  8. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Rao, D. Narayana E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com; Deepak, K. L. N.

    2014-09-21

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C₂H₅OH) and water (H₂O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ~110 fs pulse duration and ~800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  9. Ultrafast laser induced periodic sub-wavelength aluminum surface structures and nanoparticles in air and liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Dar, Mudasir H.; Deepak, K. L. N.; Rao, D. Narayana

    2014-09-01

    In this communication, we demonstrate the generation of laser-induced periodic sub-wavelength surface structures (LIPSS) or ripples on a bulk aluminum (Al) and Al nanoparticles (NPs) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Al surface at normal incidence in air and by immersing in ethanol (C2H5OH) and water (H2O) using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ˜110 fs pulse duration and ˜800 nm wavelength. Field emission scanning electron microscope is utilized for imaging surface morphology of laser written structures and it reveals that the spatial periodicity as well as the surface morphology of the LIPSS depends on the surrounding dielectric medium and also on the various laser irradiation parameters. The observed LIPSS have been classified as low spatial frequency LIPSS which are perpendicularly oriented to the laser polarization with a periodicity from 460 to 620 nm and high spatial frequency LIPSS which spectacles a periodicity less than 100 nm with the orientation parallel to the polarization of the incident laser beam. Fabricated colloidal solutions, which contain the Al NPs, were characterized by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). TEM results reveal the formation of internal cavities in Al NPs both in ethanol and water. Formation mechanism of LIPSS and cavities inside the nanoparticles are discussed in detail.

  10. Laser induced incandescence and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy based sensor development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eseller, Kemal Efe

    In this doctoral dissertation, two laser-based sensors were evaluated for different applications. Laser Induced Incandescence (LII) is a technique which can provide non-intrusive quantitative measurement of soot and it provides a unique diagnostic tool to characterize engine performance. Since LII is linearly proportional to the soot volume fraction, it can provide in situ, real time measurement of soot volume fraction with high temporal and spatial resolution. LII has the capability to characterize soot formation during combustion. The soot volume fraction from both flames and a soot generator was investigated with LII. The effects of experimental parameters, such as laser fluence, gate delay, gate width and various laser beam focusing, on LII signal was studied. Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), a diagnostic tool for in situ elemental analysis, has been evaluated for on-line, simultaneous, multi-species impurity monitoring in hydrogen. LIBS spectra with different impurity levels of nitrogen, argon, and oxygen were recorded and the intensity of the spectral lines of Ar, O, N, and H observed were used to form calibration plots for impurities in hydrogen measurements. An ungated detection method for LIBS has been developed and applied to equivalence ratio measurements of CH4/air and biofuel/air. LIBS has also been used to quantitatively analyze the composition of a slurry sample. The quenching effect of water in slurry samples causes low LIBS signal quality with poor sensitivity. Univariate and multivariate calibration was performed on LIBS spectra of dried slurry samples for elemental analysis of Mg, Si and Fe. Calibration results show that the dried slurry samples give good correlation between spectral intensity and elemental concentration.

  11. Influence of Welding Current and Focal Position on the Resonant Absorption of Laser Radiation in a TIG Welding Arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emde, B.; Huse, M.; Hermsdorf, J.; Kaierle, S.; Wesling, V.; Overmeyer, L.

    The work presents the influence of welding current and focal position on the resonant absorption of diode laser radiation in a TIG welding arc. The laser beam is guided perpendicular to the electrical arc to avoid an interaction with the electrodes. Laser power measurements have shown a reduction of the measured laser power up to 18% after passing the electrical arc. This reduction results from the interaction of argon shielding gas atoms and laser radiation at 810.4 nm and 811.5 nm. The interaction is strongly affected by the adjusted welding current and the adjustment of the laser beam and the electrical arc. Lowering the welding current or shifting the laser beam out of the centerline of the electrical arc reduces the ionization probability. An increased ionization is necessary to decrease the resistance of the electrical arc.

  12. Laser Induced Birefringence in Pure Liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Laser induced birefringence or the Optical Kerr effect is a subject that has undergone much research over previous years and is an established technique for the study of many classes of materials. To date the measurements on various media have been characterized by the substantial time required to obtain results and the generally poor sensitivity of the apparatus used. This work describes the development of a new apparatus which is the first in the field to automate the signal capture and analysis utilizing a 1 Gigasample/second digitizing oscilloscope connected to a microcomputer to provide fast, accurate transient analysis. Careful design of the apparatus enabled operation at two inducing wavelengths of 532nm and 1064nm. The sensitivity and accuracy of the apparatus coupled with the rapid transient evaluation was tested on a number of well characterized samples including benzene, nitrobenzene, toluene and benzoyl chloride and was found to give excellent agreement with other workers. The apparatus was used to investigate the properties of the organic pure liquid series the n-alkanes before making the first measurements on the 1-alkenes, 1-alkynes, alcohols, carboxylic acids and three alkdienes. Results from these experiments were used to evaluate the contributions of sigma and pi bonds to the Optical Kerr effect in simple organic molecules. A review of all previously published Optical Kerr effect results for pure liquids was also carried out and the first comprehensive table of results complied.

  13. Temperature dependent absorption measurement of various transition metal doped laser materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horackova, Lucie; Šulc, Jan; Jelinkova, Helena; Jambunathan, Venkatesan; Lucianetti, Antonio; Mocek, Tomás.

    2015-05-01

    In recent years, there has been a vast development of high energy class lasers of the order of 100 J to kJ level which have potential applications in the field of science and technology. Many such systems use the gain media cooled at cryogenic temperatures which will help in enhancing the spectroscopic and thermo-optical properties. Nevertheless, parasitic effects like amplified spontaneous emission enhance and affect the overall efficiency. The best way to suppress this effect is to use cladding element attached to the gain material. Based on these facts, this work was focused on the systematic investigation of temperature dependent absorption of several materials doped with transition metals, which can be used as cladding, as laser gain material, or as passive Q-switching element. The Ti:sapphire, Cr:YAG, V:YAG, and Co:MALO samples were measured in temperature range from 80 K to 330 K by step of 50 K. Using Beer-Lambert law we estimated the absorption coefficient of these materials.

  14. Evolution of laser-induced plasma in solvent aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hening, Alexandru; Wroblewski, Ronald; George, Robert; McGirr, Scott

    2014-10-01

    This paper describes a novel technique for the detection of contaminants in air using the process of laser-induced filamentation. This work is focused primarily on the visible and infrared spectrum. Characterization of the temporal and spatial evolution of laser-generated plasma in solvent aerosols is necessary for the development of potential applications. Atmospheric aerosols impact capabilities of applications such as range from laser-induced ionized micro channels and filaments able to transfer high electric pulses over a few hundreds of meters, to the generation of plasma artifacts in air, far away from the laser source.

  15. Real-time trace gas sensor using a multimode diode laser and multiple-line integrated cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Karpf, Andreas; Rao, Gottipaty N

    2015-07-01

    We describe and demonstrate a highly sensitive trace gas sensor based on a simplified design that is capable of measuring sub-ppb concentrations of NO2 in tens of milliseconds. The sensor makes use of a relatively inexpensive Fabry-Perot diode laser to conduct off-axis cavity enhanced spectroscopy. The broad frequency range of a multimode Fabry-Perot diode laser spans a large number of absorption lines, thereby removing the need for a single-frequency tunable laser source. The use of cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy enhances the sensitivity of the sensor by providing a pathlength on the order of 1 km in a small volume. Off-axis alignment excites a large number of cavity modes simultaneously, thereby reducing the sensor's susceptibility to vibration. Multiple-line integrated absorption spectroscopy (where one integrates the absorption spectra over a large number of rovibronic transitions of the molecular species) further improves the sensitivity of detection. Relatively high laser power (∼400  mW) is used to compensate for the low coupling efficiency of a broad linewidth laser to the optical cavity. The approach was demonstrated using a 407 nm diode laser to detect trace quantities of NO2 in zero air. Sensitivities of 750 ppt, 110 ppt, and 65 ppt were achieved using integration times of 50 ms, 5 s, and 20 s respectively. PMID:26193156

  16. Particle Formation from Pulsed Laser Irradiation of SootAggregates studied with scanning mobility particle sizer, transmissionelectron microscope and near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure.

    SciTech Connect

    Michelsen, Hope A.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Gilles, Mary K.; vanPoppel, Laura H.; Dansson, Mark A.; Buseck, Peter R.; Buseck, Peter R.

    2007-02-20

    We investigated the physical and chemical changes induced in soot aggregates exposed to laser radiation using a scanning mobility particle sizer, a transmission electron microscope, and a scanning transmission x-ray microscope to perform near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Laser-induced nanoparticle production was observed at fluences above 0.12 J/cm(2) at 532 nm and 0.22 J/cm(2) at 1064 nm. Our results indicate that new particle formation proceeds via (1) vaporization of small carbon clusters by thermal or photolytic mechanisms, followed by homogeneous nucleation, (2) heterogeneous nucleation of vaporized carbon clusters onto material ablated from primary particles, or (3) both processes.

  17. Free-electron-laser (FEL)-induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogino, Seiji; Awazu, Kunio; Tomimasu, Takio

    1997-05-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) with the wide wavelength tunability has been developed and used for various applications. The FEL gives high efficiency for the photo- induced ablation when the laser is tuned to an absorption maximum of the target. This study investigates the FEL induced desorption of ions from tooth dentine to find new possibility for laser dentistry. The FEL was tuned to 9.4 (Mu) m, which is an absorption maximum of phosphoric acid ion known as major component of dentine. The FEL pulse length was several ps. The output average power was varied from 5 to 20mW by filters. A time-of-flight mass spectroscopy systems were developed for the purpose of analyzing the desorbed ions of varying masses. After the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation, the dentine surface was ablated, and visible light emission was observed. As a result, positive ions which correspond to Na+ and many phosphoric acid ions were measured. The positive ions, however were not observed when the FEL was not tuned to the absorption peak of the target. Therefore, this wavelength dependence points to resonant multiphoton vibrational excitation of molecules by the 9.4 micrometers FEL irradiation.

  18. Femtosecond laser-induced electronic plasma at metal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Zhaoyang; Mao, Samuel S.

    2008-08-04

    We develop a theoretical analysis to model plasma initiation at the early stage of femtosecond laser irradiation of metal surfaces. The calculation reveals that there is a threshold intensity for the formation of a microscale electronic plasma at the laser-irradidated metal surface. As the full width at half maximum of a laser pulse increases from 15 to 200 fs, the plasma formation threshold decreases by merely about 20%. The dependence of the threshold intensity on laser pulse width can be attributed to laser-induced surface electron emission, in particular due to the effect of photoelectric effect.

  19. Observation of saturable absorption of Sn metal film with intense EUV laser pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoneda, H.; Inubushi, Y.; Sato, F.; Morimoto, S.; Kumagaya, T.; Nagasono, M.; Higashiya, A.; Yabashi, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Ohashi, H.; Kimura, H.; Togashi, T.; Kodama, R.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we report observation of ultra-fast switching of vacuum ultra-violet (VUV) light caused by saturable absorption by a solid metal foil. A sub-picosecond VUV pulse from a free-electron laser located in SPring-8 is focused on a metal target and transmission is measured as a function of input energy, thickness of the absorbing layer, and VUV laser wavelength. As is well known, metals have a strong linear free electron response associated with the plasma oscillation and collisional absorption (high-frequency resistivity). Due to the plasma screening and strong absorption, it is difficult to use bulk metals for optical components. However, above the plasma frequency as in our experiments, a metal can transmit light and shows phenomena related to the band gap structure, similar to the optical properties observed in transparent materials for visible and infrared light. We observe a strong gating of Sn transmission at energy fluences above 6J/cm2 at wavelength of 51nm. The ratio of the transmission at high intensity to low intensity is typically greater than 100:1. The estimated saturated transmittance is about 0.25. The mechanism of the switching phenomena is partially explained by the shift of Sn N shell band edge, however, more details should be investigated with more exact physical models and precise measurements. We think this is the first observation of such a strong nonlinear phenomena for VUV light and this result will promote the development of new nonlinear photonic devices such as auto-correlator and pulse slicer for the VUV region.

  20. Measurement of tropospheric OH by laser long-path absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraft, Michael; Perner, D.

    1994-01-01

    OH-radicals are measured by laser long-path absorption spectroscopy. A tunable Nd:YAG/dye laser system provides broadbanded light at 308 nm. The beam is expanded to 0.3 m and pointed to an array of retroreflectors placed at a distance of 2800 m. The returning beam is separated from the outgoing beam and focused into a spectrometer of 0.3 pm resolution. A 1024 element diode array is used as a detector. The signal is digitized by a 14 bit analog to digital converter. The ultimate aim is a detection limit of 10(exp 5) molecules cm(exp -3) of OH. However the measurements in 1991 allowed only the recognition of OH absorptions corresponding to 3 x 10(exp 6) OH cm(exp -3) with a signal to noise ratio of two. Improvements of the instrument are under way. The advantages of the DOAS method are: the accuracy of detection is guaranteed because loss of OH radicals within the device is avoided, the rate of OH production by the device is negligible, and absorptions of other trace gases could be corrected for; and the calibration procedure for the device is fast and easy. The disadvantages of the system are: time resolution is about minutes because about ten spectra had to be added to keep the noise level down, the OH concentration is averaged along the whole light path, weight (500 kg) and size (4x4 m) of the device; and approximately 10 l/min of coolant and supply of 8 kW electrical power are necessary.